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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science FY 2006 Accomplishment High Performance collections of scientific data. In recent years, much of the work in computer and computational science has

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

2

Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science FY 2006 Accomplishment HDF5-Fast fundamental Computer Science technologies and their application in production scientific research tools. Our technology ­ index, query, storage and retrieval ­ and use of such technology in computational and computer

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

3

Advanced Scientific Computing Research Network Requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In October 2012, ESnet and the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) of the DOE SC organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by the ASCR program office. The requirements identified at the review are summarized in the Findings section, and are described in more detail in the body of the report.

Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian

2013-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

4

Computational Biology, Advanced Scientific Computing, and Emerging Computational Architectures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This CRADA was established at the start of FY02 with $200 K from IBM and matching funds from DOE to support post-doctoral fellows in collaborative research between International Business Machines and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to explore effective use of emerging petascale computational architectures for the solution of computational biology problems. 'No cost' extensions of the CRADA were negotiated with IBM for FY03 and FY04.

None

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

5

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced scientific computing Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of scientific knowledge as a lever for advancing... and transportation, high-performance computing, modeling and simulation, and advanced weapons technologies... and objective...

6

Advanced Scientific Computing Research Funding Profile by Subprogram  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

results in mathematics, high performance computing and advanced networks and a Excludes $1 applications. High-performance computing provides a new window for researchers to observe the natural world in applied mathematics, computer science and high-performance networks and providing the high-performance

7

NERSC Role in Advanced Scientific Computing Research Katherine Yelick  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Opticalhttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gif Directorate -News,Advanced Scientific

8

Advanced Scientific Computing Research User Facilities | U.S...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

research projects that are funded by the DOE Office of Science and require high performance computing support are eligible to apply to use NERSC resources. Projects that are not...

9

National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) proposes to create a National Facility for Advanced Computational Science (NFACS) and to establish a new partnership between the American computer industry and a national consortium of laboratories, universities, and computing facilities. NFACS will provide leadership-class scientific computing capability to scientists and engineers nationwide, independent of their institutional affiliation or source of funding. This partnership will bring into existence a new class of computational capability in the United States that is optimal for science and will create a sustainable path towards petaflops performance.

Simon, Horst; Kramer, William; Saphir, William; Shalf, John; Bailey, David; Oliker, Leonid; Banda, Michael; McCurdy, C. William; Hules, John; Canning, Andrew; Day, Marc; Colella, Philip; Serafini, David; Wehner, Michael; Nugent, Peter

2004-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

10

(865) 574-6185, mccoydd@ornl.gov Advanced Scientific Computing Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on integrating new software for the science applications which researchers run on high performance computing platforms. One of the key challenges in high performance computing is to ensure that the software which

Pennycook, Steve

11

The FES Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and researchers are expected to be leaders in the efficient and productive use of High Performance Computing

12

Advanced Artificial Science. The development of an artificial science and engineering research infrastructure to facilitate innovative computational modeling, analysis, and application to interdisciplinary areas of scientific investigation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a final report of the DOE award DE-SC0001132, Advanced Artificial Science. The development of an artificial science and engineering research infrastructure to facilitate innovative computational modeling, analysis, and application to interdisciplinary areas of scientific investigation. This document describes the achievements of the goals, and resulting research made possible by this award.

Saffer, Shelley (Sam) I.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Advanced Scientific Computing Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAre theAdministratorCFM LEAP Aircraft Engines Are Fuel-

14

Advanced Scientific Computing Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAre theAdministratorCFM LEAP Aircraft Engines Are Fuel- Large

15

Edison Electrifies Scientific Computing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

recently accepted "Edison," a new flagship supercomputer designed for scientific productivity. Named in honor of American inventor Thomas Alva Edison, the Cray XC30 will be...

16

PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009 PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009 PIA - Advanced Test Reactor...

17

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis scientific computing Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of - Energy and Geoscience Institute, Geothermal Research Group Collection: Renewable Energy ; Geosciences 11 Advanced Research in High Performance Scientific Computing...

18

Educational Interventions to Advance Children's Scientific Thinking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and an assessment process. Here we describe some ways in which re- search in cognitive development has advanced our for Classifying Interventions in Science Education Scientific thinking can be characterized in terms of two of the scientific enter- prise" (row 2). (6). Research on domain-specific hypotheses (cell A) assesses young

Klahr, David

19

Energy Department Seeks Proposals to Use Scientific Computing...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE's missions," said Secretary Bodman. "This program opens up the world of high-performance computing to a broad array of scientific users. Through the use of these advanced...

20

APPLIED MATHEMATICS AND SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPLIED MATHEMATICS AND SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING Brijuni, Croatia June 23{27, 2003. y x Runge's example; Organized by: Department of Mathematics, Unversity of Zagreb, Croatia. Miljenko Maru#20;si#19;c, chairman;simir Veseli#19;c Andro Mikeli#19;c Sponsors: Ministry of Science and Technology, Croatia, CV Sistemi d

Rogina, Mladen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

IT Licentiate theses Scientific Computing on Hybrid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IT Licentiate theses 2013-002 Scientific Computing on Hybrid Architectures MARCUS HOLM UPPSALA of Licentiate of Philosophy in Scientific Computing c Marcus Holm 2013 ISSN 1404-5117 Printed by the Department

Flener, Pierre

22

Scientific Foundations of Computer Graphics Thomas Larsson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scientific Foundations of Computer Graphics Thomas Larsson Department of Computer Engineering M It is apparent that computer graphics has become a well-known tech- nology that is used in a broad spectra and medical science the importance of computer graphics is evident. But what are the scientific foundations

Larsson, Thomas

23

Advanced Scientific Computing Research Jobs  

Office of Science (SC) Website

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial CarbonArticles News NewsAbout Berkeley SiteAcknowledgingOfficeDOE

24

Scientific Discovery Learning with Computer Simulations Scientific Discovery Learning with Computer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scientific Discovery Learning with Computer Simulations 1 Scientific Discovery Learning with Computer Simulations 2 Abstract Scientific discovery learning is a highly self-directed and constructivistic form of learning. A computer simulation is a type of computer-based environment that is very

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

25

Advances and Challenges in Computational Plasma Science  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scientific simulation, which provides a natural bridge between theory and experiment, is an essential tool for understanding complex plasma behavior. Recent advances in simulations of magnetically-confined plasmas are reviewed in this paper with illustrative examples chosen from associated research areas such as microturbulence, magnetohydrodynamics, and other topics. Progress has been stimulated in particular by the exponential growth of computer speed along with significant improvements in computer technology.

W.M. Tang; V.S. Chan

2005-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

26

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

Frances M. Marshall; Jeff Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges - Advanced R and D|...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Advanced R and D Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Science Drivers of Particle Physics Energy Frontier Intensity Frontier...

28

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

successful scientific, commercial, and national security endeavors. · It is the limiting or the enablingNational Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) Science Driven Analytics Wes Bethel, and that are predictable and repeatable. · Astrophyics: CMB/Planck ­ satellite mission to collect data; size estimated

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

29

Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contacts a normal web server, downloads the map file, then begins navigation through the ordered sequence of images. The client requests images through the web server as needed to satisfy a particular viewpoint

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

30

Advanced Computational Methods for Turbulence and Combustion...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Computational Methods for Turbulence and Combustion Advanced Computational Methods for Turbulence and Combustion Bell.png Key Challenges: Development and application of...

31

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) Visualization Tools and Techniques quotas)!! · Dual IR4 graphics accelerators. · Dual GigE channels to HPSS (use hsi to move data) Alternative implementation: SGI's Vizserver · Uses escher's graphics hardware to accelerate rendering

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

32

Sandia National Laboratories: Helping Advance the Scientific...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Major Efficiency Improvements The goal of our SSLS EFRC is not to work on advancing SSL technology itself; that is something that industry is extremely good at. Our goal...

33

Scientific Methods in Computer Science Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scientific Methods in Computer Science Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic Department of Computer Science analyzes scientific aspects of Computer Science. First it defines science and scientific method in general. It gives a dis- cussion of relations between science, research, development and technology. The existing

Cunningham, Conrad

34

PLASMA SCIENCE ADVANCED COMPUTING INTITUTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, ... leading to ITER -- impact real decision-making in the large "scientific options space" -- harvest

35

Scientific and Computational Challenges of the Fusion Simulation Program (FSP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper highlights the scientific and computational challenges facing the Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) a major national initiative in the United States with the primary objective being to enable scientific discovery of important new plasma phenomena with associated understanding that emerges only upon integration. This requires developing a predictive integrated simulation capability for magnetically-confined fusion plasmas that are properly validated against experiments in regimes relevant for producing practical fusion energy. It is expected to provide a suite of advanced modeling tools for reliably predicting fusion device behavior with comprehensive and targeted science-based simulations of nonlinearly-coupled phenomena in the core plasma, edge plasma, and wall region on time and space scales required for fusion energy production. As such, it will strive to embody the most current theoretical and experimental understanding of magnetic fusion plasmas and to provide a living framework for the simulation of such plasmas as the associated physics understanding continues to advance over the next several decades. Substantive progress on answering the outstanding scientific questions in the field will drive the FSP toward its ultimate goal of developing the ability to predict the behavior of plasma discharges in toroidal magnetic fusion devices with high physics fidelity on all relevant time and space scales. From a computational perspective, this will demand computing resources in the petascale range and beyond together with the associated multi-core algorithmic formulation needed to address burning plasma issues relevant to ITER - a multibillion dollar collaborative experiment involving seven international partners representing over half the world's population. Even more powerful exascale platforms will be needed to meet the future challenges of designing a demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO). Analogous to other major applied physics modeling projects (e.g., Climate Modeling), the FSP will need to develop software in close collaboration with computers scientists and applied mathematicians and validated against experimental data from tokamaks around the world. Specific examples of expected advances needed to enable such a comprehensive integrated modeling capability and possible "co-design" approaches will be discussed. __________________________________________________

William M. Tang

2011-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

36

Using Advanced Scientific Diving Technologies to Assess the Underwater Environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scientific diving can provide unique information for addressing complex environmental issues in the marine environment and is applied to a variety of increasingly important issues throughout Puget Sound, including habitat degradation, endangered species, biological availability of contaminants, and the effects of overwater structures and shoreline protection features. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory uses trained scientific divers in conjunction with advanced technologies to collect in-situ information best obtained through direct observation and requiring minimal environmental disturbance. For example, advances in underwater communications allow divers to discuss observations and data collection techniques in real time, both with each other and with personnel on the surface. Other examples include the use of Dual frequency IDentification SONar (DIDSON), an underwater camera used to capture digital images of benthic structures, fish, and organisms during low light and high turbidity levels; the use of voice-narrated underwater video; and the development of sediment collection methods yielding one-meter cores. The combination of using trained scientific SCUBA divers and advanced underwater technologies is a key element in addressing multifaceted environmental problems, resulting in a more comprehensive understanding of the underwater environment and more reliable data with which to make resource management decisions.

Southard, John A.; Williams, Greg D.; Sargeant, Susan L.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Blanton, Michael L.

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

37

Final Technical Report - Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a final technical report for the University of Maryland work in the SciDAC Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS). The Maryland work focused on software tools for coupling parallel software components built using the Common Component Architecture (CCA) APIs. Those tools are based on the Maryland InterComm software framework that has been used in multiple computational science applications to build large-scale simulations of complex physical systems that employ multiple separately developed codes.

Sussman, Alan [University of Maryland

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

38

Scientific Grand Challenges: Crosscutting Technologies for Computing at the Exascale - February 2-4, 2010, Washington, D.C.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the "Scientific Grand Challenges - Crosscutting Technologies for Computing at the Exascale" workshop in February 2010, jointly sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energys Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research and the National Nuclear Security Administration, was to identify the elements of a research and development agenda that will address these challenges and create a comprehensive exascale computing environment. This exascale computing environment will enable the science applications identified in the eight previously held Scientific Grand Challenges Workshop Series.

Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2011-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

39

SCIENTIFIC & COMPUTATIONAL CHALLENGES OF THE FUSION SIMULATION PROJECT (FSP)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

used in ITER will be the same as those required in a power plant but additional R&D will be neededSCIENTIFIC & COMPUTATIONAL CHALLENGES OF THE FUSION SIMULATION PROJECT (FSP) SciDAC 2008 CONFERENCE of the Scientific and Technological Feasibility of Fusion Power · ITER is a truly dramatic step. For the first time

40

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center 2007 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents highlights of the research conducted on NERSC computers in a variety of scientific disciplines during the year 2007. It also reports on changes and upgrades to NERSC's systems and services aswell as activities of NERSC staff.

Hules, John A.; Bashor, Jon; Wang, Ucilia; Yarris, Lynn; Preuss, Paul

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Some applications of pipelining techniques in parallel scientific computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, we study the applicability of pipelining techniques to the development of parallel algorithms for scientific computation. General principles for pipelining techniques are discussed and two applications, Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization...

Deng, Yuanhua

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Bringing Advanced Computational Techniques to Energy Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Please find attached our final technical report for the BACTER Institute award. BACTER was created as a graduate and postdoctoral training program for the advancement of computational biology applied to questions of relevance to bioenergy research.

Mitchell, Julie C

2012-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

43

Scientific opportunities with advanced facilities for neutron scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present report documents deliberations of a large group of experts in neutron scattering and fundamental physics on the need for new neutron sources of greater intensity and more sophisticated instrumentation than those currently available. An additional aspect of the Workshop was a comparison between steady-state (reactor) and pulsed (spallation) sources. The main conclusions were: (1) the case for a new higher flux neutron source is extremely strong and such a facility will lead to qualitatively new advances in condensed matter science and fundamental physics; (2) to a large extent the future needs of the scientific community could be met with either a 5 x 10/sup 15/ n cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/ steady state source or a 10/sup 17/ n cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/ peak flux spallation source; and (3) the findings of this Workshop are consistent with the recommendations of the Major Materials Facilities Committee.

Lander, G.H.; Emery, V.J. (eds.)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

advance prediction computer: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Georgios 2 Advanced Computer Programming Engineering Websites Summary: Syllabus Books Homework Advanced Computer Programming Prof. Lyle N. Long AERSP 424 Fall...

45

advancing scientific understanding: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Interventions in Science Education Scientific thinking can be characterized in terms of two of the scientific enter- prise" (row 2). (6). Research on domain-specific...

46

Scientific Computations section monthly report September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report is computational work that is being performed in the areas of thermal analysis, applied statistics, applied physics, and thermal hydraulics.

Buckner, M.R.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Multicore Platforms for Scientific Computing: Cell BE and NVIDIA Tesla  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multicore Platforms for Scientific Computing: Cell BE and NVIDIA Tesla J. Fern´andez, M.E. Acacio Tesla computing solutions. The former is a re- cent heterogeneous chip-multiprocessor (CMP) architecture, multicore, Cell BE, NVIDIA Tesla, CUDA 1 Introduction Nowadays, multicore architectures are omnipresent

Acacio, Manuel

48

Quantum chromodynamics with advanced computing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We survey results in lattice quantum chromodynamics from groups in the USQCD Collaboration. The main focus is on physics, but many aspects of the discussion are aimed at an audience of computational physicists.

Kronfeld, Andreas S.; /Fermilab

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Concepts for High Availability in Scientific High-End Computing C. Engelmann1,2 and S. L. Scott1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

exceptions, the over- all availability of recently installed systems has been lower in comparison to the same of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, man- aged by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U. S. Department of Energy under, and Computational Sciences Division; Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research; U.S. Department of Energy

Engelmann, Christian

50

Scientific Computation Survey of Research Interests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Agricultural Engineering Astronomy Biochemistry Chemical Engineering Chemical Physics Chemistry Civil _________________________________________________________________________ Date _____________________ Areas of Research Aerospace Engineering Biomedical Engineering Biosystems Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering Geology Geophysics Mathematics Mechanical Engineering

Thomas, David D.

51

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Partnerships  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2007, the United States Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory, as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposer's physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, and obtained access to additional PIE equipment. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program enables and facilitates user access to several university and national laboratories. So far, seven universities and one national laboratory have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these universities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the user's technical needs. Universities and laboratories included in the ATR NSUF partnership program are as follows: (1) Nuclear Services Laboratories at North Carolina State University; (2) PULSTAR Reactor Facility at North Carolina State University; (3) Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory (1.7 MV Tandetron accelerator) at the University of Michigan; (4) Irradiated Materials at the University of Michigan; (5) Harry Reid Center Radiochemistry Laboratories at University of Nevada, Las Vegas; (6) Characterization Laboratory for Irradiated Materials at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (7) Tandem Accelerator Ion Beam. (1.7 MV terminal voltage tandem ion accelerator) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (8) Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) Materials Research Collaborative Access Team (MRCAT) beamline at Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Photon Source; and (9) Nanoindenter in the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) Nuclear Engineering laboratory Materials have been analyzed for ATR NSUF users at the Advanced Photon Source at the MRCAT beam, the NIST Center for Neutron Research in Gaithersburg, MD, the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, and the SHaRE user facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Additionally, ORNL has been accepted as a partner facility to enable ATR NSUF users to access the facilities at the High Flux Isotope Reactor and related facilities.

Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; Jeff B. Benson; James I. Cole; Mary Catherine Thelen

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Can Cloud Computing Address the Scientific Computing Requirements...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for meeting the ever-increasing computational needs of scientists, Department of Energy researchers have issued a report stating that the cloud computing model is useful, but...

53

Power-aware applications for scientific cluster and distributed computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aggregate power use of computing hardware is an important cost factor in scientific cluster and distributed computing systems. The Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) is a major example of such a distributed computing system, used primarily for high throughput computing (HTC) applications. It has a computing capacity and power consumption rivaling that of the largest supercomputers. The computing capacity required from this system is also expected to grow over the next decade. Optimizing the power utilization and cost of such systems is thus of great interest. A number of trends currently underway will provide new opportunities for power-aware optimizations. We discuss how power-aware software applications and scheduling might be used to reduce power consumption, both as autonomous entities and as part of a (globally) distributed system. As concrete examples of computing centers we provide information on the large HEP-focused Tier-1 at FNAL, and the Tigress High Performance Computing Center at Princeton U...

Abdurachmanov, David; Eulisse, Giulio; Grosso, Paola; Hillegas, Curtis; Holzman, Burt; Klous, Sander; Knight, Robert; Muzaffar, Shahzad

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

1/12/11 1:51 PMComputer-Aided Brains: Scientific American Page 1 of 3http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=computer-aided-brains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scientific American Mind October 2005 Head Lines | Mind & Brain Computer-Aided Brains By Brad Stenger1/12/11 1:51 PMComputer-Aided Brains: Scientific American Page 1 of 3http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=computer-aided-brains Image: For years, innovators have tried to devise computerized gadgetry to aid the brain. Advances have

Salvucci, Dario D.

55

The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2007, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), was designated by the Department of Energy (DOE) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by approved researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide those researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposers physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, obtained access to additional PIE equipment, taken steps to enable the most advanced post-irradiation analysis possible, and initiated an educational program and digital learning library to help potential users better understand the critical issues in reactor technology and how a test reactor facility could be used to address this critical research. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program invited universities to nominate their capability to become part of a broader user facility. Any university is eligible to self-nominate. Any nomination is then peer reviewed to ensure that the addition of the university facilities adds useful capability to the NSUF. Once added to the NSUF team, the university capability is then integral to the NSUF operations and is available to all users via the proposal process. So far, six universities have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these university capabilities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the users technical needs. The current NSUF partners are shown in Figure 1. This article describes the ATR as well as the expanded capabilities, partnerships, and services that allow researchers to take full advantage of this national resource.

Todd R. Allen; Collin J. Knight; Jeff B. Benson; Frances M. Marshall; Mitchell K. Meyer; Mary Catherine Thelen

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Advanced I/O for large-scale scientific applications.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As scientific simulations scale to use petascale machines and beyond, the data volumes generated pose a dual problem. First, with increasing machine sizes, the careful tuning of IO routines becomes more and more important to keep the time spent in IO acceptable. It is not uncommon, for instance, to have 20% of an application's runtime spent performing IO in a 'tuned' system. Careful management of the IO routines can move that to 5% or even less in some cases. Second, the data volumes are so large, on the order of 10s to 100s of TB, that trying to discover the scientifically valid contributions requires assistance at runtime to both organize and annotate the data. Waiting for offline processing is not feasible due both to the impact on the IO system and the time required. To reduce this load and improve the ability of scientists to use the large amounts of data being produced, new techniques for data management are required. First, there is a need for techniques for efficient movement of data from the compute space to storage. These techniques should understand the underlying system infrastructure and adapt to changing system conditions. Technologies include aggregation networks, data staging nodes for a closer parity to the IO subsystem, and autonomic IO routines that can detect system bottlenecks and choose different approaches, such as splitting the output into multiple targets, staggering output processes. Such methods must be end-to-end, meaning that even with properly managed asynchronous techniques, it is still essential to properly manage the later synchronous interaction with the storage system to maintain acceptable performance. Second, for the data being generated, annotations and other metadata must be incorporated to help the scientist understand output data for the simulation run as a whole, to select data and data features without concern for what files or other storage technologies were employed. All of these features should be attained while maintaining a simple deployment for the science code and eliminating the need for allocation of additional computational resources.

Klasky, Scott (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Schwan, Karsten (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Oldfield, Ron A.; Lofstead, Gerald F., II (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

A Generic Grid Interface for Parallel and Adaptive Scientific Computing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Generic Grid Interface for Parallel and Adaptive Scientific Computing. Part I: Abstract Framework definition of a grid for al- gorithms solving partial differential equations. Unlike previous ap- proaches [2, 3], our grids have a hierarchical structure. This makes them suitable for geometric multigrid

Kornhuber, Ralf

58

E-Print Network 3.0 - advance scientific discovery Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

57 Draft 2-5-06 Draft 2-5-06 Summary: of the universe. Discoveries across this broad range of scientific disciplines promise to advance human knowledge... experiments in...

59

Advancements in scientific data searching, sharing and retrieval Ranjeet Devarakonda1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advancements in scientific data searching, sharing and retrieval Ranjeet Devarakonda1 , Giri including metadata management,indexing, searching, data sharing, and alsosoftware reusability. Mercurysystem are indexed against Solr iii search API consistently, so thatit can rendervarious search capabilities

60

Matrix Computations & Scientific Computing Seminar Organizer: James Demmel & Ming Gu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-scale Eigenvalue Problems in Nuclei Structure Cal- culation One of the emerging computational approaches in nuclear physics is the configuration interaction (CI) method for solving the nuclear many-body problem. Like other for achieving good performance in nuclear CI calculations. #12;

California at Berkeley, University of

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Scientific Grand Challenges: Forefront Questions in Nuclear Science and the Role of High Performance Computing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is an account of the deliberations and conclusions of the workshop on "Forefront Questions in Nuclear Science and the Role of High Performance Computing" held January 26-28, 2009, co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Physics (ONP) and the DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing (ASCR). Representatives from the national and international nuclear physics communities, as well as from the high performance computing community, participated. The purpose of this workshop was to 1) identify forefront scientific challenges in nuclear physics and then determine which-if any-of these could be aided by high performance computing at the extreme scale; 2) establish how and why new high performance computing capabilities could address issues at the frontiers of nuclear science; 3) provide nuclear physicists the opportunity to influence the development of high performance computing; and 4) provide the nuclear physics community with plans for development of future high performance computing capability by DOE ASCR.

Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Power-aware applications for scientific cluster and distributed computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aggregate power use of computing hardware is an important cost factor in scientific cluster and distributed computing systems. The Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) is a major example of such a distributed computing system, used primarily for high throughput computing (HTC) applications. It has a computing capacity and power consumption rivaling that of the largest supercomputers. The computing capacity required from this system is also expected to grow over the next decade. Optimizing the power utilization and cost of such systems is thus of great interest. A number of trends currently underway will provide new opportunities for power-aware optimizations. We discuss how power-aware software applications and scheduling might be used to reduce power consumption, both as autonomous entities and as part of a (globally) distributed system. As concrete examples of computing centers we provide information on the large HEP-focused Tier-1 at FNAL, and the Tigress High Performance Computing Center at Princeton University, which provides HPC resources in a university context.

David Abdurachmanov; Peter Elmer; Giulio Eulisse; Paola Grosso; Curtis Hillegas; Burt Holzman; Ruben L. Janssen; Sander Klous; Robert Knight; Shahzad Muzaffar

2014-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

63

PNNL pushing scientific discovery through data intensive computing breakthroughs  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratorys approach to data intensive computing (DIC) is focused on three key research areas: hybrid hardware architectures, software architectures, and analytic algorithms. Advancements in these areas will help to address, and solve, DIC issues associated with capturing, managing, analyzing and understanding, in near real time, data at volumes and rates that push the frontiers of current technologies.

Deborah Gracio; David Koppenaal; Ruby Leung

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Progress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is one of the worlds premier test reactors for studying the effects of intense neutron radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR began operation in 1967, and has operated continuously since then, averaging approximately 250 operating days per year. The combination of high flux, large test volumes, and multiple experiment configuration options provide unique testing opportunities for nuclear fuels and material researchers. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water moderated and cooled, beryllium-reflected highly-enriched uranium fueled, reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The ATR peak thermal flux can reach 1.0 x1015 n/cm2-sec, and the core configuration creates five main reactor power lobes (regions) that can be operated at different powers during the same operating cycle. In addition to these nine flux traps there are 68 irradiation positions in the reactor core reflector tank. The test positions range from 0.5 to 5.0 in diameter and are all 48 in length, the active length of the fuel. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material radiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. Goals of the ATR NSUF are to define the cutting edge of nuclear technology research in high temperature and radiation environments, contribute to improved industry performance of current and future light water reactors, and stimulate cooperative research between user groups conducting basic and applied research. The ATR NSUF has developed partnerships with other universities and national laboratories to enable ATR NSUF researchers to perform research at these other facilities, when the research objectives cannot be met using the INL facilities. The ATR NSUF program includes a robust education program enabling students to participate in their research at INL and the partner facilities, attend the ATR NSUF annual User Week, and compete for prizes at sponsored conferences. Development of additional research capabilities is also a key component of the ATR NSUF Program; researchers are encouraged to propose research projects leading to these enhanced capabilities. Some ATR irradiation experiment projects irradiate more specimens than are tested, resulting in irradiated materials available for post irradiation examination by other researchers. These extra specimens comprise the ATR NSUF Sample Library. This presentation will highlight the ATR NSUF Sample Library and the process open to researchers who want to access these materials and how to propose research projects using them. This presentation will provide the current status of all the ATR NSUF Program elements. Many of these were not envisioned in 2007, when DOE established the ATR NSUF.

Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; James I. Cole; Jeff B. Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

DOE Issues Funding Opportunity for Advanced Computational and Modeling Research for the Electric Power System  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The objective of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to leverage scientific advancements in mathematics and computation for application to power system models and software tools, with the long-term goal of enabling real-time protection and control based on wide-area sensor measurements.

66

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility 2010 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the 2010 ATR National Scientific User Facility Annual Report. This report provides an overview of the program for 2010, along with individual project reports from each of the university principal investigators. The report also describes the capabilities offered to university researchers here at INL and at the ATR NSUF partner facilities.

Mary Catherine Thelen; Todd R. Allen

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Final Scientific Report - Wireless and Sensing Solutions Advancing Industrial Efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project team's goal for the Wireless and Sensing Solution Advancing Industrial Efficiency award (DE-FC36-04GO14002) was to develop, demonstrate, and test a number of leading edge technologies that could enable the emergence of wireless sensor and sampling systems for the industrial market space. This effort combined initiatives in advanced sensor development, configurable sampling and deployment platforms, and robust wireless communications to address critical obstacles in enabling enhanced industrial efficiency.

Budampati, Rama; McBrady, Adam; Nusseibeh, Fouad

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

68

Computational Design of Advanced Nuclear Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project was to develop a method for theoretical understanding of nuclear fuel materials whose physical and thermophysical properties can be predicted from first principles using a novel dynamical mean field method for electronic structure calculations. We concentrated our study on uranium, plutonium, their oxides, nitrides, carbides, as well as some rare earth materials whose 4f eletrons provide a simplified framework for understanding complex behavior of the f electrons. We addressed the issues connected to the electronic structure, lattice instabilities, phonon and magnon dynamics as well as thermal conductivity. This allowed us to evaluate characteristics of advanced nuclear fuel systems using computer based simulations and avoid costly experiments.

Savrasov, Sergey; Kotliar, Gabriel; Haule, Kristjan

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

69

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and industry research efforts to ensure the properties of materials in light water reactors are well understood. The ATR NSUF is providing this support through three main efforts: establishing unique infrastructure necessary to conduct research on highly radioactive materials, conducting research in conjunction with industry partners on life extension relevant topics, and providing training courses to encourage more U.S. researchers to understand and address LWR materials issues. In 2010 and 2011, several advanced instruments with capability focused on resolving nuclear material performance issues through analysis on the micro (10-6 m) to atomic (10-10 m) scales were installed primarily at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. These instruments included a local electrode atom probe (LEAP), a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) system, a Raman spectrometer, and an nanoindentor/atomic force microscope. Ongoing capability enhancements intended to support industry efforts include completion of two shielded, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test loops, the first of which will come online in early calendar year 2013, a pressurized and controlled chemistry water loop for the ATR center flux trap, and a dedicated facility intended to house post irradiation examination equipment. In addition to capability enhancements at the main site in Idaho, the ATR NSUF also welcomed two new partner facilities in 2011 and two new partner facilities in 2012; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and associated hot cells and the University California Berkeley capabilities in irradiated materials analysis were added in 2011. In 2012, Purdue Universitys Interaction of Materials with Particles and Components Testing (IMPACT) facility and the Pacific Northwest Nuclear Laboratory (PNNL) Radiochemistry Processing Laboratory (RPL) and PIE facilities were added. The ATR NSUF annually hosts a weeklong event called Users Week in which students and faculty from universities as well as other interested parties from regulatory agencies or industry convene in Idaho Falls, Idaho to see presentations from ATR NSUF staff as well as select researchers from the materials research field. Users week provides an overview of current materials research topics of interest and an opportunity for young researchers to understand the process of performing work through ATR NSUF. Additionally, to increase the number of researchers engaged in LWR materials issues, a series of workshops are in progress to introduce research staff to stress corrosion cracking, zirconium alloy degradation, and uranium dioxide degradation during in-reactor use.

John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Module name: Advanced topic: Visual Computing Abbreviation: SVC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

visualization (registration and segmentation of computer tomography measurement data), digital image generationModule name: Advanced topic: Visual Computing Abbreviation: SVC Study semester: 3rd semester (WS Recommended prerequisites: Geometric Modeling, Interactive Computer Graphics Learning goals: Technological

Ahlers, Volker - Fakultät IV

71

Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Indiana University?¢????s SWIM activities have primarily been in three areas. All are completed, but we are continuing to work on two of them because refinements are useful to both DoE laboratories and the high performance computing community.

Bramley, Randall B.

2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

72

Ames Lab 101: Improving Materials with Advanced Computing  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Ames Laboratory's Chief Research Officer Duane Johnson talks about using advanced computing to develop new materials and predict what types of properties those materials will have.

Johnson, Duane

2014-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

73

Ames Lab 101: Improving Materials with Advanced Computing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ames Laboratory's Chief Research Officer Duane Johnson talks about using advanced computing to develop new materials and predict what types of properties those materials will have.

Johnson, Duane

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

74

advanced computer program: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Advanced Computer Studies Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Science students 20,000 per year Collaborator On a single project or with one...

