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Sample records for advanced scientific computing

  1. Advanced Scientific Computing Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Scientific Computing Research Advanced Scientific Computing Research Discovering, developing, and deploying computational and networking capabilities to analyze, model,...

  2. Advanced Scientific Computing Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Scientific Computing Research Advanced Scientific Computing Research Discovering, developing, and deploying computational and networking capabilities to analyze, model, simulate, and predict complex phenomena important to the Department of Energy. Get Expertise Pieter Swart (505) 665 9437 Email Pat McCormick (505) 665-0201 Email Dave Higdon (505) 667-2091 Email Fulfilling the potential of emerging computing systems and architectures beyond today's tools and techniques to deliver

  3. Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (ASCR) - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  4. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Advanced Scientific...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Advanced Scientific Computing Research: Target 2014 ASCRFrontcover.png Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for ...

  5. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Advanced Scientific

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computing Research: Target 2014 Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Advanced Scientific Computing Research: Target 2014 ASCRFrontcover.png Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Advanced Scientific Computing Research An ASCR / NERSC Review January 5-6, 2011 Final Report Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Report of the Joint ASCR / NERSC Workshop conducted January 5-6, 2011 Goals This workshop is being

  6. DOE Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Subcommittee

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report on Scientific and Technical Information (Program Document) | SciTech Connect Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Subcommittee Report on Scientific and Technical Information Citation Details In-Document Search Title: DOE Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Subcommittee Report on Scientific and Technical Information The Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) was charged to form a standing subcommittee to review the Department of Energy's Office of

  7. Energy Department Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific Computing

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Research | Department of Energy Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific Computing Research Energy Department Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific Computing Research December 27, 2005 - 4:55pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy's Office of Science and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) have issued a joint Request for Proposals for advanced scientific computing research. DOE expects to fund $67 million annually for three years to five years under its

  8. Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC-3) Partnership

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Project Annual Report (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC-3) Partnership Project Annual Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC-3) Partnership Project Annual Report The Applying Computationally Efficient Schemes for BioGeochemical Cycles ACES4BGC Project is advancing the predictive capabilities of Earth System Models (ESMs) by reducing two of the largest sources of

  9. DOE Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Subcommittee (ASCAC...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    existing computer designs to reach exascale. The technical challenges revolve around energy consumption, memory performance, resilience, extreme concurrency, and big data....

  10. Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Homepage | U.S.

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    DOE Office of Science (SC) ASCAC Home Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) ASCAC Home Meetings Members Charges/Reports ASCAC Charter 2015 - signed .pdf file (134KB) ASCR Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees ASCR Home Exascale Advisory Committee Report .pdf file (2.1MB) The Opportunities and Challenges of Exascale Computing The Exascale initiative will be significant and transformative for Department of Energy missions. The ASCAC Subcommitte report is

  11. Barbara Helland, Facilities Division Director Advanced Scientific Computing Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Barbara Helland, Facilities Division Director Advanced Scientific Computing Research June 10-12, 2015 HEP Requirements Review ASCR F acili+es D ivision * Providing t he F acility - H igh---End a nd L eadership C ompu5ng - Na5onal E nergy R esearch S cien5fic C ompu5ng C enter ( NERSC) at L awrence B erkeley Na+onal L aboratory * Delivers h igh---end c apacity c ompu+ng t o e n+re D OE S C r esearch c ommunity * Over 5 000 u sers a nd 4 00 p rojects - Leadership C ompu5ng C enters a t A rgonne N

  12. Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) Homepage | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) ASCR Home Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Community Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-7486 F: (301) 903-4846 E: Email Us More Information » Panel lays out top 10 list of

  13. DOE Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Report: Exascale Computing Initiative Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, Daniel; Berzins, Martin; Pennington, Robert; Sarkar, Vivek; Taylor, Valerie

    2015-08-01

    On November 19, 2014, the Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) was charged with reviewing the Department of Energy’s conceptual design for the Exascale Computing Initiative (ECI). In particular, this included assessing whether there are significant gaps in the ECI plan or areas that need to be given priority or extra management attention. Given the breadth and depth of previous reviews of the technical challenges inherent in exascale system design and deployment, the subcommittee focused its assessment on organizational and management issues, considering technical issues only as they informed organizational or management priorities and structures. This report presents the observations and recommendations of the subcommittee.

  14. NERSC Role in Advanced Scientific Computing Research Katherine...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    using CHIMERA. NISE: NERSC Initiative for Scientific Exploration * NERSC Users: Open process for 10% NERSC time * Modeled after original INCITE program from NERSC: -...

  15. National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, Horst; Kramer, William; Saphir, William; Shalf, John; Bailey, David; Oliker, Leonid; Banda, Michael; McCurdy, C. William; Hules, John; Canning, Andrew; Day, Marc; Colella, Philip; Serafini, David; Wehner, Michael; Nugent, Peter

    2004-04-02

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) proposes to create a National Facility for Advanced Computational Science (NFACS) and to establish a new partnership between the American computer industry and a national consortium of laboratories, universities, and computing facilities. NFACS will provide leadership-class scientific computing capability to scientists and engineers nationwide, independent of their institutional affiliation or source of funding. This partnership will bring into existence a new class of computational capability in the United States that is optimal for science and will create a sustainable path towards petaflops performance.

  16. Barbara Helland Advanced Scientific Computing Research NERSC-HEP Requirements Review

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7-28, 2012 Barbara Helland Advanced Scientific Computing Research NERSC-HEP Requirements Review 1 Science C ase S tudies d rive d iscussions Program R equirements R eviews  Program offices evaluated every two-three years  Participants include program managers, PI/ Scientists, ESnet/NERSC staff and management  User-driven discussion of science opportunities and needs  What: Instruments and facilities, data scale, computational requirements  How: science process, data analysis,

  17. Edison Electrifies Scientific Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edison Electrifies Scientific Computing Edison Electrifies Scientific Computing NERSC Flips Switch on New Flagship Supercomputer January 31, 2014 Contact: Margie Wylie, mwylie@lbl.gov, +1 510 486 7421 The National Energy Research Scientific Computing (NERSC) Center recently accepted "Edison," a new flagship supercomputer designed for scientific productivity. Named in honor of American inventor Thomas Alva Edison, the Cray XC30 will be dedicated in a ceremony held at the Department of

  18. Energy Department Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Energy Department Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific Computing Research News News ... Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW ...

  19. National Energ y Research Scientific Computing Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Annual Report This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC 03-76SF00098. LBNL-49186, December 2001 National Energ y Research Scientific Computing Center 2001 Annual Report NERSC aspires to be a world leader in accelerating scientific discovery through computation. Our vision is to provide high- performance computing tools to tackle science's biggest and most challenging

  20. Advanced Artificial Science. The development of an artificial science and engineering research infrastructure to facilitate innovative computational modeling, analysis, and application to interdisciplinary areas of scientific investigation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saffer, Shelley I.

    2014-12-01

    This is a final report of the DOE award DE-SC0001132, Advanced Artificial Science. The development of an artificial science and engineering research infrastructure to facilitate innovative computational modeling, analysis, and application to interdisciplinary areas of scientific investigation. This document describes the achievements of the goals, and resulting research made possible by this award.

  1. Edison Electrifies Scientific Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (NERSC) Center recently accepted "Edison," a new flagship supercomputer designed for scientific productivity. Named in honor of American inventor Thomas Alva Edison, the Cray...

  2. Advanced Computing Tech Team | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Computing Tech Team Advanced Computing Tech Team Advanced Computing Tech Team The Advanced Computing Tech Team is working with the DOE Energy Technology Offices, the Office of Science, and the National Nuclear Security Administration to deliver technologies that will be used to create new scientific insights into complex physical systems. Advanced computing technologies have been used for decades to provide better understanding of the performance and reliability of the nuclear stockpile

  3. DOE Announces First Awards in Scientific Discovery through Advanced

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computing Program | Jefferson Lab DOE Announces First Awards in Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program August 14, 2001 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Department of Energy (DOE) today announced its first awards under the new Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program. Fifty-one projects will receive a total of $57 million this fiscal year to advance fundamental research in several areas related to the department's missions, including: climate modeling, fusion

  4. About the Advanced Computing Tech Team | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Advanced Computing Tech Team About the Advanced Computing Tech Team The Advanced Computing Tech Team is made up of representatives from DOE and its national laboratories who are involved with developing and using advanced computing tools. The following is a list of some of those programs and what how they are currently using advanced computing in pursuit of their respective missions. Advanced Science Computing Research (ASCR) The mission of the Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)

  5. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Annual Report Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720-8148 This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Cover Image Credits: front cover, main image: Ken Chen, University of California, Santa Cruz (story, p. 34) front cover, left to right: Burlen Loring, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (story, p. 42);

  6. Advanced Simulation and Computing

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NA-ASC-117R-09-Vol.1-Rev.0 Advanced Simulation and Computing PROGRAM PLAN FY09 October 2008 ASC Focal Point Robert Meisner, Director DOE/NNSA NA-121.2 202-586-0908 Program Plan Focal Point for NA-121.2 Njema Frazier DOE/NNSA NA-121.2 202-586-5789 A Publication of the Office of Advanced Simulation & Computing, NNSA Defense Programs i Contents Executive Summary ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1 I. Introduction

  7. PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009 PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009 PIA - Advanced Test Reactor ...

  8. NERSC National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center 2007 Annual Report National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center 2007 Annual Report Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720-8148 This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Ad- vanced Scientific Computing Research of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. LBNL-1143E, October 2008 iii National Energy Research Scientific Computing

  9. What Are the Computational Keys to Future Scientific Discoveries?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    What are the Computational Keys to Future Scientific Discoveries? What Are the Computational Keys to Future Scientific Discoveries? NERSC Develops a Data Intensive Pilot Program to Help Scientists Find Out August 23, 2012 Linda Vu,lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 ALS.jpg Advanced Light Source at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. (Photo by: Roy Kaltschmidt, Berkeley Lab) A new camera at the hard x-ray tomography beamline of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's (Berkeley Lab's) Advanced

  10. Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for Advanced

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific Computing Research: Target 2017 Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for Advanced Scientific Computing Research: Target 2017 ASCRLogo.png This is an invitation-only review organized by the Department of Energy's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and NERSC. The general goal is to determine production high-performance computing, storage, and services that will be needed for ASCR to achieve its science goals through 2017. A specific focus

  11. Advanced Scientific Computing Research Jobs

    Office of Science (SC) Website

  12. DOE Advanced Scientific Advisory Committee (ASCAC): Workforce Subcommittee

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Letter (Program Document) | SciTech Connect Advisory Committee (ASCAC): Workforce Subcommittee Letter Citation Details In-Document Search Title: DOE Advanced Scientific Advisory Committee (ASCAC): Workforce Subcommittee Letter Simulation and computing are essential to much of the research conducted at the DOE national laboratories. Experts in the ASCR ¬relevant Computing Sciences, which encompass a range of disciplines including Computer Science, Applied Mathematics, Statistics and domain

  13. Can Cloud Computing Address the Scientific Computing Requirements for DOE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Researchers? Well, Yes, No and Maybe Can Cloud Computing Address the Scientific Computing Requirements for DOE Researchers? Well, Yes, No and Maybe Can Cloud Computing Address the Scientific Computing Requirements for DOE Researchers? Well, Yes, No and Maybe January 30, 2012 Jon Bashor, Jbashor@lbl.gov, +1 510-486-5849 Magellan1.jpg Magellan at NERSC After a two-year study of the feasibility of cloud computing systems for meeting the ever-increasing computational needs of scientists,

  14. Recap: Advancing Scientific Innovation at the National Labs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Learn how the National Labs are advancing scientific innovation through user facilities and industry partnerships.

  15. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Advanced Test Reactor National ...

  16. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Advanced Test Reactor National...

  17. Advances and Challenges in Computational Plasma Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.M. Tang; V.S. Chan

    2005-01-03

    Scientific simulation, which provides a natural bridge between theory and experiment, is an essential tool for understanding complex plasma behavior. Recent advances in simulations of magnetically-confined plasmas are reviewed in this paper with illustrative examples chosen from associated research areas such as microturbulence, magnetohydrodynamics, and other topics. Progress has been stimulated in particular by the exponential growth of computer speed along with significant improvements in computer technology.

  18. advanced simulation and computing

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Each successive generation of computing system has provided greater computing power and energy efficiency.

    CTS-1 clusters will support NNSA's Life Extension Program and...

  19. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    advanced nuclear materials research (Conference) | SciTech Connect Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and

  20. Sandia Energy - Helping Advance the Scientific Foundation that...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Helping Advance the Scientific Foundation that Enables Major Efficiency Improvements Home Energy Research EFRCs Solid-State Lighting Science EFRC Overview Helping Advance the...

  1. PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2009 | Department of Energy Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009 PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009 PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009 PDF icon PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009 More Documents & Publications Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration, PIA, Idaho National Laboratory PIA - INL SECURITY INFORMATION

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation and Computing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ASC Advanced Simulation and Computing Computational Systems & Software Environment Crack Modeling The Computational Systems & Software Environment program builds integrated,...

  3. Computers as Scientific Peers | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computers as Intellectual Peers in Scientific Research Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) Computers as Intellectual Peers in Scientific Research Emily LeBlanc 2015.09.03 One of the most exciting futurist notions is a machine that can think like a human. Although we are not presently able to have true

  4. Final Technical Report - Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Component Software (TASCS) (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Final Technical Report - Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Final Technical Report - Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) This is a final technical report for the University of Maryland work in the SciDAC Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS). The Maryland work

  5. Advanced Materials Development through Computational Design ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development through Computational Design Advanced Materials Development through Computational Design Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research ...

  6. Energy Department Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    climate modeling, computational biology, fusion science, groundwater modeling, high ... large systems that were previously inaccessible such as heat diffusion in fusion reactors. ...

  7. ASCR Cybersecurity for Scientific Computing Integrity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piesert, Sean

    2015-02-27

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has the responsibility to address the energy, environmental, and nuclear security challenges that face our nation. Much of DOE’s enterprise involves distributed, collaborative teams; a signi¬cant fraction involves “open science,” which depends on multi-institutional, often international collaborations that must access or share signi¬cant amounts of information between institutions and over networks around the world. The mission of the Office of Science is the delivery of scienti¬c discoveries and major scienti¬c tools to transform our understanding of nature and to advance the energy, economic, and national security of the United States. The ability of DOE to execute its responsibilities depends critically on its ability to assure the integrity and availability of scienti¬c facilities and computer systems, and of the scienti¬c, engineering, and operational software and data that support its mission.

  8. Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research * Basic Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    effort * Everything is a struggle * Programmers are optimists (sort of) * Simple, language neutral APIs easily accommodate unexpected use cases Links and whatnot * Services...

  9. DOE Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC)...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    5 ; Luce, Richard 6 ; Arjun, Shankar 7 ; Trefethen, Anne 8 ; Wade, Alex 9 ; Williams, Dean 10 + Show Author Affiliations eScience Institute, University of Washington ...

  10. Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research * Basic Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Peeringupgrades: * EQX-SJ:installedMX480onOct15 th * EQX-ASH:installedMX480onNov30 th * EQX-CHI:PendingMX480ins...

  11. DOE Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Subcommittee (ASCAC...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Paul 7 ; Debenedictus, Erik 2 ; Hiller, Jon 21 ; Kim, K. H. 7 ; Langston, Harper 15 ; Murphy, Richard Micron ; Webster, Clayton 11 ; Wild, Stefan 20 ; Grider,...

  12. Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research * Basic Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in January Status today * Will start publishing SEPs in the DLV in next week * Holding KSK roll until April * Temporarily signing for one site * Will install backup signer box in...

  13. ADVANCED SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING ADVISORY COMMITTEEMonday, July...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    The meeting is open to the public. To access the call: Dial Toll-Free Number: 866-740-1260 ... Break 3:30 PM-4:00 PM Center for Applied Mathematics for Energy Research ApplicationS ...

  14. Scientific Computing at Los Alamos National Laboratory (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search Title: Scientific Computing at Los Alamos National Laboratory Authors: Sarrao, John L. 1 + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date:...

  15. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    NERSC also works with scientific communities to deploy and develop web-based portals to help scientists analyze large datasets. Science NERSC supports the largest research ...

  16. Fermilab | Science | Particle Physics | Scientific Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Today Fermilab serves as one of two US computing centers that processes and analyzes data from experiments at the Large Hadron Collider. The worldwide LHC computing project is one ...

  17. Advanced Simulation and Computing Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The SSP mission is to analyze and predict the performance, safety, and reliability of nuclear weapons and certify their functionality. ASC works in partnership with computer ...

  18. The implications of spatial locality on scientific computing benchmark

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    selection and analysis. (Conference) | SciTech Connect spatial locality on scientific computing benchmark selection and analysis. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The implications of spatial locality on scientific computing benchmark selection and analysis. No abstract prepared. Authors: Kogge, Peter [1] ; Murphy, Richard C. [1] ; Rodrigues, Arun F. [1] ; Underwood, Keith Douglas + Show Author Affiliations (University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN) Publication Date: 2005-08-01 OSTI

  19. NERSC, Cray Move Forward With Next-Generation Scientific Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC, Cray Move Forward With Next-Generation Scientific Computing NERSC, Cray Move Forward With Next-Generation Scientific Computing New Cray XC40 will be first supercomputer in Berkeley Lab's new Computational Research and Theory facility April 22, 2015 Contact: Jon Bashor, jbashor@lbl.gov, 510-486-5849 NewCRT.jpg The Cori Phase 1 system will be the first supercomputer installed in the new Computational Research and Theory Facility now in the final stages of construction at Lawrence Berkeley

  20. Scientific computations section monthly report, November 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckner, M.R.

    1993-12-30

    This progress report from the Savannah River Technology Center contains abstracts from papers from the computational modeling, applied statistics, applied physics, experimental thermal hydraulics, and packaging and transportation groups. Specific topics covered include: engineering modeling and process simulation, criticality methods and analysis, plutonium disposition.

  1. Bringing Advanced Computational Techniques to Energy Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Julie C

    2012-11-17

    Please find attached our final technical report for the BACTER Institute award. BACTER was created as a graduate and postdoctoral training program for the advancement of computational biology applied to questions of relevance to bioenergy research.

  2. Helping Advance the Scientific Foundation that Enables Major Efficiency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Improvements Helping Advance the Scientific Foundation that Enables Major Efficiency Improvements - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization

  3. Name Center for Applied Scientific Computing month day, 1998

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bosl, Art Mirin, Phil Duffy Lawrence Livermore National Lab Climate and Carbon Cycle Modeling Group Center for Applied Scientific Computing April 24, 2003 High Resolution Climate Simulation and Regional Water Supplies WJB 2 CASC/CCCM High-Performance Computing for Climate Modeling as a Planning Tool GLOBAL WARMING IS HERE!! ... so now what? How will climate change really affect societies? Effects of global climate change are local Some effects of climate change can be mitigated Requires accurate

  4. Predictive Dynamic Security Assessment through Advanced Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenyu; Diao, Ruisheng; Jin, Shuangshuang; Chen, Yousu

    2014-11-30

    Abstract— Traditional dynamic security assessment is limited by several factors and thus falls short in providing real-time information to be predictive for power system operation. These factors include the steady-state assumption of current operating points, static transfer limits, and low computational speed. This addresses these factors and frames predictive dynamic security assessment. The primary objective of predictive dynamic security assessment is to enhance the functionality and computational process of dynamic security assessment through the use of high-speed phasor measurements and the application of advanced computing technologies for faster-than-real-time simulation. This paper presents algorithms, computing platforms, and simulation frameworks that constitute the predictive dynamic security assessment capability. Examples of phasor application and fast computation for dynamic security assessment are included to demonstrate the feasibility and speed enhancement for real-time applications.

  5. ASCR Cybersecurity for Scientific Computing Integrity - Research Pathways and Ideas Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peisert, Sean; Potok, Thomas E.; Jones, Todd

    2015-06-03

    At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science (SC) Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program office, a workshop was held June 2-3, 2015, in Gaithersburg, MD, to identify potential long term (10 to +20 year) cybersecurity fundamental basic research and development challenges, strategies and roadmap facing future high performance computing (HPC), networks, data centers, and extreme-scale scientific user facilities. This workshop was a follow-on to the workshop held January 7-9, 2015, in Rockville, MD, that examined higher level ideas about scientific computing integrity specific to the mission of the DOE Office of Science. Issues included research computation and simulation that takes place on ASCR computing facilities and networks, as well as network-connected scientific instruments, such as those run by various DOE Office of Science programs. Workshop participants included researchers and operational staff from DOE national laboratories, as well as academic researchers and industry experts. Participants were selected based on the submission of abstracts relating to the topics discussed in the previous workshop report [1] and also from other ASCR reports, including "Abstract Machine Models and Proxy Architectures for Exascale Computing" [27], the DOE "Preliminary Conceptual Design for an Exascale Computing Initiative" [28], and the January 2015 machine learning workshop [29]. The workshop was also attended by several observers from DOE and other government agencies. The workshop was divided into three topic areas: (1) Trustworthy Supercomputing, (2) Extreme-Scale Data, Knowledge, and Analytics for Understanding and Improving Cybersecurity, and (3) Trust within High-end Networking and Data Centers. Participants were divided into three corresponding teams based on the category of their abstracts. The workshop began with a series of talks from the program manager and workshop chair, followed by the leaders for each of the three topics and a representative of each of the four major DOE Office of Science Advanced Scientific Computing Research Facilities: the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF), the Energy Sciences Network (ESnet), the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), and the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF). The rest of the workshop consisted of topical breakout discussions and focused writing periods that produced much of this report.

  6. A Computing Environment to Support Repeatable Scientific Big Data Experimentation of World-Wide Scientific Literature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlicher, Bob G; Kulesz, James J; Abercrombie, Robert K; Kruse, Kara L

    2015-01-01

    A principal tenant of the scientific method is that experiments must be repeatable and relies on ceteris paribus (i.e., all other things being equal). As a scientific community, involved in data sciences, we must investigate ways to establish an environment where experiments can be repeated. We can no longer allude to where the data comes from, we must add rigor to the data collection and management process from which our analysis is conducted. This paper describes a computing environment to support repeatable scientific big data experimentation of world-wide scientific literature, and recommends a system that is housed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in order to provide value to investigators from government agencies, academic institutions, and industry entities. The described computing environment also adheres to the recently instituted digital data management plan mandated by multiple US government agencies, which involves all stages of the digital data life cycle including capture, analysis, sharing, and preservation. It particularly focuses on the sharing and preservation of digital research data. The details of this computing environment are explained within the context of cloud services by the three layer classification of Software as a Service , Platform as a Service , and Infrastructure as a Service .

  7. PNNL pushing scientific discovery through data intensive computing breakthroughs

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Deborah Gracio; David Koppenaal; Ruby Leung

    2012-12-31

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratorys approach to data intensive computing (DIC) is focused on three key research areas: hybrid hardware architectures, software architectures, and analytic algorithms. Advancements in these areas will help to address, and solve, DIC issues associated with capturing, managing, analyzing and understanding, in near real time, data at volumes and rates that push the frontiers of current technologies.

  8. Sandia Energy - Computational Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computational Science Home Energy Research Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) Computational Science Computational Sciencecwdd2015-03-26T13:35:2...

  9. Scientific Grand Challenges: Forefront Questions in Nuclear Science and the Role of High Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-10-01

    This report is an account of the deliberations and conclusions of the workshop on "Forefront Questions in Nuclear Science and the Role of High Performance Computing" held January 26-28, 2009, co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Physics (ONP) and the DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing (ASCR). Representatives from the national and international nuclear physics communities, as well as from the high performance computing community, participated. The purpose of this workshop was to 1) identify forefront scientific challenges in nuclear physics and then determine which-if any-of these could be aided by high performance computing at the extreme scale; 2) establish how and why new high performance computing capabilities could address issues at the frontiers of nuclear science; 3) provide nuclear physicists the opportunity to influence the development of high performance computing; and 4) provide the nuclear physics community with plans for development of future high performance computing capability by DOE ASCR.

  10. BUSINESS PLAN ADVANCED SIMULATION AND COMPUTING

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    i BUSINESS PLAN ADVANCED SIMULATION AND COMPUTING 2015 NA-ASC-104R-15-Vol.1-Rev.0 ii Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

  11. Computational Design of Advanced Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savrasov, Sergey; Kotliar, Gabriel; Haule, Kristjan

    2014-06-03

    The objective of the project was to develop a method for theoretical understanding of nuclear fuel materials whose physical and thermophysical properties can be predicted from first principles using a novel dynamical mean field method for electronic structure calculations. We concentrated our study on uranium, plutonium, their oxides, nitrides, carbides, as well as some rare earth materials whose 4f eletrons provide a simplified framework for understanding complex behavior of the f electrons. We addressed the issues connected to the electronic structure, lattice instabilities, phonon and magnon dynamics as well as thermal conductivity. This allowed us to evaluate characteristics of advanced nuclear fuel systems using computer based simulations and avoid costly experiments.

  12. Advanced Test Reactor - A National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifford J. Stanley

    2008-05-01

    The ATR is a pressurized, light-water moderated and cooled, beryllium-reflected nuclear research reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The unique serpentine configuration of the fuel elements creates five main reactor power lobes (regions) and nine flux traps. In addition to these nine flux traps there are 68 additional irradiation positions in the reactor core reflector tank. There are also 34 low-flux irradiation positions in the irradiation tanks outside the core reflector tank. The ATR is designed to provide a test environment for the evaluation of the effects of intense radiation (neutron and gamma). Due to the unique serpentine core design each of the five lobes can be operated at different powers and controlled independently. Options exist for the individual test trains and assemblies to be either cooled by the ATR coolant (i.e., exposed to ATR coolant flow rates, pressures, temperatures, and neutron flux) or to be installed in their own independent test loops where such parameters as temperature, pressure, flow rate, neutron flux, and energy can be controlled per experimenter specifications. The full-power maximum thermal neutron flux is ~1.0 x1015 n/cm2-sec with a maximum fast flux of ~5.0 x1014 n/cm2-sec. The Advanced Test Reactor, now a National Scientific User Facility, is a versatile tool in which a variety of nuclear reactor, nuclear physics, reactor fuel, and structural material irradiation experiments can be conducted. The cumulative effects of years of irradiation in a normal power reactor can be duplicated in a few weeks or months in the ATR due to its unique design, power density, and operating flexibility.

  13. SciDAC Advances and Applications in Computational Beam Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryne, R.; Abell, D.; Adelmann, A.; Amundson, J.; Bohn, C.; Cary, J.; Colella, P.; Dechow, D.; Decyk, V.; Dragt, A.; Gerber, R.; Habib, S.; Higdon, D.; Katsouleas, T.; Ma, K.-L.; McCorquodale, P.; Mihalcea, D.; Mitchell, C.; Mori, W.; Mottershead, C.T.; Neri, F.; Pogorelov, I.; Qiang, J.; Samulyak, R.; Serafini, D.; Shalf, J.; Siegerist, C.; Spentzouris, P.; Stoltz, P.; Terzic, B.; Venturini, M.; Walstrom, P.

    2005-06-26

    SciDAC has had a major impact on computational beam dynamics and the design of particle accelerators. Particle accelerators--which account for half of the facilities in the DOE Office of Science Facilities for the Future of Science 20 Year Outlook--are crucial for US scientific, industrial, and economic competitiveness. Thanks to SciDAC, accelerator design calculations that were once thought impossible are now carried routinely, and new challenging and important calculations are within reach. SciDAC accelerator modeling codes are being used to get the most science out of existing facilities, to produce optimal designs for future facilities, and to explore advanced accelerator concepts that may hold the key to qualitatively new ways of accelerating charged particle beams. In this poster we present highlights from the SciDAC Accelerator Science and Technology (AST) project Beam Dynamics focus area in regard to algorithm development, software development, and applications.

  14. DOE Issues Funding Opportunity for Advanced Computational and Modeling Research for the Electric Power System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to leverage scientific advancements in mathematics and computation for application to power system models and software tools, with the long-term goal of enabling real-time protection and control based on wide-area sensor measurements.

  15. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond Advanced Scientific Computing Research

  16. New partnership uses advanced computer science modeling to address...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    partnership uses advanced computer science modeling to address climate change | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing...

  17. Ames Lab 101: Improving Materials with Advanced Computing

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Johnson, Duane

    2014-06-04

    Ames Laboratory's Chief Research Officer Duane Johnson talks about using advanced computing to develop new materials and predict what types of properties those materials will have.

  18. High Performance Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HPC INL Logo Home High-Performance Computing INL's high-performance computing center provides general use scientific computing capabilities to support the lab's efforts in advanced...

  19. Data-aware distributed scientific computing for big-data problems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Data-aware distributed scientific computing for big-data problems in bio-surveillance Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Data-aware distributed scientific...

  20. Data-aware distributed scientific computing for big-data problems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Data-aware distributed scientific computing for big-data problems in bio-surveillance Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Data-aware distributed scientific ...

  1. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility 2010 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mary Catherine Thelen; Todd R. Allen

    2011-05-01

    This is the 2010 ATR National Scientific User Facility Annual Report. This report provides an overview of the program for 2010, along with individual project reports from each of the university principal investigators. The report also describes the capabilities offered to university researchers here at INL and at the ATR NSUF partner facilities.

  2. Final Scientific Report - Wireless and Sensing Solutions Advancing Industrial Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budampati, Rama; McBrady, Adam; Nusseibeh, Fouad

    2009-09-28

    The project team's goal for the Wireless and Sensing Solution Advancing Industrial Efficiency award (DE-FC36-04GO14002) was to develop, demonstrate, and test a number of leading edge technologies that could enable the emergence of wireless sensor and sampling systems for the industrial market space. This effort combined initiatives in advanced sensor development, configurable sampling and deployment platforms, and robust wireless communications to address critical obstacles in enabling enhanced industrial efficiency.

  3. Workshop on Scientific Directions at the Advanced Light Source: Summary and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reports of the Working Groups (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Workshop on Scientific Directions at the Advanced Light Source: Summary and Reports of the Working Groups Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Workshop on Scientific Directions at the Advanced Light Source: Summary and Reports of the Working Groups No abstract prepared. Authors: Plummer, Ward E. ; Awschalom, David ; Russell, T. ; Cohen, M. ; Somorjai, G. ; Brown, Jr., Gordon E. ; Fleming, Graham ;

  4. #WomenInSTEM: A Physicist Focuses on Scientific Advancement | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy A Physicist Focuses on Scientific Advancement #WomenInSTEM: A Physicist Focuses on Scientific Advancement July 17, 2014 - 4:59pm Addthis How Angela Capece got her start as a physicist at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. | Video by Matty Greene. Ben Dotson Ben Dotson Former Project Coordinator for Digital Reform, Office of Public Affairs Matty Greene Matty Greene Former Videographer More STEM Watch how scientists at the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab are creating a star on Earth.

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation Computing:...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    These collaborations help solve the challenges of developing computing platforms and simulation tools across a number of disciplines. Computer Science Research Institute The...

  6. Computational Advances in Applied Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Computational Advances in Applied Energy Computational Advances in Applied Energy PDF icon Friedmann-LLNL-SEAB.10.11.pdf More Documents & Publications Director's Perspective by George Miller Fact Sheet: Collaboration of Oak Ridge, Argonne, and Livermore (CORAL) QER - Comment of Canadian Hydropower Association

  7. Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research * Basic Energy Sciences * Biological

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy S ciences N etwork Enabling Virtual Science June 9, 2009 Steve C o/er steve@es.net Dept. H ead, E nergy S ciences N etwork Lawrence B erkeley N aDonal L ab The E nergy S ciences N etwork The D epartment o f E nergy's O ffice o f S cience i s o ne o f t he l argest s upporters o f basic r esearch i n t he p hysical s ciences i n t he U .S. * Directly s upports t he r esearch o f s ome 1 5,000 s cienDsts, p ostdocs a nd g raduate s tudents at D OE l aboratories, u niversiDes, o ther F

  8. Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research * Basic Energy Sciences * Biological

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ESCC,
Salt
Lake
City
 Steve
Co6er,
Dept
Head

 steve@es.net

 Lawrence
Berkeley
NaDonal
Lab
 Outline
 * Staff
Updates
 * Network
Update
 * Advanced
Networking
IniDaDve
 * ESnet
Projects
 * Infrastructure
Projects
 * Staff
Projects
 Staff
Update
 New
hires:
 * Hing
Chow:

Project
Manager
(ANI)
 * Chris
Tracy:

Network
/
SoVware
Engineer
(ANI)
 * Andy
Lake:

SoVware
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(ANI)
 *

  9. Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC-3) Partnership...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Hoffman, Forest M. 1 ; Bochev, Pavel B. 2 ; Cameron-Smith, Philip J.. 3 ; Easter, Richard C 4 ; Elliott, Scott M. 5 ; Ghan, Steven J. 4 ; Liu, Xiaohong 6 ; ...

  10. Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) | U...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Historical information on the previous portfolios can be found on the SciDAC web site. ... Email a Friend Email link to: send SciDAC Web Site SciDAC Logo Meetings and Workshops ...

