Sample records for advanced scientific computing

  1. Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science FY 2006 Accomplishment HDF5-Fast fundamental Computer Science technologies and their application in production scientific research tools. Our technology ­ index, query, storage and retrieval ­ and use of such technology in computational and computer

  2. Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science FY 2006 Accomplishment High Performance collections of scientific data. In recent years, much of the work in computer and computational science has problem. It is generally accepted that as sciences move into the tera- and peta-scale regimes that one

  3. advanced scientific computing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: Advanced Scientific Computing...

  4. Advanced Scientific Computing Research Jobs

    Office of Science (SC) Website

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  5. Advanced Scientific Computing Research Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian

    2013-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In October 2012, ESnet and the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) of the DOE SC organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by the ASCR program office. The requirements identified at the review are summarized in the Findings section, and are described in more detail in the body of the report.

  6. Advanced Scientific Computing Research Network Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dart, Eli

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that have a high-performance computing (HPC) component (with an emphasis on high performance computing facilities.develop and deploy high- performance computing hardware and

  7. Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological and Environmental Research Fusion Energy Sciences High Energy Physics Nuclear Physics What my students Code http://code.google.com/p/net-almanac/ Beta release this week #12;Contact Information Jon Dugan

  8. Sandia Energy - Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  9. DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Interconnect technology: Increasing the performance and energy efficiency of data movement. 3. Memory Facilities Leadership Computing National Energy Research Supercomputing Center (NERSC) High. Energy efficiency: Creating more energy efficient circuit, power, and cooling technologies. 2

  10. Computational Biology, Advanced Scientific Computing, and Emerging Computational Architectures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This CRADA was established at the start of FY02 with $200 K from IBM and matching funds from DOE to support post-doctoral fellows in collaborative research between International Business Machines and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to explore effective use of emerging petascale computational architectures for the solution of computational biology problems. 'No cost' extensions of the CRADA were negotiated with IBM for FY03 and FY04.

  11. NERSC Role in Advanced Scientific Computing Research Katherine...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computing Center (NERSC) is to accelerate the pace of scientific discovery by providing high performance computing, information, data, and communications services for all DOE...

  12. Advanced Scientific Computing Research Funding Profile by Subprogram

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    results in mathematics, high performance computing and advanced networks and a Excludes $1 applications. High-performance computing provides a new window for researchers to observe the natural world in applied mathematics, computer science and high-performance networks and providing the high-performance

  13. Advanced Scientific Computing Research User Facilities | U.S...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    research projects that are funded by the DOE Office of Science and require high performance computing support are eligible to apply to use NERSC resources. Projects that are not...

  14. National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, Horst; Kramer, William; Saphir, William; Shalf, John; Bailey, David; Oliker, Leonid; Banda, Michael; McCurdy, C. William; Hules, John; Canning, Andrew; Day, Marc; Colella, Philip; Serafini, David; Wehner, Michael; Nugent, Peter

    2004-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) proposes to create a National Facility for Advanced Computational Science (NFACS) and to establish a new partnership between the American computer industry and a national consortium of laboratories, universities, and computing facilities. NFACS will provide leadership-class scientific computing capability to scientists and engineers nationwide, independent of their institutional affiliation or source of funding. This partnership will bring into existence a new class of computational capability in the United States that is optimal for science and will create a sustainable path towards petaflops performance.

  15. Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Homepage | U.S.

    Office of Science (SC) Website

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  16. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Advanced Scientific

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  17. Theory and Advanced Scientific Presentation to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theory and Advanced Scientific Computing Presentation to Dr. Walt Polansky Acting Director, MICS Laboratory August 29, 2002 #12;PPPL THEORY PROGRAM Has Well-Defined Target & Approach TARGET --- RELIABLE systems (longer-term impact) #12;PPPL THEORY/ADVANCED SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING PROGRAM Emphasizes

  18. advancing computational science: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a novel Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson 7 Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science Engineering Websites Summary: Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer...

  19. advanced computational science: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a novel Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson 7 Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science Engineering Websites Summary: Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer...

  20. advanced computer science: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a novel Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson 7 Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science Engineering Websites Summary: Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer...

  1. National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Applications, High Performance Computing for ComputationalSystem Effectiveness in High Performance Computing Systems,Tammy Welcome, High Performance Computing Facilities for

  2. Laser Direct Drive: Scientific Advances,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Laser Direct Drive: Scientific Advances, Technical Achievements, and the Road To Fusion Energy energy gain ( 40) at 1 MJ laser energy Advanced lasers/ target designs overcome uniformity requirements, medical applications) Gas laser medium is easy to cool (tough to break gas) Nike single beam focus #12

  3. Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) | U.S. DOE Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  4. (865) 574-6185, mccoydd@ornl.gov Advanced Scientific Computing Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    on integrating new software for the science applications which researchers run on high performance computing platforms. One of the key challenges in high performance computing is to ensure that the software which

  5. The FES Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and researchers are expected to be leaders in the efficient and productive use of High Performance Computing

  6. Modeling, Simulation and Analysis of Complex Networked Systems: A Program Plan for DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D L

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many complex systems of importance to the U.S. Department of Energy consist of networks of discrete components. Examples are cyber networks, such as the internet and local area networks over which nearly all DOE scientific, technical and administrative data must travel, the electric power grid, social networks whose behavior can drive energy demand, and biological networks such as genetic regulatory networks and metabolic networks. In spite of the importance of these complex networked systems to all aspects of DOE's operations, the scientific basis for understanding these systems lags seriously behind the strong foundations that exist for the 'physically-based' systems usually associated with DOE research programs that focus on such areas as climate modeling, fusion energy, high-energy and nuclear physics, nano-science, combustion, and astrophysics. DOE has a clear opportunity to develop a similarly strong scientific basis for understanding the structure and dynamics of networked systems by supporting a strong basic research program in this area. Such knowledge will provide a broad basis for, e.g., understanding and quantifying the efficacy of new security approaches for computer networks, improving the design of computer or communication networks to be more robust against failures or attacks, detecting potential catastrophic failure on the power grid and preventing or mitigating its effects, understanding how populations will respond to the availability of new energy sources or changes in energy policy, and detecting subtle vulnerabilities in large software systems to intentional attack. This white paper outlines plans for an aggressive new research program designed to accelerate the advancement of the scientific basis for complex networked systems of importance to the DOE. It will focus principally on four research areas: (1) understanding network structure, (2) understanding network dynamics, (3) predictive modeling and simulation for complex networked systems, and (4) design, situational awareness and control of complex networks. The program elements consist of a group of Complex Networked Systems Research Institutes (CNSRI), tightly coupled to an associated individual-investigator-based Complex Networked Systems Basic Research (CNSBR) program. The CNSRI's will be principally located at the DOE National Laboratories and are responsible for identifying research priorities, developing and maintaining a networked systems modeling and simulation software infrastructure, operating summer schools, workshops and conferences and coordinating with the CNSBR individual investigators. The CNSBR individual investigator projects will focus on specific challenges for networked systems. Relevancy of CNSBR research to DOE needs will be assured through the strong coupling provided between the CNSBR grants and the CNSRI's.

  7. Advanced Artificial Science. The development of an artificial science and engineering research infrastructure to facilitate innovative computational modeling, analysis, and application to interdisciplinary areas of scientific investigation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saffer, Shelley (Sam) I.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a final report of the DOE award DE-SC0001132, Advanced Artificial Science. The development of an artificial science and engineering research infrastructure to facilitate innovative computational modeling, analysis, and application to interdisciplinary areas of scientific investigation. This document describes the achievements of the goals, and resulting research made possible by this award.

  8. Advanced Scientific Computing Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    research along with supporting narratives, illustrated by specific science-based case studies. Findings from the review will guide NERSC procurements and service offerings...

  9. Advanced Scientific Computing Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  10. Advanced Scientific Computing Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  11. PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009 PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009 PIA - Advanced Test Reactor...

  12. Edison Electrifies Scientific Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    recently accepted "Edison," a new flagship supercomputer designed for scientific productivity. Named in honor of American inventor Thomas Alva Edison, the Cray XC30 will be...

  13. Educational Interventions to Advance Children's Scientific Thinking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klahr, David

    , and an assessment process. Here we describe some ways in which re- search in cognitive development has advanced our for Classifying Interventions in Science Education Scientific thinking can be characterized in terms of two of the scientific enter- prise" (row 2). (6). Research on domain-specific hypotheses (cell A) assesses young

  14. Energy Department Seeks Proposals to Use Scientific Computing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE's missions," said Secretary Bodman. "This program opens up the world of high-performance computing to a broad array of scientific users. Through the use of these advanced...

  15. APPLIED MATHEMATICS AND SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogina, Mladen

    APPLIED MATHEMATICS AND SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING Brijuni, Croatia June 23{27, 2003. y x Runge's example; Organized by: Department of Mathematics, Unversity of Zagreb, Croatia. Miljenko Maru#20;si#19;c, chairman;simir Veseli#19;c Andro Mikeli#19;c Sponsors: Ministry of Science and Technology, Croatia, CV Sistemi d

  16. IT Licentiate theses Scientific Computing on Hybrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flener, Pierre

    IT Licentiate theses 2013-002 Scientific Computing on Hybrid Architectures MARCUS HOLM UPPSALA of Licentiate of Philosophy in Scientific Computing c Marcus Holm 2013 ISSN 1404-5117 Printed by the Department

  17. ADVANCED SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING ADVISORY COMMITTEE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  18. analysis scientific computing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the need Kuzmanov, Georgi 3 SCIINSTITUTE Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: SCIINSTITUTE Scientific...

  19. Scientific Discovery Learning with Computer Simulations Scientific Discovery Learning with Computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Scientific Discovery Learning with Computer Simulations 1 Scientific Discovery Learning with Computer Simulations 2 Abstract Scientific discovery learning is a highly self-directed and constructivistic form of learning. A computer simulation is a type of computer-based environment that is very

  20. Advances and Challenges in Computational Plasma Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.M. Tang; V.S. Chan

    2005-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific simulation, which provides a natural bridge between theory and experiment, is an essential tool for understanding complex plasma behavior. Recent advances in simulations of magnetically-confined plasmas are reviewed in this paper with illustrative examples chosen from associated research areas such as microturbulence, magnetohydrodynamics, and other topics. Progress has been stimulated in particular by the exponential growth of computer speed along with significant improvements in computer technology.

  1. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) Consolidated Progress Report July 2006 - March 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernholdt, D E; McInnes, L C; Govindaraju, M; Bramley, R; Epperly, T; Kohl, J A; Nieplocha, J; Armstrong, R; Shasharina, S; Sussman, A L; Sottile, M; Damevski, K

    2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A resounding success of the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program is that high-performance computational science is now universally recognized as a critical aspect of scientific discovery [71], complementing both theoretical and experimental research. As scientific communities prepare to exploit unprecedented computing capabilities of emerging leadership-class machines for multi-model simulations at the extreme scale [72], it is more important than ever to address the technical and social challenges of geographically distributed teams that combine expertise in domain science, applied mathematics, and computer science to build robust and flexible codes that can incorporate changes over time. The Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) tackles these issues by exploiting component-based software development to facilitate collaborative high-performance scientific computing.

  2. Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges - Advanced R and D|...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Advanced R and D Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Science Drivers of Particle Physics Energy Frontier Intensity Frontier...

  3. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frances M. Marshall; Jeff Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

  4. Scientific Foundations of Computer Graphics Thomas Larsson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larsson, Thomas

    Scientific Foundations of Computer Graphics Thomas Larsson Department of Computer Engineering M methodological framework and research methods? In this paper, the nature of computer graphics is discussed from a theory of science perspective. The research methods of computer graphics are discussed and reasons

  5. Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as production-quality, parallel-capable AMR visual data analysis infrastructure. This effort will help science-quality visualization of an AMR simulation of a hydrogen flame (Sample data courtesy J. Bell and M. Day, Center Infrastructure Center (APDEC) has begun to transition away from their in-house ChomboVis application to Vis

  6. Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    contacts a normal web server, downloads the map file, then begins navigation through the ordered sequence of images. The client requests images through the web server as needed to satisfy a particular viewpoint

  7. Advance the DNA computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Zhiquan Frank

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    DNA computer. The existing models from which a few DNA computing algorithms have been developed are not sufficiently powerful and robust, however, to attract potential users. This thesis has described research performed to build a new DNA computing...

  8. Advanced Computational Methods for Turbulence and Combustion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Computational Methods for Turbulence and Combustion Advanced Computational Methods for Turbulence and Combustion Bell.png Key Challenges: Development and application of...

  9. advance science research: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that one Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson 3 Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science Engineering Websites Summary: Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer...

  10. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) Visualization Tools and Techniques quotas)!! · Dual IR4 graphics accelerators. · Dual GigE channels to HPSS (use hsi to move data) Alternative implementation: SGI's Vizserver · Uses escher's graphics hardware to accelerate rendering

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Helping Advance the Scientific...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Major Efficiency Improvements The goal of our SSLS EFRC is not to work on advancing SSL technology itself; that is something that industry is extremely good at. Our goal...

  12. Scientific Computing Kernels on the Cell Processor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Samuel W.; Shalf, John; Oliker, Leonid; Kamil, Shoaib; Husbands, Parry; Yelick, Katherine

    2007-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The slowing pace of commodity microprocessor performance improvements combined with ever-increasing chip power demands has become of utmost concern to computational scientists. As a result, the high performance computing community is examining alternative architectures that address the limitations of modern cache-based designs. In this work, we examine the potential of using the recently-released STI Cell processor as a building block for future high-end computing systems. Our work contains several novel contributions. First, we introduce a performance model for Cell and apply it to several key scientific computing kernels: dense matrix multiply, sparse matrix vector multiply, stencil computations, and 1D/2D FFTs. The difficulty of programming Cell, which requires assembly level intrinsics for the best performance, makes this model useful as an initial step in algorithm design and evaluation. Next, we validate the accuracy of our model by comparing results against published hardware results, as well as our own implementations on a 3.2GHz Cell blade. Additionally, we compare Cell performance to benchmarks run on leading superscalar (AMD Opteron), VLIW (Intel Itanium2), and vector (Cray X1E) architectures. Our work also explores several different mappings of the kernels and demonstrates a simple and effective programming model for Cell's unique architecture. Finally, we propose modest microarchitectural modifications that could significantly increase the efficiency of double-precision calculations. Overall results demonstrate the tremendous potential of the Cell architecture for scientific computations in terms of both raw performance and power efficiency.

  13. accelerating scientific computations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CSTN-131 Implementing Stereo Vision of GPU-Accelerated Scientific Simulations using Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: 0 Computational Science...

  14. MPI: The Complete Reference Scientific and Engineering Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Paul

    MPI: The Complete Reference #12; Scientific and Engineering Computation Janusz Kowalik, Editor Data Manchek, and Vaidy Sunderam, 1994 Enabling Technologies for Petaflops Computing by Thomas Sterling, Paul

  15. Advanced Materials Development through Computational Design ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development through Computational Design Advanced Materials Development through Computational Design Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research...

  16. PLASMA SCIENCE ADVANCED COMPUTING INTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , ... leading to ITER -- impact real decision-making in the large "scientific options space" -- harvest

  17. Using Advanced Scientific Diving Technologies to Assess the Underwater Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southard, John A.; Williams, Greg D.; Sargeant, Susan L.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Blanton, Michael L.

    2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific diving can provide unique information for addressing complex environmental issues in the marine environment and is applied to a variety of increasingly important issues throughout Puget Sound, including habitat degradation, endangered species, biological availability of contaminants, and the effects of overwater structures and shoreline protection features. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory uses trained scientific divers in conjunction with advanced technologies to collect in-situ information best obtained through direct observation and requiring minimal environmental disturbance. For example, advances in underwater communications allow divers to discuss observations and data collection techniques in real time, both with each other and with personnel on the surface. Other examples include the use of Dual frequency IDentification SONar (DIDSON), an underwater camera used to capture digital images of benthic structures, fish, and organisms during low light and high turbidity levels; the use of voice-narrated underwater video; and the development of sediment collection methods yielding one-meter cores. The combination of using trained scientific SCUBA divers and advanced underwater technologies is a key element in addressing multifaceted environmental problems, resulting in a more comprehensive understanding of the underwater environment and more reliable data with which to make resource management decisions.

  18. Final Technical Report - Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sussman, Alan [University of Maryland

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a final technical report for the University of Maryland work in the SciDAC Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS). The Maryland work focused on software tools for coupling parallel software components built using the Common Component Architecture (CCA) APIs. Those tools are based on the Maryland InterComm software framework that has been used in multiple computational science applications to build large-scale simulations of complex physical systems that employ multiple separately developed codes.

  19. Writing and Publishing Scientific Articles in Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wladmir Cardoso Brando

    2015-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 15 years of teaching, advising students and coordinating scientific research activities and projects in computer science, we have observed the difficulties of students to write scientific papers to present the results of their research practices. In addition, they repeatedly have doubts about the publishing process. In this article we propose a conceptual framework to support the writing and publishing of scientific papers in computer science, providing a kind of guide for computer science students to effectively present the results of their research practices, particularly for experimental research.

  20. Scientific Grand Challenges: Crosscutting Technologies for Computing at the Exascale - February 2-4, 2010, Washington, D.C.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the "Scientific Grand Challenges - Crosscutting Technologies for Computing at the Exascale" workshop in February 2010, jointly sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energys Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research and the National Nuclear Security Administration, was to identify the elements of a research and development agenda that will address these challenges and create a comprehensive exascale computing environment. This exascale computing environment will enable the science applications identified in the eight previously held Scientific Grand Challenges Workshop Series.

  1. SCIENTIFIC & COMPUTATIONAL CHALLENGES OF THE FUSION SIMULATION PROJECT (FSP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    used in ITER will be the same as those required in a power plant but additional R&D will be neededSCIENTIFIC & COMPUTATIONAL CHALLENGES OF THE FUSION SIMULATION PROJECT (FSP) SciDAC 2008 CONFERENCE of the Scientific and Technological Feasibility of Fusion Power · ITER is a truly dramatic step. For the first time

  2. Scientific opportunities with advanced facilities for neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lander, G.H.; Emery, V.J. (eds.)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present report documents deliberations of a large group of experts in neutron scattering and fundamental physics on the need for new neutron sources of greater intensity and more sophisticated instrumentation than those currently available. An additional aspect of the Workshop was a comparison between steady-state (reactor) and pulsed (spallation) sources. The main conclusions were: (1) the case for a new higher flux neutron source is extremely strong and such a facility will lead to qualitatively new advances in condensed matter science and fundamental physics; (2) to a large extent the future needs of the scientific community could be met with either a 5 x 10/sup 15/ n cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/ steady state source or a 10/sup 17/ n cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/ peak flux spallation source; and (3) the findings of this Workshop are consistent with the recommendations of the Major Materials Facilities Committee.

  3. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center 2007 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hules, John A.; Bashor, Jon; Wang, Ucilia; Yarris, Lynn; Preuss, Paul

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents highlights of the research conducted on NERSC computers in a variety of scientific disciplines during the year 2007. It also reports on changes and upgrades to NERSC's systems and services aswell as activities of NERSC staff.

  4. Some applications of pipelining techniques in parallel scientific computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Yuanhua

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we study the applicability of pipelining techniques to the development of parallel algorithms for scientific computation. General principles for pipelining techniques are discussed and two applications, Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization...

  5. Some applications of pipelining techniques in parallel scientific computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Yuanhua

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we study the applicability of pipelining techniques to the development of parallel algorithms for scientific computation. General principles for pipelining techniques are discussed and two applications, Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization...

  6. Introduction to Scientific Computing, Part I C. David Sherrill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    programs (Photoshop); Web browsers; games #12;Scientific Computing: Complex programs (106 lines, perhaps. Instruction: An elementary, low-level command that the CPU understands. Each CPU has an "instruction set

  7. Bringing Advanced Computational Techniques to Energy Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Julie C

    2012-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Please find attached our final technical report for the BACTER Institute award. BACTER was created as a graduate and postdoctoral training program for the advancement of computational biology applied to questions of relevance to bioenergy research.

  8. advanced computer techniques: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cao, Meng 2009-01-01 7 Advanced Computer Programming Engineering Websites Summary: Syllabus Books Homework Advanced Computer Programming Prof. Lyle N. Long AERSP 424 Fall...

  9. advanced computational approaches: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Paulino, Glaucio H. 2 Advanced Computer Programming Engineering Websites Summary: Syllabus Books Homework Advanced Computer Programming Prof. Lyle N. Long AERSP 424 Fall...

  10. advanced computational testing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A. Thornton 2007-01-01 2 Advanced Computer Programming Engineering Websites Summary: Syllabus Books Homework Advanced Computer Programming Prof. Lyle N. Long AERSP 424 Fall...

  11. advanced computational thermal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Last Page Topic Index 1 Advanced Computer Programming Engineering Websites Summary: Syllabus Books Homework Advanced Computer Programming Prof. Lyle N. Long AERSP 424 Fall...

  12. advance prediction computer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Georgios 2 Advanced Computer Programming Engineering Websites Summary: Syllabus Books Homework Advanced Computer Programming Prof. Lyle N. Long AERSP 424 Fall...

  13. advancing scientific understanding: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interventions in Science Education Scientific thinking can be characterized in terms of two of the scientific enter- prise" (row 2). (6). Research on domain-specific...

  14. advanced scientific component: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interventions in Science Education Scientific thinking can be characterized in terms of two of the scientific enter- prise" (row 2). (6). Research on domain-specific...

  15. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Partnerships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; Jeff B. Benson; James I. Cole; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2007, the United States Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory, as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposer's physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, and obtained access to additional PIE equipment. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program enables and facilitates user access to several university and national laboratories. So far, seven universities and one national laboratory have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these universities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the user's technical needs. Universities and laboratories included in the ATR NSUF partnership program are as follows: (1) Nuclear Services Laboratories at North Carolina State University; (2) PULSTAR Reactor Facility at North Carolina State University; (3) Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory (1.7 MV Tandetron accelerator) at the University of Michigan; (4) Irradiated Materials at the University of Michigan; (5) Harry Reid Center Radiochemistry Laboratories at University of Nevada, Las Vegas; (6) Characterization Laboratory for Irradiated Materials at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (7) Tandem Accelerator Ion Beam. (1.7 MV terminal voltage tandem ion accelerator) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (8) Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) Materials Research Collaborative Access Team (MRCAT) beamline at Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Photon Source; and (9) Nanoindenter in the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) Nuclear Engineering laboratory Materials have been analyzed for ATR NSUF users at the Advanced Photon Source at the MRCAT beam, the NIST Center for Neutron Research in Gaithersburg, MD, the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, and the SHaRE user facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Additionally, ORNL has been accepted as a partner facility to enable ATR NSUF users to access the facilities at the High Flux Isotope Reactor and related facilities.

  16. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    News NERSCLBL Study Finds No Evidence of Heartbleed External link Attacks Before the Virus Was Made Public Recent Requirement Workshops Large Scale Computing and Storage...

  17. Scientific Computations section monthly report September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckner, M.R.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report is computational work that is being performed in the areas of thermal analysis, applied statistics, applied physics, and thermal hydraulics.

  18. The advanced computational testing and simulation toolkit (ACTS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drummond, L.A.; Marques, O.

    2002-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past decades there has been a continuous growth in the number of physical and societal problems that have been successfully studied and solved by means of computational modeling and simulation. Distinctively, a number of these are important scientific problems ranging in scale from the atomic to the cosmic. For example, ionization is a phenomenon as ubiquitous in modern society as the glow of fluorescent lights and the etching on silicon computer chips; but it was not until 1999 that researchers finally achieved a complete numerical solution to the simplest example of ionization, the collision of a hydrogen atom with an electron. On the opposite scale, cosmologists have long wondered whether the expansion of the Universe, which began with the Big Bang, would ever reverse itself, ending the Universe in a Big Crunch. In 2000, analysis of new measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation showed that the geometry of the Universe is flat, and thus the Universe will continue expanding forever. Both of these discoveries depended on high performance computer simulations that utilized computational tools included in the Advanced Computational Testing and Simulation (ACTS) Toolkit. The ACTS Toolkit is an umbrella project that brought together a number of general purpose computational tool development projects funded and supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These tools, which have been developed independently, mainly at DOE laboratories, make it easier for scientific code developers to write high performance applications for parallel computers. They tackle a number of computational issues that are common to a large number of scientific applications, mainly implementation of numerical algorithms, and support for code development, execution and optimization. The ACTS Toolkit Project enables the use of these tools by a much wider community of computational scientists, and promotes code portability, reusability, reduction of duplicate efforts, and tool maturity. This paper presents a brief introduction to the functionality available in ACTS.

  19. Multicore Platforms for Scientific Computing: Cell BE and NVIDIA Tesla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acacio, Manuel

    Multicore Platforms for Scientific Computing: Cell BE and NVIDIA Tesla J. Fern´andez, M.E. Acacio Tesla computing solutions. The former is a re- cent heterogeneous chip-multiprocessor (CMP) architecture, multicore, Cell BE, NVIDIA Tesla, CUDA 1 Introduction Nowadays, multicore architectures are omnipresent

  20. Quantum chromodynamics with advanced computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kronfeld, Andreas S.; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We survey results in lattice quantum chromodynamics from groups in the USQCD Collaboration. The main focus is on physics, but many aspects of the discussion are aimed at an audience of computational physicists.

  1. 1/12/11 1:51 PMComputer-Aided Brains: Scientific American Page 1 of 3http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=computer-aided-brains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvucci, Dario D.

    Scientific American Mind October 2005 Head Lines | Mind & Brain Computer-Aided Brains By Brad Stenger1/12/11 1:51 PMComputer-Aided Brains: Scientific American Page 1 of 3http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=computer-aided-brains Image: For years, innovators have tried to devise computerized gadgetry to aid the brain. Advances have

  2. Sandia Energy - Computational Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computational Science Home Energy Research Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) Computational Science Computational Sciencecwdd2015-03-26T13:35:2...

  3. ANNUAL REPORT RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukai, Tomoki

    ANNUAL REPORT RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science FY2013-14 AICS Research Activities ............................................................73 Computational Molecular Science Research Team...................................................77 Computational Materials Science Research Team

  4. advanced computational simulation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Last Page Topic Index 1 Computational frameworks for advanced combustion simulations Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: Computational frameworks for...

  5. Power-aware applications for scientific cluster and distributed computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdurachmanov, David; Eulisse, Giulio; Grosso, Paola; Hillegas, Curtis; Holzman, Burt; Klous, Sander; Knight, Robert; Muzaffar, Shahzad

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aggregate power use of computing hardware is an important cost factor in scientific cluster and distributed computing systems. The Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) is a major example of such a distributed computing system, used primarily for high throughput computing (HTC) applications. It has a computing capacity and power consumption rivaling that of the largest supercomputers. The computing capacity required from this system is also expected to grow over the next decade. Optimizing the power utilization and cost of such systems is thus of great interest. A number of trends currently underway will provide new opportunities for power-aware optimizations. We discuss how power-aware software applications and scheduling might be used to reduce power consumption, both as autonomous entities and as part of a (globally) distributed system. As concrete examples of computing centers we provide information on the large HEP-focused Tier-1 at FNAL, and the Tigress High Performance Computing Center at Princeton U...

  6. Advanced I/O for large-scale scientific applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klasky, Scott (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Schwan, Karsten (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Oldfield, Ron A.; Lofstead, Gerald F., II (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As scientific simulations scale to use petascale machines and beyond, the data volumes generated pose a dual problem. First, with increasing machine sizes, the careful tuning of IO routines becomes more and more important to keep the time spent in IO acceptable. It is not uncommon, for instance, to have 20% of an application's runtime spent performing IO in a 'tuned' system. Careful management of the IO routines can move that to 5% or even less in some cases. Second, the data volumes are so large, on the order of 10s to 100s of TB, that trying to discover the scientifically valid contributions requires assistance at runtime to both organize and annotate the data. Waiting for offline processing is not feasible due both to the impact on the IO system and the time required. To reduce this load and improve the ability of scientists to use the large amounts of data being produced, new techniques for data management are required. First, there is a need for techniques for efficient movement of data from the compute space to storage. These techniques should understand the underlying system infrastructure and adapt to changing system conditions. Technologies include aggregation networks, data staging nodes for a closer parity to the IO subsystem, and autonomic IO routines that can detect system bottlenecks and choose different approaches, such as splitting the output into multiple targets, staggering output processes. Such methods must be end-to-end, meaning that even with properly managed asynchronous techniques, it is still essential to properly manage the later synchronous interaction with the storage system to maintain acceptable performance. Second, for the data being generated, annotations and other metadata must be incorporated to help the scientist understand output data for the simulation run as a whole, to select data and data features without concern for what files or other storage technologies were employed. All of these features should be attained while maintaining a simple deployment for the science code and eliminating the need for allocation of additional computational resources.

  7. Scientific computations section monthly report, November 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckner, M.R.

    1993-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report from the Savannah River Technology Center contains abstracts from papers from the computational modeling, applied statistics, applied physics, experimental thermal hydraulics, and packaging and transportation groups. Specific topics covered include: engineering modeling and process simulation, criticality methods and analysis, plutonium disposition.

  8. ADVANCED MODERN PHYSICS -Theoretical Foundations World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    ADVANCED MODERN PHYSICS - Theoretical Foundations © World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd. http://www.worldscibooks.com/physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 2.5.1 Coordinate Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 ix #12;ADVANCED MODERN PHYSICS.html x Advanced Modern Physics 2.5.2 Abstract Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 2

  9. Can Cloud Computing Address the Scientific Computing Requirements...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for meeting the ever-increasing computational needs of scientists, Department of Energy researchers have issued a report stating that the cloud computing model is useful, but...

  10. MA50177: Scientific Computing Nuclear Reactor Simulation Generalised Eigenvalue Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    MA50177: Scientific Computing Case Study Nuclear Reactor Simulation ­ Generalised Eigenvalue of a malfunction or of an accident experimentally, the numerical simulation of nuclear reactors is of utmost balance in a nuclear reactor are the two-group neutron diffusion equations -div (K1 u1) + (a,1 + s) u1 = 1

  11. A Generic Grid Interface for Parallel and Adaptive Scientific Computing.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kornhuber, Ralf

    A Generic Grid Interface for Parallel and Adaptive Scientific Computing. Part I: Abstract Framework definition of a grid for al- gorithms solving partial differential equations. Unlike previous ap- proaches [2, 3], our grids have a hierarchical structure. This makes them suitable for geometric multigrid

  12. advanced computation languages: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Advanced Topics in Types and Programming Languages Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: Advanced Topics in Types and...

  13. Predictive Dynamic Security Assessment through Advanced Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenyu; Diao, Ruisheng; Jin, Shuangshuang; Chen, Yousu

    2014-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract Traditional dynamic security assessment is limited by several factors and thus falls short in providing real-time information to be predictive for power system operation. These factors include the steady-state assumption of current operating points, static transfer limits, and low computational speed. This addresses these factors and frames predictive dynamic security assessment. The primary objective of predictive dynamic security assessment is to enhance the functionality and computational process of dynamic security assessment through the use of high-speed phasor measurements and the application of advanced computing technologies for faster-than-real-time simulation. This paper presents algorithms, computing platforms, and simulation frameworks that constitute the predictive dynamic security assessment capability. Examples of phasor application and fast computation for dynamic security assessment are included to demonstrate the feasibility and speed enhancement for real-time applications.

  14. advanced computational methods: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 New book on Advanced Computational Methods Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: In Brief New book on Advanced...