75

Scientific Application Requirements for Leadership Computing at the Exascale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy s Leadership Computing Facility, located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory s National Center for Computational Sciences, recently polled scientific teams that had large allocations at the center in 2007, asking them to identify computational science requirements for future exascale systems (capable of an exaflop, or 1018 floating point operations per second). These requirements are necessarily speculative, since an exascale system will not be realized until the 2015 2020 timeframe, and are expressed where possible relative to a recent petascale requirements analysis of similar science applications [1]. Our initial findings, which beg further data collection, validation, and analysis, did in fact align with many of our expectations and existing petascale requirements, yet they also contained some surprises, complete with new challenges and opportunities. First and foremost, the breadth and depth of science prospects and benefits on an exascale computing system are striking. Without a doubt, they justify a large investment, even with its inherent risks. The possibilities for return on investment (by any measure) are too large to let us ignore this opportunity. The software opportunities and challenges are enormous. In fact, as one notable computational scientist put it, the scale of questions being asked at the exascale is tremendous and the hardware has gotten way ahead of the software. We are in grave danger of failing because of a software crisis unless concerted investments and coordinating activities are undertaken to reduce and close this hardwaresoftware gap over the next decade. Key to success will be a rigorous requirement for natural mapping of algorithms to hardware in a way that complements (rather than competes with) compilers and runtime systems. The level of abstraction must be raised, and more attention must be paid to functionalities and capabilities that incorporate intent into data structures, are aware of memory hierarchy, possess fault tolerance, exploit asynchronism, and are power-consumption aware. On the other hand, we must also provide application scientists with the ability to develop software without having to become experts in the computer science components. Numerical algorithms are scattered broadly across science domains, with no one particular algorithm being ubiquitous and no one algorithm going unused. Structured grids and dense linear algebra continue to dominate, but other algorithm categories will become more common. A significant increase is projected for Monte Carlo algorithms, unstructured grids, sparse linear algebra, and particle methods, and a relative decrease foreseen in fast Fourier transforms. These projections reflect the expectation of much higher architecture concurrency and the resulting need for very high scalability. The new algorithm categories that application scientists expect to be increasingly important in the next decade include adaptive mesh refinement, implicit nonlinear systems, data assimilation, agent-based methods, parameter continuation, and optimization. The attributes of leadership computing systems expected to increase most in priority over the next decade are (in order of importance) interconnect bandwidth, memory bandwidth, mean time to interrupt, memory latency, and interconnect latency. The attributes expected to decrease most in relative priority are disk latency, archival storage capacity, disk bandwidth, wide area network bandwidth, and local storage capacity. These choices by application developers reflect the expected needs of applications or the expected reality of available hardware. One interpretation is that the increasing priorities reflect the desire to increase computational efficiency to take advantage of increasing peak flops [floating point operations per second], while the decreasing priorities reflect the expectation that computational efficiency will not increase. Per-core requirements appear to be relatively static, while aggregate requirements will grow with the system. This projection is consistent with a r

Ahern, Sean [ORNL; Alam, Sadaf R [ORNL; Fahey, Mark R [ORNL; Hartman-Baker, Rebecca J [ORNL; Barrett, Richard F [ORNL; Kendall, Ricky A [ORNL; Kothe, Douglas B [ORNL; Mills, Richard T [ORNL; Sankaran, Ramanan [ORNL; Tharrington, Arnold N [ORNL; White III, James B [ORNL

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bechtel-NV IARC INL NSTEC Pantex SNLA DOE-ALB Allied Signal KCP SRS NREL DOE NETL NNSA ARM ORAU OSTI NOAA

77

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Environmental Research · Fusion Energy Sciences · High Energy Physics · Nuclear Physics IPv6 SNMP Network · Communicate using IPv6 addressing when monitoring router/switch status and receiving real-time router/switch initiated alerts within the ESnet · Verify the operational status of both IPv4 and IPv6 protocols within

78

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

facilities, or from the data's facility of origin back to the researcher's home institution. " From the BES. · First deployments in the nets with open science missions and exchange points #12;Example: US Atlas

79

Geophysical Disaster Computational Fluid Dynamics Center Our scientific advances.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Improve how Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models work. (numerics, dynamics, physics) · Use mountain-weather random errors by making many different NWP runs. (ensemble numerical prediction) · Reduce systematic outcomes. (probabilistic forecasting) · Predict weather and turbulence in the lower atmosphere where people

80

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Environmental Research · Fusion Energy Sciences · High Energy Physics · Nuclear Physics Science ­ they carry many types of traffic ­ Desktop machines, laptops, wireless ­ VOIP ­ HVAC control systems

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81

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.0 · Iperf API ­Rewrite core functionality as an API ­Highly flexible through use of function pointers ­Written in C ­Implement "Iperf the tool" using API · Futures ­SWIG bindings for Python, Perl, etc #12/down ­configuration changes · Human interface · Machine interfaces: REST/JSON #12;Net Almanac · Current Status

82

Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Homepage | U.S.  

Office of Science (SC) Website

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial CarbonArticles News NewsAbout Berkeley SiteAcknowledgingOfficeDOE Office

83

Energy Department Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific Computing  

Office of Science (SC) Website

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial CarbonArticlesHumanJuneDocumenting the LifeEnergetic ScienceResearch |

84

Energy Department Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific Computing  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergyIDIQBusiness CompetitionDepartmentandDepartment ofHydroelectric

85

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Advanced Scientific  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs space CombinedValues shown

86

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research * Basic Energy Sciences * Biological  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout »Lab (NewportSuccessSupply Stores SupplyDNSSEC

87

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research * Basic Energy Sciences * Biological  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout »Lab (NewportSuccessSupply Stores

88

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research * Basic Energy Sciences * Biological  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout »Lab (NewportSuccessSupply StoresNetwork Monitoring

89

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research * Basic Energy Sciences * Biological  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout »Lab (NewportSuccessSupply StoresNetwork

90

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research * Basic Energy Sciences * Biological  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout »Lab (NewportSuccessSupply

91

Advanced Environments and Tools for High Performance Computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Environments and Tools for High Performance Computing Problem-Solving Environments Environments and Tools for High Performance Computing. The conference was chaired by Professor D. W. Walker and managing distributed high performance comput- ing resources is important for a PSE to meet the requirements

Walker, David W.

92

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center 2007 Annual Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Directions in High Performance Computing for the Officein the evolution of high performance computing and networks.Hectopascals High performance computing High Performance

Hules, John A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

E-Print Network 3.0 - access scientific journals Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on Accessible Computing Academic Journal 19367228 Association... -VCH Verlag Advanced Fuel Cell Technology Trade Journal 10951415 Seven Mountains Scientific, Inc. Advanced......

94

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced computer simulations Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced computer simulations Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Simulation of Advanced Large-Scale HPC...

95

A Taxonomy of Scientific Workflow Systems for Grid Computing Jia Yu and Rajkumar Buyya*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on major functions and architectural styles of Grid workflow systems. In Section 3, we map the proposed1 A Taxonomy of Scientific Workflow Systems for Grid Computing Jia Yu and Rajkumar Buyya* Grid Computing and Distributed Systems (GRIDS) Laboratory Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering

Melbourne, University of

96

International Scientific Conference Computer Science'2006 Building skills for the knowledge society  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of highly-qualified staff, lack of new scientific equipment, etc. On the other side, a growing demandInternational Scientific Conference Computer Science'2006 Building skills for the knowledge society, and the focus on ICT and e-business skills, innovation and knowledge management in organizations. It highlights

Boyer, Edmond

97

International Journal of Foundations of Computer Science fl World Scientific Publishing Company  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Journal of Foundations of Computer Science c fl World Scientific Publishing Company Science, University of Idaho Moscow, Idaho 83844­1010, USA and MOSHE DROR MIS Department, University

Krings, Axel W.

98

Advanced Computing Tech Team | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless orA BRIEF HISTORY OFEnergy AddingAdministrativeAdvanced

99

Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation and Computing:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy Advanced Nuclear Energy The

100

Previous Computer Science Award Announcements | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Previous Computer Science Award Announcements Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Applied Mathematics Computer Science Exascale Tools Workshop...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Scientific Grand Challenges: Challenges in Climate Change Science and the Role of Computing at the Extreme Scale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) in partnership with the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) held a workshop on the challenges in climate change science and the role of computing at the extreme scale, November 6-7, 2008, in Bethesda, Maryland. At the workshop, participants identified the scientific challenges facing the field of climate science and outlined the research directions of highest priority that should be pursued to meet these challenges. Representatives from the national and international climate change research community as well as representatives from the high-performance computing community attended the workshop. This group represented a broad mix of expertise. Of the 99 participants, 6 were from international institutions. Before the workshop, each of the four panels prepared a white paper, which provided the starting place for the workshop discussions. These four panels of workshop attendees devoted to their efforts the following themes: Model Development and Integrated Assessment; Algorithms and Computational Environment; Decadal Predictability and Prediction; Data, Visualization, and Computing Productivity. The recommendations of the panels are summarized in the body of this report.

Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Johnson, Gary M.; Washington, Warren M.

2009-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

102

E-Print Network 3.0 - advancing computational science Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: advancing computational science Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Army High Performance Computing Research Center Summary: Army High Performance Computing Research Center...

103

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced computer science Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: advanced computer science Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Army High Performance Computing Research Center Summary: Army High Performance Computing Research Center...

104

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced computational science Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: advanced computational science Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Army High Performance Computing Research Center Summary: Army High Performance Computing Research Center...

105

Grid Computing in the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) scientific experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The computing model for the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) scientific experiment has evolved since the beginning of the experiment. Initially CDF computing was comprised of dedicated resources located in computer farms around the world. With the wide spread acceptance of grid computing in High Energy Physics, CDF computing has migrated to using grid computing extensively. CDF uses computing grids around the world. Each computing grid has required different solutions. The use of portals as interfaces to the collaboration computing resources has proven to be an extremely useful technique allowing the CDF physicists transparently migrate from using dedicated computer farm to using computing located in grid farms often away from Fermilab. Grid computing at CDF continues to evolve as the grid standards and practices change.

Douglas P. Benjamin

2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

106

ECE 585 Advanced Computer Architecture Spring 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Its Basic Implementation HSI3: 2, 5.1­5.4 HSI4: 2, 4.1­4.4 QA3: 2 QA4: B.1­B.9 2 1/27 Pipelining/3 ILP Overview and Implementation QA3: 3.5­3.6, 4.3 QA4: 2.7­2.10 Notes 8 3/10 Memory Hierarchy I HSI3585].) Prerequisite: Combinational and sequential circuit design. Computer programming. Experience

Wang, Jia

107

An expanded framework for the advanced computational testing and simulation toolkit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Computational Testing and Simulation (ACTS) Toolkit is a set of computational tools developed primarily at DOE laboratories and is aimed at simplifying the solution of common and important computational problems. The use of the tools reduces the development time for new codes and the tools provide functionality that might not otherwise be available. This document outlines an agenda for expanding the scope of the ACTS Project based on lessons learned from current activities. Highlights of this agenda include peer-reviewed certification of new tools; finding tools to solve problems that are not currently addressed by the Toolkit; working in collaboration with other software initiatives and DOE computer facilities; expanding outreach efforts; promoting interoperability, further development of the tools; and improving functionality of the ACTS Information Center, among other tasks. The ultimate goal is to make the ACTS tools more widely used and more effective in solving DOE's and the nation's scientific problems through the creation of a reliable software infrastructure for scientific computing.

Marques, Osni A.; Drummond, Leroy A.

2003-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

108

International Scientific Conference Computer Science'2008 Near-Native Protein Folding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Scientific Conference Computer Science'2008 61 Near-Native Protein Folding Stefka: The protein folding problem is a fundamental problem in computational molecular biology. The high resolution 3. After that the folding problem is de- fined like optimization problem. Keywords: Protein folding

Fidanova, Stefka

109

Cloud computing security: the scientific challenge, and a survey of solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud computing security: the scientific challenge, and a survey of solutions Mark D. Ryan University of Birmingham January 28, 2013 Abstract We briefly survey issues in cloud computing security. The fact that data is shared with the cloud service provider is identified as the core sci- entific problem

Ryan, Mark

110

Nov 4, 2014 1 CSCE 6610:Advanced Computer Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is maintaining the performance growth rate of the system mem- ory. Typically, the disk is five orders of magnitude slower than the rest of the system [6] making frequent misses in system main memory a major of the Somewhat dated access latency chart #12;11/6/14 2 Nov 4, 2014 3 CSCE 6610:Advanced Computer Architecture

Kavi, Krishna

111

CSc 155 Advanced Computer Graphics Fall 2013 Scott Gordon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the camera forward a small amount (i.e. in the N direction). S ­ move the camera backward a small amount (i.e1 CSc 155 ­ Advanced Computer Graphics Fall 2013 Scott Gordon Assignment # 2 ­ 3D Model Viewing DUE left"). D ­ move the camera a small amount in the positive U direction (also called "strafe right"). E

Gordon, Scott

112

Operational Philosophy for the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). At its core, the ATR NSUF Program combines access to a portion of the available ATR radiation capability, the associated required examination and analysis facilities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and INL staff expertise with novel ideas provided by external contributors (universities, laboratories, and industry). These collaborations define the cutting edge of nuclear technology research in high-temperature and radiation environments, contribute to improved industry performance of current and future light-water reactors (LWRs), and stimulate cooperative research between user groups conducting basic and applied research. To make possible the broadest access to key national capability, the ATR NSUF formed a partnership program that also makes available access to critical facilities outside of the INL. Finally, the ATR NSUF has established a sample library that allows access to pre-irradiated samples as needed by national research teams.

J. Benson; J. Cole; J. Jackson; F. Marshall; D. Ogden; J. Rempe; M. C. Thelen

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced computational approaches Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Information Sciences 3 Feb. 11, 2008 Advanced Fault Tolerance Solutions for High Performance Computing 147 Advanced Fault Tolerance Solutions Summary: Algorithmic approaches...

114

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced computational algorithm Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

algorithm Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced computational algorithm Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Boston University Fall 2010...

115

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced computational methods Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

methods Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced computational methods Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Architecture Architecture...

116

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced computer architectures Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

architectures Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced computer architectures Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Architecture Architecture...

117

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced computer studies Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

studies Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced computer studies Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 MSCS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FORM...

118

Feb. 11, 2008 Advanced Fault Tolerance Solutions for High Performance Computing 1/47 Advanced Fault Tolerance Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb. 11, 2008 Advanced Fault Tolerance Solutions for High Performance Computing 1/47 RAS RAS Advanced Fault Tolerance Solutions for High Performance Computing Christian Engelmann Oak Ridge National Solutions for High Performance Computing 2/47 · Nation's largest energy laboratory · Nation's largest

Engelmann, Christian

119

Simulations for Solutions: Solving Problems Through Scientific Computing |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted forHighlightsSeminarsSilicon spongeComputing Facility

120

NERSC 2011: High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment for the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NERSC 2011 High Performance Computing Facility Operationalby providing high-performance computing, information, data,s deep knowledge of high performance computing to overcome

Antypas, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

VAX/VMS file protection on the STC (Scientific and Technical Computing) VAXES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual is a guide to use the file protection mechanisms available on the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Scientific and Technical Computing (STC) System VAXes. User identification codes (UICs) and general identifiers are discussed as a basis for understanding UIC-based and access control list (ACL) protection. 5 figs.

Not Available

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Improving Energy Efficiency of GPU based General-Purpose Scientific Computing through  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improving Energy Efficiency of GPU based General-Purpose Scientific Computing through Automated challenge. In this paper, we propose a novel framework to improve the energy efficiency of GPU-based General configurations to improve the energy efficiency of any given GPGPU program. Through preliminary empirical

Deng, Zhigang

123

The Portable Extensible Toolkit for Scientific computing Day 1: Usage and Algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Portable Extensible Toolkit for Scientific computing Day 1: Usage and Algorithms Jed Brown CSCS runs performantly on a laptop No iPhone support Jed Brown (ETH Zrich) PETSc day 1 CSCS 2010-05-10 5) Same code runs performantly on a laptop No iPhone support Jed Brown (ETH Zrich) PETSc day 1 CSCS

124

Heterogeneous High Throughput Scientific Computing with APM X-Gene and Intel Xeon Phi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrical power requirements will be a constraint on the future growth of Distributed High Throughput Computing (DHTC) as used by High Energy Physics. Performance-per-watt is a critical metric for the evaluation of computer architectures for cost- efficient computing. Additionally, future performance growth will come from heterogeneous, many-core, and high computing density platforms with specialized processors. In this paper, we examine the Intel Xeon Phi Many Integrated Cores (MIC) co-processor and Applied Micro X-Gene ARMv8 64-bit low-power server system-on-a-chip (SoC) solutions for scientific computing applications. We report our experience on software porting, performance and energy efficiency and evaluate the potential for use of such technologies in the context of distributed computing systems such as the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG).

David Abdurachmanov; Brian Bockelman; Peter Elmer; Giulio Eulisse; Robert Knight; Shahzad Muzaffar

2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

125

The Advanced Test Reactor Irradiation Capabilities Available as a National Scientific User Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is one of the worlds premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. The ATR is a very versatile facility with a wide variety of experimental test capabilities for providing the environment needed in an irradiation experiment. These capabilities include simple capsule experiments, instrumented and/or temperature-controlled experiments, and pressurized water loop experiment facilities. Monitoring systems have also been utilized to monitor different parameters such as fission gases for fuel experiments, to measure specimen performance during irradiation. ATRs control system provides a stable axial flux profile throughout each reactor operating cycle, and allows the thermal and fast neutron fluxes to be controlled separately in different sections of the core. The ATR irradiation positions vary in diameter from 16 mm to 127 mm over an active core height of 1.2 m. This paper discusses the different irradiation capabilities with examples of different experiments and the cost/benefit issues related to each capability. The recent designation of ATR as a national scientific user facility will make the ATR much more accessible at very low to no cost for research by universities and possibly commercial entities.

S. Blaine Grover

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

High-Performance Computing for Advanced Smart Grid Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The power grid is becoming far more complex as a result of the grid evolution meeting an information revolution. Due to the penetration of smart grid technologies, the grid is evolving as an unprecedented speed and the information infrastructure is fundamentally improved with a large number of smart meters and sensors that produce several orders of magnitude larger amounts of data. How to pull data in, perform analysis, and put information out in a real-time manner is a fundamental challenge in smart grid operation and planning. The future power grid requires high performance computing to be one of the foundational technologies in developing the algorithms and tools for the significantly increased complexity. New techniques and computational capabilities are required to meet the demands for higher reliability and better asset utilization, including advanced algorithms and computing hardware for large-scale modeling, simulation, and analysis. This chapter summarizes the computational challenges in smart grid and the need for high performance computing, and present examples of how high performance computing might be used for future smart grid operation and planning.

Huang, Zhenyu; Chen, Yousu

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

127

Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) | U.S. DOE Office...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Accessing ASCR Supercomputers Oak Ridge Leadership...

128

New Computer Codes Unlock the Secrets of Cleaner Burning Coal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Codes Unlock the Secrets of Cleaner Burning Coal New Computer Codes Unlock the Secrets of Cleaner Burning Coal March 29, 2012 | Tags: Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR),...

129

Editorial for Advanced Theory and Practice for High Performance Computing and Communications Geoffrey Fox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Editorial for Advanced Theory and Practice for High Performance Computing and Communications Theory and Practice for High Performance Computing and Communications. I would like to thank Omer Rana International Conference on High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC-09) http

130

June 4, 2007 Advanced Fault Tolerance Solutions for High Performance Computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

June 4, 2007 Advanced Fault Tolerance Solutions for High Performance Computing Workshop on Trends Tolerance Solutions for High Performance Computing Christian Engelmann Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Solutions for High Performance Computing Workshop on Trends, Technologies and Collaborative Opportunities

Engelmann, Christian

131

June 8, 2007 Advanced Fault Tolerance Solutions for High Performance Computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

June 8, 2007 Advanced Fault Tolerance Solutions for High Performance Computing Workshop on Trends Tolerance Solutions for High Performance Computing Christian Engelmann Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak for High Performance Computing Workshop on Trends, Technologies and Collaborative Opportunities in High

Engelmann, Christian

132

Advanced Simulation and Computing Fiscal Year 2011-2012 Implementation Plan, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering (D&E) programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional (3D) simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1 - Robust Tools. Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2 - Prediction through Simulation. Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3 - Balanced Operational Infrastructure. Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

McCoy, M; Phillips, J; Hpson, J; Meisner, R

2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

133

Advanced Simulation & Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future nonnuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear-weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable Stockpile Life Extension Programs (SLEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining the support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1. Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2--Prediction through Simulation. Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear-weapons performances in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3--Balanced Operational Infrastructure. Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Meisner, R; Perry, J; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

134

Advanced Simulation and Computing FY10-FY11 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0.5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering (D&E) programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional (3D) simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: (1) Robust Tools - Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements; (2) Prediction through Simulation - Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile; and (3) Balanced Operational Infrastructure - Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Meisner, R; Peery, J; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

135

Advanced Simulation and Computing FY10-11 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1 Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2 Prediction through Simulation--Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3 Balanced Operational Infrastructure--Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Carnes, B

2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

136

Advanced Simulation and Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan, Volume 2, Revision 0.5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1. Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2. Prediction through Simulation--Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3. Balanced Operational Infrastructure--Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Meisner, R; Hopson, J; Peery, J; McCoy, M

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

137

Advanced Simulation and Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: (1) Robust Tools - Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements; (2) Prediction through Simulation - Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile; and (3) Balanced Operational Infrastructure - Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Kissel, L

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced scientific component Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

software for high-performance scientific Yuri Alexeev, Benjamin A. Allan, Robert C. Armstrong, David E. Bernholdt, Summary: Component-based software for high-performance...

139

Final Report for the Account Creation/Deletion Reenginering Task for the Scientific Computing Department  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October 2000, the personnel responsible for administration of the corporate computers managed by the Scientific Computing Department assembled to reengineer the process of creating and deleting users' computer accounts. Using the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute (SEI) Capability Maturity Model (CMM) for quality improvement process, the team performed the reengineering by way of process modeling, defining and measuring the maturity of the processes, per SEI and CMM practices. The computers residing in the classified environment are bound by security requirements of the Secure Classified Network (SCN) Security Plan. These security requirements delimited the scope of the project, specifically mandating validation of all user accounts on the central corporate computer systems. System administrators, in addition to their assigned responsibilities, were spending valuable hours performing the additional tacit responsibility of tracking user accountability for user-generated data. For example, in cases where the data originator was no longer an employee, the administrators were forced to spend considerable time and effort determining the appropriate management personnel to assume ownership or disposition of the former owner's data files. In order to prevent this sort of problem from occurring and to have a defined procedure in the event of an anomaly, the computer account management procedure was thoroughly reengineered, as detailed in this document. An automated procedure is now in place that is initiated and supplied data by central corporate processes certifying the integrity, timeliness and authentication of account holders and their management. Automated scripts identify when an account is about to expire, to preempt the problem of data becoming ''orphaned'' without a responsible ''owner'' on the system. The automated account-management procedure currently operates on and provides a standard process for all of the computers maintained by the Scientific Computing Department.

JENNINGS, BARBARA J.; MCALLISTER, PAULA L.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

MiniGhost : a miniapp for exploring boundary exchange strategies using stencil computations in scientific parallel computing.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A broad range of scientific computation involves the use of difference stencils. In a parallel computing environment, this computation is typically implemented by decomposing the spacial domain, inducing a 'halo exchange' of process-owned boundary data. This approach adheres to the Bulk Synchronous Parallel (BSP) model. Because commonly available architectures provide strong inter-node bandwidth relative to latency costs, many codes 'bulk up' these messages by aggregating data into a message as a means of reducing the number of messages. A renewed focus on non-traditional architectures and architecture features provides new opportunities for exploring alternatives to this programming approach. In this report we describe miniGhost, a 'miniapp' designed for exploration of the capabilities of current as well as emerging and future architectures within the context of these sorts of applications. MiniGhost joins the suite of miniapps developed as part of the Mantevo project.

Barrett, Richard Frederick; Heroux, Michael Allen; Vaughan, Courtenay Thomas

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

advanced computational model: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

142

advanced computational modeling: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

143

MATLAB muliplatform research license: Numeric computation, advanced graphics and visualization, and a high-level programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATLAB muliplatform research license: Numeric computation, advanced graphics and visualization license allows research and includes the following: Feature # of users MATLAB 7 Simulink 6 Control System

Dawson, Jeff W.

144

Nationwide Buildings Energy Research enabled through an integrated Data Intensive Scientific Workflow and Advanced Analysis Environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modern workflow systems enable scientists to run ensemble simulations at unprecedented scales and levels of complexity, allowing them to study system sizes previously impossible to achieve, due to the inherent resource requirements needed for the modeling work. However as a result of these new capabilities the science teams suddenly also face unprecedented data volumes that they are unable to analyze with their existing tools and methodologies in a timely fashion. In this paper we will describe the ongoing development work to create an integrated data intensive scientific workflow and analysis environment that offers researchers the ability to easily create and execute complex simulation studies and provides them with different scalable methods to analyze the resulting data volumes. The integration of simulation and analysis environments is hereby not only a question of ease of use, but supports fundamental functions in the correlated analysis of simulation input, execution details and derived results for multi-variant, complex studies. To this end the team extended and integrated the existing capabilities of the Velo data management and analysis infrastructure, the MeDICi data intensive workflow system and RHIPE the R for Hadoop version of the well-known statistics package, as well as developing a new visual analytics interface for the result exploitation by multi-domain users. The capabilities of the new environment are demonstrated on a use case that focusses on the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) building energy team, showing how they were able to take their previously local scale simulations to a nationwide level by utilizing data intensive computing techniques not only for their modeling work, but also for the subsequent analysis of their modeling results. As part of the PNNL research initiative PRIMA (Platform for Regional Integrated Modeling and Analysis) the team performed an initial 3 year study of building energy demands for the US Eastern Interconnect domain, which they are now planning to extend to predict the demand for the complete century. The initial study raised their data demands from a few GBs to 400GB for the 3year study and expected tens of TBs for the full century.

Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Lansing, Carina S.; Elsethagen, Todd O.; Hathaway, John E.; Guillen, Zoe C.; Dirks, James A.; Skorski, Daniel C.; Stephan, Eric G.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Gorton, Ian; Liu, Yan

2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

Smart Libraries: Best SQE Practices for Libraries with an Emphasis on Scientific Computing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As scientific computing applications grow in complexity, more and more functionality is being packaged in independently developed libraries. Worse, as the computing environments in which these applications run grow in complexity, it gets easier to make mistakes in building, installing and using libraries as well as the applications that depend on them. Unfortunately, SQA standards so far developed focus primarily on applications, not libraries. We show that SQA standards for libraries differ from applications in many respects. We introduce and describe a variety of practices aimed at minimizing the likelihood of making mistakes in using libraries and at maximizing users' ability to diagnose and correct them when they occur. We introduce the term Smart Library to refer to a library that is developed with these basic principles in mind. We draw upon specific examples from existing products we believe incorporate smart features: MPI, a parallel message passing library, and HDF5 and SAF, both of which are parallel I/O libraries supporting scientific computing applications. We conclude with a narrative of some real-world experiences in using smart libraries with Ale3d, VisIt and SAF.

Miller, M C; Reus, J F; Matzke, R P; Koziol, Q A; Cheng, A P

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

POET (parallel object-oriented environment and toolkit) and frameworks for scientific distributed computing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Frameworks for parallel computing have recently become popular as a means for preserving parallel algorithms as reusable components. Frameworks for parallel computing in general, and POET in particular, focus on finding ways to orchestrate and facilitate cooperation between components that implement the parallel algorithms. Since performance is a key requirement for POET applications, CORBA or CORBA-like systems are eschewed for a SPMD message-passing architecture common to the world of distributed-parallel computing. Though the system is written in C++ for portability, the behavior of POET is more like a classical framework, such as Smalltalk. POET seeks to be a general platform for scientific parallel algorithm components which can be modified, linked, mixed and matched to a user`s specification. The purpose of this work is to identify a means for parallel code reuse and to make parallel computing more accessible to scientists whose expertise is outside the field of parallel computing. The POET framework provides two things: (1) an object model for parallel components that allows cooperation without being restrictive; (2) services that allow components to access and manage user data and message-passing facilities, etc. This work has evolved through application of a series of real distributed-parallel scientific problems. The paper focuses on what is required for parallel components to cooperate and at the same time remain ``black-boxes`` that users can drop into the frame without having to know the exquisite details of message-passing, data layout, etc. The paper walks through a specific example of a chemically reacting flow application. The example is implemented in POET and the authors identify component cooperation, usability and reusability in an anecdotal fashion.

Armstrong, R.; Cheung, A.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

SCANNING THE TECHNOLOGY Scanning Advanced  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

state of refinement. This has been made possible by advancements in a wide spec- trum of scientific economy, lower emissions and improved safety. The availability of computers on board the vehicle

148

New Sensors for In-Pile Temperature Detection at the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. As a user facility, the ATR is supporting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry, as they conduct basic and applied nuclear research and development to advance the nations energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to develop and evaluate new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing measurements of key parameters during irradiation. This paper describes the strategy for determining what instrumentation is needed and the program for developing new or enhanced sensors that can address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing new sensors now available and under development for in-pile detection of temperature at various irradiation locations in the ATR.

J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; J. E. Daw; K. G. Condie; S. Curtis Wilkins

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Project Title: Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing PROJECT OBJECTIVE The objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell system technology towards the commercial targets of power density, energy density and lifetime. These targets were laid out in the DOEs R&D roadmap to develop an advanced direct methanol fuel cell power supply that meets commercial entry requirements. Such a power supply will enable mobile computers to operate non-stop, unplugged from the wall power outlet, by using the high energy density of methanol fuel contained in a replaceable fuel cartridge. Specifically this project focused on balance-of-plant component integration and miniaturization, as well as extensive component, subassembly and integrated system durability and validation testing. This design has resulted in a pre-production power supply design and a prototype that meet the rigorous demands of consumer electronic applications. PROJECT TASKS The proposed work plan was designed to meet the project objectives, which corresponded directly with the objectives outlined in the Funding Opportunity Announcement: To engineer the fuel cell balance-of-plant and packaging to meet the needs of consumer electronic systems, specifically at power levels required for mobile computing. UNF used existing balance-of-plant component technologies developed under its current US Army CERDEC project, as well as a previous DOE project completed by PolyFuel, to further refine them to both miniaturize and integrate their functionality to increase the system power density and energy density. Benefits of UNFs novel passive water recycling MEA (membrane electrode assembly) and the simplified system architecture it enabled formed the foundation of the design approach. The package design was hardened to address orientation independence, shock, vibration, and environmental requirements. Fuel cartridge and fuel subsystems were improved to ensure effective fuel containment. PROJECT OVERVIEW The University of North Florida (UNF), with project partner the University of Florida, recently completed the Department of Energy (DOE) project entitled Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing. The primary objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell system technology towards the commercial targets as laid out in the DOE R&D roadmap by developing a 20-watt, direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), portable power supply based on the UNF innovative passive water recovery MEA. Extensive component, sub-system, and system development and testing was undertaken to meet the rigorous demands of the consumer electronic application. Numerous brassboard (nonpackaged) systems were developed to optimize the integration process and facilitating control algorithm development. The culmination of the development effort was a fully-integrated, DMFC, power supply (referred to as DP4). The project goals were 40 W/kg for specific power, 55 W/l for power density, and 575 Whr/l for energy density. It should be noted that the specific power and power density were for the power section only, and did not include the hybrid battery. The energy density is based on three, 200 ml, fuel cartridges, and also did not include the hybrid battery. The results show that the DP4 system configured without the methanol concentration sensor exceeded all performance goals, achieving 41.5 W/kg for specific power, 55.3 W/l for power density, and 623 Whr/l for energy density. During the project, the DOE revised its technical targets, and the definition of many of these targets, for the portable power application. With this revision, specific power, power density, specific energy (Whr/kg), and energy density are based on the total system, including fuel tank, fuel, and hybridization battery. Fuel capacity is not defined, but the same value is required for all calculations. Test data showed that the DP4 exceeded all 2011 Technical Status values; for example, the DP4 energy density was 373 Whr/l versus the DOE 2011 status of 200 Whr/l. For the

Fletcher, James H. [University of North Florida; Cox, Philip [University of North Florida; Harrington, William J [University of North Florida; Campbell, Joseph L [University of North Florida

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

150

The Cloud and Autonomic Computing Center concentrates on topics in advanced distributed computing as part of the National Science Foundation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Cloud and Autonomic Computing Center concentrates on topics in advanced distributed program. The Cloud and Autonomic Computing Center at Texas Tech University (CAC@TTU) provides expertise in cloud security and standards, machine learning, data mining, parallel and distributed computing

Rock, Chris

151

New DOE-Sponsored Study Helps Advance Scientific Understanding of Potential CO2 Storage Impacts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In another step forward toward improved scientific understanding of potential geologic carbon dioxide storage impacts, a new U.S. Department of Energy sponsored study has confirmed earlier research showing that proper site selection and monitoring is essential for helping anticipate and mitigate possible risks.