  11. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bramley, Randall B.

    2012-08-02

    Indiana University�¢����s SWIM activities have primarily been in three areas. All are completed, but we are continuing to work on two of them because refinements are useful to both DoE laboratories and the high performance computing community.

  12. What Are the Computational Keys to Future Scientific Discoveries...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computing Center (NERSC) developed a Data Intensive Computing Pilot. "Many of the big data challenges that have long existed in the particle and high energy physics world...

  13. Collaboration to advance high-performance computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cyber security, data sharing and mobility, cloud computing, large-scale analytics, and materials science. This first Project Task Statement (PTS) under the Umbrella CRADA is...

  14. Energy Department Seeks Proposals to Use Scientific Computing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Through the use of these advanced systems, scientists have made important progress in several grand challenge research areas, including combustion, astrophysics, protein structure, ...

  15. Sandia Energy - High Performance Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Performance Computing Home Energy Research Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) High Performance Computing High Performance Computingcwdd2015-03-18T21:41:24+00:00...

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: Advances toward quantum computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    By Neal Singer Photography By Randy Montoya Thursday, March 03, 2016 Precise atom implants in silicon provide first step toward quantum computers Precise atom implants in silicon provide first step toward quantum computers Post-doc fellows Meenakshi Singh and Jose Pacheco stand in front of Sandia's ion beam generator. Project PI Meenakshi holds a sample qubit structure embedded in silicon. (Photo by Randy Montoya) Sandia researchers have supported post-doctoral fellow Meenakshi Singh (1132) in

  17. Supercomputing and Advanced Computing at the National Labs | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Supercomputing and Advanced Computing at the National Labs Supercomputing and Advanced Computing at the National Labs RSS September 30, 2013 Lab Breakthrough: Supercomputing Power to Accelerate Fossil Energy Research Learn how a new supercomputer at the National Energy Technology Laboratory will accelerate research into the next generation of fossil fuel systems. September 26, 2013 Infographic by <a href="/node/379579">Sarah Gerrity</a>, Energy Department.

  18. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    a web form known as the ERCAP (Energy Research Computing Allocations Process) Request Form. ERCAP is accessed through the NERSC Information Management (NIM) External link web ...

  19. advanced simulation and computing | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration simulation and computing | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs

  20. 2012 Scientific Collaborations at Extreme-Scale | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) 2 Scientific Collaborations at Extreme-Scale Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Applied Mathematics Computer Science Next Generation Networking 2012 Scientific Collaborations at Extreme-Scale Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) ASCR SBIR-STTR Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Community Resources Contact Information Advanced

  1. Multicore Challenges and Benefits for High Performance Scientific Computing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nielsen, Ida M.B.; Janssen, Curtis L.

    2008-01-01

    Until recently, performance gains in processors were achieved largely by improvements in clock speeds and instruction level parallelism. Thus, applications could obtain performance increases with relatively minor changes by upgrading to the latest generation of computing hardware. Currently, however, processor performance improvements are realized by using multicore technology and hardware support for multiple threads within each core, and taking full advantage of this technology to improve the performance of applications requires exposure of extreme levels of software parallelism. We will here discuss the architecture of parallel computers constructed from many multicore chips as well as techniques for managing the complexitymore » of programming such computers, including the hybrid message-passing/multi-threading programming model. We will illustrate these ideas with a hybrid distributed memory matrix multiply and a quantum chemistry algorithm for energy computation using Møller–Plesset perturbation theory.« less

  2. The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center: Forty...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computing in Science & Engineering 1521-96151531.00 2015 IEEE Copublished by the IEEE CS and the AIP MayJune 2015 Guest editors' introduction The National Energy Research...

  3. Data-aware distributed scientific computing for big-data problems in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    bio-surveillance (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Data-aware distributed scientific computing for big-data problems in bio-surveillance Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Data-aware distributed scientific computing for big-data problems in bio-surveillance Authors: Bhattacharya, Tanmoy [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2013-09-09 OSTI Identifier: 1092438 Report Number(s): LA-UR-13-27019 DOE Contract Number:

  4. Laboratory Directed Research & Development Page National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Directed Research & Development Page National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center T3E Individual Node Optimization Michael Stewart, SGI/Cray, 4/9/98 * Introduction * T3E Processor * T3E Local Memory * Cache Structure * Optimizing Codes for Cache Usage * Loop Unrolling * Other Useful Optimization Options * References 1 Laboratory Directed Research & Development Page National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center Introduction * Primary topic will be single processor

  5. Advanced Materials Development through Computational Design | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Development through Computational Design Advanced Materials Development through Computational Design Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT). PDF icon deer07_muralidharan.pdf More Documents & Publications Materials for HCCI Engines Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review

  6. Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research in the Department of Energy Office of Science under contract number DE-AC02-05CH11231. ! Application and System Memory Use, Configuration, and Problems on Bassi Richard Gerber Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory NERSC User Services ScicomP 13 Garching bei MĂĽnchen, Germany, July 17, 2007 ScicomP 13, July 17, 2007, Garching Overview * About Bassi * Memory on Bassi * Large Page Memory (It's Great!) * System Configuration * Large Page

  7. New partnership uses advanced computer science modeling to address climate

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    change | National Nuclear Security Administration partnership uses advanced computer science modeling to address climate change | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios

  8. Certainty in Stockpile Computing: Recommending a Verification and Validation Program for Scientific Software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.R.

    1998-11-01

    As computing assumes a more central role in managing the nuclear stockpile, the consequences of an erroneous computer simulation could be severe. Computational failures are common in other endeavors and have caused project failures, significant economic loss, and loss of life. This report examines the causes of software failure and proposes steps to mitigate them. A formal verification and validation program for scientific software is recommended and described.

  9. Energy Department Seeks Proposals to Use Scientific Computing Resources at Lawrence Berkeley, Oak Ridge National Laboratories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, DC -- Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman announced today that DOE's Office of Science is seeking proposals to support computational science projects to enable high-impact advances...

  10. New classes of magnetoelectric materials promise advances in computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technology | Argonne National Laboratory classes of magnetoelectric materials promise advances in computing technology By Jared Sagoff * February 7, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - Although scientists have been aware that magnetism and electricity are two sides of the same proverbial coin for almost 150 years, researchers are still trying to find new ways to use a material's electric behavior to influence its magnetic behavior, or vice versa. Thanks to new research by an international

  11. 'Slow light' advance could speed optical computing, telecommunications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "Slow light" and specialized metamaterials 'Slow light' advance could speed optical computing, telecommunications Researchers have made the first demonstration of rapidly switching on and off "slow light" in specially designed materials at room temperature. February 12, 2013 Schematic of active optical control of terahertz waves in electromagnetically induced transparency metamaterials. Schematic of active optical control of terahertz waves in electromagnetically induced

  12. High-Performance Computing for Advanced Smart Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenyu; Chen, Yousu

    2012-07-06

    The power grid is becoming far more complex as a result of the grid evolution meeting an information revolution. Due to the penetration of smart grid technologies, the grid is evolving as an unprecedented speed and the information infrastructure is fundamentally improved with a large number of smart meters and sensors that produce several orders of magnitude larger amounts of data. How to pull data in, perform analysis, and put information out in a real-time manner is a fundamental challenge in smart grid operation and planning. The future power grid requires high performance computing to be one of the foundational technologies in developing the algorithms and tools for the significantly increased complexity. New techniques and computational capabilities are required to meet the demands for higher reliability and better asset utilization, including advanced algorithms and computing hardware for large-scale modeling, simulation, and analysis. This chapter summarizes the computational challenges in smart grid and the need for high performance computing, and present examples of how high performance computing might be used for future smart grid operation and planning.

  13. Previous Computer Science Award Announcements | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Previous Computer Science Award Announcements Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Applied Mathematics Computer Science Exascale Tools Workshop...

  14. Computer Science Program | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Computer Science Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Applied Mathematics Computer Science Exascale Tools Workshop Programming Challenges Workshop Architectures I Workshop External link Architectures II Workshop External link Next Generation Networking Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) ASCR SBIR-STTR Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Community

  15. Previous Computer Science Award Announcements | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    (SC) Previous Computer Science Award Announcements Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Applied Mathematics Computer Science Exascale Tools Workshop Programming Challenges Workshop Architectures I Workshop External link Architectures II Workshop External link Next Generation Networking Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) ASCR SBIR-STTR Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing

  16. Operational Philosophy for the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Benson; J. Cole; J. Jackson; F. Marshall; D. Ogden; J. Rempe; M. C. Thelen

    2013-02-01

    In 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). At its core, the ATR NSUF Program combines access to a portion of the available ATR radiation capability, the associated required examination and analysis facilities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and INL staff expertise with novel ideas provided by external contributors (universities, laboratories, and industry). These collaborations define the cutting edge of nuclear technology research in high-temperature and radiation environments, contribute to improved industry performance of current and future light-water reactors (LWRs), and stimulate cooperative research between user groups conducting basic and applied research. To make possible the broadest access to key national capability, the ATR NSUF formed a partnership program that also makes available access to critical facilities outside of the INL. Finally, the ATR NSUF has established a sample library that allows access to pre-irradiated samples as needed by national research teams.

  17. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) National Labs, Profiles, and Contacts » National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) SBIR/STTR Home About Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) Applicant and Awardee Resources Quick Links DOE SBIR Online Learning Center External link DOE Phase 0 Small Business Assistance External link Preparing and Submitting a Phase I Letter of Intent Preparing a DOE SBIR/STTR Phase I

  18. Scientific Grand Challenges Workshop Series | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    (SC) Scientific Grand Challenges Workshop Series Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Community Resources ASCR Discovery Monthly News Roundup News Archives ASCR Program Documents ASCR Workshops and Conferences Workshops & Conferences Archive DOE Simulations Summit Scientific Grand Challenges Workshop Series SciDAC Conferences HPC

  19. XVis: Visualization for the Extreme-Scale Scientific-Computation Ecosystem: Year-end report FY15 Q4.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreland, Kenneth D.; Sewell, Christopher; Childs, Hank; Ma, Kwan-Liu; Geveci, Berk; Meredith, Jeremy

    2015-12-01

    The XVis project brings together the key elements of research to enable scientific discovery at extreme scale. Scientific computing will no longer be purely about how fast computations can be performed. Energy constraints, processor changes, and I/O limitations necessitate significant changes in both the software applications used in scientific computation and the ways in which scientists use them. Components for modeling, simulation, analysis, and visualization must work together in a computational ecosystem, rather than working independently as they have in the past. This project provides the necessary research and infrastructure for scientific discovery in this new computational ecosystem by addressing four interlocking challenges: emerging processor technology, in situ integration, usability, and proxy analysis.

  20. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kissel, L

    2009-04-01

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: (1) Robust Tools - Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements; (2) Prediction through Simulation - Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile; and (3) Balanced Operational Infrastructure - Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

  1. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan, Volume 2, Revision 0.5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meisner, R; Hopson, J; Peery, J; McCoy, M

    2008-10-07

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1. Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2. Prediction through Simulation--Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3. Balanced Operational Infrastructure--Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

  2. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY10-FY11 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0.5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meisner, R; Peery, J; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

    2009-09-08

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering (D&E) programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional (3D) simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: (1) Robust Tools - Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements; (2) Prediction through Simulation - Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile; and (3) Balanced Operational Infrastructure - Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

  3. Advanced Simulation and Computing Fiscal Year 2011-2012 Implementation Plan, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, M; Phillips, J; Hpson, J; Meisner, R

    2010-04-22

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering (D&E) programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional (3D) simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1 - Robust Tools. Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2 - Prediction through Simulation. Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3 - Balanced Operational Infrastructure. Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

  4. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY08-09 Implementation Plan, Volume 2, Revision 0.5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kusnezov, D; Bickel, T; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

    2007-09-13

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear-weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable Stockpile Life Extension Programs (SLEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining the support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1. Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2--Prediction through Simulation. Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear-weapons performances in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3. Balanced Operational Infrastructure--Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

  5. Advanced Simulation & Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meisner, R; Perry, J; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

    2008-04-30

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future nonnuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear-weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable Stockpile Life Extension Programs (SLEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining the support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1. Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2--Prediction through Simulation. Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear-weapons performances in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3--Balanced Operational Infrastructure. Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

  6. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY10-11 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carnes, B

    2009-06-08

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1 Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2 Prediction through Simulation--Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3 Balanced Operational Infrastructure--Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

  7. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report October 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Ogden

    2014-10-01

    Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report October 2014 Highlights • Rory Kennedy, Dan Ogden and Brenden Heidrich traveled to Germantown October 6-7, for a review of the Infrastructure Management mission with Shane Johnson, Mike Worley, Bradley Williams and Alison Hahn from NE-4 and Mary McCune from NE-3. Heidrich briefed the group on the project progress from July to October 2014 as well as the planned path forward for FY15. • Jim Cole gave two invited university seminars at Ohio State University and University of Florida, providing an overview of NSUF including available capabilities and the process for accessing facilities through the peer reviewed proposal process. • Jim Cole and Rory Kennedy co-chaired the NuMat meeting with Todd Allen. The meeting, sponsored by Elsevier publishing, was held in Clearwater, Florida, and is considered one of the premier nuclear fuels and materials conferences. Over 340 delegates attended with 160 oral and over 200 posters presented over 4 days. • Thirty-one pre-applications were submitted for NSUF access through the NE-4 Combined Innovative Nuclear Research Funding Opportunity Announcement. • Fourteen proposals were received for the NSUF Rapid Turnaround Experiment Summer 2014 call. Proposal evaluations are underway. • John Jackson and Rory Kennedy attended the Nuclear Fuels Industry Research meeting. Jackson presented an overview of ongoing NSUF industry research.

  8. DOE Announces $60 Million in Projects to Accelerate Scientific Discovery

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    through Advanced Computing | Department of Energy 0 Million in Projects to Accelerate Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing DOE Announces $60 Million in Projects to Accelerate Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing September 7, 2006 - 8:53am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science today announced approximately $60 million in new awards annually for 30 computational science projects over the next three to five years. The projects

  9. Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fletcher, James H.; Cox, Philip; Harrington, William J; Campbell, Joseph L

    2013-09-03

    ABSTRACT Project Title: Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing PROJECT OBJECTIVE The objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell system technology towards the commercial targets of power density, energy density and lifetime. These targets were laid out in the DOE’s R&D roadmap to develop an advanced direct methanol fuel cell power supply that meets commercial entry requirements. Such a power supply will enable mobile computers to operate non-stop, unplugged from the wall power outlet, by using the high energy density of methanol fuel contained in a replaceable fuel cartridge. Specifically this project focused on balance-of-plant component integration and miniaturization, as well as extensive component, subassembly and integrated system durability and validation testing. This design has resulted in a pre-production power supply design and a prototype that meet the rigorous demands of consumer electronic applications. PROJECT TASKS The proposed work plan was designed to meet the project objectives, which corresponded directly with the objectives outlined in the Funding Opportunity Announcement: To engineer the fuel cell balance-of-plant and packaging to meet the needs of consumer electronic systems, specifically at power levels required for mobile computing. UNF used existing balance-of-plant component technologies developed under its current US Army CERDEC project, as well as a previous DOE project completed by PolyFuel, to further refine them to both miniaturize and integrate their functionality to increase the system power density and energy density. Benefits of UNF’s novel passive water recycling MEA (membrane electrode assembly) and the simplified system architecture it enabled formed the foundation of the design approach. The package design was hardened to address orientation independence, shock, vibration, and environmental requirements. Fuel cartridge and fuel subsystems were improved to ensure effective fuel containment. PROJECT OVERVIEW The University of North Florida (UNF), with project partner the University of Florida, recently completed the Department of Energy (DOE) project entitled “Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing”. The primary objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell system technology towards the commercial targets as laid out in the DOE R&D roadmap by developing a 20-watt, direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), portable power supply based on the UNF innovative “passive water recovery” MEA. Extensive component, sub-system, and system development and testing was undertaken to meet the rigorous demands of the consumer electronic application. Numerous brassboard (nonpackaged) systems were developed to optimize the integration process and facilitating control algorithm development. The culmination of the development effort was a fully-integrated, DMFC, power supply (referred to as DP4). The project goals were 40 W/kg for specific power, 55 W/l for power density, and 575 Whr/l for energy density. It should be noted that the specific power and power density were for the power section only, and did not include the hybrid battery. The energy density is based on three, 200 ml, fuel cartridges, and also did not include the hybrid battery. The results show that the DP4 system configured without the methanol concentration sensor exceeded all performance goals, achieving 41.5 W/kg for specific power, 55.3 W/l for power density, and 623 Whr/l for energy density. During the project, the DOE revised its technical targets, and the definition of many of these targets, for the portable power application. With this revision, specific power, power density, specific energy (Whr/kg), and energy density are based on the total system, including fuel tank, fuel, and hybridization battery. Fuel capacity is not defined, but the same value is required for all calculations. Test data showed that the DP4 exceeded all 2011 Technical Status values; for example, the DP4 energy density was 373 Whr/l versus the DOE 2011 status of 200 Whr/l. For the DOE 2013 Technical Goals, the operation time was increased from 10 hours to 14.3 hours. Under these conditions, the DP4 closely approached or surpassed the technical targets; for example, the DP4 achieved 468 Whr/l versus the goal of 500 Whr/l. Thus, UNF has successfully met the project goals. A fully-operational, 20-watt DMFC power supply was developed based on the UNF passive water recovery MEA. The power supply meets the project performance goals and advances portable power technology towards the commercialization targets set by the DOE.

  10. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report November 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soelberg, Renae

    2014-11-01

    Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report November 2014 Highlights Rory Kennedy and Sarah Robertson attended the American Nuclear Society Winter Meeting and Nuclear Technology Expo in Anaheim, California, Nov. 10-13. ATR NSUF exhibited at the technology expo where hundreds of meeting participants had an opportunity to learn more about ATR NSUF. Dr. Kennedy briefed the Nuclear Engineering Department Heads Organization (NEDHO) on the workings of the ATR NSUF. • Rory Kennedy, James Cole and Dan Ogden participated in a reactor instrumentation discussion with Jean-Francois Villard and Christopher Destouches of CEA and several members of the INL staff. • ATR NSUF received approval from the NE-20 office to start planning the annual Users Meeting. The meeting will be held at INL, June 22-25. • Mike Worley, director of the Office of Innovative Nuclear Research (NE-42), visited INL Nov. 4-5. Milestones Completed • Recommendations for the Summer Rapid Turnaround Experiment awards were submitted to DOE-HQ Nov. 12 (Level 2 milestone due Nov. 30). Major Accomplishments/Activities • The University of California, Santa Barbara 2 experiment was unloaded from the GE-2000 at HFEF. The experiment specimen packs will be removed and shipped to ORNL for PIE. • The Terrani experiment, one of three FY 2014 new awards, was completed utilizing the Advanced Photon Source MRCAT beamline. The experiment investigated the chemical state of Ag and Pd in SiC shell of irradiated TRISO particles via X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. Upcoming Meetings/Events • The ATR NSUF program review meeting will be held Dec. 9-10 at L’Enfant Plaza. In addition to NSUF staff and users, NE-4, NE-5 and NE-7 representatives will attend the meeting. Awarded Research Projects Boise State University Rapid Turnaround Experiments (14-485 and 14-486) Nanoindentation and TEM work on the T91, HT9, HCM12A and 9Cr ODS specimens has been completed at CAES by Boise State PI Janelle Wharry and Cory Dolph. PI Corey Dolph returned in early November to complete their research by performing nanoindentation on unirradiated specimens that will be used as a baseline for their research.

  11. DOE High Performance Computing Operational Review (HPCOR): Enabling Data-Driven Scientific Discovery at HPC Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, Richard; Allcock, William; Beggio, Chris; Campbell, Stuart; Cherry, Andrew; Cholia, Shreyas; Dart, Eli; England, Clay; Fahey, Tim; Foertter, Fernanda; Goldstone, Robin; Hick, Jason; Karelitz, David; Kelly, Kaki; Monroe, Laura; Prabhat,; Skinner, David; White, Julia

    2014-10-17

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities are on the verge of a paradigm shift in the way they deliver systems and services to science and engineering teams. Research projects are producing a wide variety of data at unprecedented scale and level of complexity, with community-specific services that are part of the data collection and analysis workflow. On June 18-19, 2014 representatives from six DOE HPC centers met in Oakland, CA at the DOE High Performance Operational Review (HPCOR) to discuss how they can best provide facilities and services to enable large-scale data-driven scientific discovery at the DOE national laboratories. The report contains findings from that review.

  12. September is Scientific Supercomputing Month

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    September is Scientific Supercomputing Month September is Scientific Supercomputing Month DOE celebrates the science and technology that drive modern discovery September 3, 2013 hopper2cshp.jpg NERSC's flagship Cray XE6 system is called "Hopper" in honor of American computer scientist Grace Murray Hopper. Whether it's building a car battery that will take you 500 miles on a single charge or understanding the impact of Earth's changing climate on agriculture-advanced computing is a

  13. Computing Events

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Events Computing Events Spotlighting the most advanced scientific and technical applications in the world! Featuring exhibits of the latest and greatest technologies from industry, academia and government research organizations; many of these technologies will be seen for the first time in Denver. Supercomputing Conference 13 Denver, Colorado November 17-22, 2013 Spotlighting the most advanced scientific and technical applications in the world, SC13 will bring together the international

  14. From detonation to diapers: Los Alamos computer codes at core of advanced

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    manufacturing tools From detonation to diapers Los Alamos computer codes at core of advanced manufacturing tools The computer codes used for predictive fluid modeling are part of the Los Alamos Computational Fluid Dynamics Library. July 27, 2011 This simulation of a droplet of liquid falling into a pool of liquid was modeled using Los Alamos National Laboratory's Computational Fluid Dynamics Library This simulation of a droplet of liquid falling into a pool of liquid was modeled using Los

  15. New DOE-Sponsored Study Helps Advance Scientific Understanding of Potential CO2 Storage Impacts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In another step forward toward improved scientific understanding of potential geologic carbon dioxide storage impacts, a new U.S. Department of Energy sponsored study has confirmed earlier research showing that proper site selection and monitoring is essential for helping anticipate and mitigate possible risks.

  16. A Computationally Based Approach to Homogenizing Advanced Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jablonski, P D; Cowen, C J

    2011-02-27

    We have developed a computationally based approach to optimizing the homogenization heat treatment of complex alloys. The Scheil module within the Thermo-Calc software is used to predict the as-cast segregation present within alloys, and DICTRA (Diffusion Controlled TRAnsformations) is used to model the homogenization kinetics as a function of time, temperature and microstructural scale. We will discuss this approach as it is applied to both Ni based superalloys as well as the more complex (computationally) case of alloys that solidify with more than one matrix phase as a result of segregation. Such is the case typically observed in martensitic steels. With these alloys it is doubly important to homogenize them correctly, especially at the laboratory scale, since they are austenitic at high temperature and thus constituent elements will diffuse slowly. The computationally designed heat treatment and the subsequent verification real castings are presented.

  17. Advanced Simulation and Computing Co-Design Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ang, James A.; Hoang, Thuc T.; Kelly, Suzanne M.; McPherson, Allen; Neely, Rob

    2015-11-01

    This ASC Co-design Strategy lays out the full continuum and components of the co-design process, based on what we have experienced thus far and what we wish to do more in the future to meet the program’s mission of providing high performance computing (HPC) and simulation capabilities for NNSA to carry out its stockpile stewardship responsibility.

  18. History | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Leadership Computing The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) was established at Argonne National Laboratory in 2004 as part of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiative dedicated to enabling leading-edge computational capabilities to advance fundamental discovery and understanding in a broad range of scientific and engineering disciplines. Supported by the Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program within DOE's Office of Science, the ALCF is one half of the DOE Leadership

  19. Advanced Computational Methods for Security Constrained Financial Transmission Rights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalsi, Karanjit; Elbert, Stephen T.; Vlachopoulou, Maria; Zhou, Ning; Huang, Zhenyu

    2012-07-26

    Financial Transmission Rights (FTRs) are financial insurance tools to help power market participants reduce price risks associated with transmission congestion. FTRs are issued based on a process of solving a constrained optimization problem with the objective to maximize the FTR social welfare under power flow security constraints. Security constraints for different FTR categories (monthly, seasonal or annual) are usually coupled and the number of constraints increases exponentially with the number of categories. Commercial software for FTR calculation can only provide limited categories of FTRs due to the inherent computational challenges mentioned above. In this paper, first an innovative mathematical reformulation of the FTR problem is presented which dramatically improves the computational efficiency of optimization problem. After having re-formulated the problem, a novel non-linear dynamic system (NDS) approach is proposed to solve the optimization problem. The new formulation and performance of the NDS solver is benchmarked against widely used linear programming (LP) solvers like CPLEX™ and tested on both standard IEEE test systems and large-scale systems using data from the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). The performance of the NDS is demonstrated to be comparable and in some cases is shown to outperform the widely used CPLEX algorithms. The proposed formulation and NDS based solver is also easily parallelizable enabling further computational improvement.

  20. Computing and Computational Sciences Directorate - Computer Science and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mathematics Division Computer Science and Mathematics Division The Computer Science and Mathematics Division (CSMD) is ORNL's premier source of basic and applied research in high-performance computing, applied mathematics, and intelligent systems. Our mission includes basic research in computational sciences and application of advanced computing systems, computational, mathematical and analysis techniques to the solution of scientific problems of national importance. We seek to work

  1. Vision 20/20: Automation and advanced computing in clinical radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Kevin L. Moiseenko, Vitali; Kagadis, George C.; McNutt, Todd R.; Mutic, Sasa

    2014-01-15

    This Vision 20/20 paper considers what computational advances are likely to be implemented in clinical radiation oncology in the coming years and how the adoption of these changes might alter the practice of radiotherapy. Four main areas of likely advancement are explored: cloud computing, aggregate data analyses, parallel computation, and automation. As these developments promise both new opportunities and new risks to clinicians and patients alike, the potential benefits are weighed against the hazards associated with each advance, with special considerations regarding patient safety under new computational platforms and methodologies. While the concerns of patient safety are legitimate, the authors contend that progress toward next-generation clinical informatics systems will bring about extremely valuable developments in quality improvement initiatives, clinical efficiency, outcomes analyses, data sharing, and adaptive radiotherapy.

  2. Advances in x-ray computed microtomography at the NSLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowd, B.A.; Andrews, A.B.; Marr, R.B.; Siddons, D.P.; Jones, K.W.; Peskin, A.M.

    1998-08-01

    The X-Ray Computed Microtomography workstation at beamline X27A at the NSLS has been utilized by scientists from a broad range of disciplines from industrial materials processing to environmental science. The most recent applications are presented here as well as a description of the facility that has evolved to accommodate a wide variety of materials and sample sizes. One of the most exciting new developments reported here resulted from a pursuit of faster reconstruction techniques. A Fast Filtered Back Transform (FFBT) reconstruction program has been developed and implemented, that is based on a refinement of the gridding algorithm first developed for use with radio astronomical data. This program has reduced the reconstruction time to 8.5 sec for a 929 x 929 pixel{sup 2} slice on an R10,000 CPU, more than 8x reduction compared with the Filtered Back-Projection method.

  3. DOE's Office of Science Seeks Proposals for Expanded Large-Scale Scientific

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Computing | Department of Energy Seeks Proposals for Expanded Large-Scale Scientific Computing DOE's Office of Science Seeks Proposals for Expanded Large-Scale Scientific Computing May 16, 2005 - 12:47pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman announced today that DOE's Office of Science is seeking proposals to support innovative, large-scale computational science projects to enable high-impact advances through the use of advanced computers not commonly available in

  4. ADVANCED METHODS FOR THE COMPUTATION OF PARTICLE BEAM TRANSPORT AND THE COMPUTATION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS AND MULTIPARTICLE PHENOMENA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alex J. Dragt

    2012-08-31

    Since 1980, under the grant DEFG02-96ER40949, the Department of Energy has supported the educational and research work of the University of Maryland Dynamical Systems and Accelerator Theory (DSAT) Group. The primary focus of this educational/research group has been on the computation and analysis of charged-particle beam transport using Lie algebraic methods, and on advanced methods for the computation of electromagnetic fields and multiparticle phenomena. This Final Report summarizes the accomplishments of the DSAT Group from its inception in 1980 through its end in 2011.

  5. Advances in Computational Methods for X-Ray Optics III (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Conference: Advances in Computational Methods for X-Ray Optics III Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Advances in Computational Methods for X-Ray Optics III Authors: Sanchez del Rio M. ; Chubar O. Publication Date: 2014-08-24 OSTI Identifier: 1165955 Report Number(s): BNL--107140-2014-CP R&D Project: LS001 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC02-98CH10886 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: SPIE; San Diego, CA; 20140824 through 20140829 Research Org:

  6. The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Enabling Computational Technologies FY09 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diachin, L F; Garaizar, F X; Henson, V E; Pope, G

    2009-10-12

    In this document we report on the status of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Enabling Computational Technologies (ECT) effort. In particular, we provide the context for ECT In the broader NEAMS program and describe the three pillars of the ECT effort, namely, (1) tools and libraries, (2) software quality assurance, and (3) computational facility (computers, storage, etc) needs. We report on our FY09 deliverables to determine the needs of the integrated performance and safety codes (IPSCs) in these three areas and lay out the general plan for software quality assurance to meet the requirements of DOE and the DOE Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). We conclude with a brief description of our interactions with the Idaho National Laboratory computer center to determine what is needed to expand their role as a NEAMS user facility.

  7. High performance computing and communications: Advancing the frontiers of information technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    This report, which supplements the President`s Fiscal Year 1997 Budget, describes the interagency High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program. The HPCC Program will celebrate its fifth anniversary in October 1996 with an impressive array of accomplishments to its credit. Over its five-year history, the HPCC Program has focused on developing high performance computing and communications technologies that can be applied to computation-intensive applications. Major highlights for FY 1996: (1) High performance computing systems enable practical solutions to complex problems with accuracies not possible five years ago; (2) HPCC-funded research in very large scale networking techniques has been instrumental in the evolution of the Internet, which continues exponential growth in size, speed, and availability of information; (3) The combination of hardware capability measured in gigaflop/s, networking technology measured in gigabit/s, and new computational science techniques for modeling phenomena has demonstrated that very large scale accurate scientific calculations can be executed across heterogeneous parallel processing systems located thousands of miles apart; (4) Federal investments in HPCC software R and D support researchers who pioneered the development of parallel languages and compilers, high performance mathematical, engineering, and scientific libraries, and software tools--technologies that allow scientists to use powerful parallel systems to focus on Federal agency mission applications; and (5) HPCC support for virtual environments has enabled the development of immersive technologies, where researchers can explore and manipulate multi-dimensional scientific and engineering problems. Educational programs fostered by the HPCC Program have brought into classrooms new science and engineering curricula designed to teach computational science. This document contains a small sample of the significant HPCC Program accomplishments in FY 1996.

  8. Advanced Communication and Control for Distributed Energy Resource Integration: Phase 2 Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BPL Global

    2008-09-30

    The objective of this research project is to demonstrate sensing, communication, information and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of multivendor distributed energy resource (DER) units at aggregation levels that meet individual user requirements for facility operations (residential, commercial, industrial, manufacturing, etc.) and further serve as resource options for electric and natural gas utilities. The fully demonstrated DER aggregation system with embodiment of communication and control technologies will lead to real-time, interactive, customer-managed service networks to achieve greater customer value. Work on this Advanced Communication and Control Project (ACCP) consists of a two-phase approach for an integrated demonstration of communication and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of DER units to reach progressive levels of aggregated power output. Phase I involved design and proof-of-design, and Phase II involves real-world demonstration of the Phase I design architecture. The scope of work for Phase II of this ACCP involves demonstrating the Phase I design architecture in large scale real-world settings while integrating with the operations of one or more electricity supplier feeder lines. The communication and control architectures for integrated demonstration shall encompass combinations of software and hardware components, including: sensors, data acquisition and communication systems, remote monitoring systems, metering (interval revenue, real-time), local and wide area networks, Web-based systems, smart controls, energy management/information systems with control and automation of building energy loads, and demand-response management with integration of real-time market pricing. For Phase II, BPL Global shall demonstrate the Phase I design for integrating and controlling the operation of more than 10 DER units, dispersed at various locations in one or more Independent System Operator (ISO) Control Areas, at an aggregated scale of more than 1 MW, to provide grid support. Actual performance data with respect to each specified function above is to be collected during the Phase II field demonstration. At a minimum, the Phase II demonstration shall span one year of field operations. The demonstration performance will need to be validated by the target customer(s) for acceptance and subsequent implementation. An ISO must be involved in demonstration planning and execution. As part of the Phase II work, BPL Global shall develop a roadmap to commercialization that identifies and quantifies the potential markets for the integrated, aggregated DER systems and for the communication and control technologies demonstrated in Phase I. In addition, the roadmap must identify strategies and actions, as well as the regional and national markets where the aggregated DER systems with communication and control solutions will be introduced, along with a timeline projected for introduction into each identified market. In Phase I of this project, we developed a proof-of-concept ACCP system and architecture and began to test its functionality at real-world sites. These sites had just over 10 MW of DERs and allowed us to identify what needed to be done to commercialize this concept. As a result, we started Phase II by looking at our existing platform and identified its strengths and weaknesses as well as how it would need to evolve for commercialization. During this process, we worked with different stakeholders in the market including: Independent System Operators, DER owners and operators, and electric utility companies to fully understand the issues from all of the different perspectives. Once we had an understanding of the commercialized ACCP system, we began to document and prepare detailed designs of the different system components. The components of the system with the most significant design improvements were: the on-site remote terminal unit, the communication technology between the remote site and the data center, and the scalability and reliability of the data center application. As we began to implement the Phase II ACCP system, we upgraded the real-world demonstration sites from Phase I of the project as well as added additional sites to broaden the types of DER the platform was tested with. We worked with the owners and operators of these sites to understand how the system was meeting their needs and made modifications throughout the project as needed. This also included an effort to continue to understand the barriers to commercial adoption of the ACCP architecture and standardized communication protocols. The final aspect of this phase of the project was to prepare resources to aid in the commercial adoption of the ACCP architecture and standardized communication protocols. This entailed: presentations at conferences, published articles and papers, and web-based technical resources to provide tools to aid in the design and implementation of ACCP systems.