  15. The Potential of the Cell Processor for Scientific Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Samuel; Shalf, John; Oliker, Leonid; Husbands, Parry; Kamil, Shoaib; Yelick, Katherine

    2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The slowing pace of commodity microprocessor performance improvements combined with ever-increasing chip power demands has become of utmost concern to computational scientists. As a result, the high performance computing community is examining alternative architectures that address the limitations of modern cache-based designs. In this work, we examine the potential of the using the forth coming STI Cell processor as a building block for future high-end computing systems. Our work contains several novel contributions. We are the first to present quantitative Cell performance data on scientific kernels and show direct comparisons against leading superscalar (AMD Opteron), VLIW (IntelItanium2), and vector (Cray X1) architectures. Since neither Cell hardware nor cycle-accurate simulators are currently publicly available, we develop both analytical models and simulators to predict kernel performance. Our work also explores the complexity of mapping several important scientific algorithms onto the Cells unique architecture. Additionally, we propose modest microarchitectural modifications that could significantly increase the efficiency of double-precision calculations. Overall results demonstrate the tremendous potential of the Cell architecture for scientific computations in terms of both raw performance and power efficiency.

  16. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; James I. Cole; Jeff B. Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is one of the worlds premier test reactors for studying the effects of intense neutron radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR began operation in 1967, and has operated continuously since then, averaging approximately 250 operating days per year. The combination of high flux, large test volumes, and multiple experiment configuration options provide unique testing opportunities for nuclear fuels and material researchers. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water moderated and cooled, beryllium-reflected highly-enriched uranium fueled, reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The ATR peak thermal flux can reach 1.0 x1015 n/cm2-sec, and the core configuration creates five main reactor power lobes (regions) that can be operated at different powers during the same operating cycle. In addition to these nine flux traps there are 68 irradiation positions in the reactor core reflector tank. The test positions range from 0.5 to 5.0 in diameter and are all 48 in length, the active length of the fuel. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material radiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. Goals of the ATR NSUF are to define the cutting edge of nuclear technology research in high temperature and radiation environments, contribute to improved industry performance of current and future light water reactors, and stimulate cooperative research between user groups conducting basic and applied research. The ATR NSUF has developed partnerships with other universities and national laboratories to enable ATR NSUF researchers to perform research at these other facilities, when the research objectives cannot be met using the INL facilities. The ATR NSUF program includes a robust education program enabling students to participate in their research at INL and the partner facilities, attend the ATR NSUF annual User Week, and compete for prizes at sponsored conferences. Development of additional research capabilities is also a key component of the ATR NSUF Program; researchers are encouraged to propose research projects leading to these enhanced capabilities. Some ATR irradiation experiment projects irradiate more specimens than are tested, resulting in irradiated materials available for post irradiation examination by other researchers. These extra specimens comprise the ATR NSUF Sample Library. This presentation will highlight the ATR NSUF Sample Library and the process open to researchers who want to access these materials and how to propose research projects using them. This presentation will provide the current status of all the ATR NSUF Program elements. Many of these were not envisioned in 2007, when DOE established the ATR NSUF.

  17. Scientific Grand Challenges: Forefront Questions in Nuclear Science and the Role of High Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is an account of the deliberations and conclusions of the workshop on "Forefront Questions in Nuclear Science and the Role of High Performance Computing" held January 26-28, 2009, co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Physics (ONP) and the DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing (ASCR). Representatives from the national and international nuclear physics communities, as well as from the high performance computing community, participated. The purpose of this workshop was to 1) identify forefront scientific challenges in nuclear physics and then determine which-if any-of these could be aided by high performance computing at the extreme scale; 2) establish how and why new high performance computing capabilities could address issues at the frontiers of nuclear science; 3) provide nuclear physicists the opportunity to influence the development of high performance computing; and 4) provide the nuclear physics community with plans for development of future high performance computing capability by DOE ASCR.

  18. Acts -- A collection of high performing software tools for scientific computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drummond, L.A.; Marques, O.A.

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past decades there has been a continuous growth in the number of physical and societal problems that have been successfully studied and solved by means of computational modeling and simulation. Further, many new discoveries depend on high performance computer simulations to satisfy their demands for large computational resources and short response time. The Advanced CompuTational Software (ACTS) Collection brings together a number of general-purpose computational tool development projects funded and supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These tools make it easier for scientific code developers to write high performance applications for parallel computers. They tackle a number of computational issues that are common to a large number of scientific applications, mainly implementation of numerical algorithms, and support for code development, execution and optimization. The ACTS collection promotes code portability, reusability, reduction of duplicate efforts, and tool maturity. This paper presents a brief introduction to the functionality available in ACTS. It also highlight the tools that are in demand by Climate and Weather modelers.

  19. DOE Issues Funding Opportunity for Advanced Computational and Modeling Research for the Electric Power System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to leverage scientific advancements in mathematics and computation for application to power system models and software tools, with the long-term goal of enabling real-time protection and control based on wide-area sensor measurements.

  20. PNNL pushing scientific discovery through data intensive computing breakthroughs

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Deborah Gracio; David Koppenaal; Ruby Leung

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratorys approach to data intensive computing (DIC) is focused on three key research areas: hybrid hardware architectures, software architectures, and analytic algorithms. Advancements in these areas will help to address, and solve, DIC issues associated with capturing, managing, analyzing and understanding, in near real time, data at volumes and rates that push the frontiers of current technologies.

  1. Power-aware applications for scientific cluster and distributed computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Abdurachmanov; Peter Elmer; Giulio Eulisse; Paola Grosso; Curtis Hillegas; Burt Holzman; Ruben L. Janssen; Sander Klous; Robert Knight; Shahzad Muzaffar

    2014-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The aggregate power use of computing hardware is an important cost factor in scientific cluster and distributed computing systems. The Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) is a major example of such a distributed computing system, used primarily for high throughput computing (HTC) applications. It has a computing capacity and power consumption rivaling that of the largest supercomputers. The computing capacity required from this system is also expected to grow over the next decade. Optimizing the power utilization and cost of such systems is thus of great interest. A number of trends currently underway will provide new opportunities for power-aware optimizations. We discuss how power-aware software applications and scheduling might be used to reduce power consumption, both as autonomous entities and as part of a (globally) distributed system. As concrete examples of computing centers we provide information on the large HEP-focused Tier-1 at FNAL, and the Tigress High Performance Computing Center at Princeton University, which provides HPC resources in a university context.

  2. Matrix Computations & Scientific Computing Seminar Organizer: James Demmel & Ming Gu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    -scale Eigenvalue Problems in Nuclei Structure Cal- culation One of the emerging computational approaches in nuclear physics is the configuration interaction (CI) method for solving the nuclear many-body problem. Like other for achieving good performance in nuclear CI calculations. #12;

  3. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility 2010 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mary Catherine Thelen; Todd R. Allen

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the 2010 ATR National Scientific User Facility Annual Report. This report provides an overview of the program for 2010, along with individual project reports from each of the university principal investigators. The report also describes the capabilities offered to university researchers here at INL and at the ATR NSUF partner facilities.

  4. Final Scientific Report - Wireless and Sensing Solutions Advancing Industrial Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budampati, Rama; McBrady, Adam; Nusseibeh, Fouad

    2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The project team's goal for the Wireless and Sensing Solution Advancing Industrial Efficiency award (DE-FC36-04GO14002) was to develop, demonstrate, and test a number of leading edge technologies that could enable the emergence of wireless sensor and sampling systems for the industrial market space. This effort combined initiatives in advanced sensor development, configurable sampling and deployment platforms, and robust wireless communications to address critical obstacles in enabling enhanced industrial efficiency.

  5. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and industry research efforts to ensure the properties of materials in light water reactors are well understood. The ATR NSUF is providing this support through three main efforts: establishing unique infrastructure necessary to conduct research on highly radioactive materials, conducting research in conjunction with industry partners on life extension relevant topics, and providing training courses to encourage more U.S. researchers to understand and address LWR materials issues. In 2010 and 2011, several advanced instruments with capability focused on resolving nuclear material performance issues through analysis on the micro (10-6 m) to atomic (10-10 m) scales were installed primarily at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. These instruments included a local electrode atom probe (LEAP), a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) system, a Raman spectrometer, and an nanoindentor/atomic force microscope. Ongoing capability enhancements intended to support industry efforts include completion of two shielded, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test loops, the first of which will come online in early calendar year 2013, a pressurized and controlled chemistry water loop for the ATR center flux trap, and a dedicated facility intended to house post irradiation examination equipment. In addition to capability enhancements at the main site in Idaho, the ATR NSUF also welcomed two new partner facilities in 2011 and two new partner facilities in 2012; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and associated hot cells and the University California Berkeley capabilities in irradiated materials analysis were added in 2011. In 2012, Purdue Universitys Interaction of Materials with Particles and Components Testing (IMPACT) facility and the Pacific Northwest Nuclear Laboratory (PNNL) Radiochemistry Processing Laboratory (RPL) and PIE facilities were added. The ATR NSUF annually hosts a weeklong event called Users Week in which students and faculty from universities as well as other interested parties from regulatory agencies or industry convene in Idaho Falls, Idaho to see presentations from ATR NSUF staff as well as select researchers from the materials research field. Users week provides an overview of current materials research topics of interest and an opportunity for young researchers to understand the process of performing work through ATR NSUF. Additionally, to increase the number of researchers engaged in LWR materials issues, a series of workshops are in progress to introduce research staff to stress corrosion cracking, zirconium alloy degradation, and uranium dioxide degradation during in-reactor use.

  6. Can Cloud Computing Address the Scientific Computing Requirements for DOE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess StoriesFebruary 26,Computers »CafeteriasTours SHARE

  7. Computational Design of Advanced Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savrasov, Sergey; Kotliar, Gabriel; Haule, Kristjan

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the project was to develop a method for theoretical understanding of nuclear fuel materials whose physical and thermophysical properties can be predicted from first principles using a novel dynamical mean field method for electronic structure calculations. We concentrated our study on uranium, plutonium, their oxides, nitrides, carbides, as well as some rare earth materials whose 4f eletrons provide a simplified framework for understanding complex behavior of the f electrons. We addressed the issues connected to the electronic structure, lattice instabilities, phonon and magnon dynamics as well as thermal conductivity. This allowed us to evaluate characteristics of advanced nuclear fuel systems using computer based simulations and avoid costly experiments.

  8. ATCA for Machines-- Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, R.S.; /SLAC

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture is a new industry open standard for electronics instrument modules and shelves being evaluated for the International Linear Collider (ILC). It is the first industrial standard designed for High Availability (HA). ILC availability simulations have shown clearly that the capabilities of ATCA are needed in order to achieve acceptable integrated luminosity. The ATCA architecture looks attractive for beam instruments and detector applications as well. This paper provides an overview of ongoing R&D including application of HA principles to power electronics systems.

  9. Recap: Advancing Scientific Innovation at the National Labs ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Lab Fri, Mar 07 2014 18:19:31 OLCF Industry User Named Person to Watch in High-Performance Computing for 2014 http:t.copXTjgsn0XJ Titan Industry @ORNL @GEResearch - OLCF ...

  10. Molecular Science Computing Facility Scientific Challenges: Linking Across Scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Jong, Wibe A.; Windus, Theresa L.

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to define the evolving science drivers for performing environmental molecular research at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) and to provide guidance associated with the next-generation high-performance computing center that must be developed at EMSL's Molecular Science Computing Facility (MSCF) in order to address this critical research. The MSCF is the pre-eminent computing facility?supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER)?tailored to provide the fastest time-to-solution for current computational challenges in chemistry and biology, as well as providing the means for broad research in the molecular and environmental sciences. The MSCF provides integral resources and expertise to emerging EMSL Scientific Grand Challenges and Collaborative Access Teams that are designed to leverage the multiple integrated research capabilities of EMSL, thereby creating a synergy between computation and experiment to address environmental molecular science challenges critical to DOE and the nation.

  11. Mining Scientific Data Naren Ramakrishnan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    -scale data repositories. Advances in networking technology have en- abled communication of large volumesMining Scientific Data Naren Ramakrishnan Department of Computer Science Virginia Tech, VA 24061 rapid advances in high performance computing and tools for data acquisition in a variety of scientific

  12. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bramley, Randall B.

    2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Indiana University?¢????s SWIM activities have primarily been in three areas. All are completed, but we are continuing to work on two of them because refinements are useful to both DoE laboratories and the high performance computing community.

  13. Sandia Energy - High Performance Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Performance Computing Home Energy Research Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) High Performance Computing High Performance Computingashoter2015-03-18T21:41:24+00:00...

  14. The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Advancing Nuclear Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. R. Allen; J. B. Benson; J. A. Foster; F. M. Marshall; M. K. Meyer; M. C. Thelen

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To help ensure the long-term viability of nuclear energy through a robust and sustained research and development effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor and associated post-irradiation examination facilities a National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), allowing broader access to nuclear energy researchers. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class nuclear research facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. The ATR NSUF seeks to create an engaged academic and industrial user community that routinely conducts reactor-based research. Cost free access to the ATR and PIE facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to DOE mission. Extensive publication of research results is expected as a condition for access. During FY 2008, the first full year of ATR NSUF operation, five university-led experiments were awarded access to the ATR and associated post-irradiation examination facilities. The ATR NSUF has awarded four new experiments in early FY 2009, and anticipates awarding additional experiments in the fall of 2009 as the results of the second 2009 proposal call. As the ATR NSUF program mature over the next two years, the capability to perform irradiation research of increasing complexity will become available. These capabilities include instrumented irradiation experiments and post-irradiation examinations on materials previously irradiated in U.S. reactor material test programs. The ATR critical facility will also be made available to researchers. An important component of the ATR NSUF an education program focused on the reactor-based tools available for resolving nuclear science and technology issues. The ATR NSUF provides education programs including a summer short course, internships, faculty-student team projects and faculty/staff exchanges. In June of 2008, the first week-long ATR NSUF Summer Session was attended by 68 students, university faculty and industry representatives. The Summer Session featured presentations by 19 technical experts from across the country and covered topics including irradiation damage mechanisms, degradation of reactor materials, LWR and gas reactor fuels, and non-destructive evaluation. High impact research results from leveraging the entire research infrastructure, including universities, industry, small business, and the national laboratories. To increase overall research capability, ATR NSUF seeks to form strategic partnerships with university facilities that add significant nuclear research capability to the ATR NSUF and are accessible to all ATR NSUF users. Current partner facilities include the MIT Reactor, the University of Michigan Irradiated Materials Testing Laboratory, the University of Wisconsin Characterization Laboratory, and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas transmission Electron Microscope User Facility. Needs for irradiation of material specimens at tightly controlled temperatures are being met by dedication of a large in-pile pressurized water loop facility for use by ATR NSUF users. Several environmental mechanical testing systems are under construction to determine crack growth rates and fracture toughness on irradiated test systems.

  15. Ames Lab 101: Improving Materials with Advanced Computing

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Johnson, Duane

    2014-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Ames Laboratory's Chief Research Officer Duane Johnson talks about using advanced computing to develop new materials and predict what types of properties those materials will have.

  16. advanced computer program: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Advanced Computer Studies Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Science students 20,000 per year Collaborator On a single project or with one...

  17. Scientific Application Requirements for Leadership Computing at the Exascale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahern, Sean [ORNL; Alam, Sadaf R [ORNL; Fahey, Mark R [ORNL; Hartman-Baker, Rebecca J [ORNL; Barrett, Richard F [ORNL; Kendall, Ricky A [ORNL; Kothe, Douglas B [ORNL; Mills, Richard T [ORNL; Sankaran, Ramanan [ORNL; Tharrington, Arnold N [ORNL; White III, James B [ORNL

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy s Leadership Computing Facility, located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory s National Center for Computational Sciences, recently polled scientific teams that had large allocations at the center in 2007, asking them to identify computational science requirements for future exascale systems (capable of an exaflop, or 1018 floating point operations per second). These requirements are necessarily speculative, since an exascale system will not be realized until the 2015 2020 timeframe, and are expressed where possible relative to a recent petascale requirements analysis of similar science applications [1]. Our initial findings, which beg further data collection, validation, and analysis, did in fact align with many of our expectations and existing petascale requirements, yet they also contained some surprises, complete with new challenges and opportunities. First and foremost, the breadth and depth of science prospects and benefits on an exascale computing system are striking. Without a doubt, they justify a large investment, even with its inherent risks. The possibilities for return on investment (by any measure) are too large to let us ignore this opportunity. The software opportunities and challenges are enormous. In fact, as one notable computational scientist put it, the scale of questions being asked at the exascale is tremendous and the hardware has gotten way ahead of the software. We are in grave danger of failing because of a software crisis unless concerted investments and coordinating activities are undertaken to reduce and close this hardwaresoftware gap over the next decade. Key to success will be a rigorous requirement for natural mapping of algorithms to hardware in a way that complements (rather than competes with) compilers and runtime systems. The level of abstraction must be raised, and more attention must be paid to functionalities and capabilities that incorporate intent into data structures, are aware of memory hierarchy, possess fault tolerance, exploit asynchronism, and are power-consumption aware. On the other hand, we must also provide application scientists with the ability to develop software without having to become experts in the computer science components. Numerical algorithms are scattered broadly across science domains, with no one particular algorithm being ubiquitous and no one algorithm going unused. Structured grids and dense linear algebra continue to dominate, but other algorithm categories will become more common. A significant increase is projected for Monte Carlo algorithms, unstructured grids, sparse linear algebra, and particle methods, and a relative decrease foreseen in fast Fourier transforms. These projections reflect the expectation of much higher architecture concurrency and the resulting need for very high scalability. The new algorithm categories that application scientists expect to be increasingly important in the next decade include adaptive mesh refinement, implicit nonlinear systems, data assimilation, agent-based methods, parameter continuation, and optimization. The attributes of leadership computing systems expected to increase most in priority over the next decade are (in order of importance) interconnect bandwidth, memory bandwidth, mean time to interrupt, memory latency, and interconnect latency. The attributes expected to decrease most in relative priority are disk latency, archival storage capacity, disk bandwidth, wide area network bandwidth, and local storage capacity. These choices by application developers reflect the expected needs of applications or the expected reality of available hardware. One interpretation is that the increasing priorities reflect the desire to increase computational efficiency to take advantage of increasing peak flops [floating point operations per second], while the decreasing priorities reflect the expectation that computational efficiency will not increase. Per-core requirements appear to be relatively static, while aggregate requirements will grow with the system. This projection is consistent with a r

  18. Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SDN PNWG-HUB PNNL on June 6th 1 10GE NASH-ORNL-#2 SDN Wave PNNL Sire office at OSTI June 19th 1 10GE KANS-Great Plains Net (GPN

  19. Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    configuration Continuous monitoring of servers & services Performance tuning & verifying everything Bechtel-NV IARC INL NSTEC Pantex SNLA DOE-ALB Allied Signal KCP SRS NREL DOE NETL NNSA ARM ORAU OSTI NOAA and how? Evaluate publication issues Is the data already published? Are there security concerns

  20. Energy Department Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific Computing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal RegisterHydrogen and FuelDefense asDepartment of Energy

  1. Barbara Helland, Facilities Division Director Advanced Scientific Computing Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperationalAugustDecade5-F,INITIAL JohnE Pt he A

  2. Energy Department Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific Computing

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010 SNF &DepartmentEnergyEfficiencyDepartment

  3. Energy Department Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWaterCool RoofsAmericanOfficedoe

  4. Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research * Basic Energy Sciences * Biological

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solid ...Success StoriesSupplement AnalysisSupplying

  5. Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research * Basic Energy Sciences * Biological

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solid ...Success StoriesSupplement

  6. Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research * Basic Energy Sciences * Biological

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solid ...Success StoriesSupplementNetwork Monitoring and

  7. Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research * Basic Energy Sciences * Biological

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solid ...Success StoriesSupplementNetwork Monitoring andEnergy S

  8. Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research * Basic Energy Sciences * Biological

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solid ...Success StoriesSupplementNetwork Monitoring andEnergy

  9. Advanced Environments and Tools for High Performance Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, David W.

    Advanced Environments and Tools for High Performance Computing Problem-Solving Environments Environments and Tools for High Performance Computing. The conference was chaired by Professor D. W. Walker and managing distributed high performance comput- ing resources is important for a PSE to meet the requirements

  10. STRATEGIC PLAN INSTITUTE FOR ADVANCED COMPUTER STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Daniel S.

    of national importance such as high-performance computing, software engineering, and intelligent systems. Most to Maryland. Research Programs The Institute's faculty conduct research in high performance computing, and computer vision. High-Performance Computing (HPC). In September 1993 UMIACS in conjunction

  11. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center 2007 Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hules, John A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Directions in High Performance Computing for the Officein the evolution of high performance computing and networks.Hectopascals High performance computing High Performance

  12. advanced computer architectures: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Advances in Computer Architecture CiteSeer Summary: Using previous material from prof.dr. C. Jesshope and dr. R....

  13. New Classes of Magnetoelectric Materials Can Advance Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Can Advance Computing FEBRUARY 11, 2013 Bookmark and Share An illustration of a titanium-europium oxide cage lattice studied in the experiment. To view a larger version of...

  14. Advanced Health Monitoring of Computer Cluster

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1BP-14 Power andAdvanced ComponentsenzymeAdvancedHealth

  15. advanced computer simulations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    advanced computer simulations First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Computational frameworks...

  16. The SCIRun Parallel Scientific Computing Problem Solving Environment Christopher R. Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Steven G.

    efficiency. Steering The primary purpose of SCIRun is to enable the user to interactively control scientific construc tion, debugging and steering of largescale scientific computations. SCIRun can be envisioned a dataflow programming model. SCIRun enables scientists to modify geometric models and interactively change

  17. International Scientific Conference Computer Science'2006 Building skills for the knowledge society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of highly-qualified staff, lack of new scientific equipment, etc. On the other side, a growing demandInternational Scientific Conference Computer Science'2006 Building skills for the knowledge society, and the focus on ICT and e-business skills, innovation and knowledge management in organizations. It highlights

  18. A Taxonomy of Scientific Workflow Systems for Grid Computing Jia Yu and Rajkumar Buyya*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melbourne, University of

    on major functions and architectural styles of Grid workflow systems. In Section 3, we map the proposed1 A Taxonomy of Scientific Workflow Systems for Grid Computing Jia Yu and Rajkumar Buyya* Grid Computing and Distributed Systems (GRIDS) Laboratory Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering

  19. Previous Computer Science Award Announcements | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Previous Computer Science Award Announcements Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Applied Mathematics Computer Science Exascale Tools Workshop...

  20. Advanced Topics in Computer Vision and Robotics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosecka, Jana

    % Final exam/ project: 40% ! Prerequisites: Computer Vision, Robotics, AI, Data Mining, Pattern (with Image Processing toolbox)! Open CV library! Student Participation, Presentation! 2-3 papers columnpole sky road tree signsymbol columnpole tree building building sky building car car columnpole

  1. Advanced Computing Tech Team | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJune 17, 2015EnergyTheAdvanced Biofuels

  2. Advanced Computing Tech Team | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is alwaysISO 50001Energy Efficiency Grants |Energy|Advanced

  3. Scientific Grand Challenges: Challenges in Climate Change Science and the Role of Computing at the Extreme Scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Johnson, Gary M.; Washington, Warren M.

    2009-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) in partnership with the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) held a workshop on the challenges in climate change science and the role of computing at the extreme scale, November 6-7, 2008, in Bethesda, Maryland. At the workshop, participants identified the scientific challenges facing the field of climate science and outlined the research directions of highest priority that should be pursued to meet these challenges. Representatives from the national and international climate change research community as well as representatives from the high-performance computing community attended the workshop. This group represented a broad mix of expertise. Of the 99 participants, 6 were from international institutions. Before the workshop, each of the four panels prepared a white paper, which provided the starting place for the workshop discussions. These four panels of workshop attendees devoted to their efforts the following themes: Model Development and Integrated Assessment; Algorithms and Computational Environment; Decadal Predictability and Prediction; Data, Visualization, and Computing Productivity. The recommendations of the panels are summarized in the body of this report.

  4. Grid Computing in the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) scientific experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas P. Benjamin

    2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The computing model for the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) scientific experiment has evolved since the beginning of the experiment. Initially CDF computing was comprised of dedicated resources located in computer farms around the world. With the wide spread acceptance of grid computing in High Energy Physics, CDF computing has migrated to using grid computing extensively. CDF uses computing grids around the world. Each computing grid has required different solutions. The use of portals as interfaces to the collaboration computing resources has proven to be an extremely useful technique allowing the CDF physicists transparently migrate from using dedicated computer farm to using computing located in grid farms often away from Fermilab. Grid computing at CDF continues to evolve as the grid standards and practices change.

  5. An expanded framework for the advanced computational testing and simulation toolkit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marques, Osni A.; Drummond, Leroy A.

    2003-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Computational Testing and Simulation (ACTS) Toolkit is a set of computational tools developed primarily at DOE laboratories and is aimed at simplifying the solution of common and important computational problems. The use of the tools reduces the development time for new codes and the tools provide functionality that might not otherwise be available. This document outlines an agenda for expanding the scope of the ACTS Project based on lessons learned from current activities. Highlights of this agenda include peer-reviewed certification of new tools; finding tools to solve problems that are not currently addressed by the Toolkit; working in collaboration with other software initiatives and DOE computer facilities; expanding outreach efforts; promoting interoperability, further development of the tools; and improving functionality of the ACTS Information Center, among other tasks. The ultimate goal is to make the ACTS tools more widely used and more effective in solving DOE's and the nation's scientific problems through the creation of a reliable software infrastructure for scientific computing.

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation and Computing:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitche Home About npitcheSandian Wins13,051 lbsComputational Systems

  7. International Scientific Conference Computer Science'2008 Near-Native Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fidanova, Stefka

    International Scientific Conference Computer Science'2008 61 Near-Native Protein Folding Stefka: The protein folding problem is a fundamental problem in computational molecular biology. The high resolution 3. After that the folding problem is de- fined like optimization problem. Keywords: Protein folding

  8. Cloud computing security: the scientific challenge, and a survey of solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Mark

    Cloud computing security: the scientific challenge, and a survey of solutions Mark D. Ryan University of Birmingham January 28, 2013 Abstract We briefly survey issues in cloud computing security. The fact that data is shared with the cloud service provider is identified as the core sci- entific problem

  9. Operational Philosophy for the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Benson; J. Cole; J. Jackson; F. Marshall; D. Ogden; J. Rempe; M. C. Thelen

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). At its core, the ATR NSUF Program combines access to a portion of the available ATR radiation capability, the associated required examination and analysis facilities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and INL staff expertise with novel ideas provided by external contributors (universities, laboratories, and industry). These collaborations define the cutting edge of nuclear technology research in high-temperature and radiation environments, contribute to improved industry performance of current and future light-water reactors (LWRs), and stimulate cooperative research between user groups conducting basic and applied research. To make possible the broadest access to key national capability, the ATR NSUF formed a partnership program that also makes available access to critical facilities outside of the INL. Finally, the ATR NSUF has established a sample library that allows access to pre-irradiated samples as needed by national research teams.

  10. advanced computer studies: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    computer studies First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 STRATEGIC PLAN INSTITUTE FOR ADVANCED...

  11. High-Precision Floating-Point Arithmetic in ScientificComputation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, David H.

    2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    At the present time, IEEE 64-bit floating-point arithmetic is sufficiently accurate for most scientific applications. However, for a rapidly growing body of important scientific computing applications, a higher level of numeric precision is required: some of these applications require roughly twice this level; others require four times; while still others require hundreds or more digits to obtain numerically meaningful results. Such calculations have been facilitated by new high-precision software packages that include high-level language translation modules to minimize the conversion effort. These activities have yielded a number of interesting new scientific results in fields as diverse as quantum theory, climate modeling and experimental mathematics, a few of which are described in this article. Such developments suggest that in the future, the numeric precision used for a scientific computation may be as important to the program design as are the algorithms and data structures.

  12. Certainty in Stockpile Computing: Recommending a Verification and Validation Program for Scientific Software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.R.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As computing assumes a more central role in managing the nuclear stockpile, the consequences of an erroneous computer simulation could be severe. Computational failures are common in other endeavors and have caused project failures, significant economic loss, and loss of life. This report examines the causes of software failure and proposes steps to mitigate them. A formal verification and validation program for scientific software is recommended and described.

  13. SIAM Conference on Parallel Processing for Scientific Computing - March 12-14, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2008-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The themes of the 2008 conference included, but were not limited to: Programming languages, models, and compilation techniques; The transition to ubiquitous multicore/manycore processors; Scientific computing on special-purpose processors (Cell, GPUs, etc.); Architecture-aware algorithms; From scalable algorithms to scalable software; Tools for software development and performance evaluation; Global perspectives on HPC; Parallel computing in industry; Distributed/grid computing; Fault tolerance; Parallel visualization and large scale data management; and The future of parallel architectures.

  14. Feb. 11, 2008 Advanced Fault Tolerance Solutions for High Performance Computing 1/47 Advanced Fault Tolerance Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelmann, Christian

    Feb. 11, 2008 Advanced Fault Tolerance Solutions for High Performance Computing 1/47 RAS RAS Advanced Fault Tolerance Solutions for High Performance Computing Christian Engelmann Oak Ridge National Solutions for High Performance Computing 2/47 Nation's largest energy laboratory Nation's largest

  15. Predictions for Scientific Computing Fifty Years From Now

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tiejun

    ; automobiles, airplanes, spacecraft, computers, nuclear power, nuclear weapons, plastics, antibiotics, and genetic engineering? I believe that the explanation of our special position in history may be that it is not so special after all, because history tends not to last very long. This argument has been called

  16. NERSC 2011: High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment for the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antypas, Katie

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NERSC 2011 High Performance Computing Facility Operationalby providing high-performance computing, information, data,s deep knowledge of high performance computing to overcome

  17. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report October 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Ogden

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report October 2014 Highlights Rory Kennedy, Dan Ogden and Brenden Heidrich traveled to Germantown October 6-7, for a review of the Infrastructure Management mission with Shane Johnson, Mike Worley, Bradley Williams and Alison Hahn from NE-4 and Mary McCune from NE-3. Heidrich briefed the group on the project progress from July to October 2014 as well as the planned path forward for FY15. Jim Cole gave two invited university seminars at Ohio State University and University of Florida, providing an overview of NSUF including available capabilities and the process for accessing facilities through the peer reviewed proposal process. Jim Cole and Rory Kennedy co-chaired the NuMat meeting with Todd Allen. The meeting, sponsored by Elsevier publishing, was held in Clearwater, Florida, and is considered one of the premier nuclear fuels and materials conferences. Over 340 delegates attended with 160 oral and over 200 posters presented over 4 days. Thirty-one pre-applications were submitted for NSUF access through the NE-4 Combined Innovative Nuclear Research Funding Opportunity Announcement. Fourteen proposals were received for the NSUF Rapid Turnaround Experiment Summer 2014 call. Proposal evaluations are underway. John Jackson and Rory Kennedy attended the Nuclear Fuels Industry Research meeting. Jackson presented an overview of ongoing NSUF industry research.

  18. The Advanced Test Reactor Irradiation Capabilities Available as a National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is one of the worlds premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. The ATR is a very versatile facility with a wide variety of experimental test capabilities for providing the environment needed in an irradiation experiment. These capabilities include simple capsule experiments, instrumented and/or temperature-controlled experiments, and pressurized water loop experiment facilities. Monitoring systems have also been utilized to monitor different parameters such as fission gases for fuel experiments, to measure specimen performance during irradiation. ATRs control system provides a stable axial flux profile throughout each reactor operating cycle, and allows the thermal and fast neutron fluxes to be controlled separately in different sections of the core. The ATR irradiation positions vary in diameter from 16 mm to 127 mm over an active core height of 1.2 m. This paper discusses the different irradiation capabilities with examples of different experiments and the cost/benefit issues related to each capability. The recent designation of ATR as a national scientific user facility will make the ATR much more accessible at very low to no cost for research by universities and possibly commercial entities.