152

Accepted Manuscript Title: Advanced computational tools for pem fuel cell design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepted Manuscript Title: Advanced computational tools for pem fuel cell design ­ Part 1.C. Sui, S. Kumar, N. Djilali, Advanced computational tools for pem fuel cell design ­ Part 1: Development TOOLS FOR PEM FUEL CELL DESIGN ­ Part 1: Development and Base Case Simulations P.C. Sui , S. Kumar and N

Djilali, Ned

153

Research in the design and implementation of a comprehensive facility for scientific computation. Final project report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research on ways to organize a body of numerical procedures in such a way that they may be invoked automatically by processes which accept symbolic and algebraic specifications from a user, and produce combined symbolic, numeric and graphical output is described. Efforts are made to make these algebraic systems as flexible and useful as possible in this context, and to integrate them successfully into a man-machine design which provides operating system, language, and algorithm support. Various aspects of this research are reviewed including languages for symbolic algebra systems, programming environments, numerical software, numeric/symbolic programs, floating point hardware, elementary functions, Macsyma distribution, VAX/Macsyma/computer architecture, interactive systems, Lisp language, and advanced computer concepts (supercomputers). The computing environment for this research are UNIX-VAX-11/780, Vax 11/750, and Motorola 68000 systems. 32 refs. (DWL)

Fateman, R.J.; Kahan, W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

EWEC 2006 Scientific Track Advanced Forecast Systems for the Grid Integration of 25 GW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

forecasts, smoothing effects Abstract The economic success of offshore wind farms in liberalised electricity of offshore wind farms, their electricity production must be known well in advance to allow an efficient Oldenburg, Germany Key words: Offshore wind power, grid integration, short-term prediction, regional

Heinemann, Detlev

155

Advanced Eager Scheduling for Java-Based Adaptively Parallel Computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computation, folding@home from Stanford, the anti-cancer drug discovery project, screensaver lifesaver, from

Cappello, Peter

156

DOE High Performance Computing Operational Review (HPCOR): Enabling Data-Driven Scientific Discovery at HPC Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities are on the verge of a paradigm shift in the way they deliver systems and services to science and engineering teams. Research projects are producing a wide variety of data at unprecedented scale and level of complexity, with community-specific services that are part of the data collection and analysis workflow. On June 18-19, 2014 representatives from six DOE HPC centers met in Oakland, CA at the DOE High Performance Operational Review (HPCOR) to discuss how they can best provide facilities and services to enable large-scale data-driven scientific discovery at the DOE national laboratories. The report contains findings from that review.

Gerber, Richard; Allcock, William; Beggio, Chris; Campbell, Stuart; Cherry, Andrew; Cholia, Shreyas; Dart, Eli; England, Clay; Fahey, Tim; Foertter, Fernanda; Goldstone, Robin; Hick, Jason; Karelitz, David; Kelly, Kaki; Monroe, Laura; Prabhat,; Skinner, David; White, Julia

2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

157

Unsolicited Projects in 2012: Research in Computer Architecture...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

& Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301)...

158

The Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - Site Status Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes LLNL's progress for the period April through September of 2008 for the Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) SciDAC. The TASCS project is organized into four major thrust areas: CCA Environment (72%), Component Technology Initiatives (16%), CCA Toolkit (8%), and User and Application Outreach & Support (4%). The percentage of LLNL's effort allocation is shown in parenthesis for each thrust area. Major thrust areas are further broken down into activity areas, LLNL's effort directed to each activity is shown in Figure 1. Enhancements, Core Tools, and Usability are all part of CCA Environment, and Software Quality is part of Component Technology Initiatives. The balance of this report will cover our accomplishments in each of these activity areas.

Epperly, T W

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

159

Advanced Eager Scheduling for JavaBased Adaptively Parallel Computing #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computation, folding@home from Stanford, the anti­cancer drug discovery project, screensaver lifesaver, from

Cappello, Peter

160

New Sensors for the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to develop and evaluate new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. This paper describes the selection strategy of what instrumentation is needed, and the program generated for developing new or enhanced sensors that can address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing new sensors now available to users of the ATR NSUF with data from irradiation tests using these sensors. In addition, progress is reported on current research efforts to provide users advanced methods for detecting temperature, fuel thermal conductivity, and changes in sample geometry.

Joy L. Rempe; Darrell L. Knudson; Keith G. Condie; Joshua E. Daw; Heng Ban; Brandon Fox; Gordon Kohse

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced computed tomography Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

advanced computed tomography Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 CAT scan and RadonX-ray transform Relations with the Fourier transform. Dual Radon Summary: problems X-ray tomography...

162

2013 Wisconsin Forum on Advanced Computing in Engineering ~ Poster Session Overview ~  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2013 Wisconsin Forum on Advanced Computing in Engineering ~ Poster and Thermal Mixing in Desuperheating Applications Mario Trujillo Employed at General Motors Eelco Gehring Numerical Simulation of Heat Transfer Mechanisms in Spray

Evans, Paul G.

163

advanced computational tools: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences Websites Summary: Fundamentals How data is stored Key functions of a DBMS: just the big picture Example: transactionsProviding Students with Computational...

164

Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation Computing: Research &  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy Advanced Nuclear Energy The Advanced

165

Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation Computing: Verification &  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy Advanced Nuclear Energy The AdvancedValidation

166

ADVANCED WUFI COMPUTER MODELING WORKSHOP FOR WALL DESIGN AND PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the U.S Department of Energy This symposium and workshop is co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in collaboration with the Fraunhofer and Owens Corning. The Advanced Workshop will be held in Napa, California wine country, Monday, January 30

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

167

Advanced Computational Thermal Studies and their Assessment for Supercritical-Pressure Reactors (SCRs)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this laboratory / university collaboration of coupled computational and experimental studies is the improvement of predictive methods for supercritical-pressure reactors. The general objective is to develop supporting knowledge needed of advanced computational techniques for the technology development of the concepts and their safety systems.

D. M. McEligot; J. Y. Yoo; J. S. Lee; S. T. Ro; E. Lurien; S. O. Park; R. H. Pletcher; B. L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J. M. Wallace

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Simulation based Bayesian econometric inference: principles and some recent computational advances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007/15 Simulation based Bayesian econometric inference: principles and some recent computational/15 Simulation based Bayesian econometric inference: principles and some recent computational advances Lennart F aspects of simulation based Bayesian econometric inference. We start at an elementary level on basic

Nesterov, Yurii

169

Advanced Communication and Control for Distributed Energy Resource Integration: Phase 2 Scientific Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to demonstrate sensing, communication, information and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of multivendor distributed energy resource (DER) units at aggregation levels that meet individual user requirements for facility operations (residential, commercial, industrial, manufacturing, etc.) and further serve as resource options for electric and natural gas utilities. The fully demonstrated DER aggregation system with embodiment of communication and control technologies will lead to real-time, interactive, customer-managed service networks to achieve greater customer value. Work on this Advanced Communication and Control Project (ACCP) consists of a two-phase approach for an integrated demonstration of communication and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of DER units to reach progressive levels of aggregated power output. Phase I involved design and proof-of-design, and Phase II involves real-world demonstration of the Phase I design architecture. The scope of work for Phase II of this ACCP involves demonstrating the Phase I design architecture in large scale real-world settings while integrating with the operations of one or more electricity supplier feeder lines. The communication and control architectures for integrated demonstration shall encompass combinations of software and hardware components, including: sensors, data acquisition and communication systems, remote monitoring systems, metering (interval revenue, real-time), local and wide area networks, Web-based systems, smart controls, energy management/information systems with control and automation of building energy loads, and demand-response management with integration of real-time market pricing. For Phase II, BPL Global shall demonstrate the Phase I design for integrating and controlling the operation of more than 10 DER units, dispersed at various locations in one or more Independent System Operator (ISO) Control Areas, at an aggregated scale of more than 1 MW, to provide grid support. Actual performance data with respect to each specified function above is to be collected during the Phase II field demonstration. At a minimum, the Phase II demonstration shall span one year of field operations. The demonstration performance will need to be validated by the target customer(s) for acceptance and subsequent implementation. An ISO must be involved in demonstration planning and execution. As part of the Phase II work, BPL Global shall develop a roadmap to commercialization that identifies and quantifies the potential markets for the integrated, aggregated DER systems and for the communication and control technologies demonstrated in Phase I. In addition, the roadmap must identify strategies and actions, as well as the regional and national markets where the aggregated DER systems with communication and control solutions will be introduced, along with a timeline projected for introduction into each identified market. In Phase I of this project, we developed a proof-of-concept ACCP system and architecture and began to test its functionality at real-world sites. These sites had just over 10 MW of DERs and allowed us to identify what needed to be done to commercialize this concept. As a result, we started Phase II by looking at our existing platform and identified its strengths and weaknesses as well as how it would need to evolve for commercialization. During this process, we worked with different stakeholders in the market including: Independent System Operators, DER owners and operators, and electric utility companies to fully understand the issues from all of the different perspectives. Once we had an understanding of the commercialized ACCP system, we began to document and prepare detailed designs of the different system components. The components of the system with the most significant design improvements were: the on-site remote terminal unit, the communication technology between the remote site and the data center, and the scalability and reliability of the data center application.

BPL Global

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

170

Creating science-driven computer architecture: A new path to scientific leadership  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science-Driven Computer Architecture These inversions areCreating Science-Driven Computer Architecture whole systemRice U. ) Creating Science-Driven Computer Architecture

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Creating science-driven computer architecture: A new patch to scientific leadership  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Creating Science-Driven Computer Architecture: A New Path toa New Class of Computer Architectures for Scientificthe development of computer architectures, thereby opening a

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

About the Advanced Computing Tech Team | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste and Materials2014EnergyAdvanced TechnologyAbout EmergingAbout UsAbout

173

Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation and Computing: Contact  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy Advanced Nuclear Energy TheASC Contact ASC Sandia ASC

174

Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation and Computing: Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy Advanced Nuclear Energy TheASC Contact ASC Sandia

175

Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation and Computing: Integrated  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy Advanced Nuclear Energy TheASC Contact ASC

176

Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation and Computing: Physics &  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy Advanced Nuclear Energy TheASC Contact ASCEngineering

177

18.337J / 6.338J Applied Parallel Computing (SMA 5505), Spring 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced interdisciplinary introduction to modern scientific computing on parallel supercomputers. Numerical topics include dense and sparse linear algebra, N-body problems, and Fourier transforms. Geometrical topics include ...

Edelman, Alan

178

Advanced computational simulation of flow phenomena associated with orifice meters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents and discusses results from a series of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of fluid flow phenomena associated with orifice meters. These simulations were performed using a new, state-of-the-art CFD code developed at Southwest Research Institute. This code is based on new techniques designed to take advantage of parallel computers to increase computational performance and fidelity of simulation results. This algorithm uses a domain decomposition strategy to create grid systems for very complex geometries composed of simpler geometric subregions, allowing for the accurate representation of the fluid flow domain. The domain decomposition technique maps naturally to parallel computer architectures. Here, the concept of message-passing is used to create a parallel algorithm, using the Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) library. This code is then used to simulate the flow through an orifice meter run consisting of an orifice with a beta ratio of 0.5 and air flowing at a Reynolds number of 91,100. The work discussed in this paper is but the first step in developing a Virtual Metering Research Facility to support research, analysis, and formulation of new standards for metering.

Freitas, C.J. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

Advanced Computational Methods for Security Constrained Financial Transmission Rights  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Financial Transmission Rights (FTRs) are financial insurance tools to help power market participants reduce price risks associated with transmission congestion. FTRs are issued based on a process of solving a constrained optimization problem with the objective to maximize the FTR social welfare under power flow security constraints. Security constraints for different FTR categories (monthly, seasonal or annual) are usually coupled and the number of constraints increases exponentially with the number of categories. Commercial software for FTR calculation can only provide limited categories of FTRs due to the inherent computational challenges mentioned above. In this paper, first an innovative mathematical reformulation of the FTR problem is presented which dramatically improves the computational efficiency of optimization problem. After having re-formulated the problem, a novel non-linear dynamic system (NDS) approach is proposed to solve the optimization problem. The new formulation and performance of the NDS solver is benchmarked against widely used linear programming (LP) solvers like CPLEX and tested on both standard IEEE test systems and large-scale systems using data from the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). The performance of the NDS is demonstrated to be comparable and in some cases is shown to outperform the widely used CPLEX algorithms. The proposed formulation and NDS based solver is also easily parallelizable enabling further computational improvement.

Kalsi, Karanjit; Elbert, Stephen T.; Vlachopoulou, Maria; Zhou, Ning; Huang, Zhenyu

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

180

Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) | U.S. DOE Office  

Office of Science (SC) Website

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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181

Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) Homepage | U.S. DOE Office of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearch Highlights MediaFuelAbout Us >Portal

182

Barbara Helland Advanced Scientific Computing Research NERSC-HEP Requirements Review  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground High Energy PhysicsInnovationBarbara7-28,

183

COMPUTATIONAL STEERING: TOWARDS ADVANCED INTERACTIVE HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING IN ENGINEERING SCIENCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Key-words: Computational steering, high-performance computing, interactive simulation, virtual reality, CFD Computational Science and Engineering faces a continuous increase of speed of computers and availability of very fast networks. Yet, it seems that some opportunities offered by these ongoing developments are only used to a fraction for numerical simulation. Moreover, despite new possibilities from computer visualization, virtual or augmented reality and collaboration models, most available engineering software still follows the classical way of a strict separation of preprocessing, computing and postprocessing. This paper will first identify some of the major obstructions of an interactive computation for complex simulation tasks in engineering sciences. These are especially found in traditional software structures, in the definition of geometric models and boundary conditions and in the often still very tedious work of generating computational meshes. It then presents a generic approach for collaborative computational steering, where pre- and postprocessing is integrated with high

Ernst Rank; Andr Borrmann; Er Dster; Christoph Van Treeck; Petra Wenisch

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODEL FOR THREE-PHASE SLURRY REACTORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the second year of the project, the Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for analyzing three-phase slurry flows in a bubble column is further developed. The approach uses an Eulerian analysis of liquid flows in the bubble column, and makes use of the Lagrangian trajectory analysis for the bubbles and particle motions. An experimental set for studying a two-dimensional bubble column is also developed. The operation of the bubble column is being tested and diagnostic methodology for quantitative measurements is being developed. An Eulerian computational model for the flow condition in the two-dimensional bubble column is also being developed. The liquid and bubble motions are being analyzed and the results are being compared with the experimental setup. Solid-fluid mixture flows in ducts and passages at different angle of orientations were analyzed. The model predictions were compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found. Gravity chute flows of solid-liquid mixtures is also being studied. Further progress was also made in developing a thermodynamically consistent model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction in a state of turbulent motion. The balance laws are obtained and the constitutive laws are being developed. Progress was also made in measuring concentration and velocity of particles of different sizes near a wall in a duct flow. The technique of Phase-Doppler anemometry was used in these studies. The general objective of this project is to provide the needed fundamental understanding of three-phase slurry reactors in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquid fuel synthesis. The other main goal is to develop a computational capability for predicting the transport and processing of three-phase coal slurries. The specific objectives are: (1) To develop a thermodynamically consistent rate-dependent anisotropic model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction for application to coal liquefaction. Also establish the material parameters of the model. (2) To provide experimental data for phasic fluctuation and mean velocities, as well as the solid volume fraction in the shear flow devices. (3) To develop an accurate computational capability incorporating the new rate-dependent and anisotropic model for analyzing reacting and nonreacting slurry flows, and to solve a number of technologically important problems related to Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquid fuel production processes. (4) To verify the validity of the developed model by comparing the predicted results with the performed and the available experimental data under idealized conditions.

Goodarz Ahmadi

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies UMIACS' programs are led by distinguished faculty, many of whom hold joint  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by distinguished faculty, many of whom hold joint appointments in Computer Science, Electrical and Computer, and over 400 workstations and PCs. · UMIACS' environment is enriched by a strong outreach program including, operating systems, and scientific computing Sponsored Research ANNUAL RESEARCH FUNDING $15 MILLION 3 #12

Gruner, Daniel S.

186

High performance computing and communications: Advancing the frontiers of information technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, which supplements the President`s Fiscal Year 1997 Budget, describes the interagency High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program. The HPCC Program will celebrate its fifth anniversary in October 1996 with an impressive array of accomplishments to its credit. Over its five-year history, the HPCC Program has focused on developing high performance computing and communications technologies that can be applied to computation-intensive applications. Major highlights for FY 1996: (1) High performance computing systems enable practical solutions to complex problems with accuracies not possible five years ago; (2) HPCC-funded research in very large scale networking techniques has been instrumental in the evolution of the Internet, which continues exponential growth in size, speed, and availability of information; (3) The combination of hardware capability measured in gigaflop/s, networking technology measured in gigabit/s, and new computational science techniques for modeling phenomena has demonstrated that very large scale accurate scientific calculations can be executed across heterogeneous parallel processing systems located thousands of miles apart; (4) Federal investments in HPCC software R and D support researchers who pioneered the development of parallel languages and compilers, high performance mathematical, engineering, and scientific libraries, and software tools--technologies that allow scientists to use powerful parallel systems to focus on Federal agency mission applications; and (5) HPCC support for virtual environments has enabled the development of immersive technologies, where researchers can explore and manipulate multi-dimensional scientific and engineering problems. Educational programs fostered by the HPCC Program have brought into classrooms new science and engineering curricula designed to teach computational science. This document contains a small sample of the significant HPCC Program accomplishments in FY 1996.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

187

CS 570: Advanced Computer Architecture To learn the science and art of selecting and interconnecting hardware components to create a computer that  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CS 570: Advanced Computer Architecture Objectives To learn the science and art of selecting. Course Materials Text John L. Hennessy, David A. Patterson. Computer Architecture: A Quantitative-13-185644-8. Online Resources Computer Architecture Web site. Syllabus Introduction Computer platforms and models

Heller, Barbara

188

ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODEL FOR THREE-PHASE SLURRY REACTORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the first year of the project, solid-fluid mixture flows in ducts and passages at different angle of orientations were analyzed. The model predictions are compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found. Progress was also made in analyzing the gravity chute flows of solid-liquid mixtures. An Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for analyzing three-phase slurry flows in a bubble column is being developed. The approach uses an Eulerian analysis of gas liquid flows in the bubble column, and makes use of the Lagrangian particle tracking procedure to analyze the particle motions. Progress was also made in developing a rate dependent thermodynamically consistent model for multiphase slurry flows in a state of turbulent motion. The new model includes the effect of phasic interactions and leads to anisotropic effective phasic stress tensors. Progress was also made in measuring concentration and velocity of particles of different sizes near a wall in a duct flow. The formulation of a thermodynamically consistent model for chemically active multiphase solid-fluid flows in a turbulent state of motion was also initiated. The general objective of this project is to provide the needed fundamental understanding of three-phase slurry reactors in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquid fuel synthesis. The other main goal is to develop a computational capability for predicting the transport and processing of three-phase coal slurries. The specific objectives are: (1) To develop a thermodynamically consistent rate-dependent anisotropic model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction for application to coal liquefaction. Also to establish the material parameters of the model. (2) To provide experimental data for phasic fluctuation and mean velocities, as well as the solid volume fraction in the shear flow devices. (3) To develop an accurate computational capability incorporating the new rate-dependent and anisotropic model for analyzing reacting and nonreacting slurry flows, and to solve a number of technologically important problems related to Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquid fuel production processes. (4) To verify the validity of the developed model by comparing the predicted results with the performed and the available experimental data under idealized conditions.

Goodarz Ahmadi

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Advances in Electrical and Computer Engineering Abstract--The linear, binary, block codes with no equally  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advances in Electrical and Computer Engineering 1 Abstract-- The linear, binary, block codes block codes is proposed. These codes are seen as sources with memory and the information quantities H(S,X), H(S), H(X), H(X|S), H(S|X), I(S,X) are derived. On the base of these quantities, the code

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

190

APRIL 1998 THE LEADING EDGE 461 ncreases in computing power and advances in mathe-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

optimization theory have combined to produce a new generation of algorithms that can invert geophysical dataAPRIL 1998 THE LEADING EDGE 461 ncreases in computing power and advances in mathe- matical. In this short article, we illustrate both the practicability of inverting geophysical data and the impor- tant

Oldenburg, Douglas W.

191

THE CENTER FOR INTEGRATIVE BIOMEDICAL COMPUTING: ADVANCING BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE WITH OPEN SOURCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE CENTER FOR INTEGRATIVE BIOMEDICAL COMPUTING: ADVANCING BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE WITH OPEN SOURCE the new Center for Integrative Biomedical Com- puting (CIBC) whose mission is to produce high performance im- age analysis, simulation, and visualization software in support of biomedical research. Software

Utah, University of

192

ADVANCED METHODS FOR THE COMPUTATION OF PARTICLE BEAM TRANSPORT AND THE COMPUTATION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS AND MULTIPARTICLE PHENOMENA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1980, under the grant DEFG02-96ER40949, the Department of Energy has supported the educational and research work of the University of Maryland Dynamical Systems and Accelerator Theory (DSAT) Group. The primary focus of this educational/research group has been on the computation and analysis of charged-particle beam transport using Lie algebraic methods, and on advanced methods for the computation of electromagnetic fields and multiparticle phenomena. This Final Report summarizes the accomplishments of the DSAT Group from its inception in 1980 through its end in 2011.

Alex J. Dragt

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODEL FOR THREE-PHASE SLURRY REACTORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project, an Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for analyzing three-phase slurry flows in a bubble column was developed. The approach used an Eulerian analysis of liquid flows in the bubble column, and made use of the Lagrangian trajectory analysis for the bubbles and particle motions. The bubble-bubble and particle-particle collisions are included the model. The model predictions are compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found An experimental setup for studying two-dimensional bubble columns was developed. The multiphase flow conditions in the bubble column were measured using optical image processing and Particle Image Velocimetry techniques (PIV). A simple shear flow device for bubble motion in a constant shear flow field was also developed. The flow conditions in simple shear flow device were studied using PIV method. Concentration and velocity of particles of different sizes near a wall in a duct flow was also measured. The technique of Phase-Doppler anemometry was used in these studies. An Eulerian volume of fluid (VOF) computational model for the flow condition in the two-dimensional bubble column was also developed. The liquid and bubble motions were analyzed and the results were compared with observed flow patterns in the experimental setup. Solid-fluid mixture flows in ducts and passages at different angle of orientations were also analyzed. The model predictions were compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found. Gravity chute flows of solid-liquid mixtures were also studied. The simulation results were compared with the experimental data and discussed A thermodynamically consistent model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction in a state of turbulent motion was developed. The balance laws were obtained and the constitutive laws established.

Goodarz Ahmadi

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Scienti#12;c Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC-3) Partnership Project Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Applying Computationally Efficient Schemes for BioGeochemical Cycles ACES4BGC Project is advancing the predictive capabilities of Earth System Models (ESMs) by reducing two of the largest sources of uncertainty, aerosols and biospheric feedbacks, with a highly e#14;cient computational approach. In particular, this project is implementing and optimizing new computationally e#14;cient tracer advection algorithms for large numbers of tracer species; adding important biogeochemical interactions between the atmosphere, land, and ocean models; and applying uncertainty quanti#12;cation (UQ) techniques to constrain process parameters and evaluate uncertainties in feedbacks between biogeochemical cycles and the climate system.

Hoffman, Forest M [ORNL; Bochev, Pavel B [SNL; Cameron-Smith, Philip J [LLNL; Easter, Richard C [PNNL; Elliott, Scott M [LANL; Ghan, Steven J [PNNL; Liu, Xiaohong [formerly PNNL, U. Wyoming; Lowrie, Robert B [LANL; Lucas, Donald D [LLNL; Shrivastava, Manish [PNNL; Singh, Balwinder [PNNL; Tautges, Timothy J [ANL; Taylor, Mark A [SNL; Vertenstein, Mariana [NCAR; Worley, Patrick H [ORNL; and,; Zhang, Kai [PNNL

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

195

Resilient Workflows for Cooperative Design Application of Distributed High-Performance Scientific Computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resilient Workflows for Cooperative Design Application of Distributed High-Performance Scientific-Antoine.Desideri@sophia.inria.fr Abstract--This paper describes an approach to extend process modeling for engineering design applications the traditional fault-tolerance management features provided by the existing hardware and distributed systems

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

196

E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerating scientific computations Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dream beams... : Extreme-scale computing enabling new accelerator technologies for the energy and intensity frontiers W... . Introduction 261 12;U.S. Department of Energy...

197

Advanced Analysis Software Key to New, Energy-Efficient Technologies: Leveraging Scientific and Engineering Know-How to Advance Sources of Renewable Energy  

Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

Supported by funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, other federal agencies, and industry sponsors, Argonne is providing broad-based scientific and engineering expertise to create analytical software tools that will enable the United States to make substantive enhancements in energy efficiency and serve the growing demand for renewable energy....

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

198

High Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High Energy Physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing (HPC) are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the DOE SciDAC program has produced such accelerator-modeling tools, which have beem employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. In this article we discuss the Synergia beam-dynamics framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable of handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. We present the design principles, key physical and numerical models in Synergia and its performance on HPC platforms. Finally, we present the results of Synergia applications for the Fermilab proton source upgrade, known as the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP).

Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

199

Condition monitoring through advanced sensor and computational technology : final report (January 2002 to May 2005).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this joint research project was to develop and demonstrate advanced sensors and computational technology for continuous monitoring of the condition of components, structures, and systems in advanced and next-generation nuclear power plants (NPPs). This project included investigating and adapting several advanced sensor technologies from Korean and US national laboratory research communities, some of which were developed and applied in non-nuclear industries. The project team investigated and developed sophisticated signal processing, noise reduction, and pattern recognition techniques and algorithms. The researchers installed sensors and conducted condition monitoring tests on two test loops, a check valve (an active component) and a piping elbow (a passive component), to demonstrate the feasibility of using advanced sensors and computational technology to achieve the project goal. Acoustic emission (AE) devices, optical fiber sensors, accelerometers, and ultrasonic transducers (UTs) were used to detect mechanical vibratory response of check valve and piping elbow in normal and degraded configurations. Chemical sensors were also installed to monitor the water chemistry in the piping elbow test loop. Analysis results of processed sensor data indicate that it is feasible to differentiate between the normal and degraded (with selected degradation mechanisms) configurations of these two components from the acquired sensor signals, but it is questionable that these methods can reliably identify the level and type of degradation. Additional research and development efforts are needed to refine the differentiation techniques and to reduce the level of uncertainties.

Kim, Jung-Taek (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejon, Korea); Luk, Vincent K.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

ADVANCING THE FUNDAMENTAL UNDERSTANDING AND SCALE-UP OF TRISO FUEL COATERS VIA ADVANCED MEASUREMENT AND COMPUTATIONAL TECHNIQUES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tri-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particle coating is critical for the future use of nuclear energy produced byadvanced gas reactors (AGRs). The fuel kernels are coated using chemical vapor deposition in a spouted fluidized bed. The challenges encountered in operating TRISO fuel coaters are due to the fact that in modern AGRs, such as High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGRs), the acceptable level of defective/failed coated particles is essentially zero. This specification requires processes that produce coated spherical particles with even coatings having extremely low defect fractions. Unfortunately, the scale-up and design of the current processes and coaters have been based on empirical approaches and are operated as?black boxes. Hence, a voluminous amount of experimental development and trial and error work has been conducted. It has been clearly demonstrated that the quality of the coating applied to the fuel kernels is impacted by the hydrodynamics, solids flow field, and flow regime characteristics of the spouted bed coaters, which themselves are influenced by design parameters and operating variables. Further complicating the outlook for future fuel-coating technology and nuclear energy production is the fact that a variety of new concepts will involve fuel kernels of different sizes and with compositions of different densities. Therefore, without a fundamental understanding the underlying phenomena of the spouted bed TRISO coater, a significant amount of effort is required for production of each type of particle with a significant risk of not meeting the specifications. This difficulty will significantly and negatively impact the applications of AGRs for power generation and cause further challenges to them as an alternative source of commercial energy production. Accordingly, the proposed work seeks to overcome such hurdles and advance the scale-up, design, and performance of TRISO fuel particle spouted bed coaters. The overall objectives of the proposed work are to advance the fundamental understanding of the hydrodynamics by systematically investigating the effect of design and operating variables, to evaluate the reported dimensionless groups as scaling factors, and to establish a reliable scale-up methodology for the TRISO fuel particle spouted bed coaters based on hydrodynamic similarity via advanced measurement and computational techniques. An additional objective is to develop an on-line non-invasive measurement technique based on gamma ray densitometry (i.e. Nuclear Gauge Densitometry) that can be installed and used for coater process monitoring to ensure proper performance and operation and to facilitate the developed scale-up methodology. To achieve the objectives set for the project, the work will use optical probes and gamma ray computed tomography (CT) (for the measurements of solids/voidage holdup cross-sectional distribution and radial profiles along the bed height, spouted diameter, and fountain height) and radioactive particle tracking (RPT) (for the measurements of the 3D solids flow field, velocity, turbulent parameters, circulation time, solids lagrangian trajectories, and many other of spouted bed related hydrodynamic parameters). In addition, gas dynamic measurement techniques and pressure transducers will be utilized to complement the obtained information. The measurements obtained by these techniques will be used as benchmark data to evaluate and validate the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models (two fluid model or discrete particle model) and their closures. The validated CFD models and closures will be used to facilitate the developed methodology for scale-up, design and hydrodynamic similarity. Successful execution of this work and the proposed tasks will advance the fundamental understanding of the coater flow field and quantify it for proper and safe design, scale-up, and performance. Such achievements will overcome the barriers to AGR applications and will help assure that the US maintains nuclear energy as a feasible option to meet the nation????