  9. Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    (SC) Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities User Facilities Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) Accessing ASCR Facilities Computational Science Graduate Fellowship (CSGF) Research & Evaluation Prototypes (REP) Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding

  10. Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    (SC) Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities User Facilities Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) Accessing ASCR Facilities Computational Science Graduate Fellowship (CSGF) Research & Evaluation Prototypes (REP) Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding

  11. SciCADE 95: International conference on scientific computation and differential equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    This report consists of abstracts from the conference. Topics include algorithms, computer codes, and numerical solutions for differential equations. Linear and nonlinear as well as boundary-value and initial-value problems are covered. Various applications of these problems are also included.

  12. High Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-07-28

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space, and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the US Department of Energy's SciDAC program has produced accelerator-modeling tools that have been employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. The authors discuss the Synergia framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable ofmore » handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. Our authors present Synergia's design principles and its performance on HPC platforms.« less

  13. High-Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-11-01

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing (HPC) are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the DOE SciDAC program has produced such accelerator-modeling tools, which have beem employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. In this article we discuss the Synergia beam-dynamics framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable of handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. We present the design principles, key physical and numerical models in Synergia and its performance on HPC platforms. Finally, we present the results of Synergia applications for the Fermilab proton source upgrade, known as the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP).

  14. High-Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-11-01

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing (HPC) are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the DOE SciDAC program has produced such accelerator-modeling tools, which have beem employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. In this article we discuss the Synergia beam-dynamics framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation packagemore »capable of handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. We present the design principles, key physical and numerical models in Synergia and its performance on HPC platforms. Finally, we present the results of Synergia applications for the Fermilab proton source upgrade, known as the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP).« less

  15. Eighth SIAM conference on parallel processing for scientific computing: Final program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    This SIAM conference is the premier forum for developments in parallel numerical algorithms, a field that has seen very lively and fruitful developments over the past decade, and whose health is still robust. Themes for this conference were: combinatorial optimization; data-parallel languages; large-scale parallel applications; message-passing; molecular modeling; parallel I/O; parallel libraries; parallel software tools; parallel compilers; particle simulations; problem-solving environments; and sparse matrix computations.

  16. Condition monitoring through advanced sensor and computational technology : final report (January 2002 to May 2005).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jung-Taek; Luk, Vincent K.

    2005-05-01

    The overall goal of this joint research project was to develop and demonstrate advanced sensors and computational technology for continuous monitoring of the condition of components, structures, and systems in advanced and next-generation nuclear power plants (NPPs). This project included investigating and adapting several advanced sensor technologies from Korean and US national laboratory research communities, some of which were developed and applied in non-nuclear industries. The project team investigated and developed sophisticated signal processing, noise reduction, and pattern recognition techniques and algorithms. The researchers installed sensors and conducted condition monitoring tests on two test loops, a check valve (an active component) and a piping elbow (a passive component), to demonstrate the feasibility of using advanced sensors and computational technology to achieve the project goal. Acoustic emission (AE) devices, optical fiber sensors, accelerometers, and ultrasonic transducers (UTs) were used to detect mechanical vibratory response of check valve and piping elbow in normal and degraded configurations. Chemical sensors were also installed to monitor the water chemistry in the piping elbow test loop. Analysis results of processed sensor data indicate that it is feasible to differentiate between the normal and degraded (with selected degradation mechanisms) configurations of these two components from the acquired sensor signals, but it is questionable that these methods can reliably identify the level and type of degradation. Additional research and development efforts are needed to refine the differentiation techniques and to reduce the level of uncertainties.

  17. ADVANCING THE FUNDAMENTAL UNDERSTANDING AND SCALE-UP OF TRISO FUEL COATERS VIA ADVANCED MEASUREMENT AND COMPUTATIONAL TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Pratim; Al-Dahhan, Muthanna

    2012-11-01

    Tri-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particle coating is critical for the future use of nuclear energy produced byadvanced gas reactors (AGRs). The fuel kernels are coated using chemical vapor deposition in a spouted fluidized bed. The challenges encountered in operating TRISO fuel coaters are due to the fact that in modern AGRs, such as High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGRs), the acceptable level of defective/failed coated particles is essentially zero. This specification requires processes that produce coated spherical particles with even coatings having extremely low defect fractions. Unfortunately, the scale-up and design of the current processes and coaters have been based on empirical approaches and are operated as?black boxesť. Hence, a voluminous amount of experimental development and trial and error work has been conducted. It has been clearly demonstrated that the quality of the coating applied to the fuel kernels is impacted by the hydrodynamics, solids flow field, and flow regime characteristics of the spouted bed coaters, which themselves are influenced by design parameters and operating variables. Further complicating the outlook for future fuel-coating technology and nuclear energy production is the fact that a variety of new concepts will involve fuel kernels of different sizes and with compositions of different densities. Therefore, without a fundamental understanding the underlying phenomena of the spouted bed TRISO coater, a significant amount of effort is required for production of each type of particle with a significant risk of not meeting the specifications. This difficulty will significantly and negatively impact the applications of AGRs for power generation and cause further challenges to them as an alternative source of commercial energy production. Accordingly, the proposed work seeks to overcome such hurdles and advance the scale-up, design, and performance of TRISO fuel particle spouted bed coaters. The overall objectives of the proposed work are to advance the fundamental understanding of the hydrodynamics by systematically investigating the effect of design and operating variables, to evaluate the reported dimensionless groups as scaling factors, and to establish a reliable scale-up methodology for the TRISO fuel particle spouted bed coaters based on hydrodynamic similarity via advanced measurement and computational techniques. An additional objective is to develop an on-line non-invasive measurement technique based on gamma ray densitometry (i.e. Nuclear Gauge Densitometry) that can be installed and used for coater process monitoring to ensure proper performance and operation and to facilitate the developed scale-up methodology. To achieve the objectives set for the project, the work will use optical probes and gamma ray computed tomography (CT) (for the measurements of solids/voidage holdup cross-sectional distribution and radial profiles along the bed height, spouted diameter, and fountain height) and radioactive particle tracking (RPT) (for the measurements of the 3D solids flow field, velocity, turbulent parameters, circulation time, solids lagrangian trajectories, and many other of spouted bed related hydrodynamic parameters). In addition, gas dynamic measurement techniques and pressure transducers will be utilized to complement the obtained information. The measurements obtained by these techniques will be used as benchmark data to evaluate and validate the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models (two fluid model or discrete particle model) and their closures. The validated CFD models and closures will be used to facilitate the developed methodology for scale-up, design and hydrodynamic similarity. Successful execution of this work and the proposed tasks will advance the fundamental understanding of the coater flow field and quantify it for proper and safe design, scale-up, and performance. Such achievements will overcome the barriers to AGR applications and will help assure that the US maintains nuclear energy as a feasible option to meet the nationĂ?Â?Ă?Â?Ă

  18. Development of high performance scientific components for interoperability of computing packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gulabani, Teena Pratap

    2008-12-01

    Three major high performance quantum chemistry computational packages, NWChem, GAMESS and MPQC have been developed by different research efforts following different design patterns. The goal is to achieve interoperability among these packages by overcoming the challenges caused by the different communication patterns and software design of each of these packages. A chemistry algorithm is hard to develop as well as being a time consuming process; integration of large quantum chemistry packages will allow resource sharing and thus avoid reinvention of the wheel. Creating connections between these incompatible packages is the major motivation of the proposed work. This interoperability is achieved by bringing the benefits of Component Based Software Engineering through a plug-and-play component framework called Common Component Architecture (CCA). In this thesis, I present a strategy and process used for interfacing two widely used and important computational chemistry methodologies: Quantum Mechanics and Molecular Mechanics. To show the feasibility of the proposed approach the Tuning and Analysis Utility (TAU) has been coupled with NWChem code and its CCA components. Results show that the overhead is negligible when compared to the ease and potential of organizing and coping with large-scale software applications.

  19. Computing and Computational Sciences Directorate - Joint Institute for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computational Sciences Joint Institute for Computational Sciences To help realize the full potential of new-generation computers for advancing scientific discovery, the University of Tennessee (UT) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have created the Joint Institute for Computational Sciences (JICS). JICS combines the experience and expertise in theoretical and computational science and engineering, computer science, and mathematics in these two institutions and focuses these skills on

  20. Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spentzouris, P.; /Fermilab; Cary, J.; /Tech-X, Boulder; McInnes, L.C.; /Argonne; Mori, W.; /UCLA; Ng, C.; /SLAC; Ng, E.; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-11-14

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors. ComPASS is in the first year of executing its plan to develop the next-generation HPC accelerator modeling tools. ComPASS aims to develop an integrated simulation environment that will utilize existing and new accelerator physics modules with petascale capabilities, by employing modern computing and solver technologies. The ComPASS vision is to deliver to accelerator scientists a virtual accelerator and virtual prototyping modeling environment, with the necessary multiphysics, multiscale capabilities. The plan for this development includes delivering accelerator modeling applications appropriate for each stage of the ComPASS software evolution. Such applications are already being used to address challenging problems in accelerator design and optimization. The ComPASS organization for software development and applications accounts for the natural domain areas (beam dynamics, electromagnetics, and advanced acceleration), and all areas depend on the enabling technologies activities, such as solvers and component technology, to deliver the desired performance and integrated simulation environment. The ComPASS applications focus on computationally challenging problems important for design or performance optimization to all major HEP, NP, and BES accelerator facilities. With the cost and complexity of particle accelerators rising, the use of computation to optimize their designs and find improved operating regimes becomes essential, potentially leading to significant cost savings with modest investment.

  1. Advanced Simulation and Computing Fiscal Year 2016 Implementation Plan, Version 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, M.; Archer, B.; Hendrickson, B.

    2015-08-27

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is an integrated technical program for maintaining the safety, surety, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of experimental facilities and programs, and the computational capabilities to support these programs. The purpose of this IP is to outline key work requirements to be performed and to control individual work activities within the scope of work. Contractors may not deviate from this plan without a revised WA or subsequent IP.

  2. Unsolicited Projects in 2012: Research in Computer Architecture, Modeling,

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    and Evolving MPI for Exascale | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) 2: Research in Computer Architecture, Modeling, and Evolving MPI for Exascale Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Applied Mathematics Computer Science Exascale Tools Workshop Programming Challenges Workshop Architectures I Workshop External link Architectures II Workshop External link Next Generation Networking Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) ASCR SBIR-STTR Facilities

  3. NERSC seeks Computational Systems Group Lead

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    seeks Computational Systems Group Lead NERSC seeks Computational Systems Group Lead January 6, 2011 by Katie Antypas Note: This position is now closed. The Computational Systems Group provides production support and advanced development for the supercomputer systems at NERSC. Manage the Computational Systems Group (CSG) which provides production support and advanced development for the supercomputer systems at NERSC (National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center). These systems, which

  4. Construction of Blaze at the University of Illinois at Chicago: A Shared, High-Performance, Visual Computer for Next-Generation Cyberinfrastructure-Accelerated Scientific, Engineering, Medical and Public Policy Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Maxine D.; Leigh, Jason

    2014-02-17

    The Blaze high-performance visual computing system serves the high-performance computing research and education needs of University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). Blaze consists of a state-of-the-art, networked, computer cluster and ultra-high-resolution visualization system called CAVE2(TM) that is currently not available anywhere in Illinois. This system is connected via a high-speed 100-Gigabit network to the State of Illinois' I-WIRE optical network, as well as to national and international high speed networks, such as the Internet2, and the Global Lambda Integrated Facility. This enables Blaze to serve as an on-ramp to national cyberinfrastructure, such as the National Science Foundation’s Blue Waters petascale computer at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the Department of Energy’s Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) at Argonne National Laboratory. DOE award # DE-SC005067, leveraged with NSF award #CNS-0959053 for “Development of the Next-Generation CAVE Virtual Environment (NG-CAVE),” enabled us to create a first-of-its-kind high-performance visual computing system. The UIC Electronic Visualization Laboratory (EVL) worked with two U.S. companies to advance their commercial products and maintain U.S. leadership in the global information technology economy. New applications are being enabled with the CAVE2/Blaze visual computing system that is advancing scientific research and education in the U.S. and globally, and help train the next-generation workforce.

  5. Computations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computations - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  6. Advanced computational tools for optimization and uncertainty quantification of carbon capture processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, David C.; Ng, Brenda; Eslick, John

    2014-01-01

    Advanced multi-scale modeling and simulation has the potential to dramatically reduce development time, resulting in considerable cost savings. The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) is a partnership among national laboratories, industry and universities that is developing, demonstrating, and deploying a suite of multi-scale modeling and simulation tools. One significant computational tool is FOQUS, a Framework for Optimization and Quantification of Uncertainty and Sensitivity, which enables basic data submodels, including thermodynamics and kinetics, to be used within detailed process models to rapidly synthesize and optimize a process and determine the level of uncertainty associated with the resulting process. The overall approach of CCSI is described with a more detailed discussion of FOQUS and its application to carbon capture systems.

  7. In-Service Design & Performance Prediction of Advanced Fusion Material Systems by Computational Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. R. Odette; G. E. Lucas

    2005-11-15

    This final report on "In-Service Design & Performance Prediction of Advanced Fusion Material Systems by Computational Modeling and Simulation" (DE-FG03-01ER54632) consists of a series of summaries of work that has been published, or presented at meetings, or both. It briefly describes results on the following topics: 1) A Transport and Fate Model for Helium and Helium Management; 2) Atomistic Studies of Point Defect Energetics, Dynamics and Interactions; 3) Multiscale Modeling of Fracture consisting of: 3a) A Micromechanical Model of the Master Curve (MC) Universal Fracture Toughness-Temperature Curve Relation, KJc(T - To), 3b) An Embrittlement DTo Prediction Model for the Irradiation Hardening Dominated Regime, 3c) Non-hardening Irradiation Assisted Thermal and Helium Embrittlement of 8Cr Tempered Martensitic Steels: Compilation and Analysis of Existing Data, 3d) A Model for the KJc(T) of a High Strength NFA MA957, 3e) Cracked Body Size and Geometry Effects of Measured and Effective Fracture Toughness-Model Based MC and To Evaluations of F82H and Eurofer 97, 3-f) Size and Geometry Effects on the Effective Toughness of Cracked Fusion Structures; 4) Modeling the Multiscale Mechanics of Flow Localization-Ductility Loss in Irradiation Damaged BCC Alloys; and 5) A Universal Relation Between Indentation Hardness and True Stress-Strain Constitutive Behavior. Further details can be found in the cited references or presentations that generally can be accessed on the internet, or provided upon request to the authors. Finally, it is noted that this effort was integrated with our base program in fusion materials, also funded by the DOE OFES.

  8. Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences: Target 2017 Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences: Target 2017 BES-Montage.png This is an invitation-only review organized by the Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC). The goal is to determine production high-performance computing, storage, and services that will be needed for BES to

  9. Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences: Target 2017 Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences: Target 2017 The NERSC Program Requirements Review "Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences" is organized by the Department of Energy's Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES), Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC). The review's goal is to

  10. Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics: Target 2017 Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics: Target 2017 HEPlogo.jpg The NERSC Program Requirements Review "Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics" is organized by the Department of Energy's Office of High Energy Physics (HEP), Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC). The review's goal is to characterize

  11. Computational Physics and Methods

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Computational Physics and Methods Performing innovative simulations of physics phenomena on tomorrow's scientific computing platforms Growth and emissivity of young galaxy hosting a supermassive black hole as calculated in cosmological code ENZO and post-processed with radiative transfer code AURORA. image showing detailed turbulence simulation, Rayleigh-Taylor Turbulence imaging: the largest turbulence simulations to date Advanced multi-scale modeling Turbulence datasets Density iso-surfaces

  12. Grand Challenges of Advanced Computing for Energy Innovation Report from the Workshop Held July 31-August 2, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larzelere, Alex R.; Ashby, Steven F.; Christensen, Dana C.; Crawford, Dona L.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; John, Grosh; Stults, B. Ray; Lee, Steven L.; Hammond, Steven W.; Grover, Benjamin T.; Neely, Rob; Dudney, Lee Ann; Goldstein, Noah C.; Wells, Jack; Peltz, Jim

    2013-03-06

    On July 31-August 2 of 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) held a workshop entitled Grand Challenges of Advanced Computing for Energy Innovation. This workshop built on three earlier workshops that clearly identified the potential for the Department and its national laboratories to enable energy innovation. The specific goal of the workshop was to identify the key challenges that the nation must overcome to apply the full benefit of taxpayer-funded advanced computing technologies to U.S. energy innovation in the ways that the country produces, moves, stores, and uses energy. Perhaps more importantly, the workshop also developed a set of recommendations to help the Department overcome those challenges. These recommendations provide an action plan for what the Department can do in the coming years to improve the nation’s energy future.

  13. Nick Wright Named Advanced Technologies Group Lead

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nick Wright Named Advanced Technologies Group Lead Nick Wright Named Advanced Technologies Group Lead February 4, 2013 Nick Nick Wright has been named head of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center's (NERSC) Advanced Technologies Group (ATG), which focuses on understanding the requirements of current and emerging applications to make choices in hardware design and programming models that best serve the science needs of NERSC users. ATG specializes in benchmarking, system

  14. Scientific Impact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific Impact Since its inception over twenty years ago, CAMS has achieved noteworthy scientific progress by developing new capabilities and by combining state-of-the-art tools and expertise to address important scientific challenges. Scientific Leadership CAMS scientists are recognized as scientific leaders in the field of AMS and the disciplines that it supports. Many CAMS staff participate on federal agency (NIH, NSF, NOAA and DOE) scientific review panels as well as giving a multitude

  15. computers

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Each successive generation of computing system has provided greater computing power and energy efficiency.

    CTS-1 clusters will support NNSA's Life Extension Program and...

  16. Development of Computational Approaches for Simulation and Advanced Controls for Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, Abhinaya; Lou, Xinsheng; Neuschaefer, Carl; Chaudry, Majid; Quinn, Joseph

    2012-07-31

    This document provides the results of the project through September 2009. The Phase I project has recently been extended from September 2009 to March 2011. The project extension will begin work on Chemical Looping (CL) Prototype modeling and advanced control design exploration in preparation for a scale-up phase. The results to date include: successful development of dual loop chemical looping process models and dynamic simulation software tools, development and test of several advanced control concepts and applications for Chemical Looping transport control and investigation of several sensor concepts and establishment of two feasible sensor candidates recommended for further prototype development and controls integration. There are three sections in this summary and conclusions. Section 1 presents the project scope and objectives. Section 2 highlights the detailed accomplishments by project task area. Section 3 provides conclusions to date and recommendations for future work.

  17. Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D Programs | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters

  18. Development of Computational Capabilities to Predict the Corrosion Wastage of Boiler Tubes in Advanced Combustion Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kung, Steven; Rapp, Robert

    2014-08-31

    A comprehensive corrosion research project consisting of pilot-scale combustion testing and long-term laboratory corrosion study has been successfully performed. A pilot-scale combustion facility available at Brigham Young University was selected and modified to enable burning of pulverized coals under the operating conditions typical for advanced coal-fired utility boilers. Eight United States (U.S.) coals were selected for this investigation, with the test conditions for all coals set to have the same heat input to the combustor. In addition, the air/fuel stoichiometric ratio was controlled so that staged combustion was established, with the stoichiometric ratio maintained at 0.85 in the burner zone and 1.15 in the burnout zone. The burner zone represented the lower furnace of utility boilers, while the burnout zone mimicked the upper furnace areas adjacent to the superheaters and reheaters. From this staged combustion, approximately 3% excess oxygen was attained in the combustion gas at the furnace outlet. During each of the pilot-scale combustion tests, extensive online measurements of the flue gas compositions were performed. In addition, deposit samples were collected at the same location for chemical analyses. Such extensive gas and deposit analyses enabled detailed characterization of the actual combustion environments existing at the lower furnace walls under reducing conditions and those adjacent to the superheaters and reheaters under oxidizing conditions in advanced U.S. coal-fired utility boilers. The gas and deposit compositions were then carefully simulated in a series of 1000-hour laboratory corrosion tests, in which the corrosion performances of different commercial candidate alloys and weld overlays were evaluated at various temperatures for advanced boiler systems. Results of this laboratory study led to significant improvement in understanding of the corrosion mechanisms operating on the furnace walls as well as superheaters and reheaters in coal-fired boilers resulting from the coexistence of sulfur and chlorine in the fuel. A new corrosion mechanism, i.e., “Active Sulfidation Corrosion Mechanism,” has been proposed to account for the accelerated corrosion wastage observed on the furnace walls of utility boilers burning coals containing sulfur and chlorine. In addition, a second corrosion mechanism, i.e., “Active Sulfide-to-Oxide Corrosion Mechanism,” has been identified to account for the rapid corrosion attack on superheaters and reheaters. Both of the newly discovered corrosion mechanisms involve the formation of iron chloride (FeCl2) vapor from iron sulfide (FeS) and HCl, followed by the decomposition of FeCl2 via self-sustaining cycling reactions. For higher alloys containing sufficient chromium, the attack on superheaters and reheaters is dominated by Hot Corrosion in the presence of a fused salt. Furthermore, two stages of the hot corrosion mechanism have been identified and characterized in detail. The initiation of hot corrosion attack induced by molten sulfate leads to Stage 1 “acidic” fluxing and re-precipitation of the protective scale formed initially on the deposit-covered alloy surfaces. Once the protective scale is penetrated, Stage 2 Hot Corrosion is initiated, which is dominated by “basic” fluxing and re-precipitation of the scale in the fused salt. Based on the extensive corrosion information generated from this project, corrosion modeling was performed using non-linear regression analysis. As a result of the modeling efforts, two predictive equations have been formulated, one for furnace walls and the other for superheaters and reheaters. These first-of-the-kind equations can be used to estimate the corrosion rates of boiler tubes based on coal chemistry, alloy compositions, and boiler operating conditions for advanced boiler systems.

  19. FY13 Computer Science FAQ | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    2013 Exascale Operating and Runtime Systems Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Closed Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) Closed Lab Announcements Award Search / Public Abstracts Additional Requirements and Guidance for Digital Data Management 2013 Exascale Operating and Runtime Systems RX-Solvers FAQ 2015 EXPRESS FAQ .pdf file (90KB) Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee

  20. Berkeley Lab Highlights HPC at Advanced Manufacturing Event

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Highlights HPC at Advanced Manufacturing Event Berkeley Lab Highlights HPC at Advanced Manufacturing Event September 14, 2015 Peter Nugent, Division Deputy for Scientific Engagement in Berkeley Lab's Computational Research Division, and David Skinner, who leads NERSC's Strategic Partnerships effort, are participating this week in the third annual 2015 American Energy & Manufacturing Competitiveness Summit, where they will be discussing the increasing role of high performance computing in

  1. computers

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    California.

     

    Retired computers used for cybersecurity research at Sandia National...

  2. Computer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I. INTRODUCTION This paper presents several computational tools required for processing images of a heavy ion beam and estimating the magnetic field within a plasma. The...

  3. Throwback Thursdays Celebrate Scientific Supercomputing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home » News & Publications » NERSC News » Center News » Throwback Thursdays Celebrate Scientific Supercomputing Throwback Thursdays Celebrate Scientific Supercomputing A Cray-1 supercomputer arrives at the Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center in A Cray-1 supercomputer arrives at the Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center in May 1978. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) was investing in scientific supercomputing long before the internet became the internet, and back when clouds only

  4. Computational physics and applied mathematics capability review June 8-10, 2010 (Advance materials to committee members)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Stephen R

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory will review its Computational Physics and Applied Mathematics (CPAM) capabilities in 2010. The goals of capability reviews are to assess the quality of science, technology, and engineering (STE) performed by the capability, evaluate the integration of this capability across the Laboratory and within the scientific community, examine the relevance of this capability to the Laboratory's programs, and provide advice on the current and future directions of this capability. This is the first such review for CPAM, which has a long and unique history at the laboratory, starting from the inception of the Laboratory in 1943. The CPAM capability covers an extremely broad technical area at Los Alamos, encompassing a wide array of disciplines, research topics, and organizations. A vast array of technical disciplines and activities are included in this capability, from general numerical modeling, to coupled mUlti-physics simulations, to detailed domain science activities in mathematics, methods, and algorithms. The CPAM capability involves over 12 different technical divisions and a majority of our programmatic and scientific activities. To make this large scope tractable, the CPAM capability is broken into the following six technical 'themes.' These themes represent technical slices through the CP AM capability and collect critical core competencies of the Laboratory, each of which contributes to the capability (and each of which is divided into multiple additional elements in the detailed descriptions of the themes in subsequent sections): (1) Computational Fluid Dynamics - This theme speaks to the vast array of scientific capabilities for the simulation of fluids under shocks, low-speed flow, and turbulent conditions - which are key, historical, and fundamental strengths of the laboratory; (2) Partial Differential Equations - The technical scope of this theme is the applied mathematics and numerical solution of partial differential equations (broadly defined) in a variety of settings, including particle transport, solvers, and plasma physics; (3) Monte Carlo - Monte Carlo was invented at Los Alamos, and this theme discusses these vitally important methods and their application in everything from particle transport, to condensed matter theory, to biology; (4) Molecular Dynamics - This theme describes the widespread use of molecular dynamics for a variety of important applications, including nuclear energy, materials science, and biological modeling; (5) Discrete Event Simulation - The technical scope of this theme represents a class of complex system evolutions governed by the action of discrete events. Examples include network, communication, vehicle traffic, and epidemiology modeling; and (6) Integrated Codes - This theme discusses integrated applications (comprised of all of the supporting science represented in Themes 1-5) that are of strategic importance to the Laboratory and the nation. The laboratory has in approximately 10 million source lines of code in over 100 different such strategically important applications. Of these themes, four of them will be reviewed during the 2010 review cycle: Themes 1, 2, 3, and 6. Because these capability reviews occur every three years, Themes 4 and 5 will be reviewed in 2013, along with Theme 6 (which will be reviewed during each review, owing to this theme's role as an integrator of the supporting science represented by the other 5 themes). Yearly written status reports will be provided to the Capability Review Committee Chair during off-cycle years.

  5. Hydrogen Materials Advanced Research Consortium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An overview of the organization and scientific activities of the Hydrogen Materials—Advanced Research Consortium (HyMARC).

  6. Computing at JLab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab Jefferson Lab Home Search Contact JLab Computing at JLab ---------------------- Accelerator Controls CAD CDEV CODA Computer Center High Performance Computing Scientific Computing JLab Computer Silo maintained by webmaster@jlab.org

  7. Scientific Bio

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific Bio Director Deputy Director Leadership Team Advisory Board Directorate Staff Org Chart Navigate Section Director Deputy Director Leadership Team Advisory Board...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan : ASC software quality engineering practices Version 3.0.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turgeon, Jennifer L.; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Pilch, Martin M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in the US Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Agency (DOE/NNSA) Quality Criteria, Revision 10 (QC-1) as 'conformance to customer requirements and expectations'. This quality plan defines the SNL ASC Program software quality engineering (SQE) practices and provides a mapping of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirement (CPR) 001.3.6; 'Corporate Software Engineering Excellence'. This plan also identifies ASC management's and the software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals. This SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitments to improving software products by applying cost-effective SQE practices. This plan enumerates the SQE practices that comprise the development of SNL ASC's software products and explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices.

  9. advanced simulation and computing

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NIF, in particular the first Pu experiment on NIF, the return to operations of the TA-55 gas gun, a successful series of plutonium experiments on Joint Actinide Shock Physics...

  10. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences: Target 2017

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, Richard

    2014-05-02

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computing center for the DOE Office of Science, serving approximately 4,500 users working on some 650 projects that involve nearly 600 codes in a wide variety of scientific disciplines. In March 2013, NERSC, DOE?s Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOE?s Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) held a review to characterize High Performance Computing (HPC) and storage requirements for FES research through 2017. This report is the result.

  11. Scientific Visualization, Seeing the Unseeable

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    LBNL

    2009-09-01

    June 24, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Scientific visualization transforms abstract data into readily comprehensible images, provide a vehicle for "seeing the unseeable," and play a central role in bo... June 24, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Scientific visualization transforms abstract data into readily comprehensible images, provide a vehicle for "seeing the unseeable," and play a central role in both experimental and computational sciences. Wes Bethel, who heads the Scientific Visualization Group in the Computational Research Division, presents an overview of visualization and computer graphics, current research challenges, and future directions for the field.

  12. THE CENTER FOR DATA INTENSIVE COMPUTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GLIMM,J.

    2002-11-01

    CDIC will provide state-of-the-art computational and computer science for the Laboratory and for the broader DOE and scientific community. We achieve this goal by performing advanced scientific computing research in the Laboratory's mission areas of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Biological and Environmental Research, and Basic Energy Sciences. We also assist other groups at the Laboratory to reach new levels of achievement in computing. We are ''data intensive'' because the production and manipulation of large quantities of data are hallmarks of scientific research in the 21st century and are intrinsic features of major programs at Brookhaven. An integral part of our activity to accomplish this mission will be a close collaboration with the University at Stony Brook.

  13. THE CENTER FOR DATA INTENSIVE COMPUTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GLIMM,J.

    2001-11-01

    CDIC will provide state-of-the-art computational and computer science for the Laboratory and for the broader DOE and scientific community. We achieve this goal by performing advanced scientific computing research in the Laboratory's mission areas of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Biological and Environmental Research, and Basic Energy Sciences. We also assist other groups at the Laboratory to reach new levels of achievement in computing. We are ''data intensive'' because the production and manipulation of large quantities of data are hallmarks of scientific research in the 21st century and are intrinsic features of major programs at Brookhaven. An integral part of our activity to accomplish this mission will be a close collaboration with the University at Stony Brook.

  14. THE CENTER FOR DATA INTENSIVE COMPUTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GLIMM,J.

    2003-11-01

    CDIC will provide state-of-the-art computational and computer science for the Laboratory and for the broader DOE and scientific community. We achieve this goal by performing advanced scientific computing research in the Laboratory's mission areas of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Biological and Environmental Research, and Basic Energy Sciences. We also assist other groups at the Laboratory to reach new levels of achievement in computing. We are ''data intensive'' because the production and manipulation of large quantities of data are hallmarks of scientific research in the 21st century and are intrinsic features of major programs at Brookhaven. An integral part of our activity to accomplish this mission will be a close collaboration with the University at Stony Brook.

  15. ALCF Acknowledgment Policy | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALCF Acknowledgment Policy As a U.S. Department of Energy user facility dedicated to the advancement of scientific discoveries, the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) provides unique computing resources and expertise to a user community that is bound by certain policies designed to acknowledge and promote the work of others as well as the resources used to accomplish this work. The ALCF requests your continued compliance with the terms of your program or discretionary award,

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Advancements in Fuel Spray and Combustion Modeling with High Performance Computing Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advancements in...

  17. Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics: Target 2017 Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics: Target 2017 NPicon.png This invitation-only review is organized by the Department of Energy's Offices of Nuclear Physics (NP) and Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and by NERSC. The goal is to determine production high-performance computing, storage, and services that will be needed for NP to achieve its science goals through 2017. The review brings together DOE Program Managers,

  18. Preliminary Feasibility, Design, and Hazard Analysis of a Boiling Water Test Loop Within the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas M. Gerstner

    2009-05-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a pressurized light-water reactor with a design thermal power of 250 MW. The principal function of the ATR is to provide a high neutron flux for testing reactor fuels and other materials. The ATR and its support facilities are located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A Boiling Water Test Loop (BWTL) is being designed for one of the irradiation test positions within the. The objective of the new loop will be to simulate boiling water reactor (BWR) conditions to support clad corrosion and related reactor material testing. Further it will accommodate power ramping tests of candidate high burn-up fuels and fuel pins/rods for the commercial BWR utilities. The BWTL will be much like the pressurized water loops already in service in 5 of the 9 “flux traps” (region of enhanced neutron flux) in the ATR. The loop coolant will be isolated from the primary coolant system so that the loop’s temperature, pressure, flow rate, and water chemistry can be independently controlled. This paper presents the proposed general design of the in-core and auxiliary BWTL systems; the preliminary results of the neutronics and thermal hydraulics analyses; and the preliminary hazard analysis for safe normal and transient BWTL and ATR operation.

