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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Advanced Scientific Computing Research Jobs  

Office of Science (SC) Website

about/jobs/ Below is a list of currently about/jobs/ Below is a list of currently open federal employment opportunities in the Office of Science. Prospective applicants should follow the links to the formal position announcements on USAJOBS.gov for more information. en {D1C7BEC4-D6F9-4FB7-A95E-142A6B699F6B}https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/358465200 Computer Scientist Computer Science Research & Partnerships Division Job Title: Computer Scientist Computer Science Research & Partnerships DivisionOffice: Advanced Scientific Computing ResearchURL: USAjobs listingVacancy Number: 14-DE-SC-HQ-005Location:

2

Barbara Helland Advanced Scientific Computing Research NERSC...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7-28, 2012 Barbara Helland Advanced Scientific Computing Research NERSC-HEP Requirements Review 1 Science C ase S tudies d rive d iscussions Program R equirements R eviews ...

3

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Advanced Scientific...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Advanced Scientific Computing Research: Target 2014 ASCRFrontcover.png Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for...

4

National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research of the U.S.Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (OASCR) andOASCR Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (DOE

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Energy Department Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific Computing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific Computing Research Energy Department Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific Computing Research December 27, 2005 - 4:55pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy's Office of Science and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) have issued a joint Request for Proposals for advanced scientific computing research. DOE expects to fund $67 million annually for three years to five years under its Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) research program. Scientific computing, including modeling and simulation, has become crucial for research problems that are insoluble by traditional theoretical and experimental approaches, hazardous to study in the laboratory, or time-consuming or expensive to solve by traditional means.

6

NERSC Role in Advanced Scientific Computing Research Katherine Yelick  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Advanced Scientific Computing Research Katherine Yelick NERSC Director Requirements Workshop NERSC Mission The mission of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is to accelerate the pace of scientific discovery by providing high performance computing, information, data, and communications services for all DOE Office of Science (SC) research. Sample Scientific Accomplishments at NERSC 3 Award-winning software uses massively-parallel supercomputing to map hydrocarbon reservoirs at unprecedented levels of detail. (Greg Newman, LBNL) . Combustion Adaptive Mesh Refinement allows simulation of a fuel- flexible low-swirl burner that is orders of magnitude larger & more detailed than traditional reacting flow simulations allow.

7

Energy Department Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific Computing  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Energy Energy Department Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific Computing Research News Featured Articles Science Headlines 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 12.27.05 Energy Department Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific Computing Research Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy's Office of Science and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) have issued a joint Request for Proposals for advanced scientific computing research. DOE expects to fund $67 million annually for three years to five years under its Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) research program.'

8

Computational Biology, Advanced Scientific Computing, and Emerging Computational Architectures  

SciTech Connect

This CRADA was established at the start of FY02 with $200 K from IBM and matching funds from DOE to support post-doctoral fellows in collaborative research between International Business Machines and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to explore effective use of emerging petascale computational architectures for the solution of computational biology problems. 'No cost' extensions of the CRADA were negotiated with IBM for FY03 and FY04.

None

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

9

Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Homepage | U.S.  

Office of Science (SC) Website

ASCAC Home ASCAC Home Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) ASCAC Home Meetings Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (38KB) ASCR Committees of Visitors ASCR Home Exascale Advisory Committee Report .pdf file (2.1MB) The Opportunities and Challenges of Exascale Computing The Exascale initiative will be significant and transformative for Department of Energy missions. The ASCAC Subcommitte report is available to revew.Read More .pdf file (2.1MB) Exascale picture 1 of 2 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page ADDITIONAL INFORMATION About ASCAC Contact ASCAC Email: ascr@science.doe.gov Phone: 301-903-7486 ASCAC DFO: Mrs. Christine Chalk COMMITTEE MANAGERS: Mrs. Melea Baker Dr. Lucy Nowell COMMITTEE CHAIR Dr. Roscoe C. Giles ASCR AD J. Steve Binkley The Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC), established

10

U.S. Department of Energy Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing SciDAC 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing SciDAC 2010 Dream beams. Introduction 261 #12;U.S. Department of Energy Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing SciDAC 2010 Figure 1. 262 #12;U.S. Department of Energy Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing SciDAC 2010 2

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

11

Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) | U.S. DOE Office  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Scientific Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Applied Mathematics Computer Science Next Generation Networking Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Co-Design SciDAC Institutes Computational Science Graduate Fellowship (CSGF) ASCR SBIR-STTR Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) News & Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-7486 F: (301) 903-4846 E: sc.ascr@science.doe.gov More Information » Research Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC)

12

Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) Homepage | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

ASCR Home ASCR Home Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) News & Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-7486 F: (301) 903-4846 E: sc.ascr@science.doe.gov More Information » ASCR Advisory Committee Exascale Report Synergistic Challenges in Data-Intensive Science and Exascale Computing ASCAC Subcommittee Summary Report. This new report discusses the natural synergies among the challenges facing data-intensive science and exascale computing, including the need for a new scientific workflow.

13

Merit Review Procedures for Advanced Scientific Computing Research...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

News In the News In Focus Presentations & Testimony Recovery Act About Organization Budget Field Offices Federal Advisory Committees History Scientific and Technical...

14

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center 2007 Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, whichOffice of Advanced Scientific Computing Research The primaryof the Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program

Hules, John A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) proposes to create a National Facility for Advanced Computational Science (NFACS) and to establish a new partnership between the American computer industry and a national consortium of laboratories, universities, and computing facilities. NFACS will provide leadership-class scientific computing capability to scientists and engineers nationwide, independent of their institutional affiliation or source of funding. This partnership will bring into existence a new class of computational capability in the United States that is optimal for science and will create a sustainable path towards petaflops performance.

Simon, Horst; Kramer, William; Saphir, William; Shalf, John; Bailey, David; Oliker, Leonid; Banda, Michael; McCurdy, C. William; Hules, John; Canning, Andrew; Day, Marc; Colella, Philip; Serafini, David; Wehner, Michael; Nugent, Peter

2004-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

16

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC): Advancing the frontiers of computational science and technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) provides researchers with high-performance computing tools to tackle science`s biggest and most challenging problems. Founded in 1974 by DOE/ER, the Controlled Thermonuclear Research Computer Center was the first unclassified supercomputer center and was the model for those that followed. Over the years the center`s name was changed to the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center and then to NERSC; it was relocated to LBNL. NERSC, one of the largest unclassified scientific computing resources in the world, is the principal provider of general-purpose computing services to DOE/ER programs: Magnetic Fusion Energy, High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Basic Energy Sciences, Health and Environmental Research, and the Office of Computational and Technology Research. NERSC users are a diverse community located throughout US and in several foreign countries. This brochure describes: the NERSC advantage, its computational resources and services, future technologies, scientific resources, and computational science of scale (interdisciplinary research over a decade or longer; examples: combustion in engines, waste management chemistry, global climate change modeling).

Hules, J. [ed.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Advanced Scientific Computing Research User Facilities | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

ASCR User Facilities ASCR User Facilities User Facilities ASCR User Facilities BES User Facilities BER User Facilities FES User Facilities HEP User Facilities NP User Facilities User Facilities Frequently Asked Questions User Facility Science Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 ASCR User Facilities Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The Advanced Scientific Computing Research program supports the operation of the following national scientific user facilities: Energy Sciences Network (ESnet): External link The Energy Sciences Network, or ESnet External link , is the Department of Energy's high-speed network that provides the high-bandwidth, reliable connections that link scientists at national laboratories, universities and

18

National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scientific Computing (NERSC) Center, 1996 present. Services and Systems at NERSC (Oct. 1, 1997- Dec 31, 1998,History Chief Architect, NERSC Division, Lawrence Berkeley

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Energy Department Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Energy Department Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific Computing Research News In the News 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 In Focus Presentations & Testimony...

20

Community petascale project for accelerator science and simulation: Advancing computational science for future accelerators and accelerator technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research. Theand Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research. The

Spentzouris, Panagiotis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientific Computing Center Scientific Computing Center 2004 annual report Cover image: Visualization based on a simulation of the density of a fuel pellet after it is injected into a tokamak fusion reactor. See page 40 for more information. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center 2004 annual report Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory * University of California * Berkeley, California 94720 This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC 03-76SF00098. LBNL-57369, April 2005 ii iii The Year in Perspective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Advances in Computational Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

22

(865) 574-6185, mccoydd@ornl.gov Advanced Scientific Computing Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on integrating new software for the science applications which researchers run on high performance computing platforms. One of the key challenges in high performance computing is to ensure that the software which

23

The FES Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and researchers are expected to be leaders in the efficient and productive use of High Performance Computing

24

DOE Supercomputing Resources Available for Advancing Scientific  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supercomputing Resources Available for Advancing Scientific Supercomputing Resources Available for Advancing Scientific Breakthroughs DOE Supercomputing Resources Available for Advancing Scientific Breakthroughs April 15, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today it is accepting proposals for a program to support high-impact scientific advances through the use of some of the world's most powerful supercomputers located at DOE national laboratories. Approximately 1.3 billion supercomputer processor-hours will be awarded in 2010 through the Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) program for large-scale, computationally intensive projects addressing some of the toughest challenges in science and engineering. Researchers are currently using supercomputing time under this year's

25

National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security Administration (NNSA), NSF, and NASA, as well asfunded by DOE-SC, DOE-NNSA, NSF, and NASA, as well asrecognized by both the DOE/NNSA ASCI Advanced Simulation and

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

National Energ y Research Scientific Computing Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Report Annual Report This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC 03-76SF00098. LBNL-49186, December 2001 National Energ y Research Scientific Computing Center 2001 Annual Report NERSC aspires to be a world leader in accelerating scientific discovery through computation. Our vision is to provide high- performance computing tools to tackle science's biggest and most challenging problems, and to play a major role in advancing large- scale computational science and computing technology. The result will be a rate of scientific progress previously unknown. NERSC's mission is to accelerate the pace of scientific discovery in the Department of Energy Office

27

Modeling, Simulation and Analysis of Complex Networked Systems: A Program Plan for DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many complex systems of importance to the U.S. Department of Energy consist of networks of discrete components. Examples are cyber networks, such as the internet and local area networks over which nearly all DOE scientific, technical and administrative data must travel, the electric power grid, social networks whose behavior can drive energy demand, and biological networks such as genetic regulatory networks and metabolic networks. In spite of the importance of these complex networked systems to all aspects of DOE's operations, the scientific basis for understanding these systems lags seriously behind the strong foundations that exist for the 'physically-based' systems usually associated with DOE research programs that focus on such areas as climate modeling, fusion energy, high-energy and nuclear physics, nano-science, combustion, and astrophysics. DOE has a clear opportunity to develop a similarly strong scientific basis for understanding the structure and dynamics of networked systems by supporting a strong basic research program in this area. Such knowledge will provide a broad basis for, e.g., understanding and quantifying the efficacy of new security approaches for computer networks, improving the design of computer or communication networks to be more robust against failures or attacks, detecting potential catastrophic failure on the power grid and preventing or mitigating its effects, understanding how populations will respond to the availability of new energy sources or changes in energy policy, and detecting subtle vulnerabilities in large software systems to intentional attack. This white paper outlines plans for an aggressive new research program designed to accelerate the advancement of the scientific basis for complex networked systems of importance to the DOE. It will focus principally on four research areas: (1) understanding network structure, (2) understanding network dynamics, (3) predictive modeling and simulation for complex networked systems, and (4) design, situational awareness and control of complex networks. The program elements consist of a group of Complex Networked Systems Research Institutes (CNSRI), tightly coupled to an associated individual-investigator-based Complex Networked Systems Basic Research (CNSBR) program. The CNSRI's will be principally located at the DOE National Laboratories and are responsible for identifying research priorities, developing and maintaining a networked systems modeling and simulation software infrastructure, operating summer schools, workshops and conferences and coordinating with the CNSBR individual investigators. The CNSBR individual investigator projects will focus on specific challenges for networked systems. Relevancy of CNSBR research to DOE needs will be assured through the strong coupling provided between the CNSBR grants and the CNSRI's.

Brown, D L

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

The Research Alliance in Math and Science program is sponsored by the Mathematical, Information, and Computational Sciences Division, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, U.S. Department of Energy. The work was performed at the Oak Ridge Nati  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and Computational Sciences Division, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. De-AC05-00OR22725. This work has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government, accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce

29

The Research Alliance in Math and Science program is sponsored by the Mathematical, Information, and Computational Sciences Division, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, U.S. Department of Energy. The work was performed at the Oak Ridge Nati  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and Computational Sciences Division, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, U.S. Department of Energy NATIONAL LABORATORY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Improving the Manageability of OSCAR Selima Rollins City Contract No. De-AC05-00OR22725. This work has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government

30

Advanced Computing Tech Team | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and promulgate a collection of applications for advanced architecture and high performance computing (HPC) systems. Technical engagement will occur both in the scientific...

31

Can Cloud Computing Address the Scientific Computing Requirements...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Can Cloud Computing Address the Scientific Computing Requirements for DOE Researchers? Well, Yes, No and Maybe Can Cloud Computing Address the Scientific Computing Requirements for...

32

Strategic plan for scientific computing  

SciTech Connect

Computing technology continues to undergo rapid and dramatic changes. Technological improvements in both hardware and software continue to permit analysts to model problems much more realistically than heretofore practicable. New visualization technologies vastly increase our ability to understand the results of those complex models. The mission of SRS is also undergoing very rapid change as a result of international events. While the typical demands of reactor oriented calculations may decline, environmental regulations require us to study new classes of problems in ever increasing detail. Hence, the computational workload is actually increasing rapidly. At the same time, the budget constraints demand a continued increase in cost effectiveness of scientific computing. A comprehensive strategy for scientific computing is required to adapt to these changes and still produce timely solutions to ensure continued safe operation of SRS facilities. An important goal of this strategy is to ensure that productivity gains available with new systems and technologies are truly achieved.

Church, J.P.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Berkeley Lab Scientific Programs: Computing Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

data-intensive, international scientific collaborations. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) Located at Berkeley Lab, NERSC is the flagship...

34

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) | U.S. DOE  

Office of Science (SC) Website

National National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Accessing ASCR Supercomputers Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) Research & Evaluation Prototypes (REP) Innovative & Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) ASCR Leadership Computing Challenge (ALCC) Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) News & Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-7486 F: (301)

35

PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009 PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009 PIA - Advanced Test Reactor...

36

Energy Department Seeks Proposals to Use Scientific Computing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE's missions," said Secretary Bodman. "This program opens up the world of high-performance computing to a broad array of scientific users. Through the use of these advanced...

37

NERSC: National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and share massive bio-imaging datasets. Read More National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center Computing at NERSC OURSYSTEMS GETTINGSTARTED DOCUMENTATIONFOR USERS...

38

Computer simulation and scientific visualization  

SciTech Connect

The simulation of processes in engineering and the physical sciences has progressed rapidly over the last several years. With rapid developments in supercomputers, parallel processing, numerical algorithms and software, scientists and engineers are now positioned to quantitatively simulate systems requiring many billions of arithmetic operations. The need to understand and assimilate such massive amounts of data has been a driving force in the development of both hardware and software to create visual representations of the underling physical systems. In this paper, and the accompanying videotape, the evolution and development of the visualization process in scientific computing will be reviewed. Specific applications and associated imaging hardware and software technology illustrate both the computational needs and the evolving trends. 6 refs.

Weber, D.P.; Moszur, F.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Advanced Simulation and Computing  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NA-ASC-117R-09-Vol.1-Rev.0 NA-ASC-117R-09-Vol.1-Rev.0 Advanced Simulation and Computing PROGRAM PLAN FY09 October 2008 ASC Focal Point Robert Meisner, Director DOE/NNSA NA-121.2 202-586-0908 Program Plan Focal Point for NA-121.2 Njema Frazier DOE/NNSA NA-121.2 202-586-5789 A Publication of the Office of Advanced Simulation & Computing, NNSA Defense Programs i Contents Executive Summary ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1 I. Introduction -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2 Realizing the Vision ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2 The Future of the Nuclear Weapons Complex ---------------------------------------------------------------- 2

40

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contract to Cray August 5, 2009 BERKELEY, CA - The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Scientific Computing Programs and Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... High Performance Computing Last Updated Date: 03/05/2012 High Performance Computing (HPC) enables work on challenging ...

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

42

NERSC "Visualization Greenbook" Future visualization needs of the DOE computational science community hosted at NERSC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Mathematical,Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (OASCR)

Hamann, Bernd; Bethel, E. Wes; Simon, Horst; Meza, Juan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Berkeley Lab Computing Sciences: Accelerating Scientific Discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

facilities NERSC and ESnet and by conduct- ing appliedCOMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE ESnet is a reliable, high- bandwidthdevelopment. NERSC and ESnet staff participate in advanced

Hules, John A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Berkeley Lab Computing Sciences: Accelerating Scientific Discovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scientists today rely on advances in computer science, mathematics, and computational science, as well as large-scale computing and networking facilities, to increase our understanding of ourselves, our planet, and our universe. Berkeley Lab's Computing Sciences organization researches, develops, and deploys new tools and technologies to meet these needs and to advance research in such areas as global climate change, combustion, fusion energy, nanotechnology, biology, and astrophysics.

Hules, John A

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

45

Uncertainty Quantification in Scientific Computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Mike initiated the DAKOTA effort shortly after joining Sandia in 1994 and ... computing began in 1971 at the Thames Polytechnic in South East London ...

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

46

The Magellan Final Report on Cloud Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), was

Coghlan, Susan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Computational photography: advanced topics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computational photography combines plentiful computing, digital sensors, modern optics, many varieties of actuators, probes and smart lights to escape the limitations of traditional film cameras and enables novel imaging applications. Unbounded dynamic ...

Paul Debevec; Ramesh Raskar; Jack Tumblin

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) Consolidated Progress Report July 2006 - March 2009  

SciTech Connect

A resounding success of the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program is that high-performance computational science is now universally recognized as a critical aspect of scientific discovery [71], complementing both theoretical and experimental research. As scientific communities prepare to exploit unprecedented computing capabilities of emerging leadership-class machines for multi-model simulations at the extreme scale [72], it is more important than ever to address the technical and social challenges of geographically distributed teams that combine expertise in domain science, applied mathematics, and computer science to build robust and flexible codes that can incorporate changes over time. The Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) tackles these issues by exploiting component-based software development to facilitate collaborative high-performance scientific computing.

Bernholdt, D E; McInnes, L C; Govindaraju, M; Bramley, R; Epperly, T; Kohl, J A; Nieplocha, J; Armstrong, R; Shasharina, S; Sussman, A L; Sottile, M; Damevski, K

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

49

Storage Hierarchy Management for Scientific Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the driving forces behind the design of computer systems. As a result, many advances in CPU architecture were-terabyte tertiary storage system attached to a high- speed computer. The analysis finds that the number of files instead of the two separate views of the system studied. This finding was a major motivation of the design

Miller, Ethan L.

50

Storage Hierarchy Management for Scientific Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the design of com- puter systems. As a result, many advances in CPU architecture were first developed for high-speed supercomputer systems, keeping them among the fastest computers in the world. However system attached to a high-speed computer. The analysis finds that the number of files and average file

Miller, Ethan L.

51

Exploring HPCS Languages in Scientific Computing  

SciTech Connect

As computers scale up dramatically to tens and hundreds of thousands of cores, develop deeper computational and memory hierarchies, and increased heterogeneity, developers of scientific software are increasingly challenged to express complex parallel simulations effectively and efficiently. In this paper, we explore the three languages developed under the DARPA High-Productivity Computing Systems (HPCS) program to help address these concerns: Chapel, Fortress, and X10. These languages provide a variety of features not found in currently popular HPC programming environments and make it easier to express powerful computational constructs, leading to new ways of thinking about parallel programming. Though the languages and their implementations are not yet mature enough for a comprehensive evaluation, we discuss some of the important features, and provide examples of how they can be used in scientific computing. We believe that these characteristics will be important to the future of high-performance scientific computing, whether the ultimate language of choice is one of the HPCS languages or something else.

Barrett, Richard F [ORNL; Alam, Sadaf R [ORNL; de Almeida, Valmor F [ORNL; Bernholdt, David E [ORNL; Elwasif, Wael R [ORNL; Kuehn, Jeffery A [ORNL; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL; Shet, Aniruddha G [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, FacilitiesNP) Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)

Gerber, Richard A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, FacilitiesOffice of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), and

Gerber, Richard A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

Frances M. Marshall; Jeff Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation and Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facebook Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Advanced Simulation and Computing Advanced Simulation and Computing Taking on the World's Complex Challenges Advancing Science Frontiers Our research is producing new scientific insights about the world in which we live and assists in certifying the safety and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. Technology Provides the Tools Growth in data and the software and hardware demands needed for physics-based answers and predictive capabilities are driving technology improvements. We could not achieve the breakthroughs we're making without these important tools. Partnerships Accelerate Innovation Partnerships leverage talent and multiply the effectiveness of our research efforts. Impacting Global Issues ASC software and hardware tools solve global issues ranging from nuclear

56

Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges - Advanced R and D|...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Advanced R and D Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass P5 Planning Process Energy Frontier Intensity Frontier Cosmic...

57

The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials Solutions for the Nuclear Renaissance ... U.S. Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific...

58

Advanced Computational Methods for Turbulence and Combustion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Computational Methods for Turbulence and Combustion Advanced Computational Methods for Turbulence and Combustion Bell.png Key Challenges: Development and application of...

59

Collaboration to advance high-performance computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collaboration to advance high-performance computing Collaboration to advance high-performance computing LANL and EMC will enhance, design, build, test, and deploy new cutting-edge...

60

NERSC: National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

NERSC Powering Scientific Discovery Since 1974 NERSC Powering Scientific Discovery Since 1974 Login Site Map | My NERSC search... Go Home About Overview NERSC Mission Contact us Staff Org Chart NERSC History NERSC Stakeholders NERSC Usage Demographics Careers Visitor Info Web Policies Science at NERSC NERSC HPC Achievement Awards Accelerator Science Astrophysics Biological Sciences Chemistry & Materials Science Climate & Earth Science Energy Science Engineering Science Environmental Science Fusion Science Math & Computer Science Nuclear Science Science Highlights NERSC Citations HPC Requirements Reviews Systems Computational Systems Table Data Systems Table Edison Cray XC30 Hopper Cray XE6 Carver IBM iDataPlex PDSF Genepool NERSC Global Filesystem HPSS data archive Data Transfer Nodes History of Systems NERSC-8 Procurement

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

EAGLES: An interactive environment for scientific computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EAGLES Project is creating a computing system and interactive environment for scientific applications using object-oriented software principles. This software concept leads to well defined data interfaces for integrating experiment control with acquisition and analysis codes. Tools for building object-oriented systems for user interfaces and codes are discussed. Also the terms of object-oriented programming are introduced and later defined in the appendix. These terms include objects, methods, messages, encapsulation and inheritance.

Lawver, B.S.; O'Brien, D.W.; Poggio, M.E.; Shectman, R.M.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

EAGLES: An interactive environment for scientific computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EAGLES Project is creating a computing system and interactive environment for scientific applications using object-oriented software principles. This software concept leads to well defined data interfaces for integrating experiments control with acquisition and analysis codes. Tools for building object-oriented systems for user interfaces and codes are discussed. Also the terms of object-oriented programming are introduced and later defined in the appendix. These terms include objects, methods, messages, encapsulation and inheritance.

Lawver, B.S.; O'Brien, D.W.; Poggio, M.E.; Shectman, R.M.

1987-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

63

Scientific Methods in Computer Science Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scientific Methods in Computer Science Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic Department of Computer Science analyzes scientific aspects of Computer Science. First it defines science and scientific method in general. It gives a dis- cussion of relations between science, research, development and technology. The existing

Cunningham, Conrad

64

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BES) Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Facilities

Gerber, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological and Environmental Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, FacilitiesOffice of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), and

DOE Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research Program Office BER,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Act of 2009 Advanced Scientific Computing Research Courseof Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)and for Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Facilities

Gerber, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

JASMIN: a parallel software infrastructure for scientific computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The exponential growth of computer power in the last 10 years is now creating a great challenge for parallel programming toward achieving realistic performance in the field of scientific computing. To improve on the traditional program for numerical ... Keywords: J Adaptive Structured Meshes applications INfrastructure (JASMIN), parallel computing, scientific computing

Zeyao Mo; Aiqing Zhang; Xiaolin Cao; Qingkai Liu; Xiaowen Xu; Hengbin An; Wenbing Pei; Shaoping Zhu

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Scientific computations on modern parallel vector systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computational scientists have seen a frustrating trend of stagnating application performance despite dramatic increases in the claimed peak capability of high performance computing systems. This trend has been widely attributed to the use of superscalar-based commodity components whos architectural designs offer a balance between memory performance, network capability, and execution rate that is poorly matched to the requirements of large-scale numerical computations. Recently, two innovative parallel-vector architectures have become operational: the Japanese Earth Simulator (ES) and the Cray X1. In order to quantify what these modern vector capabilities entail for the scientists that rely on modeling and simulation, it is critical to evaluate this architectural paradigm in the context of demanding computational algorithms. Our evaluation study examines four diverse scientific applications with the potential to run at ultrascale, from the areas of plasma physics, material science, astrophysics, and magnetic fusion. We compare performance between the vector-based ES and X1, with leading superscalar-based platforms: the IBM Power3/4 and the SGI Altix. Our research team was the first international group to conduct a performance evaluation study at the Earth Simulator Center; remote ES access in not available. Results demonstrate that the vector systems achieve excellent performance on our application suite the highest of any architecture tested to date. However, vectorization of a particle-incell code highlights the potential difficulty of expressing irregularly structured algorithms as data-parallel programs. 1.

Leonid Oliker; Andrew Canning; Jonathan Carter; John Shalf; Stephane Ethier

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Institute for Scientific Computing Research Fiscal Year 2002 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Institute for Scientific Computing Research (ISCR) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is jointly administered by the Computing Applications and Research Department (CAR) and the University Relations Program (URP), and this joint relationship expresses its mission. An extensively externally networked ISCR cost-effectively expands the level and scope of national computational science expertise available to the Laboratory through CAR. The URP, with its infrastructure for managing six institutes and numerous educational programs at LLNL, assumes much of the logistical burden that is unavoidable in bridging the Laboratory's internal computational research environment with that of the academic community. As large-scale simulations on the parallel platforms of DOE's Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASCI) become increasingly important to the overall mission of LLNL, the role of the ISCR expands in importance, accordingly. Relying primarily on non-permanent staffing, the ISCR complements Laboratory research in areas of the computer and information sciences that are needed at the frontier of Laboratory missions. The ISCR strives to be the ''eyes and ears'' of the Laboratory in the computer and information sciences, in keeping the Laboratory aware of and connected to important external advances. It also attempts to be ''feet and hands, in carrying those advances into the Laboratory and incorporating them into practice. In addition to conducting research, the ISCR provides continuing education opportunities to Laboratory personnel, in the form of on-site workshops taught by experts on novel software or hardware technologies. The ISCR also seeks to influence the research community external to the Laboratory to pursue Laboratory-related interests and to train the workforce that will be required by the Laboratory. Part of the performance of this function is interpreting to the external community appropriate (unclassified) aspects of the Laboratory's own contributions to the computer and information sciences--contributions that its unique mission and unique resources give it a unique opportunity and responsibility to make. Of the three principal means of packaging scientific ideas for transfer--people, papers, and software--experience suggests that the most effective means is people. The programs of the ISCR are therefore people-intensive. Finally, the ISCR, together with CAR, confers an organizational identity on the burgeoning computer and information sciences research activity at LLNL and serves as a point of contact within the Laboratory for computer and information scientists from outside.