Biswas, Pratim; Al-Dahhan, Muthanna

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

THE RELATIVE PERFORMANCES OF SEVERAL SCIENTIFIC COMPUTERS FOR A LIQUID MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MFLOPS 648 Atoms MFLOPS T Computer Tp VAX 11/70 CDC 7600CRAY-1 CRAY-1* VAX-FPSAP TTp DEC VAX 11/70 The VAX used, is located at NRCC in

Ceperley, D.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors. ComPASS is in the first year of executing its plan to develop the next-generation HPC accelerator modeling tools. ComPASS aims to develop an integrated simulation environment that will utilize existing and new accelerator physics modules with petascale capabilities, by employing modern computing and solver technologies. The ComPASS vision is to deliver to accelerator scientists a virtual accelerator and virtual prototyping modeling environment, with the necessary multiphysics, multiscale capabilities. The plan for this development includes delivering accelerator modeling applications appropriate for each stage of the ComPASS software evolution. Such applications are already being used to address challenging problems in accelerator design and optimization. The ComPASS organization for software development and applications accounts for the natural domain areas (beam dynamics, electromagnetics, and advanced acceleration), and all areas depend on the enabling technologies activities, such as solvers and component technology, to deliver the desired performance and integrated simulation environment. The ComPASS applications focus on computationally challenging problems important for design or performance optimization to all major HEP, NP, and BES accelerator facilities. With the cost and complexity of particle accelerators rising, the use of computation to optimize their designs and find improved operating regimes becomes essential, potentially leading to significant cost savings with modest investment.

Spentzouris, P.; /Fermilab; Cary, J.; /Tech-X, Boulder; McInnes, L.C.; /Argonne; Mori, W.; /UCLA; Ng, C.; /SLAC; Ng, E.; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

203

Construction of Blaze at the University of Illinois at Chicago: A Shared, High-Performance, Visual Computer for Next-Generation Cyberinfrastructure-Accelerated Scientific, Engineering, Medical and Public Policy Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Blaze high-performance visual computing system serves the high-performance computing research and education needs of University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). Blaze consists of a state-of-the-art, networked, computer cluster and ultra-high-resolution visualization system called CAVE2(TM) that is currently not available anywhere in Illinois. This system is connected via a high-speed 100-Gigabit network to the State of Illinois' I-WIRE optical network, as well as to national and international high speed networks, such as the Internet2, and the Global Lambda Integrated Facility. This enables Blaze to serve as an on-ramp to national cyberinfrastructure, such as the National Science Foundations Blue Waters petascale computer at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the Department of Energys Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) at Argonne National Laboratory. DOE award # DE-SC005067, leveraged with NSF award #CNS-0959053 for Development of the Next-Generation CAVE Virtual Environment (NG-CAVE), enabled us to create a first-of-its-kind high-performance visual computing system. The UIC Electronic Visualization Laboratory (EVL) worked with two U.S. companies to advance their commercial products and maintain U.S. leadership in the global information technology economy. New applications are being enabled with the CAVE2/Blaze visual computing system that is advancing scientific research and education in the U.S. and globally, and help train the next-generation workforce.

Brown, Maxine D. [Acting Director, EVL; Leigh, Jason [PI

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Advanced methods for the computation of particle beam transport and the computation of electromagnetic fields and beam-cavity interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Maryland Dynamical Systems and Accelerator Theory Group carries out research in two broad areas: the computation of charged particle beam transport using Lie algebraic methods and advanced methods for the computation of electromagnetic fields and beam-cavity interactions. Important improvements in the state of the art are believed to be possible in both of these areas. In addition, applications of these methods are made to problems of current interest in accelerator physics including the theoretical performance of present and proposed high energy machines. The Lie algebraic method of computing and analyzing beam transport handles both linear and nonlinear beam elements. Tests show this method to be superior to the earlier matrix or numerical integration methods. It has wide application to many areas including accelerator physics, intense particle beams, ion microprobes, high resolution electron microscopy, and light optics. With regard to the area of electromagnetic fields and beam cavity interactions, work is carried out on the theory of beam breakup in single pulses. Work is also done on the analysis of the high behavior of longitudinal and transverse coupling impendances, including the examination of methods which may be used to measure these impedances. Finally, work is performed on the electromagnetic analysis of coupled cavities and on the coupling of cavities to waveguides.

Dragt, A.J.; Gluckstern, R.L.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Eighth SIAM conference on parallel processing for scientific computing: Final program and abstracts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This SIAM conference is the premier forum for developments in parallel numerical algorithms, a field that has seen very lively and fruitful developments over the past decade, and whose health is still robust. Themes for this conference were: combinatorial optimization; data-parallel languages; large-scale parallel applications; message-passing; molecular modeling; parallel I/O; parallel libraries; parallel software tools; parallel compilers; particle simulations; problem-solving environments; and sparse matrix computations.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

Development of high performance scientific components for interoperability of computing packages  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three major high performance quantum chemistry computational packages, NWChem, GAMESS and MPQC have been developed by different research efforts following different design patterns. The goal is to achieve interoperability among these packages by overcoming the challenges caused by the different communication patterns and software design of each of these packages. A chemistry algorithm is hard to develop as well as being a time consuming process; integration of large quantum chemistry packages will allow resource sharing and thus avoid reinvention of the wheel. Creating connections between these incompatible packages is the major motivation of the proposed work. This interoperability is achieved by bringing the benefits of Component Based Software Engineering through a plug-and-play component framework called Common Component Architecture (CCA). In this thesis, I present a strategy and process used for interfacing two widely used and important computational chemistry methodologies: Quantum Mechanics and Molecular Mechanics. To show the feasibility of the proposed approach the Tuning and Analysis Utility (TAU) has been coupled with NWChem code and its CCA components. Results show that the overhead is negligible when compared to the ease and potential of organizing and coping with large-scale software applications.

Gulabani, Teena Pratap

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

DISC: A System for Distributed Data Intensive Scientific Computing George Kola, Tevfik Kosar, Jaime Frey, Miron Livny  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The scientific community has been collaborating to solve hard problems, such as finding the Higgs Boson [5

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

208

The International Symposium on Numeric and Symbolic Algorithms for Scientific Computing, SYNASC, is an annual event in Timioara, Romania. It has been organized by the West  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

years, an international forum for presenting their research, as well as by facilitating contacts between of the symposium were the plenary talks given by a distinguished set of international researchers: James DavenportPreface The International Symposium on Numeric and Symbolic Algorithms for Scientific Computing

Watt, Stephen M.

209

June 6, 2007 Large-Scale Scientific Computations'07, Sozopol, Bulgaria -p. 1/29 Multiscale Modeling and Simulation of Fluid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in porous media (soil, porous rocks, etc.) x Elasticity problems in composite materials (adobe, concrete/29 Presentation outline s Brief overview of upscaling methods in deformable porous media s The Fluid upscaling of flow in deformable porous media #12;June 6, 2007 Large-Scale Scientific Computations'07

Popov, Peter

210

Advances  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the BuildingInnovation PortalScienceScripting forAdvances in

211

Advanced computational tools for optimization and uncertainty quantification of carbon capture processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced multi-scale modeling and simulation has the potential to dramatically reduce development time, resulting in considerable cost savings. The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) is a partnership among national laboratories, industry and universities that is developing, demonstrating, and deploying a suite of multi-scale modeling and simulation tools. One significant computational tool is FOQUS, a Framework for Optimization and Quantification of Uncertainty and Sensitivity, which enables basic data submodels, including thermodynamics and kinetics, to be used within detailed process models to rapidly synthesize and optimize a process and determine the level of uncertainty associated with the resulting process. The overall approach of CCSI is described with a more detailed discussion of FOQUS and its application to carbon capture systems.

Miller, David C. [U.S. DOE; Ng, Brenda [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Eslick, John [Carnegie Mellon University

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Introduction to Scientific Computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quotes >>> s = "hello world" >>> print s hello world # single quotes also work >>> s = `hello world' >>> print s hello world >>> s = "12345" >>> len(s) 5 CREATING STRINGS # concatenating two strings >>> "hello " + "world" `hello world' # repeating a string >>> "hello " * 3 `hello hello hello ' STRING OPERATIONS STRING

Haule, Kristjan

213

Edison Electrifies Scientific Computing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4: Networking for the Future of DOEEarthAlamosEdison

214

Master of Science project in advanced computational material physics Electrical conductivity of the correlated metal LaNiO3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Master of Science project in advanced computational material physics Electrical conductivity of the correlated metal LaNiO3 Lanthanum nickelate, LaNiO3, belongs to the class of materials named strongly correlated metals. Several properties of these materials can not be understood based on standard

Hellsing, Bo

215

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced computational testing Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering ; Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 6 Prof. Michael Melliar-Smith COMPUTER ENGINEERING GROUP Summary: , Design Automation & Test Computer Networks...

216

Computational methods for stealth design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review is presented of the utilization of computer models for stealth design toward the ultimate goal of designing and fielding an aircraft that remains undetected at any altitude and any range. Attention is given to the advancements achieved in computational tools and their utilization. Consideration is given to the development of supercomputers for large-scale scientific computing and the development of high-fidelity, 3D, radar-signature-prediction tools for complex shapes with nonmetallic and radar-penetrable materials.

Cable, V.P. (Lockheed Advanced Development Co., Sunland, CA (United States))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Computational Physics on Graphics Processing Units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of graphics processing units for scientific computations is an emerging strategy that can significantly speed up various different algorithms. In this review, we discuss advances made in the field of computational physics, focusing on classical molecular dynamics, and on quantum simulations for electronic structure calculations using the density functional theory, wave function techniques, and quantum field theory.

Ari Harju; Topi Siro; Filippo Federici-Canova; Samuli Hakala; Teemu Rantalaiho

2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

218

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced computer techniques Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry) related to using computers to model the structure... , and high-performance computing resources to apply techniques discussed in class. Prerequisites:...

219

ENHANCING THE ATOMIC-LEVEL UNDERSTANDING OF CO2 MINERAL SEQUESTRATION MECHANISMS VIA ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODELING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fossil fuels currently provide 85% of the world's energy needs, with the majority coming from coal, due to its low cost, wide availability, and high energy content. The extensive use of coal-fired power assumes that the resulting CO2 emissions can be vented to the atmosphere. However, exponentially increasing atmospheric CO2 levels have brought this assumption under critical review. Over the last decade, this discussion has evolved from whether exponentially increasing anthropogenic CO2 emissions will adversely affect the global environment, to the timing and magnitude of their impact. A variety of sequestration technologies are being explored to mitigate CO2 emissions. These technologies must be both environmentally benign and economically viable. Mineral carbonation is an attractive candidate technology as it disposes of CO2 as geologically stable, environmentally benign mineral carbonates, clearly satisfying the first criteria. The primary challenge for mineral carbonation is cost-competitive process development. CO2 mineral sequestration--the conversion of stationary-source CO2 emissions into mineral carbonates (e.g., magnesium and calcium carbonate, MgCO3 and CaCO3)--has recently emerged as one of the most promising sequestration options, providing permanent CO2 disposal, rather than storage. In this approach a magnesium-bearing feedstock mineral (typically serpentine or olivine; available in vast quantities globally) is specially processed and allowed to react with CO2 under controlled conditions. This produces a mineral carbonate which (1) is environmentally benign, (2) already exists in nature in quantities far exceeding those that could result from carbonating the world's known fossil fuel reserves, and (3) is stable on a geological time scale. Minimizing the process cost via optimization of the reaction rate and degree of completion is the remaining challenge. As members of the DOE/NETL managed National Mineral Sequestration Working Group we have already significantly improved our understanding of mineral carbonation. Group members at the Albany Research Center have recently shown that carbonation of olivine and serpentine, which naturally occurs over geological time (i.e., 100,000s of years), can be accelerated to near completion in hours. Further process refinement will require a synergetic science/engineering approach that emphasizes simultaneous investigation of both thermodynamic processes and the detailed microscopic, atomic-level mechanisms that govern carbonation kinetics. Our previously funded Phase I Innovative Concepts project demonstrated the value of advanced quantum-mechanical modeling as a complementary tool in bridging important gaps in our understanding of the atomic/molecular structure and reaction mechanisms that govern CO2 mineral sequestration reaction processes for the model Mg-rich lamellar hydroxide feedstock material Mg(OH)2. In the present simulation project, improved techniques and more efficient computational schemes have allowed us to expand and augment these capabilities and explore more complex Mg-rich, lamellar hydroxide-based feedstock materials, including the serpentine-based minerals. These feedstock materials are being actively investigated due to their wide availability, and low-cost CO2 mineral sequestration potential. Cutting-edge first principles quantum chemical, computational solid-state and materials simulation methodology studies proposed herein, have been strategically integrated with our new DOE supported (ASU-Argonne National Laboratory) project to investigate the mechanisms that govern mineral feedstock heat-treatment and aqueous/fluid-phase serpentine mineral carbonation in situ. This unified, synergetic theoretical and experimental approach has provided a deeper understanding of the key reaction mechanisms than either individual approach can alone. We used ab initio techniques to significantly advance our understanding of atomic-level processes at the solid/solution interface by elucidating the origin of vibrational, electronic, x-ray and electron energy loss sp

A.V.G. Chizmeshya; M.J. McKelvy; G.H. Wolf; R.W. Carpenter; D.A. Gormley; J.R. Diefenbacher; R. Marzke

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Biomedical Computing and Visualization Chris R. Johnson and David M. Weinstein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomedical Computing and Visualization Chris R. Johnson and David M. Weinstein Scientific Computing, advanced techniques in biomedical computing, imaging, and visualization are changing the face of biology and medicine in both research and clinical practice. The goals of biomedical computing, imaging

Utah, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Grand Challenges of Advanced Computing for Energy Innovation Report from the Workshop Held July 31-August 2, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 31-August 2 of 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) held a workshop entitled Grand Challenges of Advanced Computing for Energy Innovation. This workshop built on three earlier workshops that clearly identified the potential for the Department and its national laboratories to enable energy innovation. The specific goal of the workshop was to identify the key challenges that the nation must overcome to apply the full benefit of taxpayer-funded advanced computing technologies to U.S. energy innovation in the ways that the country produces, moves, stores, and uses energy. Perhaps more importantly, the workshop also developed a set of recommendations to help the Department overcome those challenges. These recommendations provide an action plan for what the Department can do in the coming years to improve the nations energy future.

Larzelere, Alex R.; Ashby, Steven F.; Christensen, Dana C.; Crawford, Dona L.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; John, Grosh; Stults, B. Ray; Lee, Steven L.; Hammond, Steven W.; Grover, Benjamin T.; Neely, Rob; Dudney, Lee Ann; Goldstein, Noah C.; Wells, Jack; Peltz, Jim

2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

222

Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Working with INL Community Outreach Visitor Information Calendar of Events ATR National Scientific User Facility Center for Advanced Energy Studies Light Water Reactor...

223

Advanced Fuel Cycle Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Working with INL Community Outreach Visitor Information Calendar of Events ATR National Scientific User Facility Center for Advanced Energy Studies Light Water Reactor...

224

Providing the Scientific Foundations for Environmental Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waste and process con- ditions enables decisions around new treatment operations. These decisions could at Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). Using a combination of bench-, engineering-, and pilotProviding the Scientific Foundations for Environmental Management #12;Advancements in scientific

225

Accelerating scientific discovery : 2007 annual report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a gateway for scientific discovery, the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) works hand in hand with the world's best computational scientists to advance research in a diverse span of scientific domains, ranging from chemistry, applied mathematics, and materials science to engineering physics and life sciences. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science, researchers are using the IBM Blue Gene/L supercomputer at the ALCF to study and explore key scientific problems that underlie important challenges facing our society. For instance, a research team at the University of California-San Diego/ SDSC is studying the molecular basis of Parkinson's disease. The researchers plan to use the knowledge they gain to discover new drugs to treat the disease and to identify risk factors for other diseases that are equally prevalent. Likewise, scientists from Pratt & Whitney are using the Blue Gene to understand the complex processes within aircraft engines. Expanding our understanding of jet engine combustors is the secret to improved fuel efficiency and reduced emissions. Lessons learned from the scientific simulations of jet engine combustors have already led Pratt & Whitney to newer designs with unprecedented reductions in emissions, noise, and cost of ownership. ALCF staff members provide in-depth expertise and assistance to those using the Blue Gene/L and optimizing user applications. Both the Catalyst and Applications Performance Engineering and Data Analytics (APEDA) teams support the users projects. In addition to working with scientists running experiments on the Blue Gene/L, we have become a nexus for the broader global community. In partnership with the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory, we have created an environment where the world's most challenging computational science problems can be addressed. Our expertise in high-end scientific computing enables us to provide guidance for applications that are transitioning to petascale as well as to produce software that facilitates their development, such as the MPICH library, which provides a portable and efficient implementation of the MPI standard--the prevalent programming model for large-scale scientific applications--and the PETSc toolkit that provides a programming paradigm that eases the development of many scientific applications on high-end computers.

Beckman, P.; Dave, P.; Drugan, C.

2008-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

226

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced computation languages Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

; Materials Science 35 Professional Accomplishments and University Service of Marvin Solomon Summary: of computer science, publishing over 40 papers in programming languages,...

227

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced computational simulation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in such a way that it cannot be larger than the minimum timestamp... the simulation model into the hosts was proposed, where computation and communication workload of...

228

Mobile and Stationary Computer Vision based Traffic Surveillance Techniques for Advanced ITS Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between the loop data and mobile data. Bibliography [1] M.nd Workwhop on Perception of Mobile Agents, CVPR99, pp. 82-OF CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Mobile and Stationary Computer

Cao, Meng

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Report of the Snowmass 2013 Computing Frontier working group on Lattice Field Theory -- Lattice field theory for the energy and intensity frontiers: Scientific goals and computing needs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is the report of the Computing Frontier working group on Lattice Field Theory prepared for the proceedings of the 2013 Community Summer Study ("Snowmass"). We present the future computing needs and plans of the U.S. lattice gauge theory community and argue that continued support of the U.S. (and worldwide) lattice-QCD effort is essential to fully capitalize on the enormous investment in the high-energy physics experimental program. We first summarize the dramatic progress of numerical lattice-QCD simulations in the past decade, with some emphasis on calculations carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Lattice-QCD Collaboration, and describe a broad program of lattice-QCD calculations that will be relevant for future experiments at the intensity and energy frontiers. We then present details of the computational hardware and software resources needed to undertake these calculations.

T. Blum; R. S. Van de Water; D. Holmgren; R. Brower; S. Catterall; N. Christ; A. Kronfeld; J. Kuti; P. Mackenzie; E. T. Neil; S. R. Sharpe; R. Sugar

2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

230

Development of Computational Approaches for Simulation and Advanced Controls for Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the results of the project through September 2009. The Phase I project has recently been extended from September 2009 to March 2011. The project extension will begin work on Chemical Looping (CL) Prototype modeling and advanced control design exploration in preparation for a scale-up phase. The results to date include: successful development of dual loop chemical looping process models and dynamic simulation software tools, development and test of several advanced control concepts and applications for Chemical Looping transport control and investigation of several sensor concepts and establishment of two feasible sensor candidates recommended for further prototype development and controls integration. There are three sections in this summary and conclusions. Section 1 presents the project scope and objectives. Section 2 highlights the detailed accomplishments by project task area. Section 3 provides conclusions to date and recommendations for future work.

Joshi, Abhinaya; Lou, Xinsheng; Neuschaefer, Carl; Chaudry, Majid; Quinn, Joseph

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

231

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences: Target 2017  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computing center for the DOE Office of Science, serving approximately 4,500 users working on some 650 projects that involve nearly 600 codes in a wide variety of scientific disciplines. In March 2013, NERSC, DOE?s Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOE?s Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) held a review to characterize High Performance Computing (HPC) and storage requirements for FES research through 2017. This report is the result.

Gerber, Richard

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

232

An Advanced Computational Scheme for the Optimization of 2D Radial Reflectors in Pressurized Water Reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents a computational scheme for the determination of equivalent 2D multi-group heterogeneous reflectors in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The proposed strategy is to define a full-core calculation consistent with a reference lattice code calculation such as the Method Of Characteristics (MOC) as implemented in APOLLO2 lattice code. The computational scheme presented here relies on the data assimilation module known as "Assimilation de donn\\'{e}es et Aide \\`{a} l'Optimisation (ADAO)" of the SALOME platform developed at \\'{E}lectricit\\'{e} De France (EDF), coupled with the full-core code COCAGNE and with the lattice code APOLLO2. A first validation of the computational scheme is made using the OPTEX reflector model developed at \\'{E}cole Polytechnique de Montr\\'{e}al (EPM). As a result, we obtain 2D multi-group, spatially heterogeneous 2D reflectors, using both diffusion or $\\text{SP}_{\\text{N}}$ operators. We observe important improvements of the power discrepancies distribution over the core when using reflectors computed with the proposed computational scheme, and the $\\text{SP}_{\\text{N}}$ operator enables additional improvements.

Thomas Clerc; Alain Hbert; Hadrien Leroyer; Jean-Philippe Argaud; Bertrand Bouriquet; Aglique Ponot

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

233

A training program for scientific supercomputing users  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is need for a mechanism to transfer supercomputing technology into the hands of scientists and engineers in such a way that they will acquire a foundation of knowledge that will permit integration of supercomputing as a tool in their research. Most computing center training emphasizes computer-specific information about how to use a particular computer system; most academic programs teach concepts to computer scientists. Only a few brief courses and new programs are designed for computational scientists. This paper describes an eleven-week training program aimed principally at graduate and postdoctoral students in computationally-intensive fields. The program is designed to balance the specificity of computing center courses, the abstractness of computer science courses, and the personal contact of traditional apprentice approaches. It is based on the experience of computer scientists and computational scientists, and consists of seminars and clinics given by many visiting and local faculty. It covers a variety of supercomputing concepts, issues, and practices related to architecture, operating systems, software design, numerical considerations, code optimization, graphics, communications, and networks. Its research component encourages understanding of scientific computing and supercomputer hardware issues. Flexibility in thinking about computing needs is emphasized by the use of several different supercomputer architectures, such as the Cray X/MP48 at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IBM 3090 600E/VF at the Cornell National Supercomputer Facility, and Alliant FX/8 at the Advanced Computing Research Facility at Argonne National Laboratory. 11 refs., 6 tabs.

Hanson, F.; Moher, T.; Sabelli, N.; Solem, A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Commnity Petascale Project for Accelerator Science And Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators And Accelerator Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors.

Spentzouris, Panagiotis; /Fermilab; Cary, John; /Tech-X, Boulder; Mcinnes, Lois Curfman; /Argonne; Mori, Warren; /UCLA; Ng, Cho; /SLAC; Ng, Esmond; Ryne, Robert; /LBL, Berkeley

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

235

Scientific Visualization, Seeing the Unseeable  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

June 24, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Scientific visualization transforms abstract data into readily comprehensible images, provide a vehicle for "seeing the unseeable," and play a central role in bo... June 24, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Scientific visualization transforms abstract data into readily comprehensible images, provide a vehicle for "seeing the unseeable," and play a central role in both experimental and computational sciences. Wes Bethel, who heads the Scientific Visualization Group in the Computational Research Division, presents an overview of visualization and computer graphics, current research challenges, and future directions for the field.

LBNL

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

An Advanced Computational Scheme for the Optimization of 2D Radial Reflectors in Pressurized Water Reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents a computational scheme for the determination of equivalent 2D multi-group heterogeneous reflectors in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The proposed strategy is to define a full-core calculation consistent with a reference lattice code calculation such as the Method Of Characteristics (MOC) as implemented in APOLLO2 lattice code. The computational scheme presented here relies on the data assimilation module known as "Assimilation de donn\\'{e}es et Aide \\`{a} l'Optimisation (ADAO)" of the SALOME platform developed at \\'{E}lectricit\\'{e} De France (EDF), coupled with the full-core code COCAGNE and with the lattice code APOLLO2. A first validation of the computational scheme is made using the OPTEX reflector model developed at \\'{E}cole Polytechnique de Montr\\'{e}al (EPM). As a result, we obtain 2D multi-group, spatially heterogeneous 2D reflectors, using both diffusion or $\\text{SP}_{\\text{N}}$ operators. We observe important improvements of the power discrepancies distribution over the cor...

Clerc, Thomas; Leroyer, Hadrien; Argaud, Jean-Philippe; Bouriquet, Bertrand; Ponot, Aglique

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Development of Computational Capabilities to Predict the Corrosion Wastage of Boiler Tubes in Advanced Combustion Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive corrosion research project consisting of pilot-scale combustion testing and long-term laboratory corrosion study has been successfully performed. A pilot-scale combustion facility available at Brigham Young University was selected and modified to enable burning of pulverized coals under the operating conditions typical for advanced coal-fired utility boilers. Eight United States (U.S.) coals were selected for this investigation, with the test conditions for all coals set to have the same heat input to the combustor. In addition, the air/fuel stoichiometric ratio was controlled so that staged combustion was established, with the stoichiometric ratio maintained at 0.85 in the burner zone and 1.15 in the burnout zone. The burner zone represented the lower furnace of utility boilers, while the burnout zone mimicked the upper furnace areas adjacent to the superheaters and reheaters. From this staged combustion, approximately 3% excess oxygen was attained in the combustion gas at the furnace outlet. During each of the pilot-scale combustion tests, extensive online measurements of the flue gas compositions were performed. In addition, deposit samples were collected at the same location for chemical analyses. Such extensive gas and deposit analyses enabled detailed characterization of the actual combustion environments existing at the lower furnace walls under reducing conditions and those adjacent to the superheaters and reheaters under oxidizing conditions in advanced U.S. coal-fired utility boilers. The gas and deposit compositions were then carefully simulated in a series of 1000-hour laboratory corrosion tests, in which the corrosion performances of different commercial candidate alloys and weld overlays were evaluated at various temperatures for advanced boiler systems. Results of this laboratory study led to significant improvement in understanding of the corrosion mechanisms operating on the furnace walls as well as superheaters and reheaters in coal-fired boilers resulting from the coexistence of sulfur and chlorine in the fuel. A new corrosion mechanism, i.e., Active Sulfidation Corrosion Mechanism, has been proposed to account for the accelerated corrosion wastage observed on the furnace walls of utility boilers burning coals containing sulfur and chlorine. In addition, a second corrosion mechanism, i.e., Active Sulfide-to-Oxide Corrosion Mechanism, has been identified to account for the rapid corrosion attack on superheaters and reheaters. Both of the newly discovered corrosion mechanisms involve the formation of iron chloride (FeCl2) vapor from iron sulfide (FeS) and HCl, followed by the decomposition of FeCl2 via self-sustaining cycling reactions. For higher alloys containing sufficient chromium, the attack on superheaters and reheaters is dominated by Hot Corrosion in the presence of a fused salt. Furthermore, two stages of the hot corrosion mechanism have been identified and characterized in detail. The initiation of hot corrosion attack induced by molten sulfate leads to Stage 1 acidic fluxing and re-precipitation of the protective scale formed initially on the deposit-covered alloy surfaces. Once the protective scale is penetrated, Stage 2 Hot Corrosion is initiated, which is dominated by basic fluxing and re-precipitation of the scale in the fused salt. Based on the extensive corrosion information generated from this project, corrosion modeling was performed using non-linear regression analysis. As a result of the modeling efforts, two predictive equations have been formulated, one for furnace walls and the other for superheaters and reheaters. These first-of-the-kind equations can be used to estimate the corrosion rates of boiler tubes based on coal chemistry, alloy compositions, and boiler operating conditions for advanced boiler systems.

Kung, Steven; Rapp, Robert

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

238

Applied Computer Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computing CCS Division Applied Computer Science Applied Computer Science Innovative co-design of applications, algorithms, and architectures in order to enable scientific...

239

AMPS, a real-time mesoscale modeling system, has provided a decade of service for scientific and logistical needs and has helped advance polar numerical weather prediction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and logistical needs and has helped advance polar numerical weather prediction as well as understanding support for the USAP. The concern at the time was the numerical weather prediction (NWP) guidance-time implementation of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF; Skamarock et al. 2008) to support the U

Howat, Ian M.

240

J. Comput. Theor. Nanosci. Vol. 1, No. 1 2004 2004 by American Scientific Publishers 1546-198X/2004/01/0029/011/$17.00+.25 doi:10.1166/jctn.2004.004 29 *Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. Comput. Theor. Nanosci. Vol. 1, No. 1 2004 © 2004 by American Scientific Publishers 1546-198X be addressed. RESEARCHARTICLE JOURNAL OF COMPUTATIONAL AND THEORETICAL NANOSCIENCE Vol. 1. 29­40, 2004

Ghoniem, Nasr M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Advanced Computational Thermal Fluid Physics (CTFP) and Its Assessment for Light Water Reactors and Supercritical Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background: The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of Generation IV reactor systems such as supercritical water reactors (SCWR) for higher efficiency, improved performance and operation, design simplification, enhanced safety and reduced waste and cost. The objective of this Korean / US / laboratory / university collaboration of coupled fundamental computational and experimental studies is to develop the supporting knowledge needed for improved predictive techniques for use in the technology development of Generation IV reactor concepts and their passive safety systems. The present study emphasizes SCWR concepts in the Generation IV program.

D.M. McEligot; K. G. Condie; G. E. McCreery; H. M. McIlroy; R. J. Pink; L.E. Hochreiter; J.D. Jackson; R.H. Pletcher; B.L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J.M. Wallace; J.Y. Yoo; J.S. Lee; S.T. Ro; S.O. Park

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Advanced Computational Methods for Security Constrained Financial Transmission Rights: Structure and Parallelism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Financial Transmission Rights (FTRs) help power market participants reduce price risks associated with transmission congestion. FTRs are issued based on a process of solving a constrained optimization problem with the objective to maximize the FTR social welfare under power flow security constraints. Security constraints for different FTR categories (monthly, seasonal or annual) are usually coupled and the number of constraints increases exponentially with the number of categories. Commercial software for FTR calculation can only provide limited categories of FTRs due to the inherent computational challenges mentioned above. In this paper, a novel non-linear dynamical system (NDS) approach is proposed to solve the optimization problem. The new formulation and performance of the NDS solver is benchmarked against widely used linear programming (LP) solvers like CPLEX and tested on large-scale systems using data from the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). The NDS is demonstrated to outperform the widely used CPLEX algorithms while exhibiting superior scalability. Furthermore, the NDS based solver can be easily parallelized which results in significant computational improvement.