  19. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2006-11-01

    Computational Science is an integral component of Brookhaven's multi science mission, and is a reflection of the increased role of computation across all of science. Brookhaven currently has major efforts in data storage and analysis for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the ATLAS detector at CERN, and in quantum chromodynamics. The Laboratory is host for the QCDOC machines (quantum chromodynamics on a chip), 10 teraflop/s computers which boast 12,288 processors each. There are two here, one for the Riken/BNL Research Center and the other supported by DOE for the US Lattice Gauge Community and other scientific users. A 100 teraflop/s supercomputer will be installed at Brookhaven in the coming year, managed jointly by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, and funded by a grant from New York State. This machine will be used for computational science across Brookhaven's entire research program, and also by researchers at Stony Brook and across New York State. With Stony Brook, Brookhaven has formed the New York Center for Computational Science (NYCCS) as a focal point for interdisciplinary computational science, which is closely linked to Brookhaven's Computational Science Center (CSC). The CSC has established a strong program in computational science, with an emphasis on nanoscale electronic structure and molecular dynamics, accelerator design, computational fluid dynamics, medical imaging, parallel computing and numerical algorithms. We have been an active participant in DOES SciDAC program (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing). We are also planning a major expansion in computational biology in keeping with Laboratory initiatives. Additional laboratory initiatives with a dependence on a high level of computation include the development of hydrodynamics models for the interpretation of RHIC data, computational models for the atmospheric transport of aerosols, and models for combustion and for energy utilization. The CSC was formed to bring together researchers in these areas and to provide a focal point for the development of computational expertise at the Laboratory. These efforts will connect to and support the Department of Energy's long range plans to provide Leadership class computing to researchers throughout the Nation. Recruitment for six new positions at Stony Brook to strengthen its computational science programs is underway. We expect some of these to be held jointly with BNL.

  20. Scientific Objective

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate Scientific Objective Aerosols in the sky are essential to Earth's climate because they can reflect light into space, cooling the atmosphere, or they can combine with other particles to create clouds that have both warming and cooling effects. Biogenic aerosols are emitted by the biosphere directly, or are formed from biogenic volatile gases in gas-to-particle conversion. Examples include dead cells and pollen spores. Boreal forests are among the

    1. The Magellan Final Report on Cloud Computing

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      ,; Coghlan, Susan; Yelick, Katherine

      2011-12-21

      The goal of Magellan, a project funded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), was to investigate the potential role of cloud computing in addressing the computing needs for the DOE Office of Science (SC), particularly related to serving the needs of mid- range computing and future data-intensive computing workloads. A set of research questions was formed to probe various aspects of cloud computing from performance, usability, and cost. To address these questions, a distributed testbed infrastructure was deployed at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC). The testbed was designed to be flexible and capable enough to explore a variety of computing models and hardware design points in order to understand the impact for various scientific applications. During the project, the testbed also served as a valuable resource to application scientists. Applications from a diverse set of projects such as MG-RAST (a metagenomics analysis server), the Joint Genome Institute, the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, and the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), were used by the Magellan project for benchmarking within the cloud, but the project teams were also able to accomplish important production science utilizing the Magellan cloud resources.

    2. Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies...

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      More Documents & Publications Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies Computational Fluid Dynamics ...

    3. NERSC Oakland Scientific Facility

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Training 2012 February 1-2, 2012 NERSC Oakland Scientific Facility Debugging with DDT Woo-Sun Yang NERSC User Services Group Why a Debugger? * It makes it easy to find a bug in your program, by controlling pace of running your program - Examine execution flow of your code - Check values of variables * Typical usage scenario - Set breakpoints (places where you want your program to stop) and let your program run - Or advance one line in source code at a time - Check variables when a breakpoint is

    4. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1: ASC software quality engineering practices, Version 2.0.

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

      2006-09-01

      The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR 1.3.2 and 1.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

    5. Peter Nugent Named Deputy for Scientific Engagement

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Peter Nugent Named Deputy for Scientific Engagement Peter Nugent Named Deputy for Scientific Engagement June 3, 2014 Contact: Linda Vu, +1 510 495 2402, lvu@lbl.gov XBD201308-03524-01.jpg Peter Nugent working with 2013 summer student Kayla Mendel. Peter Nugent has been appointed Deputy for Scientific Engagement in Berkeley Lab's Computing Sciences. In his new role, Nugent will work with CRD and Computing Sciences leadership to develop and implement a strategy for engaging with other Berkeley Lab

    6. Scientific and Technical Information Management

      Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

      2010-12-13

      The purpose of this directive is to ensure that STI is appropriately managed as part of the DOE mission to enable the advancement of scientific knowledge and technological innovation. Supersedes DOE O 241.1A and DOE O 241.1A Chg 1.

    7. FINAL REPORT DE-FG02-04ER41317 Advanced Computation and Chaotic Dynamics for Beams and Accelerators

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Cary, John R

      2014-09-08

      During the year ending in August 2013, we continued to investigate the potential of photonic crystal (PhC) materials for acceleration purposes. We worked to characterize acceleration ability of simple PhC accelerator structures, as well as to characterize PhC materials to determine whether current fabrication techniques can meet the needs of future accelerating structures. We have also continued to design and optimize PhC accelerator structures, with the ultimate goal of finding a new kind of accelerator structure that could offer significant advantages over current RF acceleration technology. This design and optimization of these requires high performance computation, and we continue to work on methods to make such computation faster and more efficient.

    8. DOE Advanced Scientific Advisory Committee (ASCAC): Workforce...

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      Scott A. 6 ; Sarkar, Vivek 7 ; Stahlberg, Eric 8 ; Vetter, Jeffrey S. 9 ; Williams, Dean 5 + Show Author Affiliations University of Houston Total SA Lawrence Berkeley ...

    9. DOE Supercomputing Resources Available for Advancing Scientific...

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      ... In its 7th year, the 2010 INCITE program will grant scientists and engineers at universities, industry, national laboratories and other research organizations access to ...

    10. Educating Scientifically - Advances in Physics Education Research

      ScienceCinema (OSTI)

      Finkelstein, Noah [University of Colorado, Colorado, USA

      2009-09-01

      It is now fairly well documented that traditionally taught, large-scale introductory physics courses fail to teach our students the basics. In fact, often these same courses have been found to teach students things we do not want. Building on a tradition of research in physics, the physics education research community has been researching the effects of educational practice and reforms at the undergraduate level for many decades. From these efforts and those within the fields of education, cognitive science, and psychology we have learned a great deal about student learning and environments that support learning for an increasingly diverse population of students in the physics classroom. This talk will introduce some of the ideas from physics education research, discuss a variety of effective classroom practices/ surrounding educational structures, and begin to examine why these do (and do not) work. I will present both a survey of physics education research and some of the exciting theoretical and experimental developments emerging from the University of Colorado.

    11. Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      and Environmental Research: Target 2017 Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological and Environmental Research: Target 2017 BERmontage.gif September 11-12, 2012 Hilton Rockville Hotel and Executive Meeting Center 1750 Rockville Pike Rockville, MD, 20852-1699 TEL: 1-301-468-1100 Sponsored by: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) National Energy

    12. 15.01.21 RH Computational and Experimental ID - JCAP

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Computational and Experimental Identification of an Earth-Abundant Light Absorber for Solar Water Splitting Yan, Q. et al. Mn2V2O7: An Earth Abundant Light Absorber for Solar Water Splitting. Advanced Energy Materials, DOI: 10.1002/aenm.201401840 (2015). Scientific Achievement Computation, synthesis, and spectroscopy are used to first identify and then study the earth-abundant Mn2V2O7 as a highly promising light absorber for photocatalytic water splitting. Significance & impact The detailed

    13. Computing, Environment and Life Sciences | Argonne National Laboratory

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Intranet About Us Intranet Argonne National Laboratory Computing, Environment and Life Sciences Organizations Facilities and Institutes News Events Advancing the Frontiers of Knowledge More The mission of Argonne's Computing, Environment, and Life Sciences (CELS) directorate is to enable groundbreaking scientific and technical accomplishments in areas of critical importance to the 21st century. The CELS directorate integrates Argonne's research in the life sciences with the environmental

    14. NREL: Computational Science Home Page

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      high-performance computing, computational science, applied mathematics, scientific data management, visualization, and informatics. NREL is home to the largest high performance...

    15. Secretary Bodman in Illinois Highlights Scientific Research Investments to

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      Advance America's Innovation | Department of Energy Illinois Highlights Scientific Research Investments to Advance America's Innovation Secretary Bodman in Illinois Highlights Scientific Research Investments to Advance America's Innovation April 11, 2007 - 12:36pm Addthis ROMEOVILLE, IL - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel Bodman today joined Rep. Judy Biggert (IL-13th) at a technology firm in Illinois to highlight scientific research investments that have led to partnerships between DOE's

    16. Final report for %22High performance computing for advanced national electric power grid modeling and integration of solar generation resources%22, LDRD Project No. 149016.

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Reno, Matthew J.; Riehm, Andrew Charles; Hoekstra, Robert John; Munoz-Ramirez, Karina; Stamp, Jason Edwin; Phillips, Laurence R.; Adams, Brian M.; Russo, Thomas V.; Oldfield, Ron A.; McLendon, William Clarence, III; Nelson, Jeffrey Scott; Hansen, Clifford W.; Richardson, Bryan T.; Stein, Joshua S.; Schoenwald, David Alan; Wolfenbarger, Paul R.

      2011-02-01

      Design and operation of the electric power grid (EPG) relies heavily on computational models. High-fidelity, full-order models are used to study transient phenomena on only a small part of the network. Reduced-order dynamic and power flow models are used when analysis involving thousands of nodes are required due to the computational demands when simulating large numbers of nodes. The level of complexity of the future EPG will dramatically increase due to large-scale deployment of variable renewable generation, active load and distributed generation resources, adaptive protection and control systems, and price-responsive demand. High-fidelity modeling of this future grid will require significant advances in coupled, multi-scale tools and their use on high performance computing (HPC) platforms. This LDRD report demonstrates SNL's capability to apply HPC resources to these 3 tasks: (1) High-fidelity, large-scale modeling of power system dynamics; (2) Statistical assessment of grid security via Monte-Carlo simulations of cyber attacks; and (3) Development of models to predict variability of solar resources at locations where little or no ground-based measurements are available.

    17. The Digital Road to Scientific Knowledge Diffusion

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      Digital Road to Scientific Knowledge Diffusion A Faster, Better Way to Scientific Progress? By David E. Wojick, Walter L. Warnick, Bonnie C. Carroll, and June Crowe Introduction With the United States federal government spending over $130 billion annually for research and development, ways to increase the productivity of that research can have a significant return on investment. It is well known that all scientific advancement is based on work that has come before. Isaac Newton expressed this

    18. Sandia Energy - Our SSLS EFRC's Scientific Research Challenges...

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      SSL technology, and to ultimately enable significant advances in the efficiency with which SSL is produced and used. We do this through the seven scientific...

    19. Multicore Architecture-aware Scientific Applications

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Srinivasa, Avinash

      2011-11-28

      Modern high performance systems are becoming increasingly complex and powerful due to advancements in processor and memory architecture. In order to keep up with this increasing complexity, applications have to be augmented with certain capabilities to fully exploit such systems. These may be at the application level, such as static or dynamic adaptations or at the system level, like having strategies in place to override some of the default operating system polices, the main objective being to improve computational performance of the application. The current work proposes two such capabilites with respect to multi-threaded scientific applications, in particular a large scale physics application computing ab-initio nuclear structure. The first involves using a middleware tool to invoke dynamic adaptations in the application, so as to be able to adjust to the changing computational resource availability at run-time. The second involves a strategy for effective placement of data in main memory, to optimize memory access latencies and bandwidth. These capabilties when included were found to have a significant impact on the application performance, resulting in average speedups of as much as two to four times.

    20. Computing Videos

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Computing Videos Computing

    1. Advanced Simulation Capability for

      Office of Environmental Management (EM)

      Advanced Simulation & Computing pro- grams as well as collaborating with the Offices of Science, Fossil Energy, and Nuclear Energy. Challenge Current groundwater and soil...

    2. Scientific Research Data | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      and Technical Information Scientific Research Data Scientific Research Data DOE generates scientific research data in many forms, both text and non-text. Much of the Department's text-based R&D results are readily available via OSTI databases. OSTI has broadened efforts to make non-text scientific and technical information (STI) available as well, providing access to underlying non-text data such as numeric files, computer simulations and interactive maps, as well as multimedia and

    3. Wanapum Dam Advanced Hydro Turbine Upgrade Project: Part 2 - Evaluation of Fish Passage Test Results Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Dresser, Thomas J.; Dotson, Curtis L.; Fisher, Richard K.; Graf, Michael J.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Mathur, Dilip; Heisey, Paul G.

      2007-10-10

      This paper, the second part of a 2 part paper, discusses the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to gain further insight into the results of fish release testing conducted to evaluate the modifications made to upgrade Unit 8 at Wanapum Dam. Part 1 discusses the testing procedures and fish passage survival. Grant PUD is working with Voith Siemens Hydro (VSH) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) of DOE and Normandeau Associates in this evaluation. VSH has prepared the geometry for the CFD analysis corresponding to the four operating conditions tested with Unit 9, and the 5 operating conditions tested with Unit 8. Both VSH and PNNL have conducting CFD simulations of the turbine intakes, stay vanes, wicket gates, turbine blades and draft tube of the units. Primary objectives of the analyses were: • determine estimates of where the inserted fish passed the turbine components • determine the characteristics of the flow field along the paths calculated for pressure, velocity gradients and acceleration associated with fish sized bodies • determine the velocity gradients at the structures where fish to structure interaction is predicted. • correlate the estimated fish location of passage with observed injuries • correlate the calculated pressure and acceleration with the information recorded with the sensor fish • utilize the results of the analysis to further interpret the results of the testing. This paper discusses the results of the CFD analyses made to assist the interpretation of the fish test results.

    4. NERSC Contributes to Smithsonian Magazine's Surprising Scientific

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Milestones of 2012 Smithsonian Magazine's Surprising Scientific Milestones of 2012 NERSC Contributes to Smithsonian Magazine's Surprising Scientific Milestones of 2012 January 23, 2013 744889477276295a0862c.jpg Using supercomputers at National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) came up with a new approach for desalinating sea water using sheets of graphene, a one-atom-thick form of the element carbon. Team

    5. Berkeley Lab Highlights HPC at Advanced Manufacturing Event

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Highlights HPC at Advanced Manufacturing Event Berkeley Lab Highlights HPC at Advanced Manufacturing Event September 14, 2015 Peter Nugent, Division Deputy for Scientific...

    6. ITER Project Scientific Foundations Mission

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      ITER Project Scientific Foundations Mission Investment and Return Fusion reactions power the sun and the stars. To achieve fusion power on earth, a fusion reactor requires a burning plasma, where plasma energy is maintained primarily by self- heating due to internal fusion reactions. A 2002 US fusion-community study assessed a range of approaches for creating a burning plasma. Following a 2003 letter report, the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee noted ITER's advanced stage and

    7. Scientific Advisory Committee

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Scientific Advisory Committee Print The ALS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) advises Berkeley Lab and ALS management on issues relating to ALS operations, resource allocation,...

    8. Parallel computing works

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Not Available

      1991-10-23

      An account of the Caltech Concurrent Computation Program (C{sup 3}P), a five year project that focused on answering the question: Can parallel computers be used to do large-scale scientific computations '' As the title indicates, the question is answered in the affirmative, by implementing numerous scientific applications on real parallel computers and doing computations that produced new scientific results. In the process of doing so, C{sup 3}P helped design and build several new computers, designed and implemented basic system software, developed algorithms for frequently used mathematical computations on massively parallel machines, devised performance models and measured the performance of many computers, and created a high performance computing facility based exclusively on parallel computers. While the initial focus of C{sup 3}P was the hypercube architecture developed by C. Seitz, many of the methods developed and lessons learned have been applied successfully on other massively parallel architectures.

    9. Index of /documents/public/ScientificWriting

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      ScientificWriting

    10. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      3,072 Material Simulations in Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) PI: Frances A. Houle, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Edison 3,072 LLNL MFE Supercomputing...

    11. Portable Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation

      Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

      1995-06-30

      PETSC2.0 is a software toolkit for portable, parallel (and serial) numerical solution of partial differential equations and minimization problems. It includes software for the solution of linear and nonlinear systems of equations. These codes are written in a data-structure-neutral manner to enable easy reuse and flexibility.

    12. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Updated Workflows for New LHC Era Researchers working on ATLAS, one of the Large Hadron Collider's largest experiments, are using updated workflow management tools developed ...

    13. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      calculations of hadron properties . . . . . . . . ... High Performance Systems for Large-Scale Science . . . . . . ... carried out using NERSC resources in 2004 is addressing one ...

    14. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      ... This report, published in the journal Physical Review ... The case of PSRJ07370-3039 A & B," in Proceedings of the ... with DOE and Office of Management and Budget goals. ...

    15. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1 : ASC software quality engineering practices version 1.0.

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Minana, Molly A.; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

      2005-01-01

      The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in DOE/AL Quality Criteria (QC-1) as conformance to customer requirements and expectations. This quality plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirements (CPR 1.3.2 and CPR 1.3.6) and the Department of Energy (DOE) document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines (GP&G). This quality plan identifies ASC management and software project teams' responsibilities for cost-effective software engineering quality practices. The SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitment to improving software products by applying cost-effective software engineering quality practices. This document explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices; enumerates the practices that compose the development of SNL ASC's software products; and includes a sample assessment checklist that was developed based upon the practices in this document.

    16. Call for Proposals: NERSC Initiative for Scientific Exploration...

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      our computational systems through the NERSC Initiative for Scientific Exploration (NISE) program. This year we expect to allocate about 100 million hours to a few large projects. ...

    17. Microsoft Word - The_Advanced_Networks_and_Services_Underpinning_Modern,Large-Scale_Science.SciDAC.v5.doc

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      ESnet4: Advanced Networking and Services Supporting the Science Mission of DOE's Office of Science William E. Johnston ESnet Dept. Head and Senior Scientist Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory May, 2007 1 Introduction In many ways, the dramatic achievements in scientific discovery through advanced computing and the discoveries of the increasingly large-scale instruments with their enormous data handling and remote collaboration requirements, have been made possible by accompanying

    18. Simulations for Complex Fluid Flow Problems from Berkeley Lab's Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering (CCSE)

      DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

      The Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering (CCSE) develops and applies advanced computational methodologies to solve large-scale scientific and engineering problems arising in the Department of Energy (DOE) mission areas involving energy, environmental, and industrial technology. The primary focus is in the application of structured-grid finite difference methods on adaptive grid hierarchies for compressible, incompressible, and low Mach number flows. The diverse range of scientific applications that drive the research typically involve a large range of spatial and temporal scales (e.g. turbulent reacting flows) and require the use of extremely large computing hardware, such as the 153,000-core computer, Hopper, at NERSC. The CCSE approach to these problems centers on the development and application of advanced algorithms that exploit known separations in scale; for many of the application areas this results in algorithms are several orders of magnitude more efficient than traditional simulation approaches.

    19. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Gerber, Richard A.; Wasserman, Harvey J.

      2012-03-02

      IThe National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computing center for the DOE Office of Science, serving approximately 4,000 users and hosting some 550 projects that involve nearly 700 codes for a wide variety of scientific disciplines. In addition to large-scale computing resources NERSC provides critical staff support and expertise to help scientists make the most efficient use of these resources to advance the scientific mission of the Office of Science. In May 2011, NERSC, DOE’s Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOE’s Office of Nuclear Physics (NP) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for NP research over the next three to five years. The effort is part of NERSC’s continuing involvement in anticipating future user needs and deploying necessary resources to meet these demands. The workshop revealed several key requirements, in addition to achieving its goal of characterizing NP computing. The key requirements include: 1. Larger allocations of computational resources at NERSC; 2. Visualization and analytics support; and 3. Support at NERSC for the unique needs of experimental nuclear physicists. This report expands upon these key points and adds others. The results are based upon representative samples, called “case studies,” of the needs of science teams within NP. The case studies were prepared by NP workshop participants and contain a summary of science goals, methods of solution, current and future computing requirements, and special software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel, “multi-core” environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. The report also includes a section with NERSC responses to the workshop findings. NERSC has many initiatives already underway that address key workshop findings and all of the action items are aligned with NERSC strategic plans.

    20. Advancing Concentrating Solar Power Research (Fact Sheet)

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Not Available

      2014-02-01

      Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provide scientific, engineering, and analytical expertise to help advance innovation in concentrating solar power (CSP). This fact sheet summarizes how NREL is advancing CSP research.

    1. DOE Science Showcase - Computing Research | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      of Scientific and Technical Information DOE Science Showcase - Computing Research For the growing number of problems where experiments are impossible, dangerous, or inordinately costly, exascale computing will enable the solution of vastly more accurate predictive models and the analysis of massive quantities of data, producing advances in areas of science and technology that are essential to DOE and Office of Science missions and, in the hands of the private sector, drive U.S.

    2. CRITICAL ISSUES IN HIGH END COMPUTING - FINAL REPORT

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Corones, James

      2013-09-23

      High-End computing (HEC) has been a driver for advances in science and engineering for the past four decades. Increasingly HEC has become a significant element in the national security, economic vitality, and competitiveness of the United States. Advances in HEC provide results that cut across traditional disciplinary and organizational boundaries. This program provides opportunities to share information about HEC systems and computational techniques across multiple disciplines and organizations through conferences and exhibitions of HEC advances held in Washington DC so that mission agency staff, scientists, and industry can come together with White House, Congressional and Legislative staff in an environment conducive to the sharing of technical information, accomplishments, goals, and plans. A common thread across this series of conferences is the understanding of computational science and applied mathematics techniques across a diverse set of application areas of interest to the Nation. The specific objectives of this program are: Program Objective 1. To provide opportunities to share information about advances in high-end computing systems and computational techniques between mission critical agencies, agency laboratories, academics, and industry. Program Objective 2. To gather pertinent data, address specific topics of wide interest to mission critical agencies. Program Objective 3. To promote a continuing discussion of critical issues in high-end computing. Program Objective 4.To provide a venue where a multidisciplinary scientific audience can discuss the difficulties applying computational science techniques to specific problems and can specify future research that, if successful, will eliminate these problems.

    3. Los Alamos National Laboratory Scientific Excellence for Mission Impact

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      March 10, 2015 | 1 UNCLASSIFIED As a Premier National Security Scientific Laboratory, Los Alamos tackles:  Multidisciplinary science, technology, and engineering challenges  Problems demanding unique experimental and computational facilities  Highly complex national security issues requiring fundamental breakthroughs LOS ALAMOS A NATIONAL SECURITY SCIENTIFIC LABORATORY FOR THE 21ST CENTURY The nation's investment in Los Alamos has fostered scientific capabilities for national security

    4. Can Cloud Computing Address the Scientific Computing Requirements...

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      achieve energy efficiency levels comparable to commercial cloud centers. Cloud is a business model and can be applied at DOE supercomputing centers. The progress of the...

    5. Advanced Modeling & Simulation | Department of Energy

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      Advanced Modeling & Simulation Advanced Modeling & Simulation Advanced Modeling & Simulation ADVANCING THE STATE OF THE ART Innovation advances science. Historically, innovation resulted almost exclusively from fundamental theories combined with observation and experimentation over time. With advancements in engineering, computing power and visualization tools, scientists from all disciplines are gaining insights into physical systems in ways not possible with traditional approaches

    6. Department of Energy Designates the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test

      Energy Savers [EERE]

      Reactor as a National Scientific User Facility | Department of Energy Designates the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor as a National Scientific User Facility Department of Energy Designates the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor as a National Scientific User Facility April 23, 2007 - 12:36pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today designated the Idaho National Laboratory's (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User

    7. Parallel Computing Summer Research Internship

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      should have basic experience with a scientific computing language, such as C, C++, Fortran and with the LINUX operating system. Duration & Location The program will last ten...

    8. University Program in Advanced Technology | National Nuclear...

      National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

      Facility Operations and User Support Computational Systems & Software Environment Verification & Validation Physics and Engineering Models Integrated Codes Advanced Technology ...

    9. Scientific Exchange Program | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Scientific Exchange Program Scientific Exchange Program Applications due February

    10. Scientific Leadership - JCAP

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Scientific Leadership Who We Are JCAP Mission JCAP At A Glance Fact Sheets Organizational Chart Recent Science Technology Transfer Awards & Honors Senior Management Scientific Leadership Researchers Governance & Advisory Boards Operations & Administration Who we are Overview JCAP Mission JCAP At A Glance Fact Sheets Organizational Chart Our Achievements Recent Science Technology Transfer Awards & Honors Our People Senior Management Scientific Leadership Researchers Governance

    11. ATR National Scientific User Facility 2013 Annual Report

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Ulrich, Julie A.; Robertson, Sarah

      2015-03-01

      This is the 2013 Annual Report for the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility. This report includes information on university-run research projects along with a description of the program and the capabilities offered researchers.

    12. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Computational Design and Development of a New, Lightweight Cast Alloy for Advanced Cylinder Heads in High-Efficiency, Light-Duty Engines

      Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

      Presentation given by General Motors at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about computational design and...

    13. FWP Scientific Publications

      Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

      Scientific publications either directly studying former workers in the context of the screening program or recruiting former workers in the program as research participants for scientific studies funded by the National Institutes of Health or other research funding sources are summarized below according to publication date.

    14. Slide05 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical...

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      Department of Energy (DOE) researchers and the public. Premise: Science advances only if knowledge is shared Corollary: Accelerating the sharing of scientific knowledge...

    15. OSTI.gov Newsletter | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific...

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      managed as part of the DOE mission to enable the advancement of scientific knowledge and technological innovation." As provided in the DOE directive, OSTI spearheads the...

    16. SciTech Connect: "high performance computing"

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      Advanced Search Term Search Semantic Search Advanced Search All Fields: "high performance computing" Semantic Semantic Term Title: Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator ...

    17. Scientific Advisory Committee

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Scientific Advisory Committee Print The ALS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) advises Berkeley Lab and ALS management on issues relating to ALS operations, resource allocation, strategic planning, and Participating Research Team (PRT) proposals and performance. Current members of the committee, as of January 2016, are Lou Terminello, (chair), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Harald Ade, North Carolina State University Nora Berrah, Western Michigan University David L. Brown, Berkeley Lab

    18. Scientific Advisory Committee

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Scientific Advisory Committee Print The ALS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) advises Berkeley Lab and ALS management on issues relating to ALS operations, resource allocation, strategic planning, and Participating Research Team (PRT) proposals and performance. Current members of the committee, as of January 2016, are Lou Terminello, (chair), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Harald Ade, North Carolina State University Nora Berrah, Western Michigan University David L. Brown, Berkeley Lab

    19. Scientific Advisory Committee

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Scientific Advisory Committee Print The ALS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) advises Berkeley Lab and ALS management on issues relating to ALS operations, resource allocation, strategic planning, and Participating Research Team (PRT) proposals and performance. Current members of the committee, as of January 2016, are Lou Terminello, (chair), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Harald Ade, North Carolina State University Nora Berrah, Western Michigan University David L. Brown, Berkeley Lab

    20. Scientific Advisory Committee

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Scientific Advisory Committee Print The ALS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) advises Berkeley Lab and ALS management on issues relating to ALS operations, resource allocation, strategic planning, and Participating Research Team (PRT) proposals and performance. Current members of the committee, as of January 2016, are Lou Terminello, (chair), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Harald Ade, North Carolina State University Nora Berrah, Western Michigan University David L. Brown, Berkeley Lab

    1. Scientific Advisory Committee

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Scientific Advisory Committee Print The ALS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) advises Berkeley Lab and ALS management on issues relating to ALS operations, resource allocation, strategic planning, and Participating Research Team (PRT) proposals and performance. Current members of the committee, as of January 2016, are Lou Terminello, (chair), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Harald Ade, North Carolina State University Nora Berrah, Western Michigan University David L. Brown, Berkeley Lab

    2. Scientific Advisory Committee

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Scientific Advisory Committee Print The ALS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) advises Berkeley Lab and ALS management on issues relating to ALS operations, resource allocation, strategic planning, and Participating Research Team (PRT) proposals and performance. Current members of the committee, as of January 2016, are Lou Terminello, (chair), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Harald Ade, North Carolina State University Nora Berrah, Western Michigan University David L. Brown, Berkeley Lab

    3. Scientific Advisory Committee

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Scientific Advisory Committee Print The ALS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) advises Berkeley Lab and ALS management on issues relating to ALS operations, resource allocation, strategic planning, and Participating Research Team (PRT) proposals and performance. Current members of the committee, as of January 2016, are Lou Terminello, (chair), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Harald Ade, North Carolina State University Nora Berrah, Western Michigan University David L. Brown, Berkeley Lab

    4. 'Most Influential Scientific Minds'

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Three Los Alamos scientists named 'Most Influential Scientific Minds' July 22, 2014 Aiken, Korber and Perelson spotlighted in Thomson Reuters report LOS ALAMOS, N.M., July 22, 2014-Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists Allison Aiken, Bette Korber and Alan Perelson have been named to Thomson Reuters list of "The World's Most Influential Scientific Minds." "To have three of our premier scientists recognized on this list is a great honor and attests to the intellectual vitality

    5. Information Science, Computing, Applied Math

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Capabilities » Information Science, Computing, Applied Math /science-innovation/_assets/images/icon-science.jpg Information Science, Computing, Applied Math National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place on Earth pursues a broader array of world-class scientific endeavors. Computer, Computational, and Statistical Sciences (CCS)» High Performance Computing (HPC)» Extreme Scale Computing, Co-design»

    6. Application of Robust Design and Advanced Computer Aided Engineering Technologies: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-04-143

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Thornton, M.

      2013-06-01

      Oshkosh Corporation (OSK) is taking an aggressive approach to implementing advanced technologies, including hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) technology, throughout their commercial and military product lines. These technologies have important implications for OSK's commercial and military customers, including fleet fuel efficiency, quiet operational modes, additional on-board electric capabilities, and lower thermal signature operation. However, technical challenges exist with selecting the optimal HEV components and design to work within the performance and packaging constraints of specific vehicle applications. SK desires to use unique expertise developed at the Department of Energy?s (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), including HEV modeling and simulation. These tools will be used to overcome technical hurdles to implementing advanced heavy vehicle technology that meet performance requirements while improving fuel efficiency.