Keyes, D E; McGraw, J R; Bodtker, L K

2003-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

70

Scientific Computing Kernels on the Cell Processor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of High Performance Computing Applications, 2004. [Conference on High Performance Computing in the Asia Paci?cMeeting on High Performance Computing for Computational

Williams, Samuel W.; Shalf, John; Oliker, Leonid; Kamil, Shoaib; Husbands, Parry; Yelick, Katherine

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Scientific and Computational Challenges of the Fusion Simulation Program (FSP)  

SciTech Connect

This paper highlights the scientific and computational challenges facing the Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) a major national initiative in the United States with the primary objective being to enable scientific discovery of important new plasma phenomena with associated understanding that emerges only upon integration. This requires developing a predictive integrated simulation capability for magnetically-confined fusion plasmas that are properly validated against experiments in regimes relevant for producing practical fusion energy. It is expected to provide a suite of advanced modeling tools for reliably predicting fusion device behavior with comprehensive and targeted science-based simulations of nonlinearly-coupled phenomena in the core plasma, edge plasma, and wall region on time and space scales required for fusion energy production. As such, it will strive to embody the most current theoretical and experimental understanding of magnetic fusion plasmas and to provide a living framework for the simulation of such plasmas as the associated physics understanding continues to advance over the next several decades. Substantive progress on answering the outstanding scientific questions in the field will drive the FSP toward its ultimate goal of developing the ability to predict the behavior of plasma discharges in toroidal magnetic fusion devices with high physics fidelity on all relevant time and space scales. From a computational perspective, this will demand computing resources in the petascale range and beyond together with the associated multi-core algorithmic formulation needed to address burning plasma issues relevant to ITER - a multibillion dollar collaborative experiment involving seven international partners representing over half the world's population. Even more powerful exascale platforms will be needed to meet the future challenges of designing a demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO). Analogous to other major applied physics modeling projects (e.g., Climate Modeling), the FSP will need to develop software in close collaboration with computers scientists and applied mathematicians and validated against experimental data from tokamaks around the world. Specific examples of expected advances needed to enable such a comprehensive integrated modeling capability and possible "co-design" approaches will be discussed. __________________________________________________

William M. Tang

2011-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

72

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research * Basic Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy S ciences N etwork Enabling Virtual Science June 9, 2009 Steve C oer steve@es.net Dept. H ead, E nergy S ciences N etwork Lawrence B erkeley N aDonal L ab The E nergy S...

73

DOE Issues Funding Opportunity for Advanced Computational and Modeling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Funding Opportunity for Advanced Computational and Funding Opportunity for Advanced Computational and Modeling Research for the Electric Power System DOE Issues Funding Opportunity for Advanced Computational and Modeling Research for the Electric Power System May 23, 2012 - 8:36am Addthis The objective of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to leverage scientific advancements in mathematics and computation for application to power system models and software tools, with the long-term goal of enabling real-time protection and control based on wide-area sensor measurements. Specifically, this FOA focuses on two foundational research challenges: 1) handling of large data sets to improve suitability for operational (and/or planning) models and analysis; and 2) "faster than real-time" simulations that improve understanding of

74

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center NERSC Exceeds Reliability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientific Scientific Computing Center NERSC Exceeds Reliability Standards With Tape-Based Active Archive Research Facility Accelerates Access to Data while Supporting Exponential Growth Founded in 1974, the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary scientific com- puting facility for the Office of Science in the U.S. Department of Energy. NERSC is located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Oakland Scientific Facility in Oakland, California and is mandated with providing computational resources and expertise for scientific research to about 5,000 scientists at national labora- tories and universities across the United States, as well as their international col- laborators. A division of Lawrence Berke- ley National Laboratory, NERSC supports

75

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Energy National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) Awards Supercomputer Contract to Cray National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) Awards Supercomputer Contract to Cray August 5, 2009 BERKELEY, CA - The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory announced today that a contract for its next generation supercomputing system will be awarded to Cray Inc. The multi-year supercomputing contract includes delivery of a Cray XT5(tm) massively parallel processor supercomputer, which will be upgraded to a future-generation Cray supercomputer. When completed, the new system will deliver a peak performance of more than one petaflops, equivalent to more

76

Scientific Computations on Modern Parallel Vector Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computational scientists have seen a frustrating trend of stagnating application performance despite dramatic increases in the claimed peak capability of high performance computing systems. This trend has been widely attributed to the use of superscalar-based ...

Leonid Oliker; Andrew Canning; Jonathan Carter; John Shalf; Stephane Ethier

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Accelerating Scientific Discovery Through Computation and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in microchannel devices, and the modeling of hydro- dynamic dispersion. ... period, Moore's law [51] has increased computing power dramatically, so ...

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

78

New methods of secure outsourcing of scientific computations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present several methods of secure outsourcing of numerical and scientific computations. Current outsourcing techniques are inspired by the numerous problems in computational mathematics, where a solution is obtained in the form of an ... Keywords: Secure cloud computing, Secure outsourcing

Yerzhan N. Seitkulov

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Partial Evaluation for Scientific Computing: The Supercomputer Toolkit Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the key role played by partial evaluation in the Supercomputer Toolkit, a parallel computing system for scientific applications that effectively exploits the vast amount of parallelism exposed by partial ...

Berlin, Andrew

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center 2007 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents highlights of the research conducted on NERSC computers in a variety of scientific disciplines during the year 2007. It also reports on changes and upgrades to NERSC's systems and services aswell as activities of NERSC staff.

Hules, John A.; Bashor, Jon; Wang, Ucilia; Yarris, Lynn; Preuss, Paul

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Exploring Cloud Computing for DOE's Scientific Mission  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

computing is gaining traction in the commercial world, with companies like Amazon, Google, and Yahoo offering pay-to-play cycles to help organizations meet cyclical demands for...

82

Scientific Grand Challenges: Crosscutting Technologies for Computing at the Exascale - February 2-4, 2010, Washington, D.C.  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the "Scientific Grand Challenges - Crosscutting Technologies for Computing at the Exascale" workshop in February 2010, jointly sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energys Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research and the National Nuclear Security Administration, was to identify the elements of a research and development agenda that will address these challenges and create a comprehensive exascale computing environment. This exascale computing environment will enable the science applications identified in the eight previously held Scientific Grand Challenges Workshop Series.

Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2011-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

83

Multicore Platforms for Scientific Computing: Cell BE and NVIDIA Tesla  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multicore Platforms for Scientific Computing: Cell BE and NVIDIA Tesla J. Fern´andez, M.E. Acacio Tesla computing solutions. The former is a re- cent heterogeneous chip-multiprocessor (CMP) architecture, multicore, Cell BE, NVIDIA Tesla, CUDA 1 Introduction Nowadays, multicore architectures are omnipresent

Acacio, Manuel

84

Matthew R. Norman Scientific Computing Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-present, Porting the Community Atmosphere Model - Spectral Element (CAM-SE) to ORNL's Titan Supercomputer National Laboratory PO BOX 2008 MS6016 Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA normanmr@ornl.gov (865) 576-1757 Education-scale atmospheric simu- lation code, to run on Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility's (OLCF's) Titan super

85

Scientific computations section monthly report, November 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This progress report from the Savannah River Technology Center contains abstracts from papers from the computational modeling, applied statistics, applied physics, experimental thermal hydraulics, and packaging and transportation groups. Specific topics covered include: engineering modeling and process simulation, criticality methods and analysis, plutonium disposition.

Buckner, M.R.

1993-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

86

Advancing manufacturing through computational chemistry  

SciTech Connect

The capabilities of nanotechnology and computational chemistry are reaching a point of convergence. New computer hardware and novel computational methods have created opportunities to test proposed nanometer-scale devices, investigate molecular manufacturing and model and predict properties of new materials. Experimental methods are also beginning to provide new capabilities that make the possibility of manufacturing various devices with atomic precision tangible. In this paper, we will discuss some of the novel computational methods we have used in molecular dynamics simulations of polymer processes, neural network predictions of new materials, and simulations of proposed nano-bearings and fluid dynamics in nano- sized devices.

Noid, D.W.; Sumpter, B.G.; Tuzun, R.E.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

NETL: Advanced Research - Computation Energy Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computational Energy Sciences > APECS Computational Energy Sciences > APECS Advanced Research Computational Energy Sciences APECS APECS Virtual Plant APECS (Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator) is the first simulation software to combine the disciplines of process simulation and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This unique combination makes it possible for engineers to create "virtual plants" and to follow complex thermal and fluid flow phenomena from unit to unit across the plant. Advanced visualization software tools aid in analysis and optimization of the entire plant's performance. This tool can significantly reduce the cost of power plant design and optimization with an emphasis on multiphase flows critical to advanced power cycles. A government-industry-university collaboration (including DOE, NETL, Ansys/

88

A Desktop Grid Computing Approach Scientific Computing and Visualization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

limit the availability of such systems. A more convenient solution, which is becoming more and more of desktop computers provides for this solution. In a desktop grid system, the execution of an application and Visualization experiments. We present here QADPZ, an open source system for desktop grid computing that have

89

DOE Issues Funding Opportunity for Advanced Computational and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Funding Opportunity for Advanced Computational and Modeling Research for the Electric Power System DOE Issues Funding Opportunity for Advanced Computational and Modeling Research...

90

The advanced computational testing and simulation toolkit (ACTS)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the past decades there has been a continuous growth in the number of physical and societal problems that have been successfully studied and solved by means of computational modeling and simulation. Distinctively, a number of these are important scientific problems ranging in scale from the atomic to the cosmic. For example, ionization is a phenomenon as ubiquitous in modern society as the glow of fluorescent lights and the etching on silicon computer chips; but it was not until 1999 that researchers finally achieved a complete numerical solution to the simplest example of ionization, the collision of a hydrogen atom with an electron. On the opposite scale, cosmologists have long wondered whether the expansion of the Universe, which began with the Big Bang, would ever reverse itself, ending the Universe in a Big Crunch. In 2000, analysis of new measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation showed that the geometry of the Universe is flat, and thus the Universe will continue expanding forever. Both of these discoveries depended on high performance computer simulations that utilized computational tools included in the Advanced Computational Testing and Simulation (ACTS) Toolkit. The ACTS Toolkit is an umbrella project that brought together a number of general purpose computational tool development projects funded and supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These tools, which have been developed independently, mainly at DOE laboratories, make it easier for scientific code developers to write high performance applications for parallel computers. They tackle a number of computational issues that are common to a large number of scientific applications, mainly implementation of numerical algorithms, and support for code development, execution and optimization. The ACTS Toolkit Project enables the use of these tools by a much wider community of computational scientists, and promotes code portability, reusability, reduction of duplicate efforts, and tool maturity. This paper presents a brief introduction to the functionality available in ACTS.

Drummond, L.A.; Marques, O.

2002-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

91

Computational Modeling and Simulation of Advanced Materials for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Computational Modeling and Simulation of Advanced Materials for Energy Applications. Sponsorship, TMS/ASM: Computational Materials Science...

92

Exploring Cloud Computing for Large-scale Scientific Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores cloud computing for large-scale data-intensive scientific applications. Cloud computing is attractive because it provides hardware and software resources on-demand, which relieves the burden of acquiring and maintaining a huge amount of resources that may be used only once by a scientific application. However, unlike typical commercial applications that often just requires a moderate amount of ordinary resources, large-scale scientific applications often need to process enormous amount of data in the terabyte or even petabyte range and require special high performance hardware with low latency connections to complete computation in a reasonable amount of time. To address these challenges, we build an infrastructure that can dynamically select high performance computing hardware across institutions and dynamically adapt the computation to the selected resources to achieve high performance. We have also demonstrated the effectiveness of our infrastructure by building a system biology application and an uncertainty quantification application for carbon sequestration, which can efficiently utilize data and computation resources across several institutions.

Lin, Guang; Han, Binh; Yin, Jian; Gorton, Ian

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

93

MA50177: Scientific Computing Nuclear Reactor Simulation Generalised Eigenvalue Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MA50177: Scientific Computing Case Study Nuclear Reactor Simulation ­ Generalised Eigenvalue of a malfunction or of an accident experimentally, the numerical simulation of nuclear reactors is of utmost balance in a nuclear reactor are the two-group neutron diffusion equations -div (K1 u1) + (a,1 + s) u1 = 1

Scheichl, Robert

94

Exposing Digital Forgeries in Scientific Images Department of Computer Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that as many as 20% of accepted manuscripts contain figures with inappropriate manipulations, and 1% with fraudulent manipulations. Several scientific editors are considering putting safeguards in place to help to be a need for computational techniques that automatically detect common forms of tam- pering. We describe

Farid, Hany

95

NETL: Advanced Research - Computation Energy Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computational Energy Sciences Computational Energy Sciences Advanced Research Computational Energy Sciences Virtual Plant Simulating the complex processes occurring inside a coal gasifier, or across an entire chemical or power plant, is an incredible tool made possible by today's supercomputers and advanced simulation software. The Computational Energy Sciences (CES) Focus Area provides such tools to the Fossil Energy program at NETL. The goal is to help scientists and engineers to better understand the fundamental steps in a complex process so they can optimize the design of the equipment needed to run it. Not only is this less costly than performing a long series of experiments under varying conditions to try to isolate important variables, but it also provides more information than such experiments can provide. Of course, the data is

96

Scientific opportunities with advanced facilities for neutron scattering  

SciTech Connect

The present report documents deliberations of a large group of experts in neutron scattering and fundamental physics on the need for new neutron sources of greater intensity and more sophisticated instrumentation than those currently available. An additional aspect of the Workshop was a comparison between steady-state (reactor) and pulsed (spallation) sources. The main conclusions were: (1) the case for a new higher flux neutron source is extremely strong and such a facility will lead to qualitatively new advances in condensed matter science and fundamental physics; (2) to a large extent the future needs of the scientific community could be met with either a 5 x 10/sup 15/ n cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/ steady state source or a 10/sup 17/ n cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/ peak flux spallation source; and (3) the findings of this Workshop are consistent with the recommendations of the Major Materials Facilities Committee.

Lander, G.H.; Emery, V.J. (eds.)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

NETL: News Release - New DOE-Sponsored Study Helps Advance Scientific...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Study Helps Advance Scientific Understanding of Potential CO2 Storage Impacts Duke University Report Provides Data That Can Help Anticipate Issues and Protect Drinking...

98

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Partnerships  

SciTech Connect

In 2007, the United States Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory, as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposer's physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, and obtained access to additional PIE equipment. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program enables and facilitates user access to several university and national laboratories. So far, seven universities and one national laboratory have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these universities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the user's technical needs. Universities and laboratories included in the ATR NSUF partnership program are as follows: (1) Nuclear Services Laboratories at North Carolina State University; (2) PULSTAR Reactor Facility at North Carolina State University; (3) Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory (1.7 MV Tandetron accelerator) at the University of Michigan; (4) Irradiated Materials at the University of Michigan; (5) Harry Reid Center Radiochemistry Laboratories at University of Nevada, Las Vegas; (6) Characterization Laboratory for Irradiated Materials at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (7) Tandem Accelerator Ion Beam. (1.7 MV terminal voltage tandem ion accelerator) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (8) Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) Materials Research Collaborative Access Team (MRCAT) beamline at Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Photon Source; and (9) Nanoindenter in the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) Nuclear Engineering laboratory Materials have been analyzed for ATR NSUF users at the Advanced Photon Source at the MRCAT beam, the NIST Center for Neutron Research in Gaithersburg, MD, the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, and the SHaRE user facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Additionally, ORNL has been accepted as a partner facility to enable ATR NSUF users to access the facilities at the High Flux Isotope Reactor and related facilities.

Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; Jeff B. Benson; James I. Cole; Mary Catherine Thelen

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Acts -- A collection of high performing software tools for scientific computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past decades there has been a continuous growth in the number of physical and societal problems that have been successfully studied and solved by means of computational modeling and simulation. Further, many new discoveries depend on high performance computer simulations to satisfy their demands for large computational resources and short response time. The Advanced CompuTational Software (ACTS) Collection brings together a number of general-purpose computational tool development projects funded and supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These tools make it easier for scientific code developers to write high performance applications for parallel computers. They tackle a number of computational issues that are common to a large number of scientific applications, mainly implementation of numerical algorithms, and support for code development, execution and optimization. The ACTS collection promotes code portability, reusability, reduction of duplicate efforts, and tool maturity. This paper presents a brief introduction to the functionality available in ACTS. It also highlight the tools that are in demand by Climate and Weather modelers.

Drummond, L.A.; Marques, O.A.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Scientific Grand Challenges: Forefront Questions in Nuclear Science and the Role of High Performance Computing  

SciTech Connect

This report is an account of the deliberations and conclusions of the workshop on "Forefront Questions in Nuclear Science and the Role of High Performance Computing" held January 26-28, 2009, co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Physics (ONP) and the DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing (ASCR). Representatives from the national and international nuclear physics communities, as well as from the high performance computing community, participated. The purpose of this workshop was to 1) identify forefront scientific challenges in nuclear physics and then determine which-if any-of these could be aided by high performance computing at the extreme scale; 2) establish how and why new high performance computing capabilities could address issues at the frontiers of nuclear science; 3) provide nuclear physicists the opportunity to influence the development of high performance computing; and 4) provide the nuclear physics community with plans for development of future high performance computing capability by DOE ASCR.

Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Computational Advances in Applied Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advances in Applied Energy Computational Advances in Applied Energy Friedmann-LLNL-SEAB.10.11.pdf More Documents & Publications Director's Perspective by George Miller...

102

NEAMS ToolKit: advanced computational tools for modeling & simulation...  

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NEAMS ToolKit: advanced computational tools for modeling & simulation of advanced reactor systems Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures &...

103

Java Performance for Scientific Applications on LLNL Computer Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Languages in use for high performance computing at the laboratory--Fortran (f77 and f90), C, and C++--have many years of development behind them and are generally considered the fastest available. However, Fortran and C do not readily extend to object-oriented programming models, limiting their capability for very complex simulation software. C++ facilitates object-oriented programming but is a very complex and error-prone language. Java offers a number of capabilities that these other languages do not. For instance it implements cleaner (i.e., easier to use and less prone to errors) object-oriented models than C++. It also offers networking and security as part of the language standard, and cross-platform executables that make it architecture neutral, to name a few. These features have made Java very popular for industrial computing applications. The aim of this paper is to explain the trade-offs in using Java for large-scale scientific applications at LLNL. Despite its advantages, the computational science community has been reluctant to write large-scale computationally intensive applications in Java due to concerns over its poor performance. However, considerable progress has been made over the last several years. The Java Grande Forum [1] has been promoting the use of Java for large-scale computing. Members have introduced efficient array libraries, developed fast just-in-time (JIT) compilers, and built links to existing packages used in high performance parallel computing.

Kapfer, C; Wissink, A

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

104

The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2007, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), was designated by the Department of Energy (DOE) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by approved researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide those researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposers physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, obtained access to additional PIE equipment, taken steps to enable the most advanced post-irradiation analysis possible, and initiated an educational program and digital learning library to help potential users better understand the critical issues in reactor technology and how a test reactor facility could be used to address this critical research. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program invited universities to nominate their capability to become part of a broader user facility. Any university is eligible to self-nominate. Any nomination is then peer reviewed to ensure that the addition of the university facilities adds useful capability to the NSUF. Once added to the NSUF team, the university capability is then integral to the NSUF operations and is available to all users via the proposal process. So far, six universities have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these university capabilities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the users technical needs. The current NSUF partners are shown in Figure 1. This article describes the ATR as well as the expanded capabilities, partnerships, and services that allow researchers to take full advantage of this national resource.

Todd R. Allen; Collin J. Knight; Jeff B. Benson; Frances M. Marshall; Mitchell K. Meyer; Mary Catherine Thelen

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Advanced I/O for large-scale scientific applications.  

SciTech Connect

As scientific simulations scale to use petascale machines and beyond, the data volumes generated pose a dual problem. First, with increasing machine sizes, the careful tuning of IO routines becomes more and more important to keep the time spent in IO acceptable. It is not uncommon, for instance, to have 20% of an application's runtime spent performing IO in a 'tuned' system. Careful management of the IO routines can move that to 5% or even less in some cases. Second, the data volumes are so large, on the order of 10s to 100s of TB, that trying to discover the scientifically valid contributions requires assistance at runtime to both organize and annotate the data. Waiting for offline processing is not feasible due both to the impact on the IO system and the time required. To reduce this load and improve the ability of scientists to use the large amounts of data being produced, new techniques for data management are required. First, there is a need for techniques for efficient movement of data from the compute space to storage. These techniques should understand the underlying system infrastructure and adapt to changing system conditions. Technologies include aggregation networks, data staging nodes for a closer parity to the IO subsystem, and autonomic IO routines that can detect system bottlenecks and choose different approaches, such as splitting the output into multiple targets, staggering output processes. Such methods must be end-to-end, meaning that even with properly managed asynchronous techniques, it is still essential to properly manage the later synchronous interaction with the storage system to maintain acceptable performance. Second, for the data being generated, annotations and other metadata must be incorporated to help the scientist understand output data for the simulation run as a whole, to select data and data features without concern for what files or other storage technologies were employed. All of these features should be attained while maintaining a simple deployment for the science code and eliminating the need for allocation of additional computational resources.

Klasky, Scott (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Schwan, Karsten (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Oldfield, Ron A.; Lofstead, Gerald F., II (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

A Study on Future Scientific Directions for the Advanced Photon...  

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Goals Meeting Home Meeting Chairs: Gabrielle Long (Advanced Photon Source) Gopal Shenoy (Advanced Photon Source) Strategic Planning Meeting September 2 September 3, 2004, The...

107

Center Information Innovative Computing Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Tennessee as a world leader in advanced scientific and high performance computing through research Computing Distributed Computing is an integral part of the high performance computing landscape

Tennessee, University of

108

ATCA for Machines-- Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture is a new industry open standard for electronics instrument modules and shelves being evaluated for the International Linear Collider (ILC). It is the first industrial standard designed for High Availability (HA). ILC availability simulations have shown clearly that the capabilities of ATCA are needed in order to achieve acceptable integrated luminosity. The ATCA architecture looks attractive for beam instruments and detector applications as well. This paper provides an overview of ongoing R&D including application of HA principles to power electronics systems.

Larsen, R.S.; /SLAC

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

109

NETL: Advanced Research - Computation Energy Sciences  

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MFIX MFIX Advanced Research Computational Energy Sciences MFIX MFIX (Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchanges) is a general-purpose computer code developed at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for describing the hydrodynamics, heat transfer and chemical reactions in fluid-solids systems. It has been used for describing bubbling and circulating fluidized beds and spouted beds. MFIX calculations give transient data on the three-dimensional distribution of pressure, velocity, temperature, and species mass fractions. MFIX code is based on a generally accepted set of multiphase flow equations. The code is used as a "test-stand" for testing and developing multiphase flow constitutive equations. MFIX Virtual Plant Consider a fluidized bed coal gasification reactor, in which pulverized

110

Sandia National Laboratories: Careers: Computer Science  

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at Sandia Advanced software research & development Collaborative technologies Computational science and mathematics High-performance computing Visualization and scientific...

111

Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges - Advanced R and D| U.S. DOE  

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Advanced R and D Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges Advanced R and D Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass / P5 Planning Process Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Theoretical Physics Advanced Technology R&D Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges Accelerator R&D Stewardship Research Highlights .pdf file (13.1MB) Questions for the Universe Accomplishments Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Advanced Technology R&D Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges Print

112

New DOE-Sponsored Study Helps Advance Scientific Understanding of Potential  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-Sponsored Study Helps Advance Scientific Understanding of DOE-Sponsored Study Helps Advance Scientific Understanding of Potential CO2 Storage Impacts New DOE-Sponsored Study Helps Advance Scientific Understanding of Potential CO2 Storage Impacts November 30, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - In another step forward toward improved scientific understanding of potential geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) storage impacts, a new U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored study has confirmed earlier research showing that proper site selection and monitoring is essential for helping anticipate and mitigate possible risks. The Duke University study, published in the October 26, 2010 edition of Environmental Science & Technology, also provided information that can be used for advanced detection of CO2 in the unlikely event of a leak.

113

New DOE-Sponsored Study Helps Advance Scientific Understanding of Potential  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New DOE-Sponsored Study Helps Advance Scientific Understanding of New DOE-Sponsored Study Helps Advance Scientific Understanding of Potential CO2 Storage Impacts New DOE-Sponsored Study Helps Advance Scientific Understanding of Potential CO2 Storage Impacts November 30, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - In another step forward toward improved scientific understanding of potential geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) storage impacts, a new U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored study has confirmed earlier research showing that proper site selection and monitoring is essential for helping anticipate and mitigate possible risks. The Duke University study, published in the October 26, 2010 edition of Environmental Science & Technology, also provided information that can be used for advanced detection of CO2 in the unlikely event of a leak.

114

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Progress  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is one of the worlds premier test reactors for studying the effects of intense neutron radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR began operation in 1967, and has operated continuously since then, averaging approximately 250 operating days per year. The combination of high flux, large test volumes, and multiple experiment configuration options provide unique testing opportunities for nuclear fuels and material researchers. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water moderated and cooled, beryllium-reflected highly-enriched uranium fueled, reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The ATR peak thermal flux can reach 1.0 x1015 n/cm2-sec, and the core configuration creates five main reactor power lobes (regions) that can be operated at different powers during the same operating cycle. In addition to these nine flux traps there are 68 irradiation positions in the reactor core reflector tank. The test positions range from 0.5 to 5.0 in diameter and are all 48 in length, the active length of the fuel. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material radiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. Goals of the ATR NSUF are to define the cutting edge of nuclear technology research in high temperature and radiation environments, contribute to improved industry performance of current and future light water reactors, and stimulate cooperative research between user groups conducting basic and applied research. The ATR NSUF has developed partnerships with other universities and national laboratories to enable ATR NSUF researchers to perform research at these other facilities, when the research objectives cannot be met using the INL facilities. The ATR NSUF program includes a robust education program enabling students to participate in their research at INL and the partner facilities, attend the ATR NSUF annual User Week, and compete for prizes at sponsored conferences. Development of additional research capabilities is also a key component of the ATR NSUF Program; researchers are encouraged to propose research projects leading to these enhanced capabilities. Some ATR irradiation experiment projects irradiate more specimens than are tested, resulting in irradiated materials available for post irradiation examination by other researchers. These extra specimens comprise the ATR NSUF Sample Library. This presentation will highlight the ATR NSUF Sample Library and the process open to researchers who want to access these materials and how to propose research projects using them. This presentation will provide the current status of all the ATR NSUF Program elements. Many of these were not envisioned in 2007, when DOE established the ATR NSUF.

Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; James I. Cole; Jeff B. Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Los Alamos National Laboratory Advancing National Security Through Scientific  

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Scientific Scientific Inquiry LANL is a key player in energy security | pg. 14 In this Issue Take a look at LANL's visualization environment | pg. 20 October 2010 LANL is operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Editors: Barbara Mack and Jeff Berger Art Direction: Cisneros Design Produced by the Communications Office of Los Alamos National Laboratory E-mail: why@lanl.gov Printed on recycled paper LALP-10-054 About this magazine Why magazine is a new publication primarily for employees and retirees of Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Lab will publish Why four times a year and develop for it an online presence. This periodical is named for the crucial nature of scientific inquiry at Los Alamos

116

Scientific Application Requirements for Leadership Computing at the Exascale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy s Leadership Computing Facility, located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory s National Center for Computational Sciences, recently polled scientific teams that had large allocations at the center in 2007, asking them to identify computational science requirements for future exascale systems (capable of an exaflop, or 1018 floating point operations per second). These requirements are necessarily speculative, since an exascale system will not be realized until the 2015 2020 timeframe, and are expressed where possible relative to a recent petascale requirements analysis of similar science applications [1]. Our initial findings, which beg further data collection, validation, and analysis, did in fact align with many of our expectations and existing petascale requirements, yet they also contained some surprises, complete with new challenges and opportunities. First and foremost, the breadth and depth of science prospects and benefits on an exascale computing system are striking. Without a doubt, they justify a large investment, even with its inherent risks. The possibilities for return on investment (by any measure) are too large to let us ignore this opportunity. The software opportunities and challenges are enormous. In fact, as one notable computational scientist put it, the scale of questions being asked at the exascale is tremendous and the hardware has gotten way ahead of the software. We are in grave danger of failing because of a software crisis unless concerted investments and coordinating activities are undertaken to reduce and close this hardwaresoftware gap over the next decade. Key to success will be a rigorous requirement for natural mapping of algorithms to hardware in a way that complements (rather than competes with) compilers and runtime systems. The level of abstraction must be raised, and more attention must be paid to functionalities and capabilities that incorporate intent into data structures, are aware of memory hierarchy, possess fault tolerance, exploit asynchronism, and are power-consumption aware. On the other hand, we must also provide application scientists with the ability to develop software without having to become experts in the computer science components. Numerical algorithms are scattered broadly across science domains, with no one particular algorithm being ubiquitous and no one algorithm going unused. Structured grids and dense linear algebra continue to dominate, but other algorithm categories will become more common. A significant increase is projected for Monte Carlo algorithms, unstructured grids, sparse linear algebra, and particle methods, and a relative decrease foreseen in fast Fourier transforms. These projections reflect the expectation of much higher architecture concurrency and the resulting need for very high scalability. The new algorithm categories that application scientists expect to be increasingly important in the next decade include adaptive mesh refinement, implicit nonlinear systems, data assimilation, agent-based methods, parameter continuation, and optimization. The attributes of leadership computing systems expected to increase most in priority over the next decade are (in order of importance) interconnect bandwidth, memory bandwidth, mean time to interrupt, memory latency, and interconnect latency. The attributes expected to decrease most in relative priority are disk latency, archival storage capacity, disk bandwidth, wide area network bandwidth, and local storage capacity. These choices by application developers reflect the expected needs of applications or the expected reality of available hardware. One interpretation is that the increasing priorities reflect the desire to increase computational efficiency to take advantage of increasing peak flops [floating point operations per second], while the decreasing priorities reflect the expectation that computational efficiency will not increase. Per-core requirements appear to be relatively static, while aggregate requirements will grow with the system. This projection is consistent with a r

Ahern, Sean [ORNL; Alam, Sadaf R [ORNL; Fahey, Mark R [ORNL; Hartman-Baker, Rebecca J [ORNL; Barrett, Richard F [ORNL; Kendall, Ricky A [ORNL; Kothe, Douglas B [ORNL; Mills, Richard T [ORNL; Sankaran, Ramanan [ORNL; Tharrington, Arnold N [ORNL; White III, James B [ORNL

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility 2010 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the 2010 ATR National Scientific User Facility Annual Report. This report provides an overview of the program for 2010, along with individual project reports from each of the university principal investigators. The report also describes the capabilities offered to university researchers here at INL and at the ATR NSUF partner facilities.

Mary Catherine Thelen; Todd R. Allen

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Good bones: anthropological scientific collaboration around computed tomography data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report preliminary results from a socio-technical analysis of scientific collaboration, specifically a loosely connected group of physical anthropology researchers. Working from a combination of interview data and artifact analysis, we identify current ... Keywords: scientific collaboratories, virtual organizations

Andrea H. Tapia; Rosalie Ocker; Mary Beth Rosson; Bridget Blodgett

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Final Scientific Report - Wireless and Sensing Solutions Advancing Industrial Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project team's goal for the Wireless and Sensing Solution Advancing Industrial Efficiency award (DE-FC36-04GO14002) was to develop, demonstrate, and test a number of leading edge technologies that could enable the emergence of wireless sensor and sampling systems for the industrial market space. This effort combined initiatives in advanced sensor development, configurable sampling and deployment platforms, and robust wireless communications to address critical obstacles in enabling enhanced industrial efficiency.

Budampati, Rama; McBrady, Adam; Nusseibeh, Fouad

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

120

'Slow light' advance could speed optical computing, telecommunications  

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"Slow light" and specialized metamaterials 'Slow light' advance could speed optical computing, telecommunications Researchers have made the first demonstration of rapidly switching...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Advanced Computer Graphics CSCI 6631 Section 001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shaders · Animation · Color, Visual Realism · Advanced Texture Mapping (Bump, Environment Mapping) · Scene

Summa, Christopher M.

122

The Potential of the Cell Processor for Scientific Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of High Performance Computing Applications, 2004. L.Novel Processor Architecture for High Performance Computing.High Performance Computing in the Asia- Pacific Region,

Williams, Samuel; Shalf, John; Oliker, Leonid; Husbands, Parry; Kamil, Shoaib; Yelick, Katherine

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center 2007 Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Directions in High Performance Computing for the Officein the evolution of high performance computing and networks.Hectopascals High performance computing High Performance

Hules, John A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

ORISE: Coordinating Scientific Peer Reviews to Advance Energy Efficiency  

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Energy Efficiency Energy Efficiency ORISE Reviews and Evaluates Technologies that Advance Energy Efficiency ORISE Reviews and Evaluates Technologies that Advance Energy Efficiency In addition to renewable energy and changes in individual behavior, energy efficiency is generally achieved through the development of more efficient technologies. Buildings are being constructed with more energy efficient systems, fluorescent light bulbs are replacing incandescent lights, and new vehicle technologies are enabling America to use less petroleum. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education (ORISE) realizes that energy efficiency encompasses a wide spectrum of industries and supports the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in its mission to reduce America's dependence on foreign oil.

125

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and industry research efforts to ensure the properties of materials in light water reactors are well understood. The ATR NSUF is providing this support through three main efforts: establishing unique infrastructure necessary to conduct research on highly radioactive materials, conducting research in conjunction with industry partners on life extension relevant topics, and providing training courses to encourage more U.S. researchers to understand and address LWR materials issues. In 2010 and 2011, several advanced instruments with capability focused on resolving nuclear material performance issues through analysis on the micro (10-6 m) to atomic (10-10 m) scales were installed primarily at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. These instruments included a local electrode atom probe (LEAP), a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) system, a Raman spectrometer, and an nanoindentor/atomic force microscope. Ongoing capability enhancements intended to support industry efforts include completion of two shielded, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test loops, the first of which will come online in early calendar year 2013, a pressurized and controlled chemistry water loop for the ATR center flux trap, and a dedicated facility intended to house post irradiation examination equipment. In addition to capability enhancements at the main site in Idaho, the ATR NSUF also welcomed two new partner facilities in 2011 and two new partner facilities in 2012; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and associated hot cells and the University California Berkeley capabilities in irradiated materials analysis were added in 2011. In 2012, Purdue Universitys Interaction of Materials with Particles and Components Testing (IMPACT) facility and the Pacific Northwest Nuclear Laboratory (PNNL) Radiochemistry Processing Laboratory (RPL) and PIE facilities were added. The ATR NSUF annually hosts a weeklong event called Users Week in which students and faculty from universities as well as other interested parties from regulatory agencies or industry convene in Idaho Falls, Idaho to see presentations from ATR NSUF staff as well as select researchers from the materials research field. Users week provides an overview of current materials research topics of interest and an opportunity for young researchers to understand the process of performing work through ATR NSUF. Additionally, to increase the number of researchers engaged in LWR materials issues, a series of workshops are in progress to introduce research staff to stress corrosion cracking, zirconium alloy degradation, and uranium dioxide degradation during in-reactor use.

John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy's Office of Biological & Environmental Research and Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) to elucidate computing requirements for biological and...

127

Evaluating the potential of multithreaded platforms for irregular scientific computations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The resurgence of current and upcoming multithreaded architectures and programming models led us to conduct a detailed study to understand the potential of these platforms to increase the performance of data-intensive, irregular scientific applications. ... Keywords: data-intensive applications, irregular scientific applications, multithreaded architectures

Jarek Nieplocha; Andrs Mrquez; John Feo; Daniel Chavarra-Miranda; George Chin; Chad Scherrer; Nathaniel Beagley

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics  

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Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), Office of Nuclear Physics (NP), and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)...

129

Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)  

SciTech Connect

Indiana University?¢????s SWIM activities have primarily been in three areas. All are completed, but we are continuing to work on two of them because refinements are useful to both DoE laboratories and the high performance computing community.

Bramley, Randall B.

2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

130

What are the Computational Keys to Future Scientific Discoveries...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computing Center (NERSC) developed a Data Intensive Computing Pilot. "Many of the big data challenges that have long existed in the particle and high energy physics world...

131

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research * Basic Energy Sciences * Biological  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Network Monitoring and Network Monitoring and Visualiza4on at ESnet Jon Dugan, Network Engineer ESnet Network Engineering Group February 3, 2010 Winter Joint Techs, Salt Lake City, UT Overview Data Collec4on (ESxSNMP) Data Visualiza4on (Graphite) Event/Metadata Log (Net Almanac) ESxSNMP: Goals * Automate everything possible * Provide summaries but don't lose raw data - Disk is cheap - It can be useful to take a hard look at the past * Flexibility and scalability * Minimize up front assumptions * Protect data collection from DoS by users * Make data easy to access and manipulate ESxSNMP: Polling * Interface metadata - Automatically detects new interfaces - Automatically detects interface changes - Historical log of interface info * Automatic addition of new devices

132

DOE researchers advance scientific computing with record-setting...  

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capability called Cardioid to realistically and rapidly model a beating human heart at near-cellular resolution. The highly scalable code models in exquisite detail the...

133

Advanced Scientific Computing Research Funding Profile by Subprogram  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guantanamo homepage 2011 National Security Policy Process by Whittaker, Smith & McKune 2009 National Counterintelligence Strategy of the United States #12;

134

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bechtel-NV IARC INL NSTEC Pantex SNLA DOE-ALB Allied Signal KCP SRS NREL DOE NETL NNSA ARM ORAU OSTI NOAA

135

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· CombineofLOSASUNN&ELPALOSAintonewELPASUNNSDN(priortothe decommissionofLOSAHUB)Dec.3rd · OC12betweenDENVHUBandPantex

136

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GEquinixASH(DC2)fabricupgradedonJan14th · 10GEquinixSJ(SV1)fabricupgradedonJan19th · OC12betweenDENVHUBandPantex

137

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Allied Signal ARM KCP NOAA OSTI ORAU SRS JLAB PPPL Lab DC Offices MIT/ PSFC BNL NREL GA DOE GTN NNSA NNSA

138

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jacobs Company (BJC) 44 Mb/s none via ORNL connecDon DOE NNSA Headquarters - Germantown (DOE-NNSA-GTN) 155 Mb/s none Future: DC MAN parDcipant DOE NNSA Service Center - Albuquerque (DOE-NNSA-SC) 52 Mb/s none via SNL-NM connec

139

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· NERSC / LBNL · ALCF / ANL ­ Will provide multiple 10's of teraflops and multiple petabytes of storageNetwork Sunnyvale NYC Nashville Chicago OLCF/ ORNL 100G ALCF/ANL NERSC Magellan Magellan 6 #12;ARRA/ANI Testbed (Oakland, CA) and ALCF (Argonne, IL) 9 #12;Network Testbed Components · Network Testbed will consist of

140

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Large-Scale Science: DOE's ESnet William E. Johnston ESnet Manager and Senior Scientist, DOE Lawrence approach and architecture for DOE's Energy Sciences Network (ESnet), which is the network that serves all community. 1 ESnet's Role in the DOE Office of Science "The Office of Science of the US Dept. of Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Networking for the Future of Science ESnet Status Update William E. Johnston ESnet Department Head and Senior Scientist wej@es.net, www.es.net This talk is available at www.es.net/ESnet4 Energy, 2008 (Aloha!) #12;2 DOE Office of Science and ESnet ­ the ESnet Mission · ESnet's primary mission

142

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reoccurrence (of 1 cause of this particular class of soft faults) #12;Example: NERSC & OLCF · Users were having

143

Investigating the Limits of SOAP Performance for Scientific Computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growing synergy between Web Services and Grid-based technologies [7] will potentially enable profound, dynamic interactions between scientific applications dispersed in geographic, institutional, and conceptual space. Such deep interoperability requires ...

Kenneth Chiu; Madhusudhan Govindaraju; Randall Bramley

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

ROARS: a scalable repository for data intensive scientific computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As scientific research becomes more data intensive, there is an increasing need for scalable, reliable, and high performance storage systems. Such data repositories must provide both data archival services and rich metadata, and cleanly integrate with ...

Hoang Bui; Peter Bui; Patrick Flynn; Douglas Thain

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Scientific Software Bakari Jacobs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sciences Division, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, U.S. Department of Energy. The workScientific Software Bakari Jacobs Livingstone College Research Alliance in Math and Science Alliance in Math and Science program is sponsored by the Mathematical, Information, and Computational

146

Advanced Environments and Tools for High Performance Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Environments and Tools for High Performance Computing Problem-Solving Environments Environments and Tools for High Performance Computing. The conference was chaired by Professor D. W. Walker and managing distributed high performance comput- ing resources is important for a PSE to meet the requirements

Walker, David W.

147

The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Advancing Nuclear Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To help ensure the long-term viability of nuclear energy through a robust and sustained research and development effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor and associated post-irradiation examination facilities a National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), allowing broader access to nuclear energy researchers. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class nuclear research facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. The ATR NSUF seeks to create an engaged academic and industrial user community that routinely conducts reactor-based research. Cost free access to the ATR and PIE facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to DOE mission. Extensive publication of research results is expected as a condition for access. During FY 2008, the first full year of ATR NSUF operation, five university-led experiments were awarded access to the ATR and associated post-irradiation examination facilities. The ATR NSUF has awarded four new experiments in early FY 2009, and anticipates awarding additional experiments in the fall of 2009 as the results of the second 2009 proposal call. As the ATR NSUF program mature over the next two years, the capability to perform irradiation research of increasing complexity will become available. These capabilities include instrumented irradiation experiments and post-irradiation examinations on materials previously irradiated in U.S. reactor material test programs. The ATR critical facility will also be made available to researchers. An important component of the ATR NSUF an education program focused on the reactor-based tools available for resolving nuclear science and technology issues. The ATR NSUF provides education programs including a summer short course, internships, faculty-student team projects and faculty/staff exchanges. In June of 2008, the first week-long ATR NSUF Summer Session was attended by 68 students, university faculty and industry representatives. The Summer Session featured presentations by 19 technical experts from across the country and covered topics including irradiation damage mechanisms, degradation of reactor materials, LWR and gas reactor fuels, and non-destructive evaluation. High impact research results from leveraging the entire research infrastructure, including universities, industry, small business, and the national laboratories. To increase overall research capability, ATR NSUF seeks to form strategic partnerships with university facilities that add significant nuclear research capability to the ATR NSUF and are accessible to all ATR NSUF users. Current partner facilities include the MIT Reactor, the University of Michigan Irradiated Materials Testing Laboratory, the University of Wisconsin Characterization Laboratory, and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas transmission Electron Microscope User Facility. Needs for irradiation of material specimens at tightly controlled temperatures are being met by dedication of a large in-pile pressurized water loop facility for use by ATR NSUF users. Several environmental mechanical testing systems are under construction to determine crack growth rates and fracture toughness on irradiated test systems.

T. R. Allen; J. B. Benson; J. A. Foster; F. M. Marshall; M. K. Meyer; M. C. Thelen

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation and Computing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

computing related services to Defense Program customers located across the Nuclear Weapons Complex. Sandia has developed a robust User Support capability which provides various...

149

Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation and Computing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Computing at Extreme Scale (ACES) is a partnership between Sandia and Los Alamos national laboratories. The objective of the ACES Architecture Office is to define...

150

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY ROCKWELL SCIENTIFIC COMPANY, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SCIENTIFIC COMPANY, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF SCIENTIFIC COMPANY, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC26-03NT41951; W(A)-04-009, CH-1180 The Petitioner, Rockwell Scientific Company (Rockwell), was awarded this cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled, "Efficient Adjustable Reflectivity Smart Window ." The purpose of the cooperative agreement is to develop and demonstrate an efficient reversible electrochemical mirror (REM) smart window that can be manufactured at low cost so as to render large-area REM smart window devices commercially viable. The project addresses three key requirements for commercialization: uniform switching over large areas; an effective seal for preventing intrusion of oxygen and water; and a suitable counter electrode that can be

151

Probabilistic neural computing with advanced nanoscale MOSFETs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of intrinsic nanoscale MOSFET noise for probabilistic computation is explored, using the continuous restricted Boltzmann machine (CRBM), a probabilistic neural model, as the exemplar architecture. The CRBM is modified by localising noise in its ... Keywords: Nanoscale MOSFET noise, Neuromorphic VLSI systems, Probabilistic computing

Nor Hisham Hamid; Tong Boon Tang; Alan F. Murray

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Scientific Process Automation Improves Data Interaction  

SciTech Connect

This is an article written for the September 09 Scientific Computing magazine about the work of the Scientific Process Automation team of The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program. The SPA team is focused on developing and deploying automated workflows for a variety of computational science domains. Scientific workflows are the formalization of a scientific process that is frequently and repetitively performed.

Critchlow, Terence J.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

153

Advanced resource connector middleware for lightweight computational Grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As computational Grids move away from the prototyping state, reliability, performance and ease of use and maintenance become focus areas of their adoption. In this paper, we describe ARC (Advanced Resource Connector) Grid middleware, where these issues ... Keywords: cluster, distributed computing, globus, grid, linux, middleware, scheduling

M. Ellert; M. Grnager; A. Konstantinov; B. Knya; J. Lindemann; I. Livenson; J. L. Nielsen; M. Niinimki; O. Smirnova; A. Wnnen

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center 2007 Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Ad- vancedComputing for the Office of Science. A Report from the NERSCWashington, D.C. : DOE Office of Science, Vol. 1, July 30,

Hules, John A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Image Galleries of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the flagship scientific computing facility for the Office of Science in the U.S. Department of Energy. As one of the largest facilities in the world devoted to providing computational resources and expertise for basic scientific research, NERSC is a world leader in accelerating scientific discovery through computation. NERSC is located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California. The more than 3,000 computational scientists who use NERSC perform basic scientific research across a wide range of disciplines. These disciplines include climate modeling, research into new materials, simulations of the early universe, analysis of data from high energy physics experiments, investigations of protein structure, and a host of other scientific endeavors. NERSC provides three image galleries: the vizualizations image gallery (visualizations produced at NERSC from datasets resulting from experiments, simulations, or data analysis), the NERSC systems gallery (images and videos of the systems that undergird all NERSC work), and a collection of NERSC logos.

156

Scientific Grand Challenges: Challenges in Climate Change Science and the Role of Computing at the Extreme Scale  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) in partnership with the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) held a workshop on the challenges in climate change science and the role of computing at the extreme scale, November 6-7, 2008, in Bethesda, Maryland. At the workshop, participants identified the scientific challenges facing the field of climate science and outlined the research directions of highest priority that should be pursued to meet these challenges. Representatives from the national and international climate change research community as well as representatives from the high-performance computing community attended the workshop. This group represented a broad mix of expertise. Of the 99 participants, 6 were from international institutions. Before the workshop, each of the four panels prepared a white paper, which provided the starting place for the workshop discussions. These four panels of workshop attendees devoted to their efforts the following themes: Model Development and Integrated Assessment; Algorithms and Computational Environment; Decadal Predictability and Prediction; Data, Visualization, and Computing Productivity. The recommendations of the panels are summarized in the body of this report.

Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Johnson, Gary M.; Washington, Warren M.

2009-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

157

NERSC 2011: High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment for the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Argonne and Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facilitieslike Leadership Computing Facilities at Argonne and Oak

Antypas, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Laboratory Directed Research & Development Page National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Development & Development Page National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center T3E Individual Node Optimization Michael Stewart, SGI/Cray, 4/9/98 * Introduction * T3E Processor * T3E Local Memory * Cache Structure * Optimizing Codes for Cache Usage * Loop Unrolling * Other Useful Optimization Options * References 1 Laboratory Directed Research & Development Page National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center Introduction * Primary topic will be single processor optimization * Most codes on the T3E are dominated by computation * Processor interconnect specifically designed for high performance codes, unlike the T3E processor * More detailed information available on the web (see References) * Fortran oriented, but I will give C compiler flag equivalents.

159

Building an advanced climate model: Program plan for the CHAMMP (Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics, and Model Physics) Climate Modeling Program  

SciTech Connect

The issue of global warming and related climatic changes from increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has received prominent attention during the past few years. The Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics, and Model Physics (CHAMMP) Climate Modeling Program is designed to contribute directly to this rapid improvement. The goal of the CHAMMP Climate Modeling Program is to develop, verify, and apply a new generation of climate models within a coordinated framework that incorporates the best available scientific and numerical approaches to represent physical, biogeochemical, and ecological processes, that fully utilizes the hardware and software capabilities of new computer architectures, that probes the limits of climate predictability, and finally that can be used to address the challenging problem of understanding the greenhouse climate issue through the ability of the models to simulate time-dependent climatic changes over extended times and with regional resolution.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

NERSC 2011: High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment for the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NERSC 2011 High Performance Computing Facility Operationalby providing high-performance computing, information, data,s deep knowledge of high performance computing to overcome

Antypas, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Supercomputing and Advanced Computing at the National Labs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy.gov » Supercomputing and Advanced Computing at the National Energy.gov » Supercomputing and Advanced Computing at the National Labs Supercomputing and Advanced Computing at the National Labs RSS September 30, 2013 Lab Breakthrough: Supercomputing Power to Accelerate Fossil Energy Research Learn how a new supercomputer at the National Energy Technology Laboratory will accelerate research into the next generation of fossil fuel systems. September 26, 2013 Infographic by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. INFOGRAPHIC: Everything You Need to Know About Supercomputers In our newest infographic, we explain some of the complex terms associated with the speed, storage and processing on supercomputers; the game changing work being done with them; and the top 8 supercomputers that call the

162

Energy Department Seeks Proposals to Use Scientific Computing Resources at Lawrence Berkeley, Oak Ridge National Laboratories  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

WASHINGTON, DC -- Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman announced today that DOE's Office of Science is seeking proposals to support computational science projects to enable high-impact advances...

163

An expanded framework for the advanced computational testing and simulation toolkit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Computational Testing and Simulation (ACTS) Toolkit is a set of computational tools developed primarily at DOE laboratories and is aimed at simplifying the solution of common and important computational problems. The use of the tools reduces the development time for new codes and the tools provide functionality that might not otherwise be available. This document outlines an agenda for expanding the scope of the ACTS Project based on lessons learned from current activities. Highlights of this agenda include peer-reviewed certification of new tools; finding tools to solve problems that are not currently addressed by the Toolkit; working in collaboration with other software initiatives and DOE computer facilities; expanding outreach efforts; promoting interoperability, further development of the tools; and improving functionality of the ACTS Information Center, among other tasks. The ultimate goal is to make the ACTS tools more widely used and more effective in solving DOE's and the nation's scientific problems through the creation of a reliable software infrastructure for scientific computing.

Marques, Osni A.; Drummond, Leroy A.

2003-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

164

Advanced Computer Methods for Grounding Analysis Ignasi Colominas1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of grounding grids of large electrical substations in practical cases present some difficulties mainly dueAdvanced Computer Methods for Grounding Analysis Ignasi Colominas1 , Jos´e Par´is1 , Xes present the foundations of a nu- merical formulation based on the Boundary Element Method for grounding

Colominas, Ignasi

165

Advanced computational research in materials processing for design and manufacturing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The computational requirements for design and manufacture of automotive components have seen dramatic increases for producing automobiles with three times the mileage. Automotive component design systems are becoming increasingly reliant on structural analysis requiring both overall larger analysis and more complex analyses, more three-dimensional analyses, larger model sizes, and routine consideration of transient and non-linear effects. Such analyses must be performed rapidly to minimize delays in the design and development process, which drives the need for parallel computing. This paper briefly describes advanced computational research in superplastic forming and automotive crash worthiness.

Zacharia, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Hybrid approach to failure prediction for advanced computing systems |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid approach to failure prediction for advanced computing systems Hybrid approach to failure prediction for advanced computing systems January 8, 2014 Tweet EmailPrint "Fault tolerance is no longer an option but a necessity," states Franck Cappello, project manager of research on resilience at the extreme scale at Argonne National Laboratory. "And the ability to reliably predict failures can significantly reduce the overhead of fault-tolerance strategies and the recovery cost." In a special issue article in the International Journal of High Performance Computing Applications, Cappello and his colleagues at Argonne and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) discuss issues in failure prediction and present a new hybrid approach to overcome the limitations of current models. One popular way of building prediction models is to analyze log files,

167

Institute for Scientific Computing Research Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2003  

SciTech Connect

The University Relations Program (URP) encourages collaborative research between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the University of California campuses. The Institute for Scientific Computing Research (ISCR) actively participates in such collaborative research, and this report details the Fiscal Year 2003 projects jointly served by URP and ISCR.

Keyes, D; McGraw, J

2004-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

168

A distributed computing environment with support for constraint-based task scheduling and scientific experimentation  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a computing environment which supports computer-based scientific research work. Key features include support for automatic distributed scheduling and execution and computer-based scientific experimentation. A new flexible and extensible scheduling technique that is responsive to a user`s scheduling constraints, such as the ordering of program results and the specification of task assignments and processor utilization levels, is presented. An easy-to-use constraint language for specifying scheduling constraints, based on the relational database query language SQL, is described along with a search-based algorithm for fulfilling these constraints. A set of performance studies show that the environment can schedule and execute program graphs on a network of workstations as the user requests. A method for automatically generating computer-based scientific experiments is described. Experiments provide a concise method of specifying a large collection of parameterized program executions. The environment achieved significant speedups when executing experiments; for a large collection of scientific experiments an average speedup of 3.4 on an average of 5.5 scheduled processors was obtained.

Ahrens, J.P.; Shapiro, L.G.; Tanimoto, S.L. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Computer Science and Engineering

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Advanced Sensing in Fossil Energy Applications (2010 Stakeholder Workshop): Scientific Poster Presentations  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This spring, 2010 workshop focused on the Advanced Research Program for the use of sensor technology in Fossil Energy applications. The FE Advanced Research Program represents a bridge between basic research and final deployment. It provides a means by which concepts are transformed into efficient and environmentally benign power and energy production systems. Posters from the workshop include:

  • Advanced Process Control: Improving Integrated Control and Adopting New Approaches for Managing Complexity (Coal Utilization Science)
  • Harsh Environments (Coal Utilization Science)
  • Model Validation (Coal Utilization Science and Computational Energy Science)
  • Modeling Based Senor Placement (Coal Utilization Science)
  • Networking for Control(Coal Utilization Science)
  • Requirements Flow-down Process in the Advanced Research Program
  • Sensing in Harsh Environments (Coal Utilization Science)
  • Sensor Materials for High Temperature Environments (Coal Utilization Science)
  • System Needs Statement in the Advanced Research Program
  • Technology Goal Statements in the Advanced Research Program
    • See also the Advanced Research Project Factsheets on the same webpage. These provide background and context for the workshop posters.