Elbert, Stephen T.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Vlachopoulou, Maria; Rice, Mark J.; Glaesemann, Kurt R.; Zhou, Ning

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

243

Computational physics and applied mathematics capability review June 8-10, 2010 (Advance materials to committee members)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory will review its Computational Physics and Applied Mathematics (CPAM) capabilities in 2010. The goals of capability reviews are to assess the quality of science, technology, and engineering (STE) performed by the capability, evaluate the integration of this capability across the Laboratory and within the scientific community, examine the relevance of this capability to the Laboratory's programs, and provide advice on the current and future directions of this capability. This is the first such review for CPAM, which has a long and unique history at the laboratory, starting from the inception of the Laboratory in 1943. The CPAM capability covers an extremely broad technical area at Los Alamos, encompassing a wide array of disciplines, research topics, and organizations. A vast array of technical disciplines and activities are included in this capability, from general numerical modeling, to coupled mUlti-physics simulations, to detailed domain science activities in mathematics, methods, and algorithms. The CPAM capability involves over 12 different technical divisions and a majority of our programmatic and scientific activities. To make this large scope tractable, the CPAM capability is broken into the following six technical 'themes.' These themes represent technical slices through the CP AM capability and collect critical core competencies of the Laboratory, each of which contributes to the capability (and each of which is divided into multiple additional elements in the detailed descriptions of the themes in subsequent sections): (1) Computational Fluid Dynamics - This theme speaks to the vast array of scientific capabilities for the simulation of fluids under shocks, low-speed flow, and turbulent conditions - which are key, historical, and fundamental strengths of the laboratory; (2) Partial Differential Equations - The technical scope of this theme is the applied mathematics and numerical solution of partial differential equations (broadly defined) in a variety of settings, including particle transport, solvers, and plasma physics; (3) Monte Carlo - Monte Carlo was invented at Los Alamos, and this theme discusses these vitally important methods and their application in everything from particle transport, to condensed matter theory, to biology; (4) Molecular Dynamics - This theme describes the widespread use of molecular dynamics for a variety of important applications, including nuclear energy, materials science, and biological modeling; (5) Discrete Event Simulation - The technical scope of this theme represents a class of complex system evolutions governed by the action of discrete events. Examples include network, communication, vehicle traffic, and epidemiology modeling; and (6) Integrated Codes - This theme discusses integrated applications (comprised of all of the supporting science represented in Themes 1-5) that are of strategic importance to the Laboratory and the nation. The laboratory has in approximately 10 million source lines of code in over 100 different such strategically important applications. Of these themes, four of them will be reviewed during the 2010 review cycle: Themes 1, 2, 3, and 6. Because these capability reviews occur every three years, Themes 4 and 5 will be reviewed in 2013, along with Theme 6 (which will be reviewed during each review, owing to this theme's role as an integrator of the supporting science represented by the other 5 themes). Yearly written status reports will be provided to the Capability Review Committee Chair during off-cycle years.

Lee, Stephen R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Editorial, Workshop on New Directions for Advanced Computer Simulations and Experiments in Fusion-Related Plasma-Surface Interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because plasma-boundary physics encompasses some of the most important unresolved issues for both the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project and future fusion power reactors, there is a strong interest in the fusion community for better understanding and characterization of plasma-wall interactions. Chemical and physical sputtering cause the erosion of the limiters/divertor plates and vacuum vessel walls (made of C, Be and W, for example) and degrade fusion performance by diluting the fusion fuel and excessively cooling the core, while carbon redeposition could produce long-term in-vessel tritium retention, degrading the superior thermo-mechanical properties of the carbon materials. Mixed plasma-facing materials are proposed, requiring optimization for different power and particle flux characteristics. Knowledge of material properties as well as characteristics of the plasma-material interaction are prerequisites for such optimizations. Computational power will soon reach hundreds of teraflops, so that theoretical and plasma science expertise can be matched with new experimental capabilities in order to mount a strong response to these challenges. To begin to address such questions, a Workshop on New Directions for Advanced Computer Simulations and Experiments in Fusion-Related Plasma-Surface Interactions for Fusion (PSIF) was held at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory from 21 to 23 March, 2005. The purpose of the workshop was to bring together researchers in fusion related plasma-wall interactions in order to address these topics and to identify the most needed and promising directions for study, to exchange opinions on the present depth of knowledge of surface properties for the main fusion-related materials, e.g., C, Be and W, especially for sputtering, reflection, and deuterium (tritium) retention properties. The goal was to suggest the most important next steps needed for such basic computational and experimental work to be facilitated by researchers in fusion, material, and physical sciences. Representatives from many fusion research laboratories attended, and 25 talks were given, the majority of them making up the content of these Workshop proceedings. The presentations of all talks and further information on the Workshop are available at http://www-cfadc.phy.ornl.gov/psif/home.html. The workshop talks dealt with identification of needs from the perspective of integrated fusion simulation and ITER design, recent developments and perspectives on computation of plasma-facing surface properties using the current and expected new generation of computation capability, and with the status of dedicated laboratory experiments which characterize the underlying processes of PSIF. The Workshop summary and conclusions are being published in Nuclear Fusion 45 (2005).

Hogan, John T [ORNL; Krstic, Predrag S [ORNL; Meyer, Fred W [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

THE CENTER FOR DATA INTENSIVE COMPUTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CDIC will provide state-of-the-art computational and computer science for the Laboratory and for the broader DOE and scientific community. We achieve this goal by performing advanced scientific computing research in the Laboratory's mission areas of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Biological and Environmental Research, and Basic Energy Sciences. We also assist other groups at the Laboratory to reach new levels of achievement in computing. We are ''data intensive'' because the production and manipulation of large quantities of data are hallmarks of scientific research in the 21st century and are intrinsic features of major programs at Brookhaven. An integral part of our activity to accomplish this mission will be a close collaboration with the University at Stony Brook.

GLIMM,J.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Overture: An advanced object-oriented software system for moving overlapping grid computations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While the development of high-level, easy-to-use, software libraries for numerical computations has been successful in some areas (e.g. linear system solvers, ODE solvers, grid generation), this has been an elusive goal for developers of partial differential equation (PDE) solvers. The advent of new high level languages such as C++ has begun to make this an achievable goal. This report discusses an object- oriented environment that we are developing for solving problems on overlapping (Chimera) grids. The goal of this effort is to support flexible PDE solvers on adaptive, moving, overlapping grids that cover a domain and overlap where they meet. Solutions values at the overlap are determined by interpolation. The overlapping grid approach is particularly efficient for rapidly generating high- quality grids for moving geometries since as the component grids move, only the list of interpolation points changes, and the component grids do not have to be regenerated. We use structured component grids so that efficient, fast finite-difference algorithms can be used. Oliger-Berger-Corella type mesh refinement is used to efficiently resolve fine features of the flow.

Brown, D.L.; Henshaw, W.D.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

APAC'03 on Advanced Computing, Grid Applications and eResearch Gold Coast, Australia, 29th Sep2nd Oct 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Hobart, Australia 2 CSIRO Marine Research, Hobart, Australia 1 #12;incoming solar radiation [Ebert et al., 1995] and consequently reduces the absorption of solar energy into the upper ocean. The thermodynamicAPAC'03 on Advanced Computing, Grid Applications and eResearch Gold Coast, Australia, 29th Sep­2nd

Phipps, Steven J.

248

The OLCF center ensures that the world's most advanced computa-tional scientists get the resources they need, allowing them to help  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

they need, allowing them to help improve both the world and our understanding of it. Home to Jaguar, a Cray such as the Department of Energy's Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (IN- CITE), the center ensures that the world's most advanced computa- tional scientists get the resources they need

249

Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK - B135 This project final report summarizes modeling research conducted in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Low Dose Radiation Research Program at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute from October 1998 through June 2003. The modeling research described involves critically evaluating the validity of the linear nonthreshold (LNT) risk model as it relates to stochastic effects induced in cells by low doses of ionizing radiation and genotoxic chemicals. The LNT model plays a central role in low-dose risk assessment for humans. With the LNT model, any radiation (or genotoxic chemical) exposure is assumed to increase ones risk of cancer. Based on the LNT model, others have predicted tens of thousands of cancer deaths related to environmental exposure to radioactive material from nuclear accidents (e.g., Chernobyl) and fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Our research has focused on developing biologically based models that explain the shape of dose-response curves for low-dose radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells. Understanding the shape of the dose-response curve for radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells helps to better understand the shape of the dose-response curve for cancer induction in humans. We have used a modeling approach that facilitated model revisions over time, allowing for timely incorporation of new knowledge gained related to the biological basis for low-dose-induced stochastic effects in cells. Both deleterious (e.g., genomic instability, mutations, and neoplastic transformation) and protective (e.g., DNA repair and apoptosis) effects have been included in our modeling. Our most advanced model, NEOTRANS2, involves differing levels of genomic instability. Persistent genomic instability is presumed to be associated with nonspecific, nonlethal mutations and to increase both the risk for neoplastic transformation and for cancer occurrence. Our research results, based on applications of NEOTRANS2, indicate that nonlinear threshold-type, dose-response relationships for excess stochastic effects (problematic nonlethal mutations, neoplastic transformation) should be expected after exposure to low linear energy transfer (LET) gamma rays or gamma rays in combination with high-LET alpha radiation. Similar thresholds are expected for low-dose-rate low-LET beta irradiation. We attribute the thresholds to low-dose, low-LET radiation induced protection against spontaneous mutations and neoplastic transformations. The protection is presumed mainly to involve selective elimination of problematic cells via apoptosis. Low-dose, low-LET radiation is presumed to trigger wide-area cell signaling, which in turn leads to problematic bystander cells (e.g., mutants, neoplastically transformed cells) selectively undergoing apoptosis. Thus, this protective bystander effect leads to selective elimination of problematic cells (a tissue cleansing process in vivo). However, this protective bystander effects is a different process from low-dose stimulation of the immune system. Low-dose, low-LET radiation stimulation of the immune system may explain why thresholds for inducing excess cancer appear much larger (possibly more than 100-fold larger) than thresholds for inducing excess mutations and neoplastic transformations, when the dose rate is low. For ionizing radiation, the current risk assessment paradigm is such that the relative risk (RR) is always 1, no matter how small the dose. Our research results indicate that for low-dose or low-dose-rate, low-LET irradiation, RR < 1 may be more the rule than the exception. Directly tied to the current RR paradigm are the billion-dollar cleanup costs for radionuclide-contaminated DOE sites. Our research results suggest that continued use of the current RR paradigm for which RR 1 could cause more harm than benefit to society (e.g., by spreading unwarranted fear about phantom excess risks associated with low-dose low-LET radiation). Such phantom risks also may arise from risk assessments conducted for com

Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

2003-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

250

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan : ASC software quality engineering practices Version 3.0.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in the US Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Agency (DOE/NNSA) Quality Criteria, Revision 10 (QC-1) as 'conformance to customer requirements and expectations'. This quality plan defines the SNL ASC Program software quality engineering (SQE) practices and provides a mapping of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirement (CPR) 001.3.6; 'Corporate Software Engineering Excellence'. This plan also identifies ASC management's and the software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals. This SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitments to improving software products by applying cost-effective SQE practices. This plan enumerates the SQE practices that comprise the development of SNL ASC's software products and explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices.

Turgeon, Jennifer L.; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Pilch, Martin M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Scientific and Technical Information Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The purpose of this directive is to ensure that STI is appropriately managed as part of the DOE mission to enable the advancement of scientific knowledge and technological innovation. Cancels DOE O 241.1A and DOE O 241.1A Chg 1.

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

252

A comparative study of retrieval effectiveness from a scientific document database with computer-generated indexing and manually generated keyword-based indexing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The primary objective of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a full text indexing and retrieval system for a scientific document database. The secondary objective was to assess the completeness of the manual indexes that are already...

Mishra, Jayanta Kumar

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Advanced Simulation and Computing  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartmentStewardshipAdministration helps INITIATED

254

PROCEEDINGS JOINT INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC DIVING SYMPOSIUM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and the advancement of standards for scientific diving practices, certifications, and operations. Divers Alert Network THE MESOPHOTIC ZONE: DIVING OPERATIONS AND SCIENTIFIC HIGHLIGHTS OF THREE RESEARCH CRUISES ACROSS PUERTO RICO diving techniques and logistical arrangements are required to conduct in situ surveys and sampling

Schizas, Nikolaos

255

Conservativism in Scientific Research A New Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Philosophy Carnegie Mellon University #12;#12;The scientific state of nature Scientific progress on a broad conservative influences? #12;A new problem · Trying out radical ideas runs some risk · Working on obvious advancements runs very little risk · There is some incentive to leaving the risk taking to others · This has

Zollman, Kevin

256

Computing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

assetsimagesicon-science.jpg Computing Providing world-class high performance computing capability that enables unsurpassed solutions to complex problems of...

257

Scientific Impact  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearchScheduled System OutagesNews PressThemes Scientific Impact

258

The Magellan Final Report on Cloud Computing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of Magellan, a project funded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), was to investigate the potential role of cloud computing in addressing the computing needs for the DOE Office of Science (SC), particularly related to serving the needs of mid- range computing and future data-intensive computing workloads. A set of research questions was formed to probe various aspects of cloud computing from performance, usability, and cost. To address these questions, a distributed testbed infrastructure was deployed at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC). The testbed was designed to be flexible and capable enough to explore a variety of computing models and hardware design points in order to understand the impact for various scientific applications. During the project, the testbed also served as a valuable resource to application scientists. Applications from a diverse set of projects such as MG-RAST (a metagenomics analysis server), the Joint Genome Institute, the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, and the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), were used by the Magellan project for benchmarking within the cloud, but the project teams were also able to accomplish important production science utilizing the Magellan cloud resources.

,; Coghlan, Susan; Yelick, Katherine

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

259

eUROPEAN nETWORK for aDVANCED cOMPUTING tECHNOLOGY for sCIENCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Grid Service Requirements (pp. 326) Report on High Performance Computing Development for the Next Network brings together High Performance Computing (HPC) Large Scale Facilities (LSF) funded by the DGXII

Farantos, Stavros C.

260

E-Print Network 3.0 - accept scientific workshop Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 66 Accelerating the scientific exploration process with scientific Ilkay Altintas1 Summary: in the previous years, and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Multicore Architecture-aware Scientific Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modern high performance systems are becoming increasingly complex and powerful due to advancements in processor and memory architecture. In order to keep up with this increasing complexity, applications have to be augmented with certain capabilities to fully exploit such systems. These may be at the application level, such as static or dynamic adaptations or at the system level, like having strategies in place to override some of the default operating system polices, the main objective being to improve computational performance of the application. The current work proposes two such capabilites with respect to multi-threaded scientific applications, in particular a large scale physics application computing ab-initio nuclear structure. The first involves using a middleware tool to invoke dynamic adaptations in the application, so as to be able to adjust to the changing computational resource availability at run-time. The second involves a strategy for effective placement of data in main memory, to optimize memory access latencies and bandwidth. These capabilties when included were found to have a significant impact on the application performance, resulting in average speedups of as much as two to four times.

Srinivasa, Avinash

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

262

Energy Department Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

27, 2005 - 4:55pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy's Office of Science and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) have issued a joint Request...

263

DOE Supercomputing Resources Available for Advancing Scientific  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA, GA - U.S. Department ofThe U.S.D.C. - Energy Secretary Samuel

264

Science Prospects And Benefits with Exascale Computing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scientific computation has come into its own as a mature technology in all fields of science. Never before have we been able to accurately anticipate, analyze, and plan for complex events that have not yet occurred from the operation of a reactor running at 100 million degrees centigrade to the changing climate a century down the road. Combined with the more traditional approaches of theory and experiment, scientific computation provides a profound tool for insight and solution as we look at complex systems containing billions of components. Nevertheless, it cannot yet do all we would like. Much of scientific computation s potential remains untapped in areas such as materials science, Earth science, energy assurance, fundamental science, biology and medicine, engineering design, and national security because the scientific challenges are far too enormous and complex for the computational resources at hand. Many of these challenges are of immediate global importance. These challenges can be overcome by a revolution in computing that promises real advancement at a greatly accelerated pace. Planned petascale systems (capable of a petaflop, or 1015 floating point operations per second) in the next 3 years and exascale systems (capable of an exaflop, or 1018 floating point operations per second) in the next decade will provide an unprecedented opportunity to attack these global challenges through modeling and simulation. Exascale computers, with a processing capability similar to that of the human brain, will enable the unraveling of longstanding scientific mysteries and present new opportunities. Table ES.1 summarizes these scientific opportunities, their key application areas, and the goals and associated benefits that would result from solutions afforded by exascale computing.

Kothe, Douglas B [ORNL

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Advancing Concentrating Solar Power Research (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provide scientific, engineering, and analytical expertise to help advance innovation in concentrating solar power (CSP). This fact sheet summarizes how NREL is advancing CSP research.

Not Available

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1: ASC software quality engineering practices, Version 2.0.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR 1.3.2 and 1.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr. (,; .); Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan part 2 mappings for the ASC software quality engineering practices, version 2.0.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR001.3.2 and CPR001.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, ''ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines''. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams' responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

Heaphy, Robert; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr. (,; .); Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Applications of Reliable Scientific Computing I p Ao eHmI HaAexcrmIxHayam,rxBr:,macAeHmi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of reliable scien- tific computing are published not only in mathematical journals (that are usually covered.). The experience of the International Workshop on Applications of Interval Computations (El Paso, TX, February 23 by Mathematical Reviews, Zentralblatt fur Mathematik, etc.), but also in the journals of the corre- sponding

Kearfott, R. Baker

269

Computing Resources | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is dedicated to large-scale computation and builds on Argonne's strengths in high-performance computing software, advanced hardware architectures and applications expertise. It...

270

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced ring pf-ar Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: advanced ring pf-ar Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Advanced Computer Systems Architecture Summary: Advanced Computer Systems Architecture Highly Integrated...

271

Superlative Supercomputers: Argonne's Mira to Accelerate Scientific...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Scientific Discoveries, Societal Benefits December 2, 2011 - 2:01pm Addthis This is a computer simulation of a Class 1a supernova. Argonne National Laboratory's Mira will have...

272

Opportunities for discovery: Theory and computation in Basic Energy Sciences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New scientific frontiers, recent advances in theory, and rapid increases in computational capabilities have created compelling opportunities for theory and computation to advance the scientific mission of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES). The prospects for success in the experimental programs of BES will be enhanced by pursuing these opportunities. This report makes the case for an expanded research program in theory and computation in BES. The Subcommittee on Theory and Computation of the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee was charged with identifying current and emerging challenges and opportunities for theoretical research within the scientific mission of BES, paying particular attention to how computing will be employed to enable that research. A primary purpose of the Subcommittee was to identify those investments that are necessary to ensure that theoretical research will have maximum impact in the areas of importance to BES, and to assure that BES researchers will be able to exploit the entire spectrum of computational tools, including leadership class computing facilities. The Subcommittee s Findings and Recommendations are presented in Section VII of this report.

Harmon, Bruce; Kirby, Kate; McCurdy, C. William

2005-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

273

2014 Advanced Grid Modeling Peer Review Presentations - Day Two...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

with Advanced Computing - Yousu Chen, PNNL Advancing the Adoption of High Performance Computing for Time Domain Simulation - Liang Min, LLNL, Carol Woodward, LLNL An...

274

Advanced Engine Development | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Engine Development High-performance computing accelerates advanced engine development July 11, 2014 Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Dean Edwards and a...

275

Advance Network Reservation and Provisioning for Science  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are witnessing a new era that offers new opportunities to conduct scientific research with the help of recent advancements in computational and storage technologies. Computational intensive science spans multiple scientific domains, such as particle physics, climate modeling, and bio-informatics simulations. These large-scale applications necessitate collaborators to access very large data sets resulting from simulations performed in geographically distributed institutions. Furthermore, often scientific experimental facilities generate massive data sets that need to be transferred to validate the simulation data in remote collaborating sites. A major component needed to support these needs is the communication infrastructure which enables high performance visualization, large volume data analysis, and also provides access to computational resources. In order to provide high-speed on-demand data access between collaborating institutions, national governments support next generation research networks such as Internet 2 and ESnet (Energy Sciences Network). Delivering network-as-a-service that provides predictable performance, efficient resource utilization and better coordination between compute and storage resources is highly desirable. In this paper, we study network provisioning and advanced bandwidth reservation in ESnet for on-demand high performance data transfers. We present a novel approach for path finding in time-dependent transport networks with bandwidth guarantees. We plan to improve the current ESnet advance network reservation system, OSCARS [3], by presenting to the clients, the possible reservation options and alternatives for earliest completion time and shortest transfer duration. The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) provides high bandwidth connections between research laboratories and academic institutions for data sharing and video/voice communication. The ESnet On-Demand Secure Circuits and Advance Reservation System (OSCARS) establishes guaranteed bandwidth of secure virtual circuits at a certain time, for a certain bandwidth and length of time. Though OSCARS operates within the ESnet, it also supplies end-to-end provisioning between multiple autonomous network domains. OSCARS gets reservation requests through a standard web service interface, and conducts a Quality-of-service (QoS) path for bandwidth guarantees. Multi-protocol Label Switching (MPLS) and the Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) enable to create a virtual circuit using Label Switched Paths (LSP's). It contains three main components: a reservation manager, a bandwidth scheduler, and a path setup subsystem. The bandwidth scheduler needs to have information about the current and future states of the network topology in order to accomplish end-to-end bandwidth guaranteed paths.

Balman, Mehmet; Chaniotakis, Evangelos; Shoshani, Arie; Sim, Alex

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

276

Computing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2 Computational PhysicsComputing and Storage Requirements

277

Computing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2 Computational PhysicsComputing and Storage

278

Final report for %22High performance computing for advanced national electric power grid modeling and integration of solar generation resources%22, LDRD Project No. 149016.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Design and operation of the electric power grid (EPG) relies heavily on computational models. High-fidelity, full-order models are used to study transient phenomena on only a small part of the network. Reduced-order dynamic and power flow models are used when analysis involving thousands of nodes are required due to the computational demands when simulating large numbers of nodes. The level of complexity of the future EPG will dramatically increase due to large-scale deployment of variable renewable generation, active load and distributed generation resources, adaptive protection and control systems, and price-responsive demand. High-fidelity modeling of this future grid will require significant advances in coupled, multi-scale tools and their use on high performance computing (HPC) platforms. This LDRD report demonstrates SNL's capability to apply HPC resources to these 3 tasks: (1) High-fidelity, large-scale modeling of power system dynamics; (2) Statistical assessment of grid security via Monte-Carlo simulations of cyber attacks; and (3) Development of models to predict variability of solar resources at locations where little or no ground-based measurements are available.

Reno, Matthew J.; Riehm, Andrew Charles; Hoekstra, Robert John; Munoz-Ramirez, Karina; Stamp, Jason Edwin; Phillips, Laurence R.; Adams, Brian M.; Russo, Thomas V.; Oldfield, Ron A.; McLendon, William Clarence, III; Nelson, Jeffrey Scott; Hansen, Clifford W.; Richardson, Bryan T.; Stein, Joshua S.; Schoenwald, David Alan; Wolfenbarger, Paul R.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

C. Engelmann -University of Reading and Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Availability for Ultra-scale Scientific High-End Computing 1/48  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

June, 2006 C. Engelmann - University of Reading and Oak Ridge National Laboratory High AvailabilityAH, UK 2 Computer Science and Mathematics Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA #12;June, 2006 C. Engelmann - University of Reading and Oak Ridge National Laboratory High

Engelmann, Christian

280

Computational plasma physics Plasma physics is blossoming and flourishing. It is a very fertile research area, from both a scientific and technological  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Preface Computational plasma physics Plasma physics is blossoming and flourishing. It is a very of plasma technology are, besides the classical example of discharge lamps: sterilisation, plasma medicines that is still far from complete. Given the often very high temperatures and short life times of plasma states

Ebert, Ute

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

FINAL REPORT DE-FG02-04ER41317 Advanced Computation and Chaotic Dynamics for Beams and Accelerators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the year ending in August 2013, we continued to investigate the potential of photonic crystal (PhC) materials for acceleration purposes. We worked to characterize acceleration ability of simple PhC accelerator structures, as well as to characterize PhC materials to determine whether current fabrication techniques can meet the needs of future accelerating structures. We have also continued to design and optimize PhC accelerator structures, with the ultimate goal of finding a new kind of accelerator structure that could offer significant advantages over current RF acceleration technology. This design and optimization of these requires high performance computation, and we continue to work on methods to make such computation faster and more efficient.

Cary, John R [U. Colorado

2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

282

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced accelerating structures Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(NIU), where advanced accelerator concepts and beam manipulation techniques... accelerators are among the most powerful scientific instruments ... Source: Experimental High...

283

Simulations for Complex Fluid Flow Problems from Berkeley Lab's Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering (CCSE)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering (CCSE) develops and applies advanced computational methodologies to solve large-scale scientific and engineering problems arising in the Department of Energy (DOE) mission areas involving energy, environmental, and industrial technology. The primary focus is in the application of structured-grid finite difference methods on adaptive grid hierarchies for compressible, incompressible, and low Mach number flows. The diverse range of scientific applications that drive the research typically involve a large range of spatial and temporal scales (e.g. turbulent reacting flows) and require the use of extremely large computing hardware, such as the 153,000-core computer, Hopper, at NERSC. The CCSE approach to these problems centers on the development and application of advanced algorithms that exploit known separations in scale; for many of the application areas this results in algorithms are several orders of magnitude more efficient than traditional simulation approaches.

284

Description of interfaces of fluid-tethered chains: advances in density functional theories and off-lattice computer simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many objects of nanoscopic dimensions involve fluid-tethered chain interfaces. These systems are of interest for basic science and for several applications, in particular for design of nanodevices for specific purposes. We review recent developments of theoretical methods in this area of research and in particular of density functional (DF) approaches, which provide important insights into microscopic properties of such interfaces. The theories permit to describe the dependence of adsorption, wettability, solvation forces and electric interfacial phenomena on thermodynamic states and on characteristics of tethered chains. Computer simulations for the problems in question are overviewed as well. Theoretical results are discussed in relation to simulation results and to some experimental observations.

S. Soko?owski; J. Ilnytskyi; O. Pizio

2014-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

285

Configurable Virtualized System Environments for High Performance Computing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Existing challenges for current terascale high performance computing (HPC) systems are increasingly hampering the development and deployment efforts of system software and scientific applications for next-generation petascale systems. The expected rapid system upgrade interval toward petascale scientific computing demands an incremental strategy for the development and deployment of legacy and new large-scale scientific applications that avoids excessive porting. Furthermore, system software developers as well as scientific application developers require access to large-scale testbed environments in order to test individual solutions at scale. This paper proposes to address these issues at the system software level through the development of a virtualized system environment (VSE) for scientific computing. The proposed VSE approach enables ''plug-and-play'' supercomputing through desktop-to-cluster-to-petaflop computer system-level virtualization based on recent advances in hypervisor virtualization technologies. This paper describes the VSE system architecture in detail, discusses needed tools for VSE system management and configuration, and presents respective VSE use case scenarios.

Engelmann, Christian [ORNL; Scott, Stephen L [ORNL; Ong, Hong Hoe [ORNL; Vallee, Geoffroy R [ORNL; Naughton, III, Thomas J [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Computing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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287

Computer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2 Computational Physics and MethodsIfEnergy

288

Scientific Data Management (SDM) Center for Enabling Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our contributions to advancing the state?of?the?art in scientific workflows have focused on the following areas: Workflow development; Generic workflow components and templates; Provenance collection and analysis; Workflow reliability and fault tolerance.

Lud?scher, Bertram [Professor

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

289

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 196 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 196 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LOGGING WHILE DRILLING AND ADVANCED CORKS Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA

290

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IThe National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computing center for the DOE Office of Science, serving approximately 4,000 users and hosting some 550 projects that involve nearly 700 codes for a wide variety of scientific disciplines. In addition to large-scale computing resources NERSC provides critical staff support and expertise to help scientists make the most efficient use of these resources to advance the scientific mission of the Office of Science. In May 2011, NERSC, DOEs Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOEs Office of Nuclear Physics (NP) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for NP research over the next three to five years. The effort is part of NERSCs continuing involvement in anticipating future user needs and deploying necessary resources to meet these demands. The workshop revealed several key requirements, in addition to achieving its goal of characterizing NP computing. The key requirements include: 1. Larger allocations of computational resources at NERSC; 2. Visualization and analytics support; and 3. Support at NERSC for the unique needs of experimental nuclear physicists. This report expands upon these key points and adds others. The results are based upon representative samples, called case studies, of the needs of science teams within NP. The case studies were prepared by NP workshop participants and contain a summary of science goals, methods of solution, current and future computing requirements, and special software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel, multi-core environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. The report also includes a section with NERSC responses to the workshop findings. NERSC has many initiatives already underway that address key workshop findings and all of the action items are aligned with NERSC strategic plans.

Gerber, Richard A.; Wasserman, Harvey J.

2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

291

Flagship Cluster Hiring Initiative Computational Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flagship Cluster Hiring Initiative Computational Science: Advancing Research, Society and the Economy Gabrielle Allen (PI) Thomas Sterling (Presenter/co-PI) Department of Computer Science Center for Computation & Technology #12;Computational Science: Advancing Research, Society and the Economy, External

Allen, Gabrielle

292

DOE Awards 265 Million Hours of Supercomputing Time to Advance...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Institute of Standards and Technology; the Max-Planck Institute for Quantum Optics in Germany; CERFACS, the European Center for Research and Advanced Training in Scientific...

293

Wanapum Dam Advanced Hydro Turbine Upgrade Project: Part 2 - Evaluation of Fish Passage Test Results Using Computational Fluid Dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper, the second part of a 2 part paper, discusses the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to gain further insight into the results of fish release testing conducted to evaluate the modifications made to upgrade Unit 8 at Wanapum Dam. Part 1 discusses the testing procedures and fish passage survival. Grant PUD is working with Voith Siemens Hydro (VSH) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) of DOE and Normandeau Associates in this evaluation. VSH has prepared the geometry for the CFD analysis corresponding to the four operating conditions tested with Unit 9, and the 5 operating conditions tested with Unit 8. Both VSH and PNNL have conducting CFD simulations of the turbine intakes, stay vanes, wicket gates, turbine blades and draft tube of the units. Primary objectives of the analyses were: determine estimates of where the inserted fish passed the turbine components determine the characteristics of the flow field along the paths calculated for pressure, velocity gradients and acceleration associated with fish sized bodies determine the velocity gradients at the structures where fish to structure interaction is predicted. correlate the estimated fish location of passage with observed injuries correlate the calculated pressure and acceleration with the information recorded with the sensor fish utilize the results of the analysis to further interpret the results of the testing. This paper discusses the results of the CFD analyses made to assist the interpretation of the fish test results.

Dresser, Thomas J.; Dotson, Curtis L.; Fisher, Richard K.; Graf, Michael J.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Mathur, Dilip; Heisey, Paul G.

2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

294

CRITICAL ISSUES IN HIGH END COMPUTING - FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-End computing (HEC) has been a driver for advances in science and engineering for the past four decades. Increasingly HEC has become a significant element in the national security, economic vitality, and competitiveness of the United States. Advances in HEC provide results that cut across traditional disciplinary and organizational boundaries. This program provides opportunities to share information about HEC systems and computational techniques across multiple disciplines and organizations through conferences and exhibitions of HEC advances held in Washington DC so that mission agency staff, scientists, and industry can come together with White House, Congressional and Legislative staff in an environment conducive to the sharing of technical information, accomplishments, goals, and plans. A common thread across this series of conferences is the understanding of computational science and applied mathematics techniques across a diverse set of application areas of interest to the Nation. The specific objectives of this program are: Program Objective 1. To provide opportunities to share information about advances in high-end computing systems and computational techniques between mission critical agencies, agency laboratories, academics, and industry. Program Objective 2. To gather pertinent data, address specific topics of wide interest to mission critical agencies. Program Objective 3. To promote a continuing discussion of critical issues in high-end computing. Program Objective 4.To provide a venue where a multidisciplinary scientific audience can discuss the difficulties applying computational science techniques to specific problems and can specify future research that, if successful, will eliminate these problems.