  19. Improving Energy Efficiency of GPU based General-Purpose Scientific Computing through

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Zhigang

    Improving Energy Efficiency of GPU based General-Purpose Scientific Computing through Automated challenge. In this paper, we propose a novel framework to improve the energy efficiency of GPU-based General configurations to improve the energy efficiency of any given GPGPU program. Through preliminary empirical

  20. The Portable Extensible Toolkit for Scientific computing Day 1: Usage and Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Portable Extensible Toolkit for Scientific computing Day 1: Usage and Algorithms Jed Brown CSCS runs performantly on a laptop No iPhone support Jed Brown (ETH Zrich) PETSc day 1 CSCS 2010-05-10 5) Same code runs performantly on a laptop No iPhone support Jed Brown (ETH Zrich) PETSc day 1 CSCS

  1. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Scientific Computing Where We Have Been And

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valtorta, Marco

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Scientific Computing Where We Have Been And Where We 1961: University of Georgia founded the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) to study effects National Laboratory and Hanford Site) SRS workforce: Approximately 8,000 Prime contractor (about 58

  2. ITER UltraScaleScientific Joint Dark Energy Mission ComputingCapability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;ITER UltraScaleScientific Joint Dark Energy Mission ComputingCapability Linac Coherent Light eRHIC Fusion Energy Contingency Source Upgrade HFIR Second Cold Source Integrated Beam Experiment IntroductionIntroductionIntroductionIntroductionIntroduction 8 Prioritization Process 9 A Benchmark

  3. VAX/VMS file protection on the STC (Scientific and Technical Computing) VAXES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual is a guide to use the file protection mechanisms available on the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Scientific and Technical Computing (STC) System VAXes. User identification codes (UICs) and general identifiers are discussed as a basis for understanding UIC-based and access control list (ACL) protection. 5 figs.

  4. A Scientific and Engineering C ti Cl t F iComputing Cluster Focusing on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Saraju P.

    A Scientific and Engineering C ti Cl t F iComputing Cluster Focusing on the Modeling faculty cover all time and length scales ~50 researchers Combustion chemistry Material fatigue 50;CrossDisciplinary Expertise · Chemistry ­ Bagus · Engineering ­ Boetcher (M&EE) ­ Borden ­ Cundari

  5. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF c 2011 Institute for Scientific NUMERICAL ANALYSIS AND MODELING Computing and Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brger, Raimund

    -dimensional model of sedimentation of suspensions of small solid particles dispersed in a viscous fluid. This model accepted spatially one-dimensional sedimentation model [35] gives rise to one scalar, nonlinear hyperbolicINTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF c 2011 Institute for Scientific NUMERICAL ANALYSIS AND MODELING Computing

  6. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF c 2012 Institute for Scientific NUMERICAL ANALYSIS AND MODELING Computing and Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brger, Raimund

    -dimensional model of sedimentation of suspensions of small solid particles dispersed in a viscous fluid. This model accepted spatially one-dimensional sedimentation model [35] gives rise to one scalar, nonlinear hyperbolicINTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF c 2012 Institute for Scientific NUMERICAL ANALYSIS AND MODELING Computing

  7. Heterogeneous High Throughput Scientific Computing with APM X-Gene and Intel Xeon Phi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Abdurachmanov; Brian Bockelman; Peter Elmer; Giulio Eulisse; Robert Knight; Shahzad Muzaffar

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical power requirements will be a constraint on the future growth of Distributed High Throughput Computing (DHTC) as used by High Energy Physics. Performance-per-watt is a critical metric for the evaluation of computer architectures for cost- efficient computing. Additionally, future performance growth will come from heterogeneous, many-core, and high computing density platforms with specialized processors. In this paper, we examine the Intel Xeon Phi Many Integrated Cores (MIC) co-processor and Applied Micro X-Gene ARMv8 64-bit low-power server system-on-a-chip (SoC) solutions for scientific computing applications. We report our experience on software porting, performance and energy efficiency and evaluate the potential for use of such technologies in the context of distributed computing systems such as the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG).

  8. High-Performance Computing for Advanced Smart Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenyu; Chen, Yousu

    2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The power grid is becoming far more complex as a result of the grid evolution meeting an information revolution. Due to the penetration of smart grid technologies, the grid is evolving as an unprecedented speed and the information infrastructure is fundamentally improved with a large number of smart meters and sensors that produce several orders of magnitude larger amounts of data. How to pull data in, perform analysis, and put information out in a real-time manner is a fundamental challenge in smart grid operation and planning. The future power grid requires high performance computing to be one of the foundational technologies in developing the algorithms and tools for the significantly increased complexity. New techniques and computational capabilities are required to meet the demands for higher reliability and better asset utilization, including advanced algorithms and computing hardware for large-scale modeling, simulation, and analysis. This chapter summarizes the computational challenges in smart grid and the need for high performance computing, and present examples of how high performance computing might be used for future smart grid operation and planning.

  9. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report November 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renae Soelberg

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report November 2014 Highlights Rory Kennedy and Sarah Robertson attended the American Nuclear Society Winter Meeting and Nuclear Technology Expo in Anaheim, California, Nov. 10-13. ATR NSUF exhibited at the technology expo where hundreds of meeting participants had an opportunity to learn more about ATR NSUF. Dr. Kennedy briefed the Nuclear Engineering Department Heads Organization (NEDHO) on the workings of the ATR NSUF. Rory Kennedy, James Cole and Dan Ogden participated in a reactor instrumentation discussion with Jean-Francois Villard and Christopher Destouches of CEA and several members of the INL staff. ATR NSUF received approval from the NE-20 office to start planning the annual Users Meeting. The meeting will be held at INL, June 22-25. Mike Worley, director of the Office of Innovative Nuclear Research (NE-42), visited INL Nov. 4-5. Milestones Completed Recommendations for the Summer Rapid Turnaround Experiment awards were submitted to DOE-HQ Nov. 12 (Level 2 milestone due Nov. 30). Major Accomplishments/Activities The University of California, Santa Barbara 2 experiment was unloaded from the GE-2000 at HFEF. The experiment specimen packs will be removed and shipped to ORNL for PIE. The Terrani experiment, one of three FY 2014 new awards, was completed utilizing the Advanced Photon Source MRCAT beamline. The experiment investigated the chemical state of Ag and Pd in SiC shell of irradiated TRISO particles via X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. Upcoming Meetings/Events The ATR NSUF program review meeting will be held Dec. 9-10 at LEnfant Plaza. In addition to NSUF staff and users, NE-4, NE-5 and NE-7 representatives will attend the meeting. Awarded Research Projects Boise State University Rapid Turnaround Experiments (14-485 and 14-486) Nanoindentation and TEM work on the T91, HT9, HCM12A and 9Cr ODS specimens has been completed at CAES by Boise State PI Janelle Wharry and Cory Dolph. PI Corey Dolph returned in early November to complete their research by performing nanoindentation on unirradiated specimens that will be used as a baseline for their research.

  10. June 4, 2007 Advanced Fault Tolerance Solutions for High Performance Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelmann, Christian

    June 4, 2007 Advanced Fault Tolerance Solutions for High Performance Computing Workshop on Trends Tolerance Solutions for High Performance Computing Christian Engelmann Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Solutions for High Performance Computing Workshop on Trends, Technologies and Collaborative Opportunities

  11. Editorial for Advanced Theory and Practice for High Performance Computing and Communications Geoffrey Fox

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Editorial for Advanced Theory and Practice for High Performance Computing and Communications Theory and Practice for High Performance Computing and Communications. I would like to thank Omer Rana International Conference on High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC-09) http

  12. June 8, 2007 Advanced Fault Tolerance Solutions for High Performance Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelmann, Christian

    June 8, 2007 Advanced Fault Tolerance Solutions for High Performance Computing Workshop on Trends Tolerance Solutions for High Performance Computing Christian Engelmann Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak for High Performance Computing Workshop on Trends, Technologies and Collaborative Opportunities in High

  13. Software for the ACP (Advanced Computer Program) multiprocessor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biel, J.; Areti, H.; Atac, R.; Cook, A.; Fischler, M.; Gaines, I.; Kaliher, C.; Hance, R.; Husby, D.; Nash, T.

    1987-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Software has been developed for use with the Fermilab Advanced Computer Program (ACP) multiprocessor system. The software was designed to make a system of a hundred independent node processors as easy to use as a single, powerful CPU. Subroutines have been developed by which a user's host program can send data to and get results from the program running in each of his ACP node processors. Utility programs make it easy to compile and link host and node programs, to debug a node program on an ACP development system, and to submit a debugged program to an ACP production system.

  14. Fermilab advanced computer program multi-microprocessor project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, T.; Areti, H.; Biel, J.; Case, G.; Cook, A.; Fischler, M.; Gaines, I.; Hance, R.; Husby, D.; Zmuda, T.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fermilab's Advanced Computer Program is constructing a powerful 128 node multi-microprocessor system for data analysis in high-energy physics. The system will use commercial 32-bit microprocessors programmed in Fortran-77. Extensive software supports easy migration of user applications from a uniprocessor environment to the multiprocessor and provides sophisticated program development, debugging, and error handling and recovery tools. This system is designed to be readily copied, providing computing cost effectiveness of below $2200 per VAX 11/780 equivalent. The low cost, commercial availability, compatibility with off-line analysis programs, and high data bandwidths (up to 160 MByte/sec) make the system an ideal choice for applications to on-line triggers as well as an offline data processor.

  15. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY08-09 Implementation Plan, Volume 2, Revision 0.5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kusnezov, D; Bickel, T; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

    2007-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear-weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable Stockpile Life Extension Programs (SLEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining the support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1. Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2--Prediction through Simulation. Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear-weapons performances in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3. Balanced Operational Infrastructure--Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

  16. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY10-FY11 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0.5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meisner, R; Peery, J; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

    2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering (D&E) programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional (3D) simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: (1) Robust Tools - Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements; (2) Prediction through Simulation - Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile; and (3) Balanced Operational Infrastructure - Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

  17. Advanced Simulation and Computing Fiscal Year 2011-2012 Implementation Plan, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, M; Phillips, J; Hpson, J; Meisner, R

    2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering (D&E) programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional (3D) simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1 - Robust Tools. Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2 - Prediction through Simulation. Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3 - Balanced Operational Infrastructure. Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

  18. Advanced Simulation & Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meisner, R; Perry, J; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

    2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future nonnuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear-weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable Stockpile Life Extension Programs (SLEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining the support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1. Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2--Prediction through Simulation. Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear-weapons performances in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3--Balanced Operational Infrastructure. Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

  19. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kissel, L

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: (1) Robust Tools - Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements; (2) Prediction through Simulation - Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile; and (3) Balanced Operational Infrastructure - Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

  20. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan, Volume 2, Revision 0.5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meisner, R; Hopson, J; Peery, J; McCoy, M

    2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1. Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2. Prediction through Simulation--Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3. Balanced Operational Infrastructure--Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

  1. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY10-11 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carnes, B

    2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1 Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2 Prediction through Simulation--Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3 Balanced Operational Infrastructure--Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

  2. MiniGhost : a miniapp for exploring boundary exchange strategies using stencil computations in scientific parallel computing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, Richard Frederick; Heroux, Michael Allen; Vaughan, Courtenay Thomas

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A broad range of scientific computation involves the use of difference stencils. In a parallel computing environment, this computation is typically implemented by decomposing the spacial domain, inducing a 'halo exchange' of process-owned boundary data. This approach adheres to the Bulk Synchronous Parallel (BSP) model. Because commonly available architectures provide strong inter-node bandwidth relative to latency costs, many codes 'bulk up' these messages by aggregating data into a message as a means of reducing the number of messages. A renewed focus on non-traditional architectures and architecture features provides new opportunities for exploring alternatives to this programming approach. In this report we describe miniGhost, a 'miniapp' designed for exploration of the capabilities of current as well as emerging and future architectures within the context of these sorts of applications. MiniGhost joins the suite of miniapps developed as part of the Mantevo project.

  3. advanced computational model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  4. advanced computational modeling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  5. Nationwide Buildings Energy Research enabled through an integrated Data Intensive Scientific Workflow and Advanced Analysis Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Lansing, Carina S.; Elsethagen, Todd O.; Hathaway, John E.; Guillen, Zoe C.; Dirks, James A.; Skorski, Daniel C.; Stephan, Eric G.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Gorton, Ian; Liu, Yan

    2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern workflow systems enable scientists to run ensemble simulations at unprecedented scales and levels of complexity, allowing them to study system sizes previously impossible to achieve, due to the inherent resource requirements needed for the modeling work. However as a result of these new capabilities the science teams suddenly also face unprecedented data volumes that they are unable to analyze with their existing tools and methodologies in a timely fashion. In this paper we will describe the ongoing development work to create an integrated data intensive scientific workflow and analysis environment that offers researchers the ability to easily create and execute complex simulation studies and provides them with different scalable methods to analyze the resulting data volumes. The integration of simulation and analysis environments is hereby not only a question of ease of use, but supports fundamental functions in the correlated analysis of simulation input, execution details and derived results for multi-variant, complex studies. To this end the team extended and integrated the existing capabilities of the Velo data management and analysis infrastructure, the MeDICi data intensive workflow system and RHIPE the R for Hadoop version of the well-known statistics package, as well as developing a new visual analytics interface for the result exploitation by multi-domain users. The capabilities of the new environment are demonstrated on a use case that focusses on the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) building energy team, showing how they were able to take their previously local scale simulations to a nationwide level by utilizing data intensive computing techniques not only for their modeling work, but also for the subsequent analysis of their modeling results. As part of the PNNL research initiative PRIMA (Platform for Regional Integrated Modeling and Analysis) the team performed an initial 3 year study of building energy demands for the US Eastern Interconnect domain, which they are now planning to extend to predict the demand for the complete century. The initial study raised their data demands from a few GBs to 400GB for the 3year study and expected tens of TBs for the full century.

  6. New Sensors for In-Pile Temperature Measurement at the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; J. E. Daw; K. G. Condie

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. research in nuclear science and technology. As a user facility, the ATR is supporting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry, as they conduct basic and applied nuclear research and development to advance the nations energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to develop and evaluate new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing measurements of key parameters during irradiation. This paper describes the strategy for determining what instrumentation is needed and the program for developing new or enhanced sensors that can address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing new sensors now available and under development for in-pile detection of temperature at various irradiation locations in the ATR.

  7. New Sensors for In-Pile Temperature Detection at the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; J. E. Daw; K. G. Condie; S. Curtis Wilkins

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. As a user facility, the ATR is supporting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry, as they conduct basic and applied nuclear research and development to advance the nations energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to develop and evaluate new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing measurements of key parameters during irradiation. This paper describes the strategy for determining what instrumentation is needed and the program for developing new or enhanced sensors that can address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing new sensors now available and under development for in-pile detection of temperature at various irradiation locations in the ATR.

  8. Smart Libraries: Best SQE Practices for Libraries with an Emphasis on Scientific Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, M C; Reus, J F; Matzke, R P; Koziol, Q A; Cheng, A P

    2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As scientific computing applications grow in complexity, more and more functionality is being packaged in independently developed libraries. Worse, as the computing environments in which these applications run grow in complexity, it gets easier to make mistakes in building, installing and using libraries as well as the applications that depend on them. Unfortunately, SQA standards so far developed focus primarily on applications, not libraries. We show that SQA standards for libraries differ from applications in many respects. We introduce and describe a variety of practices aimed at minimizing the likelihood of making mistakes in using libraries and at maximizing users' ability to diagnose and correct them when they occur. We introduce the term Smart Library to refer to a library that is developed with these basic principles in mind. We draw upon specific examples from existing products we believe incorporate smart features: MPI, a parallel message passing library, and HDF5 and SAF, both of which are parallel I/O libraries supporting scientific computing applications. We conclude with a narrative of some real-world experiences in using smart libraries with Ale3d, VisIt and SAF.

  9. New DOE-Sponsored Study Helps Advance Scientific Understanding of Potential CO2 Storage Impacts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In another step forward toward improved scientific understanding of potential geologic carbon dioxide storage impacts, a new U.S. Department of Energy sponsored study has confirmed earlier research showing that proper site selection and monitoring is essential for helping anticipate and mitigate possible risks.

  10. POET (parallel object-oriented environment and toolkit) and frameworks for scientific distributed computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, R.; Cheung, A.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Frameworks for parallel computing have recently become popular as a means for preserving parallel algorithms as reusable components. Frameworks for parallel computing in general, and POET in particular, focus on finding ways to orchestrate and facilitate cooperation between components that implement the parallel algorithms. Since performance is a key requirement for POET applications, CORBA or CORBA-like systems are eschewed for a SPMD message-passing architecture common to the world of distributed-parallel computing. Though the system is written in C++ for portability, the behavior of POET is more like a classical framework, such as Smalltalk. POET seeks to be a general platform for scientific parallel algorithm components which can be modified, linked, mixed and matched to a user`s specification. The purpose of this work is to identify a means for parallel code reuse and to make parallel computing more accessible to scientists whose expertise is outside the field of parallel computing. The POET framework provides two things: (1) an object model for parallel components that allows cooperation without being restrictive; (2) services that allow components to access and manage user data and message-passing facilities, etc. This work has evolved through application of a series of real distributed-parallel scientific problems. The paper focuses on what is required for parallel components to cooperate and at the same time remain ``black-boxes`` that users can drop into the frame without having to know the exquisite details of message-passing, data layout, etc. The paper walks through a specific example of a chemically reacting flow application. The example is implemented in POET and the authors identify component cooperation, usability and reusability in an anecdotal fashion.

  11. Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fletcher, James H. [University of North Florida; Cox, Philip [University of North Florida; Harrington, William J [University of North Florida; Campbell, Joseph L [University of North Florida

    2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT Project Title: Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing PROJECT OBJECTIVE The objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell system technology towards the commercial targets of power density, energy density and lifetime. These targets were laid out in the DOEs R&D roadmap to develop an advanced direct methanol fuel cell power supply that meets commercial entry requirements. Such a power supply will enable mobile computers to operate non-stop, unplugged from the wall power outlet, by using the high energy density of methanol fuel contained in a replaceable fuel cartridge. Specifically this project focused on balance-of-plant component integration and miniaturization, as well as extensive component, subassembly and integrated system durability and validation testing. This design has resulted in a pre-production power supply design and a prototype that meet the rigorous demands of consumer electronic applications. PROJECT TASKS The proposed work plan was designed to meet the project objectives, which corresponded directly with the objectives outlined in the Funding Opportunity Announcement: To engineer the fuel cell balance-of-plant and packaging to meet the needs of consumer electronic systems, specifically at power levels required for mobile computing. UNF used existing balance-of-plant component technologies developed under its current US Army CERDEC project, as well as a previous DOE project completed by PolyFuel, to further refine them to both miniaturize and integrate their functionality to increase the system power density and energy density. Benefits of UNFs novel passive water recycling MEA (membrane electrode assembly) and the simplified system architecture it enabled formed the foundation of the design approach. The package design was hardened to address orientation independence, shock, vibration, and environmental requirements. Fuel cartridge and fuel subsystems were improved to ensure effective fuel containment. PROJECT OVERVIEW The University of North Florida (UNF), with project partner the University of Florida, recently completed the Department of Energy (DOE) project entitled Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing. The primary objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell system technology towards the commercial targets as laid out in the DOE R&D roadmap by developing a 20-watt, direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), portable power supply based on the UNF innovative passive water recovery MEA. Extensive component, sub-system, and system development and testing was undertaken to meet the rigorous demands of the consumer electronic application. Numerous brassboard (nonpackaged) systems were developed to optimize the integration process and facilitating control algorithm development. The culmination of the development effort was a fully-integrated, DMFC, power supply (referred to as DP4). The project goals were 40 W/kg for specific power, 55 W/l for power density, and 575 Whr/l for energy density. It should be noted that the specific power and power density were for the power section only, and did not include the hybrid battery. The energy density is based on three, 200 ml, fuel cartridges, and also did not include the hybrid battery. The results show that the DP4 system configured without the methanol concentration sensor exceeded all performance goals, achieving 41.5 W/kg for specific power, 55.3 W/l for power density, and 623 Whr/l for energy density. During the project, the DOE revised its technical targets, and the definition of many of these targets, for the portable power application. With this revision, specific power, power density, specific energy (Whr/kg), and energy density are based on the total system, including fuel tank, fuel, and hybridization battery. Fuel capacity is not defined, but the same value is required for all calculations. Test data showed that the DP4 exceeded all 2011 Technical Status values; for example, the DP4 energy density was 373 Whr/l versus the DOE 2011 status of 200 Whr/l. For the

  12. R and D plans for advanced computer and control technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ipakchi, A.; Wong, D.J. (Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (USA)); Wells, B. (Ohio Edison Co., Akron, OH (USA)); Skedzielewski, D. (Delmarva Power and Light Co., Wilmington, DE (USA)); Taft, C. (Southern Co. Services, Inc., Birmingham, AL (USA)); Valli, J. (Cleveland Electric Illuminating Co., OH (USA))

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Competition, rising cost, and changes in technology have prompted many US electric utilities to consider new methods of power plant operation. One approach is the introduction of automation in an effort to increase productivity, reliability, efficiency, flexibility, and performance. The rapid advancement of computer technology has opened new opportunities for more sophisticated control and monitoring than ever before. The application of automation, though, has been through the use of a deluge of independent, specialized systems dedicated to specific needs. The utilities' quick adoption of these systems for solving specific problems has created Islands of automation''. These islands cannot pass information or communicate with one another. Each requires their own separate computer and terminal. The redundancy of data and sensors in order to collect needed information for each independent system have added to the confusion in the plant. These independent systems have rapidly pushed the key issue of integration to the forefront for plant automation. There is still a need for further development of techniques and technologies for plant automation, but the key issue is integration. This report presents the results of an EPRI sponsored study and planning project. The purpose of this project was to identify the current automation issues facing the utility power industry, and to develop a seven year R D plan for EPRI in this area. In addition to the R D plan, the report presents the results of a survey, and discusses topics such as plant-wide automation systems' architecture, communications, and man-machine interface. 25 refs., 33 figs., 13 tabs.

  13. Research in the design and implementation of a comprehensive facility for scientific computation. Final project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fateman, R.J.; Kahan, W.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research on ways to organize a body of numerical procedures in such a way that they may be invoked automatically by processes which accept symbolic and algebraic specifications from a user, and produce combined symbolic, numeric and graphical output is described. Efforts are made to make these algebraic systems as flexible and useful as possible in this context, and to integrate them successfully into a man-machine design which provides operating system, language, and algorithm support. Various aspects of this research are reviewed including languages for symbolic algebra systems, programming environments, numerical software, numeric/symbolic programs, floating point hardware, elementary functions, Macsyma distribution, VAX/Macsyma/computer architecture, interactive systems, Lisp language, and advanced computer concepts (supercomputers). The computing environment for this research are UNIX-VAX-11/780, Vax 11/750, and Motorola 68000 systems. 32 refs. (DWL)

  14. EWEC 2006 Scientific Track Advanced Forecast Systems for the Grid Integration of 25 GW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    forecasts, smoothing effects Abstract The economic success of offshore wind farms in liberalised electricity of offshore wind farms, their electricity production must be known well in advance to allow an efficient Oldenburg, Germany Key words: Offshore wind power, grid integration, short-term prediction, regional

  15. Using LINUX/Mac Computers for Scientific Computing The easiest way to save, edit, compile, and run a program, save the output,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, Carl

    Using LINUX/Mac Computers for Scientific Computing The easiest way to save, edit, compile, and run a program, save the output, and then graph the output using MATLAB is to work on a LINUX or Mac (Mac OS X for saving, editing, compiling, and running program.c, and graphing the output with MATLAB and Fig

  16. Joint Institute for Computational Sciences | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    science and engineering. JICS advances scientific discovery and state-of-the-art engineering by taking full advantage of the computers at the petascale and beyond housed...

  17. The Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - Site Status Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epperly, T W

    2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes LLNL's progress for the period April through September of 2008 for the Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) SciDAC. The TASCS project is organized into four major thrust areas: CCA Environment (72%), Component Technology Initiatives (16%), CCA Toolkit (8%), and User and Application Outreach & Support (4%). The percentage of LLNL's effort allocation is shown in parenthesis for each thrust area. Major thrust areas are further broken down into activity areas, LLNL's effort directed to each activity is shown in Figure 1. Enhancements, Core Tools, and Usability are all part of CCA Environment, and Software Quality is part of Component Technology Initiatives. The balance of this report will cover our accomplishments in each of these activity areas.

  18. Advanced Computing Tools and Models for Accelerator Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryne, Robert D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TOOLS AND MODELS FOR ACCELERATOR PHYSICS * Robert D. Ryne,computing tools for accelerator physics. Following anscale computing in accelerator physics. INTRODUCTION To

  19. advanced computed tomography: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2007-01-01 4 Geometric Tomography: A Limited-View Approach for Computed Tomography Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: Geometric Tomography: A...

  20. Future Generation Computer Systems 16 (1999) 920 An extensible information model for shared scientific data collections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Amarnath

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    scientific data collections Amarnath Gupta , Chaitanya Baru San Diego Supercomputer Center, University

  1. DOE High Performance Computing Operational Review (HPCOR): Enabling Data-Driven Scientific Discovery at HPC Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, Richard; Allcock, William; Beggio, Chris; Campbell, Stuart; Cherry, Andrew; Cholia, Shreyas; Dart, Eli; England, Clay; Fahey, Tim; Foertter, Fernanda; Goldstone, Robin; Hick, Jason; Karelitz, David; Kelly, Kaki; Monroe, Laura; Prabhat,; Skinner, David; White, Julia

    2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities are on the verge of a paradigm shift in the way they deliver systems and services to science and engineering teams. Research projects are producing a wide variety of data at unprecedented scale and level of complexity, with community-specific services that are part of the data collection and analysis workflow. On June 18-19, 2014 representatives from six DOE HPC centers met in Oakland, CA at the DOE High Performance Operational Review (HPCOR) to discuss how they can best provide facilities and services to enable large-scale data-driven scientific discovery at the DOE national laboratories. The report contains findings from that review.

  2. New Sensors for the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy L. Rempe; Darrell L. Knudson; Keith G. Condie; Joshua E. Daw; Heng Ban; Brandon Fox; Gordon Kohse

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to develop and evaluate new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. This paper describes the selection strategy of what instrumentation is needed, and the program generated for developing new or enhanced sensors that can address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing new sensors now available to users of the ATR NSUF with data from irradiation tests using these sensors. In addition, progress is reported on current research efforts to provide users advanced methods for detecting temperature, fuel thermal conductivity, and changes in sample geometry.

  3. Instruction-Level Characterization of Scientific Computing Applications Using Hardware Performance Counters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Y.; Cameron, K.W.

    1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Workload characterization has been proven an essential tool to architecture design and performance evaluation in both scientific and commercial computing areas. Traditional workload characterization techniques include FLOPS rate, cache miss ratios, CPI (cycles per instruction or IPC, instructions per cycle) etc. With the complexity of sophisticated modern superscalar microprocessors, these traditional characterization techniques are not powerful enough to pinpoint the performance bottleneck of an application on a specific microprocessor. They are also incapable of immediately demonstrating the potential performance benefit of any architectural or functional improvement in a new processor design. To solve these problems, many people rely on simulators, which have substantial constraints especially on large-scale scientific computing applications. This paper presents a new technique of characterizing applications at the instruction level using hardware performance counters. It has the advantage of collecting instruction-level characteristics in a few runs virtually without overhead or slowdown. A variety of instruction counts can be utilized to calculate some average abstract workload parameters corresponding to microprocessor pipelines or functional units. Based on the microprocessor architectural constraints and these calculated abstract parameters, the architectural performance bottleneck for a specific application can be estimated. In particular, the analysis results can provide some insight to the problem that only a small percentage of processor peak performance can be achieved even for many very cache-friendly codes. Meanwhile, the bottleneck estimation can provide suggestions about viable architectural/functional improvement for certain workloads. Eventually, these abstract parameters can lead to the creation of an analytical microprocessor pipeline model and memory hierarchy model.

  4. 2013 Wisconsin Forum on Advanced Computing in Engineering ~ Poster Session Overview ~

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul G.

    2013 Wisconsin Forum on Advanced Computing in Engineering ~ Poster and Thermal Mixing in Desuperheating Applications Mario Trujillo Employed at General Motors Eelco Gehring Numerical Simulation of Heat Transfer Mechanisms in Spray

  5. Aachen Institute for Advanced Study in Computational Engineering Science Preprint: AICES-2011/11-02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    adaptation 1. Introduction In combustion chambers of rocket engines the walls are exposed to very high temAachen Institute for Advanced Study in Computational Engineering Science Preprint: AICES-2011

  6. advanced computational algorithm: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CS 3172, 0203: Advanced Algorithms, Part I Jrgen Dix 12;Chapter 1: Turing Zachmann, Gabriel First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20...

  7. advanced computational tools: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Websites Summary: Fundamentals How data is stored Key functions of a DBMS: just the big picture Example: transactionsProviding Students with Computational...

  8. Advanced Computational Thermal Studies and their Assessment for Supercritical-Pressure Reactors (SCRs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. McEligot; J. Y. Yoo; J. S. Lee; S. T. Ro; E. Lurien; S. O. Park; R. H. Pletcher; B. L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J. M. Wallace

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this laboratory / university collaboration of coupled computational and experimental studies is the improvement of predictive methods for supercritical-pressure reactors. The general objective is to develop supporting knowledge needed of advanced computational techniques for the technology development of the concepts and their safety systems.

  9. Simulation based Bayesian econometric inference: principles and some recent computational advances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesterov, Yurii

    2007/15 Simulation based Bayesian econometric inference: principles and some recent computational/15 Simulation based Bayesian econometric inference: principles and some recent computational advances Lennart F aspects of simulation based Bayesian econometric inference. We start at an elementary level on basic

  10. ADVANCED WUFI COMPUTER MODELING WORKSHOP FOR WALL DESIGN AND PERFORMANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    by the U.S Department of Energy This symposium and workshop is co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in collaboration with the Fraunhofer and Owens Corning. The Advanced Workshop will be held in Napa, California wine country, Monday, January 30

  11. INFORMS Journal on Computing Articles in Advance, pp. 114

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochbaum, Dorit S.

    , Berkeley, California 94720 {ebnorman@lbl.gov, swany@nuc.berkeley.edu} The detection of illicit nuclear in Articles in Advance. 1. Introduction The detection of illicit nuclear materials is of great interest for Detecting, Classifying, and Identifying Special Nuclear Materials Yan T. Yang Department of Industrial

  12. Advanced Communication and Control for Distributed Energy Resource Integration: Phase 2 Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BPL Global

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research project is to demonstrate sensing, communication, information and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of multivendor distributed energy resource (DER) units at aggregation levels that meet individual user requirements for facility operations (residential, commercial, industrial, manufacturing, etc.) and further serve as resource options for electric and natural gas utilities. The fully demonstrated DER aggregation system with embodiment of communication and control technologies will lead to real-time, interactive, customer-managed service networks to achieve greater customer value. Work on this Advanced Communication and Control Project (ACCP) consists of a two-phase approach for an integrated demonstration of communication and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of DER units to reach progressive levels of aggregated power output. Phase I involved design and proof-of-design, and Phase II involves real-world demonstration of the Phase I design architecture. The scope of work for Phase II of this ACCP involves demonstrating the Phase I design architecture in large scale real-world settings while integrating with the operations of one or more electricity supplier feeder lines. The communication and control architectures for integrated demonstration shall encompass combinations of software and hardware components, including: sensors, data acquisition and communication systems, remote monitoring systems, metering (interval revenue, real-time), local and wide area networks, Web-based systems, smart controls, energy management/information systems with control and automation of building energy loads, and demand-response management with integration of real-time market pricing. For Phase II, BPL Global shall demonstrate the Phase I design for integrating and controlling the operation of more than 10 DER units, dispersed at various locations in one or more Independent System Operator (ISO) Control Areas, at an aggregated scale of more than 1 MW, to provide grid support. Actual performance data with respect to each specified function above is to be collected during the Phase II field demonstration. At a minimum, the Phase II demonstration shall span one year of field operations. The demonstration performance will need to be validated by the target customer(s) for acceptance and subsequent implementation. An ISO must be involved in demonstration planning and execution. As part of the Phase II work, BPL Global shall develop a roadmap to commercialization that identifies and quantifies the potential markets for the integrated, aggregated DER systems and for the communication and control technologies demonstrated in Phase I. In addition, the roadmap must identify strategies and actions, as well as the regional and national markets where the aggregated DER systems with communication and control solutions will be introduced, along with a timeline projected for introduction into each identified market. In Phase I of this project, we developed a proof-of-concept ACCP system and architecture and began to test its functionality at real-world sites. These sites had just over 10 MW of DERs and allowed us to identify what needed to be done to commercialize this concept. As a result, we started Phase II by looking at our existing platform and identified its strengths and weaknesses as well as how it would need to evolve for commercialization. During this process, we worked with different stakeholders in the market including: Independent System Operators, DER owners and operators, and electric utility companies to fully understand the issues from all of the different perspectives. Once we had an understanding of the commercialized ACCP system, we began to document and prepare detailed designs of the different system components. The components of the system with the most significant design improvements were: the on-site remote terminal unit, the communication technology between the remote site and the data center, and the scalability and reliability of the data center application.