170

An evolving infrastructure for scientific computing and the integration of new graphics technology  

SciTech Connect

The National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is currently pursuing several projects to implement and integrate new hardware and software technologies. While each of these projects ought to be and is in fact individually justifiable, there is an appealing metaphor for viewing them collectively which provides a simple and memorable way to understand the future direction not only of supercomputing services but of computer centers in general. Once this general direction is understood, it becomes clearer what future computer graphics technologies would be possible and desirable, at least within the context of large scale scientific computing.

Fong, K.W.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

New classes of magnetoelectric materials promise advances in computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New classes of magnetoelectric materials promise advances in computing New classes of magnetoelectric materials promise advances in computing technology By Jared Sagoff * February 7, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - Although scientists have been aware that magnetism and electricity are two sides of the same proverbial coin for almost 150 years, researchers are still trying to find new ways to use a material's electric behavior to influence its magnetic behavior, or vice versa. Thanks to new research by an international team of researchers led by the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory, physicists have developed new methods for controlling magnetic order in a particular class of materials known as "magnetoelectrics." Magnetoelectrics get their name from the fact that their magnetic and electric properties are coupled to each other. Because this physical link

172

Feb. 11, 2008 Advanced Fault Tolerance Solutions for High Performance Computing 1/47 Advanced Fault Tolerance Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb. 11, 2008 Advanced Fault Tolerance Solutions for High Performance Computing 1/47 RAS RAS Advanced Fault Tolerance Solutions for High Performance Computing Christian Engelmann Oak Ridge National Solutions for High Performance Computing 2/47 · Nation's largest energy laboratory · Nation's largest

Engelmann, Christian

173

MiniGhost : a miniapp for exploring boundary exchange strategies using stencil computations in scientific parallel computing.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A broad range of scientific computation involves the use of difference stencils. In a parallel computing environment, this computation is typically implemented by decomposing the spacial domain, inducing a 'halo exchange' of process-owned boundary data. This approach adheres to the Bulk Synchronous Parallel (BSP) model. Because commonly available architectures provide strong inter-node bandwidth relative to latency costs, many codes 'bulk up' these messages by aggregating data into a message as a means of reducing the number of messages. A renewed focus on non-traditional architectures and architecture features provides new opportunities for exploring alternatives to this programming approach. In this report we describe miniGhost, a 'miniapp' designed for exploration of the capabilities of current as well as emerging and future architectures within the context of these sorts of applications. MiniGhost joins the suite of miniapps developed as part of the Mantevo project.

Barrett, Richard Frederick; Heroux, Michael Allen; Vaughan, Courtenay Thomas

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Operational Philosophy for the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

SciTech Connect

In 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). At its core, the ATR NSUF Program combines access to a portion of the available ATR radiation capability, the associated required examination and analysis facilities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and INL staff expertise with novel ideas provided by external contributors (universities, laboratories, and industry). These collaborations define the cutting edge of nuclear technology research in high-temperature and radiation environments, contribute to improved industry performance of current and future light-water reactors (LWRs), and stimulate cooperative research between user groups conducting basic and applied research. To make possible the broadest access to key national capability, the ATR NSUF formed a partnership program that also makes available access to critical facilities outside of the INL. Finally, the ATR NSUF has established a sample library that allows access to pre-irradiated samples as needed by national research teams.

J. Benson; J. Cole; J. Jackson; F. Marshall; D. Ogden; J. Rempe; M. C. Thelen

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

PNNL: Fundamental & Computational Sciences - About  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Us Organizational Chart Button The Fundamental & Computational Sciences are vital at DOE's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). We advance scientific frontiers and...

176

Editorial for Advanced Theory and Practice for High Performance Computing and Communications Geoffrey Fox  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Editorial for Advanced Theory and Practice for High Performance Computing and Communications Theory and Practice for High Performance Computing and Communications. I would like to thank Omer Rana International Conference on High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC-09) http

177

June 8, 2007 Advanced Fault Tolerance Solutions for High Performance Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

June 8, 2007 Advanced Fault Tolerance Solutions for High Performance Computing Workshop on Trends Tolerance Solutions for High Performance Computing Christian Engelmann Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak for High Performance Computing Workshop on Trends, Technologies and Collaborative Opportunities in High

Engelmann, Christian

178

June 4, 2007 Advanced Fault Tolerance Solutions for High Performance Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

June 4, 2007 Advanced Fault Tolerance Solutions for High Performance Computing Workshop on Trends Tolerance Solutions for High Performance Computing Christian Engelmann Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Solutions for High Performance Computing Workshop on Trends, Technologies and Collaborative Opportunities

Engelmann, Christian

179

Unsolicited Projects in 2012: Research in Computer Architecture, Modeling,  

Office of Science (SC) Website

2: Research in Computer Architecture, 2: Research in Computer Architecture, Modeling, and Evolving MPI for Exascale Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Applied Mathematics Computer Science Exascale Tools Workshop Programming Challenges Workshop Architectures I Workshop External link Architectures II Workshop External link Next Generation Networking Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Computational Science Graduate Fellowship (CSGF) ASCR SBIR-STTR Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) News & Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-7486 F: (301)

180

New Computer Codes Unlock the Secrets of Cleaner Burning Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes Unlock the Secrets of Cleaner Burning Coal New Computer Codes Unlock the Secrets of Cleaner Burning Coal March 29, 2012 | Tags: Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR),...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Nick Wright Named Advanced Technologies Group Lead  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, 2013 Nick Nick Wright has been named head of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center's (NERSC) Advanced Technologies Group (ATG), which focuses on...

182

Smart Libraries: Best SQE Practices for Libraries with an Emphasis on Scientific Computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As scientific computing applications grow in complexity, more and more functionality is being packaged in independently developed libraries. Worse, as the computing environments in which these applications run grow in complexity, it gets easier to make mistakes in building, installing and using libraries as well as the applications that depend on them. Unfortunately, SQA standards so far developed focus primarily on applications, not libraries. We show that SQA standards for libraries differ from applications in many respects. We introduce and describe a variety of practices aimed at minimizing the likelihood of making mistakes in using libraries and at maximizing users' ability to diagnose and correct them when they occur. We introduce the term Smart Library to refer to a library that is developed with these basic principles in mind. We draw upon specific examples from existing products we believe incorporate smart features: MPI, a parallel message passing library, and HDF5 and SAF, both of which are parallel I/O libraries supporting scientific computing applications. We conclude with a narrative of some real-world experiences in using smart libraries with Ale3d, VisIt and SAF.

Miller, M C; Reus, J F; Matzke, R P; Koziol, Q A; Cheng, A P

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

Advanced Simulation and Computing FY10-FY11 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0.5  

SciTech Connect

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering (D&E) programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional (3D) simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: (1) Robust Tools - Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements; (2) Prediction through Simulation - Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile; and (3) Balanced Operational Infrastructure - Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Meisner, R; Peery, J; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

184

Advanced Simulation and Computing FY08-09 Implementation Plan, Volume 2, Revision 0.5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear-weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable Stockpile Life Extension Programs (SLEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining the support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1. Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2--Prediction through Simulation. Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear-weapons performances in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3. Balanced Operational Infrastructure--Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Kusnezov, D; Bickel, T; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

2007-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

185

Advanced Simulation and Computing Fiscal Year 2011-2012 Implementation Plan, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering (D&E) programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional (3D) simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1 - Robust Tools. Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2 - Prediction through Simulation. Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3 - Balanced Operational Infrastructure. Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

McCoy, M; Phillips, J; Hpson, J; Meisner, R

2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

186

Advanced Simulation and Computing FY10-11 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0  

SciTech Connect

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1 Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2 Prediction through Simulation--Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3 Balanced Operational Infrastructure--Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Carnes, B

2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

187

Advanced Simulation & Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future nonnuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear-weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable Stockpile Life Extension Programs (SLEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining the support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1. Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2--Prediction through Simulation. Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear-weapons performances in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3--Balanced Operational Infrastructure. Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Meisner, R; Perry, J; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

188

Advanced Simulation and Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan, Volume 2, Revision 0.5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1. Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2. Prediction through Simulation--Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3. Balanced Operational Infrastructure--Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Meisner, R; Hopson, J; Peery, J; McCoy, M

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

189

Advanced Simulation and Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: (1) Robust Tools - Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements; (2) Prediction through Simulation - Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile; and (3) Balanced Operational Infrastructure - Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Kissel, L

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Innovative & Novel Computational Impact on Theory & Experiement (INCITE) |  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Innovative Innovative & Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Accessing ASCR Supercomputers Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) Research & Evaluation Prototypes (REP) Innovative & Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) ASCR Leadership Computing Challenge (ALCC) Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) News & Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building

191

Computation in Large-Scale Scientific and Internet Data Applications is a Focus of MMDS 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 2010 Workshop on Algorithms for Modern Massive Data Sets (MMDS 2010) was held at Stanford University, June 15--18. The goals of MMDS 2010 were (1) to explore novel techniques for modeling and analyzing massive, high-dimensional, and nonlinearly-structured scientific and Internet data sets; and (2) to bring together computer scientists, statisticians, applied mathematicians, and data analysis practitioners to promote cross-fertilization of ideas. MMDS 2010 followed on the heels of two previous MMDS workshops. The first, MMDS 2006, addressed the complementary perspectives brought by the numerical linear algebra and theoretical computer science communities to matrix algorithms in modern informatics applications; and the second, MMDS 2008, explored more generally fundamental algorithmic and statistical challenges in modern large-scale data analysis.

Mahoney, Michael W

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation Computing: Verification &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Verification & Validation Verification & Validation high-fidelity simulations The Verification and Validation (V&V) program conducts two major activities at Sandia. The first is to perform assessments and studies that quantify confidence in Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) calculation results. The second activity develops and improves V&V and uncertainty quantification methods, metrics, and standards. Assessments This project area conducts studies and assessments for Sandia's engineering simulation focus areas (outlined below). These assessments quantify the prediction uncertainty of the engineering codes as they apply to applications in the four focus areas. Safety and Security This area focuses on engineering codes as they apply to nuclear weapon. External load prediction capability includes mechanical (impact, pressure,)

193

Computational Science Graduate Fellowship (CSGF) | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Computational Computational Science Graduate Fellowship (CSGF) Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Applied Mathematics Computer Science Next Generation Networking Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Computational Science Graduate Fellowship (CSGF) ASCR SBIR-STTR Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) News & Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-7486 F: (301) 903-4846 E: sc.ascr@science.doe.gov More Information » Research Computational Science Graduate Fellowship (CSGF) Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds

194

A New Approach in Advance Network Reservation and Provisioning for High-Performance Scientific Data Transfers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scientific applications already generate many terabytes and even petabytes of data from supercomputer runs and large-scale experiments. The need for transferring data chunks of ever-increasing sizes through the network shows no sign of abating. Hence, we need high-bandwidth high speed networks such as ESnet (Energy Sciences Network). Network reservation systems, i.e. ESnet's OSCARS (On-demand Secure Circuits and Advance Reservation System) establish guaranteed bandwidth of secure virtual circuits at a certain time, for a certain bandwidth and length of time. OSCARS checks network availability and capacity for the specified period of time, and allocates requested bandwidth for that user if it is available. If the requested reservation cannot be granted, no further suggestion is returned back to the user. Further, there is no possibility from the users view-point to make an optimal choice. We report a new algorithm, where the user specifies the total volume that needs to be transferred, a maximum bandwidth that he/she can use, and a desired time period within which the transfer should be done. The algorithm can find alternate allocation possibilities, including earliest time for completion, or shortest transfer duration - leaving the choice to the user. We present a novel approach for path finding in time-dependent networks, and a new polynomial algorithm to find possible reservation options according to given constraints. We have implemented our algorithm for testing and incorporation into a future version of ESnet?s OSCARS. Our approach provides a basis for provisioning end-to-end high performance data transfers over storage and network resources.

Balman, Mehmet; Chaniotakis, Evangelos; Shoshani, Arie; Sim, Alex

2010-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

195

Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT Project Title: Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing PROJECT OBJECTIVE The objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell system technology towards the commercial targets of power density, energy density and lifetime. These targets were laid out in the DOEs R&D roadmap to develop an advanced direct methanol fuel cell power supply that meets commercial entry requirements. Such a power supply will enable mobile computers to operate non-stop, unplugged from the wall power outlet, by using the high energy density of methanol fuel contained in a replaceable fuel cartridge. Specifically this project focused on balance-of-plant component integration and miniaturization, as well as extensive component, subassembly and integrated system durability and validation testing. This design has resulted in a pre-production power supply design and a prototype that meet the rigorous demands of consumer electronic applications. PROJECT TASKS The proposed work plan was designed to meet the project objectives, which corresponded directly with the objectives outlined in the Funding Opportunity Announcement: To engineer the fuel cell balance-of-plant and packaging to meet the needs of consumer electronic systems, specifically at power levels required for mobile computing. UNF used existing balance-of-plant component technologies developed under its current US Army CERDEC project, as well as a previous DOE project completed by PolyFuel, to further refine them to both miniaturize and integrate their functionality to increase the system power density and energy density. Benefits of UNFs novel passive water recycling MEA (membrane electrode assembly) and the simplified system architecture it enabled formed the foundation of the design approach. The package design was hardened to address orientation independence, shock, vibration, and environmental requirements. Fuel cartridge and fuel subsystems were improved to ensure effective fuel containment. PROJECT OVERVIEW The University of North Florida (UNF), with project partner the University of Florida, recently completed the Department of Energy (DOE) project entitled Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing. The primary objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell system technology towards the commercial targets as laid out in the DOE R&D roadmap by developing a 20-watt, direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), portable power supply based on the UNF innovative passive water recovery MEA. Extensive component, sub-system, and system development and testing was undertaken to meet the rigorous demands of the consumer electronic application. Numerous brassboard (nonpackaged) systems were developed to optimize the integration process and facilitating control algorithm development. The culmination of the development effort was a fully-integrated, DMFC, power supply (referred to as DP4). The project goals were 40 W/kg for specific power, 55 W/l for power density, and 575 Whr/l for energy density. It should be noted that the specific power and power density were for the power section only, and did not include the hybrid battery. The energy density is based on three, 200 ml, fuel cartridges, and also did not include the hybrid battery. The results show that the DP4 system configured without the methanol concentration sensor exceeded all performance goals, achieving 41.5 W/kg for specific power, 55.3 W/l for power density, and 623 Whr/l for energy density. During the project, the DOE revised its technical targets, and the definition of many of these targets, for the portable power application. With this revision, specific power, power density, specific energy (Whr/kg), and energy density are based on the total system, including fuel tank, fuel, and hybridization battery. Fuel capacity is not defined, but the same value is required for all calculations. Test data showed that the DP4 exceeded all 2011 Technical Status values; for example, the DP4 energy density was 373 Whr/l versus the DOE 2011 status of 200 Whr/l. For the

Fletcher, James H. [University of North Florida; Cox, Philip [University of North Florida; Harrington, William J [University of North Florida; Campbell, Joseph L [University of North Florida

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

196

High Performance Scientific and Engineering Computing: Proceedings of the International Fortwihr Conference on Hpsec, Munich, March 16-18, 1998, 1st edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the Publisher:This volume contains the proceedings of an international conference on high performance scientific and engineering computing held in Munich in March 1998 and organized by FORTWIHR, the Bavarian Consortium for High Performance Scientific ...

Hans-Joachim -J Bungartz; F. Durst; C. Zenger

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Computer Science Program | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computer Computer Science Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Applied Mathematics Computer Science Exascale Tools Workshop Programming Challenges Workshop Architectures I Workshop External link Architectures II Workshop External link Next Generation Networking Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Computational Science Graduate Fellowship (CSGF) ASCR SBIR-STTR Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) News & Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-7486 F: (301) 903-4846 E: sc.ascr@science.doe.gov More Information »

198

Development of Computational Approaches for Simulation and Advanced Controls for Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computational Approaches Computational Approaches for Simulation and Advanced Controls for Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Background The United States Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) develops affordable and clean energy from coal and other fossil fuels to secure a sustainable energy economy. To further this mission, NETL funds research and development of advanced control technologies, including chemical looping (CL)

199

Editorial message: special track on computer-aided law and advanced technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computer-aided Law and Advanced Technology is focussed on law and advanced technologies for representing a broad and diverse forum for the discussion of research in computer-aided law, one that can provide synergies when aligned with other areas within ...

Giovanni Sartor; Alessandra Villecco

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Scalable in situ scientific data encoding for analytical query processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process of scientific data analysis in high-performance computing environments has been evolving along with the advancement of computing capabilities. With the onset of exascale computing, the increasing gap between compute performance and I/O bandwidth ... Keywords: compression, exascale computing, indexing, query processing

Sriram Lakshminarasimhan; David A. Boyuka; Saurabh V. Pendse; Xiaocheng Zou; John Jenkins; Venkatram Vishwanath; Michael E. Papka; Nagiza F. Samatova

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Argonne Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Accessing ASCR Supercomputers Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) Research & Evaluation Prototypes (REP) Innovative & Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) ASCR Leadership Computing Challenge (ALCC) Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) News & Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-7486 F: (301)

202

ASCR Leadership Computing Challenge (ALCC) | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

ASCR ASCR Leadership Computing Challenge (ALCC) Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Accessing ASCR Supercomputers Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) Research & Evaluation Prototypes (REP) Innovative & Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) ASCR Leadership Computing Challenge (ALCC) ALCC Application Details ALCC Past Awards Frequently Asked Questions Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) News & Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy

203

Advanced Institute for Computational Science (AICS): Japanese National High-Performance Computing Research Institute and its 10-petaflops supercomputer "K"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Institute for Computational Science (AICS) was created in July 2010 at RIKEN under the supervision of Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology (MEXT) in order to establish the national center of excellence (COE) ... Keywords: AICS, K computer, center of excellence, supercomputer

Akinori Yonezawa; Tadashi Watanabe; Mitsuo Yokokawa; Mitsuhisa Sato; Kimihiko Hirao

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation Computing: Research &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research & Collaboration Research & Collaboration Partnerships among the national laboratories, industry, and academia leverage a broad spectrum of talent and multiply the effectiveness of our research efforts. These collaborations help solve the challenges of developing computing platforms and simulation tools across a number of disciplines. Computer Science Research Institute The Computer Science Research Institute brings university faculty and students to Sandia for focused collaborative research on DOE computer and computational science problems. Organized under the DOE Stockpile Computing Program, participants conduct leading-edge research, interact with scientists and engineers at the Laboratories, and help transfer the results of their research to programs at the Labs.

205

2012 Scientific Collaborations at Extreme-Scale | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Next Next Generation Networking » 2012 Scientific Collaborations at Extreme-Scale Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Applied Mathematics Computer Science Next Generation Networking 2012 Scientific Collaborations at Extreme-Scale Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Computational Science Graduate Fellowship (CSGF) ASCR SBIR-STTR Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) News & Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-7486 F: (301) 903-4846 E: sc.ascr@science.doe.gov More Information » Next Generation Networking

206

Computer science principles: analysis of a proposed advanced placement course  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we analyze the CS Principles project, a proposed Advanced Placement course, by focusing on the second pilot that took place in 2011-2012. In a previous publication the first pilot of the course was explained, but not in a context related ... Keywords: advanced placement, national pilot, portfolio assessment

Andrea Arpaci-Dusseau; Owen Astrachan; Dwight Barnett; Matthew Bauer; Marilyn Carrell; Rebecca Dovi; Baker Franke; Christina Gardner; Jeff Gray; Jean Griffin; Richard Kick; Andy Kuemmel; Ralph Morelli; Deepa Muralidhar; R Brook Osborne; Chinma Uche

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Open grid computing environments: advanced gateway support activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe three case studies for providing advanced support for TeraGrid Science Gateways as part of our participation in the Advanced User Support (AUS) team. These case studies include providing workflow support, robust job management, and mass job ... Keywords: ASTA, OGCE software, science gateways workflow suite

Marlon Pierce; Suresh Marru; Raminder Singh; Archit Kulshrestha; Karthik Muthuraman

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

New Sensors for In-Pile Temperature Measurement at the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. research in nuclear science and technology. As a user facility, the ATR is supporting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry, as they conduct basic and applied nuclear research and development to advance the nations energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to develop and evaluate new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing measurements of key parameters during irradiation. This paper describes the strategy for determining what instrumentation is needed and the program for developing new or enhanced sensors that can address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing new sensors now available and under development for in-pile detection of temperature at various irradiation locations in the ATR.

J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; J. E. Daw; K. G. Condie

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Accessing ASCR Supercomputers Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) Research & Evaluation Prototypes (REP) Innovative & Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) ASCR Leadership Computing Challenge (ALCC) Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) News & Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-7486 F: (301)

210

Estimating Computational Noise?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

partment of Energy, under Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357. ... supported by the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Office of Science, U.S. De-.

211

Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D Programs  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D Programs Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog ASC Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D Programs Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and ...

212

Unsolicited Projects in 2012: Research in Computer Architecture...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Architectures I Workshop External link Architectures II Workshop External link Next Generation Networking Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC)...

213

Trace-Penalty Minimization for Large-scale Eigenspace Computation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 6, 2013 ... U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research (and Basic Energy Sciences) under award number...

214

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sponsored by: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) National...

215

High Performance Computing: From Grids and Clouds to Exascale Volume 20 Advances in Parallel Computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the last decade, parallel computing technologies have transformed highperformance computing. Two trends have emerged: massively parallel computing leading to exascale on the one hand and moderately parallel applications, which have opened up highperformance ...

I. Foster; W. Gentzsch; L. Grandinetti; G. R. Joubert

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Advanced Computational Thermal Studies and their Assessment for Supercritical-Pressure Reactors (SCRs)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this laboratory / university collaboration of coupled computational and experimental studies is the improvement of predictive methods for supercritical-pressure reactors. The general objective is to develop supporting knowledge needed of advanced computational techniques for the technology development of the concepts and their safety systems.

D. M. McEligot; J. Y. Yoo; J. S. Lee; S. T. Ro; E. Lurien; S. O. Park; R. H. Pletcher; B. L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J. M. Wallace

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

A Computationally Based Approach to Homogenizing Advanced Alloys  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a computationally based approach to optimizing the homogenization heat treatment of complex alloys. The Scheil module within the Thermo-Calc software is used to predict the as-cast segregation present within alloys, and DICTRA (Diffusion Controlled TRAnsformations) is used to model the homogenization kinetics as a function of time, temperature and microstructural scale. We will discuss this approach as it is applied to both Ni based superalloys as well as the more complex (computationally) case of alloys that solidify with more than one matrix phase as a result of segregation. Such is the case typically observed in martensitic steels. With these alloys it is doubly important to homogenize them correctly, especially at the laboratory scale, since they are austenitic at high temperature and thus constituent elements will diffuse slowly. The computationally designed heat treatment and the subsequent verification real castings are presented.

Jablonski, P D; Cowen, C J

2011-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

218

Certification of version 1.2 of the PORFLO-3 code for the WHC scientific and engineering computational center  

SciTech Connect

Version 1.2 of the PORFLO-3 Code has migrated from the Hanford Cray computer to workstations in the WHC Scientific and Engineering Computational Center. The workstation-based configuration and acceptance testing are inherited from the CRAY-based configuration. The purpose of this report is to document differences in the new configuration as compared to the parent Cray configuration, and summarize some of the acceptance test results which have shown that the migrated code is functioning correctly in the new environment.

Kline, N.W.

1994-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

219

Toward exascale computational science with heterogeneous processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computational requirements for scientific simulation continue to grow in scale and complexity. Meanwhile, HPC systems and centers are facing urgent constraints of power and thermal limits, while continuing to advance computational science. Our experiences ...

Jeffrey Vetter

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

COMPUTATIONAL STEERING: TOWARDS ADVANCED INTERACTIVE HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING IN ENGINEERING SCIENCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Key-words: Computational steering, high-performance computing, interactive simulation, virtual reality, CFD Computational Science and Engineering faces a continuous increase of speed of computers and availability of very fast networks. Yet, it seems that some opportunities offered by these ongoing developments are only used to a fraction for numerical simulation. Moreover, despite new possibilities from computer visualization, virtual or augmented reality and collaboration models, most available engineering software still follows the classical way of a strict separation of preprocessing, computing and postprocessing. This paper will first identify some of the major obstructions of an interactive computation for complex simulation tasks in engineering sciences. These are especially found in traditional software structures, in the definition of geometric models and boundary conditions and in the often still very tedious work of generating computational meshes. It then presents a generic approach for collaborative computational steering, where pre- and postprocessing is integrated with high

Ernst Rank; Andr Borrmann; Er Dster; Christoph Van Treeck; Petra Wenisch

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Advanced Data Processing and Computing Technologies at Control Centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Control center operation is becoming more complex as new and often-conflicting reliability, economics, and public policy issues emerge. To manage the complexity, control center operators need prompt, comprehensive information about their own systems and neighboring systems. Computer simulations analyze system data and what-if-scenarios to derive succinct information for operators to make more informed decisions. This report reviews the applicability of new technologies and some solution methods for addre...

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

222

Advanced wellbore thermal simulator GEOTEMP2. Appendix. Computer program listing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This appendix gives the program listing of GEOTEMP2 with comments and discussion to make the program organization more understandable. This appendix is divided into an introduction and four main blocks of code: main program, program initiation, wellbore flow, and wellbore heat transfer. The purpose and use of each subprogram is discussed and the program listing is given. Flowcharts will be included to clarify code organization when needed. GEOTEMP2 was written in FORTRAN IV. Efforts have been made to keep the programing as conventional as possible so that GEOTEMP2 will run without modification on most computers.

Mitchell, R.F.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Computational Efforts in Support of Advanced Coal Research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus in this project was to employ first principles computational methods to study the underlying molecular elementary processes that govern hydrogen diffusion through Pd membranes as well as the elementary processes that govern the CO- and S-poisoning of these membranes. Our computational methodology integrated a multiscale hierarchical modeling approach, wherein a molecular understanding of the interactions between various species is gained from ab-initio quantum chemical Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations, while a mesoscopic statistical mechanical model like Kinetic Monte Carlo is employed to predict the key macroscopic membrane properties such as permeability. The key developments are: (1) We have coupled systematically the ab initio calculations with Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations to model hydrogen diffusion through the Pd based-membranes. The predicted tracer diffusivity of hydrogen atoms through the bulk of Pd lattice from KMC simulations are in excellent agreement with experiments. (2) The KMC simulations of dissociative adsorption of H{sub 2} over Pd(111) surface indicates that for thin membranes (less than 10{micro} thick), the diffusion of hydrogen from surface to the first subsurface layer is rate limiting. (3) Sulfur poisons the Pd surface by altering the electronic structure of the Pd atoms in the vicinity of the S atom. The KMC simulations indicate that increasing sulfur coverage drastically reduces the hydrogen coverage on the Pd surface and hence the driving force for diffusion through the membrane.