Corones, James [Krell Institute] [Krell Institute

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

295

Parallel computing works  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An account of the Caltech Concurrent Computation Program (C{sup 3}P), a five year project that focused on answering the question: Can parallel computers be used to do large-scale scientific computations '' As the title indicates, the question is answered in the affirmative, by implementing numerous scientific applications on real parallel computers and doing computations that produced new scientific results. In the process of doing so, C{sup 3}P helped design and build several new computers, designed and implemented basic system software, developed algorithms for frequently used mathematical computations on massively parallel machines, devised performance models and measured the performance of many computers, and created a high performance computing facility based exclusively on parallel computers. While the initial focus of C{sup 3}P was the hypercube architecture developed by C. Seitz, many of the methods developed and lessons learned have been applied successfully on other massively parallel architectures.

Not Available

1991-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

296

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1 : ASC software quality engineering practices version 1.0.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in DOE/AL Quality Criteria (QC-1) as conformance to customer requirements and expectations. This quality plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirements (CPR 1.3.2 and CPR 1.3.6) and the Department of Energy (DOE) document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines (GP&G). This quality plan identifies ASC management and software project teams' responsibilities for cost-effective software engineering quality practices. The SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitment to improving software products by applying cost-effective software engineering quality practices. This document explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices; enumerates the practices that compose the development of SNL ASC's software products; and includes a sample assessment checklist that was developed based upon the practices in this document.

Minana, Molly A.; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is an annual report, detailing activities at the Advanced Light Source for the year 2000. It includes highlights of scientific research by users of the facility as well as information about the development of the facility itself.

Greiner, A.; Moxon, L.; Robinson, A.; Tamura, L.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Knowledge-Based Parallel Performance Technology for Scientific Application Competitiveness Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of the University of Oregon's DOE "??competitiveness" project was to create performance technology that embodies and supports knowledge of performance data, analysis, and diagnosis in parallel performance problem solving. The target of our development activities was the TAU Performance System and the technology accomplishments reported in this and prior reports have all been incorporated in the TAU open software distribution. In addition, the project has been committed to maintaining strong interactions with the DOE SciDAC Performance Engineering Research Institute (PERI) and Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS). This collaboration has proved valuable for translation of our knowledge-based performance techniques to parallel application development and performance engineering practice. Our outreach has also extended to the DOE Advanced CompuTational Software (ACTS) collection and project. Throughout the project we have participated in the PERI and TASCS meetings, as well as the ACTS annual workshops.

Allen D. Malony; Sameer Shende

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Sandia National Laboratories: Scientific Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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300

Delivering Insight The History of the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The history of the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) tells of the development of computational simulation into a third fundamental piece of the scientific method, on a par with theory and experiment. ASCI did not invent the idea, nor was it alone in bringing it to fruition. But ASCI provided the wherewithal - hardware, software, environment, funding, and, most of all, the urgency - that made it happen. On October 1, 2005, the Initiative completed its tenth year of funding. The advances made by ASCI over its first decade are truly incredible. Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, and Sandia National Laboratories, along with leadership provided by the Department of Energy's Defense Programs Headquarters, fundamentally changed computational simulation and how it is used to enable scientific insight. To do this, astounding advances were made in simulation applications, computing platforms, and user environments. ASCI dramatically changed existing - and forged new - relationships, both among the Laboratories and with outside partners. By its tenth anniversary, despite daunting challenges, ASCI had accomplished all of the major goals set at its beginning. The history of ASCI is about the vision, leadership, endurance, and partnerships that made these advances possible.

Larzelere II, A R

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Advanced Simulation and Computing Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAre theAdministratorCFM LEAP Aircraft Engines Are Fuel-

302

Computational Biology & KBase | Clean Energy| ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computational Biology and KBase SHARE Computational Biology and KBase The ever-increasing scale and complexity of biological data require advanced computational tools and resources...

303

18.337J / 6.338J Applied Parallel Computing (SMA 5505), Spring 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applied Parallel Computing is an advanced interdisciplinary introduction to applied parallel computing on modern supercomputers.

Edelman, Alan

304

CS 3200 Introduction to Scientific Computing Instructor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gradient (CG) Method 13" #12;Conjugate Gradient Method 14" #12;Orthogonal Directions 15" #12;A-Orthogonal Directions 16"from J. R. Shewchuk "Painless CG"! #12;Conjugate Gradient Method 17" #12;Search Step Size Gradient Method The conjugate gradient method was originally proposed in Magnu

Turkel, Eli

305

Scientific Computing Kernels on the Cell Processor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FFT algorithm for the IBM/Sony/Toshiba Cell Broadband Engine1998. ISBN 0262692155. [33] Sony press release. http://concepts. Chips like the Sony Emotion Engine [23, 26, 34

Williams, Samuel W.; Shalf, John; Oliker, Leonid; Kamil, Shoaib; Husbands, Parry; Yelick, Katherine

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" Tech. Report: see http://view.eecs.berkeley.edu (Inspired by a view of the Golden Gate Bridge from

307

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Bookmarks External link Email a Friend Email link to: send Additional Information NERSC Web Page NERSC logo NERSC at 25 NERSC News NERSCLBL Study Finds No Evidence of Heartbleed...

308

Resolving Numerical Anomalies in Scientific Computation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,992 processing cores and a sustained performance rate on the scalable Linpack benchmark of 478 trillion floating are available, at least in theory if not in widespread practice. For instance, it is often possible to run algorithms and/or programming techniques. This may true in some cases, although, as will be clear below

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

309

NERSC: National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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310

Fermilab | Science | Particle Physics | Scientific Computing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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311

NERSC National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Opticalhttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gif Directorate -News, JanStatus and

312

National Energ y Research Scientific Computing Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData andFleetEngineeringAnnual Report This work was supported by the

313

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData andFleetEngineeringAnnual Report This work was supported

314

The Effect of a Contrast Agent on Proton Beam Range in Radiotherapy Planning Using Computed Tomography for Patients With Locoregionally Advanced Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: We evaluated the effect of a contrast agent (CA) on proton beam range in a treatment planning system (TPS) for patients with locoregionally advanced lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Two sets of computed tomography (CT) images (with and without CA) were obtained from 20 patients with lung cancer. Because the increase in Hounsfield unit ( Increment HU) value of the heart and great vessels due to the effect of CA is most prominent among thoracic structures, to evaluate the effect of CA on proton beam range in the TPS, we compared the calculated distal ranges in the plan with CA-enhanced CT with those with corrected CT, in which the HU values of the heart and great vessels in the CA-enhanced CT were replaced by average HU values obtained from the unenhanced CT. Results: The mean Increment HU value and the longest length of the heart and great vessels within the proton beam path in the field that passed through these structures were 189 {+-} 29 HU (range, 110-250 HU) and 7.1 {+-} 1.1 cm (range, 2.6-11.2 cm), respectively. The mean distal range error in the TPS because of the presence of CA was 1.0 {+-} 0.7 cm (range, 0.2-2.6 cm). Conclusion: If CA-enhanced CT images are used for radiotherapy planning using a proton beam for the treatment of lung cancer, our results suggest that the HU values of the heart and great vessels should be replaced by the average HU values of soft tissue to avoid discrepancies between planned and delivered doses.

Hwang, Ui-Jung; Shin, Dong Ho [Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hyun, E-mail: k2onco@naver.com [Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Sung Ho; Lim, Young Kyung; Jeong, Hojin; Rah, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, Joo-Young; Kim, Dae Yong; Park, Sung Yong; Cho, Kwan Ho [Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Energy Innovation Hubs: A Home for Scientific Collaboration  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Secretary Chu will host a live, streaming Q&A session with the directors of the Energy Innovation Hubs on Tuesday, March 6, at 2:15 p.m. EST. The directors will be available for questions regarding their teams' work and the future of American energy. Ask your questions in the comments below, or submit them on Facebook, Twitter (@energy), or send an e-mail to newmedia@hq.doe.gov, prior or during the live event. Dr. Hank Foley is the director of the Greater Philadelphia Innovation Cluster for Energy-Efficient Buildings, which is pioneering new data intensive techniques for designing and operating energy efficient buildings, including advanced computer modeling. Dr. Douglas Kothe is the director of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors, which uses powerful supercomputers to create "virtual" reactors that will help improve the safety and performance of both existing and new nuclear reactors. Dr. Nathan Lewis is the director of the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, which focuses on how to produce fuels from sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide. The Energy Innovation Hubs are major integrated research centers, with researchers from many different institutions and technical backgrounds. Each hub is focused on a specific high priority goal, rapidly accelerating scientific discoveries and shortening the path from laboratory innovation to technological development and commercial deployment of critical energy technologies. Ask your questions in the comments below, or submit them on Facebook, Twitter (@energy), or send an e-mail to newmedia@energy.gov, prior or during the live event. The Energy Innovation Hubs are major integrated research centers, with researchers from many different institutions and technical backgrounds. Each Hub is focused on a specific high priority goal, rapidly accelerating scientific discoveries and shortening the path from laboratory innovation to technological development and commercial deployment of critical energy technologies. Dr. Hank Holey is the director of the Greater Philadelphia Innovation Cluster for Energy-Efficient Buildings, which is pioneering new data intensive techniques for designing and operating energy efficient buildings, including advanced computer modeling. Dr. Douglas Kothe is the director of the Modeling and Simulation for Nuclear Reactors Hub, which uses powerful supercomputers to create "virtual" reactors that will help improve the safety and performance of both existing and new nuclear reactors. Dr. Nathan Lewis is the director of the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis Hub, which focuses on how to produce biofuels from sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide.

Chu, Steven

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

316

Energy Innovation Hubs: A Home for Scientific Collaboration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Secretary Chu will host a live, streaming Q&A session with the directors of the Energy Innovation Hubs on Tuesday, March 6, at 2:15 p.m. EST. The directors will be available for questions regarding their teams' work and the future of American energy. Ask your questions in the comments below, or submit them on Facebook, Twitter (@energy), or send an e-mail to newmedia@hq.doe.gov, prior or during the live event. Dr. Hank Foley is the director of the Greater Philadelphia Innovation Cluster for Energy-Efficient Buildings, which is pioneering new data intensive techniques for designing and operating energy efficient buildings, including advanced computer modeling. Dr. Douglas Kothe is the director of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors, which uses powerful supercomputers to create "virtual" reactors that will help improve the safety and performance of both existing and new nuclear reactors. Dr. Nathan Lewis is the director of the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, which focuses on how to produce fuels from sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide. The Energy Innovation Hubs are major integrated research centers, with researchers from many different institutions and technical backgrounds. Each hub is focused on a specific high priority goal, rapidly accelerating scientific discoveries and shortening the path from laboratory innovation to technological development and commercial deployment of critical energy technologies. Ask your questions in the comments below, or submit them on Facebook, Twitter (@energy), or send an e-mail to newmedia@energy.gov, prior or during the live event. The Energy Innovation Hubs are major integrated research centers, with researchers from many different institutions and technical backgrounds. Each Hub is focused on a specific high priority goal, rapidly accelerating scientific discoveries and shortening the path from laboratory innovation to technological development and commercial deployment of critical energy technologies. Dr. Hank Holey is the director of the Greater Philadelphia Innovation Cluster for Energy-Efficient Buildings, which is pioneering new data intensive techniques for designing and operating energy efficient buildings, including advanced computer modeling. Dr. Douglas Kothe is the director of the Modeling and Simulation for Nuclear Reactors Hub, which uses powerful supercomputers to create "virtual" reactors that will help improve the safety and performance of both existing and new nuclear reactors. Dr. Nathan Lewis is the director of the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis Hub, which focuses on how to produce biofuels from sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide.

Chu, Steven

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Empirical Performance Analysis of High Performance Computing Benchmarks Across Variations in Cloud Computing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??High Performance Computing (HPC) applications are data-intensive scientific software requiring significant CPU and data storage capabilities. Researchers have examined the performance of Amazon Elastic Compute (more)

Mani, Sindhu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Scientific Visualization: The Modern Oscilloscope for "Seeing the Unseeable" (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Summer Lecture Series 2008: Scientific visualization transforms abstract data into readily comprehensible images, provide a vehicle for "seeing the unseeable," and play a central role in both experimental and computational sciences. Wes Bethel, who heads the Scientific Visualization Group in the Computational Research Division, presents an overview of visualization and computer graphics, current research challenges, and future directions for the field.

Bethel, E Wes

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

320

Automation of Network-Based Scientific Workflows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Comprehensive, end-to-end, data and workflow management solutions are needed to handle the increasing complexity of processes and data volumes associated with modern distributed scientific problem solving, such as ultra-scale simulations and high-throughput experiments. The key to the solution is an integrated network-based framework that is functional, dependable, fault-tolerant, and supports data and process provenance. Such a framework needs to make development and use of application workflows dramatically easier so that scientists' efforts can shift away from data management and utility software development to scientific research and discovery An integrated view of these activities is provided by the notion of scientific workflows - a series of structured activities and computations that arise in scientific problem-solving. An information technology framework that supports scientific workflows is the Ptolemy II based environment called Kepler. This paper discusses the issues associated with practical automation of scientific processes and workflows and illustrates this with workflows developed using the Kepler framework and tools.

Altintas, I. [University of California, La Jolla; Barreto, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Blondin, J. M. [North Carolina State University; Cheng, Z. [North Carolina State University; Critchlow, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Khan, A. [University of Utah; Klasky, Scott A [ORNL; Ligon, J. [North Carolina State University; Ludaescher, B. [University of California, Davis; Mouallem, P. A. [North Carolina State University; Parker, S. [University of Utah; Podhorszki, Norbert [University of California, Davis; Shoshani, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Silva, C. [University of Utah; Vouk, M. A. [North Carolina State University

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Anatomy of Scientific Evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The quest for historically impactful science and technology provides invaluable insight into the innovation dynamics of human society, yet many studies are limited to qualitative and small-scale approaches. Here, we investigate scientific evolution through systematic analysis of a massive corpus of digitized English texts between 1800 and 2008. Our analysis reveals remarkable predictability for long-prevailing scientific concepts based on the levels of their prior usage. Interestingly, once a threshold of early adoption rates is passed even slightly, scientific concepts can exhibit sudden leaps in their eventual lifetimes. We developed a mechanistic model to account for such results, indicating that slowly-but-commonly adopted science and technology surprisingly tend to have higher innate strength than fast-and-commonly adopted ones. The model prediction for disciplines other than science was also well verified. Our approach sheds light on unbiased and quantitative analysis of scientific evolution in society,...

Yun, Jinhyuk; Jeong, Hawoong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced land imager Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 94 Coupling High Resolution Earth System Models Using Advanced Computational Technologies Summary: Coupling High Resolution...

323

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORYS CAPABILITIES FOR ADVANCED ANALYSES OF CYBER THREATS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BNL has several ongoing, mature, and successful programs and areas of core scientific expertise that readily could be modified to address problems facing national security and efforts by the IC related to securing our nations computer networks. In supporting these programs, BNL houses an expansive, scalable infrastructure built exclusively for transporting, storing, and analyzing large disparate data-sets. Our ongoing research projects on various infrastructural issues in computer science undoubtedly would be relevant to national security. Furthermore, BNL frequently partners with researchers in academia and industry worldwide to foster unique and innovative ideas for expanding research opportunities and extending our insights. Because the basic science conducted at BNL is unique, such projects have led to advanced techniques, unlike any others, to support our mission of discovery. Many of them are modular techniques, thus making them ideal for abstraction and retrofitting to other uses including those facing national security, specifically the safety of the nations cyber space.

DePhillips M. P.

2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

324

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the leading scientific computing facility supporting research within the Department of Energy's Office of Science. NERSC provides high-performance computing (HPC) resources to approximately 4,000 researchers working on about 400 projects. In addition to hosting large-scale computing facilities, NERSC provides the support and expertise scientists need to effectively and efficiently use HPC systems. In February 2010, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOE's Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for BES research through 2013. The workshop was part of NERSC's legacy of anticipating users future needs and deploying the necessary resources to meet these demands. Workshop participants reached a consensus on several key findings, in addition to achieving the workshop's goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. The key requirements for scientists conducting research in BES are: (1) Larger allocations of computational resources; (2) Continued support for standard application software packages; (3) Adequate job turnaround time and throughput; and (4) Guidance and support for using future computer architectures. This report expands upon these key points and presents others. Several 'case studies' are included as significant representative samples of the needs of science teams within BES. Research teams scientific goals, computational methods of solution, current and 2013 computing requirements, and special software and support needs are summarized in these case studies. Also included are researchers strategies for computing in the highly parallel, 'multi-core' environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. NERSC has strategic plans and initiatives already underway that address key workshop findings. This report includes a brief summary of those relevant to issues raised by researchers at the workshop.

Gerber, Richard; Wasserman, Harvey

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

325

Kelly Scientific Resources Kelly Scientific Resources yy BIOTECHNOLOGY DRUG &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kelly Scientific Resources Kelly Scientific Resources yy BIOTECHNOLOGY DRUG & PHARMACEUTICAL · What Kelly Scientific Resources or staffing agencies are and how they work?they work? · How to work Role: ­ Northern California Recruiting and Business efforts for Kelly Scientific Resources ­ Promote

Puglisi, Joseph

326

advanced biomedical research: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rose, Michael R. 2 THE CENTER FOR INTEGRATIVE BIOMEDICAL COMPUTING: ADVANCING BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE WITH OPEN SOURCE Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary:...

327

Scientific/Techical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ACNS provides a focal point for the North American neutron user community, strengthening ties within this diverse group, and promoting neutron research in related disciplines. The conference thus serves a dual role as both a national user meeting and a scientific meeting. As a venue for scientific exchange, the ACNS showcases recent results and provides a forum for scientific discussion of neutron-enabled research in fields as diverse as hard and soft condensed matter, liquids, biology, magnetism, engineering materials, chemical spectroscopy, crystal structure, elementary excitations, fundamental physics, and development of neutron instrumentation. This is achieved through a combination of invited oral presentations, contributed oral presentations, and poster sessions. Adequate opportunity for spontaneous discussion and collaboration is also built into the ACNS program in order to foster free exchange of new scientific ideas and the potential for use of powerful neutron scattering methods beyond the current realms of application. The sixth American Conference on Neutron Scattering (ACNS 2012) provided essential information on the breadth and depth of current neutron-related research worldwide. A strong program of plenary, invited and contributed talks showcased recent scientific results in neutron science in a wide range of fields, including soft and hard condensed matter, biology, chemistry, energy and engineering applications, and neutron physics.

Dr. Chris Leighton, Neutron Scattering Society of American; Mr. J. Ardie (Butch) Dillen, MRS Director of Finance and Administration

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

328

Techniques for interactive 3-D scientific visualization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interest in interactive 3-D graphics has exploded of late, fueled by (a) the allure of using scientific visualization to go where no-one has gone before'' and (b) by the development of new input devices which overcome some of the limitations imposed in the past by technology, yet which may be ill-suited to the kinds of interaction required by researchers active in scientific visualization. To resolve this tension, we propose a flat 5-D'' environment in which 2-D graphics are augmented by exploiting multiple human sensory modalities using cheap, conventional hardware readily available with personal computers and workstations. We discuss how interactions basic to 3-D scientific visualization, like searching a solution space and comparing two such spaces, are effectively carried out in our environment. Finally, we describe 3DMOVE, an experimental microworld we have implemented to test out some of our ideas. 40 refs., 4 figs.

Glinert, E.P. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (USA). Dept. of Computer Science); Blattner, M.M. (Anderson (M.D.) Hospital and Tumor Inst., Houston, TX (USA). Dept. of Biomathematics California Univ., Davis, CA (USA). Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Becker, B.G. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA). Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National La

1990-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

329

advanced public transportation: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of advanced sensor, computer, electronics, and communications technologies and management strategies in an integrated manner providing traveler information to increase...

330

advanced robot control: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Symposium on Measurement and Control in Robotics -Toward Advanced Robots: Design, Sensors, Control and Applications - Computer Technologies and Information Sciences...

331

Can Cloud Computing Address the Scientific Computing Requirements for DOE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6Energy,MUSEUM DISPLAY STATUS4Tours SHARE Tours Public Tours

332

Recording Scientific Knowledge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The way we record knowledge, and the web of technical, formal, and social practices that surrounds it, inevitably affects the knowledge that we record. The ways we hold knowledge about the past - in handwritten manuscripts, in printed books, in file folders, in databases - shape the kind of stories we tell about that past. In this talk, I look at how over the past two hundred years, information technology has affected the nature and production of scientific knowledge. Further, I explore ways in which the emergent new cyberinfrastructure is changing our relationship to scientific practice.

Bowker, Geof (Santa Clara University) [Santa Clara University

2006-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

333

Exploring nanoscale magnetism in advanced materials with polarized X-rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stoehr and H.C. Siegmann, Magnetism, Springer (2006) [93]Exploring nanoscale magnetism in advanced materials withABSTRACT Nanoscale magnetism is of paramount scientific

Fischer, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced accelerator experimental Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(NIU), where advanced accelerator concepts and beam manipulation techniques... accelerators are among the most powerful scientific instruments mankind has built. They are...

335

NWChem: Bridging the gap between experimental and computational...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chemistry Experimental and computational scientists at EMSL explain how high performance computing and NWChem enhance scientific discovery. NWChem is EMSL's open-source...

336

SCIENTIFIC CORRESPONDENCE Radiation doses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCIENTIFIC CORRESPONDENCE Radiation doses and cancert-A T. w- - SIR- In February 1990, the Soviet. Nikipelov et al. published in g Priroda (Nature)' the radiation doses for each year, averaged over environmental impact on the Gulf waters is rapidly ex- ported to the Arabian Sea and then to the Indian Ocean

Shlyakhter, Ilya

337

This is an electronic version of the article published in: Hulshof, C. D., & de Jong, T. (2006). Using just-in-time information to support scientific discovery learning about geometrical optics in a computer-based simulation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a computer-based simulation. Interactive Learning Environments, 14 (1), 79-94 2006 Taylor & Francis learning with computer-based simulations have been identified. A number of studies have examined different learning processes is by the use of computer simulations (De Jong, 1991; De Jong & Van Joolingen, 1998

Boyer, Edmond

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Scientific Highlights News & Events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The phenomenal rate of increase in the inte- gration density on semiconductor micro-chips is driven by advances around the central C=C bridge, i.e. to cis- and trans-stilbene, respectively (Fig. 1). This isomerisation

339

COMPUTATIONAL ECONOMICS AT THE COMPUTATION INSTITUTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

discussed the modern economic theory of incentives. Asymmetric information is common in economic relationsCOMPUTATIONAL ECONOMICS AT THE COMPUTATION INSTITUTE Summary of 3-D Discussions Prepared by Ken and economists to discuss a variety of topics on how computational methods can advance economic analysis

340

Extreme Scale Computing to Secure the Nation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the dawn of modern electronic computing in the mid 1940's, U.S. national security programs have been dominant users of every new generation of high-performance computer. Indeed, the first general-purpose electronic computer, ENIAC (the Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer), was used to calculate the expected explosive yield of early thermonuclear weapons designs. Even the U. S. numerical weather prediction program, another early application for high-performance computing, was initially funded jointly by sponsors that included the U.S. Air Force and Navy, agencies interested in accurate weather predictions to support U.S. military operations. For the decades of the cold war, national security requirements continued to drive the development of high performance computing (HPC), including advancement of the computing hardware and development of sophisticated simulation codes to support weapons and military aircraft design, numerical weather prediction as well as data-intensive applications such as cryptography and cybersecurity U.S. national security concerns continue to drive the development of high-performance computers and software in the U.S. and in fact, events following the end of the cold war have driven an increase in the growth rate of computer performance at the high-end of the market. This mainly derives from our nation's observance of a moratorium on underground nuclear testing beginning in 1992, followed by our voluntary adherence to the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) beginning in 1995. The CTBT prohibits further underground nuclear tests, which in the past had been a key component of the nation's science-based program for assuring the reliability, performance and safety of U.S. nuclear weapons. In response to this change, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated the Science-Based Stockpile Stewardship (SBSS) program in response to the Fiscal Year 1994 National Defense Authorization Act, which requires, 'in the absence of nuclear testing, a progam to: (1) Support a focused, multifaceted program to increase the understanding of the enduring stockpile; (2) Predict, detect, and evaluate potential problems of the aging of the stockpile; (3) Refurbish and re-manufacture weapons and components, as required; and (4) Maintain the science and engineering institutions needed to support the nation's nuclear deterrent, now and in the future'. This program continues to fulfill its national security mission by adding significant new capabilities for producing scientific results through large-scale computational simulation coupled with careful experimentation, including sub-critical nuclear experiments permitted under the CTBT. To develop the computational science and the computational horsepower needed to support its mission, SBSS initiated the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative, later renamed the Advanced Simulation & Computing (ASC) program (sidebar: 'History of ASC Computing Program Computing Capability'). The modern 3D computational simulation capability of the ASC program supports the assessment and certification of the current nuclear stockpile through calibration with past underground test (UGT) data. While an impressive accomplishment, continued evolution of national security mission requirements will demand computing resources at a significantly greater scale than we have today. In particular, continued observance and potential Senate confirmation of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) together with the U.S administration's promise for a significant reduction in the size of the stockpile and the inexorable aging and consequent refurbishment of the stockpile all demand increasing refinement of our computational simulation capabilities. Assessment of the present and future stockpile with increased confidence of the safety and reliability without reliance upon calibration with past or future test data is a long-term goal of the ASC program. This will be accomplished through significant increases in the scientific bases that underlie the computational tools. Computer codes must be de

Brown, D L; McGraw, J R; Johnson, J R; Frincke, D

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Army High Performance Computing Research Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Army High Performance Computing Research Center Applying advanced computational science research challenges http://me.stanford.edu/research/centers/ahpcrc #12;Army High Performance Computing challenges http://me.stanford.edu/research/centers/ahpcrc #12;Army High Performance Computing Research

Prinz, Friedrich B.

342

Application of Robust Design and Advanced Computer Aided Engineering Technologies: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-04-143  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oshkosh Corporation (OSK) is taking an aggressive approach to implementing advanced technologies, including hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) technology, throughout their commercial and military product lines. These technologies have important implications for OSK's commercial and military customers, including fleet fuel efficiency, quiet operational modes, additional on-board electric capabilities, and lower thermal signature operation. However, technical challenges exist with selecting the optimal HEV components and design to work within the performance and packaging constraints of specific vehicle applications. SK desires to use unique expertise developed at the Department of Energy?s (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), including HEV modeling and simulation. These tools will be used to overcome technical hurdles to implementing advanced heavy vehicle technology that meet performance requirements while improving fuel efficiency.

Thornton, M.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Argonne's computing Zen | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is dedicated to large-scale computation and builds on Argonne's strengths in high-performance computing software, advanced hardware architectures and applications expertise....

344

Modeling and Analysis of Scholar Mobility on Scientific Landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scientific literature till date can be thought of as a partially revealed landscape, where scholars keep unveiling hidden knowledge by exploring novel research topics. How do scholars explore the scientific landscape, i.e., choose research topics to work on? We propose an agent-based model of topic mobility behavior where scholars migrate across research topics on the space of science following different strategies, seeking different utilities. We use this model to study whether strategies widely used in current scientific community can provide a balance between individual scientific success and the efficiency and diversity of the whole academic society. Through extensive simulations, we provide insights into the roles of different strategies, such as choosing topics according to research potential or the popularity. Our model provides a conceptual framework and a computational approach to analyze scholars' behavior and its impact on scientific production. We also discuss how such an agent-based modeling appr...

Ying, Qiu Fang; Chiu, Dah Ming

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Sandia National Laboratories: Scientific Visit on Crystalline...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WorkshopsScientific Visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development Scientific Visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development Many thanks to all participants at the Scientific...

346

DOE High Performance Computing Operational Review  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Forward Private Sector Partnerships MANTISSA Home R & D HPCOR DOE High Performance Computing Operational Review (HPCOR) All logos Enabling Data-Driven Scientific...

347

A NATIONAL COLLABORATORY TO ADVANCE THE SCIENCE OF HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA PHYSICS FOR MAGNETIC FUSION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work of the University of Utah, which was a member of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) under the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program (SciDAC) to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. A five year project that was initiated in 2001, it the NFC built on the past collaborative work performed within the U.S. fusion community and added the component of computer science research done with the USDOE Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computer Research. The project was itself a collaboration, itself uniting fusion scientists from General Atomics, MIT, and PPPL and computer scientists from ANL, LBNL, and Princeton University, and the University of Utah to form a coordinated team. The group leveraged existing computer science technology where possible and extended or created new capabilities where required. The complete finial report is attached as an addendum. The In the collaboration, the primary technical responsibility of the University of Utah in the collaboration was to develop and deploy an advanced scientific visualization service. To achieve this goal, the SCIRun Problem Solving Environment (PSE) is used on FusionGrid for an advanced scientific visualization service. SCIRun is open source software that gives the user the ability to create complex 3D visualizations and 2D graphics. This capability allows for the exploration of complex simulation results and the comparison of simulation and experimental data. SCIRun on FusionGrid gives the scientist a no-license-cost visualization capability that rivals present day commercial visualization packages. To accelerate the usage of SCIRun within the fusion community, a stand-alone application built on top of SCIRun was developed and deployed. This application, FusionViewer, allows users who are unfamiliar with SCIRun to quickly create visualizations and perform analysis of their simulation data from either the MDSplus data storage environment or from locally stored HDF5 files. More advanced tools for visualization and analysis also were created in collaboration with the SciDAC Center for Extended MHD Modeling. Versions of SCIRun with the FusionViewer have been made available to fusion scientists on the Mac OS X, Linux, and other Unix based platforms and have been downloaded 1163 times. SCIRun has been used with NIMROD, M3D, BOUT fusion simulation data as well as simulation data from other SciDAC application areas (e.g., Astrophysics). The subsequent visualization results - including animations - have been incorporated into invited talks at multiple APS/DPP meetings as well as peer reviewed journal articles. As an example, SCIRun was used for the visualization and analysis of a NIMROD simulation of a disruption that occurred in a DIII-D experiment. The resulting animations and stills were presented as part of invited talks at APS/DPP meetings and the SC04 conference in addition to being highlighted in the NIH/NSF Visualization Research Challenges Report. By achieving its technical goals, the University of Utah played a key role in the successful development of a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. Many of the visualization tools developed as part of the NFC continue to be used by Fusion and other SciDAC application scientists and are currently being supported and expanded through follow-on up on SciDAC projects (Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technology, and the Visualization and Analysis in Support of Fusion SAP).

Allen R. Sanderson; Christopher R. Johnson

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Final Report: Super Instruction Architecture for Scalable Parallel Computations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most advanced methods for reliable and accurate computation of the electronic structure of molecular and nano systems are the coupled-cluster techniques. These high-accuracy methods help us to understand, for example, how biological enzymes operate and contribute to the design of new organic explosives. The ACES III software provides a modern, high-performance implementation of these methods optimized for high performance parallel computer systems, ranging from small clusters typical in individual research groups, through larger clusters available in campus and regional computer centers, all the way to high-end petascale systems at national labs, including exploiting GPUs if available. This project enhanced the ACESIII software package and used it to study interesting scientific problems.

Sanders, Beverly Ann [University of Florida] [University of Florida; Bartlett, Rodney [University of Florida] [University of Florida; Deumens, Erik [University of Florida] [University of Florida

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

349

DOE Announces First Awards in Scientific Discovery through Advanced...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nature. The projects include the search for the explosion mechanism of core-collapse supernovae, development of a new generation of accelerator simulation codes and simulations of...