    7. Final Week of National Energy Action Month Features Technological Advances

      Office of Environmental Management (EM)

      in Clean Energy and DOE Support of Scientific Research | Department of Energy Final Week of National Energy Action Month Features Technological Advances in Clean Energy and DOE Support of Scientific Research Final Week of National Energy Action Month Features Technological Advances in Clean Energy and DOE Support of Scientific Research October 23, 2014 - 4:20pm Addthis News Media Contact 202-586-4940 Final Week of National Energy Action Month Features Technological Advances in Clean Energy

    8. Extreme Scale Computing to Secure the Nation

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Brown, D L; McGraw, J R; Johnson, J R; Frincke, D

      2009-11-10

      Since the dawn of modern electronic computing in the mid 1940's, U.S. national security programs have been dominant users of every new generation of high-performance computer. Indeed, the first general-purpose electronic computer, ENIAC (the Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer), was used to calculate the expected explosive yield of early thermonuclear weapons designs. Even the U. S. numerical weather prediction program, another early application for high-performance computing, was initially funded jointly by sponsors that included the U.S. Air Force and Navy, agencies interested in accurate weather predictions to support U.S. military operations. For the decades of the cold war, national security requirements continued to drive the development of high performance computing (HPC), including advancement of the computing hardware and development of sophisticated simulation codes to support weapons and military aircraft design, numerical weather prediction as well as data-intensive applications such as cryptography and cybersecurity U.S. national security concerns continue to drive the development of high-performance computers and software in the U.S. and in fact, events following the end of the cold war have driven an increase in the growth rate of computer performance at the high-end of the market. This mainly derives from our nation's observance of a moratorium on underground nuclear testing beginning in 1992, followed by our voluntary adherence to the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) beginning in 1995. The CTBT prohibits further underground nuclear tests, which in the past had been a key component of the nation's science-based program for assuring the reliability, performance and safety of U.S. nuclear weapons. In response to this change, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated the Science-Based Stockpile Stewardship (SBSS) program in response to the Fiscal Year 1994 National Defense Authorization Act, which requires, 'in the absence of nuclear testing, a progam to: (1) Support a focused, multifaceted program to increase the understanding of the enduring stockpile; (2) Predict, detect, and evaluate potential problems of the aging of the stockpile; (3) Refurbish and re-manufacture weapons and components, as required; and (4) Maintain the science and engineering institutions needed to support the nation's nuclear deterrent, now and in the future'. This program continues to fulfill its national security mission by adding significant new capabilities for producing scientific results through large-scale computational simulation coupled with careful experimentation, including sub-critical nuclear experiments permitted under the CTBT. To develop the computational science and the computational horsepower needed to support its mission, SBSS initiated the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative, later renamed the Advanced Simulation & Computing (ASC) program (sidebar: 'History of ASC Computing Program Computing Capability'). The modern 3D computational simulation capability of the ASC program supports the assessment and certification of the current nuclear stockpile through calibration with past underground test (UGT) data. While an impressive accomplishment, continued evolution of national security mission requirements will demand computing resources at a significantly greater scale than we have today. In particular, continued observance and potential Senate confirmation of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) together with the U.S administration's promise for a significant reduction in the size of the stockpile and the inexorable aging and consequent refurbishment of the stockpile all demand increasing refinement of our computational simulation capabilities. Assessment of the present and future stockpile with increased confidence of the safety and reliability without reliance upon calibration with past or future test data is a long-term goal of the ASC program. This will be accomplished through significant increases in the scientific bases that underlie the computational tools. Computer codes must be de

    9. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences Research

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Gerber, Richard; Wasserman, Harvey

      2011-03-31

      The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the leading scientific computing facility supporting research within the Department of Energy's Office of Science. NERSC provides high-performance computing (HPC) resources to approximately 4,000 researchers working on about 400 projects. In addition to hosting large-scale computing facilities, NERSC provides the support and expertise scientists need to effectively and efficiently use HPC systems. In February 2010, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOE's Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for BES research through 2013. The workshop was part of NERSC's legacy of anticipating users future needs and deploying the necessary resources to meet these demands. Workshop participants reached a consensus on several key findings, in addition to achieving the workshop's goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. The key requirements for scientists conducting research in BES are: (1) Larger allocations of computational resources; (2) Continued support for standard application software packages; (3) Adequate job turnaround time and throughput; and (4) Guidance and support for using future computer architectures. This report expands upon these key points and presents others. Several 'case studies' are included as significant representative samples of the needs of science teams within BES. Research teams scientific goals, computational methods of solution, current and 2013 computing requirements, and special software and support needs are summarized in these case studies. Also included are researchers strategies for computing in the highly parallel, 'multi-core' environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. NERSC has strategic plans and initiatives already underway that address key workshop findings. This report includes a brief summary of those relevant to issues raised by researchers at the workshop.

    10. 2014 Call for NERSC Initiative for Scientific Exploration (NISE) Program

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Due December 8 the NERSC Initiative for Scientific Exploration (NISE) program 2014 Call for NERSC Initiative for Scientific Exploration (NISE) Program Due December 8 November 18, 2013 by Francesca Verdier Users may now submit requests for the 2014 NERSC Initiative for Scientific Exploration (NISE) program. The deadline to apply is Sunday December 8, 11:59 PM Pacific Time. The goals for this program in 2014 are: HPC and data analysis: Projects that leverage extreme scale parallel computing to

    11. It's In The Hopper: 4,000 Scientific Users Now Working With Supercomputer

      Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

      The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) in Berkeley, California, marked a major milestone when they recently put their supercomputer, “Hopper,” into the hands of its 4,000 scientific users.

    12. Energy Innovation Hubs: A Home for Scientific Collaboration

      ScienceCinema (OSTI)

      Chu, Steven

      2013-05-29

      Secretary Chu will host a live, streaming Q&A session with the directors of the Energy Innovation Hubs on Tuesday, March 6, at 2:15 p.m. EST. The directors will be available for questions regarding their teams' work and the future of American energy. Ask your questions in the comments below, or submit them on Facebook, Twitter (@energy), or send an e-mail to newmedia@hq.doe.gov, prior or during the live event. Dr. Hank Foley is the director of the Greater Philadelphia Innovation Cluster for Energy-Efficient Buildings, which is pioneering new data intensive techniques for designing and operating energy efficient buildings, including advanced computer modeling. Dr. Douglas Kothe is the director of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors, which uses powerful supercomputers to create "virtual" reactors that will help improve the safety and performance of both existing and new nuclear reactors. Dr. Nathan Lewis is the director of the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, which focuses on how to produce fuels from sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide. The Energy Innovation Hubs are major integrated research centers, with researchers from many different institutions and technical backgrounds. Each hub is focused on a specific high priority goal, rapidly accelerating scientific discoveries and shortening the path from laboratory innovation to technological development and commercial deployment of critical energy technologies. Ask your questions in the comments below, or submit them on Facebook, Twitter (@energy), or send an e-mail to newmedia@energy.gov, prior or during the live event. The Energy Innovation Hubs are major integrated research centers, with researchers from many different institutions and technical backgrounds. Each Hub is focused on a specific high priority goal, rapidly accelerating scientific discoveries and shortening the path from laboratory innovation to technological development and commercial deployment of critical energy technologies. Dr. Hank Holey is the director of the Greater Philadelphia Innovation Cluster for Energy-Efficient Buildings, which is pioneering new data intensive techniques for designing and operating energy efficient buildings, including advanced computer modeling. Dr. Douglas Kothe is the director of the Modeling and Simulation for Nuclear Reactors Hub, which uses powerful supercomputers to create "virtual" reactors that will help improve the safety and performance of both existing and new nuclear reactors. Dr. Nathan Lewis is the director of the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis Hub, which focuses on how to produce biofuels from sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide.

    13. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Virtual Environment for Scientific Collaboration Posted: April 30, 2013 The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors, the Department of Energy's first...

    14. 2014 Advanced Grid Modeling Program Peer Review Presentations...

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      leverages scientific research in mathematics for application to power system models and software tools. 17 projects were presented at the 2014 Advanced Grid Modeling Peer Review. ...

    15. 2014 Advanced Grid Modeling Peer Review Presentations - Day One...

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      The Advanced Grid Modeling Research Program leverages scientific research in mathematics for application to power system models and software tools. More than 17 projects were ...

    16. Breaking Ground on Computational Research and Theory Facility

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Berkeley Lab Breaks Ground on New Computational Research Facility Breaking Ground on Computational Research and Theory Facility CRT to Foster Scientific Collaboration in...

    17. Scientific/Techical Report

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Dr. Chris Leighton, Neutron Scattering Society of American; Mr. J. Ardie Dillen, MRS Director of Finance and Administration

      2012-11-07

      The ACNS provides a focal point for the North American neutron user community, strengthening ties within this diverse group, and promoting neutron research in related disciplines. The conference thus serves a dual role as both a national user meeting and a scientific meeting. As a venue for scientific exchange, the ACNS showcases recent results and provides a forum for scientific discussion of neutron-enabled research in fields as diverse as hard and soft condensed matter, liquids, biology, magnetism, engineering materials, chemical spectroscopy, crystal structure, elementary excitations, fundamental physics, and development of neutron instrumentation. This is achieved through a combination of invited oral presentations, contributed oral presentations, and poster sessions. Adequate opportunity for spontaneous discussion and collaboration is also built into the ACNS program in order to foster free exchange of new scientific ideas and the potential for use of powerful neutron scattering methods beyond the current realms of application. The sixth American Conference on Neutron Scattering (ACNS 2012) provided essential information on the breadth and depth of current neutron-related research worldwide. A strong program of plenary, invited and contributed talks showcased recent scientific results in neutron science in a wide range of fields, including soft and hard condensed matter, biology, chemistry, energy and engineering applications, and neutron physics.

    18. Advances in Performance Assessment

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories originated an innovative approach to determining the safety of geologic repositories for radioactive waste disposal called "performance assessment", PA. The discipline of PA continues to advance within the Defense Waste Management Programs as computing capabilities advance and as the discipline is used in an expanding portfolio of applications both nationally and internationally. Do Radioactive Waste Disposal Options Assure Safety for

    19. Awards | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

      Office of Science (SC) Website

      Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Applied Mathematics Computer Science Next Generation Networking Scientific Discovery through Advanced...

    20. Scientific Visualization: The Modern Oscilloscope for "Seeing the Unseeable" (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

      ScienceCinema (OSTI)

      Bethel, E Wes

      2011-04-28

      Summer Lecture Series 2008: Scientific visualization transforms abstract data into readily comprehensible images, provide a vehicle for "seeing the unseeable," and play a central role in both experimental and computational sciences. Wes Bethel, who heads the Scientific Visualization Group in the Computational Research Division, presents an overview of visualization and computer graphics, current research challenges, and future directions for the field.

    1. Call for Proposals: NERSC Initiative for Scientific Exploration - deadline

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      is January 25 NISE Call for Proposals: NERSC Initiative for Scientific Exploration - deadline is January 25 December 20, 2011 by Francesca Verdier NERSC allocates 10% of the total MPP hours on our computational systems through the NERSC Initiative for Scientific Exploration (NISE) program. This year we expect to allocate about 100 million hours to a few large projects. Users who wish to explore a new research area that requires a large amount of computational resources are encouraged to

    2. Berkeley Lab to Collaborate with Intel in Updating Scientific Applications

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      for Manycore Architectures Berkeley Lab to Collaborate with Intel in Updating Scientific Applications for Manycore Architectures Berkeley Lab to Collaborate with Intel in Updating Scientific Applications for Manycore Architectures Codes for Studying Climate Change, Chemistry focus of Lab's Intel Parallel Computing Center June 18, 2014 Contact: Jon Bashor, jbashor@lbl.gov, 510-486-5849 Intel Berkeley Lab's Intel Parallel Computing Center will be led by (from top) Bert de Jong, Hans Johansen

    3. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      DAVENPORT, J.

      2005-11-01

      The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include, for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security. To achieve our goals we have established a close alliance with applied mathematicians and computer scientists at Stony Brook and Columbia Universities.

    4. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2000

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Greiner, A.; Moxon, L.; Robinson, A.; Tamura, L.

      2001-04-01

      This is an annual report, detailing activities at the Advanced Light Source for the year 2000. It includes highlights of scientific research by users of the facility as well as information about the development of the facility itself.

    5. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Informatio...

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      Scientific and Technical Information, Turns Two by Catherine Pepmiller 02 Apr, 2015 in Products and Content As ... space, the discovery of electricity, and the digital computer ...

    6. Four Scientific Approaches | JCESR

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      at the atomic level for the three energy storage concepts. 3. Systems Analysis and Translation designs virtual batteries on the computer, projects their performance, identifies...

    7. TRAC-PF1/MOD1: an advanced best-estimate computer program for pressurized water reactor thermal-hydraulic analysis

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Liles, D.R.; Mahaffy, J.H.

      1986-07-01

      The Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in light-water reactors. The TRAC-PF1/MOD1 program provides this capability for pressurized water reactors and for many thermal-hydraulic test facilities. The code features either a one- or a three-dimensional treatment of the pressure vessel and its associated internals, a two-fluid nonequilibrium hydrodynamics model with a noncondensable gas field and solute tracking, flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment, optional reflood tracking capability for bottom-flood and falling-film quench fronts, and consistent treatment of entire accident sequences including the generation of consistent initial conditions. The stability-enhancing two-step (SETS) numerical algorithm is used in the one-dimensional hydrodynamics and permits this portion of the fluid dynamics to violate the material Courant condition. This technique permits large time steps and, hence, reduced running time for slow transients.

    8. NREL'S Zunger Receives Top Scientific Honors

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Top Scientific Honors For more information contact: Gary Schmitz, 303-275-4050 email: Gary Schmitz Golden, Colo., Nov. 29, 2000 - Alex Zunger, a physicist and research fellow at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has been named the 2001 recipient of the prestigious Rahman Award by the American Physical Society (APS). The award from the APS is bestowed once annually to an individual for "outstanding achievement in computational physics research."

    9. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORYS CAPABILITIES FOR ADVANCED ANALYSES OF CYBER THREATS

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      DePhillips M. P.

      2014-06-06

      BNL has several ongoing, mature, and successful programs and areas of core scientific expertise that readily could be modified to address problems facing national security and efforts by the IC related to securing our nation’s computer networks. In supporting these programs, BNL houses an expansive, scalable infrastructure built exclusively for transporting, storing, and analyzing large disparate data-sets. Our ongoing research projects on various infrastructural issues in computer science undoubtedly would be relevant to national security. Furthermore, BNL frequently partners with researchers in academia and industry worldwide to foster unique and innovative ideas for expanding research opportunities and extending our insights. Because the basic science conducted at BNL is unique, such projects have led to advanced techniques, unlike any others, to support our mission of discovery. Many of them are modular techniques, thus making them ideal for abstraction and retrofitting to other uses including those facing national security, specifically the safety of the nation’s cyber space.

    10. 2015 Scientific Advisory Committee Meeting | Photosynthetic Antenna

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Research Center Scientific Advisory Committee Meeting 2015 Scientific Advisory Committee Meeting June 25, 2015

    11. Scientific Exchange Program deadline | Photosynthetic Antenna...

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Scientific Exchange Program deadline Scientific Exchange Program deadline Applications due February...

    12. Final Report: Super Instruction Architecture for Scalable Parallel Computations

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Sanders, Beverly Ann; Bartlett, Rodney; Deumens, Erik

      2013-12-23

      The most advanced methods for reliable and accurate computation of the electronic structure of molecular and nano systems are the coupled-cluster techniques. These high-accuracy methods help us to understand, for example, how biological enzymes operate and contribute to the design of new organic explosives. The ACES III software provides a modern, high-performance implementation of these methods optimized for high performance parallel computer systems, ranging from small clusters typical in individual research groups, through larger clusters available in campus and regional computer centers, all the way to high-end petascale systems at national labs, including exploiting GPUs if available. This project enhanced the ACESIII software package and used it to study interesting scientific problems.

    13. Advanced Technology Development and Mitigation | National Nuclear...

      National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

      Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home About Us Our Programs Defense Programs Future Science & Technology Programs Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D...

    14. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies

      Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

      dioxide power cycles, hybrid systems matching renewables with nuclear or fossil, and energy storage. Advanced capabilities in materials, computing, and manufacturing can...

    15. Feedback-based, muLti-dimensional Interface as a General Human-Computer Tech.

      Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

      2002-05-13

      FLIGHT is a 3D human-computer interface and application development software that can be used by both end users and programmers. It is based on advanced feedback and a multi-dimensional nature that more closely resembles real life interactions. The software uses a craft metaphor and allows multimodal feedback for advanced tools and navigation techniques. Overall, FLIGHT is a software that is based on the principle that as the human-computer interface is strengthened through the use ofmore » more intuitive inputs and more effective feedback, the computer itself will be for more valuable. FLIGHT has been used to visualize scientific data sets in 3D graphics at Sandia National Laboratories.« less

    16. Workshop on Scientific Directions at the Advanced Light Source...

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      Authors: Plummer, Ward E. ; Awschalom, David ; Russell, T. ; Cohen, M. ; Somorjai, G. ; Brown, Jr., Gordon E. ; Fleming, Graham ; Greene, C. ; Houston, Paul L. ; Smith, Neville V. ...

    17. DOE Announces First Awards in Scientific Discovery through Advanced...

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      ... Four projects in high energy and nuclear physics will significantly extend our exploration of the fundamental processes of nature. The projects include the search for the explosion ...

    18. Final Technical Report - Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific...

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      The Maryland work focused on software tools for coupling parallel software components built using the Common Component Architecture (CCA) APIs. Those tools are based on the ...

    19. #WomenInSTEM: A Physicist Focuses on Scientific Advancement

      ScienceCinema (OSTI)

      Capece, Angela

      2014-07-21

      Dr. Capece first became interested in science after learning about NASA's Voyager missions at an early age. In this video, Dr. Capece provides advice for women and girls interested in pursuing careers in STEM fields, like focusing on physics, biology and chemistry at the high school level. This video is part of the Energy Department's #WomenInSTEM video series. At the Energy Department, we're committed to supporting a diverse talent pool of STEM innovators ready to address the challenges and opportunities of our growing clean energy economy.

    20. A. Hampel (Scientific Consultant)

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      2 September 9 - Tuesday TM-behavior of salt 08:30-08:50 Update on the "Joint Project on Constitutive Laws benchmark" A. Hampel (Scientific Consultant) 08:50-09:10 Modeling WIPP rooms B/D L. ArgĂĽello (SNL) 09:10-09:30 Laboratory tests on WIPP salt (update) U. DĂĽsterloh (TU Clausthal) 09:30-09:50 Laboratory tests on WIPP salt (update) T. Popp (IfG) 09:50-10:10 Complementary laboratory tests on WIPP salt at higher temperatures I. Plischke (BGR) 10:10-10:30 Characterization of halite

    1. Applied Computer Science

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      ADTSC » CCS » CCS-7 Applied Computer Science Innovative co-design of applications, algorithms, and architectures in order to enable scientific simulations at extreme scale Leadership Group Leader Linn Collins Email Deputy Group Leader (Acting) Bryan Lally Email Climate modeling visualization Results from a climate simulation computed using the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) code. This visualization shows the temperature of ocean currents using a green and blue color scale. These

    2. FY 2012 Budget Request Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      ... efforts to develop near real-time analysis of events that could impact energy ... development of computational, mathematical, and scientific understanding ...

    3. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      plant power uprates, life extension, and higher burnup fuels Provide the primary bridge between the scientific and computational capabilities developed by CASL and external...

    4. Advanced Gasificatioin

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Advanced Gasification Research Team Members Key Contacts Advanced Gasification Carbon feedstock gasification is a promising pathway for high-efficiency, low-pollutant power generation and chemical production. The inability, however, to meet a number of operational goals could create roadblocks to widespread acceptance and commercialization of advanced gasification technologies. We must, for example, achieve gasifier online availability of 85-95 percent in utility applications, and 95 percent for

    5. Computing and Computational Sciences Directorate - Information Technology

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Computational Sciences and Engineering The Computational Sciences and Engineering Division (CSED) is ORNL's premier source of basic and applied research in the field of data sciences and knowledge discovery. CSED's science agenda is focused on research and development related to knowledge discovery enabled by the explosive growth in the availability, size, and variability of dynamic and disparate data sources. This science agenda encompasses data sciences as well as advanced modeling and

    6. 2014 Advanced Grid Modeling Program Peer Review | Department of Energy

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      Advanced Grid Modeling Program Peer Review 2014 Advanced Grid Modeling Program Peer Review The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability held a peer review of the Advanced Grid Modeling Program on June 17-18, 2014 in Alexandria, VA. The Advanced Grid Modeling Research Program leverages scientific research in mathematics for application to power system models and software tools. More than 17 projects were presented at the 2014 Advanced Grid Modeling Peer Review. The agenda is provided

    7. DOE Awards Over a Billion Supercomputing Hours to Address Scientific

      Energy Savers [EERE]

      Challenges | Department of Energy Over a Billion Supercomputing Hours to Address Scientific Challenges DOE Awards Over a Billion Supercomputing Hours to Address Scientific Challenges January 26, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC. - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that approximately 1.6 billion supercomputing processor hours have been awarded to 69 cutting-edge research projects through the Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) program.

    8. Call for Nominations for 2016 NERSC Scientific Achievement Awards

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Call for Nominations (2016) Call for Nominations for 2016 NERSC Scientific Achievement Awards Nominations are open for the 2016 NERSC Award for Innovative Use of High Performance Computing and the 2016 NERSC Award for High Impact Scientific Achievement. NERSC Principal Investigators, Project Managers, PI Proxies, and DOE Program Managers may nominate any NERSC user or collaboratory group. The deadline for nominations is Friday, March 4, 2016. Winners will be announced at the NERSC Users Group

    9. Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop

      ScienceCinema (OSTI)

      None

      2011-10-06

      The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilities  International Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden) Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis Vlachoudis Workshop Assistant: Géraldine Jean

    10. Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop

      ScienceCinema (OSTI)

      None

      2011-10-06

      The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilities  International Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden) Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis Vlachoudis Workshop Assistant: Géraldine Jean

    11. CNM Scientific Contact List | Argonne National Laboratory

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      CNM Scientific Contact List A list of scientific contacts for the Center for Nanoscale Materials PDF icon CNM Scientific Contact sheet 915...

    12. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological and Environmental Research

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      DOE Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research Program Office ,

      2009-09-30

      In May 2009, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), and DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for BER-funded research over the subsequent three to five years. The workshop revealed several key points, in addition to achieving its goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. Chief among them: scientific progress in BER-funded research is limited by current allocations of computational resources. Additionally, growth in mission-critical computing -- combined with new requirements for collaborative data manipulation and analysis -- will demand ever increasing computing, storage, network, visualization, reliability and service richness from NERSC. This report expands upon these key points and adds others. It also presents a number of"case studies" as significant representative samples of the needs of science teams within BER. Workshop participants were asked to codify their requirements in this"case study" format, summarizing their science goals, methods of solution, current and 3-5 year computing requirements, and special software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel,"multi-core" environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years.

    13. Scientific Challenges for Understanding the Quantum Universe

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Khaleel, Mohammad A.

      2009-10-16

      A workshop titled "Scientific Challenges for Understanding the Quantum Universe" was held December 9-11, 2008, at the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center-National Accelerator Laboratory. The primary purpose of the meeting was to examine how computing at the extreme scale can contribute to meeting forefront scientific challenges in particle physics, particle astrophysics and cosmology. The workshop was organized around five research areas with associated panels. Three of these, "High Energy Theoretical Physics," "Accelerator Simulation," and "Experimental Particle Physics," addressed research of the Office of High Energy Physics’ Energy and Intensity Frontiers, while the"Cosmology and Astrophysics Simulation" and "Astrophysics Data Handling, Archiving, and Mining" panels were associated with the Cosmic Frontier.

    14. Computation & Simulation > Theory & Computation > Research >...

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      it. Click above to view. computational2 computational3 In This Section Computation & Simulation Computation & Simulation Extensive combinatorial results and ongoing basic...

    15. Fundamental Scientific Problems in Magnetic Recording

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Schulthess, T.C.; Miller, M.K.

      2007-06-27

      Magnetic data storage technology is presently leading the high tech industry in advancing device integration--doubling the storage density every 12 months. To continue these advancements and to achieve terra bit per inch squared recording densities, new approaches to store and access data will be needed in about 3-5 years. In this project, collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Center for Materials for Information Technology (MINT) at University of Alabama (UA), Imago Scientific Instruments, and Seagate Technologies, was undertaken to address the fundamental scientific problems confronted by the industry in meeting the upcoming challenges. The areas that were the focus of this study were to: (1) develop atom probe tomography for atomic scale imaging of magnetic heterostructures used in magnetic data storage technology; (2) develop a first principles based tools for the study of exchange bias aimed at finding new anti-ferromagnetic materials to reduce the thickness of the pinning layer in the read head; (3) develop high moment magnetic materials and tools to study magnetic switching in nanostructures aimed at developing improved writers of high anisotropy magnetic storage media.

    16. Accelerating Advanced Material Development

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Materials Research in the Information Age Accelerating Advanced Material Development NERSC Science Gateway a 'Google of Material Properties' October 31, 2011 Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 Kristin Persson is one of the founding scientists behind the Materials Project, a computational tool aimed at taking the guesswork out of new materials discoveries, especially those aimed at energy applications like batteries. (Roy Kaltschmidt, LBNL) New materials are crucial to building a clean energy

    17. Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation and Computing

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      these models are then incorporated into integrated design codes. Verification and Validation develops and improves methods, metrics, and standards to assess code and model...

    18. Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation and Computing...

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      bahendr@sandia.gov Program Manager David Womble dewombl@sandia.gov Integrated Codes Lead Scott Hutchinson sahutch@sandia.gov Physics & Engineering Modeling Lead Jim Redmond...

    19. Advanced Computational Methods for Turbulence and Combustion

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      flow, local burning, and emissions across a range of flow and fueling scenarios at a spectacular level of detail (see image). The simulated chemical details are experimentally...

    20. Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation Computing:...

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      System response prediction capability includes mechanical (large deformation, contact, fracture), thermal (conduction, surface radiation), and lightning (arc). Radiation...

    1. Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation and Computing...

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Crack Modeling The Physics & Engineering Models program provides the models and databases used in simulations supporting the U.S. stockpile. These models and databases...

    2. Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation and Computing...

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      located at other laboratories. These interconnects require constant observation and analysis as minor changes or error conditions can drastically alter the performance of...

    3. Advanced Health Monitoring of Computer Cluster

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Sherry Salas Mentors: Susan Coulter, Andree Jacobson, Kevin Tegtmeier LANL ISTIIAS ClusterNetwork Management Summer Institute August 2, 2007 Problem As a cluster grows in...

    4. Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation and Computing...

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      and surfaces for finite element analysis. Trilinos Trilinos is an extensive open source software library that provides users with a variety of solvers for use on parallel...

    5. Advanced Simulation and Computing Business Plan

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Rummel, E.

      2015-07-09

      To maintain a credible nuclear weapons program, the National Nuclear Security Administration’s (NNSA’s) Office of Defense Programs (DP) needs to make certain that the capabilities, tools, and expert staff are in place and are able to deliver validated assessments. This requires a complete and robust simulation environment backed by an experimental program to test ASC Program models. This ASC Business Plan document encapsulates a complex set of elements, each of which is essential to the success of the simulation component of the Nuclear Security Enterprise. The ASC Business Plan addresses the hiring, mentoring, and retaining of programmatic technical staff responsible for building the simulation tools of the nuclear security complex. The ASC Business Plan describes how the ASC Program engages with industry partners—partners upon whom the ASC Program relies on for today’s and tomorrow’s high performance architectures. Each piece in this chain is essential to assure policymakers, who must make decisions based on the results of simulations, that they are receiving all the actionable information they need.

    6. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Gerber, Richard A.; Wasserman, Harvey

      2010-11-24

      The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the leading scientific computing facility for the Department of Energy's Office of Science, providing high-performance computing (HPC) resources to more than 3,000 researchers working on about 400 projects. NERSC provides large-scale computing resources and, crucially, the support and expertise needed for scientists to make effective use of them. In November 2009, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), and DOE's Office of High Energy Physics (HEP) held a workshop to characterize the HPC resources needed at NERSC to support HEP research through the next three to five years. The effort is part of NERSC's legacy of anticipating users needs and deploying resources to meet those demands. The workshop revealed several key points, in addition to achieving its goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. The chief findings: (1) Science teams need access to a significant increase in computational resources to meet their research goals; (2) Research teams need to be able to read, write, transfer, store online, archive, analyze, and share huge volumes of data; (3) Science teams need guidance and support to implement their codes on future architectures; and (4) Projects need predictable, rapid turnaround of their computational jobs to meet mission-critical time constraints. This report expands upon these key points and includes others. It also presents a number of case studies as representative of the research conducted within HEP. Workshop participants were asked to codify their requirements in this case study format, summarizing their science goals, methods of solution, current and three-to-five year computing requirements, and software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel, multi-core environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. The report includes a section that describes efforts already underway or planned at NERSC that address requirements collected at the workshop. NERSC has many initiatives in progress that address key workshop findings and are aligned with NERSC's strategic plans.

    7. Introduction to computers: Reference guide

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Ligon, F.V.

      1995-04-01

      The ``Introduction to Computers`` program establishes formal partnerships with local school districts and community-based organizations, introduces computer literacy to precollege students and their parents, and encourages students to pursue Scientific, Mathematical, Engineering, and Technical careers (SET). Hands-on assignments are given in each class, reinforcing the lesson taught. In addition, the program is designed to broaden the knowledge base of teachers in scientific/technical concepts, and Brookhaven National Laboratory continues to act as a liaison, offering educational outreach to diverse community organizations and groups. This manual contains the teacher`s lesson plans and the student documentation to this introduction to computer course.

    8. Scientific Data Management (SDM) Center for Enabling Technologies. Final Report, 2007-2012

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Ludascher, Bertram; Altintas, Ilkay

      2013-09-06

      Our contributions to advancing the State of the Art in scientific workflows have focused on the following areas: Workflow development; Generic workflow components and templates; Provenance collection and analysis; and, Workflow reliability and fault tolerance.

    9. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Informatio...

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      Who knows what great things the next 50 years will bring? One thing is for sure: equipped with state-of-the-art facilities and an advanced suite of scientific tools and expertise, ...

    10. ALS Scientific Advisory Committee Charter

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      would create or appear to create a conflict of interest. *Formerly known as Program Advisory Committee (PAC) (rev. 1 - February 15, 1995) Scientific Advisory Committee...

    11. Scientific and Technical Information Management

      Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

      2003-10-14

      The Order establishes requirements and responsibilities for managing DOE's scientific and technical information. Cancels DOE O 241.1. Canceled by DOE O 241.1B.

    12. DOE Awards 265 Million Hours of Supercomputing Time to Advance Leading

      Energy Savers [EERE]

      Scientific Research Projects | Department of Energy 265 Million Hours of Supercomputing Time to Advance Leading Scientific Research Projects DOE Awards 265 Million Hours of Supercomputing Time to Advance Leading Scientific Research Projects January 17, 2008 - 10:38am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science today announced that 265 million processor-hours were awarded to 55 scientific projects, the largest amount of supercomputing resource awards

    13. Acquisition of Scientific Equipment

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Noland, Lynn [Director, Sponsored Programs] [Director, Sponsored Programs

      2014-05-16

      Whitworth University constructed a 63,00 sq. ft. biology and chemistry building which opened in the Fall of 2011. This project provided for new state-of-the-art science instrumentation enabling Whitworth students to develop skills and knowledge that are directly transferable to practical applications thus enhancing Whitworth student's ability to compete and perform in the scientific workforce. Additionally, STEM faculty undertake outreach programs in the area schools, bringing students to our campus to engage in activities with our science students. The ability to work with insturmentation that is current helps to make science exciting for middle school and high school students and gets them thinking about careers in science. 14 items were purchased following the university's purchasing policy, that benefit instruction and research in the departments of biology, chemistry, and health sciences. They are: Cadaver Dissection Tables with Exhaust Chamber and accessories, Research Microscope with DF DIC, Phase and Fluorescence illumination with DP72 Camera, Microscope with Fluorescence, Microcomputer controlled ultracentrifuge, Ultracentrifuge rotor, Variable Temperature steam pressure sterilizer, Alliance APLC System, DNA Speedvac, Gel Cocumentation System, BioPac MP150, Glovebox personal workstation,Lyophilizer, Nano Drop 2000/2000c Spectrophotometer, C02 Incubator.

    14. Advanced Combustion

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Advanced Combustion Fact Sheet Key Contacts Advanced Combustion Background Conventional coal-fired power plants utilize steam turbines to generate electricity, which operate at efficiencies of 35-37 percent. Operation at higher temperatures and pressures can lead to higher efficiencies. Oxy-combustion comes with an efficiency loss, so it will actually increase the amount of CO2 to be captured. But without so much N2 in the flue gas, it will be easier and perhaps more efficient to capture,

    15. Cielo Computational Environment Usage Model With Mappings to...

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      Cielo is a massively parallel supercomputer funded by the DOENNSA Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program, and operated by the Alliance for Computing at Extreme Scale ...