Suljo Linic

2006-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

224

National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SC), the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA),network) NNSA National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

theory. Some significant problems in magnetic -confinement-fusion reactorTheory and Experiment I/O Input/output IRU Irrevocable right-of-use (networking) ISM Interstellar matter ITER International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SC), the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA),NNSA National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE program)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

integrated simulation of a fusion reactor Accurately detectin magnetic -confinement-fusion reactor simulation for whichsimulation of a fusion reactor is beyond the capability of

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Sciences Network, or ESnet, is a high-speed networkreliable connections, ESnet enables researchers at nationaloperated by Berkeley Lab, ESnet provides direct connections

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

User Facilities .Managing National User Facilities Berkeley Lab has been afour DOE national user facilities. The focus of Berkeley Lab

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the long-puzzling gamma-ray bursts (extremely bright andcollapse supernovae and gamma-ray burst modeling);, and, at

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

(865) 574-6185, mccoydd@ornl.gov Advanced Scientific Computing Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sciences Directorate at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the U. S. Department of Energy in this field." The TeraGrid '08 Conference was held at the Riviera Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada, June

232

National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Year Outlook, US DOE, Office of Science, Nov I-2 APPENDIX JWashington, D.C. : DOE Office of Science, July 30, 2003).Proposal to the DOE Office of Science from Lawrence Berkeley

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

ADVANCED METHODS FOR THE COMPUTATION OF PARTICLE BEAM TRANSPORT AND THE COMPUTATION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS AND MULTIPARTICLE PHENOMENA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1980, under the grant DEFG02-96ER40949, the Department of Energy has supported the educational and research work of the University of Maryland Dynamical Systems and Accelerator Theory (DSAT) Group. The primary focus of this educational/research group has been on the computation and analysis of charged-particle beam transport using Lie algebraic methods, and on advanced methods for the computation of electromagnetic fields and multiparticle phenomena. This Final Report summarizes the accomplishments of the DSAT Group from its inception in 1980 through its end in 2011.

Alex J. Dragt

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

EcoG: A Power-Efficient GPU Cluster Architecture for Scientific Computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers built the EcoG GPU-based cluster to show that a system can be designed around GPU computing and still be power efficient.

Mike Showerman; Jeremy Enos; Craig Steffen; Sean Treichler; William Gropp; Wen-mei W. Hwu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Enabling Computational Technologies FY09 Report  

SciTech Connect

In this document we report on the status of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Enabling Computational Technologies (ECT) effort. In particular, we provide the context for ECT In the broader NEAMS program and describe the three pillars of the ECT effort, namely, (1) tools and libraries, (2) software quality assurance, and (3) computational facility (computers, storage, etc) needs. We report on our FY09 deliverables to determine the needs of the integrated performance and safety codes (IPSCs) in these three areas and lay out the general plan for software quality assurance to meet the requirements of DOE and the DOE Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). We conclude with a brief description of our interactions with the Idaho National Laboratory computer center to determine what is needed to expand their role as a NEAMS user facility.

Diachin, L F; Garaizar, F X; Henson, V E; Pope, G

2009-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

236

Development of Computation Capabilities to Predict the Corrosion Wastage of Boiler Tubes in Advanced Combustion Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computation Capabilities Computation Capabilities to Predict the Corrosion Wastage of Boiler Tubes in Advanced Combustion Systems Background Staged combustion is a method of reducing nitrogen oxide (NO x ) emissions in boilers by controlling the combustion mixture of air and fuel. Its process conditions are particularly corrosive to lower furnace walls. Superheaters and/or reheaters are often employed in the upper furnace to reuse hot combustion gasses to further raise the

237

From detonation to diapers: Los Alamos computer codes at core of advanced  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

From detonation to diapers From detonation to diapers Los Alamos computer codes at core of advanced manufacturing tools The computer codes used for predictive fluid modeling are part of the Los Alamos Computational Fluid Dynamics Library. July 27, 2011 This simulation of a droplet of liquid falling into a pool of liquid was modeled using Los Alamos National Laboratory's Computational Fluid Dynamics Library This simulation of a droplet of liquid falling into a pool of liquid was modeled using Los Alamos National Laboratory's Computational Fluid Dynamics Library (CFDLib), which was also used by Procter and Gamble to simulate a manufacturing process. The computer code is now available to help American industries become more competitive. Contact James Rickman Communicatons Office (505) 665-9203

238

Creating science-driven computer architecture: A new path to scientific leadership  

SciTech Connect

This document proposes a multi-site strategy for creating a new class of computing capability for the U.S. by undertaking the research and development necessary to build supercomputers optimized for science in partnership with the American computer industry.

McCurdy, C. William; Stevens, Rick; Simon, Horst; Kramer, William; Bailey, David; Johnston, William; Catlett, Charlie; Lusk, Rusty; Morgan, Thomas; Meza, Juan; Banda, Michael; Leighton, James; Hules, John

2002-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

239

Supercomputing | Computer Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resilience Engineering of Scientific Software Translation Quantum Computing Machine Learning Information Retrieval Content Tagging Visual Analytics Data Earth Sciences Energy Science Future Technology Knowledge Discovery Materials Mathematics National Security Systems Modeling Engineering Analysis Behavioral Sciences Geographic Information Science and Technology Quantum Information Science Supercomputing and Computation Home | Science & Discovery | Supercomputing and Computation | Research Areas | Computer Science SHARE Computer Science Computer Science at ORNL involves extreme scale scientific simulations through research and engineering efforts advancing the state of the art in algorithms, programming environments, tools, and system software. ORNL's work is strongly motivated by, and often carried out in direct

240

Advanced Communication and Control for Distributed Energy Resource Integration: Phase 2 Scientific Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to demonstrate sensing, communication, information and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of multivendor distributed energy resource (DER) units at aggregation levels that meet individual user requirements for facility operations (residential, commercial, industrial, manufacturing, etc.) and further serve as resource options for electric and natural gas utilities. The fully demonstrated DER aggregation system with embodiment of communication and control technologies will lead to real-time, interactive, customer-managed service networks to achieve greater customer value. Work on this Advanced Communication and Control Project (ACCP) consists of a two-phase approach for an integrated demonstration of communication and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of DER units to reach progressive levels of aggregated power output. Phase I involved design and proof-of-design, and Phase II involves real-world demonstration of the Phase I design architecture. The scope of work for Phase II of this ACCP involves demonstrating the Phase I design architecture in large scale real-world settings while integrating with the operations of one or more electricity supplier feeder lines. The communication and control architectures for integrated demonstration shall encompass combinations of software and hardware components, including: sensors, data acquisition and communication systems, remote monitoring systems, metering (interval revenue, real-time), local and wide area networks, Web-based systems, smart controls, energy management/information systems with control and automation of building energy loads, and demand-response management with integration of real-time market pricing. For Phase II, BPL Global shall demonstrate the Phase I design for integrating and controlling the operation of more than 10 DER units, dispersed at various locations in one or more Independent System Operator (ISO) Control Areas, at an aggregated scale of more than 1 MW, to provide grid support. Actual performance data with respect to each specified function above is to be collected during the Phase II field demonstration. At a minimum, the Phase II demonstration shall span one year of field operations. The demonstration performance will need to be validated by the target customer(s) for acceptance and subsequent implementation. An ISO must be involved in demonstration planning and execution. As part of the Phase II work, BPL Global shall develop a roadmap to commercialization that identifies and quantifies the potential markets for the integrated, aggregated DER systems and for the communication and control technologies demonstrated in Phase I. In addition, the roadmap must identify strategies and actions, as well as the regional and national markets where the aggregated DER systems with communication and control solutions will be introduced, along with a timeline projected for introduction into each identified market. In Phase I of this project, we developed a proof-of-concept ACCP system and architecture and began to test its functionality at real-world sites. These sites had just over 10 MW of DERs and allowed us to identify what needed to be done to commercialize this concept. As a result, we started Phase II by looking at our existing platform and identified its strengths and weaknesses as well as how it would need to evolve for commercialization. During this process, we worked with different stakeholders in the market including: Independent System Operators, DER owners and operators, and electric utility companies to fully understand the issues from all of the different perspectives. Once we had an understanding of the commercialized ACCP system, we began to document and prepare detailed designs of the different system components. The components of the system with the most significant design improvements were: the on-site remote terminal unit, the communication technology between the remote site and the data center, and the scalability and reliability of the data center application.

BPL Global

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

18.337J / 6.338J Applied Parallel Computing (SMA 5505), Spring 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced interdisciplinary introduction to modern scientific computing on parallel supercomputers. Numerical topics include dense and sparse linear algebra, N-body problems, and Fourier transforms. Geometrical topics include ...

Edelman, Alan

242

Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Advances in Mobile Computing and Multimedia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume consists of the Proceedings of The 7th International Conference on Advances in Mobile Computing & Multimedia (MoMM2009) held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, in December 14-16, 2009. MoMM2009 is held in conjunction with iiWAS2009 conference, and ...

Gabriele Kotsis; David Taniar; Eric Pardede

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

The MicroGrid: A scientific tool for modeling Computational Grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The complexity and dynamic nature of the Internet (and the emerging Computational Grid) demand that middleware and applications adapt to the changes in configuration and availability of resources. However, to the best of our knowledge there are no simulation ...

H. J. Song; X. Liu; D. Jakobsen; R. Bhagwan; X. Zhang; K. Taura; A. Chien

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Attached Scientific Processors for Chemical Computations: A Report to the Chemistry Community  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emitter-coupled logic), TTL (transistor-transistor logic),of the switching speeds of ECL, TTL and N-MOS is 1, 5 and 50delay. Most current computers use TTL logic, very high speed

Ostlund, Neil S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Confidence in ASCI scientific simulations  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) program calls for the development of high end computing and advanced application simulations as one component of a program to eliminate reliance upon nuclear testing in the US nuclear weapons program. This paper presents results from the ASCI program`s examination of needs for focused validation and verification (V and V). These V and V activities will ensure that 100 TeraOP-scale ASCI simulation code development projects apply the appropriate means to achieve high confidence in the use of simulations for stockpile assessment and certification. The authors begin with an examination of the roles for model development and validation in the traditional scientific method. The traditional view is that the scientific method has two foundations, experimental and theoretical. While the traditional scientific method does not acknowledge the role for computing and simulation, this examination establishes a foundation for the extension of the traditional processes to include verification and scientific software development that results in the notional framework known as Sargent`s Framework. This framework elucidates the relationships between the processes of scientific model development, computational model verification and simulation validation. This paper presents a discussion of the methodologies and practices that the ASCI program will use to establish confidence in large-scale scientific simulations. While the effort for a focused program in V and V is just getting started, the ASCI program has been underway for a couple of years. The authors discuss some V and V activities and preliminary results from the ALEGRA simulation code that is under development for ASCI. The breadth of physical phenomena and the advanced computational algorithms that are employed by ALEGRA make it a subject for V and V that should typify what is required for many ASCI simulations.

Ang, J.A.; Trucano, T.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Luginbuhl, D.R. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) ASCEM is being developed to provide a tool and approach to facilitate robust and standardized development of performance and risk assessments for cleanup and closure activities throughout the EM complex. The ASCEM team is composed of scientists from eight National Laboratories. This team is leveraging Department of Energy (DOE) investments in basic science and applied research including high performance computing codes developed through the Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Advanced Simulation & Computing programs as well as collaborating with the Offices of Science,

247

Knowledge Discovery & Scientific Advancement  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

It has only been 11 years since DOE posted its first home page. Of course, by today's standards, that home page was primitive. To draw an analogy, let's look at another...

248

Statistical Power and Performance Modeling for Optimizing the Energy Efficiency of Scientific Computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-performance computing (HPC) has become an indispensable resource in science and engineering, and it has oftentimes been referred to as the "thirdpillar" of science, along with theory and experimentation. Performance tuning is a key aspect in utilizing ... Keywords: energy-efficiency tuning, green supercomputing, regression modeling

Balaji Subramaniam; Wu-chun Feng

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Eighth SIAM conference on parallel processing for scientific computing: Final program and abstracts  

SciTech Connect

This SIAM conference is the premier forum for developments in parallel numerical algorithms, a field that has seen very lively and fruitful developments over the past decade, and whose health is still robust. Themes for this conference were: combinatorial optimization; data-parallel languages; large-scale parallel applications; message-passing; molecular modeling; parallel I/O; parallel libraries; parallel software tools; parallel compilers; particle simulations; problem-solving environments; and sparse matrix computations.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

Scientific Software  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science & Education: Science & Education: Science Highlights Conferences Seminars & Meetings Publications Annual Reports APS Upgrade Courses and Schools Graduate Programs Scientific Software Subscribe to APS Recent Publications rss feed Scientific Software Scientists and researchers at the APS develop custom scientific software to help with acquisition and analysis of beamline data. Several packages are available for a variety of platforms and uses. General Diffraction Powder Diffraction Crystallography Synchrotron Radiation / Optical Elements Time-Resolved EXAFS Visualization / Data Processing Detector Controls General Diffraction fprime FPRIME/Absorb This provides utilities for computing approximate x-ray scattering cross sections (f, f' and f") for individual elements using the Cromer & Liberman

251

Development of high performance scientific components for interoperability of computing packages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three major high performance quantum chemistry computational packages, NWChem, GAMESS and MPQC have been developed by different research efforts following different design patterns. The goal is to achieve interoperability among these packages by overcoming the challenges caused by the different communication patterns and software design of each of these packages. A chemistry algorithm is hard to develop as well as being a time consuming process; integration of large quantum chemistry packages will allow resource sharing and thus avoid reinvention of the wheel. Creating connections between these incompatible packages is the major motivation of the proposed work. This interoperability is achieved by bringing the benefits of Component Based Software Engineering through a plug-and-play component framework called Common Component Architecture (CCA). In this thesis, I present a strategy and process used for interfacing two widely used and important computational chemistry methodologies: Quantum Mechanics and Molecular Mechanics. To show the feasibility of the proposed approach the Tuning and Analysis Utility (TAU) has been coupled with NWChem code and its CCA components. Results show that the overhead is negligible when compared to the ease and potential of organizing and coping with large-scale software applications.

Gulabani, Teena Pratap

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Condition monitoring through advanced sensor and computational technology : final report (January 2002 to May 2005).  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this joint research project was to develop and demonstrate advanced sensors and computational technology for continuous monitoring of the condition of components, structures, and systems in advanced and next-generation nuclear power plants (NPPs). This project included investigating and adapting several advanced sensor technologies from Korean and US national laboratory research communities, some of which were developed and applied in non-nuclear industries. The project team investigated and developed sophisticated signal processing, noise reduction, and pattern recognition techniques and algorithms. The researchers installed sensors and conducted condition monitoring tests on two test loops, a check valve (an active component) and a piping elbow (a passive component), to demonstrate the feasibility of using advanced sensors and computational technology to achieve the project goal. Acoustic emission (AE) devices, optical fiber sensors, accelerometers, and ultrasonic transducers (UTs) were used to detect mechanical vibratory response of check valve and piping elbow in normal and degraded configurations. Chemical sensors were also installed to monitor the water chemistry in the piping elbow test loop. Analysis results of processed sensor data indicate that it is feasible to differentiate between the normal and degraded (with selected degradation mechanisms) configurations of these two components from the acquired sensor signals, but it is questionable that these methods can reliably identify the level and type of degradation. Additional research and development efforts are needed to refine the differentiation techniques and to reduce the level of uncertainties.

Kim, Jung-Taek (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejon, Korea); Luk, Vincent K.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

DOE Announces $60 Million in Projects to Accelerate Scientific Discovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 Million in Projects to Accelerate Scientific 0 Million in Projects to Accelerate Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing DOE Announces $60 Million in Projects to Accelerate Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing September 7, 2006 - 8:53am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science today announced approximately $60 million in new awards annually for 30 computational science projects over the next three to five years. The projects are aimed at accelerating research in designing new materials, developing future energy sources, studying global climate change, improving environmental cleanup methods and understanding physics from the tiniest particles to the massive explosions of supernovae. "Advanced computing is a critical element of President Bush's American

254

The MicroGrid: a Scientific Tool for Modeling Computational Grids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The complexity and dynamic nature of the Internet (and the emerging Computational Grid) demand that middleware and applications adapt to the changes in configuration and availability of resources. However, to the best of our knowledge there are no simulation tools which support systematic exploration of dynamic Grid software (or Grid resource) behavior. We describe our vision and initial efforts to build tools to meet these needs. Our MicroGrid simulation tools enable Globus applications to be run in arbitrary virtual grid resource environments, enabling broad experimentation. We describe the design of these tools, and their validation on microbench marks, the NAS parallel benchmarks, and an entire Grid application. These validation experiments show that the MicroGrid can match actual experiments within a few percent (2% to 4%).

H. J. Song; X. Liu; D. Jakobsen; R. Bhagwan; X. Zhang; K. Taura; A. Chien

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors. ComPASS is in the first year of executing its plan to develop the next-generation HPC accelerator modeling tools. ComPASS aims to develop an integrated simulation environment that will utilize existing and new accelerator physics modules with petascale capabilities, by employing modern computing and solver technologies. The ComPASS vision is to deliver to accelerator scientists a virtual accelerator and virtual prototyping modeling environment, with the necessary multiphysics, multiscale capabilities. The plan for this development includes delivering accelerator modeling applications appropriate for each stage of the ComPASS software evolution. Such applications are already being used to address challenging problems in accelerator design and optimization. The ComPASS organization for software development and applications accounts for the natural domain areas (beam dynamics, electromagnetics, and advanced acceleration), and all areas depend on the enabling technologies activities, such as solvers and component technology, to deliver the desired performance and integrated simulation environment. The ComPASS applications focus on computationally challenging problems important for design or performance optimization to all major HEP, NP, and BES accelerator facilities. With the cost and complexity of particle accelerators rising, the use of computation to optimize their designs and find improved operating regimes becomes essential, potentially leading to significant cost savings with modest investment.

Spentzouris, P.; /Fermilab; Cary, J.; /Tech-X, Boulder; McInnes, L.C.; /Argonne; Mori, W.; /UCLA; Ng, C.; /SLAC; Ng, E.; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

256

Applied and Computational Mathematics Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applied and Computational Mathematics Division. Topic Areas. Mathematics; Scientific Computing; Visualization; Quantum Computing. ...

2013-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

257

Pragmatic optimizations for better scientific utilization of large supercomputers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in modeling and algorithms, combined with growth in computing resources, have enabled simulations of multiphysics-multiscale phenomena that can greatly enhance our scientific understanding. However, on currently available high-performance computing ... Keywords: FLASH, GCD model, SN Ia, optimizations, supercomputer

Anshu Dubey, Alan C. Calder, Christopher Daley, Robert T. Fisher, C. Graziani, George C. Jordan, Donald Q. Lamb, Lynn B. Reid, Dean M. Townsley, Klaus Weide

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Further advancements for large area-detector based computed tomography system  

SciTech Connect

We present advancements made to a large area-detector based system for industrial x-ray computed tomography. Past performance improvements in data acquisition speeds were made by use of high-resolution large area, flat-panel amorphous-silicon (a-Si) detectors. The detectors have proven, over several years, to be a robust alternative to CCD-optics and image intensifier CT systems. These detectors also provide the advantage of area detection as compared with the single slice geometry of linear array systems. New advancements in this system include parallel processing of sinogram reconstructions, improved visualization software and migration to frame-rate a-Si detectors. Parallel processing provides significant speed improvements for data reconstruction, and is implemented for parallel-beam, fan-beam and Feldkamp cone-beam reconstruction algorithms. Reconstruction times are reduced by an order of magnitude by use of a cluster of ten or more equal-speed computers. Advancements in data visualization are made through interactive software, which allows interrogation of the full three-dimensional dataset. Inspection examples presented in this paper include an electromechanical device, a nonliving biological specimen and a press-cast plastic specimen. We also present a commonplace item for the benefit of the layperson.

Davis, A. W. (Anthony W.); Keating, S. C. (Scott C.); Claytor, T. N. (Thomas N.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

NERSC 2001 Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

81 Advanced Scientific Computing Research and OtherAdvanced Scientific Computing Research . . . . . . . . . . .Advanced Scientific Computing Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Hules editor, John

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

About the ASCR Computer Science Program | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

About the ASCR Computer Science Program About the ASCR Computer Science Program Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Applied Mathematics Computer Science Exascale Tools Workshop Programming Challenges Workshop Architectures I Workshop External link Architectures II Workshop External link Next Generation Networking Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Computational Science Graduate Fellowship (CSGF) ASCR SBIR-STTR Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) News & Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-7486 F: (301) 903-4846 E: sc.ascr@science.doe.gov More Information »

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Introduction to Scientific Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the Hubble Space Telescope. REDHATPAINT SHOP PRO 8 WALT DISNEY Anaconda, the Redhat Linux installer program

Haule, Kristjan

262

Scientific Computing Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The flow of polymer composites via injection molding, spraying or spreading on surfaces is crucial to polymer composite ... "Just Try". Top of the Charts. ...

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

263

An Overview of the Advanced CompuTational Software (ACTS) Collection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Meeting on High Performance Computing for ComputationalSciences, High Performance Computing 1. MOTIVATION ANDto state-of-the-art high performance computing environments.

Drummond, Leroy A.; Marques, Osni A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Advances in the operation of the DIII-D neutral beam computer systems  

SciTech Connect

The DIII-D neutral beam system routinely provides up to 20 MW of deuterium neutral beam heating in support of experiments on the DIII-D tokamak, and is a critical part of the DIII-D physics experimental program. The four computer systems previously used to control neutral beam operation and data acquisition were designed and implemented in the late 1970`s and used on DIII and DIII-D from 1981--1996. By comparison to modern standards, they had become expensive to maintain, slow and cumbersome, making it difficult to implement improvements. Most critical of all, they were not networked computers. During the 1997 experimental campaign, these systems were replaced with new Unix compliant hardware and, for the most part, commercially available software. This paper describes operational experience with the new neutral beam computer systems, and new advances made possible by using features not previously available. These include retention and access to historical data, an asynchronously fired ``rules`` base, and a relatively straightforward programming interface. Methods and principles for extending the availability of data beyond the scope of the operator consoles will be discussed.

Phillips, J.C.; Busath, J.L.; Penaflor, B.G.; Piglowski, D.; Kellman, D.H.; Chiu, H.K.; Hong, R.M.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Application of Advanced Data Processing, Mathematical Techniques and Computing Technologies in Control Centers: Enhancing Speed and Robustness of Power Flow Computation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To combat added complexity, a system operators job can be facilitated by deploying advanced computing technologies, with new software and hardware, that can potentially accelerate and improve data analysis and computer simulation tasks. The overall goal of this project is apply new technologies and techniques, within a few years, to address the current limitations of tools that we identified in the 2011 project. The goal of the 2012 research effort focuses on improving two aspects of the ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Secretary Bodman in Illinois Highlights Scientific Research Investment...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in Illinois Highlights Scientific Research Investments to Advance America's Innovation Secretary Bodman in Illinois Highlights Scientific Research Investments to Advance America's...

267

Optimization of a petroleum producing assets portfolio: development of an advanced computer model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Portfolios of contemporary integrated petroleum companies consist of a few dozen Exploration and Production (E&P) projects that are usually spread all over the world. Therefore, it is important not only to manage individual projects by themselves, but to also take into account different interactions between projects in order to manage whole portfolios. This study is the step-by-step representation of the method of optimizing portfolios of risky petroleum E&P projects, an illustrated method based on Markowitzs Portfolio Theory. This method uses the covariance matrix between projects expected return in order to optimize their portfolio. The developed computer model consists of four major modules. The first module generates petroleum price forecasts. In our implementation we used the price forecasting method based on Sequential Gaussian Simulation. The second module, Monte Carlo, simulates distribution of reserves and a set of expected production profiles. The third module calculates expected after tax net cash flows and estimates performance indicators for each realization, thus yielding distribution of return for each project. The fourth module estimates covariance between return distributions of individual projects and compiles them into portfolios. Using results of the fourth module, analysts can make their portfolio selection decisions. Thus, an advanced computer model for optimization of the portfolio of petroleum assets has been developed. The model is implemented in a MATLAB computational environment and allows optimization of the portfolio using three different return measures (NPV, GRR, PI). The model has been successfully applied to the set of synthesized projects yielding reasonable solutions in all three return planes. Analysis of obtained solutions has shown that the given computer model is robust and flexible in terms of input data and output results. Its modular architecture allows further inclusion of complementary blocks that may solve optimization problems utilizing different measures (than considered) of risk and return as well as different input data formats.

Aibassov, Gizatulla

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Fisher Scientific Fisher Scientific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The furnace is heated by electric resistance elements ... nearest Fisher scientific Service District Office. ... Failure to heat Heating program not entered or ...

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

269

UNEDF: Advanced Scienti?c Computing Collaboration Transforms the Low-Energy Nuclear Many-Body Problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With diverse scienti?c backgrounds, the UNEDF SciDAC collaboration of nuclear theorists, applied mathematicians, and computer scientists is developing a comprehensive description of nuclei and their reactions that delivers maximum predictive power with quanti?ed uncertainties. This paper describes the UNEDF collaboration and identi?es attributes that classify UNEDF as a successful computational collaboration. We illustrate signi?cant milestones accomplished by UNEDF through integrative solutions using the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and leadership class computational resources.

Nam, Hai A.; Stoitsov, M.; Nazarewicz, Witold; Bulgac, Aurel; Hagen, Gaute; Kortelainene, Markus; Maris, P.; Pei, Junchen; Roche, Kenneth J.; Schunck, Nicolas; Thompson, Ian; Vary, James; Wild, Stefan

2012-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

270

Nucleosome positioning and energetics: Recent advances in genomic and computational studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chromatin is a complex of DNA, RNA and proteins whose primary function is to package genomic DNA into the tight confines of a cell nucleus. A fundamental repeating unit of chromatin is the nucleosome, an octamer of histone proteins around which 147 base pairs of DNA are wound in almost two turns of a left-handed superhelix. Chromatin is a dynamic structure which exerts profound influence on regulation of gene expression and other cellular functions. These chromatin-directed processes are facilitated by optimizing nucleosome positions throughout the genome and by remodeling nucleosomes in response to various external and internal signals such as environmental perturbations. Here we discuss large-scale maps of nucleosome positions made available through recent advances in parallel high-throughput sequencing and microarray technologies. We show that these maps reveal common features of nucleosome organization in eukaryotic genomes. We also survey computational models designed to predict nucleosome formation scores or energies, and demonstrate how these predictions can be used to position multiple nucleosome on the genome without steric overlap.

Denis Tolkunov; Alexandre V. Morozov

2009-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

271

IMPROVED COMPUTATIONAL NEUTRONICS METHODS AND VALIDATION PROTOCOLS FOR THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is in the process of modernizing the various reactor physics modeling and simulation tools used to support operation and safety assurance of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (HELIOS, KENO6/SCALE, NEWT/SCALE, ATTILA, and an extended implementation of MCNP5) has been installed at the INL. Corresponding models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational with all five codes, demonstrating the basic feasibility of the new code packages for their intended purpose. Of particular importance, a set of as-run core depletion HELIOS calculations for all ATR cycles since August 2009 was successfully completed during 2011. This demonstration supported a decision late in the year to proceed with the phased incorporation of the HELIOS methodology into the ATR fuel cycle management process beginning in 2012. On the experimental side of the project, new hardware was fabricated, measurement protocols were finalized, and the first four of six planned physics code validation experiments based on neutron activation spectrometry were conducted at the ATRC facility. Data analysis for the first three experiments, focused on characterization of the neutron spectrum in one of the ATR flux traps, has been completed. The six experiments will ultimately form the basis for a flexible, easily-repeatable ATR physics code validation protocol that is consistent with applicable ASTM standards.