350

CENTER FOR ADVANCED BIOTECHNOLOGY AND MEDICINE 2012 SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY BOARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REPRESENTATIVES Dr. Nader Fotouhi Vice President, Discovery Chemistry Hoffmann-La Roche Michael Dean Miller, Ph Academy of Sciences), '86 Babiss, Lee, Vice President Pre-Clinical Res. & Dev. Hoffmann-La Roche Inc.'99. Biol. Sci., '88-'91 Drews, Jurgen, M.D., Pres., Intl. R & D, Hoffmann-La Roche Inc., '93-'96 Gage, L

351

#WomenInSTEM: A Physicist Focuses on Scientific Advancement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dr. Capece first became interested in science after learning about NASA's Voyager missions at an early age. In this video, Dr. Capece provides advice for women and girls interested in pursuing careers in STEM fields, like focusing on physics, biology and chemistry at the high school level. This video is part of the Energy Department's #WomenInSTEM video series. At the Energy Department, we're committed to supporting a diverse talent pool of STEM innovators ready to address the challenges and opportunities of our growing clean energy economy.

Capece, Angela

2014-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

352

Advancements in scientific data searching, sharing and retrieval Ranjeet Devarakonda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ridge National Laboratory PO Box 2008 MS 6407, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 USA Email: devarakondar@ornl.gov Giri Palanisamy Oak Ridge National Laboratory PO Box 2008 MS 6407, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 USA Email: palanisamyg@ornl.gov Bruce E. Wilson Oak Ridge National Laboratory PO Box 2008 MS 6407, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 USA Email

353

#WomenInSTEM: A Physicist Focuses on Scientific Advancement  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Dr. Capece first became interested in science after learning about NASA's Voyager missions at an early age. In this video, Dr. Capece provides advice for women and girls interested in pursuing careers in STEM fields, like focusing on physics, biology and chemistry at the high school level. This video is part of the Energy Department's #WomenInSTEM video series. At the Energy Department, we're committed to supporting a diverse talent pool of STEM innovators ready to address the challenges and opportunities of our growing clean energy economy.

Capece, Angela

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

354

Recap: Advancing Scientific Innovation at the National Labs | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergy 0611__Joint_DOE_GoJ_AMS_Data_v3.pptx More DocumentsCommunicationsProvidesDOE

355

PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002OpticsPeriodical: Volume 5,PET Imaging:Department 12009 |

356

DOE Announces First Awards in Scientific Discovery through Advanced  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY MiddlePLAN-46847 (2) RevisionDOEComputing

357

Sandia National Laboratories: Helping Advance the Scientific Foundation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik Spoerke SSLS Exhibit at ExploraGlobalFacilityHeliostat Field Heliostatthat

358

National Scientific User Facility Purpose and Capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007. This designation allows the ATR to become a cornerstone of nuclear energy research and development (R&D) within the U.S. by making it easier for universities, the commercial power industry, other national laboratories, and international organizations to conduct nuclear energy R&D. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide nuclear energy researchers access to world-class facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology within the U.S. In support of this mission, hot cell laboratories are being upgraded. These upgrades include a set of lead shielded cells that will house Irradiated Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) test rigs and construction of a shielded laboratory facility. A primary function of this shielded laboratory is to provide a state of the art type laboratory facility that is functional, efficient and flexible that is dedicated to the analysis and characterization of nuclear and non-nuclear materials. The facility shall be relatively easy to reconfigure to provide laboratory scale hot cave space for housing current and future nuclear material scientific research instruments.

K. E. Rosenberg; T. R. Allen; J. C. Haley; M. K. Meyer

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Scientific Impact | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearchScheduled System OutagesNews PressThemes Scientific

360

Scientific Advisory Committee  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) Sr (2)Science HighlightAlan Bishop selectedScientific

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Scientific Advisory Committee  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) Sr (2)Science HighlightAlan BishopScientific Advisory

362

Scientific Advisory Committee  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted forHighlights Nuclear Physics (NP) NPBiogenic AerosolsScientific

363

Scientific Advisory Committee  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted forHighlights Nuclear Physics (NP) NPBiogenicScientific Advisory

364

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCIENTIFIC DIVING SAFETY MANUAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................................................ 43 Section 13 Scientific Cave and Cavern Diving Standard

Rubloff, Gary W.

365

Scientific Challenges for Understanding the Quantum Universe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A workshop titled "Scientific Challenges for Understanding the Quantum Universe" was held December 9-11, 2008, at the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center-National Accelerator Laboratory. The primary purpose of the meeting was to examine how computing at the extreme scale can contribute to meeting forefront scientific challenges in particle physics, particle astrophysics and cosmology. The workshop was organized around five research areas with associated panels. Three of these, "High Energy Theoretical Physics," "Accelerator Simulation," and "Experimental Particle Physics," addressed research of the Office of High Energy Physics Energy and Intensity Frontiers, while the"Cosmology and Astrophysics Simulation" and "Astrophysics Data Handling, Archiving, and Mining" panels were associated with the Cosmic Frontier.

Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2009-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

366

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced extraction methods Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 5 SRA PROJECT FOR ARPA USACOM David Oppenheimer Summary: of the larger SAICBBN Advanced Joint Planning (AJP) Advanced Concepts...

367

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced mcr operators Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 31 Advanced Photon Source Conduct of Operations Manual Summary: ;TABLE OF CONTENTS x Advanced Photon Source Conduct of...

368

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced information components Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: advanced information components Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Advanced Topics in Computer Vision Principal Component Analysis, Eigenfaces and Fisher discriminant Summary:...

369

Bioinformatics Computing Consultant Position Available  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

exploit advanced computing platforms. JGI provides production sequencing and genomics for the Department of Energy. These activities are critical to the DOE missions in...

370

Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilitiesInternational Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden)Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis VlachoudisWorkshop Assistant: Graldine Jean

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

371

Scientific and Natural Areas (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Certain scientific and natural areas are established throughout the state for the purpose of preservation and protection. Construction and new development is prohibited in these areas.

372

Scientific and Technical Information Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes requirements and responsibilities for managing DOE's scientific and technical information. Cancels DOE O 241.1. Canceled by DOE O 241.1B.

2003-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

373

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological and Environmental Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In May 2009, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), and DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for BER-funded research over the subsequent three to five years. The workshop revealed several key points, in addition to achieving its goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. Chief among them: scientific progress in BER-funded research is limited by current allocations of computational resources. Additionally, growth in mission-critical computing -- combined with new requirements for collaborative data manipulation and analysis -- will demand ever increasing computing, storage, network, visualization, reliability and service richness from NERSC. This report expands upon these key points and adds others. It also presents a number of"case studies" as significant representative samples of the needs of science teams within BER. Workshop participants were asked to codify their requirements in this"case study" format, summarizing their science goals, methods of solution, current and 3-5 year computing requirements, and special software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel,"multi-core" environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years.

DOE Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research Program Office (BER),

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

374

TRAC-PF1/MOD1: an advanced best-estimate computer program for pressurized water reactor thermal-hydraulic analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in light-water reactors. The TRAC-PF1/MOD1 program provides this capability for pressurized water reactors and for many thermal-hydraulic test facilities. The code features either a one- or a three-dimensional treatment of the pressure vessel and its associated internals, a two-fluid nonequilibrium hydrodynamics model with a noncondensable gas field and solute tracking, flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment, optional reflood tracking capability for bottom-flood and falling-film quench fronts, and consistent treatment of entire accident sequences including the generation of consistent initial conditions. The stability-enhancing two-step (SETS) numerical algorithm is used in the one-dimensional hydrodynamics and permits this portion of the fluid dynamics to violate the material Courant condition. This technique permits large time steps and, hence, reduced running time for slow transients.

Liles, D.R.; Mahaffy, J.H.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Advanced energy projects FY 1997 research summaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of the Advanced Energy Projects (AEP) program is to explore the scientific feasibility of novel energy-related concepts that are high risk, in terms of scientific feasibility, yet have a realistic potential for a high technological payoff. The concepts supported by the AEP are typically at an early stage of scientific development. They often arise from advances in basic research and are premature for consideration by applied research or technology development programs. Some are based on discoveries of new scientific phenomena or involve exploratory ideas that span multiple scientific and technical disciplines which do not fit into an existing DOE program area. In all cases, the objective is to support evaluation of the scientific or technical feasibility of the novel concepts involved. Following AEP support, it is expected that each concept will be sufficiently developed to attract further funding from other sources to realize its full potential. Projects that involve evolutionary research or technology development and demonstration are not supported by AEP. Furthermore, research projects more appropriate for another existing DOE research program are not encouraged. There were 65 projects in the AEP research portfolio during Fiscal Year 1997. Eigheen projects were initiated during that fiscal year. This document consists of short summaries of projects active in FY 1997. Further information of a specific project may be obtained by contacting the principal investigator.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

State of Advancement of the International REVE Project: Computational Modelling of Irradiation-Induced Hardening in Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels and Relevant Experimental Validation Programme  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The REVE (Reactor for Virtual Experiments) project is an international joint effort aimed at developing multi-scale modelling computational toolboxes capable of simulating the behaviour of materials under irradiation at different time and length scales. Well grounded numerical techniques such as molecular dynamics (MD) and Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms, as well as rate equation (RE) and dislocation-defect interaction theory, form the basis on which the project is built. The goal is to put together a suite of integrated codes capable of deducing the changes in macroscopic properties starting from a detailed simulation of the microstructural changes produced by irradiation in materials. To achieve this objective, several European laboratories are closely collaborating, while exchanging data with American and Japanese laboratories currently pursuing similar approaches. The material chosen for the first phase of this project is reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel, the target macroscopic magnitude to be predicted being the yield strength increase ({delta}{sigma}y) due, essentially, to irradiation-enhanced formation of intragranular solute atom precipitates or clouds, as well as irradiation induced defects in the matrix, such as point defect clusters and dislocation loops. A description of the methodological approach used in the project and its current state is given in the paper. The development of the simulation tools requires a continuous feedback from ad hoc experimental data. In the framework of the REVE project SCK EN has therefore performed a neutron irradiation campaign of model alloys of growing complexity (from pure Fe to binary and ternary systems and a real RPV steel) in the Belgian test reactor BR2 and is currently carrying on the subsequent materials characterisation using its hot cell facilities. The paper gives the details of this experimental programme - probably the first large-scale one devoted to the validation of numerical simulation tools - and presents and discusses the first available results, with a view to their use as feedback for the improvement of the computational modelling. (authors)

Malerba, Lorenzo; Van Walle, Eric [SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Domain, Christophe; Jumel, Stephanie; Van Duysen, Jean-Claude [EDR R and D (France)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Computer Science Faculty Dr. Stephen Beale, Research Assistant Professor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer Science Faculty Dr. Stephen Beale, Research Assistant Professor Syntactic and semantic, multi-engine NLP applications Dr. Richard Chang, Associate Professor Computational complexity theory, natural language processing, intelligent agents Dr. Milton Halem, Research Professor Scientific computing

Adali, Tulay

378

Possibilities for Healthcare Computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advances in computing technology promise to aid in achieving the goals of healthcare. We review how such changes can support each of the goals of healthcare as identified by the U.S. Institute of Medicine: safety, ...

Szolovits, Peter

379

ProductSpecifications Thermo Scientific  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ProductSpecifications Thermo Scientific Niton XL3t GOLDD+ XRF Analyzer The Thermo Scientific Niton XL3t x-ray tube-based x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer with GOLDD+ technology is purpose versatile x-ray tubes ever used in a handheld XRF instrument. When this power is harnessed to our

Short, Daniel

380

Screw Placement and Osteoplasty Under Computed Tomographic-Fluoroscopic Guidance in a Case of Advanced Metastatic Destruction of the Iliosacral Joint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a case of combined surgical screw placement and osteoplasty guided by computed tomography-fluoroscopy (CTF) in a 68-year-old man with unilateral osteolytic destruction and a pathological fracture of the iliosacral joint due to a metastasis from renal cell carcinoma. The patient experienced intractable lower back pain that was refractory to analgesia. After transarterial particle and coil embolization of the tumor-feeding vessels in the angiography unit, the procedure was performed under general anesthesia by an interdisciplinary team of interventional radiologists and trauma surgeons. Under intermittent single-shot CTF, two K wires were inserted into the left iliosacral joint from a lateral transiliac approach at the S1 level followed by two self-tapping surgical screws. Continuous CTF was used for monitoring of the subsequent polymethylmethacrylate injection through two vertebroplasty cannulas for further stabilization of the screw threads within the osteolytic sacral ala. Both the screw placement and cement injection were successful, with no complications occurring during or after the procedure. With additional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory and opioid medication, the patient reported a marked decrease in his lower back pain and was able to move independently again at the 3-month follow-up assessment. In our patient with intolerable back pain due to tumor destruction and consequent pathological fracture of the iliosacral joint, CTF-guided iliosacral screw placement combined with osteoplasty was successful with respect to joint stabilization and a reduction in the need for analgesic therapy.

Trumm, Christoph Gregor, E-mail: christoph.trumm@med.lmu.de [University of Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology (Germany); Rubenbauer, Bianca; Piltz, Stefan [University of Munich, Department of Surgery (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F.; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten [University of Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology (Germany)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Acquisition of Scientific Equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Whitworth University constructed a 63,00 sq. ft. biology and chemistry building which opened in the Fall of 2011. This project provided for new state-of-the-art science instrumentation enabling Whitworth students to develop skills and knowledge that are directly transferable to practical applications thus enhancing Whitworth student's ability to compete and perform in the scientific workforce. Additionally, STEM faculty undertake outreach programs in the area schools, bringing students to our campus to engage in activities with our science students. The ability to work with insturmentation that is current helps to make science exciting for middle school and high school students and gets them thinking about careers in science. 14 items were purchased following the university's purchasing policy, that benefit instruction and research in the departments of biology, chemistry, and health sciences. They are: Cadaver Dissection Tables with Exhaust Chamber and accessories, Research Microscope with DF DIC, Phase and Fluorescence illumination with DP72 Camera, Microscope with Fluorescence, Microcomputer controlled ultracentrifuge, Ultracentrifuge rotor, Variable Temperature steam pressure sterilizer, Alliance APLC System, DNA Speedvac, Gel Cocumentation System, BioPac MP150, Glovebox personal workstation,Lyophilizer, Nano Drop 2000/2000c Spectrophotometer, C02 Incubator.

Noland, Lynn [Director, Sponsored Programs] [Director, Sponsored Programs

2014-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

382

K. S. Telang, R. W. Pike, F. C. Knopf, J. R. Hopper, J. Saleh, S. Waghchoure, S. C. Hedge and T. A. Hertwig,"An Advanced Process Analysis System for Improving Chemical and Refinery Processes," Computers and Chemical Engineering, Vol. 23, p. S727-730 (1999  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Hertwig,"An Advanced Process Analysis System for Improving Chemical and Refinery Processes," Computers Chemical and Refinery Processes K. S. Telang, X. Chen, R. W. Pike and F. C. Knopf Louisiana State and refineries for process improvements. The system integrates programs for on-line optimization, chemical

Pike, Ralph W.

383

Scientific Data Management Center for Enabling Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Managing scientific data has been identified by the scientific community as one of the most important emerging needs because of the sheer volume and increasing complexity of data being collected. Effectively generating, managing, and analyzing this information requires a comprehensive, end-to-end approach to data management that encompasses all of the stages from the initial data acquisition to the final analysis of the data. Fortunately, the data management problems encountered by most scientific domains are common enough to be addressed through shared technology solutions. Based on community input, we have identified three significant requirements. First, more efficient access to storage systems is needed. In particular, parallel file system and I/O system improvements are needed to write and read large volumes of data without slowing a simulation, analysis, or visualization engine. These processes are complicated by the fact that scientific data are structured differently for specific application domains, and are stored in specialized file formats. Second, scientists require technologies to facilitate better understanding of their data, in particular the ability to effectively perform complex data analysis and searches over extremely large data sets. Specialized feature discovery and statistical analysis techniques are needed before the data can be understood or visualized. Furthermore, interactive analysis requires techniques for efficiently selecting subsets of the data. Finally, generating the data, collecting and storing the results, keeping track of data provenance, data post-processing, and analysis of results is a tedious, fragmented process. Tools for automation of this process in a robust, tractable, and recoverable fashion are required to enhance scientific exploration. The SDM center was established under the SciDAC program to address these issues. The SciDAC-1 Scientific Data Management (SDM) Center succeeded in bringing an initial set of advanced data management technologies to DOE application scientists in astrophysics, climate, fusion, and biology. Equally important, it established collaborations with these scientists to better understand their science as well as their forthcoming data management and data analytics challenges. Building on our early successes, we have greatly enhanced, robustified, and deployed our technology to these communities. In some cases, we identified new needs that have been addressed in order to simplify the use of our technology by scientists. This report summarizes our work so far in SciDAC-2. Our approach is to employ an evolutionary development and deployment process: from research through prototypes to deployment and infrastructure. Accordingly, we have organized our activities in three layers that abstract the end-to-end data flow described above. We labeled the layers (from bottom to top): a) Storage Efficient Access (SEA), b) Data Mining and Analysis (DMA), c) Scientific Process Automation (SPA). The SEA layer is immediately on top of hardware, operating systems, file systems, and mass storage systems, and provides parallel data access technology, and transparent access to archival storage. The DMA layer, which builds on the functionality of the SEA layer, consists of indexing, feature identification, and parallel statistical analysis technology. The SPA layer, which is on top of the DMA layer, provides the ability to compose scientific workflows from the components in the DMA layer as well as application specific modules. NCSU work performed under this contract was primarily at the SPA layer.

Vouk, Mladen A.

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Parallel Processing Letters fc World Scientific Publishing Company  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parallel Processing Letters fc World Scientific Publishing Company SCHEDULING ISSUES Department, University of Idaho Moscow, Idaho 83844-1010, USA and AZAD AZADMANESH Computer Science Department, University of Nebraska at Omaha Omaha, Nebraska 68182-0500, USA and MILES McQUEEN Idaho National Engineering

Krings, Axel W.

385

Typologies of Computation and Computational Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We need much better understanding of information processing and computation as its primary form. Future progress of new computational devices capable of dealing with problems of big data, internet of things, semantic web, cognitive robotics and neuroinformatics depends on the adequate models of computation. In this article we first present the current state of the art through systematization of existing models and mechanisms, and outline basic structural framework of computation. We argue that defining computation as information processing, and given that there is no information without (physical) representation, the dynamics of information on the fundamental level is physical/ intrinsic/ natural computation. As a special case, intrinsic computation is used for designed computation in computing machinery. Intrinsic natural computation occurs on variety of levels of physical processes, containing the levels of computation of living organisms (including highly intelligent animals) as well as designed computational devices. The present article offers a typology of current models of computation and indicates future paths for the advancement of the field; both by the development of new computational models and by learning from nature how to better compute using different mechanisms of intrinsic computation.

Mark Burgin; Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

386

COMPUTER SCIENCE Program of Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPUTER SCIENCE Program of Study Financial Aid Applying Correspondence Computer Science offers describing original computer science research. Students are required to complete 58 semester hours understanding of computer science that gives a solid foundation for many advanced jobs in the field as well

Thomas, Andrew

387

Advanced Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

Holcomb, Gordon R. [NETL

2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

388

ANU College of Engineering and Computer Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANU College of Engineering and Computer Science CRICOS Provider Number 00120C Appendix B: Computing AND COMPUTER SCIENCE Taylor's Program ANU Program ANU Credits/Status Special Notes Bachelor of Software of Advanced Computing (Honours) 96 units of status Bachelor of Computer Science (Hons) (Computer Security

Zhou, Xiangyun "Sean"

389

E-Print Network 3.0 - advance science research Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: advance science research Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Army High Performance Computing Research Center Summary: Army High Performance Computing Research Center...

390

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced high performance Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: advanced high performance Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Army High Performance Computing Research Center Summary: Army High Performance Computing Research Center...

391

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the leading scientific computing facility for the Department of Energy's Office of Science, providing high-performance computing (HPC) resources to more than 3,000 researchers working on about 400 projects. NERSC provides large-scale computing resources and, crucially, the support and expertise needed for scientists to make effective use of them. In November 2009, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), and DOE's Office of High Energy Physics (HEP) held a workshop to characterize the HPC resources needed at NERSC to support HEP research through the next three to five years. The effort is part of NERSC's legacy of anticipating users needs and deploying resources to meet those demands. The workshop revealed several key points, in addition to achieving its goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. The chief findings: (1) Science teams need access to a significant increase in computational resources to meet their research goals; (2) Research teams need to be able to read, write, transfer, store online, archive, analyze, and share huge volumes of data; (3) Science teams need guidance and support to implement their codes on future architectures; and (4) Projects need predictable, rapid turnaround of their computational jobs to meet mission-critical time constraints. This report expands upon these key points and includes others. It also presents a number of case studies as representative of the research conducted within HEP. Workshop participants were asked to codify their requirements in this case study format, summarizing their science goals, methods of solution, current and three-to-five year computing requirements, and software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel, multi-core environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. The report includes a section that describes efforts already underway or planned at NERSC that address requirements collected at the workshop. NERSC has many initiatives in progress that address key workshop findings and are aligned with NERSC's strategic plans.

Gerber, Richard A.; Wasserman, Harvey

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

392

User Monitor & Feedback Mechanism for Social Scientific Study on Laptop Energy Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

change among laptop users via interactive energy-usage feedback with college students as the initiali User Monitor & Feedback Mechanism for Social Scientific Study on Laptop Energy Reduction SCIENTIFIC STUDY ON LAPTOP ENERGY REDUCTION by Namrata Buddhadev APPROVED FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER

Stamp, Mark

393

Advanced fuel chemistry for advanced engines.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Autoignition chemistry is central to predictive modeling of many advanced engine designs that combine high efficiency and low inherent pollutant emissions. This chemistry, and especially its pressure dependence, is poorly known for fuels derived from heavy petroleum and for biofuels, both of which are becoming increasingly prominent in the nation's fuel stream. We have investigated the pressure dependence of key ignition reactions for a series of molecules representative of non-traditional and alternative fuels. These investigations combined experimental characterization of hydroxyl radical production in well-controlled photolytically initiated oxidation and a hybrid modeling strategy that linked detailed quantum chemistry and computational kinetics of critical reactions with rate-equation models of the global chemical system. Comprehensive mechanisms for autoignition generally ignore the pressure dependence of branching fractions in the important alkyl + O{sub 2} reaction systems; however we have demonstrated that pressure-dependent 'formally direct' pathways persist at in-cylinder pressures.

Taatjes, Craig A.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Zador, Judit; Fernandes, Ravi X.; Miller, James A.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

advanced signal processing: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

XI, Universit de 9 Hindawi Publishing Corporation EURASIP Journal on Advances in Signal Processing Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: content...

395

Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Applied to Advanced Engine Combustion...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

over broad operating ranges) - Requirements for efficient and routine use of high-performance computing (HPC), development of both predictive and affordable models for advanced...

396

Development and Validation of an Advanced Stimulation Prediction...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of created fractures." State Colorado Objectives Develop and validate an advanced computer model that can be used in the planning and design of stimulation techniques to create...

397

advanced ant societies: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Raleigh,NC 27695 (RAL,EJJ) Feeding by ants (Hymenoptera Mitchell, Mike 3 Ant Colony Optimization for vehicle routing in advanced logistics systems Computer Technologies and...

398

adenomas technical advances: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University, Department of Engineering, Technical Report 97-25, December 1997. Based Pont, Michael J. 253 Memory Hierarchy: Advanced Concepts Computer Technologies and...

399

advanced practice nurse: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Domain Chapman, Michael S. 2 PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION Programme name Advanced Practice in Health and Social Care (Ophthalmic Nursing) Computer Technologies and Information Sciences...

400

advanced practice nurses: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Domain Chapman, Michael S. 2 PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION Programme name Advanced Practice in Health and Social Care (Ophthalmic Nursing) Computer Technologies and Information Sciences...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

advanced practice nursing: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Domain Chapman, Michael S. 2 PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION Programme name Advanced Practice in Health and Social Care (Ophthalmic Nursing) Computer Technologies and Information Sciences...

402

NREL: Community - NREL Researchers Advance Wind Energy Systems...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

gave a large improvement in computational efficiency, suggesting that there is potential in using advanced statistical methods to analyze wind turbine fatigue and...

403

Computer Assisted Parallel Program Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parallel computation is widely employed in scientific researches, engineering activities and product development. Parallel program writing itself is not always a simple task depending on problems solved. Large-scale scientific computing, huge data analyses and precise visualizations, for example, would require parallel computations, and the parallel computing needs the parallelization techniques. In this Chapter a parallel program generation support is discussed, and a computer-assisted parallel program generation system P-NCAS is introduced. Computer assisted problem solving is one of key methods to promote innovations in science and engineering, and contributes to enrich our society and our life toward a programming-free environment in computing science. Problem solving environments (PSE) research activities had started to enhance the programming power in 1970's. The P-NCAS is one of the PSEs; The PSE concept provides an integrated human-friendly computational software and hardware system to solve a target ...

Kawata, Shigeo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced technology development Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 55 Kompetenzzentrum fr Automobil-und Industrieelektronik Summary: of materials for these advanced semiconductor...

405

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced micromachined microphone Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

integrated circuit fabrication technology to the manufacture of micromechanical, optical, electrochemical Summary: , micromachined ultrasonic transducers; advanced computer aided...

406

Legacy Computing Markup Language (LCML) and LEGEND -- LEGacy Encapsulation for Network Distribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The rapid increase of computing power and emergence of distributed computing technologies such as Grid computing create new opportunities for scientific computing. One of the challenges faced in harnessing the emerging ...

Geiger, Stephen Kurt

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Uncertainty Analyses of Advanced Fuel Cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is developing technology, experimental protocols, computational methods, systems analysis software, and many other capabilities in order to advance the nuclear power infrastructure through the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFDI). Our project, is intended to facilitate will-informed decision making for the selection of fuel cycle options and facilities for development.

Laurence F. Miller; J. Preston; G. Sweder; T. Anderson; S. Janson; M. Humberstone; J. MConn; J. Clark

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

408

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced process research Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

computer science, education and scientific research aimed at helping... of the research process. Microsoft ... Source: Narasayya, Vivek - Data Management, Exploration and Mining...

409

2011 Computation Directorate Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From its founding in 1952 until today, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has made significant strategic investments to develop high performance computing (HPC) and its application to national security and basic science. Now, 60 years later, the Computation Directorate and its myriad resources and capabilities have become a key enabler for LLNL programs and an integral part of the effort to support our nation's nuclear deterrent and, more broadly, national security. In addition, the technological innovation HPC makes possible is seen as vital to the nation's economic vitality. LLNL, along with other national laboratories, is working to make supercomputing capabilities and expertise available to industry to boost the nation's global competitiveness. LLNL is on the brink of an exciting milestone with the 2012 deployment of Sequoia, the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA's) 20-petaFLOP/s resource that will apply uncertainty quantification to weapons science. Sequoia will bring LLNL's total computing power to more than 23 petaFLOP/s-all brought to bear on basic science and national security needs. The computing systems at LLNL provide game-changing capabilities. Sequoia and other next-generation platforms will enable predictive simulation in the coming decade and leverage industry trends, such as massively parallel and multicore processors, to run petascale applications. Efficient petascale computing necessitates refining accuracy in materials property data, improving models for known physical processes, identifying and then modeling for missing physics, quantifying uncertainty, and enhancing the performance of complex models and algorithms in macroscale simulation codes. Nearly 15 years ago, NNSA's Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI), now called the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program, was the critical element needed to shift from test-based confidence to science-based confidence. Specifically, ASCI/ASC accelerated the development of simulation capabilities necessary to ensure confidence in the nuclear stockpile-far exceeding what might have been achieved in the absence of a focused initiative. While stockpile stewardship research pushed LLNL scientists to develop new computer codes, better simulation methods, and improved visualization technologies, this work also stimulated the exploration of HPC applications beyond the standard sponsor base. As LLNL advances to a petascale platform and pursues exascale computing (1,000 times faster than Sequoia), ASC will be paramount to achieving predictive simulation and uncertainty quantification. Predictive simulation and quantifying the uncertainty of numerical predictions where little-to-no data exists demands exascale computing and represents an expanding area of scientific research important not only to nuclear weapons, but to nuclear attribution, nuclear reactor design, and understanding global climate issues, among other fields. Aside from these lofty goals and challenges, computing at LLNL is anything but 'business as usual.' International competition in supercomputing is nothing new, but the HPC community is now operating in an expanded, more aggressive climate of global competitiveness. More countries understand how science and technology research and development are inextricably linked to economic prosperity, and they are aggressively pursuing ways to integrate HPC technologies into their native industrial and consumer products. In the interest of the nation's economic security and the science and technology that underpins it, LLNL is expanding its portfolio and forging new collaborations. We must ensure that HPC remains an asymmetric engine of innovation for the Laboratory and for the U.S. and, in doing so, protect our research and development dynamism and the prosperity it makes possible. One untapped area of opportunity LLNL is pursuing is to help U.S. industry understand how supercomputing can benefit their business. Industrial investment in HPC applications has historically been limited by the prohibitive cost of entry

Crawford, D L

2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

410

Scientific Data Management (SDM) Center for Enabling Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past five years, our activities have both established Kepler as a viable scientific workflow environment and demonstrated its value across multiple science applications. We have published numerous peer-reviewed papers on the technologies highlighted in this short paper and have given Kepler tutorials at SC06,SC07,SC08,and SciDAC 2007. Our outreach activities have allowed scientists to learn best practices and better utilize Kepler to address their individual workflow problems. Our contributions to advancing the state-of-the-art in scientific workflows have focused on the following areas. Progress in each of these areas is described in subsequent sections. Workflow development. The development of a deeper understanding of scientific workflows "in the wild" and of the requirements for support tools that allow easy construction of complex scientific workflows; Generic workflow components and templates. The development of generic actors (i.e.workflow components and processes) which can be broadly applied to scientific problems; Provenance collection and analysis. The design of a flexible provenance collection and analysis infrastructure within the workflow environment; and Workflow reliability and fault tolerance. The improvement of the reliability and fault-tolerance of workflow environments.

Lud?scher, Bertram; Altintas, Ilkay

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

411

Advanced Combustion  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the Building TechnologiesS1!4T opAddress:AdolphusAdvanced Energy

412

DOE SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL REPORTS  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Record Disposition Schedule items listed below are have been consolidated from DOE Records Schedules previously approved over the last 35 years. They apply specifically to those scientific and...

413

E-Print Network 3.0 - artery computed tomography Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

computed tomography Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: artery computed tomography Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Abstract Computed...

414

Computing at the leading edge: Research in the energy sciences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this publication is to highlight selected scientific challenges that have been undertaken by the DOE Energy Research community. The high quality of the research reflected in these contributions underscores the growing importance both to the Grand Challenge scientific efforts sponsored by DOE and of the related supporting technologies that the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) and other facilities are able to provide. The continued improvement of the computing resources available to DOE scientists is prerequisite to ensuring their future progress in solving the Grand Challenges. Titles of articles included in this publication include: the numerical tokamak project; static and animated molecular views of a tumorigenic chemical bound to DNA; toward a high-performance climate systems model; modeling molecular processes in the environment; lattice Boltzmann models for flow in porous media; parallel algorithms for modeling superconductors; parallel computing at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory; the advanced combustion modeling environment; adaptive methodologies for computational fluid dynamics; lattice simulations of quantum chromodynamics; simulating high-intensity charged-particle beams for the design of high-power accelerators; electronic structure and phase stability of random alloys.

Mirin, A.A.; Van Dyke, P.T. [eds.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Increasing Scientific Productivity by Tracking Data  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Data Tracking Increases Scientific Productivity Data Tracking Increases Scientific Productivity July 20, 2011 | Tags: HPSS, NERSC Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 486 2402 HPSS...