  13. Vision 20/20: Automation and advanced computing in clinical radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Kevin L., E-mail: kevinmoore@ucsd.edu; Moiseenko, Vitali [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Kagadis, George C. [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Rion, GR 26504 (Greece)] [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Rion, GR 26504 (Greece); McNutt, Todd R. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Science, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Science, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This Vision 20/20 paper considers what computational advances are likely to be implemented in clinical radiation oncology in the coming years and how the adoption of these changes might alter the practice of radiotherapy. Four main areas of likely advancement are explored: cloud computing, aggregate data analyses, parallel computation, and automation. As these developments promise both new opportunities and new risks to clinicians and patients alike, the potential benefits are weighed against the hazards associated with each advance, with special considerations regarding patient safety under new computational platforms and methodologies. While the concerns of patient safety are legitimate, the authors contend that progress toward next-generation clinical informatics systems will bring about extremely valuable developments in quality improvement initiatives, clinical efficiency, outcomes analyses, data sharing, and adaptive radiotherapy.

  14. 18.337J / 6.338J Applied Parallel Computing (SMA 5505), Spring 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edelman, Alan

    Advanced interdisciplinary introduction to modern scientific computing on parallel supercomputers. Numerical topics include dense and sparse linear algebra, N-body problems, and Fourier transforms. Geometrical topics include ...

  15. NREL: Continuum Magazine - Computing Advances Enable More Efficient...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the United States: along with countless desktop and laptop computers Americans use at home and at work, more than half of the U.S. population now owns a smart phone, which is...

  16. Advancing accelerator science using Mira | Argonne Leadership Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1BP-14Scripting for Advanced Workflowsa min

  17. Computing support for advanced medical data analysis and imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wi?licki, W; Bia?as, P; Czerwi?ski, E; Kap?on, ?; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowal, J; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Krzemie?, W; Molenda, M; Moskal, P; Nied?wiecki, S; Pa?ka, M; Pawlik, M; Raczy?ski, L; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Sharma, N G; Silarski, M; S?omski, A; Smyrski, J; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Zieli?ski, M; Zo?, N

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss computing issues for data analysis and image reconstruction of PET-TOF medical scanner or other medical scanning devices producing large volumes of data. Service architecture based on the grid and cloud concepts for distributed processing is proposed and critically discussed.

  18. Advanced Computational Methods for Security Constrained Financial Transmission Rights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalsi, Karanjit; Elbert, Stephen T.; Vlachopoulou, Maria; Zhou, Ning; Huang, Zhenyu

    2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Financial Transmission Rights (FTRs) are financial insurance tools to help power market participants reduce price risks associated with transmission congestion. FTRs are issued based on a process of solving a constrained optimization problem with the objective to maximize the FTR social welfare under power flow security constraints. Security constraints for different FTR categories (monthly, seasonal or annual) are usually coupled and the number of constraints increases exponentially with the number of categories. Commercial software for FTR calculation can only provide limited categories of FTRs due to the inherent computational challenges mentioned above. In this paper, first an innovative mathematical reformulation of the FTR problem is presented which dramatically improves the computational efficiency of optimization problem. After having re-formulated the problem, a novel non-linear dynamic system (NDS) approach is proposed to solve the optimization problem. The new formulation and performance of the NDS solver is benchmarked against widely used linear programming (LP) solvers like CPLEX and tested on both standard IEEE test systems and large-scale systems using data from the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). The performance of the NDS is demonstrated to be comparable and in some cases is shown to outperform the widely used CPLEX algorithms. The proposed formulation and NDS based solver is also easily parallelizable enabling further computational improvement.

  19. National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    plasma microturbulence pellet injection edge plasma physics.at the device scale. Pellet injection. The fuel in a fusion

  20. Barbara Helland Advanced Scientific Computing Research NERSC-HEP Requirements Review

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperationalAugustDecade5-F,INITIAL JohnE Pt he A dvanced

  1. Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) Homepage | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Become agovEducationWelcomestructures |Science (SC)

  2. The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Enabling Computational Technologies FY09 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diachin, L F; Garaizar, F X; Henson, V E; Pope, G

    2009-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this document we report on the status of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Enabling Computational Technologies (ECT) effort. In particular, we provide the context for ECT In the broader NEAMS program and describe the three pillars of the ECT effort, namely, (1) tools and libraries, (2) software quality assurance, and (3) computational facility (computers, storage, etc) needs. We report on our FY09 deliverables to determine the needs of the integrated performance and safety codes (IPSCs) in these three areas and lay out the general plan for software quality assurance to meet the requirements of DOE and the DOE Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). We conclude with a brief description of our interactions with the Idaho National Laboratory computer center to determine what is needed to expand their role as a NEAMS user facility.

  3. Computational Advances in Applied Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuildingCoalComplex Flow Workshop Report JanuarySystemComputational

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation and Computing: Contact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitche Home About npitcheSandian Wins13,051 lbsComputational

  5. Final Scientific Report: A Scalable Development Environment for Peta-Scale Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karbach, Carsten; Frings, Wolfgang

    2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final scientific report of the project DE-SC000120 (A scalable Development Environment for Peta-Scale Computing)?. The objective of this project is the extension of the Parallel Tools Platform (PTP) for applying it to peta-scale systems. PTP is an integrated development environment for parallel applications. It comprises code analysis, performance tuning, parallel debugging and system monitoring. The contribution of the Juelich Supercomputing Centre (JSC) aims to provide a scalable solution for system monitoring of supercomputers. This includes the development of a new communication protocol for exchanging status data between the target remote system and the client running PTP. The communication has to work for high latency. PTP needs to be implemented robustly and should hide the complexity of the supercomputer's architecture in order to provide a transparent access to various remote systems via a uniform user interface. This simplifies the porting of applications to different systems, because PTP functions as abstraction layer between parallel application developer and compute resources. The common requirement for all PTP components is that they have to interact with the remote supercomputer. E.g. applications are built remotely and performance tools are attached to job submissions and their output data resides on the remote system. Status data has to be collected by evaluating outputs of the remote job scheduler and the parallel debugger needs to control an application executed on the supercomputer. The challenge is to provide this functionality for peta-scale systems in real-time. The client server architecture of the established monitoring application LLview, developed by the JSC, can be applied to PTP's system monitoring. LLview provides a well-arranged overview of the supercomputer's current status. A set of statistics, a list of running and queued jobs as well as a node display mapping running jobs to their compute resources form the user display of LLview. These monitoring features have to be integrated into the development environment. Besides showing the current status PTP's monitoring also needs to allow for submitting and canceling user jobs. Monitoring peta-scale systems especially deals with presenting the large amount of status data in a useful manner. Users require to select arbitrary levels of detail. The monitoring views have to provide a quick overview of the system state, but also need to allow for zooming into specific parts of the system, into which the user is interested in. At present, the major batch systems running on supercomputers are PBS, TORQUE, ALPS and LoadLeveler, which have to be supported by both the monitoring and the job controlling component. Finally, PTP needs to be designed as generic as possible, so that it can be extended for future batch systems.

  6. University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies UMIACS' programs are led by distinguished faculty, many of whom hold joint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Daniel S.

    by distinguished faculty, many of whom hold joint appointments in Computer Science, Electrical and Computer, and over 400 workstations and PCs. · UMIACS' environment is enriched by a strong outreach program including, operating systems, and scientific computing Sponsored Research ANNUAL RESEARCH FUNDING $15 MILLION 3 #12

  7. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODEL FOR THREE-PHASE SLURRY REACTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the second year of the project, the Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for analyzing three-phase slurry flows in a bubble column is further developed. The approach uses an Eulerian analysis of liquid flows in the bubble column, and makes use of the Lagrangian trajectory analysis for the bubbles and particle motions. An experimental set for studying a two-dimensional bubble column is also developed. The operation of the bubble column is being tested and diagnostic methodology for quantitative measurements is being developed. An Eulerian computational model for the flow condition in the two-dimensional bubble column is also being developed. The liquid and bubble motions are being analyzed and the results are being compared with the experimental setup. Solid-fluid mixture flows in ducts and passages at different angle of orientations were analyzed. The model predictions were compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found. Gravity chute flows of solid-liquid mixtures is also being studied. Further progress was also made in developing a thermodynamically consistent model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction in a state of turbulent motion. The balance laws are obtained and the constitutive laws are being developed. Progress was also made in measuring concentration and velocity of particles of different sizes near a wall in a duct flow. The technique of Phase-Doppler anemometry was used in these studies. The general objective of this project is to provide the needed fundamental understanding of three-phase slurry reactors in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquid fuel synthesis. The other main goal is to develop a computational capability for predicting the transport and processing of three-phase coal slurries. The specific objectives are: (1) To develop a thermodynamically consistent rate-dependent anisotropic model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction for application to coal liquefaction. Also establish the material parameters of the model. (2) To provide experimental data for phasic fluctuation and mean velocities, as well as the solid volume fraction in the shear flow devices. (3) To develop an accurate computational capability incorporating the new rate-dependent and anisotropic model for analyzing reacting and nonreacting slurry flows, and to solve a number of technologically important problems related to Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquid fuel production processes. (4) To verify the validity of the developed model by comparing the predicted results with the performed and the available experimental data under idealized conditions.

  8. High performance computing and communications: Advancing the frontiers of information technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, which supplements the President`s Fiscal Year 1997 Budget, describes the interagency High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program. The HPCC Program will celebrate its fifth anniversary in October 1996 with an impressive array of accomplishments to its credit. Over its five-year history, the HPCC Program has focused on developing high performance computing and communications technologies that can be applied to computation-intensive applications. Major highlights for FY 1996: (1) High performance computing systems enable practical solutions to complex problems with accuracies not possible five years ago; (2) HPCC-funded research in very large scale networking techniques has been instrumental in the evolution of the Internet, which continues exponential growth in size, speed, and availability of information; (3) The combination of hardware capability measured in gigaflop/s, networking technology measured in gigabit/s, and new computational science techniques for modeling phenomena has demonstrated that very large scale accurate scientific calculations can be executed across heterogeneous parallel processing systems located thousands of miles apart; (4) Federal investments in HPCC software R and D support researchers who pioneered the development of parallel languages and compilers, high performance mathematical, engineering, and scientific libraries, and software tools--technologies that allow scientists to use powerful parallel systems to focus on Federal agency mission applications; and (5) HPCC support for virtual environments has enabled the development of immersive technologies, where researchers can explore and manipulate multi-dimensional scientific and engineering problems. Educational programs fostered by the HPCC Program have brought into classrooms new science and engineering curricula designed to teach computational science. This document contains a small sample of the significant HPCC Program accomplishments in FY 1996.

  9. An advanced computer system for medical research by WILLIAM J. SANDERS, G. BREITBARD,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiederhold, Gio

    An advanced computer system for medical research by WILLIAM J. SANDERS, G. BREITBARD, D. CUMMINS, R. FLEXER, K. HOLTZ, J. MILLER and G. WIEDERHOLD ACME Project, Stanford Medical Center Stanford, California in 1959, with the purpose of more closely integrating medical research and educa- tion with the other

  10. AN ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL APPROACH TO SYSTEM MODELING OF TOKAMAK POWER PLANTS Zoran Dragojlovic1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    AN ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL APPROACH TO SYSTEM MODELING OF TOKAMAK POWER PLANTS Zoran Dragojlovic1 power plant system studies is being developed for the ARIES program. An operational design space has power plants. This allows examination of a multi-dimensional trade space as opposed to traditional

  11. Advances in Electrical and Computer Engineering Abstract--The linear, binary, block codes with no equally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Advances in Electrical and Computer Engineering 1 Abstract-- The linear, binary, block codes block codes is proposed. These codes are seen as sources with memory and the information quantities H(S,X), H(S), H(X), H(X|S), H(S|X), I(S,X) are derived. On the base of these quantities, the code

  12. Draft Workshop Report: 30 June 2004 Workshop on Advanced Computational Materials Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gropp, Bill

    Summary The Workshop on Advanced Computational Materials Science: Application to Fusion and Generation IV and fission (Generation IV) reactors represents a significant challenge in materials science. There is a range power plants represent an even greater challenge to structural materials development and application

  13. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODEL FOR THREE-PHASE SLURRY REACTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the first year of the project, solid-fluid mixture flows in ducts and passages at different angle of orientations were analyzed. The model predictions are compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found. Progress was also made in analyzing the gravity chute flows of solid-liquid mixtures. An Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for analyzing three-phase slurry flows in a bubble column is being developed. The approach uses an Eulerian analysis of gas liquid flows in the bubble column, and makes use of the Lagrangian particle tracking procedure to analyze the particle motions. Progress was also made in developing a rate dependent thermodynamically consistent model for multiphase slurry flows in a state of turbulent motion. The new model includes the effect of phasic interactions and leads to anisotropic effective phasic stress tensors. Progress was also made in measuring concentration and velocity of particles of different sizes near a wall in a duct flow. The formulation of a thermodynamically consistent model for chemically active multiphase solid-fluid flows in a turbulent state of motion was also initiated. The general objective of this project is to provide the needed fundamental understanding of three-phase slurry reactors in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquid fuel synthesis. The other main goal is to develop a computational capability for predicting the transport and processing of three-phase coal slurries. The specific objectives are: (1) To develop a thermodynamically consistent rate-dependent anisotropic model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction for application to coal liquefaction. Also to establish the material parameters of the model. (2) To provide experimental data for phasic fluctuation and mean velocities, as well as the solid volume fraction in the shear flow devices. (3) To develop an accurate computational capability incorporating the new rate-dependent and anisotropic model for analyzing reacting and nonreacting slurry flows, and to solve a number of technologically important problems related to Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquid fuel production processes. (4) To verify the validity of the developed model by comparing the predicted results with the performed and the available experimental data under idealized conditions.

  14. ADVANCED METHODS FOR THE COMPUTATION OF PARTICLE BEAM TRANSPORT AND THE COMPUTATION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS AND MULTIPARTICLE PHENOMENA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alex J. Dragt

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1980, under the grant DEFG02-96ER40949, the Department of Energy has supported the educational and research work of the University of Maryland Dynamical Systems and Accelerator Theory (DSAT) Group. The primary focus of this educational/research group has been on the computation and analysis of charged-particle beam transport using Lie algebraic methods, and on advanced methods for the computation of electromagnetic fields and multiparticle phenomena. This Final Report summarizes the accomplishments of the DSAT Group from its inception in 1980 through its end in 2011.

  15. Scienti#12;c Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC-3) Partnership Project Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, Forest M [ORNL; Bochev, Pavel B [SNL; Cameron-Smith, Philip J [LLNL; Easter, Richard C [PNNL; Elliott, Scott M [LANL; Ghan, Steven J [PNNL; Liu, Xiaohong [formerly PNNL, U. Wyoming; Lowrie, Robert B [LANL; Lucas, Donald D [LLNL; Shrivastava, Manish [PNNL; Singh, Balwinder [PNNL; Tautges, Timothy J [ANL; Taylor, Mark A [SNL; Vertenstein, Mariana [NCAR; Worley, Patrick H [ORNL; and,; Zhang, Kai [PNNL

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Applying Computationally Efficient Schemes for BioGeochemical Cycles ACES4BGC Project is advancing the predictive capabilities of Earth System Models (ESMs) by reducing two of the largest sources of uncertainty, aerosols and biospheric feedbacks, with a highly e#14;cient computational approach. In particular, this project is implementing and optimizing new computationally e#14;cient tracer advection algorithms for large numbers of tracer species; adding important biogeochemical interactions between the atmosphere, land, and ocean models; and applying uncertainty quanti#12;cation (UQ) techniques to constrain process parameters and evaluate uncertainties in feedbacks between biogeochemical cycles and the climate system.

  16. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODEL FOR THREE-PHASE SLURRY REACTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project, an Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for analyzing three-phase slurry flows in a bubble column was developed. The approach used an Eulerian analysis of liquid flows in the bubble column, and made use of the Lagrangian trajectory analysis for the bubbles and particle motions. The bubble-bubble and particle-particle collisions are included the model. The model predictions are compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found An experimental setup for studying two-dimensional bubble columns was developed. The multiphase flow conditions in the bubble column were measured using optical image processing and Particle Image Velocimetry techniques (PIV). A simple shear flow device for bubble motion in a constant shear flow field was also developed. The flow conditions in simple shear flow device were studied using PIV method. Concentration and velocity of particles of different sizes near a wall in a duct flow was also measured. The technique of Phase-Doppler anemometry was used in these studies. An Eulerian volume of fluid (VOF) computational model for the flow condition in the two-dimensional bubble column was also developed. The liquid and bubble motions were analyzed and the results were compared with observed flow patterns in the experimental setup. Solid-fluid mixture flows in ducts and passages at different angle of orientations were also analyzed. The model predictions were compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found. Gravity chute flows of solid-liquid mixtures were also studied. The simulation results were compared with the experimental data and discussed A thermodynamically consistent model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction in a state of turbulent motion was developed. The balance laws were obtained and the constitutive laws established.

  17. Using Computers For Scientific Work c 1996 C.T.J. Dodson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodson, C.T.J.

    simple hypertext documents for the World Wide Web. Updates! If you are using these materials for learning quality reports of scientific work. The software we shall need is a web browser, a spreadsheet package be called for: Wordprocessing On a PC, WordPad, Word, WordPerfect etc are standard wordprocessing packages

  18. Opportunities and Challenges for Running Scientific Workflows on the Cloud School of Computer Science and Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Shiyong

    of Computer Science and Engineering Univ. of Electronic and Science Technology of China Chengdu, China yongzh04@gmail.com Xubo Fei Department of Computer Science Wayne State University Detroit, USA xubo@wayne.edu Ioan Raicu Department of Computer Science Illinois Institute of Technology Chicago, USA iraicu

  19. Advanced Analysis Software Key to New, Energy-Efficient Technologies: Leveraging Scientific and Engineering Know-How to Advance Sources of Renewable Energy

    Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

    2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Supported by funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, other federal agencies, and industry sponsors, Argonne is providing broad-based scientific and engineering expertise to create analytical software tools that will enable the United States to make substantive enhancements in energy efficiency and serve the growing demand for renewable energy....

  20. High Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing (HPC) are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the DOE SciDAC program has produced such accelerator-modeling tools, which have beem employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. In this article we discuss the Synergia beam-dynamics framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable of handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. We present the design principles, key physical and numerical models in Synergia and its performance on HPC platforms. Finally, we present the results of Synergia applications for the Fermilab proton source upgrade, known as the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP).

  1. High-Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amundson, James [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Macridin, Alexandru [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Spentzouris, Panagiotis [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing (HPC) are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the DOE SciDAC program has produced such accelerator-modeling tools, which have beem employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. In this article we discuss the Synergia beam-dynamics framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable of handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. We present the design principles, key physical and numerical models in Synergia and its performance on HPC platforms. Finally, we present the results of Synergia applications for the Fermilab proton source upgrade, known as the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP).

  2. High-Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing (HPC) are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the DOE SciDAC program has produced such accelerator-modeling tools, which have beem employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. In this article we discuss the Synergia beam-dynamics framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation packagemorecapable of handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. We present the design principles, key physical and numerical models in Synergia and its performance on HPC platforms. Finally, we present the results of Synergia applications for the Fermilab proton source upgrade, known as the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP).less

  3. Condition monitoring through advanced sensor and computational technology : final report (January 2002 to May 2005).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jung-Taek (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejon, Korea); Luk, Vincent K.

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this joint research project was to develop and demonstrate advanced sensors and computational technology for continuous monitoring of the condition of components, structures, and systems in advanced and next-generation nuclear power plants (NPPs). This project included investigating and adapting several advanced sensor technologies from Korean and US national laboratory research communities, some of which were developed and applied in non-nuclear industries. The project team investigated and developed sophisticated signal processing, noise reduction, and pattern recognition techniques and algorithms. The researchers installed sensors and conducted condition monitoring tests on two test loops, a check valve (an active component) and a piping elbow (a passive component), to demonstrate the feasibility of using advanced sensors and computational technology to achieve the project goal. Acoustic emission (AE) devices, optical fiber sensors, accelerometers, and ultrasonic transducers (UTs) were used to detect mechanical vibratory response of check valve and piping elbow in normal and degraded configurations. Chemical sensors were also installed to monitor the water chemistry in the piping elbow test loop. Analysis results of processed sensor data indicate that it is feasible to differentiate between the normal and degraded (with selected degradation mechanisms) configurations of these two components from the acquired sensor signals, but it is questionable that these methods can reliably identify the level and type of degradation. Additional research and development efforts are needed to refine the differentiation techniques and to reduce the level of uncertainties.

  4. ADVANCING THE FUNDAMENTAL UNDERSTANDING AND SCALE-UP OF TRISO FUEL COATERS VIA ADVANCED MEASUREMENT AND COMPUTATIONAL TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Pratim; Al-Dahhan, Muthanna

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tri-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particle coating is critical for the future use of nuclear energy produced byadvanced gas reactors (AGRs). The fuel kernels are coated using chemical vapor deposition in a spouted fluidized bed. The challenges encountered in operating TRISO fuel coaters are due to the fact that in modern AGRs, such as High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGRs), the acceptable level of defective/failed coated particles is essentially zero. This specification requires processes that produce coated spherical particles with even coatings having extremely low defect fractions. Unfortunately, the scale-up and design of the current processes and coaters have been based on empirical approaches and are operated as?black boxes. Hence, a voluminous amount of experimental development and trial and error work has been conducted. It has been clearly demonstrated that the quality of the coating applied to the fuel kernels is impacted by the hydrodynamics, solids flow field, and flow regime characteristics of the spouted bed coaters, which themselves are influenced by design parameters and operating variables. Further complicating the outlook for future fuel-coating technology and nuclear energy production is the fact that a variety of new concepts will involve fuel kernels of different sizes and with compositions of different densities. Therefore, without a fundamental understanding the underlying phenomena of the spouted bed TRISO coater, a significant amount of effort is required for production of each type of particle with a significant risk of not meeting the specifications. This difficulty will significantly and negatively impact the applications of AGRs for power generation and cause further challenges to them as an alternative source of commercial energy production. Accordingly, the proposed work seeks to overcome such hurdles and advance the scale-up, design, and performance of TRISO fuel particle spouted bed coaters. The overall objectives of the proposed work are to advance the fundamental understanding of the hydrodynamics by systematically investigating the effect of design and operating variables, to evaluate the reported dimensionless groups as scaling factors, and to establish a reliable scale-up methodology for the TRISO fuel particle spouted bed coaters based on hydrodynamic similarity via advanced measurement and computational techniques. An additional objective is to develop an on-line non-invasive measurement technique based on gamma ray densitometry (i.e. Nuclear Gauge Densitometry) that can be installed and used for coater process monitoring to ensure proper performance and operation and to facilitate the developed scale-up methodology. To achieve the objectives set for the project, the work will use optical probes and gamma ray computed tomography (CT) (for the measurements of solids/voidage holdup cross-sectional distribution and radial profiles along the bed height, spouted diameter, and fountain height) and radioactive particle tracking (RPT) (for the measurements of the 3D solids flow field, velocity, turbulent parameters, circulation time, solids lagrangian trajectories, and many other of spouted bed related hydrodynamic parameters). In addition, gas dynamic measurement techniques and pressure transducers will be utilized to complement the obtained information. The measurements obtained by these techniques will be used as benchmark data to evaluate and validate the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models (two fluid model or discrete particle model) and their closures. The validated CFD models and closures will be used to facilitate the developed methodology for scale-up, design and hydrodynamic similarity. Successful execution of this work and the proposed tasks will advance the fundamental understanding of the coater flow field and quantify it for proper and safe design, scale-up, and performance. Such achievements will overcome the barriers to AGR applications and will help assure that the US maintains nuclear energy as a feasible option to meet the nation????

  5. International Journal of Foundations of Computer Science fl World Scientific Publishing Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harsha, Prahladh

    DISTRIBUTED PROCESSING IN AUTOMATA \\Lambda KAMALA KRITHIVASAN M. SAKTHI BALAN and PRAHLADH HARSHA Departmentmail : kamala@iitm.ernet.in ABSTRACT With distributed computing beginning to play a major role in modern Computer Science, the theory of grammar systems and distributed automata has been developed in order

  6. International Journal of Foundations of Computer Science c World Scientific Publishing Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harsha, Prahladh

    DISTRIBUTED PROCESSING IN AUTOMATA KAMALA KRITHIVASAN M. SAKTHI BALAN and PRAHLADH HARSHA Department-mail : kamala@iitm.ernet.in ABSTRACT With distributed computing beginning to play a major role in modern Computer Science, the theory of grammar systems and distributed automata has been developed in order

  7. An Ontology for Scientific Information in a Grid Environment: the Earth System Grid.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chervenak, Ann

    An Ontology for Scientific Information in a Grid Environment: the Earth System Grid. Line Pouchard.S. Department of Energy Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program. The Earth System Grid, 5 Carl Kesselman,5 Arie Shoshani, 6 Alex Sim6 [1] Oak Ridge National Laboratory, [2] Argonne

  8. THE RELATIVE PERFORMANCES OF SEVERAL SCIENTIFIC COMPUTERS FOR A LIQUID MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceperley, D.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MFLOPS 648 Atoms MFLOPS T Computer Tp VAX 11/70 CDC 7600CRAY-1 CRAY-1* VAX-FPSAP TTp DEC VAX 11/70 The VAX used, is located at NRCC in

  9. Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spentzouris, P.; /Fermilab; Cary, J.; /Tech-X, Boulder; McInnes, L.C.; /Argonne; Mori, W.; /UCLA; Ng, C.; /SLAC; Ng, E.; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors. ComPASS is in the first year of executing its plan to develop the next-generation HPC accelerator modeling tools. ComPASS aims to develop an integrated simulation environment that will utilize existing and new accelerator physics modules with petascale capabilities, by employing modern computing and solver technologies. The ComPASS vision is to deliver to accelerator scientists a virtual accelerator and virtual prototyping modeling environment, with the necessary multiphysics, multiscale capabilities. The plan for this development includes delivering accelerator modeling applications appropriate for each stage of the ComPASS software evolution. Such applications are already being used to address challenging problems in accelerator design and optimization. The ComPASS organization for software development and applications accounts for the natural domain areas (beam dynamics, electromagnetics, and advanced acceleration), and all areas depend on the enabling technologies activities, such as solvers and component technology, to deliver the desired performance and integrated simulation environment. The ComPASS applications focus on computationally challenging problems important for design or performance optimization to all major HEP, NP, and BES accelerator facilities. With the cost and complexity of particle accelerators rising, the use of computation to optimize their designs and find improved operating regimes becomes essential, potentially leading to significant cost savings with modest investment.

  10. Massively parallel algorithms for method of characteristics neutral particle transport on shared memory computer architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, William Robert Dawson, III

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past 20 years, parallel computing has enabled computers to grow ever larger and more powerful while scientific applications have advanced in sophistication and resolution. This trend is being challenged, however, ...

  11. Construction of Blaze at the University of Illinois at Chicago: A Shared, High-Performance, Visual Computer for Next-Generation Cyberinfrastructure-Accelerated Scientific, Engineering, Medical and Public Policy Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Maxine D. [Acting Director, EVL; Leigh, Jason [PI

    2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Blaze high-performance visual computing system serves the high-performance computing research and education needs of University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). Blaze consists of a state-of-the-art, networked, computer cluster and ultra-high-resolution visualization system called CAVE2(TM) that is currently not available anywhere in Illinois. This system is connected via a high-speed 100-Gigabit network to the State of Illinois' I-WIRE optical network, as well as to national and international high speed networks, such as the Internet2, and the Global Lambda Integrated Facility. This enables Blaze to serve as an on-ramp to national cyberinfrastructure, such as the National Science Foundations Blue Waters petascale computer at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the Department of Energys Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) at Argonne National Laboratory. DOE award # DE-SC005067, leveraged with NSF award #CNS-0959053 for Development of the Next-Generation CAVE Virtual Environment (NG-CAVE), enabled us to create a first-of-its-kind high-performance visual computing system. The UIC Electronic Visualization Laboratory (EVL) worked with two U.S. companies to advance their commercial products and maintain U.S. leadership in the global information technology economy. New applications are being enabled with the CAVE2/Blaze visual computing system that is advancing scientific research and education in the U.S. and globally, and help train the next-generation workforce.

  12. Advanced methods for the computation of particle beam transport and the computation of electromagnetic fields and beam-cavity interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dragt, A.J.; Gluckstern, R.L.

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Maryland Dynamical Systems and Accelerator Theory Group carries out research in two broad areas: the computation of charged particle beam transport using Lie algebraic methods and advanced methods for the computation of electromagnetic fields and beam-cavity interactions. Important improvements in the state of the art are believed to be possible in both of these areas. In addition, applications of these methods are made to problems of current interest in accelerator physics including the theoretical performance of present and proposed high energy machines. The Lie algebraic method of computing and analyzing beam transport handles both linear and nonlinear beam elements. Tests show this method to be superior to the earlier matrix or numerical integration methods. It has wide application to many areas including accelerator physics, intense particle beams, ion microprobes, high resolution electron microscopy, and light optics. With regard to the area of electromagnetic fields and beam cavity interactions, work is carried out on the theory of beam breakup in single pulses. Work is also done on the analysis of the high behavior of longitudinal and transverse coupling impendances, including the examination of methods which may be used to measure these impedances. Finally, work is performed on the electromagnetic analysis of coupled cavities and on the coupling of cavities to waveguides.

  13. Development of high performance scientific components for interoperability of computing packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gulabani, Teena Pratap

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three major high performance quantum chemistry computational packages, NWChem, GAMESS and MPQC have been developed by different research efforts following different design patterns. The goal is to achieve interoperability among these packages by overcoming the challenges caused by the different communication patterns and software design of each of these packages. A chemistry algorithm is hard to develop as well as being a time consuming process; integration of large quantum chemistry packages will allow resource sharing and thus avoid reinvention of the wheel. Creating connections between these incompatible packages is the major motivation of the proposed work. This interoperability is achieved by bringing the benefits of Component Based Software Engineering through a plug-and-play component framework called Common Component Architecture (CCA). In this thesis, I present a strategy and process used for interfacing two widely used and important computational chemistry methodologies: Quantum Mechanics and Molecular Mechanics. To show the feasibility of the proposed approach the Tuning and Analysis Utility (TAU) has been coupled with NWChem code and its CCA components. Results show that the overhead is negligible when compared to the ease and potential of organizing and coping with large-scale software applications.