David W. Nigg; Joseph W. Nielsen; Benjamin M. Chase; Ronnie K. Murray; Kevin A. Steuhm

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Improved computational neutronics methods and validation protocols for the advanced test reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is in the process of updating the various reactor physics modeling and simulation tools used to support operation and safety assurance of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (HELIOS, KENO6/SCALE, NEWT/SCALE, ATTILA, and an extended implementation of MCNP5) has been installed at the INL. Corresponding models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational with all five codes, demonstrating the basic feasibility of the new code packages for their intended purposes. On the experimental side of the project, new hardware was fabricated, measurement protocols were finalized, and the first four of six planned physics code validation experiments based on neutron activation spectrometry have been conducted at the ATRC facility. Data analysis for the first three experiments, focused on characterization of the neutron spectrum in one of the ATR flux traps, has been completed. The six experiments will ultimately form the basis for flexible and repeatable ATR physics code validation protocols that are consistent with applicable national standards. (authors)

Nigg, D. W.; Nielsen, J. W.; Chase, B. M.; Murray, R. K.; Steuhm, K. A.; Unruh, T. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 Fremont Street, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3870 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Mobile and Stationary Computer Vision based Traffic Surveillance Techniques for Advanced ITS Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

more robust and reliable computer vision techniques areIEEE International Conference on Computer Vision and PatternProc. 3 rd Eur.Conf. Computer Vision, 1994 [32] H.

Cao, Meng

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

EMSL: Capabilities: Molecular Science Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Partners and Related Links Partners and Related Links These are the organizations with which EMSL maintains closest relationships in high performance computing and software development. Partners Note: The links below leave this site Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Daresbury Laboratory San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at UCSD Maui High Performance Computing Center (MHPCC) Intel Corporation Silicon Graphics, Inc. Hewlett-Packard Company (HP) Quadrics Ltd. Organizations SP-XXL SCICOMP Cray User Group (CUG) SC Conference Series - International Conference of High Performing Computing and Communications High Performance Computing Links Advanced Simulation and Computing at Lawrence Livermore National

275

DOE's Office of Science Seeks Proposals for Expanded Large-Scale Scientific  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seeks Proposals for Expanded Large-Scale Seeks Proposals for Expanded Large-Scale Scientific Computing DOE's Office of Science Seeks Proposals for Expanded Large-Scale Scientific Computing May 16, 2005 - 12:47pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman announced today that DOE's Office of Science is seeking proposals to support innovative, large-scale computational science projects to enable high-impact advances through the use of advanced computers not commonly available in academia or the private sector. Projects currently funded are helping to reduce engine pollution and to improve our understanding of the stars and solar systems and human genetics. Successful proposers will be given the use of substantial computer time and data storage at the department's scientific

276

DOE's Office of Science Seeks Proposals for Expanded Large-Scale Scientific  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE's Office of Science Seeks Proposals for Expanded Large-Scale DOE's Office of Science Seeks Proposals for Expanded Large-Scale Scientific Computing DOE's Office of Science Seeks Proposals for Expanded Large-Scale Scientific Computing May 16, 2005 - 12:47pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman announced today that DOE's Office of Science is seeking proposals to support innovative, large-scale computational science projects to enable high-impact advances through the use of advanced computers not commonly available in academia or the private sector. Projects currently funded are helping to reduce engine pollution and to improve our understanding of the stars and solar systems and human genetics. Successful proposers will be given the use of substantial computer time and data storage at the department's scientific

277

An overview of the Advanced CompuTational Software (ACTS) collection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ACTS Collection brings together a number of general-purpose computational tools that were developed by independent research projects mostly funded and supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. These tools tackle a number of common computational ... Keywords: Computational sciences, high-performance computing

L. A. Drummond; O. A. Marques

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

ENHANCING THE ATOMIC-LEVEL UNDERSTANDING OF CO2 MINERAL SEQUESTRATION MECHANISMS VIA ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODELING  

SciTech Connect

Fossil fuels currently provide 85% of the world's energy needs, with the majority coming from coal, due to its low cost, wide availability, and high energy content. The extensive use of coal-fired power assumes that the resulting CO{sub 2} emissions can be vented to the atmosphere. However, exponentially increasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels have brought this assumption under critical review. Over the last decade, this discussion has evolved from whether exponentially increasing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions will adversely affect the global environment, to the timing and magnitude of their impact. A variety of sequestration technologies are being explored to mitigate CO{sub 2} emissions. These technologies must be both environmentally benign and economically viable. Mineral carbonation is an attractive candidate technology as it disposes of CO{sub 2} as geologically stable, environmentally benign mineral carbonates, clearly satisfying the first criteria. The primary challenge for mineral carbonation is cost-competitive process development. CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration--the conversion of stationary-source CO{sub 2} emissions into mineral carbonates (e.g., magnesium and calcium carbonate, MgCO{sub 3} and CaCO{sub 3})--has recently emerged as one of the most promising sequestration options, providing permanent CO{sub 2} disposal, rather than storage. In this approach a magnesium-bearing feedstock mineral (typically serpentine or olivine; available in vast quantities globally) is specially processed and allowed to react with CO{sub 2} under controlled conditions. This produces a mineral carbonate which (1) is environmentally benign, (2) already exists in nature in quantities far exceeding those that could result from carbonating the world's known fossil fuel reserves, and (3) is stable on a geological time scale. Minimizing the process cost via optimization of the reaction rate and degree of completion is the remaining challenge. As members of the DOE/NETL managed National Mineral Sequestration Working Group we have already significantly improved our understanding of mineral carbonation. Group members at the Albany Research Center have recently shown that carbonation of olivine and serpentine, which naturally occurs over geological time (i.e., 100,000s of years), can be accelerated to near completion in hours. Further process refinement will require a synergetic science/engineering approach that emphasizes simultaneous investigation of both thermodynamic processes and the detailed microscopic, atomic-level mechanisms that govern carbonation kinetics. Our previously funded Phase I Innovative Concepts project demonstrated the value of advanced quantum-mechanical modeling as a complementary tool in bridging important gaps in our understanding of the atomic/molecular structure and reaction mechanisms that govern CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration reaction processes for the model Mg-rich lamellar hydroxide feedstock material Mg(OH){sub 2}. In the present simulation project, improved techniques and more efficient computational schemes have allowed us to expand and augment these capabilities and explore more complex Mg-rich, lamellar hydroxide-based feedstock materials, including the serpentine-based minerals. These feedstock materials are being actively investigated due to their wide availability, and low-cost CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration potential. Cutting-edge first principles quantum chemical, computational solid-state and materials simulation methodology studies proposed herein, have been strategically integrated with our new DOE supported (ASU-Argonne National Laboratory) project to investigate the mechanisms that govern mineral feedstock heat-treatment and aqueous/fluid-phase serpentine mineral carbonation in situ. This unified, synergetic theoretical and experimental approach will provide a deeper understanding of the key reaction mechanisms than either individual approach can alone. Ab initio techniques will also significantly advance our understanding of atomic-level processes at the solid/solution interface by e

A.V.G. Chizmeshya

2003-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

279

ENHANCING THE ATOMIC-LEVEL UNDERSTANDING OF CO2 MINERAL SEQUESTRATION MECHANISMS VIA ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODELING  

SciTech Connect

Fossil fuels currently provide 85% of the world's energy needs, with the majority coming from coal, due to its low cost, wide availability, and high energy content. The extensive use of coalfired power assumes that the resulting CO{sub 2} emissions can be vented to the atmosphere. However, exponentially increasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels have brought this assumption under critical review. Over the last decade, this discussion has evolved from whether exponentially increasing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions will adversely affect the global environment, to the timing and magnitude of their impact. A variety of sequestration technologies are being explored to mitigate CO{sub 2} emissions. These technologies must be both environmentally benign and economically viable. Mineral carbonation is an attractive candidate technology as it disposes of CO{sub 2} as geologically stable, environmentally benign mineral carbonates, clearly satisfying the first criteria. The primary challenge for mineral carbonation is cost-competitive process development. CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration--the conversion of stationary-source CO{sub 2} emissions into mineral carbonates (e.g., magnesium and calcium carbonate, MgCO{sub 3} and CaCO{sub 3})--has recently emerged as one of the most promising sequestration options, providing permanent CO{sub 2} disposal, rather than storage. In this approach a magnesium-bearing feedstock mineral (typically serpentine or olivine; available in vast quantities globally) is specially processed and allowed to react with CO{sub 2} under controlled conditions. This produces a mineral carbonate which (i) is environmentally benign, (ii) already exists in nature in quantities far exceeding those that could result from carbonating the world's known fossil fuel reserves, and (iii) is stable on a geological time scale. Minimizing the process cost via optimization of the reaction rate and degree of completion is the remaining challenge. As members of the DOE/NETL managed National Mineral Sequestration Working Group we have already significantly improved our understanding of mineral carbonation. Group members at the Albany Research Center have recently shown that carbonation of olivine and serpentine, which naturally occurs over geological time (i.e., 100,000s of years), can be accelerated to near completion in hours. Further process refinement will require a synergetic science/engineering approach that emphasizes simultaneous investigation of both thermodynamic processes and the detailed microscopic, atomic-level mechanisms that govern carbonation kinetics. Our previously funded Phase I Innovative Concepts project demonstrated the value of advanced quantum-mechanical modeling as a complementary tool in bridging important gaps in our understanding of the atomic/molecular structure and reaction mechanisms that govern CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration reaction processes for the model Mg-rich lamellar hydroxide feedstock material Mg(OH){sub 2}. In the present simulation project, improved techniques and more efficient computational schemes have allowed us to expand and augment these capabilities and explore more complex Mg-rich, lamellar hydroxide-based feedstock materials, including the serpentine-based minerals. These feedstock materials are being actively investigated due to their wide availability, and low-cost CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration potential. Cutting-edge first principles quantum chemical, computational solid-state and materials simulation methodology studies proposed herein, have been strategically integrated with our new DOE supported (ASU-Argonne National Laboratory) project to investigate the mechanisms that govern mineral feedstock heat-treatment and aqueous/fluid-phase serpentine mineral carbonation in situ. This unified, synergetic theoretical and experimental approach will provide a deeper understanding of the key reaction mechanisms than either individual approach can alone. Ab initio techniques will also significantly advance our understanding of atomic-level processes at the solid/solution interface by

A.V.G. Chizmeshya

2002-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

280

ENHANCING THE ATOMIC-LEVEL UNDERSTANDING OF CO2 MINERAL SEQUESTRATION MECHANISMS VIA ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODELING  

SciTech Connect

Fossil fuels currently provide 85% of the world's energy needs, with the majority coming from coal, due to its low cost, wide availability, and high energy content. The extensive use of coal-fired power assumes that the resulting CO2 emissions can be vented to the atmosphere. However, exponentially increasing atmospheric CO2 levels have brought this assumption under critical review. Over the last decade, this discussion has evolved from whether exponentially increasing anthropogenic CO2 emissions will adversely affect the global environment, to the timing and magnitude of their impact. A variety of sequestration technologies are being explored to mitigate CO2 emissions. These technologies must be both environmentally benign and economically viable. Mineral carbonation is an attractive candidate technology as it disposes of CO2 as geologically stable, environmentally benign mineral carbonates, clearly satisfying the first criteria. The primary challenge for mineral carbonation is cost-competitive process development. CO2 mineral sequestration--the conversion of stationary-source CO2 emissions into mineral carbonates (e.g., magnesium and calcium carbonate, MgCO3 and CaCO3)--has recently emerged as one of the most promising sequestration options, providing permanent CO2 disposal, rather than storage. In this approach a magnesium-bearing feedstock mineral (typically serpentine or olivine; available in vast quantities globally) is specially processed and allowed to react with CO2 under controlled conditions. This produces a mineral carbonate which (1) is environmentally benign, (2) already exists in nature in quantities far exceeding those that could result from carbonating the world's known fossil fuel reserves, and (3) is stable on a geological time scale. Minimizing the process cost via optimization of the reaction rate and degree of completion is the remaining challenge. As members of the DOE/NETL managed National Mineral Sequestration Working Group we have already significantly improved our understanding of mineral carbonation. Group members at the Albany Research Center have recently shown that carbonation of olivine and serpentine, which naturally occurs over geological time (i.e., 100,000s of years), can be accelerated to near completion in hours. Further process refinement will require a synergetic science/engineering approach that emphasizes simultaneous investigation of both thermodynamic processes and the detailed microscopic, atomic-level mechanisms that govern carbonation kinetics. Our previously funded Phase I Innovative Concepts project demonstrated the value of advanced quantum-mechanical modeling as a complementary tool in bridging important gaps in our understanding of the atomic/molecular structure and reaction mechanisms that govern CO2 mineral sequestration reaction processes for the model Mg-rich lamellar hydroxide feedstock material Mg(OH)2. In the present simulation project, improved techniques and more efficient computational schemes have allowed us to expand and augment these capabilities and explore more complex Mg-rich, lamellar hydroxide-based feedstock materials, including the serpentine-based minerals. These feedstock materials are being actively investigated due to their wide availability, and low-cost CO2 mineral sequestration potential. Cutting-edge first principles quantum chemical, computational solid-state and materials simulation methodology studies proposed herein, have been strategically integrated with our new DOE supported (ASU-Argonne National Laboratory) project to investigate the mechanisms that govern mineral feedstock heat-treatment and aqueous/fluid-phase serpentine mineral carbonation in situ. This unified, synergetic theoretical and experimental approach has provided a deeper understanding of the key reaction mechanisms than either individual approach can alone. We used ab initio techniques to significantly advance our understanding of atomic-level processes at the solid/solution interface by elucidating the origin of vibrational, electronic, x-ray and electron energy loss sp

A.V.G. Chizmeshya; M.J. McKelvy; G.H. Wolf; R.W. Carpenter; D.A. Gormley; J.R. Diefenbacher; R. Marzke

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Grand Challenges of Advanced Computing for Energy Innovation Report from the Workshop Held July 31-August 2, 2012  

SciTech Connect

On July 31-August 2 of 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) held a workshop entitled Grand Challenges of Advanced Computing for Energy Innovation. This workshop built on three earlier workshops that clearly identified the potential for the Department and its national laboratories to enable energy innovation. The specific goal of the workshop was to identify the key challenges that the nation must overcome to apply the full benefit of taxpayer-funded advanced computing technologies to U.S. energy innovation in the ways that the country produces, moves, stores, and uses energy. Perhaps more importantly, the workshop also developed a set of recommendations to help the Department overcome those challenges. These recommendations provide an action plan for what the Department can do in the coming years to improve the nations energy future.

Larzelere, Alex R.; Ashby, Steven F.; Christensen, Dana C.; Crawford, Dona L.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; John, Grosh; Stults, B. Ray; Lee, Steven L.; Hammond, Steven W.; Grover, Benjamin T.; Neely, Rob; Dudney, Lee Ann; Goldstein, Noah C.; Wells, Jack; Peltz, Jim

2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

282

Scientific Access  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientific Access The APS is a open user facility that makes beam time available to the international scientific community through a peer-reviewed proposal process. Two access...

283

Big Data Ecosystems Enable Scientific Discovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past 5 years, advances in experimental, sensor and computational technologies have driven the exponential growth in the volumes, acquisition rates, variety and complexity of scientific data. As noted by Hey et al in their 2009 e-book The Fourth Paradigm, this availability of large-quantities of scientifically meaningful data has given rise to a new scientific methodology - data intensive science. Data intensive science is the ability to formulate and evaluate hypotheses using data and analysis to extend, complement and, at times, replace experimentation, theory, or simulation. This new approach to science no longer requires scientists to interact directly with the objects of their research; instead they can utilize digitally captured, reduced, calibrated, analyzed, synthesized and visualized results - allowing them carry out 'experiments' in data.

Critchlow, Terence J.; Kleese van Dam, Kerstin

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

In the ever-evolving world of computers, the latest applications and advances bring with them new challenges. With courses that develop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Overview In the ever-evolving world of computers, the latest applications and advances bring, our Master of Computer Science program equips you with the knowledge to develop much-needed solutions the Department of Computer Science, this online, coursework-only degree guides you through subjects such as

285

Report of the Snowmass 2013 Computing Frontier working group on Lattice Field Theory -- Lattice field theory for the energy and intensity frontiers: Scientific goals and computing needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is the report of the Computing Frontier working group on Lattice Field Theory prepared for the proceedings of the 2013 Community Summer Study ("Snowmass"). We present the future computing needs and plans of the U.S. lattice gauge theory community and argue that continued support of the U.S. (and worldwide) lattice-QCD effort is essential to fully capitalize on the enormous investment in the high-energy physics experimental program. We first summarize the dramatic progress of numerical lattice-QCD simulations in the past decade, with some emphasis on calculations carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Lattice-QCD Collaboration, and describe a broad program of lattice-QCD calculations that will be relevant for future experiments at the intensity and energy frontiers. We then present details of the computational hardware and software resources needed to undertake these calculations.

Blum, T; Holmgren, D; Brower, R; Catterall, S; Christ, N; Kronfeld, A; Kuti, J; Mackenzie, P; Neil, E T; Sharpe, S R; Sugar, R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Report of the Snowmass 2013 Computing Frontier working group on Lattice Field Theory -- Lattice field theory for the energy and intensity frontiers: Scientific goals and computing needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is the report of the Computing Frontier working group on Lattice Field Theory prepared for the proceedings of the 2013 Community Summer Study ("Snowmass"). We present the future computing needs and plans of the U.S. lattice gauge theory community and argue that continued support of the U.S. (and worldwide) lattice-QCD effort is essential to fully capitalize on the enormous investment in the high-energy physics experimental program. We first summarize the dramatic progress of numerical lattice-QCD simulations in the past decade, with some emphasis on calculations carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Lattice-QCD Collaboration, and describe a broad program of lattice-QCD calculations that will be relevant for future experiments at the intensity and energy frontiers. We then present details of the computational hardware and software resources needed to undertake these calculations.

T. Blum; R. S. Van de Water; D. Holmgren; R. Brower; S. Catterall; N. Christ; A. Kronfeld; J. Kuti; P. Mackenzie; E. T. Neil; S. R. Sharpe; R. Sugar

2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

287

Throwback Thursdays Celebrate Scientific Supercomputing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thursdays Celebrate Scientific Supercomputing A Cray-1 supercomputer arrives at the Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center in A Cray-1 supercomputer arrives at the Magnetic...

288

Advanced Simulation Capability for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Simulation Capability for Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) ASCEM is being developed to provide a tool and approach to facilitate robust and standardized development of perfor- mance and risk assessments for cleanup and closure activi- ties throughout the EM complex. The ASCEM team is composed of scientists from eight National Laboratories. This team is leveraging Department of Energy (DOE) investments in basic science and applied research including high performance computing codes developed through the Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Advanced Simulation & Computing pro- grams as well as collaborating with the Offices of Science, Fossil Energy, and Nuclear Energy. Challenge Current groundwater and soil remediation challenges that will continue to be addressed in the next decade include

289

PNNL: Computational Sciences & Mathematics - Fundamental & Computational  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News News Contacts mathematical sciences, Computational Sciences & Mathematics We focus on merging high performance computing with data-centric analysis capabilities to solve significant problems in energy, the environment, and national security. PNNL has made scientific breakthroughs and advanced frontiers in high performance computer science, computational biology and bioinformatics, subsurface simulation modeling, and multiscale mathematics. Stream flowing through rocks with binary data on top Testing a Land Model's Water Cycle Simulation Skills Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, exploring new research territory in a popular Earth system model, applied a computational technique to systematically evaluate the

290

Controller and computer display interface in an advanced terminal area ATC system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Controller and display interactions and information requirements in an advanced Air Traffic Control (ATC) system are investigated. A description of the present ATC system and of some proposed developments for the future ...

Dopart, Kevin Peter

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

CS4353 Course Outline Advanced Graphics ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduce advanced interactive computer graphics concepts Introduce advanced architecture of computer graphics devices Introduce advanced mathematical representation of graphic images Develop advanced graphics programming skills

Instructor John; E. Howl

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Accelerating scientific discovery : 2007 annual report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a gateway for scientific discovery, the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) works hand in hand with the world's best computational scientists to advance research in a diverse span of scientific domains, ranging from chemistry, applied mathematics, and materials science to engineering physics and life sciences. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science, researchers are using the IBM Blue Gene/L supercomputer at the ALCF to study and explore key scientific problems that underlie important challenges facing our society. For instance, a research team at the University of California-San Diego/ SDSC is studying the molecular basis of Parkinson's disease. The researchers plan to use the knowledge they gain to discover new drugs to treat the disease and to identify risk factors for other diseases that are equally prevalent. Likewise, scientists from Pratt & Whitney are using the Blue Gene to understand the complex processes within aircraft engines. Expanding our understanding of jet engine combustors is the secret to improved fuel efficiency and reduced emissions. Lessons learned from the scientific simulations of jet engine combustors have already led Pratt & Whitney to newer designs with unprecedented reductions in emissions, noise, and cost of ownership. ALCF staff members provide in-depth expertise and assistance to those using the Blue Gene/L and optimizing user applications. Both the Catalyst and Applications Performance Engineering and Data Analytics (APEDA) teams support the users projects. In addition to working with scientists running experiments on the Blue Gene/L, we have become a nexus for the broader global community. In partnership with the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory, we have created an environment where the world's most challenging computational science problems can be addressed. Our expertise in high-end scientific computing enables us to provide guidance for applications that are transitioning to petascale as well as to produce software that facilitates their development, such as the MPICH library, which provides a portable and efficient implementation of the MPI standard--the prevalent programming model for large-scale scientific applications--and the PETSc toolkit that provides a programming paradigm that eases the development of many scientific applications on high-end computers.

Beckman, P.; Dave, P.; Drugan, C.

2008-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

293

Proceedings of the 2006 ACM SIGCHI international conference on Advances in computer entertainment technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The field of computer entertainment technology has aroused great interest recently amongst researchers and developers in both academic and industrial / business fields as it is duly recognized as showing high promise of bringing on exciting new forms ...

Hiroshi Ishii; Newton Lee; Stephane Natkin; Katsuhide Tsushima

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Advances in bayesian modelling and computation: spatio-temporal processes, model assessment and adaptive mcmc  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The modelling and analysis of complex stochastic systems with increasingly large data sets, state-spaces and parameters provides major stimulus to research in Bayesian nonparametric methods and Bayesian computation. This dissertation presents ...

Chunlin Ji / Mike West

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Proceedings of the International Conference on Advances in Computing, Communications and Informatics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Globalization tends to be most perceptible and observable in almost every facet of life mainly due to the emergence of new digital technologies of computing and communications. At the same time, informatics with its strong focus on providing fast and ...

K. Gopalan; Sabu M. Thampi

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

CCSI and the role of advanced computing in accelerating the commercial deployment of carbon capture systems  

SciTech Connect

The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative is developing state-of-the-art computational modeling and simulation tools to accelerate the commercialization of carbon capture technology. The CCSI Toolset consists of an integrated multi-scale modeling and simulation framework, which includes extensive use of reduced order models (ROMs) and a comprehensive uncertainty quantification (UQ) methodology. This paper focuses on the interrelation among high performance computing, detailed device simulations, ROMs for scale-bridging, UQ and the integration framework.

Miller, D.; Agarwal, D.; Sun, X.; Tong, C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Scientific Awards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nominations Scientific Awards Awards Program achievement aocs application award Awards baldwin distinguished division memorial nomination poster program recognizing research service ...

298

Advanced computational simulation for design and manufacturing of lightweight material components for automotive applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Computational vehicle models for the analysis of lightweight material performance in automobiles have been developed through collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration, and George Washington University. The vehicle models have been verified against experimental data obtained from vehicle collisions. The crashed vehicles were analyzed, and the main impact energy dissipation mechanisms were identified and characterized. Important structural parts were extracted and digitized and directly compared with simulation results. High-performance computing played a key role in the model development because it allowed for rapid computational simulations and model modifications. The deformation of the computational model shows a very good agreement with the experiments. This report documents the modifications made to the computational model and relates them to the observations and findings on the test vehicle. Procedural guidelines are also provided that the authors believe need to be followed to create realistic models of passenger vehicles that could be used to evaluate the performance of lightweight materials in automotive structural components.

Simunovic, S.; Aramayo, G.A.; Zacharia, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Toridis, T.G. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Bandak, F.; Ragland, C.L. [Dept. of Transportation, Washington, DC (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Principles of energy efficiency in high performance computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Performance Computing (HPC) is a key technology for modern researchers enabling scientific advances through simulation where experiments are either technically impossible or financially not feasible to conduct and theory is not applicable. However, ... Keywords: HPC, PUE, energy efficiency, high performance computing, power usage effectiveness

Axel Auweter; Arndt Bode; Matthias Brehm; Herbert Huber; Dieter Kranzlmller

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Commnity Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators is essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modeling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multi-physics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors.

Spentzouris, Panagiotis; /Fermilab; Cary, John; /Tech-X, Boulder; Mcinnes, Lois Curfman; /Argonne; Mori, Warren; /UCLA; Ng, Cho; /SLAC; Ng, Esmond; Ryne, Robert; /LBL, Berkeley

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Commnity Petascale Project for Accelerator Science And Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators And Accelerator Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors.

Spentzouris, Panagiotis; /Fermilab; Cary, John; /Tech-X, Boulder; Mcinnes, Lois Curfman; /Argonne; Mori, Warren; /UCLA; Ng, Cho; /SLAC; Ng, Esmond; Ryne, Robert; /LBL, Berkeley

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

302

Workshop on Emerging Scientific Opportunities using X-ray Imaging  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wah Keat Lee (Advanced Photon Source) Gabrielle Long (Advanced Photon Source) Stuart Stock (Northwestern Medical School) Workshop on Emerging Scientific Opportunities using...

303

A training program for scientific supercomputing users  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is need for a mechanism to transfer supercomputing technology into the hands of scientists and engineers in such a way that they will acquire a foundation of knowledge that will permit integration of supercomputing as a tool in their research. Most computing center training emphasizes computer-specific information about how to use a particular computer system; most academic programs teach concepts to computer scientists. Only a few brief courses and new programs are designed for computational scientists. This paper describes an eleven-week training program aimed principally at graduate and postdoctoral students in computationally-intensive fields. The program is designed to balance the specificity of computing center courses, the abstractness of computer science courses, and the personal contact of traditional apprentice approaches. It is based on the experience of computer scientists and computational scientists, and consists of seminars and clinics given by many visiting and local faculty. It covers a variety of supercomputing concepts, issues, and practices related to architecture, operating systems, software design, numerical considerations, code optimization, graphics, communications, and networks. Its research component encourages understanding of scientific computing and supercomputer hardware issues. Flexibility in thinking about computing needs is emphasized by the use of several different supercomputer architectures, such as the Cray X/MP48 at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IBM 3090 600E/VF at the Cornell National Supercomputer Facility, and Alliant FX/8 at the Advanced Computing Research Facility at Argonne National Laboratory. 11 refs., 6 tabs.

Hanson, F.; Moher, T.; Sabelli, N.; Solem, A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

NERSC Annual Report 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Scientific Computing Research . . . . . . . . . . . .Advanced Scientific Computing Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research of the U.S.