    16. About ALCF | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      HPC at Argonne About ALCF The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility's (ALCF) mission is to accelerate major scientific discoveries and engineering breakthroughs for humanity by designing and providing world-leading computing facilities in partnership with the computational science community. We help researchers solve some of the world's largest and most complex problems with our unique combination of supercomputing resources and expertise. ALCF projects cover many scientific disciplines, ranging

    17. 2011 Computation Directorate Annual Report

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Crawford, D L

      2012-04-11

      From its founding in 1952 until today, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has made significant strategic investments to develop high performance computing (HPC) and its application to national security and basic science. Now, 60 years later, the Computation Directorate and its myriad resources and capabilities have become a key enabler for LLNL programs and an integral part of the effort to support our nation's nuclear deterrent and, more broadly, national security. In addition, the technological innovation HPC makes possible is seen as vital to the nation's economic vitality. LLNL, along with other national laboratories, is working to make supercomputing capabilities and expertise available to industry to boost the nation's global competitiveness. LLNL is on the brink of an exciting milestone with the 2012 deployment of Sequoia, the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA's) 20-petaFLOP/s resource that will apply uncertainty quantification to weapons science. Sequoia will bring LLNL's total computing power to more than 23 petaFLOP/s-all brought to bear on basic science and national security needs. The computing systems at LLNL provide game-changing capabilities. Sequoia and other next-generation platforms will enable predictive simulation in the coming decade and leverage industry trends, such as massively parallel and multicore processors, to run petascale applications. Efficient petascale computing necessitates refining accuracy in materials property data, improving models for known physical processes, identifying and then modeling for missing physics, quantifying uncertainty, and enhancing the performance of complex models and algorithms in macroscale simulation codes. Nearly 15 years ago, NNSA's Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI), now called the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program, was the critical element needed to shift from test-based confidence to science-based confidence. Specifically, ASCI/ASC accelerated the development of simulation capabilities necessary to ensure confidence in the nuclear stockpile-far exceeding what might have been achieved in the absence of a focused initiative. While stockpile stewardship research pushed LLNL scientists to develop new computer codes, better simulation methods, and improved visualization technologies, this work also stimulated the exploration of HPC applications beyond the standard sponsor base. As LLNL advances to a petascale platform and pursues exascale computing (1,000 times faster than Sequoia), ASC will be paramount to achieving predictive simulation and uncertainty quantification. Predictive simulation and quantifying the uncertainty of numerical predictions where little-to-no data exists demands exascale computing and represents an expanding area of scientific research important not only to nuclear weapons, but to nuclear attribution, nuclear reactor design, and understanding global climate issues, among other fields. Aside from these lofty goals and challenges, computing at LLNL is anything but 'business as usual.' International competition in supercomputing is nothing new, but the HPC community is now operating in an expanded, more aggressive climate of global competitiveness. More countries understand how science and technology research and development are inextricably linked to economic prosperity, and they are aggressively pursuing ways to integrate HPC technologies into their native industrial and consumer products. In the interest of the nation's economic security and the science and technology that underpins it, LLNL is expanding its portfolio and forging new collaborations. We must ensure that HPC remains an asymmetric engine of innovation for the Laboratory and for the U.S. and, in doing so, protect our research and development dynamism and the prosperity it makes possible. One untapped area of opportunity LLNL is pursuing is to help U.S. industry understand how supercomputing can benefit their business. Industrial investment in HPC applications has historically been limited by the prohibitive cost of entry, the inaccessibility of software to run the powerful systems, and the years it takes to grow the expertise to develop codes and run them in an optimal way. LLNL is helping industry better compete in the global market place by providing access to some of the world's most powerful computing systems, the tools to run them, and the experts who are adept at using them. Our scientists are collaborating side by side with industrial partners to develop solutions to some of industry's toughest problems. The goal of the Livermore Valley Open Campus High Performance Computing Innovation Center is to allow American industry the opportunity to harness the power of supercomputing by leveraging the scientific and computational expertise at LLNL in order to gain a competitive advantage in the global economy.

    18. Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies Overview Bruce P. Hallbert DOE-NE Webinar September 16, 2014 Light Water Sustainability Program Goals and Scope * Develop the fundamental scientific basis to understand, predict, and measure changes in materials and structures, systems, and components (SSCs) as they age in environments * Apply this knowledge to develop and demonstrate methods and technologies that support safe and economical long-term operation of existing

    19. Computing at the leading edge: Research in the energy sciences

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Mirin, A.A.; Van Dyke, P.T.

      1994-02-01

      The purpose of this publication is to highlight selected scientific challenges that have been undertaken by the DOE Energy Research community. The high quality of the research reflected in these contributions underscores the growing importance both to the Grand Challenge scientific efforts sponsored by DOE and of the related supporting technologies that the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) and other facilities are able to provide. The continued improvement of the computing resources available to DOE scientists is prerequisite to ensuring their future progress in solving the Grand Challenges. Titles of articles included in this publication include: the numerical tokamak project; static and animated molecular views of a tumorigenic chemical bound to DNA; toward a high-performance climate systems model; modeling molecular processes in the environment; lattice Boltzmann models for flow in porous media; parallel algorithms for modeling superconductors; parallel computing at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory; the advanced combustion modeling environment; adaptive methodologies for computational fluid dynamics; lattice simulations of quantum chromodynamics; simulating high-intensity charged-particle beams for the design of high-power accelerators; electronic structure and phase stability of random alloys.

    20. High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment, CY...

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      around the world for computational simulations relevant to national and energy security; advancing the frontiers of knowledge in physical sciences and areas of ...

    1. Fermilab | Science at Fermilab | Computing

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Computing Computing is indispensable to science at Fermilab. High-energy physics experiments generate an astounding amount of data that physicists need to store, analyze and communicate with others. Cutting-edge technology allows scientists to work quickly and efficiently to advance our understanding of the world . Fermilab's Computing Division is recognized for its expertise in handling huge amounts of data, its success in high-speed parallel computing and its willingness to take its craft in

    2. NERSC, Cray Move Forward With Next-Generation Scientific Computing

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      do." "NERSC and Cray share a common vision around the convergence of supercomputing and big data, and Cori will embody that overarching technical direction with a number of...

    3. Scientific Computing at Los Alamos National Laboratory (Conference...

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      for visitors (e.g., Bill Gates visit ; 2014-06-30 - 2014-06-30 ; los alamos, New Mexico, United States Research Org: Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Sponsoring Org:...

    4. The implications of spatial locality on scientific computing...

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Proposed for presentation at the 2005 IEEE International Symposium on Workload Characterization held October 6-8, 2005 in ...

    5. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center NERSC Exceeds...

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      NERSC stores data from some of the largest experimental devices in the world, including the Large Hadron Col- lider in Europe, the Daya Bay Neutrino detector in China, the Planck ...

    6. NERSC Enhances PDSF, Genepool Computing Capabilities

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Enhances PDSF, Genepool Computing Capabilities NERSC Enhances PDSF, Genepool Computing Capabilities Linux cluster expansion speeds data access and analysis January 3, 2014 Christmas came early for users of the Parallel Distributed Systems Facility (PDSF) and Genepool systems at Department of Energy's National Energy Research Scientific Computer Center (NERSC). Throughout November members of NERSC's Computational Systems Group were busy expanding the Linux computing resources that support PDSF's

    7. Molecular Science Computing: 2010 Greenbook

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      De Jong, Wibe A.; Cowley, David E.; Dunning, Thom H.; Vorpagel, Erich R.

      2010-04-02

      This 2010 Greenbook outlines the science drivers for performing integrated computational environmental molecular research at EMSL and defines the next-generation HPC capabilities that must be developed at the MSC to address this critical research. The EMSL MSC Science Panel used EMSL’s vision and science focus and white papers from current and potential future EMSL scientific user communities to define the scientific direction and resulting HPC resource requirements presented in this 2010 Greenbook.

    8. 2014 Advanced Grid Modeling Peer Review Presentations - Day One Afternoon

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      Session | Department of Energy Afternoon Session 2014 Advanced Grid Modeling Peer Review Presentations - Day One Afternoon Session The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability held a peer review of the Advanced Grid Modeling Program on June 17-18, 2014 in Alexandria, VA. The Advanced Grid Modeling Research Program leverages scientific research in mathematics for application to power system models and software tools. More than 17 projects were presented at the 2014 Advanced Grid

    9. 2014 Advanced Grid Modeling Peer Review Presentations - Day One Morning

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      Session | Department of Energy Morning Session 2014 Advanced Grid Modeling Peer Review Presentations - Day One Morning Session The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability held a peer review of the Advanced Grid Modeling Program on June 17-18, 2014 in Alexandria, VA. The Advanced Grid Modeling Research Program leverages scientific research in mathematics for application to power system models and software tools. More than 17 projects were presented at the 2014 Advanced Grid

    10. 2014 Advanced Grid Modeling Peer Review Presentations - Day Two Afternoon

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      Session | Department of Energy Afternoon Session 2014 Advanced Grid Modeling Peer Review Presentations - Day Two Afternoon Session The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability held a peer review of the Advanced Grid Modeling Program on June 17-18, 2014 in Alexandria, VA. The Advanced Grid Modeling Research Program leverages scientific research in mathematics for application to power system models and software tools. More than 17 projects were presented at the 2014 Advanced Grid

    11. 2014 Advanced Grid Modeling Peer Review Presentations - Day Two Morning

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      Session | Department of Energy Morning Session 2014 Advanced Grid Modeling Peer Review Presentations - Day Two Morning Session The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability held a peer review of the Advanced Grid Modeling Program on June 17-18, 2014 in Alexandria, VA. The Advanced Grid Modeling Research Program leverages scientific research in mathematics for application to power system models and software tools. More than 17 projects were presented at the 2014 Advanced Grid

    12. 2014 Advanced Grid Modeling Program Peer Review Presentations Now Available

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      | Department of Energy Advanced Grid Modeling Program Peer Review Presentations Now Available 2014 Advanced Grid Modeling Program Peer Review Presentations Now Available July 10, 2014 - 6:01pm Addthis The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability held a peer review of the Advanced Grid Modeling Program on June 17-18, 2014 in Alexandria, VA. The Advanced Grid Modeling Research Program leverages scientific research in mathematics for application to power system models and software

    13. Final Scientific Report

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Suzanne Lutwick; Helen Cunning

      2011-05-25

      Hackensack University Medical Center's major initiative to create a cleaner healthier and safer environment for patients, employees and the community served by the medical center is built on its commitment to protect the environment and conserve precious energy resources. Since 2004 the Medical Center launched a long term campaign to temper the negative environmental impact of proposed and existing new construction at the medical center and to improve campus wide overall energy efficiency. The plan was to begin by implementing a number of innovative and eco-friendly enhancements to the Gabrellian Women's and Children's Pavilion, in construction at the time, which would lead to Certification by the US Green Building Councils Leadership & Environmental Design (LEED) program. In addition the medical center would evaluate the feasibility of implementing a photovoltaic system in the new construction (in development and planned) to provide clean pollution free electricity. The steps taken to achieve this included conducting a feasibility study complete with architectural and engineering assessments to determine the potential for implementation of a photovoltaic system on the campus and also to conduct an energy survey that would focus on determining specific opportunities and upgrades that would lead to a healthier energy efficient interior environment at the medical center. The studies conducted by the medical center to determine the viability of installing a photovoltaic system identified two key issues that factored into leaderships decision not to implement the solar powered system. These factors were related to the advanced phase of construction of the women's and children's pavilion and the financial considerations to redesign and implement in the ambulatory cancer center. The medical center, in spite of their inability to proceed with the solar aspect of the project upheld their commitment to create a healthier environment for the patients and the community. To achieve a healthier energy efficient interior environment the medical center made substantive upgrades and improvements to the HVAC, plumbing electrical and other operating systems. Measures that were implemented range from use of lighting and plumbing fixture sensors, to reduce electrical and water usage, to use of refrigerants containing hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) which cause significantly less depletion of the ozone layer than the refrigerants more commonly used. Additional appropriate energy efficiency component upgrades include the installation of Chiller plants with variable frequency drives (VFDs) and harmonic filters, high efficiency motors, solar window glazing, and lighting/motion sensors.

    14. DOE SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL REPORTS

      Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

      The Record Disposition Schedule items listed below are have been consolidated from DOE Records Schedules previously approved over the last 35 years. They apply specifically to those scientific and...

    15. September is Scientific Supercomputing Month

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      is Scientific Supercomputing Month DOE celebrates the science and technology that drive modern discovery September 3, 2013 hopper2cshp.jpg NERSC's flagship Cray XE6 system is...

    16. ALS Scientific Advisory Committee Charter

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Scientific Advisory Committee Charter Print This document was revised and approved December 18, 2008. I. FUNCTION AND REPORTING The ALS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) is advisory to the Berkeley Lab Director through the ALS Director. The SAC serves two primary functions: It acts as a "board of directors" to advise the Laboratory on current and future ALS operations, allocation of facility resources, strategic planning, budget development, and other major issues; and It reviews

    17. ALS Scientific Advisory Committee Charter

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Scientific Advisory Committee Charter Print This document was revised and approved December 18, 2008. I. FUNCTION AND REPORTING The ALS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) is advisory to the Berkeley Lab Director through the ALS Director. The SAC serves two primary functions: It acts as a "board of directors" to advise the Laboratory on current and future ALS operations, allocation of facility resources, strategic planning, budget development, and other major issues; and It reviews

    18. Nuclear Advances | Y-12 National Security Complex

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Advances Nuclear Advances Posted: February 11, 2013 - 2:52pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 9, Issue 2 | 2013 The scope of research and development at the Y-12 National Security Complex has widened from a single-focus World War II defense mission to a panoply of explorations and achievements. Seventy years of projects with members of the Nuclear Security Enterprise, other government agencies, universities and private industry have supercharged Y-12 into an invaluable scientific and technological

    19. Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics | Members

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Spectroscopic Capabilities of CASP and Open Challenges Istvan Robel Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics, Chemistry Division, LANL Wednesday, April 1st, 1:30pm Chemistry Division Auditorium, TA-46, Bld. 535, Rm. 103 Abstract This presentation is the third in a series of informational seminars conducted in conjunction with a call for exploratory projects (http://casp.lanl.gov/call.shtml) issued by the Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics (CASP). Through examples of scientific challenges

    20. Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation | Department of Energy

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      Sensors and Instrumentation Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation The ASI subprogram plans to develop the scientific basis for sensors and supporting infrastructure technology that will address crosscutting technology gaps relating to measurements at existing and advanced nuclear power plants as well as within their fuel cycles. The focus of the program is on the following technical challenges and objectives: Identify needed physical measurement accuracy of nuclear system process parameters and

    1. Advanced Combustion

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Holcomb, Gordon R.

      2013-03-11

      The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

    2. Advanced Biofuels

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

    3. Advanced Imaging

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Imaging - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

    4. Advanced Materials

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

    5. Advanced fuel chemistry for advanced engines.

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Taatjes, Craig A.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Zador, Judit; Fernandes, Ravi X.; Miller, James A.

      2009-09-01

      Autoignition chemistry is central to predictive modeling of many advanced engine designs that combine high efficiency and low inherent pollutant emissions. This chemistry, and especially its pressure dependence, is poorly known for fuels derived from heavy petroleum and for biofuels, both of which are becoming increasingly prominent in the nation's fuel stream. We have investigated the pressure dependence of key ignition reactions for a series of molecules representative of non-traditional and alternative fuels. These investigations combined experimental characterization of hydroxyl radical production in well-controlled photolytically initiated oxidation and a hybrid modeling strategy that linked detailed quantum chemistry and computational kinetics of critical reactions with rate-equation models of the global chemical system. Comprehensive mechanisms for autoignition generally ignore the pressure dependence of branching fractions in the important alkyl + O{sub 2} reaction systems; however we have demonstrated that pressure-dependent 'formally direct' pathways persist at in-cylinder pressures.

    6. Venkatram Vishwanath | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      leadership-class computers, including IO forwarding and power consumption on the Blue GenP and Blue GeneQ systems. Vishwanath won a Department of Energy SciDAC Scientific...

    7. Scientific Advisory Committee | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation...

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Scientific Advisory Committee Role and Charter of the SSRL SAC Scope The SSRL Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) reports to and advises the SSRL Director on issues related to:...

    8. Scientific Advisory Committee | Photosynthetic Antenna Research...

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Marion Thurnauer Scientific Advisory Committee Member Read more about Marion Thurnauer Thomas Moore Thomas Moore Scientific Advisory Committee Chair Read more about Thomas Moore...

    9. Topco Scientific Company Ltd | Open Energy Information

      Open Energy Info (EERE)

      Topco Scientific Company Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Topco Scientific Company Ltd Place: Taipei City, Taiwan Sector: Solar Product: String representation "Its principal a...

    10. Taiflex Scientific Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

      Open Energy Info (EERE)

      Taiflex Scientific Co Ltd Place: Kaohsiung, Taiwan Product: Taiwan-based electronic material manufacturer. References: Taiflex Scientific Co Ltd1 This article is a stub. You...

    11. Guide to Scientific Management | Argonne National Laboratory

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Guide to Scientific Management A Practical Guide to Scientifc Management for Postdocs and New Faculty. PDF icon Guide to Scientific Management second edition.pdf...

    12. PROJECT PROFILE: Scientific Approach to Reducing Photovoltaic...

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      PROJECT PROFILE: Scientific Approach to Reducing Photovoltaic Module Material Costs While Increasing Durability PROJECT PROFILE: Scientific Approach to Reducing Photovoltaic Module ...

    13. Year 1 Progress Report Computational Materials and Chemical Sciences Network Administration

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Rehr, John J.

      2012-08-02

      This document reports progress on the project “Computational Materials and Chemical Sciences Network Administration,” which is supported by DOE BES Grant DE-FG02-02ER45990 MOD 08. As stated in the original proposal, the primary goal of this project is to carry out the scientific administrative responsibilities for the Computational Materials and Chemical Sciences Network (CMCSN) of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. These responsibilities include organizing meetings, publishing and maintaining CMCSN’s website, publishing a periodic newsletter, writing original material for both the website and the newsletter, maintaining CMCSN documentation, editing scientific documents, as needed, serving as liaison for the entire Network, facilitating information exchange across the network, communicating CMCSN’s success stories to the larger community and numerous other tasks outside the purview of the scientists in the CMCSN. Given the dramatic increase in computational power, advances in computational materials science can have an enormous impact in science and technology. For many of the questions that can be addressed by computation there is a choice of theoretical techniques available, yet often there is no accepted understanding of the relative strengths and effectiveness of the competing approaches. The CMCSN fosters progress in this understanding by providing modest additional funding to research groups which engage in collaborative activities to develop, compare, and test novel computational techniques. Thus, the CMCSN provides the “glue” money which enables different groups to work together, building on their existing programs and expertise while avoiding unnecessary duplication of effort. This includes travel funding, partial postdoc salaries, and funding for periodic scientific meetings. The activities supported by this grant are briefly summarized below.

    14. Compute nodes

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Compute nodes Compute nodes Click here to see more detailed hierachical map of the topology of a compute node. Last edited: 2016-02-01 08:07:08

    15. Sandia Energy - Advanced Controls of Wave Energy Converters May...

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Advanced Controls of Wave Energy Converters May Increase Power Capture Up to 330% Home Renewable Energy Energy Water Power Partnership News News & Events Computational Modeling &...

    16. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      J.C., CASL: Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors - A DOE Energy Innovation Hub, ANS MC2015 Joint Internation Conference on Mathematics and Computation...

    17. Advances In Geothermal Resource Exploration Circa 2007 | Open...

      Open Energy Info (EERE)

      that will indicate the presence of geothermal resources before drilling. Advances in computer technology have propelled geothermal exploration forward, but can only go so far. New...

    18. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Computational design and development of a new, lightweight cast alloy for advanced cylinder heads in high-efficiency, light-duty engines FOA 648-3a

      Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

      Presentation given by General Motors at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about computational design and...

    19. Computing Information

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      here you can find information relating to: Obtaining the right computer accounts. Using NIC terminals. Using BooNE's Computing Resources, including: Choosing your desktop....

    20. Computer System,

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      undergraduate summer institute http:isti.lanl.gov (Educational Prog) 2016 Computer System, Cluster, and Networking Summer Institute Purpose The Computer System,...

    1. Scientific and Technical Information Management

      Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

      2001-04-09

      To establish Department of Energy (DOE) requirements and responsibilities to ensure that scientific and technical information (STI) is identified, processed, disseminated, and preserved in a manner that (a) enables the scientific community and the public to locate and use the unclassified and unlimited STI resulting from DOE's research and related endeavors and (b) ensures access to classified and sensitive unclassified STI is protected according to legal or Departmental requirements. Cancels DOE O 241.1. Canceled by DOE O 241.1A Chg 1.

    2. Mira | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Computing Resources Mira Cetus and Vesta Visualization Cluster Data and Networking Software JLSE Featured Videos Mira: Argonne's 10-Petaflop Supercomputer Mira's Dedication Ceremony Introducing Mira: Our Next-Generation Supercomputer Mira Mira Ushers in a New Era of Scientific Supercomputing As one of the fastest supercomputers, Mira, our 10-petaflops IBM Blue Gene/Q system, is capable of 10 quadrillion calculations per second. With this computing power, Mira can do in one day what it would take

    3. NERSC Intern Wins Award for Computing Achievement

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Intern Wins Award for Computing Achievement NERSC Intern Wins Award for Computing Achievement March 27, 2013 Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 ncwit1 Stephanie Cabanela, a student intern in the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center's (NERSC) Operation Technologies Group was honored with the Bay Area Affiliate National Center for Women and Information Technology (NCWIT) Aspirations in Computing award on Saturday, March 16, 2013 in a ceremony in San Jose, CA. The award honors

    4. Bioinformatics Computing Consultant Position Available

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Bioinformatics Computing Consultant Position Available Bioinformatics Computing Consultant Position Available October 31, 2011 by Katie Antypas NERSC and the Joint Genome Institute (JGI) are searching for two individuals who can help biologists exploit advanced computing platforms. JGI provides production sequencing and genomics for the Department of Energy. These activities are critical to the DOE missions in areas related to clean energy generation and environmental characterization and

    5. computational-fluid-dynamics-training

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Table of Contents Date Location Advanced Hydraulic and Aerodynamic Analysis Using CFD March 27-28, 2013 Argonne TRACC Argonne, IL Computational Hydraulics and Aerodynamics using STAR-CCM+ for CFD Analysis March 21-22, 2012 Argonne TRACC Argonne, IL Computational Hydraulics and Aerodynamics using STAR-CCM+ for CFD Analysis March 30-31, 2011 Argonne TRACC Argonne, IL Computational Hydraulics for Transportation Workshop September 23-24, 2009 Argonne TRACC West Chicago, IL

    6. Computing for Finance

      ScienceCinema (OSTI)

      None

      2011-10-06

      The finance sector is one of the driving forces for the use of distributed or Grid computing for business purposes. The speakers will review the state-of-the-art of high performance computing in the financial sector, and provide insight into how different types of Grid computing ? from local clusters to global networks - are being applied to financial applications. They will also describe the use of software and techniques from physics, such as Monte Carlo simulations, in the financial world. There will be four talks of 20min each. The talk abstracts and speaker bios are listed below. This will be followed by a Q&A; panel session with the speakers. From 19:00 onwards there will be a networking cocktail for audience and speakers. This is an EGEE / CERN openlab event organized in collaboration with the regional business network rezonance.ch. A webcast of the event will be made available for subsequent viewing, along with powerpoint material presented by the speakers. Attendance is free and open to all. Registration is mandatory via www.rezonance.ch, including for CERN staff. 1. Overview of High Performance Computing in the Financial Industry Michael Yoo, Managing Director, Head of the Technical Council, UBS Presentation will describe the key business challenges driving the need for HPC solutions, describe the means in which those challenges are being addressed within UBS (such as GRID) as well as the limitations of some of these solutions, and assess some of the newer HPC technologies which may also play a role in the Financial Industry in the future. Speaker Bio: Michael originally joined the former Swiss Bank Corporation in 1994 in New York as a developer on a large data warehouse project. In 1996 he left SBC and took a role with Fidelity Investments in Boston. Unable to stay away for long, he returned to SBC in 1997 while working for Perot Systems in Singapore. Finally, in 1998 he formally returned to UBS in Stamford following the merger with SBC and has remained with UBS for the past 9 years. During his tenure at UBS, he has had a number of leadership roles within IT in development, support and architecture. In 2006 Michael relocated to Switzerland to take up his current role as head of the UBS IB Technical Council, responsible for the overall technology strategy and vision of the Investment Bank. One of Michael's key responsibilities is to manage the UBS High Performance Computing Research Lab and he has been involved in a number of initiatives in the HPC space. 2. Grid in the Commercial WorldFred Gedling, Chief Technology Officer EMEA and Senior Vice President Global Services, DataSynapse Grid computing gets mentions in the press for community programs starting last decade with "Seti@Home". Government, national and supranational initiatives in grid receive some press. One of the IT-industries' best-kept secrets is the use of grid computing by commercial organizations with spectacular results. Grid Computing and its evolution into Application Virtualization is discussed and how this is key to the next generation data center. Speaker Bio: Fred Gedling holds the joint roles of Chief Technology Officer for EMEA and Senior Vice President of Global Services at DataSynapse, a global provider of application virtualisation software. Based in London and working closely with organisations seeking to optimise their IT infrastructures, Fred offers unique insights into the technology of virtualisation as well as the methodology of establishing ROI and rapid deployment to the immediate advantage of the business. Fred has more than fifteen years experience of enterprise middleware and high-performance infrastructures. Prior to DataSynapse he worked in high performance CRM middleware and was the CTO EMEA for New Era of Networks (NEON) during the rapid growth of Enterprise Application Integration. His 25-year career in technology also includes management positions at Goldman Sachs and Stratus Computer. Fred holds a First Class Bsc (Hons) degree in Physics with Astrophysics from the University of Leeds and had the privilege of being a summer student at CERN.3. Opportunities for gLite in finance and related industriesAdam Vile, Head of Grid, HPC and Technical Computing, Excelian Ltd.gLite, the Grid software developed by the EGEE project, has been exceedingly successful as an enabling infrastructure, and has been a massive success in bringing together scientific and technical communities to provide the compute power to address previously incomputable problems. Not so in the finance industry. In its current form gLite would be a business disabler. There are other middleware tools that solve the finance communities compute problems much better. Things are moving on, however. There are moves afoot in the open source community to evolve the technology to address other, more sophisticated needs such as utility and interactive computing. In this talk, I will describe how Excelian is providing Grid consultancy services for the finance community and how, through its relationship to the EGEE project, Excelian is helping to identify and exploit opportunities as the research and business worlds converge. Because of the strong third party presence in the finance industry, such opportunities are few and far between, but they are there, especially as we expand sideways into related verticals such as the smaller hedge funds and energy companies. This talk will give an overview of the barriers to adoption of gLite in the finance industry and highlight some of the opportunities offered in this and related industries as the ideas around Grid mature. Speaker Bio: Dr Adam Vile is a senior consultant and head of the Grid and HPC practice at Excelian, a consultancy that focuses on financial markets professional services. He has spent many years in investment banking, as a developer, project manager and architect in both front and back office. Before joining Excelian he was senior Grid and HPC architect at Barclays Capital. Prior to joining investment banking, Adam spent a number of years lecturing in IT and mathematics at a UK University and maintains links with academia through lectures, research and through validation and steering of postgraduate courses. He is a chartered mathematician and was the conference chair of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications first conference in computational Finance.4. From Monte Carlo to Wall Street Daniel Egloff, Head of Financial Engineering Computing Unit, Zürich Cantonal Bank High performance computing techniques provide new means to solve computationally hard problems in the financial service industry. First I consider Monte Carlo simulation and illustrate how it can be used to implement a sophisticated credit risk management and economic capital framework. From a HPC perspective, basic Monte Carlo simulation is embarrassingly parallel and can be implemented efficiently on distributed memory clusters. Additional difficulties arise for adaptive variance reduction schemes, if the information content in a sample is very small, and if the amount of simulated date becomes huge such that incremental processing algorithms are indispensable. We discuss the business value of an advanced credit risk quantification which is particularly compelling in these days. While Monte Carlo simulation is a very versatile tool it is not always the preferred solution for the pricing of complex products like multi asset options, structured products, or credit derivatives. As a second application I show how operator methods can be used to develop a pricing framework. The scalability of operator methods relies heavily on optimized dense matrix-matrix multiplications and requires specialized BLAS level-3 implementations provided by specialized FPGA or GPU boards. Speaker Bio: Daniel Egloff studied mathematics, theoretical physics, and computer science at the University of Zurich and the ETH Zurich. He holds a PhD in Mathematics from University of Fribourg, Switzerland. After his PhD he started to work for a large Swiss insurance company in the area of asset and liability management. He continued his professional career in the consulting industry. At KPMG and Arthur Andersen he consulted international clients and implemented quantitative risk management solutions for financial institutions and insurance companies. In 2002 he joined Zurich Cantonal Bank. He was assigned to develop and implement credit portfolio risk and economic capital methodologies. He built up a competence center for high performance and cluster computing. Currently, Daniel Egloff is heading the Financial Computing unit in the ZKB Financial Engineering division. He and his team is engineering and operating high performance cluster applications for computationally intensive problems in financial risk management.

    7. Computing for Finance

      ScienceCinema (OSTI)

      None

      2011-10-06

      The finance sector is one of the driving forces for the use of distributed or Grid computing for business purposes. The speakers will review the state-of-the-art of high performance computing in the financial sector, and provide insight into how different types of Grid computing ? from local clusters to global networks - are being applied to financial applications. They will also describe the use of software and techniques from physics, such as Monte Carlo simulations, in the financial world. There will be four talks of 20min each. The talk abstracts and speaker bios are listed below. This will be followed by a Q&A; panel session with the speakers. From 19:00 onwards there will be a networking cocktail for audience and speakers. This is an EGEE / CERN openlab event organized in collaboration with the regional business network rezonance.ch. A webcast of the event will be made available for subsequent viewing, along with powerpoint material presented by the speakers. Attendance is free and open to all. Registration is mandatory via www.rezonance.ch, including for CERN staff. 1. Overview of High Performance Computing in the Financial Industry Michael Yoo, Managing Director, Head of the Technical Council, UBS Presentation will describe the key business challenges driving the need for HPC solutions, describe the means in which those challenges are being addressed within UBS (such as GRID) as well as the limitations of some of these solutions, and assess some of the newer HPC technologies which may also play a role in the Financial Industry in the future. Speaker Bio: Michael originally joined the former Swiss Bank Corporation in 1994 in New York as a developer on a large data warehouse project. In 1996 he left SBC and took a role with Fidelity Investments in Boston. Unable to stay away for long, he returned to SBC in 1997 while working for Perot Systems in Singapore. Finally, in 1998 he formally returned to UBS in Stamford following the merger with SBC and has remained with UBS for the past 9 years. During his tenure at UBS, he has had a number of leadership roles within IT in development, support and architecture. In 2006 Michael relocated to Switzerland to take up his current role as head of the UBS IB Technical Council, responsible for the overall technology strategy and vision of the Investment Bank. One of Michael's key responsibilities is to manage the UBS High Performance Computing Research Lab and he has been involved in a number of initiatives in the HPC space. 2. Grid in the Commercial WorldFred Gedling, Chief Technology Officer EMEA and Senior Vice President Global Services, DataSynapse Grid computing gets mentions in the press for community programs starting last decade with "Seti@Home". Government, national and supranational initiatives in grid receive some press. One of the IT-industries' best-kept secrets is the use of grid computing by commercial organizations with spectacular results. Grid Computing and its evolution into Application Virtualization is discussed and how this is key to the next generation data center. Speaker Bio: Fred Gedling holds the joint roles of Chief Technology Officer for EMEA and Senior Vice President of Global Services at DataSynapse, a global provider of application virtualisation software. Based in London and working closely with organisations seeking to optimise their IT infrastructures, Fred offers unique insights into the technology of virtualisation as well as the methodology of establishing ROI and rapid deployment to the immediate advantage of the business. Fred has more than fifteen years experience of enterprise middleware and high-performance infrastructures. Prior to DataSynapse he worked in high performance CRM middleware and was the CTO EMEA for New Era of Networks (NEON) during the rapid growth of Enterprise Application Integration. His 25-year career in technology also includes management positions at Goldman Sachs and Stratus Computer. Fred holds a First Class Bsc (Hons) degree in Physics with Astrophysics from the University of Leeds and had the privilege of being a summer student at CERN.3. Opportunities for gLite in finance and related industriesAdam Vile, Head of Grid, HPC and Technical Computing, Excelian Ltd.gLite, the Grid software developed by the EGEE project, has been exceedingly successful as an enabling infrastructure, and has been a massive success in bringing together scientific and technical communities to provide the compute power to address previously incomputable problems. Not so in the finance industry. In its current form gLite would be a business disabler. There are other middleware tools that solve the finance communities compute problems much better. Things are moving on, however. There are moves afoot in the open source community to evolve the technology to address other, more sophisticated needs such as utility and interactive computing. In this talk, I will describe how Excelian is providing Grid consultancy services for the finance community and how, through its relationship to the EGEE project, Excelian is helping to identify and exploit opportunities as the research and business worlds converge. Because of the strong third party presence in the finance industry, such opportunities are few and far between, but they are there, especially as we expand sideways into related verticals such as the smaller hedge funds and energy companies. This talk will give an overview of the barriers to adoption of gLite in the finance industry and highlight some of the opportunities offered in this and related industries as the ideas around Grid mature. Speaker Bio: Dr Adam Vile is a senior consultant and head of the Grid and HPC practice at Excelian, a consultancy that focuses on financial markets professional services. He has spent many years in investment banking, as a developer, project manager and architect in both front and back office. Before joining Excelian he was senior Grid and HPC architect at Barclays Capital. Prior to joining investment banking, Adam spent a number of years lecturing in IT and mathematics at a UK University and maintains links with academia through lectures, research and through validation and steering of postgraduate courses. He is a chartered mathematician and was the conference chair of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications first conference in computational Finance.4. From Monte Carlo to Wall Street Daniel Egloff, Head of Financial Engineering Computing Unit, ZĂĽrich Cantonal Bank High performance computing techniques provide new means to solve computationally hard problems in the financial service industry. First I consider Monte Carlo simulation and illustrate how it can be used to implement a sophisticated credit risk management and economic capital framework. From a HPC perspective, basic Monte Carlo simulation is embarrassingly parallel and can be implemented efficiently on distributed memory clusters. Additional difficulties arise for adaptive variance reduction schemes, if the information content in a sample is very small, and if the amount of simulated date becomes huge such that incremental processing algorithms are indispensable. We discuss the business value of an advanced credit risk quantification which is particularly compelling in these days. While Monte Carlo simulation is a very versatile tool it is not always the preferred solution for the pricing of complex products like multi asset options, structured products, or credit derivatives. As a second application I show how operator methods can be used to develop a pricing framework. The scalability of operator methods relies heavily on optimized dense matrix-matrix multiplications and requires specialized BLAS level-3 implementations provided by specialized FPGA or GPU boards. Speaker Bio: Daniel Egloff studied mathematics, theoretical physics, and computer science at the University of Zurich and the ETH Zurich. He holds a PhD in Mathematics from University of Fribourg, Switzerland. After his PhD he started to work for a large Swiss insurance company in the area of asset and liability management. He continued his professional career in the consulting industry. At KPMG and Arthur Andersen he consulted international clients and implemented quantitative risk management solutions for financial institutions and insurance companies. In 2002 he joined Zurich Cantonal Bank. He was assigned to develop and implement credit portfolio risk and economic capital methodologies. He built up a competence center for high performance and cluster computing. Currently, Daniel Egloff is heading the Financial Computing unit in the ZKB Financial Engineering division. He and his team is engineering and operating high performance cluster applications for computationally intensive problems in financial risk management.