  14. Advances

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1BP-14Scripting for Advanced Workflows Jack

  15. A fission matrix based validation protocol for computed power distributions in the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, J. W. [Idaho National Laboratory, MS 3840, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Nigg, D. W. [Idaho National Laboratory, MS 3860, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); LaPorta, A. W. [Idaho National Laboratory, MS 7136, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been engaged in a significant multi year effort to modernize the computational reactor physics tools and validation procedures used to support operations of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and its companion critical facility (ATRC). Several new protocols for validation of computed neutron flux distributions and spectra as well as for validation of computed fission power distributions, based on new experiments and well-recognized least-squares statistical analysis techniques, have been under development. In the case of power distributions, estimates of the a priori ATR-specific fuel element-to-element fission power correlation and covariance matrices are required for validation analysis. A practical method for generating these matrices using the element-to-element fission matrix is presented, along with a high-order scheme for estimating the underlying fission matrix itself. The proposed methodology is illustrated using the MCNP5 neutron transport code for the required neutronics calculations. The general approach is readily adaptable for implementation using any multidimensional stochastic or deterministic transport code that offers the required level of spatial, angular, and energy resolution in the computed solution for the neutron flux and fission source. (authors)

  16. DISC: A System for Distributed Data Intensive Scientific Computing George Kola, Tevfik Kosar, Jaime Frey, Miron Livny

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    The scientific community has been collaborating to solve hard problems, such as finding the Higgs Boson [5

  17. June 6, 2007 Large-Scale Scientific Computations'07, Sozopol, Bulgaria -p. 1/29 Multiscale Modeling and Simulation of Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, Peter

    in porous media (soil, porous rocks, etc.) x Elasticity problems in composite materials (adobe, concrete/29 Presentation outline s Brief overview of upscaling methods in deformable porous media s The Fluid upscaling of flow in deformable porous media #12;June 6, 2007 Large-Scale Scientific Computations'07

  18. Advanced computational tools for optimization and uncertainty quantification of carbon capture processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, David C. [U.S. DOE; Ng, Brenda [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Eslick, John [Carnegie Mellon University

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced multi-scale modeling and simulation has the potential to dramatically reduce development time, resulting in considerable cost savings. The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) is a partnership among national laboratories, industry and universities that is developing, demonstrating, and deploying a suite of multi-scale modeling and simulation tools. One significant computational tool is FOQUS, a Framework for Optimization and Quantification of Uncertainty and Sensitivity, which enables basic data submodels, including thermodynamics and kinetics, to be used within detailed process models to rapidly synthesize and optimize a process and determine the level of uncertainty associated with the resulting process. The overall approach of CCSI is described with a more detailed discussion of FOQUS and its application to carbon capture systems.

  19. ACHI 2012, The Fifth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions, January 30 -February 4, 2012 -Valencia, Spain User Experience: Buzzword or New Paradigm?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    the early days of ergonomics and HCI (Human- Computer Interaction), user experience really meant userACHI 2012, The Fifth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions, January 30 - February 4, 2012 - Valencia, Spain User Experience: Buzzword

  20. Edison Electrifies Scientific Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract ManagementDiscoveringESnet UpdateEarth WeekAlamosEdison

  1. Master of Science project in advanced computational material physics Electrical conductivity of the correlated metal LaNiO3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellsing, Bo

    Master of Science project in advanced computational material physics Electrical conductivity of the correlated metal LaNiO3 Lanthanum nickelate, LaNiO3, belongs to the class of materials named strongly correlated metals. Several properties of these materials can not be understood based on standard

  2. Big Data Ecosystems Enable Scientific Discovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Critchlow, Terence J.; Kleese van Dam, Kerstin

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past 5 years, advances in experimental, sensor and computational technologies have driven the exponential growth in the volumes, acquisition rates, variety and complexity of scientific data. As noted by Hey et al in their 2009 e-book The Fourth Paradigm, this availability of large-quantities of scientifically meaningful data has given rise to a new scientific methodology - data intensive science. Data intensive science is the ability to formulate and evaluate hypotheses using data and analysis to extend, complement and, at times, replace experimentation, theory, or simulation. This new approach to science no longer requires scientists to interact directly with the objects of their research; instead they can utilize digitally captured, reduced, calibrated, analyzed, synthesized and visualized results - allowing them carry out 'experiments' in data.

  3. EMSL - Molecular Science Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    computing Resources and Techniques Molecular Science Computing - Sophisticated and integrated computational capabilities, including scientific consultants, software, Cascade...

  4. UNEDF: Advanced Scienti?c Computing Collaboration Transforms the Low-Energy Nuclear Many-Body Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam, Hai A.; Stoitsov, M.; Nazarewicz, Witold; Bulgac, Aurel; Hagen, Gaute; Kortelainene, Markus; Maris, P.; Pei, Junchen; Roche, Kenneth J.; Schunck, Nicolas; Thompson, Ian; Vary, James; Wild, Stefan

    2012-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    With diverse scienti?c backgrounds, the UNEDF SciDAC collaboration of nuclear theorists, applied mathematicians, and computer scientists is developing a comprehensive description of nuclei and their reactions that delivers maximum predictive power with quanti?ed uncertainties. This paper describes the UNEDF collaboration and identi?es attributes that classify UNEDF as a successful computational collaboration. We illustrate signi?cant milestones accomplished by UNEDF through integrative solutions using the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and leadership class computational resources.

  5. Improved computational neutronics methods and validation protocols for the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nigg, D. W.; Nielsen, J. W.; Chase, B. M.; Murray, R. K.; Steuhm, K. A.; Unruh, T. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 Fremont Street, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3870 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is in the process of updating the various reactor physics modeling and simulation tools used to support operation and safety assurance of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (HELIOS, KENO6/SCALE, NEWT/SCALE, ATTILA, and an extended implementation of MCNP5) has been installed at the INL. Corresponding models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational with all five codes, demonstrating the basic feasibility of the new code packages for their intended purposes. On the experimental side of the project, new hardware was fabricated, measurement protocols were finalized, and the first four of six planned physics code validation experiments based on neutron activation spectrometry have been conducted at the ATRC facility. Data analysis for the first three experiments, focused on characterization of the neutron spectrum in one of the ATR flux traps, has been completed. The six experiments will ultimately form the basis for flexible and repeatable ATR physics code validation protocols that are consistent with applicable national standards. (authors)

  6. Computational methods for stealth design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cable, V.P. (Lockheed Advanced Development Co., Sunland, CA (United States))

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review is presented of the utilization of computer models for stealth design toward the ultimate goal of designing and fielding an aircraft that remains undetected at any altitude and any range. Attention is given to the advancements achieved in computational tools and their utilization. Consideration is given to the development of supercomputers for large-scale scientific computing and the development of high-fidelity, 3D, radar-signature-prediction tools for complex shapes with nonmetallic and radar-penetrable materials.

  7. NERSC is supported by the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research in the Department of Energy Office of Science under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    -site! #12;Accelerating Remote Display Performance Problems X11 is a verbose protocol Frequent blocking at the end of a high-latency network link High latency likely to be the main cause of performance problems)NX Based on differential X protocol compressor Compresses X11 traffic Adds proxy/agent that caches

  8. Computational Physics on Graphics Processing Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harju, Ari; Federici-Canova, Filippo; Hakala, Samuli; Rantalaiho, Teemu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of graphics processing units for scientific computations is an emerging strategy that can significantly speed up various different algorithms. In this review, we discuss advances made in the field of computational physics, focusing on classical molecular dynamics, and on quantum simulations for electronic structure calculations using the density functional theory, wave function techniques, and quantum field theory.

  9. Computational Physics on Graphics Processing Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Harju; Topi Siro; Filippo Federici-Canova; Samuli Hakala; Teemu Rantalaiho

    2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of graphics processing units for scientific computations is an emerging strategy that can significantly speed up various different algorithms. In this review, we discuss advances made in the field of computational physics, focusing on classical molecular dynamics, and on quantum simulations for electronic structure calculations using the density functional theory, wave function techniques, and quantum field theory.

  10. The Cloud and Autonomic Computing Center concentrates on topics in advanced distributed computing as part of the National Science Foundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    standards, software and methods. Expertise in a wide spectrum of high performance computing, grid-research partnerships. The High Performance Computing Center at TTU, http://www.hpcc.ttu.edu, supports the CAC services. Provides experience in creating and managing high performance computing and Grid frameworks

  11. Throwback Thursdays Celebrate Scientific Supercomputing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Celebrate Scientific Supercomputing A Cray-1 supercomputer arrives at the Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center in A Cray-1 supercomputer arrives at the Magnetic Fusion...

  12. Grand Challenges of Advanced Computing for Energy Innovation Report from the Workshop Held July 31-August 2, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larzelere, Alex R.; Ashby, Steven F.; Christensen, Dana C.; Crawford, Dona L.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; John, Grosh; Stults, B. Ray; Lee, Steven L.; Hammond, Steven W.; Grover, Benjamin T.; Neely, Rob; Dudney, Lee Ann; Goldstein, Noah C.; Wells, Jack; Peltz, Jim

    2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    On July 31-August 2 of 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) held a workshop entitled Grand Challenges of Advanced Computing for Energy Innovation. This workshop built on three earlier workshops that clearly identified the potential for the Department and its national laboratories to enable energy innovation. The specific goal of the workshop was to identify the key challenges that the nation must overcome to apply the full benefit of taxpayer-funded advanced computing technologies to U.S. energy innovation in the ways that the country produces, moves, stores, and uses energy. Perhaps more importantly, the workshop also developed a set of recommendations to help the Department overcome those challenges. These recommendations provide an action plan for what the Department can do in the coming years to improve the nations energy future.

  13. ENHANCING THE ATOMIC-LEVEL UNDERSTANDING OF CO2 MINERAL SEQUESTRATION MECHANISMS VIA ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODELING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.V.G. Chizmeshya; M.J. McKelvy; G.H. Wolf; R.W. Carpenter; D.A. Gormley; J.R. Diefenbacher; R. Marzke

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fossil fuels currently provide 85% of the world's energy needs, with the majority coming from coal, due to its low cost, wide availability, and high energy content. The extensive use of coal-fired power assumes that the resulting CO2 emissions can be vented to the atmosphere. However, exponentially increasing atmospheric CO2 levels have brought this assumption under critical review. Over the last decade, this discussion has evolved from whether exponentially increasing anthropogenic CO2 emissions will adversely affect the global environment, to the timing and magnitude of their impact. A variety of sequestration technologies are being explored to mitigate CO2 emissions. These technologies must be both environmentally benign and economically viable. Mineral carbonation is an attractive candidate technology as it disposes of CO2 as geologically stable, environmentally benign mineral carbonates, clearly satisfying the first criteria. The primary challenge for mineral carbonation is cost-competitive process development. CO2 mineral sequestration--the conversion of stationary-source CO2 emissions into mineral carbonates (e.g., magnesium and calcium carbonate, MgCO3 and CaCO3)--has recently emerged as one of the most promising sequestration options, providing permanent CO2 disposal, rather than storage. In this approach a magnesium-bearing feedstock mineral (typically serpentine or olivine; available in vast quantities globally) is specially processed and allowed to react with CO2 under controlled conditions. This produces a mineral carbonate which (1) is environmentally benign, (2) already exists in nature in quantities far exceeding those that could result from carbonating the world's known fossil fuel reserves, and (3) is stable on a geological time scale. Minimizing the process cost via optimization of the reaction rate and degree of completion is the remaining challenge. As members of the DOE/NETL managed National Mineral Sequestration Working Group we have already significantly improved our understanding of mineral carbonation. Group members at the Albany Research Center have recently shown that carbonation of olivine and serpentine, which naturally occurs over geological time (i.e., 100,000s of years), can be accelerated to near completion in hours. Further process refinement will require a synergetic science/engineering approach that emphasizes simultaneous investigation of both thermodynamic processes and the detailed microscopic, atomic-level mechanisms that govern carbonation kinetics. Our previously funded Phase I Innovative Concepts project demonstrated the value of advanced quantum-mechanical modeling as a complementary tool in bridging important gaps in our understanding of the atomic/molecular structure and reaction mechanisms that govern CO2 mineral sequestration reaction processes for the model Mg-rich lamellar hydroxide feedstock material Mg(OH)2. In the present simulation project, improved techniques and more efficient computational schemes have allowed us to expand and augment these capabilities and explore more complex Mg-rich, lamellar hydroxide-based feedstock materials, including the serpentine-based minerals. These feedstock materials are being actively investigated due to their wide availability, and low-cost CO2 mineral sequestration potential. Cutting-edge first principles quantum chemical, computational solid-state and materials simulation methodology studies proposed herein, have been strategically integrated with our new DOE supported (ASU-Argonne National Laboratory) project to investigate the mechanisms that govern mineral feedstock heat-treatment and aqueous/fluid-phase serpentine mineral carbonation in situ. This unified, synergetic theoretical and experimental approach has provided a deeper understanding of the key reaction mechanisms than either individual approach can alone. We used ab initio techniques to significantly advance our understanding of atomic-level processes at the solid/solution interface by elucidating the origin of vibrational, electronic, x-ray and electron energy loss sp

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: Our SSLS EFRC's Scientific Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    works to advance the scientific foundation that underlies current and potential-future SSL technology, and to ultimately enable significant advances in the efficiency with which...

  15. Jeffrey R. Haack --Research Statement --Fall 2013 My research focuses on scientific computing and kinetic equations. More specifically I de-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haack, Jeff

    transport equation and similar kinetic models, as well as their application to high performance computing resources. My work is supported1 by NSF-DMS Grant 1217254 "Accurate high performance computing for nonlinear

  16. Huang and Nicol Journal of Cloud Computing: Advances, Systems and Applications 2013, 2:9 http://www.journalofcloudcomputing.com/content/2/1/9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ing-Ray

    Huang and Nicol Journal of Cloud Computing: Advances, Systems and Applications 2013, 2:9 http://www.journalofcloudcomputing.com/content/2/1/9 RESEARCH Open Access Trust mechanisms for cloud computing Jingwei Huang* and David M Nicol Abstract Trust is a critical factor in cloud computing; in present practice it depends largely

  17. Accelerating scientific discovery : 2007 annual report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckman, P.; Dave, P.; Drugan, C.

    2008-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    As a gateway for scientific discovery, the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) works hand in hand with the world's best computational scientists to advance research in a diverse span of scientific domains, ranging from chemistry, applied mathematics, and materials science to engineering physics and life sciences. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science, researchers are using the IBM Blue Gene/L supercomputer at the ALCF to study and explore key scientific problems that underlie important challenges facing our society. For instance, a research team at the University of California-San Diego/ SDSC is studying the molecular basis of Parkinson's disease. The researchers plan to use the knowledge they gain to discover new drugs to treat the disease and to identify risk factors for other diseases that are equally prevalent. Likewise, scientists from Pratt & Whitney are using the Blue Gene to understand the complex processes within aircraft engines. Expanding our understanding of jet engine combustors is the secret to improved fuel efficiency and reduced emissions. Lessons learned from the scientific simulations of jet engine combustors have already led Pratt & Whitney to newer designs with unprecedented reductions in emissions, noise, and cost of ownership. ALCF staff members provide in-depth expertise and assistance to those using the Blue Gene/L and optimizing user applications. Both the Catalyst and Applications Performance Engineering and Data Analytics (APEDA) teams support the users projects. In addition to working with scientists running experiments on the Blue Gene/L, we have become a nexus for the broader global community. In partnership with the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory, we have created an environment where the world's most challenging computational science problems can be addressed. Our expertise in high-end scientific computing enables us to provide guidance for applications that are transitioning to petascale as well as to produce software that facilitates their development, such as the MPICH library, which provides a portable and efficient implementation of the MPI standard--the prevalent programming model for large-scale scientific applications--and the PETSc toolkit that provides a programming paradigm that eases the development of many scientific applications on high-end computers.

  18. The 11th International Conference of the International Association of Computer Methods and Advances in Geomechanics, Turin, Italy, June 19-21, 2005.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gracie, Robert

    in Geomechanics, Turin, Italy, June 19-21, 2005. An ALE FEM Model of Ice Scour I. Konuk Geological Survey Conference of the International Association of Computer Methods and Advances in Geomechanics, Turin, Italy

  19. Computing at JLab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JLab --- Accelerator Controls CAD CDEV CODA Computer Center High Performance Computing Scientific Computing JLab Computer Silo maintained by webmaster@jlab.org...

  20. Advanced Visualization Technology for Terascale Particle Accelerator Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Kwan-Liu

    Advanced Visualization Technology for Terascale Particle Accelerator Simulations Kwan-Liu Ma Greg-performance computing, particle accelerators, perception, point-based rendering, scientific visualization, field lines Introduction Particle accelerators have helped enable some of the most remarkable discoveries of the 20th

  1. An Overview of the Advanced CompuTational Software (ACTS)Collection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drummond, Leroy A.; Marques, Osni A.

    2005-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The ACTS Collection brings together a number of general-purpose computational tools that were developed by independent research projects mostly funded and supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. These tools tackle a number of common computational issues found in many applications, mainly implementation of numerical algorithms, and support for code development, execution and optimization. In this article, we introduce the numerical tools in the collection and their functionalities, present a model for developing more complex computational applications on top of ACTS tools, and summarize applications that use these tools. Lastly, we present a vision of the ACTS project for deployment of the ACTS Collection by the computational sciences community.

  2. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences: Target 2017

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, Richard

    2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computing center for the DOE Office of Science, serving approximately 4,500 users working on some 650 projects that involve nearly 600 codes in a wide variety of scientific disciplines. In March 2013, NERSC, DOE?s Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOE?s Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) held a review to characterize High Performance Computing (HPC) and storage requirements for FES research through 2017. This report is the result.

  3. A training program for scientific supercomputing users

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, F.; Moher, T.; Sabelli, N.; Solem, A.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is need for a mechanism to transfer supercomputing technology into the hands of scientists and engineers in such a way that they will acquire a foundation of knowledge that will permit integration of supercomputing as a tool in their research. Most computing center training emphasizes computer-specific information about how to use a particular computer system; most academic programs teach concepts to computer scientists. Only a few brief courses and new programs are designed for computational scientists. This paper describes an eleven-week training program aimed principally at graduate and postdoctoral students in computationally-intensive fields. The program is designed to balance the specificity of computing center courses, the abstractness of computer science courses, and the personal contact of traditional apprentice approaches. It is based on the experience of computer scientists and computational scientists, and consists of seminars and clinics given by many visiting and local faculty. It covers a variety of supercomputing concepts, issues, and practices related to architecture, operating systems, software design, numerical considerations, code optimization, graphics, communications, and networks. Its research component encourages understanding of scientific computing and supercomputer hardware issues. Flexibility in thinking about computing needs is emphasized by the use of several different supercomputer architectures, such as the Cray X/MP48 at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IBM 3090 600E/VF at the Cornell National Supercomputer Facility, and Alliant FX/8 at the Advanced Computing Research Facility at Argonne National Laboratory. 11 refs., 6 tabs.

  4. University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies U M I A C S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Daniel S.

    but particularly subject to security risks. even power outages can cause data loss. "Unfortunately, electronic Joseph JaJa, professor of electrical and computer engineering and a member of the UMIACS Laboratory

  5. Development of Computational Approaches for Simulation and Advanced Controls for Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, Abhinaya; Lou, Xinsheng; Neuschaefer, Carl; Chaudry, Majid; Quinn, Joseph

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the results of the project through September 2009. The Phase I project has recently been extended from September 2009 to March 2011. The project extension will begin work on Chemical Looping (CL) Prototype modeling and advanced control design exploration in preparation for a scale-up phase. The results to date include: successful development of dual loop chemical looping process models and dynamic simulation software tools, development and test of several advanced control concepts and applications for Chemical Looping transport control and investigation of several sensor concepts and establishment of two feasible sensor candidates recommended for further prototype development and controls integration. There are three sections in this summary and conclusions. Section 1 presents the project scope and objectives. Section 2 highlights the detailed accomplishments by project task area. Section 3 provides conclusions to date and recommendations for future work.

  6. Scientific Visualization, Seeing the Unseeable

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    LBNL

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    June 24, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Scientific visualization transforms abstract data into readily comprehensible images, provide a vehicle for "seeing the unseeable," and play a central role in bo... June 24, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Scientific visualization transforms abstract data into readily comprehensible images, provide a vehicle for "seeing the unseeable," and play a central role in both experimental and computational sciences. Wes Bethel, who heads the Scientific Visualization Group in the Computational Research Division, presents an overview of visualization and computer graphics, current research challenges, and future directions for the field.

  7. Advanced computational simulation for design and manufacturing of lightweight material components for automotive applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simunovic, S.; Aramayo, G.A.; Zacharia, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Toridis, T.G. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Bandak, F.; Ragland, C.L. [Dept. of Transportation, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational vehicle models for the analysis of lightweight material performance in automobiles have been developed through collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration, and George Washington University. The vehicle models have been verified against experimental data obtained from vehicle collisions. The crashed vehicles were analyzed, and the main impact energy dissipation mechanisms were identified and characterized. Important structural parts were extracted and digitized and directly compared with simulation results. High-performance computing played a key role in the model development because it allowed for rapid computational simulations and model modifications. The deformation of the computational model shows a very good agreement with the experiments. This report documents the modifications made to the computational model and relates them to the observations and findings on the test vehicle. Procedural guidelines are also provided that the authors believe need to be followed to create realistic models of passenger vehicles that could be used to evaluate the performance of lightweight materials in automotive structural components.

  8. An Advanced Computational Scheme for the Optimization of 2D Radial Reflectors in Pressurized Water Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Clerc; Alain Hbert; Hadrien Leroyer; Jean-Philippe Argaud; Bertrand Bouriquet; Aglique Ponot

    2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a computational scheme for the determination of equivalent 2D multi-group heterogeneous reflectors in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The proposed strategy is to define a full-core calculation consistent with a reference lattice code calculation such as the Method Of Characteristics (MOC) as implemented in APOLLO2 lattice code. The computational scheme presented here relies on the data assimilation module known as "Assimilation de donn\\'{e}es et Aide \\`{a} l'Optimisation (ADAO)" of the SALOME platform developed at \\'{E}lectricit\\'{e} De France (EDF), coupled with the full-core code COCAGNE and with the lattice code APOLLO2. A first validation of the computational scheme is made using the OPTEX reflector model developed at \\'{E}cole Polytechnique de Montr\\'{e}al (EPM). As a result, we obtain 2D multi-group, spatially heterogeneous 2D reflectors, using both diffusion or $\\text{SP}_{\\text{N}}$ operators. We observe important improvements of the power discrepancies distribution over the core when using reflectors computed with the proposed computational scheme, and the $\\text{SP}_{\\text{N}}$ operator enables additional improvements.

  9. Commnity Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spentzouris, Panagiotis; /Fermilab; Cary, John; /Tech-X, Boulder; Mcinnes, Lois Curfman; /Argonne; Mori, Warren; /UCLA; Ng, Cho; /SLAC; Ng, Esmond; Ryne, Robert; /LBL, Berkeley

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators is essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modeling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multi-physics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors.

  10. Commnity Petascale Project for Accelerator Science And Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators And Accelerator Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spentzouris, Panagiotis; /Fermilab; Cary, John; /Tech-X, Boulder; Mcinnes, Lois Curfman; /Argonne; Mori, Warren; /UCLA; Ng, Cho; /SLAC; Ng, Esmond; Ryne, Robert; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors.

  11. Combinatorial Parallel and Scientific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinar, Ali

    - tional biology, scientific data mining, and network analysis. These applications are changing, and Department of Computer Science, University of New Mexico, email: bah at sandia dot gov. #12;i i discrete modeling, astrophysics, nanoscience, and combustion. Sparse solvers invariably require exploiting

  12. Global Scientific Information and Computing Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology Large-Scale GPU-Equipped High-Performance Compute Nodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furui, Sadaoki

    -Equipped High-Performance Compute Nodes High-Speed Network Interconnect High-Speed and Highly Reliable Storage Systems Low Power Consumption and Green Operation System and Application Software HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE 2 USB Internal Micro SD DIMM6CDIMM6C DIMM5FDIMM5F DIMM4BDIMM4B DIMM3EDIMM3E DIMM2ADIMM2A DIMM1DDIMM1

  13. Multiscale Methods for Modeling Fluid Flow Through Naturally Fractured Carbonate Karst P. Popov, G. Qin, L. Bi, Y. Efendiev, R. Ewing, Institute for Scientific Computation, Texas A&M University; Z. Kang, J. Li,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ewing, Richard E.

    reservoir conditions, such as partially filled fractures. Introduction Naturally fractured karst reservoirsSPE 110778 Multiscale Methods for Modeling Fluid Flow Through Naturally Fractured Carbonate Karst Reservoirs P. Popov, G. Qin, L. Bi, Y. Efendiev, R. Ewing, Institute for Scientific Computation, Texas A

  14. Community petascale project for accelerator science and simulation: Advancing computational science for future accelerators and accelerator technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    program for computational accelerator physics development isof computational accelerator physics applications, withof computational accelerator physics. Under ComPASS, the

  15. Development of Computational Capabilities to Predict the Corrosion Wastage of Boiler Tubes in Advanced Combustion Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kung, Steven; Rapp, Robert

    2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive corrosion research project consisting of pilot-scale combustion testing and long-term laboratory corrosion study has been successfully performed. A pilot-scale combustion facility available at Brigham Young University was selected and modified to enable burning of pulverized coals under the operating conditions typical for advanced coal-fired utility boilers. Eight United States (U.S.) coals were selected for this investigation, with the test conditions for all coals set to have the same heat input to the combustor. In addition, the air/fuel stoichiometric ratio was controlled so that staged combustion was established, with the stoichiometric ratio maintained at 0.85 in the burner zone and 1.15 in the burnout zone. The burner zone represented the lower furnace of utility boilers, while the burnout zone mimicked the upper furnace areas adjacent to the superheaters and reheaters. From this staged combustion, approximately 3% excess oxygen was attained in the combustion gas at the furnace outlet. During each of the pilot-scale combustion tests, extensive online measurements of the flue gas compositions were performed. In addition, deposit samples were collected at the same location for chemical analyses. Such extensive gas and deposit analyses enabled detailed characterization of the actual combustion environments existing at the lower furnace walls under reducing conditions and those adjacent to the superheaters and reheaters under oxidizing conditions in advanced U.S. coal-fired utility boilers. The gas and deposit compositions were then carefully simulated in a series of 1000-hour laboratory corrosion tests, in which the corrosion performances of different commercial candidate alloys and weld overlays were evaluated at various temperatures for advanced boiler systems. Results of this laboratory study led to significant improvement in understanding of the corrosion mechanisms operating on the furnace walls as well as superheaters and reheaters in coal-fired boilers resulting from the coexistence of sulfur and chlorine in the fuel. A new corrosion mechanism, i.e., Active Sulfidation Corrosion Mechanism, has been proposed to account for the accelerated corrosion wastage observed on the furnace walls of utility boilers burning coals containing sulfur and chlorine. In addition, a second corrosion mechanism, i.e., Active Sulfide-to-Oxide Corrosion Mechanism, has been identified to account for the rapid corrosion attack on superheaters and reheaters. Both of the newly discovered corrosion mechanisms involve the formation of iron chloride (FeCl2) vapor from iron sulfide (FeS) and HCl, followed by the decomposition of FeCl2 via self-sustaining cycling reactions. For higher alloys containing sufficient chromium, the attack on superheaters and reheaters is dominated by Hot Corrosion in the presence of a fused salt. Furthermore, two stages of the hot corrosion mechanism have been identified and characterized in detail. The initiation of hot corrosion attack induced by molten sulfate leads to Stage 1 acidic fluxing and re-precipitation of the protective scale formed initially on the deposit-covered alloy surfaces. Once the protective scale is penetrated, Stage 2 Hot Corrosion is initiated, which is dominated by basic fluxing and re-precipitation of the scale in the fused salt. Based on the extensive corrosion information generated from this project, corrosion modeling was performed using non-linear regression analysis. As a result of the modeling efforts, two predictive equations have been formulated, one for furnace walls and the other for superheaters and reheaters. These first-of-the-kind equations can be used to estimate the corrosion rates of boiler tubes based on coal chemistry, alloy compositions, and boiler operating conditions for advanced boiler systems.

  16. An Advanced Computational Scheme for the Optimization of 2D Radial Reflectors in Pressurized Water Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clerc, Thomas; Leroyer, Hadrien; Argaud, Jean-Philippe; Bouriquet, Bertrand; Ponot, Aglique

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a computational scheme for the determination of equivalent 2D multi-group heterogeneous reflectors in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The proposed strategy is to define a full-core calculation consistent with a reference lattice code calculation such as the Method Of Characteristics (MOC) as implemented in APOLLO2 lattice code. The computational scheme presented here relies on the data assimilation module known as "Assimilation de donn\\'{e}es et Aide \\`{a} l'Optimisation (ADAO)" of the SALOME platform developed at \\'{E}lectricit\\'{e} De France (EDF), coupled with the full-core code COCAGNE and with the lattice code APOLLO2. A first validation of the computational scheme is made using the OPTEX reflector model developed at \\'{E}cole Polytechnique de Montr\\'{e}al (EPM). As a result, we obtain 2D multi-group, spatially heterogeneous 2D reflectors, using both diffusion or $\\text{SP}_{\\text{N}}$ operators. We observe important improvements of the power discrepancies distribution over the cor...

  17. Computer Aided Design of Advanced Turbine Airfoil Alloys for Industrial Gas Turbines in Coal Fired Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.E. Fuchs

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent initiatives for fuel flexibility, increased efficiency and decreased emissions in power generating industrial gas turbines (IGT's), have highlighted the need for the development of techniques to produce large single crystal or columnar grained, directionally solidified Ni-base superalloy turbine blades and vanes. In order to address the technical difficulties of producing large single crystal components, a program has been initiated to, using computational materials science, better understand how alloy composition in potential IGT alloys and solidification conditions during processing, effect castability, defect formation and environmental resistance. This program will help to identify potential routes for the development of high strength, corrosion resistant airfoil/vane alloys, which would be a benefit to all IGT's, including small IGT's and even aerospace gas turbines. During the first year, collaboration with Siemens Power Corporation (SPC), Rolls-Royce, Howmet and Solar Turbines has identified and evaluated about 50 alloy compositions that are of interest for this potential application. In addition, alloy modifications to an existing alloy (CMSX-4) were also evaluated. Collaborating with SPC and using computational software at SPC to evaluate about 50 alloy compositions identified 5 candidate alloys for experimental evaluation. The results obtained from the experimentally determined phase transformation temperatures did not compare well to the calculated values in many cases. The effects of small additions of boundary strengtheners (i.e., C, B and N) to CMSX-4 were also examined. The calculated phase transformation temperatures were somewhat closer to the experimentally determined values than for the 5 candidate alloys, discussed above. The calculated partitioning coefficients were similar for all of the CMSX-4 alloys, similar to the experimentally determined segregation behavior. In general, it appears that computational materials science has become a useful tool to help reduce the number of iterations necessary to perform laboratory experiments or alloy development. However, we clearly are not able to rely solely on computational techniques in the development of high temperature materials for IGT applications. A significant amount of experimentation will continue to be required.

  18. Advanced Computational Thermal Fluid Physics (CTFP) and Its Assessment for Light Water Reactors and Supercritical Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.M. McEligot; K. G. Condie; G. E. McCreery; H. M. McIlroy; R. J. Pink; L.E. Hochreiter; J.D. Jackson; R.H. Pletcher; B.L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J.M. Wallace; J.Y. Yoo; J.S. Lee; S.T. Ro; S.O. Park

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of Generation IV reactor systems such as supercritical water reactors (SCWR) for higher efficiency, improved performance and operation, design simplification, enhanced safety and reduced waste and cost. The objective of this Korean / US / laboratory / university collaboration of coupled fundamental computational and experimental studies is to develop the supporting knowledge needed for improved predictive techniques for use in the technology development of Generation IV reactor concepts and their passive safety systems. The present study emphasizes SCWR concepts in the Generation IV program.