Hules, John

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

NERSC seeks Computational Systems Group Lead  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

seeks Computational Systems Group Lead seeks Computational Systems Group Lead NERSC seeks Computational Systems Group Lead January 6, 2011 by Katie Antypas Note: This position is now closed. The Computational Systems Group provides production support and advanced development for the supercomputer systems at NERSC. Manage the Computational Systems Group (CSG) which provides production support and advanced development for the supercomputer systems at NERSC (National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center). These systems, which include the second fastest supercomputer in the U.S., provide 24x7 computational services for open (unclassified) science to world-wide researchers supported by DOE's Office of Science. Duties/Responsibilities Manage the Computational Systems Group's staff of approximately 10

306

Computer Aided Design of Advanced Turbine Airfoil Alloys for Industrial Gas Turbines in Coal Fired Environments  

SciTech Connect

Recent initiatives for fuel flexibility, increased efficiency and decreased emissions in power generating industrial gas turbines (IGT's), have highlighted the need for the development of techniques to produce large single crystal or columnar grained, directionally solidified Ni-base superalloy turbine blades and vanes. In order to address the technical difficulties of producing large single crystal components, a program has been initiated to, using computational materials science, better understand how alloy composition in potential IGT alloys and solidification conditions during processing, effect castability, defect formation and environmental resistance. This program will help to identify potential routes for the development of high strength, corrosion resistant airfoil/vane alloys, which would be a benefit to all IGT's, including small IGT's and even aerospace gas turbines. During the first year, collaboration with Siemens Power Corporation (SPC), Rolls-Royce, Howmet and Solar Turbines has identified and evaluated about 50 alloy compositions that are of interest for this potential application. In addition, alloy modifications to an existing alloy (CMSX-4) were also evaluated. Collaborating with SPC and using computational software at SPC to evaluate about 50 alloy compositions identified 5 candidate alloys for experimental evaluation. The results obtained from the experimentally determined phase transformation temperatures did not compare well to the calculated values in many cases. The effects of small additions of boundary strengtheners (i.e., C, B and N) to CMSX-4 were also examined. The calculated phase transformation temperatures were somewhat closer to the experimentally determined values than for the 5 candidate alloys, discussed above. The calculated partitioning coefficients were similar for all of the CMSX-4 alloys, similar to the experimentally determined segregation behavior. In general, it appears that computational materials science has become a useful tool to help reduce the number of iterations necessary to perform laboratory experiments or alloy development. However, we clearly are not able to rely solely on computational techniques in the development of high temperature materials for IGT applications. A significant amount of experimentation will continue to be required.

G.E. Fuchs

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

307

Advanced Computational Thermal Fluid Physics (CTFP) and Its Assessment for Light Water Reactors and Supercritical Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Background: The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of Generation IV reactor systems such as supercritical water reactors (SCWR) for higher efficiency, improved performance and operation, design simplification, enhanced safety and reduced waste and cost. The objective of this Korean / US / laboratory / university collaboration of coupled fundamental computational and experimental studies is to develop the supporting knowledge needed for improved predictive techniques for use in the technology development of Generation IV reactor concepts and their passive safety systems. The present study emphasizes SCWR concepts in the Generation IV program.

D.M. McEligot; K. G. Condie; G. E. McCreery; H. M. McIlroy; R. J. Pink; L.E. Hochreiter; J.D. Jackson; R.H. Pletcher; B.L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J.M. Wallace; J.Y. Yoo; J.S. Lee; S.T. Ro; S.O. Park

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Advanced Computational Methods for Security Constrained Financial Transmission Rights: Structure and Parallelism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Financial Transmission Rights (FTRs) help power market participants reduce price risks associated with transmission congestion. FTRs are issued based on a process of solving a constrained optimization problem with the objective to maximize the FTR social welfare under power flow security constraints. Security constraints for different FTR categories (monthly, seasonal or annual) are usually coupled and the number of constraints increases exponentially with the number of categories. Commercial software for FTR calculation can only provide limited categories of FTRs due to the inherent computational challenges mentioned above. In this paper, a novel non-linear dynamical system (NDS) approach is proposed to solve the optimization problem. The new formulation and performance of the NDS solver is benchmarked against widely used linear programming (LP) solvers like CPLEX and tested on large-scale systems using data from the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). The NDS is demonstrated to outperform the widely used CPLEX algorithms while exhibiting superior scalability. Furthermore, the NDS based solver can be easily parallelized which results in significant computational improvement.

Elbert, Stephen T.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Vlachopoulou, Maria; Rice, Mark J.; Glaesemann, Kurt R.; Zhou, Ning

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

309

Using a Phenomenological Computer Model to Investigate Advanced Combustion Trajectories in a CIDI Engine  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes results from simulations of conventional, high-dilution, and high-efficiency clean combustion in a diesel engine based on a two-zone phenomenological model. The two-zone combustion model is derived from a previously published multi-zone model, but it has been further simplified to increase computational speed by a factor of over 100. The results demonstrate that this simplified model is still able to track key aspects of the combustion trajectory responsible for NOx and soot production. In particular, the two-zone model in combination with highly simplified global kinetics correctly predicts the importance of including oxygen mass fraction (in addition to equivalence ratio and temperature) in lowering emissions from high-efficiency clean combustion. The methodology also provides a convenient framework for extracting information directly from in-cylinder pressure measurements. This feature is likely to be useful for on-board combustion diagnostics and controls. Because of the possibility for simulating large numbers of engine cycles in a short time, models of this type can provide insight into multi-cycle and transient combustion behavior not readily accessible to more computationally intensive models. Also the representation of the combustion trajectory in 3D space corresponding to equivalence ratio, flame temperature, and oxygen fraction provides new insight into optimal combustion management.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Green Jr, Johney Boyd [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Green In Silico Project - Evolving Scientific Research out of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Green In Silico Project - Evolving Scientific Research out of the Lab into the Data Center - Environmental Benefits and Challenges of Scientific Computing Speaker(s): Peter James...

311

Center for Applied Scientific Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on problems critical to national security. Addressing problems in the weapons program, cyber and energy security, and knowledge discovery for intelligence applications requires...

312

Uncertainty Quantification in Scientific Computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... attendance at all technical sessions, coffee breaks, lunch each day, a reception the evening of Monday August 1, and a conference banquet on the ...

2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

313

Computer Science Research: Computation Directorate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains short papers in the following areas: large-scale scientific computation; parallel computing; general-purpose numerical algorithms; distributed operating systems and networks; knowledge-based systems; and technology information systems.

Durst, M.J. (ed.); Grupe, K.F. (ed.)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Interactive, Internet Delivery of Visualization via Structured, Prerendered multiresolution Imagery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, of theAdvanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science FY

Bethel, E. Wes; Yoon, Ilmi; Chen, Jerry

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Variable Interactions in Query-Driven Visualization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, of theAdvanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science FY

Bethel, E. Wes; Gosink, Luke J.; Anderson, John C.; Joy, Kenneth I.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Production-quality Tools for Adaptive Mesh Refinement Visualization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, of theAdvanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science FY

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Computational physics and applied mathematics capability review June 8-10, 2010 (Advance materials to committee members)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory will review its Computational Physics and Applied Mathematics (CPAM) capabilities in 2010. The goals of capability reviews are to assess the quality of science, technology, and engineering (STE) performed by the capability, evaluate the integration of this capability across the Laboratory and within the scientific community, examine the relevance of this capability to the Laboratory's programs, and provide advice on the current and future directions of this capability. This is the first such review for CPAM, which has a long and unique history at the laboratory, starting from the inception of the Laboratory in 1943. The CPAM capability covers an extremely broad technical area at Los Alamos, encompassing a wide array of disciplines, research topics, and organizations. A vast array of technical disciplines and activities are included in this capability, from general numerical modeling, to coupled mUlti-physics simulations, to detailed domain science activities in mathematics, methods, and algorithms. The CPAM capability involves over 12 different technical divisions and a majority of our programmatic and scientific activities. To make this large scope tractable, the CPAM capability is broken into the following six technical 'themes.' These themes represent technical slices through the CP AM capability and collect critical core competencies of the Laboratory, each of which contributes to the capability (and each of which is divided into multiple additional elements in the detailed descriptions of the themes in subsequent sections): (1) Computational Fluid Dynamics - This theme speaks to the vast array of scientific capabilities for the simulation of fluids under shocks, low-speed flow, and turbulent conditions - which are key, historical, and fundamental strengths of the laboratory; (2) Partial Differential Equations - The technical scope of this theme is the applied mathematics and numerical solution of partial differential equations (broadly defined) in a variety of settings, including particle transport, solvers, and plasma physics; (3) Monte Carlo - Monte Carlo was invented at Los Alamos, and this theme discusses these vitally important methods and their application in everything from particle transport, to condensed matter theory, to biology; (4) Molecular Dynamics - This theme describes the widespread use of molecular dynamics for a variety of important applications, including nuclear energy, materials science, and biological modeling; (5) Discrete Event Simulation - The technical scope of this theme represents a class of complex system evolutions governed by the action of discrete events. Examples include network, communication, vehicle traffic, and epidemiology modeling; and (6) Integrated Codes - This theme discusses integrated applications (comprised of all of the supporting science represented in Themes 1-5) that are of strategic importance to the Laboratory and the nation. The laboratory has in approximately 10 million source lines of code in over 100 different such strategically important applications. Of these themes, four of them will be reviewed during the 2010 review cycle: Themes 1, 2, 3, and 6. Because these capability reviews occur every three years, Themes 4 and 5 will be reviewed in 201/span>3, along with Theme 6 (which will be reviewed during each review, owing to this theme's role as an integrator of the supporting science represented by the other 5 themes). Yearly written status reports will be provided to the Capability Review Committee Chair during off-cycle years.

Lee, Stephen R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Computational physics and applied mathematics capability review June 8-10, 2010 (Advance materials to committee members)  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory will review its Computational Physics and Applied Mathematics (CPAM) capabilities in 2010. The goals of capability reviews are to assess the quality of science, technology, and engineering (STE) performed by the capability, evaluate the integration of this capability across the Laboratory and within the scientific community, examine the relevance of this capability to the Laboratory's programs, and provide advice on the current and future directions of this capability. This is the first such review for CPAM, which has a long and unique history at the laboratory, starting from the inception of the Laboratory in 1943. The CPAM capability covers an extremely broad technical area at Los Alamos, encompassing a wide array of disciplines, research topics, and organizations. A vast array of technical disciplines and activities are included in this capability, from general numerical modeling, to coupled mUlti-physics simulations, to detailed domain science activities in mathematics, methods, and algorithms. The CPAM capability involves over 12 different technical divisions and a majority of our programmatic and scientific activities. To make this large scope tractable, the CPAM capability is broken into the following six technical 'themes.' These themes represent technical slices through the CP AM capability and collect critical core competencies of the Laboratory, each of which contributes to the capability (and each of which is divided into multiple additional elements in the detailed descriptions of the themes in subsequent sections): (1) Computational Fluid Dynamics - This theme speaks to the vast array of scientific capabilities for the simulation of fluids under shocks, low-speed flow, and turbulent conditions - which are key, historical, and fundamental strengths of the laboratory; (2) Partial Differential Equations - The technical scope of this theme is the applied mathematics and numerical solution of partial differential equations (broadly defined) in a variety of settings, including particle transport, solvers, and plasma physics; (3) Monte Carlo - Monte Carlo was invented at Los Alamos, and this theme discusses these vitally important methods and their application in everything from particle transport, to condensed matter theory, to biology; (4) Molecular Dynamics - This theme describes the widespread use of molecular dynamics for a variety of important applications, including nuclear energy, materials science, and biological modeling; (5) Discrete Event Simulation - The technical scope of this theme represents a class of complex system evolutions governed by the action of discrete events. Examples include network, communication, vehicle traffic, and epidemiology modeling; and (6) Integrated Codes - This theme discusses integrated applications (comprised of all of the supporting science represented in Themes 1-5) that are of strategic importance to the Laboratory and the nation. The laboratory has in approximately 10 million source lines of code in over 100 different such strategically important applications. Of these themes, four of them will be reviewed during the 2010 review cycle: Themes 1, 2, 3, and 6. Because these capability reviews occur every three years, Themes 4 and 5 will be reviewed in 2013, along with Theme 6 (which will be reviewed during each review, owing to this theme's role as an integrator of the supporting science represented by the other 5 themes). Yearly written status reports will be provided to the Capability Review Committee Chair during off-cycle years.

Lee, Stephen R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

THE CENTER FOR DATA INTENSIVE COMPUTING  

SciTech Connect

CDIC will provide state-of-the-art computational and computer science for the Laboratory and for the broader DOE and scientific community. We achieve this goal by performing advanced scientific computing research in the Laboratory's mission areas of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Biological and Environmental Research, and Basic Energy Sciences. We also assist other groups at the Laboratory to reach new levels of achievement in computing. We are ''data intensive'' because the production and manipulation of large quantities of data are hallmarks of scientific research in the 21st century and are intrinsic features of major programs at Brookhaven. An integral part of our activity to accomplish this mission will be a close collaboration with the University at Stony Brook.

GLIMM,J.

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

THE CENTER FOR DATA INTENSIVE COMPUTING  

SciTech Connect

CDIC will provide state-of-the-art computational and computer science for the Laboratory and for the broader DOE and scientific community. We achieve this goal by performing advanced scientific computing research in the Laboratory's mission areas of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Biological and Environmental Research, and Basic Energy Sciences. We also assist other groups at the Laboratory to reach new levels of achievement in computing. We are ''data intensive'' because the production and manipulation of large quantities of data are hallmarks of scientific research in the 21st century and are intrinsic features of major programs at Brookhaven. An integral part of our activity to accomplish this mission will be a close collaboration with the University at Stony Brook.

GLIMM,J.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Scientific Basis and Initial Evaluation of the CLAVR-1 Global Clear/Cloud Classification Algorithm for the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An algorithm for the remote sensing of global cloud cover using multispectral radiance measurements from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on board National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) polar-orbiting ...

Larry L. Stowe; Paul A. Davis; E. Paul McClain

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computing Computing and Storage Requirements Computing and Storage Requirements for FES J. Candy General Atomics, San Diego, CA Presented at DOE Technical Program Review Hilton Washington DC/Rockville Rockville, MD 19-20 March 2013 2 Computing and Storage Requirements Drift waves and tokamak plasma turbulence Role in the context of fusion research * Plasma performance: In tokamak plasmas, performance is limited by turbulent radial transport of both energy and particles. * Gradient-driven: This turbulent transport is caused by drift-wave instabilities, driven by free energy in plasma temperature and density gradients. * Unavoidable: These instabilities will persist in a reactor. * Various types (asymptotic theory): ITG, TIM, TEM, ETG . . . + Electromagnetic variants (AITG, etc). 3 Computing and Storage Requirements Fokker-Planck Theory of Plasma Transport Basic equation still

323

Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures  

SciTech Connect

OAK - B135 This project final report summarizes modeling research conducted in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Low Dose Radiation Research Program at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute from October 1998 through June 2003. The modeling research described involves critically evaluating the validity of the linear nonthreshold (LNT) risk model as it relates to stochastic effects induced in cells by low doses of ionizing radiation and genotoxic chemicals. The LNT model plays a central role in low-dose risk assessment for humans. With the LNT model, any radiation (or genotoxic chemical) exposure is assumed to increase ones risk of cancer. Based on the LNT model, others have predicted tens of thousands of cancer deaths related to environmental exposure to radioactive material from nuclear accidents (e.g., Chernobyl) and fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Our research has focused on developing biologically based models that explain the shape of dose-response curves for low-dose radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells. Understanding the shape of the dose-response curve for radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells helps to better understand the shape of the dose-response curve for cancer induction in humans. We have used a modeling approach that facilitated model revisions over time, allowing for timely incorporation of new knowledge gained related to the biological basis for low-dose-induced stochastic effects in cells. Both deleterious (e.g., genomic instability, mutations, and neoplastic transformation) and protective (e.g., DNA repair and apoptosis) effects have been included in our modeling. Our most advanced model, NEOTRANS2, involves differing levels of genomic instability. Persistent genomic instability is presumed to be associated with nonspecific, nonlethal mutations and to increase both the risk for neoplastic transformation and for cancer occurrence. Our research results, based on applications of NEOTRANS2, indicate that nonlinear threshold-type, dose-response relationships for excess stochastic effects (problematic nonlethal mutations, neoplastic transformation) should be expected after exposure to low linear energy transfer (LET) gamma rays or gamma rays in combination with high-LET alpha radiation. Similar thresholds are expected for low-dose-rate low-LET beta irradiation. We attribute the thresholds to low-dose, low-LET radiation induced protection against spontaneous mutations and neoplastic transformations. The protection is presumed mainly to involve selective elimination of problematic cells via apoptosis. Low-dose, low-LET radiation is presumed to trigger wide-area cell signaling, which in turn leads to problematic bystander cells (e.g., mutants, neoplastically transformed cells) selectively undergoing apoptosis. Thus, this protective bystander effect leads to selective elimination of problematic cells (a tissue cleansing process in vivo). However, this protective bystander effects is a different process from low-dose stimulation of the immune system. Low-dose, low-LET radiation stimulation of the immune system may explain why thresholds for inducing excess cancer appear much larger (possibly more than 100-fold larger) than thresholds for inducing excess mutations and neoplastic transformations, when the dose rate is low. For ionizing radiation, the current risk assessment paradigm is such that the relative risk (RR) is always 1, no matter how small the dose. Our research results indicate that for low-dose or low-dose-rate, low-LET irradiation, RR < 1 may be more the rule than the exception. Directly tied to the current RR paradigm are the billion-dollar cleanup costs for radionuclide-contaminated DOE sites. Our research results suggest that continued use of the current RR paradigm for which RR 1 could cause more harm than benefit to society (e.g., by spreading unwarranted fear about phantom excess risks associated with low-dose low-LET radiation). Such phantom risks also may arise from risk assessments conducted for com

Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

2003-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

324

Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OAK - B135 This project final report summarizes modeling research conducted in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Low Dose Radiation Research Program at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute from October 1998 through June 2003. The modeling research described involves critically evaluating the validity of the linear nonthreshold (LNT) risk model as it relates to stochastic effects induced in cells by low doses of ionizing radiation and genotoxic chemicals. The LNT model plays a central role in low-dose risk assessment for humans. With the LNT model, any radiation (or genotoxic chemical) exposure is assumed to increase ones risk of cancer. Based on the LNT model, others have predicted tens of thousands of cancer deaths related to environmental exposure to radioactive material from nuclear accidents (e.g., Chernobyl) and fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Our research has focused on developing biologically based models that explain the shape of dose-response curves for low-dose radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells. Understanding the shape of the dose-response curve for radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells helps to better understand the shape of the dose-response curve for cancer induction in humans. We have used a modeling approach that facilitated model revisions over time, allowing for timely incorporation of new knowledge gained related to the biological basis for low-dose-induced stochastic effects in cells. Both deleterious (e.g., genomic instability, mutations, and neoplastic transformation) and protective (e.g., DNA repair and apoptosis) effects have been included in our modeling. Our most advanced model, NEOTRANS2, involves differing levels of genomic instability. Persistent genomic instability is presumed to be associated with nonspecific, nonlethal mutations and to increase both the risk for neoplastic transformation and for cancer occurrence. Our research results, based on applications of NEOTRANS2, indicate that nonlinear threshold-type, dose-response relationships for excess stochastic effects (problematic nonlethal mutations, neoplastic transformation) should be expected after exposure to low linear energy transfer (LET) gamma rays or gamma rays in combination with high-LET alpha radiation. Similar thresholds are expected for low-dose-rate low-LET beta irradiation. We attribute the thresholds to low-dose, low-LET radiation induced protection against spontaneous mutations and neoplastic transformations. The protection is presumed mainly to involve selective elimination of problematic cells via apoptosis. Low-dose, low-LET radiation is presumed to trigger wide-area cell signaling, which in turn leads to problematic bystander cells (e.g., mutants, neoplastically transformed cells) selectively undergoing apoptosis. Thus, this protective bystander effect leads to selective elimination of problematic cells (a tissue cleansing process in vivo). However, this protective bystander effects is a different process from low-dose stimulation of the immune system. Low-dose, low-LET radiation stimulation of the immune system may explain why thresholds for inducing excess cancer appear much larger (possibly more than 100-fold larger) than thresholds for inducing excess mutations and neoplastic transformations, when the dose rate is low. For ionizing radiation, the current risk assessment paradigm is such that the relative risk (RR) is always 1, no matter how small the dose. Our research results indicate that for low-dose or low-dose-rate, low-LET irradiation, RR fear about phantom excess risks associated with low-dose low-LET radiation). Such phantom risks also may arise from risk assessments conducted for com

Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

2003-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

325

3-1 Computing and Networking Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CaNS Overview CaNS Overview Section 3-1-1 Computing and Networking Services The primary mission of Computing and Networking Services (CaNS) is to provide the infrastructure and computing services within the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) for an advanced computing environment that enables staff, visitors, and collaborators to effectively use computer and network resources for their scientific and business requirements. In supporting growing business and research needs of EMSL in the area of information sciences, CaNS secures global information access to our facilities by providing online remote access to both computing resources and scientific equipment. A large portion of the efforts undertaken by CaNS staff members involves

326

Computing Frontier: Distributed Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computing Computing Frontier: Distributed Computing and Facility Infrastructures Conveners: Kenneth Bloom 1 , Richard Gerber 2 1 Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska-Lincoln 2 National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1.1 Introduction The field of particle physics has become increasingly reliant on large-scale computing resources to address the challenges of analyzing large datasets, completing specialized computations and simulations, and allowing for wide-spread participation of large groups of researchers. For a variety of reasons, these resources have become more distributed over a large geographic area, and some resources are highly specialized computing machines. In this report for the Snowmass Computing Frontier Study, we consider several questions about distributed computing

327

The computational materials science of concrete:  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Computational Materials Engineering (ICME), advanced by the ... models need to advance to the ... reposito- ry, the computational materials science of ...

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

328

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan : ASC software quality engineering practices Version 3.0.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in the US Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Agency (DOE/NNSA) Quality Criteria, Revision 10 (QC-1) as 'conformance to customer requirements and expectations'. This quality plan defines the SNL ASC Program software quality engineering (SQE) practices and provides a mapping of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirement (CPR) 001.3.6; 'Corporate Software Engineering Excellence'. This plan also identifies ASC management's and the software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals. This SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitments to improving software products by applying cost-effective SQE practices. This plan enumerates the SQE practices that comprise the development of SNL ASC's software products and explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices.

Turgeon, Jennifer L.; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Pilch, Martin M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Performance evaluation of a dynamic load-balancing library for cluster computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of scientific applications in heterogeneous environments has been improved with the research advances in dynamic scheduling at application and runtime system levels. This paper presents the performance evaluation of a library as a result ... Keywords: cluster computing, data migration, dynamic load balancing library, dynamic scheduling, loop scheduling, overhead analysis, parallel computing, parallel runtime system, performance evaluation, resource management, task migration

Ioana Banicescu; Ricolindo L. Carino; Jaderick P. Pabico; Mahadevan Balasubramaniam

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Scientific Working Groups  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... TWGDAM 1988). SWGDOG, Scientific Working Group on Dogs and Orthogonal Detection Guidelines, 2004. SWGTOX, Scientific ...

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

331

COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER  

SciTech Connect

Computational Science is an integral component of Brookhaven's multi science mission, and is a reflection of the increased role of computation across all of science. Brookhaven currently has major efforts in data storage and analysis for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the ATLAS detector at CERN, and in quantum chromodynamics. The Laboratory is host for the QCDOC machines (quantum chromodynamics on a chip), 10 teraflop/s computers which boast 12,288 processors each. There are two here, one for the Riken/BNL Research Center and the other supported by DOE for the US Lattice Gauge Community and other scientific users. A 100 teraflop/s supercomputer will be installed at Brookhaven in the coming year, managed jointly by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, and funded by a grant from New York State. This machine will be used for computational science across Brookhaven's entire research program, and also by researchers at Stony Brook and across New York State. With Stony Brook, Brookhaven has formed the New York Center for Computational Science (NYCCS) as a focal point for interdisciplinary computational science, which is closely linked to Brookhaven's Computational Science Center (CSC). The CSC has established a strong program in computational science, with an emphasis on nanoscale electronic structure and molecular dynamics, accelerator design, computational fluid dynamics, medical imaging, parallel computing and numerical algorithms. We have been an active participant in DOES SciDAC program (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing). We are also planning a major expansion in computational biology in keeping with Laboratory initiatives. Additional laboratory initiatives with a dependence on a high level of computation include the development of hydrodynamics models for the interpretation of RHIC data, computational models for the atmospheric transport of aerosols, and models for combustion and for energy utilization. The CSC was formed to bring together researchers in these areas and to provide a focal point for the development of computational expertise at the Laboratory. These efforts will connect to and support the Department of Energy's long range plans to provide Leadership class computing to researchers throughout the Nation. Recruitment for six new positions at Stony Brook to strengthen its computational science programs is underway. We expect some of these to be held jointly with BNL.

DAVENPORT, J.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

The Magellan Final Report on Cloud Computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of Magellan, a project funded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), was to investigate the potential role of cloud computing in addressing the computing needs for the DOE Office of Science (SC), particularly related to serving the needs of mid- range computing and future data-intensive computing workloads. A set of research questions was formed to probe various aspects of cloud computing from performance, usability, and cost. To address these questions, a distributed testbed infrastructure was deployed at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC). The testbed was designed to be flexible and capable enough to explore a variety of computing models and hardware design points in order to understand the impact for various scientific applications. During the project, the testbed also served as a valuable resource to application scientists. Applications from a diverse set of projects such as MG-RAST (a metagenomics analysis server), the Joint Genome Institute, the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, and the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), were used by the Magellan project for benchmarking within the cloud, but the project teams were also able to accomplish important production science utilizing the Magellan cloud resources.

,; Coghlan, Susan; Yelick, Katherine

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

333

FY13 Computer Science FAQ | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Exascale Operating and Runtime Systems 2013 Exascale Operating and Runtime Systems Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Closed Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) Closed Lab Announcements Award Search 2013 Exascale Operating and Runtime Systems RX-Solvers FAQ Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) News & Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-7486 F: (301) 903-4846 E: sc.ascr@science.doe.gov More Information » Funding Opportunities 2013 Exascale Operating and Runtime Systems Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page http://science.doe.gov/grants/pdf/LAB_13-02.pdf

334

eUROPEAN nETWORK for aDVANCED cOMPUTING tECHNOLOGY for sCIENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Grid Service Requirements (pp. 326) Report on High Performance Computing Development for the Next Network brings together High Performance Computing (HPC) Large Scale Facilities (LSF) funded by the DGXII

Farantos, Stavros C.

335

Network Communication as a Service-Oriented Capability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Science: Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Basicof Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)

Johnston, William

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Exploring HPSS bandwidth - NERSC production experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Mathematical,of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Mathematical,

Holmes, Harvard H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Exploration of cache behavior using HPSS per-file transfer logs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Mathematical,of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Mathematical,

Holmes, Harvard

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Preliminary Feasibility, Design, and Hazard Analysis of a Boiling Water Test Loop Within the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a pressurized light-water reactor with a design thermal power of 250 MW. The principal function of the ATR is to provide a high neutron flux for testing reactor fuels and other materials. The ATR and its support facilities are located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A Boiling Water Test Loop (BWTL) is being designed for one of the irradiation test positions within the. The objective of the new loop will be to simulate boiling water reactor (BWR) conditions to support clad corrosion and related reactor material testing. Further it will accommodate power ramping tests of candidate high burn-up fuels and fuel pins/rods for the commercial BWR utilities. The BWTL will be much like the pressurized water loops already in service in 5 of the 9 flux traps (region of enhanced neutron flux) in the ATR. The loop coolant will be isolated from the primary coolant system so that the loops temperature, pressure, flow rate, and water chemistry can be independently controlled. This paper presents the proposed general design of the in-core and auxiliary BWTL systems; the preliminary results of the neutronics and thermal hydraulics analyses; and the preliminary hazard analysis for safe normal and transient BWTL and ATR operation.