416

Advanced Vehicle Testing & Evaluation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Provide benchmark data for advanced technology vehicles Develop lifecycle cost data for production vehicles utilizing advanced power trains Provide fleet...

417

Advanced LIGO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are second generation instruments designed and built for the two LIGO observatories in Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA. The two instruments are identical in design, and are specialized versions of a Michelson interferometer with 4 km long arms. As in initial LIGO, Fabry-Perot cavities are used in the arms to increase the interaction time with a gravitational wave, and power recycling is used to increase the effective laser power. Signal recycling has been added in Advanced LIGO to improve the frequency response. In the most sensitive frequency region around 100 Hz, the design strain sensitivity is a factor of 10 better than initial LIGO. In addition, the low frequency end of the sensitivity band is moved from 40 Hz down to 10 Hz. All interferometer components have been replaced with improved technologies to achieve this sensitivity gain. Much better seismic isolation and test mass suspensions are responsible for the gains at lower frequencies. Higher laser power, larger test masses and improved mirror coatings lead to the improved sensitivity at mid- and high- frequencies. Data collecting runs with these new instruments are planned to begin in mid-2015.

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

418

Computer resources Computer resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer resources 1 Computer resources available to the LEAD group Cédric David 30 September 2009 #12;Ouline · UT computer resources and services · JSG computer resources and services · LEAD computers· LEAD computers 2 #12;UT Austin services UT EID and Password 3 https://utdirect.utexas.edu #12;UT Austin

Yang, Zong-Liang

419

Final Scientific Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hackensack University Medical Center's major initiative to create a cleaner healthier and safer environment for patients, employees and the community served by the medical center is built on its commitment to protect the environment and conserve precious energy resources. Since 2004 the Medical Center launched a long term campaign to temper the negative environmental impact of proposed and existing new construction at the medical center and to improve campus wide overall energy efficiency. The plan was to begin by implementing a number of innovative and eco-friendly enhancements to the Gabrellian Women's and Children's Pavilion, in construction at the time, which would lead to Certification by the US Green Building Councils Leadership & Environmental Design (LEED) program. In addition the medical center would evaluate the feasibility of implementing a photovoltaic system in the new construction (in development and planned) to provide clean pollution free electricity. The steps taken to achieve this included conducting a feasibility study complete with architectural and engineering assessments to determine the potential for implementation of a photovoltaic system on the campus and also to conduct an energy survey that would focus on determining specific opportunities and upgrades that would lead to a healthier energy efficient interior environment at the medical center. The studies conducted by the medical center to determine the viability of installing a photovoltaic system identified two key issues that factored into leaderships decision not to implement the solar powered system. These factors were related to the advanced phase of construction of the women's and children's pavilion and the financial considerations to redesign and implement in the ambulatory cancer center. The medical center, in spite of their inability to proceed with the solar aspect of the project upheld their commitment to create a healthier environment for the patients and the community. To achieve a healthier energy efficient interior environment the medical center made substantive upgrades and improvements to the HVAC, plumbing electrical and other operating systems. Measures that were implemented range from use of lighting and plumbing fixture sensors, to reduce electrical and water usage, to use of refrigerants containing hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) which cause significantly less depletion of the ozone layer than the refrigerants more commonly used. Additional appropriate energy efficiency component upgrades include the installation of Chiller plants with variable frequency drives (VFDs) and harmonic filters, high efficiency motors, solar window glazing, and lighting/motion sensors.

Suzanne Lutwick; Helen Cunning

2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

420

Introduction to computers: Reference guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ``Introduction to Computers`` program establishes formal partnerships with local school districts and community-based organizations, introduces computer literacy to precollege students and their parents, and encourages students to pursue Scientific, Mathematical, Engineering, and Technical careers (SET). Hands-on assignments are given in each class, reinforcing the lesson taught. In addition, the program is designed to broaden the knowledge base of teachers in scientific/technical concepts, and Brookhaven National Laboratory continues to act as a liaison, offering educational outreach to diverse community organizations and groups. This manual contains the teacher`s lesson plans and the student documentation to this introduction to computer course.

Ligon, F.V.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Transfer Function Design for Scientific Discovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As computation scales beyond terascale, the scientific problems under study through computing are increasingly pushing the boundaries of human knowledge about the physical world. It is more pivotal than ever to quickly and reliably extract new knowledge from these complex simulations of ultra scale. In this project, the PI expanded the traditional notion of transfer function, which maps physical quantities to visual cues via table look-ups, to include general temporal as well as multivariate patterns that can be described procedurally through specialty mini programming languages. Their efforts aimed at answering a perpetual question of fundamental importance. That is "what a visualization should show". Instead of waiting for application scientists to initiate the process, the team at University of Tennessee worked closely with scientists at ORNL in a proactive role to envision and design elegant, powerful, and reliable tools that a user can use to specify "what is interesting". Their new techniques include visualization operators that revolve around correlation and graph properties, relative patterns in statistical distribution, temporal regular expressions, concurrent attribute subspaces and traditional compound boolean range queries. The team also paid special attention to ensure that all visualization operators are inherently designed with great parallel scalability to handle tera-scale datasets in both homogeneous and heterogeneous environments. Success has been demonstrated with leading edge computational science areas include climate modeling, combustion and systems genetics.

Jian Huang

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

422

Advanced Computer Control Concepts Facilitate Energy Recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Matrix Control that has been used successfully by Shell for several years. A brief description of the technique will be given and an illustration of its feed forward capabilities to compensate for load and soot blowing disturbances on a complex furnace...

Cutler, C. R.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Collaboration to advance high-performance computing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group and UserofProtein structure research

424

Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation and Computing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive SolarEducation Programs: CroSSlinksHuman ResourcesFacebook Twitter YouTube

425

Advanced Energy Projects FY 1996 research summaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of the Advanced Energy Projects Division (AEP) is to explore the scientific feasibility of novel energy-related concepts. These concepts are typically at an early stage of scientific development and, therefore, are premature for consideration by applied research or technology development programs. The portfolio of projects is dynamic, but reflects the broad role of the Department in supporting research and development for improving the Nation`s energy posture. Topical areas presently receiving support include: alternative energy sources; innovative concepts for energy conversion and storage; alternate pathways to energy efficiency; exploring uses of new scientific discoveries; biologically-based energy concepts; renewable and biodegradable materials; novel materials for energy technology; and innovative approaches to waste treatment and reduction. Summaries of the 70 projects currently being supported are presented. Appendices contain budget information and investigator and institutional indices.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Incentivizing Advanced Load Scheduling in Smart Homes , and David Irwin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Incentivizing Advanced Load Scheduling in Smart Homes Ye Xu , and David Irwin , and Prashant Shenoy Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering School of Computer Science University of Massachusetts Amherst ABSTRACT In recent years, researchers have proposed numerous advanced load scheduling algorithms

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

427

Year 1 Progress Report Computational Materials and Chemical Sciences Network Administration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports progress on the project Computational Materials and Chemical Sciences Network Administration, which is supported by DOE BES Grant DE-FG02-02ER45990 MOD 08. As stated in the original proposal, the primary goal of this project is to carry out the scientific administrative responsibilities for the Computational Materials and Chemical Sciences Network (CMCSN) of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. These responsibilities include organizing meetings, publishing and maintaining CMCSNs website, publishing a periodic newsletter, writing original material for both the website and the newsletter, maintaining CMCSN documentation, editing scientific documents, as needed, serving as liaison for the entire Network, facilitating information exchange across the network, communicating CMCSNs success stories to the larger community and numerous other tasks outside the purview of the scientists in the CMCSN. Given the dramatic increase in computational power, advances in computational materials science can have an enormous impact in science and technology. For many of the questions that can be addressed by computation there is a choice of theoretical techniques available, yet often there is no accepted understanding of the relative strengths and effectiveness of the competing approaches. The CMCSN fosters progress in this understanding by providing modest additional funding to research groups which engage in collaborative activities to develop, compare, and test novel computational techniques. Thus, the CMCSN provides the glue money which enables different groups to work together, building on their existing programs and expertise while avoiding unnecessary duplication of effort. This includes travel funding, partial postdoc salaries, and funding for periodic scientific meetings. The activities supported by this grant are briefly summarized below.

Rehr, John J.

2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

428

Scientific and Technical Information Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish Department of Energy (DOE) requirements and responsibilities to ensure that scientific and technical information (STI) is identified, processed, disseminated, and preserved in a manner that (a) enables the scientific community and the public to locate and use the unclassified and unlimited STI resulting from DOE's research and related endeavors and (b) ensures access to classified and sensitive unclassified STI is protected according to legal or Departmental requirements. Cancels DOE O 241.1. Canceled by DOE O 241.1A Chg 1.

2001-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

429

Scientific Cornerstones | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) Sr (2)Science HighlightAlan BishopScientificScientific

430

Computational Biology & KBase | Clean Energy| ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

scale and complexity of biological data require advanced computational tools and resources for processing, analyzing, visualizing, and integrating information needed to build,...

431

Computational Engineering (CoE) Degree Committee: Dawson (Chair), Akella, Demkowicz, Fowler,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an undergraduate degree in Scientific Computing. UT has a new Statistics and Data Science (SDS) Dept. which and Statistics SDS 335: Scientific and Technical Computing SDS 339: Applied Computational Science M 362: Probability I M 378K/SDS 378: Introduction to Math Statistics SDS 374C: Parallel Computing SDS 374D

Lightsey, Glenn

432

A characterization of the scientific data analysis process. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extensible scientific visualization tools are often offered as data analysis tools. While images may be the goal of visualization, insight is the goal of analysis. Visualization tools often fail to reflect this fact both in functionality and in their user interfaces, which typically focus on graphics and programming concepts rather than on concepts more meaningful to end-user scientists. This paper presents a characterization which shows how data visualization fits into the border process of scientific data analysis. We conducted an empirical study, observing scientists from several disciplines while they analyzed their own data. Examination of the observations exposed process elements outside conventional image viewing. For example, analysts queried for quantitative information, made a variety of comparisons, applied math, managed data, and kept records. The characterization of scientific data analysis reveals activity beyond that traditionally supported by computer. It offers an understanding which has the potential to be applied to many future designs, and suggests specific recommendations for improving the support of this important aspect of scientific computing.

Springmeyer, R.R.; Blattner, M.M.; Max, N.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)]|[California Univ., Davis, CA (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Final Technical and Scientific Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to study the ultrafast carrier dynamics of in two types of semiconductor quantum dots: self-assembled quantum dots (SAQDs) and patterned quantum dots (PQDs) and to correlate these dynamics with the shape, size and material composition of the dots, thereby obtaining a fundamental scientific understanding of these nanoscale systems.

Sanjay Krishna (PI) and Diana Huffaker (Co-PI)

2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

434

Molecular Science Computing: 2010 Greenbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This 2010 Greenbook outlines the science drivers for performing integrated computational environmental molecular research at EMSL and defines the next-generation HPC capabilities that must be developed at the MSC to address this critical research. The EMSL MSC Science Panel used EMSLs vision and science focus and white papers from current and potential future EMSL scientific user communities to define the scientific direction and resulting HPC resource requirements presented in this 2010 Greenbook.

De Jong, Wibe A.; Cowley, David E.; Dunning, Thom H.; Vorpagel, Erich R.

2010-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

435

Teaching interdisciplinary computational science from an electronic book on the Internet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The advances in high performance computing technology have led to great changes in the way applied and pure sciences are being carried out. These advances have left curricula at the graduate level in many disciplines omitting a whole body of essential research tools that students have to seek out on their own to carry out their research. In many cases the skills are not difficult to assimilate and the student develops the required knowledge during the process of carrying out research. Usually this is not a systematic approach, and it often leaves the student with a fragmented knowledge of some of the increasingly important concepts and areas relating to computing. By offering a general introduction and overview to networks, computer architectures, scientific visualization, programming languages, a variety of operating systems and hypertext authoring tools students get a broad comprehensive view of modern high performance computing methodologies. Students from all disciplines benefit from such a course. The survey of such tools is ideally suited for an interdisciplinary curriculum. As high performance computing becomes an essential component of the University curriculum, instructors need to be prepared to incorporate these concepts and methods in their own research and curricula. At this point in time educators are uncertain as to how to proceed, and there appears to be a lack of consensus on the curriculum for computational science. The Computational Science Education Project was initiated in September 1991, by the Department of Energy to develop a syllabus for teaching interdisciplinary computational science. The interdisciplinary nature of the project is intended to contribute to national technological competitiveness by producing a body of graduates with the necessary skills to operate effectively in high performance computing environments.

Oliver, C.E.; Strayer, M.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Umar, V.M. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

436

Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance, and to some extent, experiment management, are inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are difficult, if not impossible, to verify and validate (V&V) according to modern standards. Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for effective application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In late 2009, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort, the ATR Core Modeling Update Project, to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF).

David W. Nigg

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance and, to some extent, experiment management are obsolete, inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are becoming increasingly difficult to properly verify and validate (V&V). Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In 2009 the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate V&V, within the next 3-4 years via the ATR Core Modeling and Simulation and V&V Update (or Core Modeling Update) Project. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF).

Rahmat Aryaeinejad; Douglas S. Crawford; Mark D. DeHart; George W. Griffith; D. Scott Lucas; Joseph W. Nielsen; David W. Nigg; James R. Parry; Jorge Navarro

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Computer Science Computer Science?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michigan Autonomous Aerial Vehicles, UM::Autonomy, U-M Programming, U-M Solar Car, Hybrid RacingComputer Science @ Michigan Life as a CS Student What is Computer Science? Computer science is shaping the future. A degree in computer science can help shape yours. Michigan CS students have

Eustice, Ryan

439

NEST Scientific Report 2007-2009 Transport phenomena in self-assembled nanowires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NEST Scientific Report 2007-2009 Transport phenomena in self-assembled nanowires 21 S elf incompatible materials can be combined into advanced ­ in some cases unprecedented ­ nanostructures and charge transport in self-assembled structures as well as Josephson coupling in devices combining

Abbondandolo, Alberto

440

Code Booster Award-winning research on code optimization explores multicore computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 2008 Code Booster Award-winning research on code optimization explores multicore computing paper exploring ways to make a popular scientific analysis code run smoothly on different types of multicore computers. SamuelWilliams,aresearcherfromBerkeleyLab'sComputational

Knowles, David William

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Should we train scientific generalists?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I examine the topic of training scientific generalists. To focus the discussion, I propose the creation of a new graduate program, analogous in structure to existing MD/PhD programs, aimed at training a critical mass of scientific researchers with substantial intellectual breadth. In addition to completing the normal requirements for a PhD, students would undergo an intense, several year training period designed to expose them to the core vocabulary of multiple subjects at the graduate level. After providing some historical and philosophical context for this proposal, I outline how such a program could be implemented with little institutional overhead by existing research universities. Finally, I discuss alternative possibilities for training generalists by taking advantage of contemporary developments in online learning and open science.

Sarma, Gopal

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Adventures in supercomputing: Scientific exploration in an era of change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Students deserve the opportunity to explore the world of science surrounding them. Therefore it is important that scientific exploration and investigation be a part of each student`s educational career. The Department of Energy`s Adventures in Superconducting (AiS) takes students beyond mere scientific literacy to a rich embodiment of scientific exploration. AiS provides today`s science and math students with a greater opportunity to investigate science problems, propose solutions, explore different methods of solving the problem, organize their work into a technical paper, and present their results. Students learn at different rates in different ways. Science classes with students having varying learning styles and levels of achievement have always been a challenge for teachers. The AiS {open_quotes}hands-on, minds-on{close_quotes} project-based method of teaching science meets the challenge of this diversity heads on! AiS uses the development of student chosen projects as the means of achieving a lifelong enthusiasm for scientific proficiency. One goal of AiS is to emulate the research that takes place in the everyday environment of scientists. Students work in teams and often collaborate with students nationwide. With the help of mentors from the academic and scientific community, students pose a problem in science, investigate possible solutions, design a mathematical and computational model for the problem, exercise the model to achieve results, and evaluate the implications of the results. The students then have the opportunity to present the project to their peers, teachers, and scientists. Using this inquiry-based technique, students learn more than science skills, they learn to reason and think -- going well beyond the National Science Education Standard. The teacher becomes a resource person actively working together with the students in their quest for scientific knowledge.

Gentry, E. [Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States); Helland, B. [Krell Institute, Ames, IA (United States); Summers, B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Ceph, a distributed storage system for scientific computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ceph is a distributed storage system designed to providing high performance and reliability at scales of up to thousands of storage nodes. The system is based on a distributed object storage layer call RADOS that provides durability, availability, efficient data distribution, and rich object semantics. This storage can be consumed directly via an object-based interface, or via file, block, or REST-based object services that are built on top of it. Clusters are composed of commodity components to provide a reliable storage service serving multiple use-cases. This seminar will cover the basic architecture of Ceph, with a focus on how each service can be consumed in a research and infrastructure environment. About the speaker Sage Weil, Founder and current CTO of Inktank Inc, is the creator of the Ceph project. He originally designed it as part of his PhD research in Storage Systems at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Since graduating, he has continued to refine the system with the goal of providi...

CERN. Geneva

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

12.010 Computational Methods of Scientific Programming, Fall 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This course introduces programming languages and techniques used by physical scientists: FORTRAN, C, C++, MATLAB, and Mathematica. Emphasis is placed on program design, algorithm development and verification, and comparative ...

Herring, T. (Thomas)

445

12.010 Computational Methods of Scientific Programming, Fall 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This course introduces programming languages and techniques used by physical scientists: FORTRAN, C, C++, Matlab, and Mathematica. Emphasis is placed on program design, algorithm development and verification, and comparative ...

Herring, T. (Thomas)

446

Indiana-Illinois Workshop on Scientific Computing 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

... a non-invasive approach to the diagnosis and continuous monitoring for many ... micro-vasculature, accounting for the IOP-induced deformation of the vessel...

447

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center 2007 Annual Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annual Report aims to develop commercially viable hydrogen fuel cells.Annual Report Scientists discover why the right amount of moisture in the membrane plays a key role in fuel cell

Hules, John A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

MA50177: Scientific Computing Nuclear Reactor Simulation Generalised Eigenvalue Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Problems Introduction While people are still looking for (energy and cost) efficient ways to exploit renewable energies (solar, aeolian, fuel cells, etc.), nuclear power stations will continue to play a major role as an energy source in the world. Since it is not possible to test safety procedures in the case

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

449

VGDS: An ObjectOriented Framework for Distributed Scientific Computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bottlenecks in the production pipeline for High Performance Com­ puting software result from a shortage of adequate design tools and design theory. We propose one technology that can help eliminate the HPC soft­ ware bottleneck: object­oriented construction of vir­ tual global data structures (VGDS). In this paper

450

Python and PyDSTool for Scientific Computation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems, neural modeling of small networks, etc.) #12;Integrated Development Environments Free: IPython

Clewley, Robert

451

Scientific Computing & InstrumentationTM www.scimag.com  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-D Visualization to Investigate the Drosophila Brain critical and ongoing challenge for medical the functioning of the brain. A quantitative assessment of brain structure seemed particularly rewarding since it allows the identification of genetic variants with subtle brain structure phenotypes and, even more

Andrzejak, Artur

452

A distributed scientific visualization paradigm for heterogeneous computer networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the object oriented techniques described by the Xt Intrinsics [1]. The system as a whole consists of two parts, the communication libraries that exist on the supercomputer (Libsp), and the daemon process that runs on the workstation (SPD). This particular... an ethernet socket con- nection, formatted, and sent to the appropriate display widget for physical rendering. SPD Organization The SPD is organized according to the constraints provided by the X Window Sys- tem Xt Intrinsics libraries [20], and is shown...

Lenox, Mark Wayne

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Computational Plasma Physics: Powerful New Tools of Scientific Discovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ Deuterium and lithium easily available for thousands of years · Environmental advantages ­ No carbon, seasonal or regional weather variation, no requirement for local CO2 sequestration. ­ Not limited in its

Hammett, Greg

454

What are the Computational Keys to Future Scientific Discoveries...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

share the torrent of data being generated. And they are not alone. From astronomy to genomics, increasingly sophisticated instruments are producing data at staggering rates, and...

455

Computational Techniques and Applications: CTAC95 1 World Scientific  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, production and re­ covery of oil and gas the petroleum industry has developed and implemented a variety into the aquifer has been studied by nuclear engineers in connection to possible leaks from tanks with radioactive

456

Energy Department Seeks Proposals to Use Scientific Computing Resources at  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergyIDIQBusiness CompetitionDepartmentandDepartmentCareer

457

What are the Computational Keys to Future Scientific Discoveries?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout PrintableBlenderWhat Makes Clouds Form, Grow andWhyWhat

458

NERSC, Cray Move Forward With Next-Generation Scientific Computing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat Cornell Batteries & FuelTechnologies |T I O N A L SNERSC,

459

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center NERSC Exceeds Reliability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData andFleetEngineeringAnnual Report This work was

460

Costs and business models in scientific  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Costs and business models in scientific research publishing A report commissioned by the Wellcome Trust DP-3114.p/100/04-2004/JM #12;Costs and business models in scientific research publishing A report, Cambridgeshire CB4 9ZR, UK Tel: +44 (0)1223 209400 Web: www.sqw.co.uk #12;Costs and business models in scientific

Rambaut, Andrew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

University of Arizona Research Computing 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in High Performance Computing and High Throughput Computing (HPC/HTC) and storage will greatly advance, the new Research Data Center houses our next generation of High Performance Computing (HPC), High on interdisciplinary concepts and on collaborations with industry. Our reliance on high performance computing

Lega, Joceline

462

The Netherlands Code of Conduct for Scientific Practice Principles of good scientific teaching and research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Netherlands Code of Conduct for Scientific Practice Principles of good scientific teaching and research 2004, revision 20121 Association of Universities in the Netherlands 1 The code of conduct for Scientific Practice 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS The Netherlands Code of Conduct for Scientific Practice Preamble 3

van Rooij, Robert

463

A SURVEY OF UNDERWATER VEHICLE NAVIGATION: RECENT ADVANCES AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the value, quantity, and cost- effectiveness of scientific data obtained with these vehicles. This paperA SURVEY OF UNDERWATER VEHICLE NAVIGATION: RECENT ADVANCES AND NEW CHALLENGES James C. Kinsey Ryan M. Eustice Louis L. Whitcomb Department of Mechanical Engineering The Johns Hopkins University

Eustice, Ryan

464

Advanced energy projects FY 1994 research summaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Division of Advanced Energy Projects (AEP) provides support to explore the feasibility of novel, energy-related concepts that evolve from advances in basic research. These concepts are typically at an early stage of scientific definition and, therefore, are premature for consideration by applied research or technology development programs. The AEP also supports high-risk, exploratory concepts that do not readily fit into a program area but could have several applications that may span scientific disciplines or technical areas. Projects supported by the Division arise from unsolicited ideas and concepts submitted by researchers. The portfolio of projects is dynamic and reflects the broad role of the Department in supporting research and development for improving the Nation`s energy outlook. FY 1994 projects include the following topical areas: novel materials for energy technology; renewable and biodegradable materials; exploring uses of new scientific discoveries; alternate pathways to energy efficiency; alternative energy sources; and innovative approaches to waste treatment and reduction. Summaries are given for 66 projects.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Techniques and tools for measuring energy efficiency of scientific software applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The scale of scientific High Performance Computing (HPC) and High Throughput Computing (HTC) has increased significantly in recent years, and is becoming sensitive to total energy use and cost. Energy-efficiency has thus become an important concern in scientific fields such as High Energy Physics (HEP). There has been a growing interest in utilizing alternate architectures, such as low power ARM processors, to replace traditional Intel x86 architectures. Nevertheless, even though such solutions have been successfully used in mobile applications with low I/O and memory demands, it is unclear if they are suitable and more energy-efficient in the scientific computing environment. Furthermore, there is a lack of tools and experience to derive and compare power consumption between the architectures for various workloads, and eventually to support software optimizations for energy efficiency. To that end, we have performed several physical and software-based measurements of workloads from HEP applications running o...

Abdurachmanov, David; Eulisse, Giulio; Knight, Robert; Niemi, Tapio; Nurminen, Jukka K; Nyback, Filip; Pestana, Goncalo; Ou, Zhonghong; Khan, Kashif

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Scientific Labs | Neutron Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) Sr (2)Science HighlightAlanExchange ProgramScientific Labs

467

Sandia National Laboratories: Scientific Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErikGroundbreaking Work on CriegeeElectronicsAssociationScaledandScientific

468

Scientific Programs | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted forHighlights Nuclear Physics (NP)Data MovementScientific Programs

469

ALS Scientific Advisory Committee Charter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations DuringALS DoctoralALS RevealsScientific

470

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Computational design and development of a new, lightweight cast alloy for advanced cylinder heads in high-efficiency, light-duty engines FOA 648-3a  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by General Motors at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about computational design and...

471

BUILDING REMOTE SENSING APPLICATIONS USING SCIENTIFIC DATABASE AND SEMANTIC WEB TECHNOLOGIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

it bases its innovation to the state of the art on its orig- inal contributions to data models, query. Giammatteo, M. Sagona, S. Perelli (Advanced Computer Systems), T. Reitz, E. Klien, R. Gregor (Fraunhofer Inst

Koubarakis, Manolis

472

Modeling aspects of human memory for scientific study.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Working with leading experts in the field of cognitive neuroscience and computational intelligence, SNL has developed a computational architecture that represents neurocognitive mechanisms associated with how humans remember experiences in their past. The architecture represents how knowledge is organized and updated through information from individual experiences (episodes) via the cortical-hippocampal declarative memory system. We compared the simulated behavioral characteristics with those of humans measured under well established experimental standards, controlling for unmodeled aspects of human processing, such as perception. We used this knowledge to create robust simulations of & human memory behaviors that should help move the scientific community closer to understanding how humans remember information. These behaviors were experimentally validated against actual human subjects, which was published. An important outcome of the validation process will be the joining of specific experimental testing procedures from the field of neuroscience with computational representations from the field of cognitive modeling and simulation.

Caudell, Thomas P. (University of New Mexico); Watson, Patrick (University of Illinois - Champaign-Urbana Beckman Institute); McDaniel, Mark A. (Washington University); Eichenbaum, Howard B. (Boston University); Cohen, Neal J. (University of Illinois - Champaign-Urbana Beckman Institute); Vineyard, Craig Michael; Taylor, Shawn Ellis; Bernard, Michael Lewis; Morrow, James Dan; Verzi, Stephen J.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

September is Scientific Supercomputing Month  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in honor of American computer scientist Grace Murray Hopper. Whether it's building a car battery that will take you 500 miles on a single charge or understanding the impact of...

474

Computational Science and Innovation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulations - utilizing computers to solve complicated science and engineering problems - are a key ingredient of modern science. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is a world leader in the development of high-performance computing (HPC), the development of applied math and algorithms that utilize the full potential of HPC platforms, and the application of computing to science and engineering problems. An interesting general question is whether the DOE can strategically utilize its capability in simulations to advance innovation more broadly. In this article, I will argue that this is certainly possible.

D. J. Dean

2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

475

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis cai computer Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cai computer Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: analysis cai computer Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Publications Book Edited Summary:...

476

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual international computer Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

computer Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: annual international computer Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Proceedings of the The IEEE...

477

E-Print Network 3.0 - anthropomorphic computer character Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

computer character Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anthropomorphic computer character Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Effects of Head...

478

E-Print Network 3.0 - african computer scientists Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

computer scientists Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: african computer scientists Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 http:chronicle.com...

479

E-Print Network 3.0 - auscultatory skills computer Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

auscultatory skills computer Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: auscultatory skills computer Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The Health...

480

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis computer program Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: analysis computer program Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Computational Science and Engineering Programs in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

ECE 554: Computer Architecture -ECE 452 or CS470 or written consent of instructor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECE 554: Computer Architecture - ECE 452 or CS470 or written consent of instructor Pre: - Factors affecting computer system performance - Instruction level parallelism (ILP) Advanced pipelining

Schumacher, Russ

482

Advanced Critical Advanced Energy Retrofit Education and Training...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Critical Advanced Energy Retrofit Education and Training and Credentialing - 2014 BTO Peer Review Advanced Critical Advanced Energy Retrofit Education and Training and...

483

COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE Ronald A. Thisted  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The Digital VAX 11/780 was a typical scientific computer of the era. The VAX had over 300 different machine such as the VAX, the Intel 80x86 family of processors (the processors on which the IBM PC and its successors

Stephens, Matthew

484

Italian Academy Advanced Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America at Columbia University Annual Report 20062007 The Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America at Columbia University Annual Report 20062007 #12;italian academy for advanced studies in america 1161 Amsterdam Avenue New York, NY 10027 tel: (212) 854-2306 fax

Qian, Ning

485

Advanced Search Search Tips  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Search Search Tips Advanced Search Search Tips springerlink.com SpringerLink 2,000 40,000 20,000 2010 11 Please visit 7 http://www.springerlink.com GO 1997 1997 SpringerLink Advanced Search Search Tips CONTENT DOI CITATION DOI ISSN ISBN CATEGORY AND DATE LIMITERS Journals Books Protocols

Kinosita Jr., Kazuhiko

486

1.00 Introduction to Computers and Engineering Problem Solving, Spring 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This course examines fundamental software development and computational methods for engineering, scientific and managerial applications. Emphasis is placed on object-oriented software design and development. Students engage ...

Kocur, George

487

1.00 Introduction to Computers and Engineering Problem Solving, Spring 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fundamental software development and computational methods for engineering and scientific applications. Object-oriented software design and development. Weekly programming problems cover programming concepts, graphical ...

Kocur, George

488

Maintainable and Reusable Scientific Software Adaptation Democratizing Scientific Software Adaptation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.kang@samsung.com Eli Tilevich, Srinidhi Varadarajan, and Naren Ramakrishnan Center for High-End Computing Systems Dept resources to ensure its efficiency and reliability. Although adaptation patterns can be found in a sizable-oriented Pro- gramming; D.2.7 [Software Engineering]: Distribution, Maintenance, and Enhancement; D.2

Ramakrishnan, Naren

489

Advanced Security Acceleration Project for Smart Grid (ASAP-SG...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Security Acceleration Project for Smart Grid (ASAP-SG) June 12, 2013 Problem Statement: The goal of this project is to develop a set of computer and network security...

490

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced technology program Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of science and technology to identify... and transportation, high-performance computing, modeling and simulation, and advanced weapons technologies... THE VALUE OF THE DEPARTMENT...

491

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced distillation curve Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

58 (2003) 26712680 www.elsevier.comlocateces Summary: distillation: Advanced simulation and experimental validation. Computers and Chemical Engineering, 22, S371-S......

492

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced integrated modeling Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering, University of Calgary Collection: Engineering 55 Kompetenzzentrum fr Automobil-und Industrieelektronik Summary: to use advanced computational methods make this...

493

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced marine vehicle Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of different earth environments. Recent advances in marine and aerial robotics, sensors, computers... supervision of human operators. The present talk will address ......

494

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced remote technology Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

County Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 24 TSM 433: Precision Farming Systems Advanced Concepts and Applications Summary: TSM 433: Precision Farming...

495

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced numerical methods Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kentucky Collection: Engineering 30 STAT 639v: Topics in Statistics Statistical Computing Summary: advanced courses. On the...

496

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced converter reactors Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

computer network ring for advance science and education cooperation in Beijing... thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) project have an opportunity to offer technical...