    8. Computing for Finance

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      2010-03-24

      The finance sector is one of the driving forces for the use of distributed or Grid computing for business purposes. The speakers will review the state-of-the-art of high performance computing in the financial sector, and provide insight into how different types of Grid computing – from local clusters to global networks - are being applied to financial applications. They will also describe the use of software and techniques from physics, such as Monte Carlo simulations, in the financial world. There will be four talks of 20min each. The talk abstracts and speaker bios are listed below. This will be followed by a Q&A; panel session with the speakers. From 19:00 onwards there will be a networking cocktail for audience and speakers. This is an EGEE / CERN openlab event organized in collaboration with the regional business network rezonance.ch. A webcast of the event will be made available for subsequent viewing, along with powerpoint material presented by the speakers. Attendance is free and open to all. Registration is mandatory via www.rezonance.ch, including for CERN staff. 1. Overview of High Performance Computing in the Financial Industry Michael Yoo, Managing Director, Head of the Technical Council, UBS Presentation will describe the key business challenges driving the need for HPC solutions, describe the means in which those challenges are being addressed within UBS (such as GRID) as well as the limitations of some of these solutions, and assess some of the newer HPC technologies which may also play a role in the Financial Industry in the future. Speaker Bio: Michael originally joined the former Swiss Bank Corporation in 1994 in New York as a developer on a large data warehouse project. In 1996 he left SBC and took a role with Fidelity Investments in Boston. Unable to stay away for long, he returned to SBC in 1997 while working for Perot Systems in Singapore. Finally, in 1998 he formally returned to UBS in Stamford following the merger with SBC and has remained with UBS for the past 9 years. During his tenure at UBS, he has had a number of leadership roles within IT in development, support and architecture. In 2006 Michael relocated to Switzerland to take up his current role as head of the UBS IB Technical Council, responsible for the overall technology strategy and vision of the Investment Bank. One of Michael's key responsibilities is to manage the UBS High Performance Computing Research Lab and he has been involved in a number of initiatives in the HPC space. 2. Grid in the Commercial WorldFred Gedling, Chief Technology Officer EMEA and Senior Vice President Global Services, DataSynapse Grid computing gets mentions in the press for community programs starting last decade with "Seti@Home". Government, national and supranational initiatives in grid receive some press. One of the IT-industries' best-kept secrets is the use of grid computing by commercial organizations with spectacular results. Grid Computing and its evolution into Application Virtualization is discussed and how this is key to the next generation data center. Speaker Bio: Fred Gedling holds the joint roles of Chief Technology Officer for EMEA and Senior Vice President of Global Services at DataSynapse, a global provider of application virtualisation software. Based in London and working closely with organisations seeking to optimise their IT infrastructures, Fred offers unique insights into the technology of virtualisation as well as the methodology of establishing ROI and rapid deployment to the immediate advantage of the business. Fred has more than fifteen years experience of enterprise middleware and high-performance infrastructures. Prior to DataSynapse he worked in high performance CRM middleware and was the CTO EMEA for New Era of Networks (NEON) during the rapid growth of Enterprise Application Integration. His 25-year career in technology also includes management positions at Goldman Sachs and Stratus Computer. Fred holds a First Class Bsc (Hons) degree in Physics with Astrophysics from the University of Leeds and had the privilege of being a summer student at CERN.3. Opportunities for gLite in finance and related industriesAdam Vile, Head of Grid, HPC and Technical Computing, Excelian Ltd.gLite, the Grid software developed by the EGEE project, has been exceedingly successful as an enabling infrastructure, and has been a massive success in bringing together scientific and technical communities to provide the compute power to address previously incomputable problems. Not so in the finance industry. In its current form gLite would be a business disabler. There are other middleware tools that solve the finance communities compute problems much better. Things are moving on, however. There are moves afoot in the open source community to evolve the technology to address other, more sophisticated needs such as utility and interactive computing. In this talk, I will describe how Excelian is providing Grid consultancy services for the finance community and how, through its relationship to the EGEE project, Excelian is helping to identify and exploit opportunities as the research and business worlds converge. Because of the strong third party presence in the finance industry, such opportunities are few and far between, but they are there, especially as we expand sideways into related verticals such as the smaller hedge funds and energy companies. This talk will give an overview of the barriers to adoption of gLite in the finance industry and highlight some of the opportunities offered in this and related industries as the ideas around Grid mature. Speaker Bio: Dr Adam Vile is a senior consultant and head of the Grid and HPC practice at Excelian, a consultancy that focuses on financial markets professional services. He has spent many years in investment banking, as a developer, project manager and architect in both front and back office. Before joining Excelian he was senior Grid and HPC architect at Barclays Capital. Prior to joining investment banking, Adam spent a number of years lecturing in IT and mathematics at a UK University and maintains links with academia through lectures, research and through validation and steering of postgraduate courses. He is a chartered mathematician and was the conference chair of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications first conference in computational Finance.4. From Monte Carlo to Wall Street Daniel Egloff, Head of Financial Engineering Computing Unit, Zürich Cantonal Bank High performance computing techniques provide new means to solve computationally hard problems in the financial service industry. First I consider Monte Carlo simulation and illustrate how it can be used to implement a sophisticated credit risk management and economic capital framework. From a HPC perspective, basic Monte Carlo simulation is embarrassingly parallel and can be implemented efficiently on distributed memory clusters. Additional difficulties arise for adaptive variance reduction schemes, if the information content in a sample is very small, and if the amount of simulated date becomes huge such that incremental processing algorithms are indispensable. We discuss the business value of an advanced credit risk quantification which is particularly compelling in these days. While Monte Carlo simulation is a very versatile tool it is not always the preferred solution for the pricing of complex products like multi asset options, structured products, or credit derivatives. As a second application I show how operator methods can be used to develop a pricing framework. The scalability of operator methods relies heavily on optimized dense matrix-matrix multiplications and requires specialized BLAS level-3 implementations provided by specialized FPGA or GPU boards. Speaker Bio: Daniel Egloff studied mathematics, theoretical physics, and computer science at the University of Zurich and the ETH Zurich. He holds a PhD in Mathematics from University of Fribourg, Switzerland. After his PhD he started to work for a large Swiss insurance company in the area of asset and liability management. He continued his professional career in the consulting industry. At KPMG and Arthur Andersen he consulted international clients and implemented quantitative risk management solutions for financial institutions and insurance companies. In 2002 he joined Zurich Cantonal Bank. He was assigned to develop and implement credit portfolio risk and economic capital methodologies. He built up a competence center for high performance and cluster computing. Currently, Daniel Egloff is heading the Financial Computing unit in the ZKB Financial Engineering division. He and his team is engineering and operating high performance cluster applications for computationally intensive problems in financial risk management.

    9. Scientific

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Where can I find DOE research results? OSTI delivers free public access to DOE R&D results. Science, technology, and engineering research from DOE DOEOSTI--C187 0915 OSTI...

    10. computer graphics

      Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

      2001-06-08

      MUSTAFA is a scientific visualization package for visualizing data in the EXODUSII file format. These data files are typically priduced from Sandia's suite of finite element engineering analysis codes.

    11. Next Generation Networking | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

      Office of Science (SC) Website

      Next Generation Networking Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Applied Mathematics Computer Science Next Generation Networking 2012 Scientific Collaborations at Extreme-Scale Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) ASCR SBIR-STTR Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Community Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S.

    12. Computing and Computational Sciences Directorate - Computer Science...

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      AWARD Winners: Jess Gehin; Jackie Isaacs; Douglas Kothe; Debbie McCoy; Bonnie Nestor; John Turner; Gilbert Weigand Organization(s): Nuclear Technology Program; Computing and...

    13. Evolving the Land Information System into a Cloud Computing Service

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Houser, Paul R.

      2015-02-17

      The Land Information System (LIS) was developed to use advanced flexible land surface modeling and data assimilation frameworks to integrate extremely large satellite- and ground-based observations with advanced land surface models to produce continuous high-resolution fields of land surface states and fluxes. The resulting fields are extremely useful for drought and flood assessment, agricultural planning, disaster management, weather and climate forecasting, water resources assessment, and the like. We envisioned transforming the LIS modeling system into a scientific cloud computing-aware web and data service that would allow clients to easily setup and configure for use in addressing large water management issues. The focus of this Phase 1 project was to determine the scientific, technical, commercial merit and feasibility of the proposed LIS-cloud innovations that are currently barriers to broad LIS applicability. We (a) quantified the barriers to broad LIS utility and commercialization (high performance computing, big data, user interface, and licensing issues); (b) designed the proposed LIS-cloud web service, model-data interface, database services, and user interfaces; (c) constructed a prototype LIS user interface including abstractions for simulation control, visualization, and data interaction, (d) used the prototype to conduct a market analysis and survey to determine potential market size and competition, (e) identified LIS software licensing and copyright limitations and developed solutions, and (f) developed a business plan for development and marketing of the LIS-cloud innovation. While some significant feasibility issues were found in the LIS licensing, overall a high degree of LIS-cloud technical feasibility was found.

    14. NERSC Initiative for Scientific Exploration (NISE) 2013 Awards

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Awards NERSC Initiative for Scientific Exploration (NISE) 2013 Awards NISE is a mechanism used for allocating the NERSC reserve (10% of the total allocation). In 2013 we made the second year of the two-year awards made in 2012, supplemented by projects selected by the NERSC director. NERSC Application Readiness for Future Architectures Katie Antypas, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory NISE award: 250,000 hours NERSC repository: m1759 It is now widely recognized that computing technology is

    15. Cloud Computing Services

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Computing Services - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

    16. High Performance Computing

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Performance Computing - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

    17. Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Anti-HIV antibody Software optimized on Mira advances design of mini-proteins for medicines, materials Scientists at the University of Washington are using Mira to virtually design unique, artificial peptides, or short proteins. Read More Celebrating 10 years 10 science highlights celebrating 10 years of Argonne Leadership Computing Facility To celebrate our 10th anniversary, we're highlighting 10 science accomplishments since we opened our doors. Read More Bill Gropp works with students during

    18. Applied & Computational Math

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      & Computational Math - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

    19. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond ROI Topic OSTI: The Storefront for the DOE by Philip Ellis 14 Nov, 2011 in Science Communications store sign - open The Department of Energy has made a formidable contribution to the advancement of the scientific and technological knowledge frontier. In particular, DOE sponsors more basic and applied scientific research in the physical sciences than any other U.S. federal agency and all of this is made possible by the taxpayer.

    20. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond ScienceCinema Topic DOE Open Government Plan 3.0 Highlights OSTI Products by Peter Lincoln 24 Jun, 2014 in The Department of Energy recently issued its latest Open Government Plan, and the document recognizes the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) for advancing open government and the principles of transparency, participation, and collaboration by making scientific and technical information (STI) publicly

    1. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond collaboration Topic DOE Open Government Plan 3.0 Highlights OSTI Products by Peter Lincoln 24 Jun, 2014 in The Department of Energy recently issued its latest Open Government Plan, and the document recognizes the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) for advancing open government and the principles of transparency, participation, and collaboration by making scientific and technical information (STI) publicly

    2. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond government plan Topic DOE Open Government Plan 3.0 Highlights OSTI Products by Peter Lincoln 24 Jun, 2014 in The Department of Energy recently issued its latest Open Government Plan, and the document recognizes the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) for advancing open government and the principles of transparency, participation, and collaboration by making scientific and technical information (STI) publicly

    3. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond product offering Topic OSTI: The Storefront for the DOE by Philip Ellis 14 Nov, 2011 in Science Communications store sign - open The Department of Energy has made a formidable contribution to the advancement of the scientific and technological knowledge frontier. In particular, DOE sponsors more basic and applied scientific research in the physical sciences than any other U.S. federal agency and all of this is made possible by the

    4. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond transparency Topic DOE Open Government Plan 3.0 Highlights OSTI Products by Peter Lincoln 24 Jun, 2014 in The Department of Energy recently issued its latest Open Government Plan, and the document recognizes the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) for advancing open government and the principles of transparency, participation, and collaboration by making scientific and technical information (STI) publicly

    5. ORISE: Scientific Peer Review Planning

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Planning Woman participating in a peer review The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) begins the peer review planning process by analyzing the purpose of the funds to be distributed. Because each agency's needs are different, ORISE then designs and manages a flexible, scientific peer review process that can be modified based on a sponsor's regulatory, policy and operational requirements. ORISE's existing tools and systems, and knowledge of reviewing proposals from a government

    6. NREL'S Zunger Receives Scientific Award

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Scientific Award For more information contact: Kerry Masson 303-275-4083 email: Kerry Masson Golden, Colo., Aug. 18, 2000 - Alex Zunger, a leading scientist and research fellow at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has been named the 2001 recipient of the prestigious John Bardeen award from The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society (TMS). The annual award recognizes "an individual who has made an outstanding contribution and is a leader in the field of

    7. Machine Learning A Scientific Method

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Machine Learning A Scientific Method or Just a Bag of Tools? Don Hush Machine Learning Team Group CCS-3, Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory LAUR Number 06-2338 - p.1/30 Machine Learning Toolbox Fisher's Linear Discriminant Nearest Neighbor Neural Networks (backprop) Decision Trees (CART, C4.5) Boosting Support Vector Machines K-Means Clustering Principle Component Analysis (PCA) Expectation-Maximization (EM) ... and many more Los Alamos National Laboratory LAUR Number

    8. Advanced isotope separation

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Not Available

      1982-05-04

      The Study Group briefly reviewed the technical status of the three Advanced Isotope Separation (AIS) processes. It also reviewed the evaluation work that has been carried out by DOE's Process Evaluation Board (PEB) and the Union Carbide Corporation-Nuclear Division (UCCND). The Study Group briefly reviewed a recent draft assessment made for DOE staff of the nonproliferation implications of the AIS technologies. The staff also very briefly summarized the status of GCEP and Advanced Centrifuge development. The Study Group concluded that: (1) there has not been sufficient progress to provide a firm scientific, technical or economic basis on which to select one of the three competing AIS processes for full-scale engineering development at this time; and (2) however, should budgetary restraints or other factors force such a selection, we believe that the evaluation process that is being carried out by the PEB provides the best basis available for making a decision. The Study Group recommended that: (1) any decisions on AIS processes should include a comparison with gas centrifuge processes, and should not be made independently from the plutonium isotope program; (2) in evaluating the various enrichment processes, all applicable costs (including R and D and sales overhead) and an appropriate discounting approach should be included in order to make comparisons on a private industry basis; (3) if the three AIS programs continue with limited resources, the work should be reoriented to focus only on the most pressing technical problems; and (4) if a decision is made to develop the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation process, the solid collector option should be pursued in parallel to alleviate the potential program impact of liquid collector thermal control problems.

    9. Argonne's Magellan Cloud Computing Research Project

      ScienceCinema (OSTI)

      Beckman, Pete

      2013-04-19

      Pete Beckman, head of Argonne's Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF), discusses the Department of Energy's new $32-million Magellan project, which designed to test how cloud computing can be used for scientific research. More information: http://www.anl.gov/Media_Center/News/2009/news091014a.html

    10. Computationally Optimized Homogenization Heat Treatment of Metal Alloys -

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Energy Innovation Portal Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Computationally Optimized Homogenization Heat Treatment of Metal Alloys National Energy Technology Laboratory Contact NETL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Computationally Optimized Homogenization Heat Treatment of Metal Alloys (291 KB) Technology Marketing Summary ? A computational approach has been developed to improve the homogenization heat treatment of solid

    11. Introduction to Scientific I/O

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Scientific I/O Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 6 | Next » Introduction to Scientific I/O Table of Contents Introduction to Scientific I/O The Lustre File System The HDF5 Library Parallel HDF5 Scientific I/O in HDF5 Optimizations for HDF5 on Lustre Introduction to Scientific I/O I/O is commonly used by scientific applications to achieve goals like: storing numerical output from simulations for later analysis; implementing 'out-of-core' techniques for algorithms that process more data than can fit in system

    12. Computing Sciences

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Division The Computational Research Division conducts research and development in mathematical modeling and simulation, algorithm design, data storage, management and...

    13. Computing Resources

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Cluster-Image TRACC RESEARCH Computational Fluid Dynamics Computational Structural Mechanics Transportation Systems Modeling Computing Resources The TRACC Computational Clusters With the addition of a new cluster called Zephyr that was made operational in September of this year (2012), TRACC now offers two clusters to choose from: Zephyr and our original cluster that has now been named Phoenix. Zephyr was acquired from Atipa technologies, and it is a 92-node system with each node having two AMD

    14. Extensible Computational Chemistry Environment

      Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

      2012-08-09

      ECCE provides a sophisticated graphical user interface, scientific visualization tools, and the underlying data management framework enabling scientists to efficiently set up calculations and store, retrieve, and analyze the rapidly growing volumes of data produced by computational chemistry studies. ECCE was conceived as part of the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory construction to solve the problem of researchers being able to effectively utilize complex computational chemistry codes and massively parallel high performance compute resources. Bringing themore » power of these codes and resources to the desktops of researcher and thus enabling world class research without users needing a detailed understanding of the inner workings of either the theoretical codes or the supercomputers needed to run them was a grand challenge problem in the original version of the EMSL. ECCE allows collaboration among researchers using a web-based data repository where the inputs and results for all calculations done within ECCE are organized. ECCE is a first of kind end-to-end problem solving environment for all phases of computational chemistry research: setting up calculations with sophisticated GUI and direct manipulation visualization tools, submitting and monitoring calculations on remote high performance supercomputers without having to be familiar with the details of using these compute resources, and performing results visualization and analysis including creating publication quality images. ECCE is a suite of tightly integrated applications that are employed as the user moves through the modeling process.« less

    15. Throwback Thursdays Celebrate Scientific Supercomputing

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      153,216 compute cores, 217 terabytes of memory, 2 petabytes of disk storage-and a cat figurine for luck Photo of Hopper supercomputer and lucky cat placed inside Hopper's...

    16. Compute Nodes

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Compute Nodes Compute Nodes Quad CoreAMDOpteronprocessor Compute Node Configuration 9,572 nodes 1 quad-core AMD 'Budapest' 2.3 GHz processor per node 4 cores per node (38,288 total cores) 8 GB DDR3 800 MHz memory per node Peak Gflop rate 9.2 Gflops/core 36.8 Gflops/node 352 Tflops for the entire machine Each core has their own L1 and L2 caches, with 64 KB and 512KB respectively 2 MB L3 cache shared among the 4 cores Compute Node Software By default the compute nodes run a restricted low-overhead

    17. Scientific Advisory Committee | Photosynthetic Antenna Research...

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Lagarias Scientific Advisory Committee Member E-mail: jclagarias@ucdavis.edu Thomas Moore Thomas Moore Scientific Advisory Committee Chair E-mail: tom.moore@asu.edu Phone:...

    18. Scientific Alternative Investment Advisory Partners | Open Energy...

      Open Energy Info (EERE)

      Alternative Investment Advisory Partners Jump to: navigation, search Name: Scientific Alternative Investment Advisory Partners Place: Frankfurt, Germany Zip: 60325 Sector:...

    19. Fermilab | Directorate | Fermilab Committee on Scientific Appointments

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      (FCSA) Committee on Scientific Appointments (FCSA) The Fermilab Committee on Scientific Appointments (FCSA) reviews the hiring, promotion and term extensions for scientific staff. FCSA also plays a review role when a member of the scientific staff requires a Performance Improvement Plan or is considered for a Reduction in Force. FCSA does not review the hiring of Wilson and Peoples Fellows, or promotions from Scientist II to Scientist III, both of which are subject to separate procedures.

    20. LCLS CDR Chapter 3 - Scientific Experiments

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Scientific Basis for Optical Systems TECHNICAL SYNOPSIS The LCLS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) has recommended experiments in five scientific disciplines for the initial operation of the LCLS. These experiments cover a variety of scientific disciplines: atomic physics, plasma physics, chemistry, biology and materials science. The x-ray optics and detectors needed to verify the LCLS capability to address these five disciplines will be constructed and installed as part of the LCLS project.

    1. Multicore: Fallout from a Computing Evolution

      ScienceCinema (OSTI)

      Yelick, Kathy [Director, NERSC

      2009-09-01

      July 22, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Parallel computing used to be reserved for big science and engineering projects, but in two years that's all changed. Even laptops and hand-helds use parallel processors. Unfortunately, the software hasn't kept pace. Kathy Yelick, Director of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center at Berkeley Lab, describes the resulting chaos and the computing community's efforts to develop exciting applications that take advantage of tens or hundreds of processors on a single chip.

    2. User Advisory Council | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      About Overview History Staff Directory Our Teams User Advisory Council Careers Margaret Butler Fellowship Visiting Us Contact Us User Advisory Council The User Advisory Council meets regularly to review major policies and to provide user feedback to the facility leadership. All council members are active Principal Investigators or users of ALCF computational resources through one or more of the allocation programs. Martin Berzins Professor Department of Computer Science Scientific Computing and

    3. Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Computing and Computational Sciences

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Directorate Oak Ridge to acquire next generation supercomputer Oak Ridge to acquire next generation supercomputer The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) has signed a contract with IBM to bring a next-generation supercomputer to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The OLCF's new hybrid CPU/GPU computing system, Summit, will be delivered in 2017. (more) Links Department of Energy Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors Extreme

    4. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond American Association for the Advancement of Science Topic Join OSTI at the AAAS Annual Meeting, February 17-21 by Dr. Walt Warnick 01 Feb, 2011 in Science Communications Picture showing progression of federated search tools The Department of Energy's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) will be at the American Association for the Advancement of Science's 2011 Annual Meeting. The theme of this year's meeting is

    5. Sandia Energy - Advanced Imaging

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Advanced Imaging Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Reacting Flow Experiments Advanced Imaging Advanced ImagingAshley Otero2015-10-30T01:47:37+00:00...

    6. Adventures in supercomputing: Scientific exploration in an era of change

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Gentry, E.; Helland, B.; Summers, B.

      1997-11-01

      Students deserve the opportunity to explore the world of science surrounding them. Therefore it is important that scientific exploration and investigation be a part of each student`s educational career. The Department of Energy`s Adventures in Superconducting (AiS) takes students beyond mere scientific literacy to a rich embodiment of scientific exploration. AiS provides today`s science and math students with a greater opportunity to investigate science problems, propose solutions, explore different methods of solving the problem, organize their work into a technical paper, and present their results. Students learn at different rates in different ways. Science classes with students having varying learning styles and levels of achievement have always been a challenge for teachers. The AiS {open_quotes}hands-on, minds-on{close_quotes} project-based method of teaching science meets the challenge of this diversity heads on! AiS uses the development of student chosen projects as the means of achieving a lifelong enthusiasm for scientific proficiency. One goal of AiS is to emulate the research that takes place in the everyday environment of scientists. Students work in teams and often collaborate with students nationwide. With the help of mentors from the academic and scientific community, students pose a problem in science, investigate possible solutions, design a mathematical and computational model for the problem, exercise the model to achieve results, and evaluate the implications of the results. The students then have the opportunity to present the project to their peers, teachers, and scientists. Using this inquiry-based technique, students learn more than science skills, they learn to reason and think -- going well beyond the National Science Education Standard. The teacher becomes a resource person actively working together with the students in their quest for scientific knowledge.

    7. Computer Assisted Virtual Environment - CAVE

      ScienceCinema (OSTI)

      Erickson, Phillip; Podgorney, Robert; Weingartner, Shawn; Whiting, Eric

      2014-06-09

      Research at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies is taking on another dimension with a 3-D device known as a Computer Assisted Virtual Environment. The CAVE uses projection to display high-end computer graphics on three walls and the floor. By wearing 3-D glasses to create depth perception and holding a wand to move and rotate images, users can delve into data.

    8. ASCR Leadership Computing Challenge Requests for Time Due February...

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      laboratories, academia and industry. This program allocates time at NERSC and the Leadership Computing Facilities at Argonne and Oak Ridge. Areas of interest are: Advancing...

    9. Computer Science

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Cite Seer Department of Energy provided open access science research citations in chemistry, physics, materials, engineering, and computer science IEEE Xplore Full text...

    10. Computer Security

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Computer Security All JLF participants must fully comply with all LLNL computer security regulations and procedures. A laptop entering or leaving B-174 for the sole use by a US citizen and so configured, and requiring no IP address, need not be registered for use in the JLF. By September 2009, it is expected that computers for use by Foreign National Investigators will have no special provisions. Notify maricle1@llnl.gov of all other computers entering, leaving, or being moved within B 174. Use

    11. A Component Approach to Collaborative Scientific Software Development: Tools and Techniques Utilized by the Quantum Chemistry Science Application Partnership

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Kenny, Joseph P.; Janssen, Curtis L.; Gordon, Mark S.; Sosonkina, Masha; Windus, Theresa L.

      2008-01-01

      Cutting-edge scientific computing software is complex, increasingly involving the coupling of multiple packages to combine advanced algorithms or simulations at multiple physical scales. Component-based software engineering (CBSE) has been advanced as a technique for managing this complexity, and complex component applications have been created in the quantum chemistry domain, as well as several other simulation areas, using the component model advocated by the Common Component Architecture (CCA) Forum. While programming models do indeed enable sound software engineering practices, the selection of programming model is just one building block in a comprehensive approach to large-scale collaborative development which must also addressmore » interface and data standardization, and language and package interoperability. We provide an overview of the development approach utilized within the Quantum Chemistry Science Application Partnership, identifying design challenges, describing the techniques which we have adopted to address these challenges and highlighting the advantages which the CCA approach offers for collaborative development.« less

    12. Sandia Energy - Advanced Research & Development

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Advanced Research & Development Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Photovoltaics Advanced Research & Development Advanced Research & DevelopmentCoryne...

    13. Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Workshop

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Additive Manufacturing Workshop Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Materials (AM) Workshop Our goal is to define opportunities and research gaps within additive manufacturing (AM) and to engage the broader scientific/engineering community to discuss future research directions. thumbnail of thumbnail of Contact Institute Director Dr. Alexander V. Balatsky Institute for Materials Science (505) 665-0077 Email Deputy Director Dr. Jennifer S. Martinez Institute for Materials Science

    14. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL): Advanced Electrocatalysts

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      Brookhaven National Laboratory Advanced Electrocatalysts Fuel Cell Seminar, Los Angeles November 11, 2014 Alex Harris Chair, BNL Chemistry Department BNL Overview 2 * Core Capabilities * Primary mission in physical and energy sciences * And R&D in life and environmental sciences, energy technologies and national security * Established 1947 * Builds and operates major scientific facilities available to university, industry and government researchers * Location: Long Island, NY * 2900 staff,

    15. Modeling aspects of human memory for scientific study.

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Caudell, Thomas P.; Watson, Patrick; McDaniel, Mark A.; Eichenbaum, Howard B.; Cohen, Neal J.; Vineyard, Craig Michael; Taylor, Shawn Ellis; Bernard, Michael Lewis; Morrow, James Dan; Verzi, Stephen J.

      2009-10-01

      Working with leading experts in the field of cognitive neuroscience and computational intelligence, SNL has developed a computational architecture that represents neurocognitive mechanisms associated with how humans remember experiences in their past. The architecture represents how knowledge is organized and updated through information from individual experiences (episodes) via the cortical-hippocampal declarative memory system. We compared the simulated behavioral characteristics with those of humans measured under well established experimental standards, controlling for unmodeled aspects of human processing, such as perception. We used this knowledge to create robust simulations of & human memory behaviors that should help move the scientific community closer to understanding how humans remember information. These behaviors were experimentally validated against actual human subjects, which was published. An important outcome of the validation process will be the joining of specific experimental testing procedures from the field of neuroscience with computational representations from the field of cognitive modeling and simulation.

    16. Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2013

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      David W. Nigg

      2013-09-01

      Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance, and to some extent, experiment management, are inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are difficult, if not impossible, to verify and validate (V&V) according to modern standards. Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for effective application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In late 2009, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort, the ATR Core Modeling Update Project, to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF).

    17. Katherine Riley | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Katherine Riley Director of Science Katherine Riley Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Building 240 - Rm. 2125 Argonne, IL 60439 630-252-5786 riley@alcf.anl.gov Katherine Riley is the Director of Science for the Scientific Applications (Catalyst) Group at the ALCF. Trained at the University of Chicago Flash Center, Riley helped develop a community code designed to solve a wide variety of scientific problems on the largest available computers. At Argonne, she has worked closely

    18. Computation Directorate 2008 Annual Report

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Crawford, D L

      2009-03-25

      Whether a computer is simulating the aging and performance of a nuclear weapon, the folding of a protein, or the probability of rainfall over a particular mountain range, the necessary calculations can be enormous. Our computers help researchers answer these and other complex problems, and each new generation of system hardware and software widens the realm of possibilities. Building on Livermore's historical excellence and leadership in high-performance computing, Computation added more than 331 trillion floating-point operations per second (teraFLOPS) of power to LLNL's computer room floors in 2008. In addition, Livermore's next big supercomputer, Sequoia, advanced ever closer to its 2011-2012 delivery date, as architecture plans and the procurement contract were finalized. Hyperion, an advanced technology cluster test bed that teams Livermore with 10 industry leaders, made a big splash when it was announced during Michael Dell's keynote speech at the 2008 Supercomputing Conference. The Wall Street Journal touted Hyperion as a 'bright spot amid turmoil' in the computer industry. Computation continues to measure and improve the costs of operating LLNL's high-performance computing systems by moving hardware support in-house, by measuring causes of outages to apply resources asymmetrically, and by automating most of the account and access authorization and management processes. These improvements enable more dollars to go toward fielding the best supercomputers for science, while operating them at less cost and greater responsiveness to the customers.

    19. Bridging the Gap to 64-bit Computing

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Opteron and AMD64 A Commodity 64 bit x86 SOC Fred Weber Vice President and CTO Computation Products Group Advanced Micro Devices 22 April 2003 AMD - Salishan HPC 2003 2 Opteron...

    20. Computing and Computational Sciences Directorate - Divisions

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      CCSD Divisions Computational Sciences and Engineering Computer Sciences and Mathematics Information Technolgoy Services Joint Institute for Computational Sciences National Center for Computational Sciences

    1. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond Browse OSTIblog Articles by Products Select an OSTIblog product to view articles .EDUconnections Adopt-A-Doc DOE Data Explorer (DDE) The DOE Data Explorer can be used to find collections of DOE sponsored scientific research data, such as computer simulations, figures and plots, interactive maps, multimedia, numeric files, and scientific images. DOE Green Energy DOE PAGES(Beta) Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science

    2. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond Titan Topic A banner year expected for high-performance computing by Kathy Chambers 05 Feb, 2014 in Science Communications Titan Cray XK7 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory Just seven miles south of our OSTI facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee is a national treasure - the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL is DOE's largest multi-program laboratory where remarkable scientific expertise and world-class scientific facilities and

    3. Directors | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Information Directors 1947 Thompson 1948 Boardman 1951 Abdian 1956 Day 1959 Shannon 1979 Coyne 1991 Buffum 1997 Warnick OSTI Directors Timeline, 1994 to 1997 Walter L. Warnick, 1997-2014 Office of Scientific and Technical Information Walter L. Warnick Amid emerging computing power and expanding networks revolutionizing scientific communication, OSTI pushed pedal to the metal to lead government search technology under the guidance of Walt Warnick. The OSTI Corollary: accelerating the spread

    4. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond A banner year expected for high-performance computing by Kathy Chambers on Wed, Feb 5, 2014 Titan Cray XK7 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory Just seven miles south of our OSTI facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee is a national treasure - the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL is DOE's largest multi-program laboratory where remarkable scientific expertise and world-class scientific facilities and equipment are applied to develop

    5. U.S. Scientific Team Draws on New Data, Multiple Scientific Methodologies

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      to Reach Updated Estimate of Oil Flows from BP's Well | Department of Energy Scientific Team Draws on New Data, Multiple Scientific Methodologies to Reach Updated Estimate of Oil Flows from BP's Well U.S. Scientific Team Draws on New Data, Multiple Scientific Methodologies to Reach Updated Estimate of Oil Flows from BP's Well June 15, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington - Based on updated information and scientific assessments, Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, Secretary of the Interior Ken

    6. Scientific American: "Tall Trees Sucked Dry by Global Warming...

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Scientific American: "Tall Trees Sucked Dry by Global Warming" June 7, 2015 Scientific American: "Tall Trees Sucked Dry by Global Warming" A well-known scientific principle...