  19. Cyber Center Highlights Mission: Advancing computing research and enabling science and engineering through cyber infrastructure is the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jeffrey

    . The Computing Research Institute (CRI) held its second successful Purdue-Industry High Performance Computing

  20. Advanced Computational Methods for Security Constrained Financial Transmission Rights: Structure and Parallelism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elbert, Stephen T.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Vlachopoulou, Maria; Rice, Mark J.; Glaesemann, Kurt R.; Zhou, Ning

    2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Financial Transmission Rights (FTRs) help power market participants reduce price risks associated with transmission congestion. FTRs are issued based on a process of solving a constrained optimization problem with the objective to maximize the FTR social welfare under power flow security constraints. Security constraints for different FTR categories (monthly, seasonal or annual) are usually coupled and the number of constraints increases exponentially with the number of categories. Commercial software for FTR calculation can only provide limited categories of FTRs due to the inherent computational challenges mentioned above. In this paper, a novel non-linear dynamical system (NDS) approach is proposed to solve the optimization problem. The new formulation and performance of the NDS solver is benchmarked against widely used linear programming (LP) solvers like CPLEX and tested on large-scale systems using data from the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). The NDS is demonstrated to outperform the widely used CPLEX algorithms while exhibiting superior scalability. Furthermore, the NDS based solver can be easily parallelized which results in significant computational improvement.

  1. Computational physics and applied mathematics capability review June 8-10, 2010 (Advance materials to committee members)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Stephen R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory will review its Computational Physics and Applied Mathematics (CPAM) capabilities in 2010. The goals of capability reviews are to assess the quality of science, technology, and engineering (STE) performed by the capability, evaluate the integration of this capability across the Laboratory and within the scientific community, examine the relevance of this capability to the Laboratory's programs, and provide advice on the current and future directions of this capability. This is the first such review for CPAM, which has a long and unique history at the laboratory, starting from the inception of the Laboratory in 1943. The CPAM capability covers an extremely broad technical area at Los Alamos, encompassing a wide array of disciplines, research topics, and organizations. A vast array of technical disciplines and activities are included in this capability, from general numerical modeling, to coupled mUlti-physics simulations, to detailed domain science activities in mathematics, methods, and algorithms. The CPAM capability involves over 12 different technical divisions and a majority of our programmatic and scientific activities. To make this large scope tractable, the CPAM capability is broken into the following six technical 'themes.' These themes represent technical slices through the CP AM capability and collect critical core competencies of the Laboratory, each of which contributes to the capability (and each of which is divided into multiple additional elements in the detailed descriptions of the themes in subsequent sections): (1) Computational Fluid Dynamics - This theme speaks to the vast array of scientific capabilities for the simulation of fluids under shocks, low-speed flow, and turbulent conditions - which are key, historical, and fundamental strengths of the laboratory; (2) Partial Differential Equations - The technical scope of this theme is the applied mathematics and numerical solution of partial differential equations (broadly defined) in a variety of settings, including particle transport, solvers, and plasma physics; (3) Monte Carlo - Monte Carlo was invented at Los Alamos, and this theme discusses these vitally important methods and their application in everything from particle transport, to condensed matter theory, to biology; (4) Molecular Dynamics - This theme describes the widespread use of molecular dynamics for a variety of important applications, including nuclear energy, materials science, and biological modeling; (5) Discrete Event Simulation - The technical scope of this theme represents a class of complex system evolutions governed by the action of discrete events. Examples include network, communication, vehicle traffic, and epidemiology modeling; and (6) Integrated Codes - This theme discusses integrated applications (comprised of all of the supporting science represented in Themes 1-5) that are of strategic importance to the Laboratory and the nation. The laboratory has in approximately 10 million source lines of code in over 100 different such strategically important applications. Of these themes, four of them will be reviewed during the 2010 review cycle: Themes 1, 2, 3, and 6. Because these capability reviews occur every three years, Themes 4 and 5 will be reviewed in 2013, along with Theme 6 (which will be reviewed during each review, owing to this theme's role as an integrator of the supporting science represented by the other 5 themes). Yearly written status reports will be provided to the Capability Review Committee Chair during off-cycle years.

  2. Editorial, Workshop on New Directions for Advanced Computer Simulations and Experiments in Fusion-Related Plasma-Surface Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, John T [ORNL; Krstic, Predrag S [ORNL; Meyer, Fred W [ORNL

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because plasma-boundary physics encompasses some of the most important unresolved issues for both the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project and future fusion power reactors, there is a strong interest in the fusion community for better understanding and characterization of plasma-wall interactions. Chemical and physical sputtering cause the erosion of the limiters/divertor plates and vacuum vessel walls (made of C, Be and W, for example) and degrade fusion performance by diluting the fusion fuel and excessively cooling the core, while carbon redeposition could produce long-term in-vessel tritium retention, degrading the superior thermo-mechanical properties of the carbon materials. Mixed plasma-facing materials are proposed, requiring optimization for different power and particle flux characteristics. Knowledge of material properties as well as characteristics of the plasma-material interaction are prerequisites for such optimizations. Computational power will soon reach hundreds of teraflops, so that theoretical and plasma science expertise can be matched with new experimental capabilities in order to mount a strong response to these challenges. To begin to address such questions, a Workshop on New Directions for Advanced Computer Simulations and Experiments in Fusion-Related Plasma-Surface Interactions for Fusion (PSIF) was held at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory from 21 to 23 March, 2005. The purpose of the workshop was to bring together researchers in fusion related plasma-wall interactions in order to address these topics and to identify the most needed and promising directions for study, to exchange opinions on the present depth of knowledge of surface properties for the main fusion-related materials, e.g., C, Be and W, especially for sputtering, reflection, and deuterium (tritium) retention properties. The goal was to suggest the most important next steps needed for such basic computational and experimental work to be facilitated by researchers in fusion, material, and physical sciences. Representatives from many fusion research laboratories attended, and 25 talks were given, the majority of them making up the content of these Workshop proceedings. The presentations of all talks and further information on the Workshop are available at http://www-cfadc.phy.ornl.gov/psif/home.html. The workshop talks dealt with identification of needs from the perspective of integrated fusion simulation and ITER design, recent developments and perspectives on computation of plasma-facing surface properties using the current and expected new generation of computation capability, and with the status of dedicated laboratory experiments which characterize the underlying processes of PSIF. The Workshop summary and conclusions are being published in Nuclear Fusion 45 (2005).

  3. The OLCF center ensures that the world's most advanced computa-tional scientists get the resources they need, allowing them to help

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    they need, allowing them to help improve both the world and our understanding of it. Home to Jaguar, a Cray such as the Department of Energy's Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (IN- CITE), the center ensures that the world's most advanced computa- tional scientists get the resources they need

  4. APAC'03 on Advanced Computing, Grid Applications and eResearch Gold Coast, Australia, 29th Sep2nd Oct 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phipps, Steven J.

    , Hobart, Australia 2 CSIRO Marine Research, Hobart, Australia 1 #12;incoming solar radiation [Ebert et al., 1995] and consequently reduces the absorption of solar energy into the upper ocean. The thermodynamicAPAC'03 on Advanced Computing, Grid Applications and eResearch Gold Coast, Australia, 29th Sep­2nd

  5. Overture: An advanced object-oriented software system for moving overlapping grid computations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D.L.; Henshaw, W.D.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While the development of high-level, easy-to-use, software libraries for numerical computations has been successful in some areas (e.g. linear system solvers, ODE solvers, grid generation), this has been an elusive goal for developers of partial differential equation (PDE) solvers. The advent of new high level languages such as C++ has begun to make this an achievable goal. This report discusses an object- oriented environment that we are developing for solving problems on overlapping (Chimera) grids. The goal of this effort is to support flexible PDE solvers on adaptive, moving, overlapping grids that cover a domain and overlap where they meet. Solutions values at the overlap are determined by interpolation. The overlapping grid approach is particularly efficient for rapidly generating high- quality grids for moving geometries since as the component grids move, only the list of interpolation points changes, and the component grids do not have to be regenerated. We use structured component grids so that efficient, fast finite-difference algorithms can be used. Oliger-Berger-Corella type mesh refinement is used to efficiently resolve fine features of the flow.

  6. Institute of Computer Science Computational experience with ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Numerical optimization, conjugate direction methods, conjugate gradient methods, ...... Mathematics and Scientific/Engineering Computing, Chinese Academy of...

  7. Section 22: Scientific computing 1 Section 22: Scientific computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohlenbach, Ulrich

    correlations that are subsequently employed to model distillation or extraction columns. Because of the effort Windmann, Jadran Vrabec (Universitt Paderborn) For the design and optimization of chemical process

  8. Scientific Bio

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook Twitter Principalfuel cells"03,ScientificScientific

  9. Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

    2003-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK - B135 This project final report summarizes modeling research conducted in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Low Dose Radiation Research Program at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute from October 1998 through June 2003. The modeling research described involves critically evaluating the validity of the linear nonthreshold (LNT) risk model as it relates to stochastic effects induced in cells by low doses of ionizing radiation and genotoxic chemicals. The LNT model plays a central role in low-dose risk assessment for humans. With the LNT model, any radiation (or genotoxic chemical) exposure is assumed to increase ones risk of cancer. Based on the LNT model, others have predicted tens of thousands of cancer deaths related to environmental exposure to radioactive material from nuclear accidents (e.g., Chernobyl) and fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Our research has focused on developing biologically based models that explain the shape of dose-response curves for low-dose radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells. Understanding the shape of the dose-response curve for radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells helps to better understand the shape of the dose-response curve for cancer induction in humans. We have used a modeling approach that facilitated model revisions over time, allowing for timely incorporation of new knowledge gained related to the biological basis for low-dose-induced stochastic effects in cells. Both deleterious (e.g., genomic instability, mutations, and neoplastic transformation) and protective (e.g., DNA repair and apoptosis) effects have been included in our modeling. Our most advanced model, NEOTRANS2, involves differing levels of genomic instability. Persistent genomic instability is presumed to be associated with nonspecific, nonlethal mutations and to increase both the risk for neoplastic transformation and for cancer occurrence. Our research results, based on applications of NEOTRANS2, indicate that nonlinear threshold-type, dose-response relationships for excess stochastic effects (problematic nonlethal mutations, neoplastic transformation) should be expected after exposure to low linear energy transfer (LET) gamma rays or gamma rays in combination with high-LET alpha radiation. Similar thresholds are expected for low-dose-rate low-LET beta irradiation. We attribute the thresholds to low-dose, low-LET radiation induced protection against spontaneous mutations and neoplastic transformations. The protection is presumed mainly to involve selective elimination of problematic cells via apoptosis. Low-dose, low-LET radiation is presumed to trigger wide-area cell signaling, which in turn leads to problematic bystander cells (e.g., mutants, neoplastically transformed cells) selectively undergoing apoptosis. Thus, this protective bystander effect leads to selective elimination of problematic cells (a tissue cleansing process in vivo). However, this protective bystander effects is a different process from low-dose stimulation of the immune system. Low-dose, low-LET radiation stimulation of the immune system may explain why thresholds for inducing excess cancer appear much larger (possibly more than 100-fold larger) than thresholds for inducing excess mutations and neoplastic transformations, when the dose rate is low. For ionizing radiation, the current risk assessment paradigm is such that the relative risk (RR) is always 1, no matter how small the dose. Our research results indicate that for low-dose or low-dose-rate, low-LET irradiation, RR < 1 may be more the rule than the exception. Directly tied to the current RR paradigm are the billion-dollar cleanup costs for radionuclide-contaminated DOE sites. Our research results suggest that continued use of the current RR paradigm for which RR 1 could cause more harm than benefit to society (e.g., by spreading unwarranted fear about phantom excess risks associated with low-dose low-LET radiation). Such phantom risks also may arise from risk assessments conducted for com

  10. Secretary Bodman in Illinois Highlights Scientific Research Investment...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Bodman in Illinois Highlights Scientific Research Investments to Advance America's Innovation April 11, 2007 - 12:36pm Addthis ROMEOVILLE, IL - U.S. Secretary of Energy...

  11. Scientific and Technical Information Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this directive is to ensure that STI is appropriately managed as part of the DOE mission to enable the advancement of scientific knowledge and technological innovation. Cancels DOE O 241.1A and DOE O 241.1A Chg 1.

  12. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan : ASC software quality engineering practices Version 3.0.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turgeon, Jennifer L.; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Pilch, Martin M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in the US Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Agency (DOE/NNSA) Quality Criteria, Revision 10 (QC-1) as 'conformance to customer requirements and expectations'. This quality plan defines the SNL ASC Program software quality engineering (SQE) practices and provides a mapping of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirement (CPR) 001.3.6; 'Corporate Software Engineering Excellence'. This plan also identifies ASC management's and the software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals. This SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitments to improving software products by applying cost-effective SQE practices. This plan enumerates the SQE practices that comprise the development of SNL ASC's software products and explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices.

  13. Data Mining for Scientific & Engineering Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Vipin

    Data Mining for Scientific & Engineering Applications Robert Grossman, Laboratory for Advanced Kumar, Army High Performance Research Center, University of Minnesota #12;Chapter 10 Data Mining. Grossman, C. Kamath, V. Kumar Data Mining for Scientific and Engineering Applications Ch 10/ 3 Goals

  14. Scientific Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitcheResearch BriefsTenney,ScienceScientific

  15. Scientific Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitcheResearch BriefsTenney,ScienceScientific

  16. Molecular Science Computing | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific Capabilities Molecular Science Computing Overview Cell Isolation and Systems Analysis Deposition and Microfabrication Mass Spectrometry Microscopy Molecular Science...

  17. A comparative study of retrieval effectiveness from a scientific document database with computer-generated indexing and manually generated keyword-based indexing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishra, Jayanta Kumar

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a full text indexing and retrieval system for a scientific document database. The secondary objective was to assess the completeness of the manual indexes that are already...

  18. Advance the DNA computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Zhiquan Frank

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    of the huge possible memory by generating a ``lookup table'' during the implementation of the algorithms. If the initial condition changes, the answer changes accordingly. In addition, the new model has the advantage of decoding all the strands in the final...

  19. Advanced Simulation and Computing

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTubahq.na.gov Office of the Administrator NNSA

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Advancements in Fuel Spray and Combustion Modeling with High Performance Computing Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advancements in...

  1. C. Engelmann -University of Reading and Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Availability for Ultra-scale Scientific High-End Computing 1/48

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelmann, Christian

    Research Office Building Research Office Building Computational Sciences Building Computational Sciences LaboratoryLargest Multipurpose Science Laboratory within the U.S. Department of Energywithin the U

  2. Data-intensive computing laying foundation for biological breakthroughs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hachigian, David J.

    2007-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Finding a different way is the goal of the Data-Intensive Computing for Complex Biological Systems (Biopilot) projecta joint research effort between the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory funded by the U.S. Department of Energys Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research. The two national laboratories, both of whom are world leaders in computing and computational sciences, are teaming to support areas of biological research in urgent need of data-intensive computing capabilities.

  3. Slide03 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    computing power and fast networks have only just begun to revolutionize scientific communication. Our vision and our intention is to accelerate the sharing of scientific knowledge...

  4. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Informatio...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    computing power and fast networks have only just begun to revolutionize scientific communication. Our vision and our intention is to accelerate the sharing of scientific...

  5. Multicore Architecture-aware Scientific Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srinivasa, Avinash

    2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern high performance systems are becoming increasingly complex and powerful due to advancements in processor and memory architecture. In order to keep up with this increasing complexity, applications have to be augmented with certain capabilities to fully exploit such systems. These may be at the application level, such as static or dynamic adaptations or at the system level, like having strategies in place to override some of the default operating system polices, the main objective being to improve computational performance of the application. The current work proposes two such capabilites with respect to multi-threaded scientific applications, in particular a large scale physics application computing ab-initio nuclear structure. The first involves using a middleware tool to invoke dynamic adaptations in the application, so as to be able to adjust to the changing computational resource availability at run-time. The second involves a strategy for effective placement of data in main memory, to optimize memory access latencies and bandwidth. These capabilties when included were found to have a significant impact on the application performance, resulting in average speedups of as much as two to four times.

  6. The Magellan Final Report on Cloud Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ,; Coghlan, Susan; Yelick, Katherine

    2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of Magellan, a project funded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), was to investigate the potential role of cloud computing in addressing the computing needs for the DOE Office of Science (SC), particularly related to serving the needs of mid- range computing and future data-intensive computing workloads. A set of research questions was formed to probe various aspects of cloud computing from performance, usability, and cost. To address these questions, a distributed testbed infrastructure was deployed at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC). The testbed was designed to be flexible and capable enough to explore a variety of computing models and hardware design points in order to understand the impact for various scientific applications. During the project, the testbed also served as a valuable resource to application scientists. Applications from a diverse set of projects such as MG-RAST (a metagenomics analysis server), the Joint Genome Institute, the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, and the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), were used by the Magellan project for benchmarking within the cloud, but the project teams were also able to accomplish important production science utilizing the Magellan cloud resources.

  7. Advancing Concentrating Solar Power Research (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provide scientific, engineering, and analytical expertise to help advance innovation in concentrating solar power (CSP). This fact sheet summarizes how NREL is advancing CSP research.

  8. Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    assetsimagesicon-science.jpg Computing Providing world-class high performance computing capability that enables unsurpassed solutions to complex problems of...

  9. eUROPEAN nETWORK for aDVANCED cOMPUTING tECHNOLOGY for sCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farantos, Stavros C.

    on Grid Service Requirements (pp. 326) Report on High Performance Computing Development for the Next Network brings together High Performance Computing (HPC) Large Scale Facilities (LSF) funded by the DGXII

  10. Educating Scientifically - Advances in Physics Education Research

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Finkelstein, Noah [University of Colorado, Colorado, USA

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is now fairly well documented that traditionally taught, large-scale introductory physics courses fail to teach our students the basics. In fact, often these same courses have been found to teach students things we do not want. Building on a tradition of research in physics, the physics education research community has been researching the effects of educational practice and reforms at the undergraduate level for many decades. From these efforts and those within the fields of education, cognitive science, and psychology we have learned a great deal about student learning and environments that support learning for an increasingly diverse population of students in the physics classroom. This talk will introduce some of the ideas from physics education research, discuss a variety of effective classroom practices/ surrounding educational structures, and begin to examine why these do (and do not) work. I will present both a survey of physics education research and some of the exciting theoretical and experimental developments emerging from the University of Colorado.

  11. Scientific Software Projects | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    obtain the orientation or strain information within an inhomogeneous material Grains in a polycrystalline sample MIDAS: Microstructural Imaging using Diffraction Analysis Software...

  12. Energy Department Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    These results were incorporated into the design of ITER, the planned international fusion energy experiment. In another SciDAC effort, the sophistication of climate research...

  13. DOE Supercomputing Resources Available for Advancing Scientific

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout »DepartmentLaboratory | DepartmentCoalRules

  14. The International Symposium on Numeric and Symbolic Algorithms for Scientific Computing, SYNASC, is an annual event in Timioara, Romania. It has been organized by the West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watt, Stephen M.

    , SYNASC, is an annual event in Timioara, Romania. It has been organized by the West University of Timioara to the promotion of scientific research in Romania. It has offered scientists, especially in the early difficult scientists from Romania and abroad. With this meeting, SYNASC now enters its second decade. The focus

  15. The Greek Association of Computational Mechanics (GRACM), founded in 1991, represents a small but active scientific community in Greece. Being affiliated with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stavroulakis, Georgios E.

    a small but active scientific community in Greece. Being affiliated with the International Association, France G. A. Athanassoulis, NTUA, Greece C. Bekas, IBM, Zurich, Switzerland P. Chaviaropoulos, Center For Renewable Energy Sources (CRES), Greece V. Dougalis, Univ. Athens & IACM/FORTH, Greece D. Fotiadis, Univ

  16. Science Prospects And Benefits with Exascale Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kothe, Douglas B [ORNL

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific computation has come into its own as a mature technology in all fields of science. Never before have we been able to accurately anticipate, analyze, and plan for complex events that have not yet occurred from the operation of a reactor running at 100 million degrees centigrade to the changing climate a century down the road. Combined with the more traditional approaches of theory and experiment, scientific computation provides a profound tool for insight and solution as we look at complex systems containing billions of components. Nevertheless, it cannot yet do all we would like. Much of scientific computation s potential remains untapped in areas such as materials science, Earth science, energy assurance, fundamental science, biology and medicine, engineering design, and national security because the scientific challenges are far too enormous and complex for the computational resources at hand. Many of these challenges are of immediate global importance. These challenges can be overcome by a revolution in computing that promises real advancement at a greatly accelerated pace. Planned petascale systems (capable of a petaflop, or 1015 floating point operations per second) in the next 3 years and exascale systems (capable of an exaflop, or 1018 floating point operations per second) in the next decade will provide an unprecedented opportunity to attack these global challenges through modeling and simulation. Exascale computers, with a processing capability similar to that of the human brain, will enable the unraveling of longstanding scientific mysteries and present new opportunities. Table ES.1 summarizes these scientific opportunities, their key application areas, and the goals and associated benefits that would result from solutions afforded by exascale computing.

  17. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational Science is an integral component of Brookhaven's multi science mission, and is a reflection of the increased role of computation across all of science. Brookhaven currently has major efforts in data storage and analysis for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the ATLAS detector at CERN, and in quantum chromodynamics. The Laboratory is host for the QCDOC machines (quantum chromodynamics on a chip), 10 teraflop/s computers which boast 12,288 processors each. There are two here, one for the Riken/BNL Research Center and the other supported by DOE for the US Lattice Gauge Community and other scientific users. A 100 teraflop/s supercomputer will be installed at Brookhaven in the coming year, managed jointly by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, and funded by a grant from New York State. This machine will be used for computational science across Brookhaven's entire research program, and also by researchers at Stony Brook and across New York State. With Stony Brook, Brookhaven has formed the New York Center for Computational Science (NYCCS) as a focal point for interdisciplinary computational science, which is closely linked to Brookhaven's Computational Science Center (CSC). The CSC has established a strong program in computational science, with an emphasis on nanoscale electronic structure and molecular dynamics, accelerator design, computational fluid dynamics, medical imaging, parallel computing and numerical algorithms. We have been an active participant in DOES SciDAC program (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing). We are also planning a major expansion in computational biology in keeping with Laboratory initiatives. Additional laboratory initiatives with a dependence on a high level of computation include the development of hydrodynamics models for the interpretation of RHIC data, computational models for the atmospheric transport of aerosols, and models for combustion and for energy utilization. The CSC was formed to bring together researchers in these areas and to provide a focal point for the development of computational expertise at the Laboratory. These efforts will connect to and support the Department of Energy's long range plans to provide Leadership class computing to researchers throughout the Nation. Recruitment for six new positions at Stony Brook to strengthen its computational science programs is underway. We expect some of these to be held jointly with BNL.

  18. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1: ASC software quality engineering practices, Version 2.0.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr. (,; .); Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR 1.3.2 and 1.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

  19. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan part 2 mappings for the ASC software quality engineering practices, version 2.0.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heaphy, Robert; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr. (,; .); Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR001.3.2 and CPR001.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, ''ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines''. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams' responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

  20. 2014 Advanced Grid Modeling Peer Review Presentations - Day Two...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    with Advanced Computing - Yousu Chen, PNNL Advancing the Adoption of High Performance Computing for Time Domain Simulation - Liang Min, LLNL, Carol Woodward, LLNL An...

  1. Advanced Engine Development | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Engine Development High-performance computing accelerates advanced engine development July 11, 2014 Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Dean Edwards and a...

  2. Computing Resources | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is dedicated to large-scale computation and builds on Argonne's strengths in high-performance computing software, advanced hardware architectures and applications expertise. It...

  3. Applications of Reliable Scientific Computing I p Ao eHmI HaAexcrmIxHayam,rxBr:,macAeHmi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearfott, R. Baker

    of reliable scien- tific computing are published not only in mathematical journals (that are usually covered.). The experience of the International Workshop on Applications of Interval Computations (El Paso, TX, February 23 by Mathematical Reviews, Zentralblatt fur Mathematik, etc.), but also in the journals of the corre- sponding

  4. Advance Network Reservation and Provisioning for Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balman, Mehmet; Chaniotakis, Evangelos; Shoshani, Arie; Sim, Alex

    2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We are witnessing a new era that offers new opportunities to conduct scientific research with the help of recent advancements in computational and storage technologies. Computational intensive science spans multiple scientific domains, such as particle physics, climate modeling, and bio-informatics simulations. These large-scale applications necessitate collaborators to access very large data sets resulting from simulations performed in geographically distributed institutions. Furthermore, often scientific experimental facilities generate massive data sets that need to be transferred to validate the simulation data in remote collaborating sites. A major component needed to support these needs is the communication infrastructure which enables high performance visualization, large volume data analysis, and also provides access to computational resources. In order to provide high-speed on-demand data access between collaborating institutions, national governments support next generation research networks such as Internet 2 and ESnet (Energy Sciences Network). Delivering network-as-a-service that provides predictable performance, efficient resource utilization and better coordination between compute and storage resources is highly desirable. In this paper, we study network provisioning and advanced bandwidth reservation in ESnet for on-demand high performance data transfers. We present a novel approach for path finding in time-dependent transport networks with bandwidth guarantees. We plan to improve the current ESnet advance network reservation system, OSCARS [3], by presenting to the clients, the possible reservation options and alternatives for earliest completion time and shortest transfer duration. The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) provides high bandwidth connections between research laboratories and academic institutions for data sharing and video/voice communication. The ESnet On-Demand Secure Circuits and Advance Reservation System (OSCARS) establishes guaranteed bandwidth of secure virtual circuits at a certain time, for a certain bandwidth and length of time. Though OSCARS operates within the ESnet, it also supplies end-to-end provisioning between multiple autonomous network domains. OSCARS gets reservation requests through a standard web service interface, and conducts a Quality-of-service (QoS) path for bandwidth guarantees. Multi-protocol Label Switching (MPLS) and the Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) enable to create a virtual circuit using Label Switched Paths (LSP's). It contains three main components: a reservation manager, a bandwidth scheduler, and a path setup subsystem. The bandwidth scheduler needs to have information about the current and future states of the network topology in order to accomplish end-to-end bandwidth guaranteed paths.

  5. Opportunities for discovery: Theory and computation in Basic Energy Sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, Bruce; Kirby, Kate; McCurdy, C. William

    2005-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    New scientific frontiers, recent advances in theory, and rapid increases in computational capabilities have created compelling opportunities for theory and computation to advance the scientific mission of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES). The prospects for success in the experimental programs of BES will be enhanced by pursuing these opportunities. This report makes the case for an expanded research program in theory and computation in BES. The Subcommittee on Theory and Computation of the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee was charged with identifying current and emerging challenges and opportunities for theoretical research within the scientific mission of BES, paying particular attention to how computing will be employed to enable that research. A primary purpose of the Subcommittee was to identify those investments that are necessary to ensure that theoretical research will have maximum impact in the areas of importance to BES, and to assure that BES researchers will be able to exploit the entire spectrum of computational tools, including leadership class computing facilities. The Subcommittee s Findings and Recommendations are presented in Section VII of this report.

  6. Capabilities Series www.emsl.pnl.govScientific Innovation Through Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capabilities Series www.emsl.pnl.govScientific Innovation Through Integration WHY USE EMSL'S MOLECULAR SCIENCE COMPUTING CAPABILITY? Molecular Science Computing provides users with an integrated, and scientific knowledge to support EMSL's users. Substantial integration of transformational high

  7. Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit theInnovationComputationalEnergy Computers,Computing

  8. Final report for %22High performance computing for advanced national electric power grid modeling and integration of solar generation resources%22, LDRD Project No. 149016.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reno, Matthew J.; Riehm, Andrew Charles; Hoekstra, Robert John; Munoz-Ramirez, Karina; Stamp, Jason Edwin; Phillips, Laurence R.; Adams, Brian M.; Russo, Thomas V.; Oldfield, Ron A.; McLendon, William Clarence, III; Nelson, Jeffrey Scott; Hansen, Clifford W.; Richardson, Bryan T.; Stein, Joshua S.; Schoenwald, David Alan; Wolfenbarger, Paul R.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design and operation of the electric power grid (EPG) relies heavily on computational models. High-fidelity, full-order models are used to study transient phenomena on only a small part of the network. Reduced-order dynamic and power flow models are used when analysis involving thousands of nodes are required due to the computational demands when simulating large numbers of nodes. The level of complexity of the future EPG will dramatically increase due to large-scale deployment of variable renewable generation, active load and distributed generation resources, adaptive protection and control systems, and price-responsive demand. High-fidelity modeling of this future grid will require significant advances in coupled, multi-scale tools and their use on high performance computing (HPC) platforms. This LDRD report demonstrates SNL's capability to apply HPC resources to these 3 tasks: (1) High-fidelity, large-scale modeling of power system dynamics; (2) Statistical assessment of grid security via Monte-Carlo simulations of cyber attacks; and (3) Development of models to predict variability of solar resources at locations where little or no ground-based measurements are available.

  9. Simulations for Complex Fluid Flow Problems from Berkeley Lab's Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering (CCSE)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering (CCSE) develops and applies advanced computational methodologies to solve large-scale scientific and engineering problems arising in the Department of Energy (DOE) mission areas involving energy, environmental, and industrial technology. The primary focus is in the application of structured-grid finite difference methods on adaptive grid hierarchies for compressible, incompressible, and low Mach number flows. The diverse range of scientific applications that drive the research typically involve a large range of spatial and temporal scales (e.g. turbulent reacting flows) and require the use of extremely large computing hardware, such as the 153,000-core computer, Hopper, at NERSC. The CCSE approach to these problems centers on the development and application of advanced algorithms that exploit known separations in scale; for many of the application areas this results in algorithms are several orders of magnitude more efficient than traditional simulation approaches.

  10. Computational plasma physics Plasma physics is blossoming and flourishing. It is a very fertile research area, from both a scientific and technological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ebert, Ute

    Preface Computational plasma physics Plasma physics is blossoming and flourishing. It is a very of plasma technology are, besides the classical example of discharge lamps: sterilisation, plasma medicines that is still far from complete. Given the often very high temperatures and short life times of plasma states

  11. Slide07 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    & Advancement Areas of active innovations include: Federation of distributed collections with simultaneous, ranked, full text search. Modeling scientific exchange in the...

  12. Slide05 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    tools such as federated deep Web searching of multiple databases and relevancy ranking to advance awareness of a broad array of scientific information related to DOE missions...

  13. BNL | CFN: Theory & Computation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Theory and Computation Contact: Mark Hybertsen Advances in theory, numerical algorithms and computational capabilities have enabled an unprecedented opportunity for fundamental...

  14. X-RAY POWDER DIFFRACTION (XPD-1) SCIENTIFIC SCOPE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    are implicated in novel electronic properties from high temperature superconductivity to high performance properties. SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS Nuclear Applications: High throughput, combinatorial approach, unmanned storage, CO2 sequestration, advanced structural ceramics, catalysis, and materials processing. ENDSTATION

  15. Scientific Data Management (SDM) Center for Enabling Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lud?scher, Bertram [Professor

    2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Our contributions to advancing the state?of?the?art in scientific workflows have focused on the following areas: Workflow development; Generic workflow components and templates; Provenance collection and analysis; Workflow reliability and fault tolerance.

  16. FINAL REPORT DE-FG02-04ER41317 Advanced Computation and Chaotic Dynamics for Beams and Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cary, John R [U. Colorado

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    During the year ending in August 2013, we continued to investigate the potential of photonic crystal (PhC) materials for acceleration purposes. We worked to characterize acceleration ability of simple PhC accelerator structures, as well as to characterize PhC materials to determine whether current fabrication techniques can meet the needs of future accelerating structures. We have also continued to design and optimize PhC accelerator structures, with the ultimate goal of finding a new kind of accelerator structure that could offer significant advantages over current RF acceleration technology. This design and optimization of these requires high performance computation, and we continue to work on methods to make such computation faster and more efficient.

  17. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 196 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 196 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LOGGING WHILE DRILLING AND ADVANCED CORKS Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA

  18. DOE Awards 265 Million Hours of Supercomputing Time to Advance...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Institute of Standards and Technology; the Max-Planck Institute for Quantum Optics in Germany; CERFACS, the European Center for Research and Advanced Training in Scientific...