    7. Electrochromic Windows - Advanced Processing Technology | Department of

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      Energy Electrochromic Windows - Advanced Processing Technology Electrochromic Windows - Advanced Processing Technology 'Smart Glass' Technology Reduces Solar Heat Gain in Buildings Windows are often the most inefficient part of a building envelope and are responsible for heat loss in cold months and solar heat gain in warm months. Sunlight entering a home can increase cooling loads by up to 20%. In some instances, glare from the sun can make it difficult to see a computer or other LCD

    8. Advanced Manufacturing Office News

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      2013-08-08

      News stories about advanced manufacturing, events, and office accomplishments. Subscribe to receive updates.

    9. Applied Mathematics | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

      Office of Science (SC) Website

      Applied Mathematics Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Applied Mathematics Applied Mathematics Conferences And Workshops Computer Science Next Generation Networking Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) ASCR SBIR-STTR Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Community Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of

    10. Supporting collaborative computing and interaction

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Agarwal, Deborah; McParland, Charles; Perry, Marcia

      2002-05-22

      To enable collaboration on the daily tasks involved in scientific research, collaborative frameworks should provide lightweight and ubiquitous components that support a wide variety of interaction modes. We envision a collaborative environment as one that provides a persistent space within which participants can locate each other, exchange synchronous and asynchronous messages, share documents and applications, share workflow, and hold videoconferences. We are developing the Pervasive Collaborative Computing Environment (PCCE) as such an environment. The PCCE will provide integrated tools to support shared computing and task control and monitoring. This paper describes the PCCE and the rationale for its design.

    11. Review of the synergies between computational modeling and experimental characterization of materials across length scales

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Dingreville, RĂ©mi; Karnesky, Richard A.; Puel, Guillaume; Schmitt, Jean -Hubert

      2015-11-16

      With the increasing interplay between experimental and computational approaches at multiple length scales, new research directions are emerging in materials science and computational mechanics. Such cooperative interactions find many applications in the development, characterization and design of complex material systems. This manuscript provides a broad and comprehensive overview of recent trends in which predictive modeling capabilities are developed in conjunction with experiments and advanced characterization to gain a greater insight into structure–property relationships and study various physical phenomena and mechanisms. The focus of this review is on the intersections of multiscale materials experiments and modeling relevant to the materials mechanics community. After a general discussion on the perspective from various communities, the article focuses on the latest experimental and theoretical opportunities. Emphasis is given to the role of experiments in multiscale models, including insights into how computations can be used as discovery tools for materials engineering, rather than to “simply” support experimental work. This is illustrated by examples from several application areas on structural materials. In conclusion this manuscript ends with a discussion on some problems and open scientific questions that are being explored in order to advance this relatively new field of research.

    12. Advanced Manufacturing Office Overview

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      DOE Workshop: Microwave (MW) and Radio Frequency (RF) as Enabling Technologies for Advanced Manufacturing Venue: The 2nd Global Congress on Microwave Energy Applications (2GCMEA) July 25, 2012 Long Beach Hilton Long Beach, CA Advanced Manufacturing Office U.S. Department of Energy Rob Ivester Acting Deputy Program Manager, Advanced Manufacturing Office Advanced Manufacturing Office Advanced Manufacturing Office Agenda Time Activity 2:00-2:30 PM Opening Session - AMO o Presentation of Industry

    13. HyMARC: Hydrogen Materials-Advanced Research Consortium | Department of

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      Energy HyMARC: Hydrogen Materials-Advanced Research Consortium HyMARC: Hydrogen Materials-Advanced Research Consortium The Hydrogen Materials-Advanced Research Consortium (HyMARC), composed of Sandia National Laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, has been formed with the objective of addressing the scientific gaps blocking the advancement of solid-state storage materials. Illustration of the research consortia model showing a

    14. Compute Nodes

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Compute Nodes Compute Nodes There are currently 2632 nodes available on PDSF. The compute (batch) nodes at PDSF are heterogenous, reflecting the periodic procurement of new nodes (and the eventual retirement of old nodes). From the user's perspective they are essentially all equivalent except that some have more memory per job slot. If your jobs have memory requirements beyond the default maximum of 1.1GB you should specify that in your job submission and the batch system will run your job on an

    15. Scientific Exchange Application | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Scientific Exchange Program / Scientific Exchange Application Scientific Exchange Application Please read all instructions before submitting your application. Interested applicants should complete the following application and provide the materials requested below. The PARC Steering Committee will evaluate these proposals and select those that offer the best chance to lead to new directions and publishable results. An effort will be made to achieve some balance in the various types of exchanges

    16. ORISE: Capabilities in Scientific Peer Review

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Related Link Best Practices in Peer Review Assure Quality, Value, Objectivity (PDF, 330KB) Journal of the National Grants Management Association Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Capabilities in Scientific Peer Review ORISE Provides Extensive Capabilities in Managing Competitive Scientific Peer Reviews The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) manages scientific peer reviews for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other government agencies. Our capabilities span the

    17. Compute Nodes

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Nodes Quad CoreAMDOpteronprocessor Compute Node Configuration 9,572 nodes 1 quad-core AMD 'Budapest' 2.3 GHz processor per node 4 cores per node (38,288 total cores) 8 GB...

    18. Scientific Themes | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Themes Scientific Themes The Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center (PARC) is focused on a basic science approach to understanding the process of light collection in natural,...

    19. Workshop on Scientific Applications of the LCLS

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      WORKSHOP ON SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS OF THE LCLS Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, January 12-14, 1999 I. Lindau and J. Arthur, principal organizers INTRODUCTION Free electron...

    20. Increasing Scientific Productivity by Tracking Data

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      than its predecessor. To effectively meet the increasing scientific demand for storage systems and services, the center's staff must first understand how data moves within the...

    1. Hoku Scientific Inc | Open Energy Information

      Open Energy Info (EERE)

      Hoku Scientific Inc Place: Kapolei, Hawaii Zip: 96707 Product: US-based materials science company, which started as a fuel cell company and then got into polysilicon...

    2. ORISE: Contact Us - Scientific Peer Review

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Contact Us Tony Lester Senior Associate Director, Scientific Assessment and Workforce Development Work: 865.576.3304 peerreview@orau.org...

    3. Exascale Computing

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Computing Exascale Computing CoDEx Project: A Hardware/Software Codesign Environment for the Exascale Era The next decade will see a rapid evolution of HPC node architectures as power and cooling constraints are limiting increases in microprocessor clock speeds and constraining data movement. Applications and algorithms will need to change and adapt as node architectures evolve. A key element of the strategy as we move forward is the co-design of applications, architectures and programming

    4. LHC Computing

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Lincoln, Don

      2015-07-28

      The LHC is the world’s highest energy particle accelerator and scientists use it to record an unprecedented amount of data. This data is recorded in electronic format and it requires an enormous computational infrastructure to convert the raw data into conclusions about the fundamental rules that govern matter. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln gives us a sense of just how much data is involved and the incredible computer resources that makes it all possible.

    5. Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps Ă— You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy

    6. Advancing the Fundamental Understanding of Fission: 2014 LDRD 20120077DR

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      Review (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Advancing the Fundamental Understanding of Fission: 2014 LDRD 20120077DR Review Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Advancing the Fundamental Understanding of Fission: 2014 LDRD 20120077DR Review Ă— You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional

    7. Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Advance Nuclear Technology |

      Office of Environmental Management (EM)

      Department of Energy 0 Million to Advance Nuclear Technology Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Advance Nuclear Technology June 5, 2015 - 11:18am Addthis News Media Contact 202-586-4940 WASHINGTON - Today, the Energy Department announced more than $60 million in nuclear energy research and infrastructure enhancement awards. Sixty-eight projects from across the country were selected based on their potential to create scientific breakthroughs that both help strengthen the nation's energy

    8. Climate Modeling using High-Performance Computing

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Mirin, A A

      2007-02-05

      The Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC) and the LLNL Climate and Carbon Science Group of Energy and Environment (E and E) are working together to improve predictions of future climate by applying the best available computational methods and computer resources to this problem. Over the last decade, researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have developed a number of climate models that provide state-of-the-art simulations on a wide variety of massively parallel computers. We are now developing and applying a second generation of high-performance climate models. Through the addition of relevant physical processes, we are developing an earth systems modeling capability as well.

    9. Argonne's Laboratory computing center - 2007 annual report.

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Bair, R.; Pieper, G. W.

      2008-05-28

      Argonne National Laboratory founded the Laboratory Computing Resource Center (LCRC) in the spring of 2002 to help meet pressing program needs for computational modeling, simulation, and analysis. The guiding mission is to provide critical computing resources that accelerate the development of high-performance computing expertise, applications, and computations to meet the Laboratory's challenging science and engineering missions. In September 2002 the LCRC deployed a 350-node computing cluster from Linux NetworX to address Laboratory needs for mid-range supercomputing. This cluster, named 'Jazz', achieved over a teraflop of computing power (1012 floating-point calculations per second) on standard tests, making it the Laboratory's first terascale computing system and one of the 50 fastest computers in the world at the time. Jazz was made available to early users in November 2002 while the system was undergoing development and configuration. In April 2003, Jazz was officially made available for production operation. Since then, the Jazz user community has grown steadily. By the end of fiscal year 2007, there were over 60 active projects representing a wide cross-section of Laboratory expertise, including work in biosciences, chemistry, climate, computer science, engineering applications, environmental science, geoscience, information science, materials science, mathematics, nanoscience, nuclear engineering, and physics. Most important, many projects have achieved results that would have been unobtainable without such a computing resource. The LCRC continues to foster growth in the computational science and engineering capability and quality at the Laboratory. Specific goals include expansion of the use of Jazz to new disciplines and Laboratory initiatives, teaming with Laboratory infrastructure providers to offer more scientific data management capabilities, expanding Argonne staff use of national computing facilities, and improving the scientific reach and performance of Argonne's computational applications. Furthermore, recognizing that Jazz is fully subscribed, with considerable unmet demand, the LCRC has framed a 'path forward' for additional computing resources.

    10. Advanced fossil fuel combustor

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Rogers, B.

      1995-05-01

      Charged with enhancing the use of US fossil energy resources, the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is a federal Department of Energy research center that performs its own research and also manages the work of contractors. One interesting recent METC project is the effort to develop a ``multiannular swirl burner`` (MSB) for use in an advanced fossil fuel combustion system. The design is being developed by an outside contractor with funding and technical assistance from METC. Recently, EG and G Technical Services of West Virginia was asked to provide analytical support to the contractor developing the MSB. Design projects like this usually require building and testing a series of very expensive prototypes. Recent success with computational fluid dynamic (CFD) design techniques, however, have generated a great deal of excitement because of its ability to reduce research and development costs. Using FLUENT, a CFD package from Fluent Inc., EG and G was able to predict, with a high degree of accuracy, the performance of one of the MSB combustor prototypes. Furthermore, the model provided researchers with a more detailed understanding of the proposed design`s performance characteristics.

    11. UTILITY OF MECHANISTIC MODELS FOR DIRECTING ADVANCED SEPARATIONS RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES: Electrochemically Modulated Separation Example

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Schwantes, Jon M.

      2009-06-01

      The objective for this work was to demonstrate the utility of mechanistic computer models designed to simulate actinide behavior for use in efficiently and effectively directing advanced laboratory R&D activities associated with developing advanced separations methods.

    12. Scientific Data Management Integrated Software Infrastructure Center (SDM/ISIC): Scientific Process Automation (SPA), FINAL REPORT

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Bertram Ludaescher; Ilkay Altintas

      2012-07-03

      This is the final report from SDSC and UC Davis on DE-FC02-01ER25486, Scientific Data Management Integrated Software Infrastructure Center (SDM/ISIC): Scientific Process Automation (SPA).

    13. U.S. Scientific Team Draws on New Data, Multiple Scientific Methodolog...

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      of Oil Flows from BP's Well U.S. Scientific Team Draws on New Data, Multiple Scientific Methodologies to Reach Updated Estimate of Oil Flows from BP's Well June 15, 2010 - 12:00am ...

    14. Computational mechanics

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Goudreau, G.L.

      1993-03-01

      The Computational Mechanics thrust area sponsors research into the underlying solid, structural and fluid mechanics and heat transfer necessary for the development of state-of-the-art general purpose computational software. The scale of computational capability spans office workstations, departmental computer servers, and Cray-class supercomputers. The DYNA, NIKE, and TOPAZ codes have achieved world fame through our broad collaborators program, in addition to their strong support of on-going Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) programs. Several technology transfer initiatives have been based on these established codes, teaming LLNL analysts and researchers with counterparts in industry, extending code capability to specific industrial interests of casting, metalforming, and automobile crash dynamics. The next-generation solid/structural mechanics code, ParaDyn, is targeted toward massively parallel computers, which will extend performance from gigaflop to teraflop power. Our work for FY-92 is described in the following eight articles: (1) Solution Strategies: New Approaches for Strongly Nonlinear Quasistatic Problems Using DYNA3D; (2) Enhanced Enforcement of Mechanical Contact: The Method of Augmented Lagrangians; (3) ParaDyn: New Generation Solid/Structural Mechanics Codes for Massively Parallel Processors; (4) Composite Damage Modeling; (5) HYDRA: A Parallel/Vector Flow Solver for Three-Dimensional, Transient, Incompressible Viscous How; (6) Development and Testing of the TRIM3D Radiation Heat Transfer Code; (7) A Methodology for Calculating the Seismic Response of Critical Structures; and (8) Reinforced Concrete Damage Modeling.

    15. Computing and Computational Sciences Directorate - Contacts

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Home › About Us Contacts Jeff Nichols Associate Laboratory Director Computing and Computational Sciences Becky Verastegui Directorate Operations Manager Computing and Computational Sciences Directorate Michael Bartell Chief Information Officer Information Technologies Services Division Jim Hack Director, Climate Science Institute National Center for Computational Sciences Shaun Gleason Division Director Computational Sciences and Engineering Barney Maccabe Division Director Computer Science

    16. Compute Nodes

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Compute Nodes Compute Nodes MC-proc.png Compute Node Configuration 6,384 nodes 2 twelve-core AMD 'MagnyCours' 2.1-GHz processors per node (see die image to the right and schematic below) 24 cores per node (153,216 total cores) 32 GB DDR3 1333-MHz memory per node (6,000 nodes) 64 GB DDR3 1333-MHz memory per node (384 nodes) Peak Gflop/s rate: 8.4 Gflops/core 201.6 Gflops/node 1.28 Peta-flops for the entire machine Each core has its own L1 and L2 caches, with 64 KB and 512KB respectively One 6-MB

    17. Computational Science

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Science - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

    18. Computational mechanics

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Raboin, P J

      1998-01-01

      The Computational Mechanics thrust area is a vital and growing facet of the Mechanical Engineering Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This work supports the development of computational analysis tools in the areas of structural mechanics and heat transfer. Over 75 analysts depend on thrust area-supported software running on a variety of computing platforms to meet the demands of LLNL programs. Interactions with the Department of Defense (DOD) High Performance Computing and Modernization Program and the Defense Special Weapons Agency are of special importance as they support our ParaDyn project in its development of new parallel capabilities for DYNA3D. Working with DOD customers has been invaluable to driving this technology in directions mutually beneficial to the Department of Energy. Other projects associated with the Computational Mechanics thrust area include work with the Partnership for a New Generation Vehicle (PNGV) for ''Springback Predictability'' and with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for the ''Development of Methodologies for Evaluating Containment and Mitigation of Uncontained Engine Debris.'' In this report for FY-97, there are five articles detailing three code development activities and two projects that synthesized new code capabilities with new analytic research in damage/failure and biomechanics. The article this year are: (1) Energy- and Momentum-Conserving Rigid-Body Contact for NIKE3D and DYNA3D; (2) Computational Modeling of Prosthetics: A New Approach to Implant Design; (3) Characterization of Laser-Induced Mechanical Failure Damage of Optical Components; (4) Parallel Algorithm Research for Solid Mechanics Applications Using Finite Element Analysis; and (5) An Accurate One-Step Elasto-Plasticity Algorithm for Shell Elements in DYNA3D.

    19. ACM TOMS replicated computational results initiative

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Heroux, Michael Allen

      2015-06-03

      In this study, the scientific community relies on the peer review process for assuring the quality of published material, the goal of which is to build a body of work we can trust. Computational journals such as The ACM Transactions on Mathematical Software (TOMS) use this process for rigorously promoting the clarity and completeness of content, and citation of prior work. At the same time, it is unusual to independently confirm computational results.

    20. ACM TOMS replicated computational results initiative

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Heroux, Michael Allen

      2015-06-03

      In this study, the scientific community relies on the peer review process for assuring the quality of published material, the goal of which is to build a body of work we can trust. Computational journals such as The ACM Transactions on Mathematical Software (TOMS) use this process for rigorously promoting the clarity and completeness of content, and citation of prior work. At the same time, it is unusual to independently confirm computational results.

    1. Data triage enables extreme-scale computing

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Data triage enables extreme-scale computing Data triage enables extreme-scale computing Data selection and triage are important techniques for large-scale data, which can drastically reduce the amount of data written to disk or transmitted over a network. August 1, 2014 Spatial partitioning for the ocean simulation data set. Spatial partitioning for the ocean simulation data set. The main focus for ADR is to prioritize data primarily generated by large-scale scientific simulations run on

    2. Michael Papka | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Papka Division Director Michael Papka Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Building 240 - Rm. 4134 Argonne, IL 60439 630-252-1556 papka@anl.gov http://papka.alcf.anl.gov Michael E. Papka is the Director of the ALCF. He is also Argonne's Deputy Associate Laboratory Director for Computing, Environment and Life Sciences. Both his laboratory leadership roles and his research interests relate to high-performance computing in support of scientific discovery. Dr. Papka holds a Senior

    3. Managing Scientific Software Complexity with Bocca and CCA

      DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

      Allan, Benjamin A.; Norris, Boyana; Elwasif, Wael R.; Armstrong, Robert C.

      2008-01-01

      In high-performance scientific software development, the emphasis is often on short time to first solution. Even when the development of new components mostly reuses existing components or libraries and only small amounts of new code must be created, dealing with the component glue code and software build processes to obtain complete applications is still tedious and error-prone. Component-based software meant to reduce complexity at the application level increases complexity to the extent that the user must learn and remember the interfaces and conventions of the component model itself. To address these needs, we introduce Bocca, the first tool to enablemore » application developers to perform rapid component prototyping while maintaining robust software-engineering practices suitable to HPC environments. Bocca provides project management and a comprehensive build environment for creating and managing applications composed of Common Component Architecture components. Of critical importance for high-performance computing (HPC) applications, Bocca is designed to operate in a language-agnostic way, simultaneously handling components written in any of the languages commonly used in scientific applications: C, C++, Fortran, Python and Java. Bocca automates the tasks related to the component glue code, freeing the user to focus on the scientific aspects of the application. Bocca embraces the philosophy pioneered by Ruby on Rails for web applications: start with something that works, and evolve it to the user's purpose.« less

    4. Computing Resources

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Resources This page is the repository for sundry items of information relevant to general computing on BooNE. If you have a question or problem that isn't answered here, or a suggestion for improving this page or the information on it, please mail boone-computing@fnal.gov and we'll do our best to address any issues. Note about this page Some links on this page point to www.everything2.com, and are meant to give an idea about a concept or thing without necessarily wading through a whole website

    5. Intro - High Performance Computing for 2015 HPC Annual Report

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Klitsner, Tom

      2015-10-01

      The recent Executive Order creating the National Strategic Computing Initiative (NSCI) recognizes the value of high performance computing for economic competitiveness and scientific discovery and commits to accelerate delivery of exascale computing. The HPC programs at Sandia –the NNSA ASC program and Sandia’s Institutional HPC Program– are focused on ensuring that Sandia has the resources necessary to deliver computation in the national interest.

    6. Barracuda® Computational Particle Fluid Dynamics (CPFD®) Software |

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      Department of Energy Barracuda® Computational Particle Fluid Dynamics (CPFD®) Software Barracuda® Computational Particle Fluid Dynamics (CPFD®) Software Innovative Software Program Extends the Capabilities of CFD by Modeling Solid Particle Movement Invented at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory in the 1950s and '60s, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a mathematical expression of the physics of the movements of fluids (liquids and gases). CFD computer software simulates real-world

    7. Advanced Critical Advanced Energy Retrofit Education and Training...

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      Critical Advanced Energy Retrofit Education and Training and Credentialing - 2014 BTO Peer Review Advanced Critical Advanced Energy Retrofit Education and Training and...

    8. Advanced Nuclear Technology: Advanced Light Water Reactors Utility...

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      Nuclear Technology: Advanced Light Water Reactors Utility Requirements Document Small Modular Reactors Inclusion Summary Advanced Nuclear Technology: Advanced Light Water Reactors ...

    9. Peter Nugent Named Deputy for Scientific Engagement

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Computing Sciences. In his new role, Nugent will work with CRD and Computing Sciences leadership to develop and implement a strategy for engaging with other Berkeley Lab...

    10. The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility 2010 annual report.

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Drugan, C.

      2011-05-09

      Researchers found more ways than ever to conduct transformative science at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) in 2010. Both familiar initiatives and innovative new programs at the ALCF are now serving a growing, global user community with a wide range of computing needs. The Department of Energy's (DOE) INCITE Program remained vital in providing scientists with major allocations of leadership-class computing resources at the ALCF. For calendar year 2011, 35 projects were awarded 732 million supercomputer processor-hours for computationally intensive, large-scale research projects with the potential to significantly advance key areas in science and engineering. Argonne also continued to provide Director's Discretionary allocations - 'start up' awards - for potential future INCITE projects. And DOE's new ASCR Leadership Computing (ALCC) Program allocated resources to 10 ALCF projects, with an emphasis on high-risk, high-payoff simulations directly related to the Department's energy mission, national emergencies, or for broadening the research community capable of using leadership computing resources. While delivering more science today, we've also been laying a solid foundation for high performance computing in the future. After a successful DOE Lehman review, a contract was signed to deliver Mira, the next-generation Blue Gene/Q system, to the ALCF in 2012. The ALCF is working with the 16 projects that were selected for the Early Science Program (ESP) to enable them to be productive as soon as Mira is operational. Preproduction access to Mira will enable ESP projects to adapt their codes to its architecture and collaborate with ALCF staff in shaking down the new system. We expect the 10-petaflops system to stoke economic growth and improve U.S. competitiveness in key areas such as advancing clean energy and addressing global climate change. Ultimately, we envision Mira as a stepping-stone to exascale-class computers that will be faster than petascale-class computers by a factor of a thousand. Pete Beckman, who served as the ALCF's Director for the past few years, has been named director of the newly created Exascale Technology and Computing Institute (ETCi). The institute will focus on developing exascale computing to extend scientific discovery and solve critical science and engineering problems. Just as Pete's leadership propelled the ALCF to great success, we know that that ETCi will benefit immensely from his expertise and experience. Without question, the future of supercomputing is certainly in good hands. I would like to thank Pete for all his effort over the past two years, during which he oversaw the establishing of ALCF2, the deployment of the Magellan project, increases in utilization, availability, and number of projects using ALCF1. He managed the rapid growth of ALCF staff and made the facility what it is today. All the staff and users are better for Pete's efforts.

    11. Michael Strayer

      Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

      Michael Strayer is the Associate Director of Advanced Scientific Computing in the Office of Science.

    12. Parallel Computation of the Topology of Level Sets

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Pascucci, V; Cole-McLaughlin, K

      2004-12-16

      This paper introduces two efficient algorithms that compute the Contour Tree of a 3D scalar field F and its augmented version with the Betti numbers of each isosurface. The Contour Tree is a fundamental data structure in scientific visualization that is used to preprocess the domain mesh to allow optimal computation of isosurfaces with minimal overhead storage. The Contour Tree can also be used to build user interfaces reporting the complete topological characterization of a scalar field, as shown in Figure 1. Data exploration time is reduced since the user understands the evolution of level set components with changing isovalue. The Augmented Contour Tree provides even more accurate information segmenting the range space of the scalar field in portion of invariant topology. The exploration time for a single isosurface is also improved since its genus is known in advance. Our first new algorithm augments any given Contour Tree with the Betti numbers of all possible corresponding isocontours in linear time with the size of the tree. Moreover we show how to extend the scheme introduced in [3] with the Betti number computation without increasing its complexity. Thus, we improve on the time complexity from our previous approach [10] from O(m log m) to O(n log n + m), where m is the number of cells and n is the number of vertices in the domain of F. Our second contribution is a new divide-and-conquer algorithm that computes the Augmented Contour Tree with improved efficiency. The approach computes the output Contour Tree by merging two intermediate Contour Trees and is independent of the interpolant. In this way we confine any knowledge regarding a specific interpolant to an independent function that computes the tree for a single cell. We have implemented this function for the trilinear interpolant and plan to replace it with higher order interpolants when needed. The time complexity is O(n + t log n), where t is the number of critical points of F. For the first time we can compute the Contour Tree in linear time in many practical cases where t = O(n{sup 1-{epsilon}}). We report the running times for a parallel implementation, showing good scalability with the number of processors.

    13. 1993 Annual report on scientific programs: A broad research program on the sciences of complexity

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      1993-12-31

      This report provides a summary of many of the research projects completed by the Santa Fe Institute (SFI) during 1993. These research efforts continue to focus on two general areas: the study of, and search for, underlying scientific principles governing complex adaptive systems, and the exploration of new theories of computation that incorporate natural mechanisms of adaptation (mutation, genetics, evolution).

    14. Recovery Act. Development and Validation of an Advanced Stimulation

      Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

      Prediction Model for Enhanced Geothermal Systems (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Recovery Act. Development and Validation of an Advanced Stimulation Prediction Model for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Recovery Act. Development and Validation of an Advanced Stimulation Prediction Model for Enhanced Geothermal Systems This research project aims to develop and validate an advanced computer model that can be used in the planning and design of

    15. Parallel Tensor Compression for Large-Scale Scientific Data.

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Kolda, Tamara G.; Ballard, Grey; Austin, Woody Nathan

      2015-10-01

      As parallel computing trends towards the exascale, scientific data produced by high-fidelity simulations are growing increasingly massive. For instance, a simulation on a three-dimensional spatial grid with 512 points per dimension that tracks 64 variables per grid point for 128 time steps yields 8 TB of data. By viewing the data as a dense five way tensor, we can compute a Tucker decomposition to find inherent low-dimensional multilinear structure, achieving compression ratios of up to 10000 on real-world data sets with negligible loss in accuracy. So that we can operate on such massive data, we present the first-ever distributed memory parallel implementation for the Tucker decomposition, whose key computations correspond to parallel linear algebra operations, albeit with nonstandard data layouts. Our approach specifies a data distribution for tensors that avoids any tensor data redistribution, either locally or in parallel. We provide accompanying analysis of the computation and communication costs of the algorithms. To demonstrate the compression and accuracy of the method, we apply our approach to real-world data sets from combustion science simulations. We also provide detailed performance results, including parallel performance in both weak and strong scaling experiments.

    16. Scientific Opportunities to Reduce Risk in Nuclear Process Science

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Bredt, Paul R.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Poloski, Adam P.; Vienna, John D.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Hobbs, David; Wilmarth, B.; Mcilwain, Michael; Subramanian, K.; Krahn, Steve; Machara, N.

      2009-08-28

      Cleaning up the nation’s nuclear weapons complex remains as one of the most technologically challenging and financially costly problems facing the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Safety, cost, and technological challenges have often delayed progress in retrieval, processing, and final disposition of high-level waste, spent nuclear fuel, and challenging materials. Some of the issues result from the difficulty and complexity of the technological issues; others have programmatic bases, such as strategies that may provide undue focus on near-term goals or difficulty in developing and maintaining stakeholder confidence in the proposed solutions. We propose that independent basic fundamental science research, addressing the full cleanup life-cycle, offers an opportunity to help address these challenges by providing 1) scientific insight into the fundamental mechanisms involved in currently selected processing and disposal options, 2) a rational path to the development of alternative technologies should the primary options fail, 3) confidence that models that predict long-term performance of different disposal options are based upon the best available science, and 4) fundamental science discovery that enables transformational solutions to revolutionize the current baseline processes. Over the last 3 years, DOE’s Office of Environmental Management (EM) has experienced a fundamental shift in philosophy. The mission focus of driving to closure has been replaced by one of enabling the long-term needs of DOE and the nation. Resolving new challenges, such as the disposition of DOE spent nuclear fuel, have been added to EM’s responsibilities. In addition, the schedules for addressing several elements of the cleanup mission have been extended. As a result, EM’s mission is no longer focused only on driving the current baselines to closure. Meeting the mission will require fundamental advances over at least a 30-year window if not longer as new challenges are added. The overall intent of this paper is to foster a dialogue on how basic scientific research can assist DOE in executing its cleanup and environmental management mission. In this paper, we propose that such scientific investments not be focused solely on what may be viewed as current DOE needs, but also be based upon longer-term investments in specific areas of science that underpin technologies presently in use. In the latter regard, we propose four science theme areas: 1) the structure and dynamics of materials and interfaces, 2) coupled chemical and physical processes, 3) complex solution phase phenomena, and 4) chemical recognition phenomena. The proposed scientific focus for each of these theme areas and the scientific opportunities are identified, along with links to major risks within the initiative areas identified in EM’s Engineering and Technology Roadmap.

    17. Introducing Enabling Computational Tools to the Climate Sciences: Multi-Resolution Climate Modeling with Adaptive Cubed-Sphere Grids

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Jablonowski, Christiane

      2015-07-14

      The research investigates and advances strategies how to bridge the scale discrepancies between local, regional and global phenomena in climate models without the prohibitive computational costs of global cloud-resolving simulations. In particular, the research explores new frontiers in computational geoscience by introducing high-order Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) techniques into climate research. AMR and statically-adapted variable-resolution approaches represent an emerging trend for atmospheric models and are likely to become the new norm in future-generation weather and climate models. The research advances the understanding of multi-scale interactions in the climate system and showcases a pathway how to model these interactions effectively with advanced computational tools, like the Chombo AMR library developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The research is interdisciplinary and combines applied mathematics, scientific computing and the atmospheric sciences. In this research project, a hierarchy of high-order atmospheric models on cubed-sphere computational grids have been developed that serve as an algorithmic prototype for the finite-volume solution-adaptive Chombo-AMR approach. The foci of the investigations have lied on the characteristics of both static mesh adaptations and dynamically-adaptive grids that can capture flow fields of interest like tropical cyclones. Six research themes have been chosen. These are (1) the introduction of adaptive mesh refinement techniques into the climate sciences, (2) advanced algorithms for nonhydrostatic atmospheric dynamical cores, (3) an assessment of the interplay between resolved-scale dynamical motions and subgrid-scale physical parameterizations, (4) evaluation techniques for atmospheric model hierarchies, (5) the comparison of AMR refinement strategies and (6) tropical cyclone studies with a focus on multi-scale interactions and variable-resolution modeling. The results of this research project demonstrate significant advances in all six research areas. The major conclusions are that statically-adaptive variable-resolution modeling is currently becoming mature in the climate sciences, and that AMR holds outstanding promise for future-generation weather and climate models on high-performance computing architectures.

    18. Computer System,

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      System, Cluster, and Networking Summer Institute New Mexico Consortium and Los Alamos National Laboratory HOW TO APPLY Applications will be accepted JANUARY 5 - FEBRUARY 13, 2016 Computing and Information Technology undegraduate students are encouraged to apply. Must be a U.S. citizen. * Submit a current resume; * Offcial University Transcript (with spring courses posted and/or a copy of spring 2016 schedule) 3.0 GPA minimum; * One Letter of Recommendation from a Faculty Member; and * Letter of

    19. Secretarial Policy Statement on Scientific Integrity

      Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

      2012-03-23

      Science and Technology are the foundation of all Department of Energy (DOE) activities, so it is essential that we be committed to developing and maintaining a culture that fosters the highest levels of scientific integrity.

    20. Secretarial Policy Statement on Scientific Integrity

      Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

      2014-06-02

      This Secretarial policy statement is intended to enhance our culture by establishing a unified framework for scientific integrity. This policy applies to all DOE Federal employees. This policy will be reviewed annually. Does not cancel/supersede other directives.