  19. 2014 Advanced Grid Modeling Program Peer Review Presentations...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Modeling Research Program leverages scientific research in mathematics for application to power system models and software tools. 17 projects were presented at the 2014 Advanced...

  20. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, Richard A.; Wasserman, Harvey J.

    2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    IThe National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computing center for the DOE Office of Science, serving approximately 4,000 users and hosting some 550 projects that involve nearly 700 codes for a wide variety of scientific disciplines. In addition to large-scale computing resources NERSC provides critical staff support and expertise to help scientists make the most efficient use of these resources to advance the scientific mission of the Office of Science. In May 2011, NERSC, DOEs Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOEs Office of Nuclear Physics (NP) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for NP research over the next three to five years. The effort is part of NERSCs continuing involvement in anticipating future user needs and deploying necessary resources to meet these demands. The workshop revealed several key requirements, in addition to achieving its goal of characterizing NP computing. The key requirements include: 1. Larger allocations of computational resources at NERSC; 2. Visualization and analytics support; and 3. Support at NERSC for the unique needs of experimental nuclear physicists. This report expands upon these key points and adds others. The results are based upon representative samples, called case studies, of the needs of science teams within NP. The case studies were prepared by NP workshop participants and contain a summary of science goals, methods of solution, current and future computing requirements, and special software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel, multi-core environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. The report also includes a section with NERSC responses to the workshop findings. NERSC has many initiatives already underway that address key workshop findings and all of the action items are aligned with NERSC strategic plans.

  1. advancing implementation science: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The main drawbacks of current distance learning Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 14 School of Computer Science MSc in Advanced Computer Science Computer Technologies and...

  2. Flagship Cluster Hiring Initiative Computational Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Gabrielle

    Flagship Cluster Hiring Initiative Computational Science: Advancing Research, Society and the Economy Gabrielle Allen (PI) Thomas Sterling (Presenter/co-PI) Department of Computer Science Center for Computation & Technology #12;Computational Science: Advancing Research, Society and the Economy, External

  3. Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting theCommercialization andComputer Simulations Indicate

  4. Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit theInnovationComputationalEnergy

  5. CRITICAL ISSUES IN HIGH END COMPUTING - FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corones, James [Krell Institute] [Krell Institute

    2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    High-End computing (HEC) has been a driver for advances in science and engineering for the past four decades. Increasingly HEC has become a significant element in the national security, economic vitality, and competitiveness of the United States. Advances in HEC provide results that cut across traditional disciplinary and organizational boundaries. This program provides opportunities to share information about HEC systems and computational techniques across multiple disciplines and organizations through conferences and exhibitions of HEC advances held in Washington DC so that mission agency staff, scientists, and industry can come together with White House, Congressional and Legislative staff in an environment conducive to the sharing of technical information, accomplishments, goals, and plans. A common thread across this series of conferences is the understanding of computational science and applied mathematics techniques across a diverse set of application areas of interest to the Nation. The specific objectives of this program are: Program Objective 1. To provide opportunities to share information about advances in high-end computing systems and computational techniques between mission critical agencies, agency laboratories, academics, and industry. Program Objective 2. To gather pertinent data, address specific topics of wide interest to mission critical agencies. Program Objective 3. To promote a continuing discussion of critical issues in high-end computing. Program Objective 4.To provide a venue where a multidisciplinary scientific audience can discuss the difficulties applying computational science techniques to specific problems and can specify future research that, if successful, will eliminate these problems.

  6. Computer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit theInnovationComputational Biology2If yousimulation of

  7. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greiner, A.; Moxon, L.; Robinson, A.; Tamura, L.

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an annual report, detailing activities at the Advanced Light Source for the year 2000. It includes highlights of scientific research by users of the facility as well as information about the development of the facility itself.

  8. Procedia Computer Science 00 (2012) 110 Procedia Computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    generates a huge amount of data in every minute in the world. We are really in the data deluge era. In reflection of data deluge era, data-intensive scientific computing [1] has been emerging in the scientific

  9. The choice: evaluating and selecting scientific proposals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navarra, Antonio

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The selection process of proposals is a crucial component of scientific progress and innovations. Limited resources must be allocated in the most effective way to maximise advancements and the production of new knowledge, especially as it is becoming increasingly clear that technological and scientific innovation and creativity is an instrument of economic policy and social development. The traditional approach based on merit evaluation by experts has been the preferred method, but there is an issue regarding to what extent such a method can also be an instrument of effective policy. This paper discuss some of the basic processes involved in the evaluation and selection of proposals, indicating some criterion for an optimal solution.

  10. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1 : ASC software quality engineering practices version 1.0.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minana, Molly A.; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in DOE/AL Quality Criteria (QC-1) as conformance to customer requirements and expectations. This quality plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirements (CPR 1.3.2 and CPR 1.3.6) and the Department of Energy (DOE) document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines (GP&G). This quality plan identifies ASC management and software project teams' responsibilities for cost-effective software engineering quality practices. The SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitment to improving software products by applying cost-effective software engineering quality practices. This document explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices; enumerates the practices that compose the development of SNL ASC's software products; and includes a sample assessment checklist that was developed based upon the practices in this document.

  11. Parallel computing works

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An account of the Caltech Concurrent Computation Program (C{sup 3}P), a five year project that focused on answering the question: Can parallel computers be used to do large-scale scientific computations '' As the title indicates, the question is answered in the affirmative, by implementing numerous scientific applications on real parallel computers and doing computations that produced new scientific results. In the process of doing so, C{sup 3}P helped design and build several new computers, designed and implemented basic system software, developed algorithms for frequently used mathematical computations on massively parallel machines, devised performance models and measured the performance of many computers, and created a high performance computing facility based exclusively on parallel computers. While the initial focus of C{sup 3}P was the hypercube architecture developed by C. Seitz, many of the methods developed and lessons learned have been applied successfully on other massively parallel architectures.

  12. advanced methods algorithms: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CS 3172, 0203: Advanced Algorithms, Part I Jrgen Dix 12;Chapter 1: Turing Zachmann, Gabriel 9 Advanced Algorithms Course. Lecture Notes. Part 9 Computer Technologies...

  13. advanced fitting algorithms: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CS 3172, 0203: Advanced Algorithms, Part I Jrgen Dix 12;Chapter 1: Turing Zachmann, Gabriel 15 Advanced Algorithms Course. Lecture Notes. Part 9 Computer Technologies...

  14. advanced server klasterdamise: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Advanced SQL Injection In SQL Server Applications Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: Advanced SQL Injection In SQL...

  15. DOE Announces $60 Million in Projects to Accelerate Scientific...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and understanding physics from the tiniest particles to the massive explosions of supernovae. "Advanced computing is a critical element of President Bush's American...

  16. Delivering Insight The History of the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larzelere II, A R

    2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The history of the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) tells of the development of computational simulation into a third fundamental piece of the scientific method, on a par with theory and experiment. ASCI did not invent the idea, nor was it alone in bringing it to fruition. But ASCI provided the wherewithal - hardware, software, environment, funding, and, most of all, the urgency - that made it happen. On October 1, 2005, the Initiative completed its tenth year of funding. The advances made by ASCI over its first decade are truly incredible. Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, and Sandia National Laboratories, along with leadership provided by the Department of Energy's Defense Programs Headquarters, fundamentally changed computational simulation and how it is used to enable scientific insight. To do this, astounding advances were made in simulation applications, computing platforms, and user environments. ASCI dramatically changed existing - and forged new - relationships, both among the Laboratories and with outside partners. By its tenth anniversary, despite daunting challenges, ASCI had accomplished all of the major goals set at its beginning. The history of ASCI is about the vision, leadership, endurance, and partnerships that made these advances possible.

  17. 18.337J / 6.338J Applied Parallel Computing (SMA 5505), Spring 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edelman, Alan

    Applied Parallel Computing is an advanced interdisciplinary introduction to applied parallel computing on modern supercomputers.

  18. Scientific Motivation Project Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dyk, David

    and Tracking of Solar Features David Stenning1 Vinay Kashyap2 Thomas Lee3 David van Dyk4 C. Alex Young5 1 Flight Center Stenning, David Automatic Classifying and Tracking of Solar Features #12;Scientific Classifying and Tracking of Solar Features #12;Scientific Motivation Project Overview Methodology Results

  19. Energy Innovation Hubs: A Home for Scientific Collaboration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, Steven

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Secretary Chu will host a live, streaming Q&A session with the directors of the Energy Innovation Hubs on Tuesday, March 6, at 2:15 p.m. EST. The directors will be available for questions regarding their teams' work and the future of American energy. Ask your questions in the comments below, or submit them on Facebook, Twitter (@energy), or send an e-mail to newmedia@hq.doe.gov, prior or during the live event. Dr. Hank Foley is the director of the Greater Philadelphia Innovation Cluster for Energy-Efficient Buildings, which is pioneering new data intensive techniques for designing and operating energy efficient buildings, including advanced computer modeling. Dr. Douglas Kothe is the director of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors, which uses powerful supercomputers to create "virtual" reactors that will help improve the safety and performance of both existing and new nuclear reactors. Dr. Nathan Lewis is the director of the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, which focuses on how to produce fuels from sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide. The Energy Innovation Hubs are major integrated research centers, with researchers from many different institutions and technical backgrounds. Each hub is focused on a specific high priority goal, rapidly accelerating scientific discoveries and shortening the path from laboratory innovation to technological development and commercial deployment of critical energy technologies. Ask your questions in the comments below, or submit them on Facebook, Twitter (@energy), or send an e-mail to newmedia@energy.gov, prior or during the live event. The Energy Innovation Hubs are major integrated research centers, with researchers from many different institutions and technical backgrounds. Each Hub is focused on a specific high priority goal, rapidly accelerating scientific discoveries and shortening the path from laboratory innovation to technological development and commercial deployment of critical energy technologies. Dr. Hank Holey is the director of the Greater Philadelphia Innovation Cluster for Energy-Efficient Buildings, which is pioneering new data intensive techniques for designing and operating energy efficient buildings, including advanced computer modeling. Dr. Douglas Kothe is the director of the Modeling and Simulation for Nuclear Reactors Hub, which uses powerful supercomputers to create "virtual" reactors that will help improve the safety and performance of both existing and new nuclear reactors. Dr. Nathan Lewis is the director of the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis Hub, which focuses on how to produce biofuels from sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide.

  20. Energy Innovation Hubs: A Home for Scientific Collaboration

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chu, Steven

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Secretary Chu will host a live, streaming Q&A session with the directors of the Energy Innovation Hubs on Tuesday, March 6, at 2:15 p.m. EST. The directors will be available for questions regarding their teams' work and the future of American energy. Ask your questions in the comments below, or submit them on Facebook, Twitter (@energy), or send an e-mail to newmedia@hq.doe.gov, prior or during the live event. Dr. Hank Foley is the director of the Greater Philadelphia Innovation Cluster for Energy-Efficient Buildings, which is pioneering new data intensive techniques for designing and operating energy efficient buildings, including advanced computer modeling. Dr. Douglas Kothe is the director of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors, which uses powerful supercomputers to create "virtual" reactors that will help improve the safety and performance of both existing and new nuclear reactors. Dr. Nathan Lewis is the director of the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, which focuses on how to produce fuels from sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide. The Energy Innovation Hubs are major integrated research centers, with researchers from many different institutions and technical backgrounds. Each hub is focused on a specific high priority goal, rapidly accelerating scientific discoveries and shortening the path from laboratory innovation to technological development and commercial deployment of critical energy technologies. Ask your questions in the comments below, or submit them on Facebook, Twitter (@energy), or send an e-mail to newmedia@energy.gov, prior or during the live event. The Energy Innovation Hubs are major integrated research centers, with researchers from many different institutions and technical backgrounds. Each Hub is focused on a specific high priority goal, rapidly accelerating scientific discoveries and shortening the path from laboratory innovation to technological development and commercial deployment of critical energy technologies. Dr. Hank Holey is the director of the Greater Philadelphia Innovation Cluster for Energy-Efficient Buildings, which is pioneering new data intensive techniques for designing and operating energy efficient buildings, including advanced computer modeling. Dr. Douglas Kothe is the director of the Modeling and Simulation for Nuclear Reactors Hub, which uses powerful supercomputers to create "virtual" reactors that will help improve the safety and performance of both existing and new nuclear reactors. Dr. Nathan Lewis is the director of the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis Hub, which focuses on how to produce biofuels from sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide.

  1. Advanced Simulation and Computing Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP Related LinksATHENAAdministrative80-AAAdvanced Large

  2. CS 3200 Introduction to Scientific Computing Instructor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turkel, Eli

    Gradient (CG) Method 13" #12;Conjugate Gradient Method 14" #12;Orthogonal Directions 15" #12;A-Orthogonal Directions 16"from J. R. Shewchuk "Painless CG"! #12;Conjugate Gradient Method 17" #12;Search Step Size Gradient Method The conjugate gradient method was originally proposed in Magnu

  3. Scientific Computing Kernels on the Cell Processor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Samuel W.; Shalf, John; Oliker, Leonid; Kamil, Shoaib; Husbands, Parry; Yelick, Katherine

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FFT algorithm for the IBM/Sony/Toshiba Cell Broadband Engine1998. ISBN 0262692155. [33] Sony press release. http://concepts. Chips like the Sony Emotion Engine [23, 26, 34

  4. Multiscale Problems: Numerical Analysis and Scientific Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Underground Nuclear Longterm Disposal of Radioactive Waste Underground Reactor Safety: Neutron Diffusion Multilevel Iterative Methods (homogeneous coefficients in PDE) Multigrid, AMG, DDM (with theory!) R. Scheichl theory!) Multiscale/Upscaling Methods (heterogeneous coefficients in PDE) Homogenisation (with theory

  5. Fermilab | Science | Particle Physics | Scientific Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall A ThisFermilab'sSpaceResearch

  6. NERSC National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Saleshttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gif Directorate - Events -Exascalemade 2012BerkeleyGW

  7. NERSC: National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science,SpeedingWu,IntelligenceYou are hereNews item$altMagnet

  8. National Energ y Research Scientific Computing Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar Energy Harvesting LosNationalAnnual Report This work

  9. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar Energy Harvesting LosNationalAnnual Report

  10. In: Advances in Modeling the Management of Stormwater Impacts, Volume 7. (Edited by W. James). Computational Hydraulics International, Guelph, Ontario and Lewis Publishers/CRC Press. 1999.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitt, Robert E.

    ). Computational Hydraulics International, Guelph, Ontario and Lewis Publishers/CRC Press. 1999. Small Storm

  11. Scientific Visualization: The Modern Oscilloscope for "Seeing the Unseeable" (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bethel, E Wes

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer Lecture Series 2008: Scientific visualization transforms abstract data into readily comprehensible images, provide a vehicle for "seeing the unseeable," and play a central role in both experimental and computational sciences. Wes Bethel, who heads the Scientific Visualization Group in the Computational Research Division, presents an overview of visualization and computer graphics, current research challenges, and future directions for the field.

  12. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORYS CAPABILITIES FOR ADVANCED ANALYSES OF CYBER THREATS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DePhillips M. P.

    2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    BNL has several ongoing, mature, and successful programs and areas of core scientific expertise that readily could be modified to address problems facing national security and efforts by the IC related to securing our nations computer networks. In supporting these programs, BNL houses an expansive, scalable infrastructure built exclusively for transporting, storing, and analyzing large disparate data-sets. Our ongoing research projects on various infrastructural issues in computer science undoubtedly would be relevant to national security. Furthermore, BNL frequently partners with researchers in academia and industry worldwide to foster unique and innovative ideas for expanding research opportunities and extending our insights. Because the basic science conducted at BNL is unique, such projects have led to advanced techniques, unlike any others, to support our mission of discovery. Many of them are modular techniques, thus making them ideal for abstraction and retrofitting to other uses including those facing national security, specifically the safety of the nations cyber space.

  13. advanced biomedical research: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rose, Michael R. 2 THE CENTER FOR INTEGRATIVE BIOMEDICAL COMPUTING: ADVANCING BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE WITH OPEN SOURCE Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary:...

  14. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, Richard; Wasserman, Harvey

    2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the leading scientific computing facility supporting research within the Department of Energy's Office of Science. NERSC provides high-performance computing (HPC) resources to approximately 4,000 researchers working on about 400 projects. In addition to hosting large-scale computing facilities, NERSC provides the support and expertise scientists need to effectively and efficiently use HPC systems. In February 2010, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOE's Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for BES research through 2013. The workshop was part of NERSC's legacy of anticipating users future needs and deploying the necessary resources to meet these demands. Workshop participants reached a consensus on several key findings, in addition to achieving the workshop's goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. The key requirements for scientists conducting research in BES are: (1) Larger allocations of computational resources; (2) Continued support for standard application software packages; (3) Adequate job turnaround time and throughput; and (4) Guidance and support for using future computer architectures. This report expands upon these key points and presents others. Several 'case studies' are included as significant representative samples of the needs of science teams within BES. Research teams scientific goals, computational methods of solution, current and 2013 computing requirements, and special software and support needs are summarized in these case studies. Also included are researchers strategies for computing in the highly parallel, 'multi-core' environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. NERSC has strategic plans and initiatives already underway that address key workshop findings. This report includes a brief summary of those relevant to issues raised by researchers at the workshop.

  15. advanced public transportation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of advanced sensor, computer, electronics, and communications technologies and management strategies in an integrated manner providing traveler information to increase...

  16. advanced robot control: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Symposium on Measurement and Control in Robotics -Toward Advanced Robots: Design, Sensors, Control and Applications - Computer Technologies and Information Sciences...

  17. Fault-Tolerant and Reliable Computation in Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Jing

    Fault-Tolerant and Reliable Computation in Cloud Computing Jing Deng Scott C.-H. Huang Yunghsiang S, Taipei, 106 Taiwan. Intelligent Automation, Inc., Rockville, MD, USA. Abstract-- Cloud computing of scientific computation in cloud computing. We investigate a cloud selection strategy to decompose the matrix

  18. Techniques for interactive 3-D scientific visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glinert, E.P. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (USA). Dept. of Computer Science); Blattner, M.M. (Anderson (M.D.) Hospital and Tumor Inst., Houston, TX (USA). Dept. of Biomathematics California Univ., Davis, CA (USA). Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Becker, B.G. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA). Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National La

    1990-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Interest in interactive 3-D graphics has exploded of late, fueled by (a) the allure of using scientific visualization to go where no-one has gone before'' and (b) by the development of new input devices which overcome some of the limitations imposed in the past by technology, yet which may be ill-suited to the kinds of interaction required by researchers active in scientific visualization. To resolve this tension, we propose a flat 5-D'' environment in which 2-D graphics are augmented by exploiting multiple human sensory modalities using cheap, conventional hardware readily available with personal computers and workstations. We discuss how interactions basic to 3-D scientific visualization, like searching a solution space and comparing two such spaces, are effectively carried out in our environment. Finally, we describe 3DMOVE, an experimental microworld we have implemented to test out some of our ideas. 40 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Scientific/Techical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Chris Leighton, Neutron Scattering Society of American; Mr. J. Ardie (Butch) Dillen, MRS Director of Finance and Administration

    2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The ACNS provides a focal point for the North American neutron user community, strengthening ties within this diverse group, and promoting neutron research in related disciplines. The conference thus serves a dual role as both a national user meeting and a scientific meeting. As a venue for scientific exchange, the ACNS showcases recent results and provides a forum for scientific discussion of neutron-enabled research in fields as diverse as hard and soft condensed matter, liquids, biology, magnetism, engineering materials, chemical spectroscopy, crystal structure, elementary excitations, fundamental physics, and development of neutron instrumentation. This is achieved through a combination of invited oral presentations, contributed oral presentations, and poster sessions. Adequate opportunity for spontaneous discussion and collaboration is also built into the ACNS program in order to foster free exchange of new scientific ideas and the potential for use of powerful neutron scattering methods beyond the current realms of application. The sixth American Conference on Neutron Scattering (ACNS 2012) provided essential information on the breadth and depth of current neutron-related research worldwide. A strong program of plenary, invited and contributed talks showcased recent scientific results in neutron science in a wide range of fields, including soft and hard condensed matter, biology, chemistry, energy and engineering applications, and neutron physics.

  20. Exploring nanoscale magnetism in advanced materials with polarized X-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stoehr and H.C. Siegmann, Magnetism, Springer (2006) [93]Exploring nanoscale magnetism in advanced materials withABSTRACT Nanoscale magnetism is of paramount scientific

  1. Recording Scientific Knowledge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowker, Geof (Santa Clara University) [Santa Clara University

    2006-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The way we record knowledge, and the web of technical, formal, and social practices that surrounds it, inevitably affects the knowledge that we record. The ways we hold knowledge about the past - in handwritten manuscripts, in printed books, in file folders, in databases - shape the kind of stories we tell about that past. In this talk, I look at how over the past two hundred years, information technology has affected the nature and production of scientific knowledge. Further, I explore ways in which the emergent new cyberinfrastructure is changing our relationship to scientific practice.

  2. Scientific Advisory Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook Twitter Principalfuel cells"03,Scientific AdvisoryScientific

  3. Scientific Data Movement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook Twitter Principalfuel cells"03,ScientificScientificData

  4. Computer Science & Engineering The Department of Computer Science & Engineering at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Shengli

    Computer Science & Engineering The Department of Computer Science & Engineering at the University # Students 10 undergraduates Prequisites Background in computing or biological science and interest in both-Grid Computing. The initiatives aim at advancing the application of modern computing infrasutrcture

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Computational Design and Development of a New, Lightweight Cast Alloy for Advanced Cylinder Heads in High-Efficiency, Light-Duty Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by General Motors at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about computational design and...

  6. Scientific Highlights News & Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The phenomenal rate of increase in the inte- gration density on semiconductor micro-chips is driven by advances around the central C=C bridge, i.e. to cis- and trans-stilbene, respectively (Fig. 1). This isomerisation

  7. Slide1 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Innovative Web Resources Can Advance the DOE R&D Mission ARPA-E June 24, 2010 Walter L. Warnick, Ph.D. Director Office of Scientific & Technical Information Office of Science...

  8. Slide14 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    - a searchable gateway to over 500,000 documents, access to more than 16,000 scientific Web sites DOE R&D Accomplishments - where you can find remarkable advances in science Our...

  9. Energy-Constrained Provisioning for Scientific Workflow Ensembles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sakellariou, Rizos

    Energy-Constrained Provisioning for Scientific Workflow Ensembles Ilia Pietri, Maciej Malawski of Computer Science, U.K AGH University of Science and Technology, Dept. of Computer Science, Poland USC the problem of meeting energy constraints along with either budget or deadline constraints. We propose

  10. South Florida Ecosystem Restoration: Scientific Information Needs in the Southern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Florida Ecosystem Restoration: Scientific Information Needs in the Southern Coastal Areas information needed for ecosystem restoration in the Southern Coastal Areas of South Florida. In 1996 that time, ecosystem restoration has advanced from planning to implementation; progress in research has

  11. NWChem: Bridging the gap between experimental and computational...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    25, 2014 Experimental and computational scientists at EMSL explain how high performance computing and NWChem enhance scientific discovery. NWChem is EMSL's open-source...

  12. Interdisciplinary Supervisory General Engineer/Nuclear Engineer/Computer Engineer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate will serve as the Director, Office of Advanced Modeling and Simulation and be responsible for providing managerial direction and scientific leadership and coordination...

  13. An Autonomous Reliabilit Cloud Comput

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    An Autonomous Reliabilit Ami Cloud Comput Department of Computing and Informa Abstract--Cloud computing paradigm allo based access to computing and storages s Internet. Since with advances of Cloud. Keywords- Cloud computing; SLA negotiat I. INTRODUCTION Cloud computing has transferred the services

  14. This is an electronic version of the article published in: Hulshof, C. D., & de Jong, T. (2006). Using just-in-time information to support scientific discovery learning about geometrical optics in a computer-based simulation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in a computer-based simulation. Interactive Learning Environments, 14 (1), 79-94 2006 Taylor & Francis learning with computer-based simulations have been identified. A number of studies have examined different learning processes is by the use of computer simulations (De Jong, 1991; De Jong & Van Joolingen, 1998

  15. COMPUTATIONAL ECONOMICS AT THE COMPUTATION INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    discussed the modern economic theory of incentives. Asymmetric information is common in economic relationsCOMPUTATIONAL ECONOMICS AT THE COMPUTATION INSTITUTE Summary of 3-D Discussions Prepared by Ken and economists to discuss a variety of topics on how computational methods can advance economic analysis

  16. Army High Performance Computing Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    Army High Performance Computing Research Center Applying advanced computational science research challenges http://me.stanford.edu/research/centers/ahpcrc #12;Army High Performance Computing challenges http://me.stanford.edu/research/centers/ahpcrc #12;Army High Performance Computing Research

  17. Extreme Scale Computing to Secure the Nation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D L; McGraw, J R; Johnson, J R; Frincke, D

    2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the dawn of modern electronic computing in the mid 1940's, U.S. national security programs have been dominant users of every new generation of high-performance computer. Indeed, the first general-purpose electronic computer, ENIAC (the Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer), was used to calculate the expected explosive yield of early thermonuclear weapons designs. Even the U. S. numerical weather prediction program, another early application for high-performance computing, was initially funded jointly by sponsors that included the U.S. Air Force and Navy, agencies interested in accurate weather predictions to support U.S. military operations. For the decades of the cold war, national security requirements continued to drive the development of high performance computing (HPC), including advancement of the computing hardware and development of sophisticated simulation codes to support weapons and military aircraft design, numerical weather prediction as well as data-intensive applications such as cryptography and cybersecurity U.S. national security concerns continue to drive the development of high-performance computers and software in the U.S. and in fact, events following the end of the cold war have driven an increase in the growth rate of computer performance at the high-end of the market. This mainly derives from our nation's observance of a moratorium on underground nuclear testing beginning in 1992, followed by our voluntary adherence to the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) beginning in 1995. The CTBT prohibits further underground nuclear tests, which in the past had been a key component of the nation's science-based program for assuring the reliability, performance and safety of U.S. nuclear weapons. In response to this change, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated the Science-Based Stockpile Stewardship (SBSS) program in response to the Fiscal Year 1994 National Defense Authorization Act, which requires, 'in the absence of nuclear testing, a progam to: (1) Support a focused, multifaceted program to increase the understanding of the enduring stockpile; (2) Predict, detect, and evaluate potential problems of the aging of the stockpile; (3) Refurbish and re-manufacture weapons and components, as required; and (4) Maintain the science and engineering institutions needed to support the nation's nuclear deterrent, now and in the future'. This program continues to fulfill its national security mission by adding significant new capabilities for producing scientific results through large-scale computational simulation coupled with careful experimentation, including sub-critical nuclear experiments permitted under the CTBT. To develop the computational science and the computational horsepower needed to support its mission, SBSS initiated the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative, later renamed the Advanced Simulation & Computing (ASC) program (sidebar: 'History of ASC Computing Program Computing Capability'). The modern 3D computational simulation capability of the ASC program supports the assessment and certification of the current nuclear stockpile through calibration with past underground test (UGT) data. While an impressive accomplishment, continued evolution of national security mission requirements will demand computing resources at a significantly greater scale than we have today. In particular, continued observance and potential Senate confirmation of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) together with the U.S administration's promise for a significant reduction in the size of the stockpile and the inexorable aging and consequent refurbishment of the stockpile all demand increasing refinement of our computational simulation capabilities. Assessment of the present and future stockpile with increased confidence of the safety and reliability without reliance upon calibration with past or future test data is a long-term goal of the ASC program. This will be accomplished through significant increases in the scientific bases that underlie the computational tools. Computer codes must be de

  18. Scientific Advisory Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitcheResearch BriefsTenney,Science andJanuary »Scientific

  19. Scientific Advisory Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitcheResearch BriefsTenney,Science andJanuaryScientific Advisory

  20. A NATIONAL COLLABORATORY TO ADVANCE THE SCIENCE OF HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA PHYSICS FOR MAGNETIC FUSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen R. Sanderson; Christopher R. Johnson

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work of the University of Utah, which was a member of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) under the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program (SciDAC) to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. A five year project that was initiated in 2001, it the NFC built on the past collaborative work performed within the U.S. fusion community and added the component of computer science research done with the USDOE Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computer Research. The project was itself a collaboration, itself uniting fusion scientists from General Atomics, MIT, and PPPL and computer scientists from ANL, LBNL, and Princeton University, and the University of Utah to form a coordinated team. The group leveraged existing computer science technology where possible and extended or created new capabilities where required. The complete finial report is attached as an addendum. The In the collaboration, the primary technical responsibility of the University of Utah in the collaboration was to develop and deploy an advanced scientific visualization service. To achieve this goal, the SCIRun Problem Solving Environment (PSE) is used on FusionGrid for an advanced scientific visualization service. SCIRun is open source software that gives the user the ability to create complex 3D visualizations and 2D graphics. This capability allows for the exploration of complex simulation results and the comparison of simulation and experimental data. SCIRun on FusionGrid gives the scientist a no-license-cost visualization capability that rivals present day commercial visualization packages. To accelerate the usage of SCIRun within the fusion community, a stand-alone application built on top of SCIRun was developed and deployed. This application, FusionViewer, allows users who are unfamiliar with SCIRun to quickly create visualizations and perform analysis of their simulation data from either the MDSplus data storage environment or from locally stored HDF5 files. More advanced tools for visualization and analysis also were created in collaboration with the SciDAC Center for Extended MHD Modeling. Versions of SCIRun with the FusionViewer have been made available to fusion scientists on the Mac OS X, Linux, and other Unix based platforms and have been downloaded 1163 times. SCIRun has been used with NIMROD, M3D, BOUT fusion simulation data as well as simulation data from other SciDAC application areas (e.g., Astrophysics). The subsequent visualization results - including animations - have been incorporated into invited talks at multiple APS/DPP meetings as well as peer reviewed journal articles. As an example, SCIRun was used for the visualization and analysis of a NIMROD simulation of a disruption that occurred in a DIII-D experiment. The resulting animations and stills were presented as part of invited talks at APS/DPP meetings and the SC04 conference in addition to being highlighted in the NIH/NSF Visualization Research Challenges Report. By achieving its technical goals, the University of Utah played a key role in the successful development of a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. Many of the visualization tools developed as part of the NFC continue to be used by Fusion and other SciDAC application scientists and are currently being supported and expanded through follow-on up on SciDAC projects (Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technology, and the Visualization and Analysis in Support of Fusion SAP).

  1. Application of Robust Design and Advanced Computer Aided Engineering Technologies: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-04-143

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, M.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oshkosh Corporation (OSK) is taking an aggressive approach to implementing advanced technologies, including hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) technology, throughout their commercial and military product lines. These technologies have important implications for OSK's commercial and military customers, including fleet fuel efficiency, quiet operational modes, additional on-board electric capabilities, and lower thermal signature operation. However, technical challenges exist with selecting the optimal HEV components and design to work within the performance and packaging constraints of specific vehicle applications. SK desires to use unique expertise developed at the Department of Energy?s (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), including HEV modeling and simulation. These tools will be used to overcome technical hurdles to implementing advanced heavy vehicle technology that meet performance requirements while improving fuel efficiency.

  2. ProductSpecifications Thermo Scientific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peraire, Jaime

    ProductSpecifications Thermo Scientific CellomicsArrayScan VTI HCS Reader The Thermo Scientific info.cellularimaging@thermofisher.com www.thermo.com/cellomics and Cellular Imaging Europe: +44 118 988 and filters available Integrated Software Features Thermo Scientific Cellomics iQ - High Content intelligent

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Scientific Visit on Crystalline...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WorkshopsScientific Visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development Scientific Visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development Many thanks to all participants at the Scientific...

  4. Argonne's computing Zen | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is dedicated to large-scale computation and builds on Argonne's strengths in high-performance computing software, advanced hardware architectures and applications expertise....

  5. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAVENPORT,J.

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security.

  6. National Scientific User Facility Purpose and Capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. E. Rosenberg; T. R. Allen; J. C. Haley; M. K. Meyer

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007. This designation allows the ATR to become a cornerstone of nuclear energy research and development (R&D) within the U.S. by making it easier for universities, the commercial power industry, other national laboratories, and international organizations to conduct nuclear energy R&D. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide nuclear energy researchers access to world-class facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology within the U.S. In support of this mission, hot cell laboratories are being upgraded. These upgrades include a set of lead shielded cells that will house Irradiated Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) test rigs and construction of a shielded laboratory facility. A primary function of this shielded laboratory is to provide a state of the art type laboratory facility that is functional, efficient and flexible that is dedicated to the analysis and characterization of nuclear and non-nuclear materials. The facility shall be relatively easy to reconfigure to provide laboratory scale hot cave space for housing current and future nuclear material scientific research instruments.

  7. Energy Smart Management of Scientific Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otoo, Ekow; Rotem, Dron; Tsao, Shih-Chiang

    2009-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific data centers comprised of high-powered computing equipment and large capacity disk storage systems consume considerable amount of energy. Dynamic power management techniques (DPM) are commonly used for saving energy in disk systems. These involve powering down disks that exhibit long idle periods and placing them in standby mode. A file request from a disk in standby mode will incur both energy and performance penalties as it takes energy (and time) to spin up the disk before it can serve a file. For this reason, DPM has to make decisions as to when to transition the disk into standby mode such that the energy saved is greater than the energy needed to spin it up again and the performance penalty is tolerable. The length of the idle period until the DPM decides to power down a disk is called idlenessthreshold. In this paper, we study both analytically and experimentally dynamic power management techniques that save energy subject to performance constraints on file access costs. Based on observed workloads of scientific applications and disk characteristics, we provide a methodology for determining file assignment to disks and computing idleness thresholds that result in significant improvements to the energy saved by existing DPMsolutions while meeting response time constraints. We validate our methods with simulations that use traces taken from scientific applications.

  8. #WomenInSTEM: A Physicist Focuses on Scientific Advancement

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Capece, Angela

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Dr. Capece first became interested in science after learning about NASA's Voyager missions at an early age. In this video, Dr. Capece provides advice for women and girls interested in pursuing careers in STEM fields, like focusing on physics, biology and chemistry at the high school level. This video is part of the Energy Department's #WomenInSTEM video series. At the Energy Department, we're committed to supporting a diverse talent pool of STEM innovators ready to address the challenges and opportunities of our growing clean energy economy.

  9. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Mathew Sottile

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The UO portion of the larger TASCS project was focused on the usability subproject identified in the original project proposal. The key usability issue that we tacked was that of supporting legacy code developers in migrating to a component-oriented design pattern and development model with minimal manual labor. It was observed during the lifetime of the TASCS (and previous CCA efforts) that more often than not, users would arrive with existing code that was developed previous to their exposure to component design methods. As such, they were faced with the task of both learning the CCA toolchain and at the same time, manually deconstructing and reassembling their existing code to fit the design constraints imposed by components. This was a common complaint (and occasional reason for a user to abandon components altogether), so our task was to remove this manual labor as much as possible to lessen the burden placed on the end-user when adopting components for existing codes. To accomplish this, we created a source-based static analysis tool that used code annotations to drive code generation and transformation operations. The use of code annotations is due to one of the key technical challenges facing this work | programming languages are limited in the degree to which application-specific semantics can be represented in code. For example, data types are often ambiguous. The C pointer is the most common example cited in practice. Given a pointer to a location in memory, should it be interpreted as a singleton or an array. If it is to be interpreted as an array, how many dimensions does the array have? What are their extents? The annotation language that we designed and implemented addresses this ambiguity issue by allowing users to decorate their code in places where ambiguity exists in order to guide tools to interpret what the programmer really intends.

  10. DOE Announces First Awards in Scientific Discovery through Advanced...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nature. The projects include the search for the explosion mechanism of core-collapse supernovae, development of a new generation of accelerator simulation codes and simulations of...

  11. #WomenInSTEM: A Physicist Focuses on Scientific Advancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capece, Angela

    2014-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Dr. Capece first became interested in science after learning about NASA's Voyager missions at an early age. In this video, Dr. Capece provides advice for women and girls interested in pursuing careers in STEM fields, like focusing on physics, biology and chemistry at the high school level. This video is part of the Energy Department's #WomenInSTEM video series. At the Energy Department, we're committed to supporting a diverse talent pool of STEM innovators ready to address the challenges and opportunities of our growing clean energy economy.

  12. CENTER FOR ADVANCED BIOTECHNOLOGY AND MEDICINE 2012 SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY BOARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REPRESENTATIVES Dr. Nader Fotouhi Vice President, Discovery Chemistry Hoffmann-La Roche Michael Dean Miller, Ph Academy of Sciences), '86 Babiss, Lee, Vice President Pre-Clinical Res. & Dev. Hoffmann-La Roche Inc.'99. Biol. Sci., '88-'91 Drews, Jurgen, M.D., Pres., Intl. R & D, Hoffmann-La Roche Inc., '93-'96 Gage, L

  13. PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732onMake YourDepartmentChartForums OutreachAMWTP2009 | Department

  14. PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEWResponse toOctoberMultifamily Landlords1Reality2009 | Department of

  15. Sandia Energy - Helping Advance the Scientific Foundation that Enables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesInAppliedEnergyGeothermal HomeGridH

  16. NERSC Enhances PDSF, Genepool Computing Capabilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems Facility (PDSF) and Genepool systems at Department of Energy's National Energy Research Scientific Computer Center (NERSC). Throughout November members of NERSC's...

  17. Final Report: Super Instruction Architecture for Scalable Parallel Computations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanders, Beverly Ann [University of Florida] [University of Florida; Bartlett, Rodney [University of Florida] [University of Florida; Deumens, Erik [University of Florida] [University of Florida

    2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The most advanced methods for reliable and accurate computation of the electronic structure of molecular and nano systems are the coupled-cluster techniques. These high-accuracy methods help us to understand, for example, how biological enzymes operate and contribute to the design of new organic explosives. The ACES III software provides a modern, high-performance implementation of these methods optimized for high performance parallel computer systems, ranging from small clusters typical in individual research groups, through larger clusters available in campus and regional computer centers, all the way to high-end petascale systems at national labs, including exploiting GPUs if available. This project enhanced the ACESIII software package and used it to study interesting scientific problems.

  18. Scientific Advisory Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook Twitter Principalfuel cells"03,Scientific Advisory Committee

  19. Scientific Advisory Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook Twitter Principalfuel cells"03,Scientific Advisory

  20. Scientific Advisory Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitcheResearch BriefsTenney,Science andJanuary »Scientific Advisory

  1. Scientific Challenges for Understanding the Quantum Universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A workshop titled "Scientific Challenges for Understanding the Quantum Universe" was held December 9-11, 2008, at the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center-National Accelerator Laboratory. The primary purpose of the meeting was to examine how computing at the extreme scale can contribute to meeting forefront scientific challenges in particle physics, particle astrophysics and cosmology. The workshop was organized around five research areas with associated panels. Three of these, "High Energy Theoretical Physics," "Accelerator Simulation," and "Experimental Particle Physics," addressed research of the Office of High Energy Physics Energy and Intensity Frontiers, while the"Cosmology and Astrophysics Simulation" and "Astrophysics Data Handling, Archiving, and Mining" panels were associated with the Cosmic Frontier.

  2. Load Balancing Scientific Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearce, Olga

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The largest supercomputers have millions of independent processors, and concurrency levels are rapidly increasing. For ideal efficiency, developers of the simulations that run on these machines must ensure that computational work is evenly balanced...

  3. Load Balancing Scientific Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearce, Olga

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The largest supercomputers have millions of independent processors, and concurrency levels are rapidly increasing. For ideal efficiency, developers of the simulations that run on these machines must ensure that computational work is evenly balanced...

  4. Advanced energy projects FY 1997 research summaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Advanced Energy Projects (AEP) program is to explore the scientific feasibility of novel energy-related concepts that are high risk, in terms of scientific feasibility, yet have a realistic potential for a high technological payoff. The concepts supported by the AEP are typically at an early stage of scientific development. They often arise from advances in basic research and are premature for consideration by applied research or technology development programs. Some are based on discoveries of new scientific phenomena or involve exploratory ideas that span multiple scientific and technical disciplines which do not fit into an existing DOE program area. In all cases, the objective is to support evaluation of the scientific or technical feasibility of the novel concepts involved. Following AEP support, it is expected that each concept will be sufficiently developed to attract further funding from other sources to realize its full potential. Projects that involve evolutionary research or technology development and demonstration are not supported by AEP. Furthermore, research projects more appropriate for another existing DOE research program are not encouraged. There were 65 projects in the AEP research portfolio during Fiscal Year 1997. Eigheen projects were initiated during that fiscal year. This document consists of short summaries of projects active in FY 1997. Further information of a specific project may be obtained by contacting the principal investigator.

  5. Bioinformatics Computing Consultant Position Available

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    exploit advanced computing platforms. JGI provides production sequencing and genomics for the Department of Energy. These activities are critical to the DOE missions in...

  6. Computer Science Page 91Sonoma State University 2014-2015 Catalog COMPUTER SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    Computer Science Page 91Sonoma State University 2014-2015 Catalog COMPUTER SCIENCE DEPARTMENT Suzanne Rivoire Lynn Stauffer Tia Watts Programs Offered Bachelor of Science in Computer Science Minor in Computer Science Computer science is the scientific study of computing devices, the software that drives

  7. Recommended documentation for computer users at ANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiberger, A.A.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recommended Documentation for Computer Users at ANL is for all users of the services available from the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Computing and Telecommunications Division (CTD). This document will guide you in selecting available documentation that will best fill your particular needs. Chapter 1 explains how to use this document to select documents and how to obtain them from the CTD Document Distribution Counter. Chapter 2 contains a table that categorizes available publications. Chapter 3 gives descriptions of the online DOCUMENT command for CMS, and VAX, and the Sun workstation. DOCUMENT allows you to scan for and order documentation that interests you. Chapter 4 lists publications by subject. Categories I and IX cover publications of a general nature and publications on telecommunications and networks respectively. Categories II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII, and X cover publications on specific computer systems. Category XI covers publications on advanced scientific computing at Argonne. Chapter 5 contains abstracts for each publication, all arranged alphabetically. Chapter 6 describes additional publications containing bibliographies and master indexes that the user may find useful. The appendix identifies available computer systems, applications, languages, and libraries.

  8. JT-60 Modification Plan for Long Pulse Advanced Tokamak Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JT-60 Modification Plan for Long Pulse Advanced Tokamak Research Colloquium of Max Planck Institute as one step to DEMO Advanced tokamak researches Scientific achievements of JT-60 and its phase Tokamak Commercializa tion pease JT-60 Decision system of prototype reactor Electricity Generation

  9. Scientific and Technical Information Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes requirements and responsibilities for managing DOE's scientific and technical information. Cancels DOE O 241.1. Canceled by DOE O 241.1B.

  10. Scientific and Technical Need | JCESR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    key questions in electrochemical energy storage along the full technology-development pipeline, from basic scientific research through manufacturing and delivery to market. The...

  11. Scientific and Natural Areas (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain scientific and natural areas are established throughout the state for the purpose of preservation and protection. Construction and new development is prohibited in these areas.

  12. Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilitiesInternational Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden)Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis VlachoudisWorkshop Assistant: Graldine Jean

  13. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological and Environmental Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research Program Office (BER),

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In May 2009, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), and DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for BER-funded research over the subsequent three to five years. The workshop revealed several key points, in addition to achieving its goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. Chief among them: scientific progress in BER-funded research is limited by current allocations of computational resources. Additionally, growth in mission-critical computing -- combined with new requirements for collaborative data manipulation and analysis -- will demand ever increasing computing, storage, network, visualization, reliability and service richness from NERSC. This report expands upon these key points and adds others. It also presents a number of"case studies" as significant representative samples of the needs of science teams within BER. Workshop participants were asked to codify their requirements in this"case study" format, summarizing their science goals, methods of solution, current and 3-5 year computing requirements, and special software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel,"multi-core" environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years.

  14. Kelly Scientific Resources Kelly Scientific Resources yy BIOTECHNOLOGY DRUG &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puglisi, Joseph

    for a wide variety of scientific and clinical research positions. KSR is a trusted career advisor, guiding is a $92 Billion Dollar Industry Customer Uses for an Agencyg y Strictly Head Count Special Projects staffing supplier in the world * Recruiting Scientific and Clinical Research professionals since 1995

  15. Scientific methods for developing ultrastable structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamble, M.; Thompson, T.; Miller, W.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific methods used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory for developing an ultrastable structure for study of silicon-based elementary particle tracking systems are addressed. In particular, the design, analysis, and monitoring of this system are explored. The development methodology was based on a triad of analytical, computational, and experimental techniques. These were used to achieve a significant degree of mechanical stability (alignment accuracy >1 {mu}rad) and yet allow dynamic manipulation of the system. Estimates of system thermal and vibratory stability and component performance are compared with experimental data collected using laser interferometry and accelerometers. 8 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. all-russian scientific research: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MPI programming in Python NumPy (SciPy) arrays Plotting in Python: - bar-charts, pie and processing (interpolation) 2 12;Advanced Research Computing About me ...

  17. TRAC-PF1/MOD1: an advanced best-estimate computer program for pressurized water reactor thermal-hydraulic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liles, D.R.; Mahaffy, J.H.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in light-water reactors. The TRAC-PF1/MOD1 program provides this capability for pressurized water reactors and for many thermal-hydraulic test facilities. The code features either a one- or a three-dimensional treatment of the pressure vessel and its associated internals, a two-fluid nonequilibrium hydrodynamics model with a noncondensable gas field and solute tracking, flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment, optional reflood tracking capability for bottom-flood and falling-film quench fronts, and consistent treatment of entire accident sequences including the generation of consistent initial conditions. The stability-enhancing two-step (SETS) numerical algorithm is used in the one-dimensional hydrodynamics and permits this portion of the fluid dynamics to violate the material Courant condition. This technique permits large time steps and, hence, reduced running time for slow transients.

  18. ProductSpecifications Thermo Scientific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    ProductSpecifications Thermo Scientific Niton XL3t GOLDD+ XRF Analyzer The Thermo Scientific Niton XL3t x-ray tube-based x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer with GOLDD+ technology is purpose versatile x-ray tubes ever used in a handheld XRF instrument. When this power is harnessed to our

  19. New Frontiers in Leadership Computing | Argonne Leadership Computing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of chemistry and microbiology a century and a half ago-the introduction of high-performance computing, or HPC, into the process of scientific inquiry. Insights may still favor...

  20. State of Advancement of the International REVE Project: Computational Modelling of Irradiation-Induced Hardening in Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels and Relevant Experimental Validation Programme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malerba, Lorenzo; Van Walle, Eric [SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Domain, Christophe; Jumel, Stephanie; Van Duysen, Jean-Claude [EDR R and D (France)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The REVE (Reactor for Virtual Experiments) project is an international joint effort aimed at developing multi-scale modelling computational toolboxes capable of simulating the behaviour of materials under irradiation at different time and length scales. Well grounded numerical techniques such as molecular dynamics (MD) and Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms, as well as rate equation (RE) and dislocation-defect interaction theory, form the basis on which the project is built. The goal is to put together a suite of integrated codes capable of deducing the changes in macroscopic properties starting from a detailed simulation of the microstructural changes produced by irradiation in materials. To achieve this objective, several European laboratories are closely collaborating, while exchanging data with American and Japanese laboratories currently pursuing similar approaches. The material chosen for the first phase of this project is reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel, the target macroscopic magnitude to be predicted being the yield strength increase ({delta}{sigma}y) due, essentially, to irradiation-enhanced formation of intragranular solute atom precipitates or clouds, as well as irradiation induced defects in the matrix, such as point defect clusters and dislocation loops. A description of the methodological approach used in the project and its current state is given in the paper. The development of the simulation tools requires a continuous feedback from ad hoc experimental data. In the framework of the REVE project SCK EN has therefore performed a neutron irradiation campaign of model alloys of growing complexity (from pure Fe to binary and ternary systems and a real RPV steel) in the Belgian test reactor BR2 and is currently carrying on the subsequent materials characterisation using its hot cell facilities. The paper gives the details of this experimental programme - probably the first large-scale one devoted to the validation of numerical simulation tools - and presents and discusses the first available results, with a view to their use as feedback for the improvement of the computational modelling. (authors)

  1. Advanced Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, Gordon R. [NETL

    2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  2. Computer Science Faculty Dr. Stephen Beale, Research Assistant Professor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adali, Tulay

    Computer Science Faculty Dr. Stephen Beale, Research Assistant Professor Syntactic and semantic, multi-engine NLP applications Dr. Richard Chang, Associate Professor Computational complexity theory, natural language processing, intelligent agents Dr. Milton Halem, Research Professor Scientific computing

  3. Dynamic Voltage and Frequency Scaling for Scientific Applications #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kremer, Ulrich

    of the processor waiting for the memory subsystem to provide the data. Minimizing the power/energy consumption energy consumption. 1 Introduction Modern architectures have a large gap between the speeds of the memory of scientific computations leads to a reduction in heat dissipation and cooling requirements, which in turn

  4. Acquisition of Scientific Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noland, Lynn [Director, Sponsored Programs] [Director, Sponsored Programs

    2014-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Whitworth University constructed a 63,00 sq. ft. biology and chemistry building which opened in the Fall of 2011. This project provided for new state-of-the-art science instrumentation enabling Whitworth students to develop skills and knowledge that are directly transferable to practical applications thus enhancing Whitworth student's ability to compete and perform in the scientific workforce. Additionally, STEM faculty undertake outreach programs in the area schools, bringing students to our campus to engage in activities with our science students. The ability to work with insturmentation that is current helps to make science exciting for middle school and high school students and gets them thinking about careers in science. 14 items were purchased following the university's purchasing policy, that benefit instruction and research in the departments of biology, chemistry, and health sciences. They are: Cadaver Dissection Tables with Exhaust Chamber and accessories, Research Microscope with DF DIC, Phase and Fluorescence illumination with DP72 Camera, Microscope with Fluorescence, Microcomputer controlled ultracentrifuge, Ultracentrifuge rotor, Variable Temperature steam pressure sterilizer, Alliance APLC System, DNA Speedvac, Gel Cocumentation System, BioPac MP150, Glovebox personal workstation,Lyophilizer, Nano Drop 2000/2000c Spectrophotometer, C02 Incubator.

  5. Possibilities for Healthcare Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szolovits, Peter

    Advances in computing technology promise to aid in achieving the goals of healthcare. We review how such changes can support each of the goals of healthcare as identified by the U.S. Institute of Medicine: safety, ...

  6. K. S. Telang, R. W. Pike, F. C. Knopf, J. R. Hopper, J. Saleh, S. Waghchoure, S. C. Hedge and T. A. Hertwig,"An Advanced Process Analysis System for Improving Chemical and Refinery Processes," Computers and Chemical Engineering, Vol. 23, p. S727-730 (1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pike, Ralph W.

    . Hertwig,"An Advanced Process Analysis System for Improving Chemical and Refinery Processes," Computers Chemical and Refinery Processes K. S. Telang, X. Chen, R. W. Pike and F. C. Knopf Louisiana State and refineries for process improvements. The system integrates programs for on-line optimization, chemical

  7. Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 2 (in-depth...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3008 HYbrid4 DOE strategic goalsbarriers addressed - F: Constant advances in technology - D: Lack of standardized test protocols - E: Computational models, design and...

  8. Development and Validation of an Advanced Stimulation Prediction...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of created fractures." State Colorado Objectives Develop and validate an advanced computer model that can be used in the planning and design of stimulation techniques to create...

  9. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Applied to Advanced Engine Combustion...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    over broad operating ranges) - Requirements for efficient and routine use of high-performance computing (HPC), development of both predictive and affordable models for advanced...

  10. Overview of DOE Advanced Combustion Engine R&D

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    modeling and experiments Advanced diagnostics including optical, laser, x-ray, and neutron based techniques Multi-dimensional computational models and combustion...

  11. adenomas technical advances: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University, Department of Engineering, Technical Report 97-25, December 1997. Based Pont, Michael J. 253 Memory Hierarchy: Advanced Concepts Computer Technologies and...

  12. advanced general purpose: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Virtual-Threading: Advanced General Purpose Processors Architecture CERN Preprints Summary: The paper describes the new computers architecture, the...

  13. advanced signal processing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    XI, Universit de 9 Hindawi Publishing Corporation EURASIP Journal on Advances in Signal Processing Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: content...

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: public-private partnership to advance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    public-private partnership to advance hydrogen infrastructure Sandia and NREL Announce Two New H2FIRST Reports On April 21, 2015, in Capabilities, Computational Modeling &...

  15. advanced marine reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fueling; - Te ITB formation - Heat accumulation ? Extension of research area towards reactor-relevant regime Development of ECRF (110 GHz) and N 28 An Advanced Computational...

  16. advanced ndi techniques: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hand, the Experimental Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 47 A Benchmarking Technique for DBMSs with Advanced Data Models Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites...

  17. advanced qexafs techniques: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hand, the Experimental Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 43 A Benchmarking Technique for DBMSs with Advanced Data Models Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites...

  18. advanced ant societies: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Raleigh,NC 27695 (RAL,EJJ) Feeding by ants (Hymenoptera Mitchell, Mike 3 Ant Colony Optimization for vehicle routing in advanced logistics systems Computer Technologies and...

  19. advanced nursing practice: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Domain Chapman, Michael S. 2 PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION Programme name Advanced Practice in Health and Social Care (Ophthalmic Nursing) Computer Technologies and Information Sciences...

  20. advanced practice nurse: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Domain Chapman, Michael S. 2 PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION Programme name Advanced Practice in Health and Social Care (Ophthalmic Nursing) Computer Technologies and Information Sciences...

  1. advanced practice nurses: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Domain Chapman, Michael S. 2 PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION Programme name Advanced Practice in Health and Social Care (Ophthalmic Nursing) Computer Technologies and Information Sciences...

  2. advanced practice nursing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Domain Chapman, Michael S. 2 PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION Programme name Advanced Practice in Health and Social Care (Ophthalmic Nursing) Computer Technologies and Information Sciences...

  3. NREL: Community - NREL Researchers Advance Wind Energy Systems...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gave a large improvement in computational efficiency, suggesting that there is potential in using advanced statistical methods to analyze wind turbine fatigue and...

  4. Advanced fuel chemistry for advanced engines.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taatjes, Craig A.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Zador, Judit; Fernandes, Ravi X.; Miller, James A.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Autoignition chemistry is central to predictive modeling of many advanced engine designs that combine high efficiency and low inherent pollutant emissions. This chemistry, and especially its pressure dependence, is poorly known for fuels derived from heavy petroleum and for biofuels, both of which are becoming increasingly prominent in the nation's fuel stream. We have investigated the pressure dependence of key ignition reactions for a series of molecules representative of non-traditional and alternative fuels. These investigations combined experimental characterization of hydroxyl radical production in well-controlled photolytically initiated oxidation and a hybrid modeling strategy that linked detailed quantum chemistry and computational kinetics of critical reactions with rate-equation models of the global chemical system. Comprehensive mechanisms for autoignition generally ignore the pressure dependence of branching fractions in the important alkyl + O{sub 2} reaction systems; however we have demonstrated that pressure-dependent 'formally direct' pathways persist at in-cylinder pressures.

  5. Uncertainty Analyses of Advanced Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurence F. Miller; J. Preston; G. Sweder; T. Anderson; S. Janson; M. Humberstone; J. MConn; J. Clark

    2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy is developing technology, experimental protocols, computational methods, systems analysis software, and many other capabilities in order to advance the nuclear power infrastructure through the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFDI). Our project, is intended to facilitate will-informed decision making for the selection of fuel cycle options and facilities for development.

  6. User Monitor & Feedback Mechanism for Social Scientific Study on Laptop Energy Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stamp, Mark

    change among laptop users via interactive energy-usage feedback with college students as the initiali User Monitor & Feedback Mechanism for Social Scientific Study on Laptop Energy Reduction SCIENTIFIC STUDY ON LAPTOP ENERGY REDUCTION by Namrata Buddhadev APPROVED FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER

  7. Screw Placement and Osteoplasty Under Computed Tomographic-Fluoroscopic Guidance in a Case of Advanced Metastatic Destruction of the Iliosacral Joint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trumm, Christoph Gregor, E-mail: christoph.trumm@med.lmu.de [University of Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology (Germany); Rubenbauer, Bianca; Piltz, Stefan [University of Munich, Department of Surgery (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F.; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten [University of Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology (Germany)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a case of combined surgical screw placement and osteoplasty guided by computed tomography-fluoroscopy (CTF) in a 68-year-old man with unilateral osteolytic destruction and a pathological fracture of the iliosacral joint due to a metastasis from renal cell carcinoma. The patient experienced intractable lower back pain that was refractory to analgesia. After transarterial particle and coil embolization of the tumor-feeding vessels in the angiography unit, the procedure was performed under general anesthesia by an interdisciplinary team of interventional radiologists and trauma surgeons. Under intermittent single-shot CTF, two K wires were inserted into the left iliosacral joint from a lateral transiliac approach at the S1 level followed by two self-tapping surgical screws. Continuous CTF was used for monitoring of the subsequent polymethylmethacrylate injection through two vertebroplasty cannulas for further stabilization of the screw threads within the osteolytic sacral ala. Both the screw placement and cement injection were successful, with no complications occurring during or after the procedure. With additional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory and opioid medication, the patient reported a marked decrease in his lower back pain and was able to move independently again at the 3-month follow-up assessment. In our patient with intolerable back pain due to tumor destruction and consequent pathological fracture of the iliosacral joint, CTF-guided iliosacral screw placement combined with osteoplasty was successful with respect to joint stabilization and a reduction in the need for analgesic therapy.

  8. COMPUTER SCIENCE Program of Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    COMPUTER SCIENCE Program of Study Financial Aid Applying Correspondence Computer Science offers describing original computer science research. Students are required to complete 58 semester hours understanding of computer science that gives a solid foundation for many advanced jobs in the field as well

  9. GeoComputational Intelligence and High-Performance Geospatial Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guan, Qingfeng

    2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    GeoComputational Intelligence and High-performance Geospatial Computing Qingfeng (Gene) Guan, Ph.D Center for Advanced Land Management Information Technologies School of Natural Resources University of Nebraska - Lincoln GIS Day @ University... of Kansas Nov. 16th, 2011 Contents 1. Computational Science and GeoComputation 2. GeoComputational Intelligence - ANN-based Urban-CA model 3. High-performance Geospatial Computing - Parallel Geostatistical Areal Interpolation - pRPL and pSLEUTH 4. Conclusion...

  10. ANU College of Engineering and Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Xiangyun "Sean"

    ANU College of Engineering and Computer Science CRICOS Provider Number 00120C Appendix B: Computing AND COMPUTER SCIENCE Taylor's Program ANU Program ANU Credits/Status Special Notes Bachelor of Software of Advanced Computing (Honours) 96 units of status Bachelor of Computer Science (Hons) (Computer Security

  11. Measurement and Standards for Computational Science and Engineering 1 Computation has become a critical tool for the practice of science and engineering. Modern research and development leading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Ronald F.

    of mathematical methods, algorithms, and software are crucial to the advance of modern science and engineeringMeasurement and Standards for Computational Science and Engineering 1 Computation has become. ITL promotes advancement in computational science and engineering by providing fundamental

  12. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, Richard A.; Wasserman, Harvey

    2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the leading scientific computing facility for the Department of Energy's Office of Science, providing high-performance computing (HPC) resources to more than 3,000 researchers working on about 400 projects. NERSC provides large-scale computing resources and, crucially, the support and expertise needed for scientists to make effective use of them. In November 2009, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), and DOE's Office of High Energy Physics (HEP) held a workshop to characterize the HPC resources needed at NERSC to support HEP research through the next three to five years. The effort is part of NERSC's legacy of anticipating users needs and deploying resources to meet those demands. The workshop revealed several key points, in addition to achieving its goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. The chief findings: (1) Science teams need access to a significant increase in computational resources to meet their research goals; (2) Research teams need to be able to read, write, transfer, store online, archive, analyze, and share huge volumes of data; (3) Science teams need guidance and support to implement their codes on future architectures; and (4) Projects need predictable, rapid turnaround of their computational jobs to meet mission-critical time constraints. This report expands upon these key points and includes others. It also presents a number of case studies as representative of the research conducted within HEP. Workshop participants were asked to codify their requirements in this case study format, summarizing their science goals, methods of solution, current and three-to-five year computing requirements, and software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel, multi-core environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. The report includes a section that describes efforts already underway or planned at NERSC that address requirements collected at the workshop. NERSC has many initiatives in progress that address key workshop findings and are aligned with NERSC's strategic plans.

  13. Slide15 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Accessible Scientific Research Data Many disciplines overlap and use data from other sciences Internet can unify all literature and data Go from lit to computation to data and back...

  14. Scientific Data Management (SDM) Center for Enabling Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lud?scher, Bertram; Altintas, Ilkay

    2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past five years, our activities have both established Kepler as a viable scientific workflow environment and demonstrated its value across multiple science applications. We have published numerous peer-reviewed papers on the technologies highlighted in this short paper and have given Kepler tutorials at SC06,SC07,SC08,and SciDAC 2007. Our outreach activities have allowed scientists to learn best practices and better utilize Kepler to address their individual workflow problems. Our contributions to advancing the state-of-the-art in scientific workflows have focused on the following areas. Progress in each of these areas is described in subsequent sections. Workflow development. The development of a deeper understanding of scientific workflows "in the wild" and of the requirements for support tools that allow easy construction of complex scientific workflows; Generic workflow components and templates. The development of generic actors (i.e.workflow components and processes) which can be broadly applied to scientific problems; Provenance collection and analysis. The design of a flexible provenance collection and analysis infrastructure within the workflow environment; and Workflow reliability and fault tolerance. The improvement of the reliability and fault-tolerance of workflow environments.

  15. Advanced Combustion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1BP-14 Power and TransmissionAdolphusAdvanced Energy

  16. Typologies of Computation and Computational Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark Burgin; Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic

    2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We need much better understanding of information processing and computation as its primary form. Future progress of new computational devices capable of dealing with problems of big data, internet of things, semantic web, cognitive robotics and neuroinformatics depends on the adequate models of computation. In this article we first present the current state of the art through systematization of existing models and mechanisms, and outline basic structural framework of computation. We argue that defining computation as information processing, and given that there is no information without (physical) representation, the dynamics of information on the fundamental level is physical/ intrinsic/ natural computation. As a special case, intrinsic computation is used for designed computation in computing machinery. Intrinsic natural computation occurs on variety of levels of physical processes, containing the levels of computation of living organisms (including highly intelligent animals) as well as designed computational devices. The present article offers a typology of current models of computation and indicates future paths for the advancement of the field; both by the development of new computational models and by learning from nature how to better compute using different mechanisms of intrinsic computation.

  17. I/O Resources for Scientific Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources for Scientific Applications at NERSC IO Resources for Scientific Applications at NERSC Introduction NERSC provides a range of online resources to assist users...

  18. NERSC HPSS Storage by Scientific Discipline

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage by Scientific Discipline Troubleshooting IO Resources for Scientific Applications at NERSC Optimizing IO performance on the Lustre file system IO Formats Science...

  19. Increasing Scientific Productivity by Tracking Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Tracking Increases Scientific Productivity Data Tracking Increases Scientific Productivity July 20, 2011 | Tags: HPSS, NERSC Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 486 2402 HPSS...

  20. Legacy Computing Markup Language (LCML) and LEGEND -- LEGacy Encapsulation for Network Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geiger, Stephen Kurt

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid increase of computing power and emergence of distributed computing technologies such as Grid computing create new opportunities for scientific computing. One of the challenges faced in harnessing the emerging ...