Douglas M. Gerstner

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Scientific Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

contributions of the Tevatron contributions of the Tevatron experiments and accelerator complex Scientific Highlights Collider experiments The Tevatron's collider program began proton-antiproton collisions in 1985 and has led to about 1,000 Ph.D. degrees and about a paper a week through work on the CDF and DZero experiments. Discovered: * the top quark and determined its mass to a high precision * two distinct production mechanisms for the top quark: pair and single production * five B baryons (2 cascade, 1 omega and 2 sigma _b) * B c meson * Y(4140), a new quark structure * B s oscillations Observed: * strongest evidence yet for violation of matter-antimatter

340

Science Prospects And Benefits with Exascale Computing  

SciTech Connect

Scientific computation has come into its own as a mature technology in all fields of science. Never before have we been able to accurately anticipate, analyze, and plan for complex events that have not yet occurred from the operation of a reactor running at 100 million degrees centigrade to the changing climate a century down the road. Combined with the more traditional approaches of theory and experiment, scientific computation provides a profound tool for insight and solution as we look at complex systems containing billions of components. Nevertheless, it cannot yet do all we would like. Much of scientific computation s potential remains untapped in areas such as materials science, Earth science, energy assurance, fundamental science, biology and medicine, engineering design, and national security because the scientific challenges are far too enormous and complex for the computational resources at hand. Many of these challenges are of immediate global importance. These challenges can be overcome by a revolution in computing that promises real advancement at a greatly accelerated pace. Planned petascale systems (capable of a petaflop, or 1015 floating point operations per second) in the next 3 years and exascale systems (capable of an exaflop, or 1018 floating point operations per second) in the next decade will provide an unprecedented opportunity to attack these global challenges through modeling and simulation. Exascale computers, with a processing capability similar to that of the human brain, will enable the unraveling of longstanding scientific mysteries and present new opportunities. Table ES.1 summarizes these scientific opportunities, their key application areas, and the goals and associated benefits that would result from solutions afforded by exascale computing.

Kothe, Douglas B [ORNL

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Innovation | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Innovation Innovation Research | Diffusion | Accelerator | Links Science progresses only if knowledge is shared. OSTI Corollary: Accelerating the sharing of scientific knowledge accelerates the advancement of science. Areas of active OSTI innovation include but are not limited to: Developing plug & play website applications using Web 2.0 capabilities Developing a language translation tool Making hundreds of databases searchable by a single query Incorporating file cabinet or personal workspace capability for users on OSTI search tools Developing web service that stratifies K-12 education sites by grade level Expanding digital access to legacy documents Increasing visibility of and access to scientific research data Developing grid-based and other distributed computer processing

342

Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges - Electron Accelerator...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Aspects and Scientific Challenges Cosmic Frontier Theoretical Physics Advanced Technology R&D Accelerator R&D Stewardship Research Highlights .pdf file (13.1MB) Questions for the...

343

A Provenance-based Adaptive Scheduling Heuristic for Parallel Scientific Workflows in Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the last years, scientific workflows have emerged as a fundamental abstraction for structuring and executing scientific experiments in computational environments. Scientific workflows are becoming increasingly complex and more demanding in terms of ... Keywords: Cloud computing, Provenance, Scientific experiment, Scientific workflow

Daniel Oliveira; Kary A. Ocaa; Fernanda Baio; Marta Mattoso

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Enabling scientific workflows in virtual reality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To advance research and improve the scientific return on data collection and interpretation efforts in the geosciences, we have developed methods of interactive visualization, with a special focus on immersive virtual reality (VR) environments. Earth ... Keywords: geosciences, scientific visualization, virtual reality, workflow

Oliver Kreylos; Gerald Bawden; Tony Bernardin; Magali I. Billen; Eric S. Cowgill; Ryan D. Gold; Bernd Hamann; Margarete Jadamec; Louise H. Kellogg; Oliver G. Staadt; Dawn Y. Sumner

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Final Scientific/Technical Report  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Final ScientificTechnical Report Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New...

346

Microsoft Word - The_Advanced_Networks_and_Services_Underpinning_Modern,Large-Scale_Science.SciDAC.v5.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

: Advanced Networking and Services : Advanced Networking and Services Supporting the Science Mission of DOE's Office of Science William E. Johnston ESnet Dept. Head and Senior Scientist Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory May, 2007 1 Introduction In many ways, the dramatic achievements in scientific discovery through advanced computing and the discoveries of the increasingly large-scale instruments with their enormous data handling and remote collaboration requirements, have been made possible by accompanying accomplishments in high performance networking. As increasingly advanced supercomputers and experimental research facilities have provided researchers powerful tools with unprecedented capabilities, advancements in networks connecting scientists to these tools have made these research facilities available to broader communities

347

Computation and Hypercomputation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Does Nature permit the implementation of behaviours that cannot be simulated computationally? We consider the meaning of physical computation in some detail, and present arguments in favour of physical hypercomputation: for example, modern scientific ... Keywords: ChurchTuring thesis, computability, hypercomputation, recursion, scientific method, super-Turing machine

Mike Stannett

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Slide06 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DDE are: - Numeric data - Figures (graphic) and data plots - Interactive data maps - Computer models and simulations - Scientific images (static) - Scientific multimedia (audio,...

349

Computational Computational  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

38 Computational complexity Computational complexity In 1965, the year Juris Hartmanis became Chair On the computational complexity of algorithms in the Transactions of the American Mathematical Society. The paper the best talent to the field. Theoretical computer science was immediately broadened from automata theory

Keinan, Alon

350

Multicore Architecture-aware Scientific Applications  

SciTech Connect

Modern high performance systems are becoming increasingly complex and powerful due to advancements in processor and memory architecture. In order to keep up with this increasing complexity, applications have to be augmented with certain capabilities to fully exploit such systems. These may be at the application level, such as static or dynamic adaptations or at the system level, like having strategies in place to override some of the default operating system polices, the main objective being to improve computational performance of the application. The current work proposes two such capabilites with respect to multi-threaded scientific applications, in particular a large scale physics application computing ab-initio nuclear structure. The first involves using a middleware tool to invoke dynamic adaptations in the application, so as to be able to adjust to the changing computational resource availability at run-time. The second involves a strategy for effective placement of data in main memory, to optimize memory access latencies and bandwidth. These capabilties when included were found to have a significant impact on the application performance, resulting in average speedups of as much as two to four times.

Srinivasa, Avinash

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

351

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan. Part 2, Mappings for the ASC software quality engineering practices. Version 1.0.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR 1.3.2 and 1.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, 'ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines'. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

Ellis, Molly A.; Heaphy, Robert; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan part 2 mappings for the ASC software quality engineering practices, version 2.0.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR001.3.2 and CPR001.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, ''ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines''. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams' responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

Heaphy, Robert; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr. (,; .); Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1: ASC software quality engineering practices, Version 2.0.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR 1.3.2 and 1.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr. (,; .); Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

BNL | CFN: Theory & Computation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Theory and Computation Contact: Mark Hybertsen Advances in theory, numerical algorithms and computational capabilities have enabled an unprecedented opportunity for fundamental...

355

A Fortran binding for the GNU scientific library  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GNU scientific library is a collection of numerical routines for scientific computing. This article discusses some aspects of the design of a fully standard-conforming Fortran binding for GSL via incremental usage of Fortran 2003 features, in particular ...

Reinhold Bader

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Cloud Computing Forensic Science Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud Computing Forensic Science Workshop. Purpose: The New Frontiers in IT and Measurement Science Rapid advances ...

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

357

3-1 Computer and Network Services (CaNS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CaNS User Resources CaNS User Resources Computer and Network Services (CaNS) The primary mission of the CaNS Group is to provide the infrastructure and computing services within the W.R. Wiley Environmental Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) for an advanced computing environment that enables staff, visitors, and collaborators to effectively use computer and network resources for their scientific research and business requirements. In supporting EMSL's growing business and research needs regarding information sciences, CaNS secures global information access to our facilities by providing online remote access to both computing resources and scientific equipment. A large portion of the CaNS Group's efforts involves providing customer support to EMSL researchers and offsite users. For

358

Opportunities for discovery: Theory and computation in Basic Energy Sciences  

SciTech Connect

New scientific frontiers, recent advances in theory, and rapid increases in computational capabilities have created compelling opportunities for theory and computation to advance the scientific mission of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES). The prospects for success in the experimental programs of BES will be enhanced by pursuing these opportunities. This report makes the case for an expanded research program in theory and computation in BES. The Subcommittee on Theory and Computation of the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee was charged with identifying current and emerging challenges and opportunities for theoretical research within the scientific mission of BES, paying particular attention to how computing will be employed to enable that research. A primary purpose of the Subcommittee was to identify those investments that are necessary to ensure that theoretical research will have maximum impact in the areas of importance to BES, and to assure that BES researchers will be able to exploit the entire spectrum of computational tools, including leadership class computing facilities. The Subcommittee s Findings and Recommendations are presented in Section VII of this report.

Harmon, Bruce; Kirby, Kate; McCurdy, C. William

2005-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

359

Educating Scientifically: Advances in Physics Education Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is now fairly well documented that traditionally taught, large-scale introductory physics courses fail to teach our students the basics. In fact, often these same courses have been found to teach students things we do not want. Building on a tradition of research in physics, the physics education research community has been researching the effects of educational practice and reforms at the undergraduate level for many decades. From these efforts and those within the fields of education, cognitive science, and psychology we have learned a great deal about student learning and environments that support learning for an increasingly diverse population of students in the physics classroom. This talk will introduce some of the ideas from physics education research, discuss a variety of effective classroom practices/ surrounding educational structures, and begin to examine why these do (and do not) work. I will present both a survey of physics education research and some of the exciting theoretical and experimental developments emerging from the University of Colorado.

Finkelstein, Noah (University of Colorado)

2007-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

360

DOE Supercomputing Resources Available for Advancing Scientific...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

models have also helped physicists use radio waves to heat and control ionized fuel in a fusion reactor and have aided engineers in designing materials to recover energy escaping...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Sustaining Scientific Advances and Innovation: NIST Boulder's ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... net assignable square feet of instrument space and ... is impossible without the tighter controls on temperature ... cause major errors in the instruments. ...

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

362

Energy Department Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

biology, fusion science, groundwater modeling, high energy physics, nuclear physics, quantum chromodynamics, materials sciences, radiation transport and turbulence. Research...

363

Slide07 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Slide07 Slide07 Slide07 * Fielded Search provides a very sophisticated search experience. * Reports fall into the disciplines of physics, chemistry, materials, biology, environmental sciences, energy technologies, engineering, computer and information science, renewable energy, and other topics of interest related to the DOE mission. The Information Bridge Advanced Search provides a variety of search fields for a very sophisticated search feature. Keep in mind that energy is not really a scientific discipline. Reports contained in the Information Bridge fall into the disciplines of physics, chemistry, materials, biology, environmental sciences, energy technologies, engineering, computer and information science, renewable energy, and other topics of interest related

364

Supporting National User Communities at NERSC and NCAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research of the U.S.and Advanced Scientific Computing Research. Computing is arealizing its advanced scientific computing research vision.

Killeen, Timothy L.; Simon, Horst D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Advanced Analysis Software Key to New, Energy-Efficient ...  

Advanced Analysis Software Key to New, Energy-Efficient Technologies Leveraging Scientific and Engineering Know-How to Advance Sources of Renewable En ...

366

Advanced Analysis Software Key to New, Energy-Efficient ...  

Advanced Analysis Software Key to New, Energy-Efficient Technologies Leveraging Scientific and Engineering Know-How to Advance Sources of Renewable Energy

367

A.I., Scientific Discovery and Realism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Epistemologists have debated at length whether scientific discovery is a rational and logical process. If it is, according to the Artificial Intelligence hypothesis, it should be possible to write computer programs able to discover laws or theories; ...

Mario Alai

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

NERSC Oakland Scientific Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training 2012 Training 2012 February 1-2, 2012 NERSC Oakland Scientific Facility Debugging with DDT Woo-Sun Yang NERSC User Services Group Why a Debugger? * It makes it easy to find a bug in your program, by controlling pace of running your program - Examine execution flow of your code - Check values of variables * Typical usage scenario - Set breakpoints (places where you want your program to stop) and let your program run - Or advance one line in source code at a time - Check variables when a breakpoint is reached 2 DDT * Distributed Debugging Tool by Allinea * Graphical parallel debugger capable of debugging - Serial - OpenMP - MPI - CAF - UPC - CUDA - NERSC doesn't have a license on Dirac * Intuitive and simple user interfaces * Scalable * Available on Hopper, Franklin and Carver

369

NIST Advances Single Photon Management for Quantum ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Advances Single Photon Management for Quantum Computers. For Immediate Release: January 19, 2011. ...

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

370

Nick Wright Named Advanced Technologies Group Lead  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nick Wright Named Nick Wright Named Advanced Technologies Group Lead Nick Wright Named Advanced Technologies Group Lead February 4, 2013 Nick Nick Wright has been named head of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center's (NERSC) Advanced Technologies Group (ATG), which focuses on understanding the requirements of current and emerging applications to make choices in hardware design and programming models that best serve the science needs of NERSC users. ATG specializes in benchmarking, system performance, debugging and analysis, workload monitoring, use of application modeling tools, and future algorithm scaling and technology assessment. The team also engages with vendors and the general research community to advocate technological features that will enhance the effectiveness of systems for NERSC scientists.

371

Advanced Mixing Models  

Propose mixing indicators. Turbulence kinetic energy ... (Turbulence intensity observed at Point 8 in Tank B & C) Advanced Mixing Models. Computational Sciences. 13.

372

Advanced geothermal technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research and development in advanced technologies for geothermal energy production continue to increase the energy production options for the Nation. The high-risk investment over the past few years by the US Department of Energy in geopressured, hot dry rock, and magma energy resources is producing new means to lower production costs and to take advantage of these resources. The Nation has far larger and more regionally extensive geothermal resources than heretofore realized. At the end of a short 30-day closed-loop flow test, the manmade hot dry rock reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, was producing 10 MW thermal - and still climbing - proving the technical feasibility of this new technology. The scientific feasibility of magma energy extraction has been demonstrated, and new field tests to evaluate this technology are planned. Analysis and field tests confirm the viability of geopressured-geothermal energy and the prospect that many dry-hole or depleted petroleum wells can be turned into producing geopressured-geothermal wells. Technological advances achieved through hot dry rock, magma, geopressured, and other geothermal research are making these resources and conventional hydrothermal resources more competitive. Noteworthy among these technological advances are techniques in computer simulation of geothermal reservoirs, new means for well stimulation, new high-temperature logging tools and packers, new hard-rock penetration techniques, and new methods for mapping fracture flow paths across large underground areas in reservoirs. In addition, many of these same technological advances can be applied by the petroleum industry to help lower production costs in domestic oil and gas fields. 5 refs., 4 figs.

Whetten, J.T.; Murphy, H.D.; Hanold, R.J.; Myers, C.W.; Dunn, J.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Final report for %22High performance computing for advanced national electric power grid modeling and integration of solar generation resources%22, LDRD Project No. 149016.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design and operation of the electric power grid (EPG) relies heavily on computational models. High-fidelity, full-order models are used to study transient phenomena on only a small part of the network. Reduced-order dynamic and power flow models are used when analysis involving thousands of nodes are required due to the computational demands when simulating large numbers of nodes. The level of complexity of the future EPG will dramatically increase due to large-scale deployment of variable renewable generation, active load and distributed generation resources, adaptive protection and control systems, and price-responsive demand. High-fidelity modeling of this future grid will require significant advances in coupled, multi-scale tools and their use on high performance computing (HPC) platforms. This LDRD report demonstrates SNL's capability to apply HPC resources to these 3 tasks: (1) High-fidelity, large-scale modeling of power system dynamics; (2) Statistical assessment of grid security via Monte-Carlo simulations of cyber attacks; and (3) Development of models to predict variability of solar resources at locations where little or no ground-based measurements are available.

Reno, Matthew J.; Riehm, Andrew Charles; Hoekstra, Robert John; Munoz-Ramirez, Karina; Stamp, Jason Edwin; Phillips, Laurence R.; Adams, Brian M.; Russo, Thomas V.; Oldfield, Ron A.; McLendon, William Clarence, III; Nelson, Jeffrey Scott; Hansen, Clifford W.; Richardson, Bryan T.; Stein, Joshua S.; Schoenwald, David Alan; Wolfenbarger, Paul R.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Development of coupled SCALE4.2/GTRAN2 computational capability for advanced MOX fueled assembly designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An advanced assembly code system that can efficiently and accurately analyze various designs (current and advanced) proposed for plutonium disposition is being developed by {open_quotes}marrying{close_quotes} two existing state-of-the-art methodologies-GTRAN2 and SCALE 4.2. The resulting code system, GT-SCALE, posses several unique characteristics: exact 2D representation of a complete fuel assembly, while preserving the heterogeniety of each of its pin cells; flexibility in the energy group structure, the present upper limit being 218 groups; a comprehensive cross-section library and material data base; and accurate burnup calculations. The resulting GT-SCALE is expected to be very useful for a wide variety of applications, including the analysis of very heterogeneous UO{sub 2} fueled LWR fuel assemblies; of hexagonal shaped fuel assemblies as of the Russian LWRs; of fuel assemblies for HTGRs; as well as for the analysis of criticality safety and for calculation of the source term of spent fuel.

Vujic, J.; Greenspan, E.; Slater, Postma, T.; Casher, G.; Soares, I. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Leal, L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Forging New Ground Fostering a Knowledge of Science Forging New Ground Fostering a Knowledge of Science Slide01 Slide01 Dr. Walter Warnick, Director U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) Web-Enabled Government Conference Washington, DC June 2, 2005 Slide02 Slide02 OSTI's Mission We are a component of the DOE Office of Science. Our mission is to advance science and sustain technological creativity by making R&D findings available and useful to DOE researchers and the American people. Slide03 Slide03 OSTI's Vision Our vision for the future rests on the premise that emerging computing power and fast networks have only just begun to revolutionize scientific communication. Our vision and our intention is to accelerate the sharing of scientific knowledge. Slide04 Slide04 Dispensing with the Fancy Words ...

376

Types of Scientific and Technical Information (STI) | Scientific and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Types of Scientific and Technical Information (STI) Types of Scientific and Technical Information (STI) Print page Print page Email page Email page STI is produced and published in various media and formats, including textual, graphical, numeric, multimedia, digital data, technical reports, scientific/technical conference papers and presentations, theses and dissertations, computer software, journal manuscripts and citations, workshop reports, program documents, patents, and other types of technical data. Additionally, program documents encompass needs assessments, progress reports (e.g. semi-annual and annual summaries), workshop reports, etc. Note: "Announce" as used in the context below refers to when the submitter only provides OSTI with an announcement notice (AN 241.1, AN 241.3, AN 241.4, AN 241.5 and AN 241.6) and not the STI product itself. "Submit"

377

NERSC's Franklin Supercomputer Upgraded to Double Its Scientific...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

system. The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Research Scientific Computing (NERSC) Center has officially accepted a series of upgrades to its Cray XT4 supercomputer,...

378

OSTI Innovation, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

documents Increasing visibility of and access to scientific research data Developing grid-based and other distributed computer processing techniques to support search across...

379

DOE Announces $60 Million in Projects to Accelerate Scientific...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

global climate, turbulence, stress corrosion cracking, computational chemistry and quantum chromodynamics. In support of these scientific applications, approximately 24.3...

380

Parallel computing works  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An account of the Caltech Concurrent Computation Program (C{sup 3}P), a five year project that focused on answering the question: Can parallel computers be used to do large-scale scientific computations '' As the title indicates, the question is answered in the affirmative, by implementing numerous scientific applications on real parallel computers and doing computations that produced new scientific results. In the process of doing so, C{sup 3}P helped design and build several new computers, designed and implemented basic system software, developed algorithms for frequently used mathematical computations on massively parallel machines, devised performance models and measured the performance of many computers, and created a high performance computing facility based exclusively on parallel computers. While the initial focus of C{sup 3}P was the hypercube architecture developed by C. Seitz, many of the methods developed and lessons learned have been applied successfully on other massively parallel architectures.

Not Available

1991-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Scientific Data Movement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Data Movement enabled by the DYNES ∗ Instrument Jason Zurawski Internet2 zurawski@internet2.edu Eric Boyd Internet2 eboyd@internet2.edu Tom Lehman ISI East tlehman@east.isi.edu Shawn McKee University of Michigan smckee@umich.edu Azher Mughal California Institute of Technology azher@hep.caltech.edu Harvey Newman California Institute of Technology newman@hep.caltech.edu Paul Sheldon Vanderbilt University paul.sheldon @vanderbilt.edu Steve Wolff Internet2 swolff@internet2.edu Xi Yang ISI East xyang@east.isi.edu ABSTRACT Scientific innovation continues to increase requirements for the computing and networking infrastructures of the world. Collaborative partners, instrumentation, storage, and processing facilities are often geographically and topo- logically separated, thus complicating the problem of end- to-end data management. Networking

382

NEHRP - Scientific Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Scientific Data. Chile Earthquake Reconnaissance Meeting Earthquake engineering implications of the February 27, 2010 Chilean earthquake. ...

383

Flagship Cluster Hiring Initiative Computational Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flagship Cluster Hiring Initiative Computational Science: Advancing Research, Society and the Economy Gabrielle Allen (PI) Thomas Sterling (Presenter/co-PI) Department of Computer Science Center for Computation & Technology #12;Computational Science: Advancing Research, Society and the Economy, External

Allen, Gabrielle

384

Scientific and Technical Information (STI) Managers | Scientific...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Scientific and Technical Information (STI) Managers Print page Print page Email page Email page Roles and Responsibilities Last updated: February 17...

385

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research  

SciTech Connect

IThe National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computing center for the DOE Office of Science, serving approximately 4,000 users and hosting some 550 projects that involve nearly 700 codes for a wide variety of scientific disciplines. In addition to large-scale computing resources NERSC provides critical staff support and expertise to help scientists make the most efficient use of these resources to advance the scientific mission of the Office of Science. In May 2011, NERSC, DOEs Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOEs Office of Nuclear Physics (NP) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for NP research over the next three to five years. The effort is part of NERSCs continuing involvement in anticipating future user needs and deploying necessary resources to meet these demands. The workshop revealed several key requirements, in addition to achieving its goal of characterizing NP computing. The key requirements include: 1. Larger allocations of computational resources at NERSC; 2. Visualization and analytics support; and 3. Support at NERSC for the unique needs of experimental nuclear physicists. This report expands upon these key points and adds others. The results are based upon representative samples, called case studies, of the needs of science teams within NP. The case studies were prepared by NP workshop participants and contain a summary of science goals, methods of solution, current and future computing requirements, and special software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel, multi-core environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. The report also includes a section with NERSC responses to the workshop findings. NERSC has many initiatives already underway that address key workshop findings and all of the action items are aligned with NERSC strategic plans.

Gerber, Richard A.; Wasserman, Harvey J.

2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

386

Advanced Reactor Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Reactor Advanced Reactor Technologies Advanced Reactor Technologies Advanced Reactor Technologies Advanced Reactor Technologies The Office of Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) sponsors research, development and deployment (RD&D) activities through its Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC), and Advanced Small Modular Reactor (aSMR) programs to promote safety, technical, economical, and environmental advancements of innovative Generation IV nuclear energy technologies. The Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) will pursue these advancements through RD&D activities at the Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories and U.S. universities, as well as through collaboration with industry and international partners. These activities will focus on advancing scientific

387

Model Based Load Indices (MBLI) for Scientific Stefan P. Muszala  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model Based Load Indices (MBLI) for Scientific Simulation by Stefan P. Muszala B.S., B.A. Rutgers and Computer Engineering 2008 #12;This thesis entitled: Model Based Load Indices (MBLI) for Scientific Engineering) Model Based Load Indices (MBLI) for Scientific Simulation Thesis directed by Dr. Daniel Connors

Colorado at Boulder, University of

388

GMS: preserving multiple expert voices in scientific knowledge management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computer archives of scientific and engineering knowledge must insure the accuracy, completeness, and validity of their contents. Unfortunately, designers of these sites often overlook the social and cognitive context of scientific activity in favor ... Keywords: cognitive psychology, ethnography, expert communities, information architecture, interaction design, knowledge design, scientific knowledge management, user interface design

Adria H. Liszka; William A. Stubblefield; Stephen D. Kleban

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Scientific Research Data | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Scientific Research Data Scientific Research Data Scientific Research Data DOE generates scientific research data in many forms, both text and non-text. Much of the Department's text-based R&D results are readily available via OSTI databases. OSTI has broadened efforts to make non-text scientific and technical information (STI) available as well, providing access to underlying non-text data such as numeric files, computer simulations and interactive maps, as well as multimedia and scientific images. During 2011, OSTI implemented changes to its technology infrastructure to facilitate the announcement and registration of DOE-funded publicly available R&D research datasets through its membership in DataCite exit federal site . This web service builds on OSTI scientific research data discovery tools,

390

BER Science Network Requirements Workshop -- July 26-27, 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Facilitiesof Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)

Tierney, Brian L.; Dart, Eli

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

BES Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, FacilitiesOffice of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR).Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Facilities

Dart, Eli

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

BER Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR).Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, FacilitiesOffice of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR).

Dart, Eli

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Institutional Plan FY 2003 - 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research Berkeleythe Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research are: of Advanced Scientific Computing Researchs initiative on

Chartock, Michael; Hansen, Todd

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

The Evolution of Research and Education Networks and their Essential Role in Modern Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)AC02- 05CH11231. Advanced Scientific Computing Research ?Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR).

Chaniotakis, E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

NERSC Annual Report 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Mathematical,Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research Appendix F:Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research at DOE, the

Hules Ed., John

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

ASCR Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research NetworkOffice of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, DOE OfficeOffice of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR).

Dart, Eli

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

NERSC Annual Report 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Scientific Computing Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Mathematical,Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research of the U.S.

Hules, John; Bashor, Jon; Yarris, Lynn; McCullough, Julie; Preuss, Paul; Bethel, Wes

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

NP Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR).Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, FacilitiesOffice of Advanced Scientific Computing Research. Vince

Dart, Eli

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Institutional Plan FY 2001-2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research BerkeleyThe Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research alsoThe Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research also

Chartock editor, Michael; Hansen editor, Todd

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

How Are We Doing? A Self-Assessment of the Quality of Services and Systems at NERSC, 2005-2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, U.S.Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research at DOE, theof Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Mathematical,

Kramer, William T.C.; Hules, John

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Low-rank approximations with sparse factors II: penalized methods with discrete Newton-like iterations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, DivisionOffice of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, DivisionOffice of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Division

Simon, Horst

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

HEP Science Network Requirements--Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR).Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, FacilitiesOffice of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR).

Dart Ed, Eli

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Science-Driven Network Requirements for ESnet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, FacilitiesNLCF) from Advanced Scientific Computing Research; and the

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Nuclear Physics Science Network Requirements Workshop, May 2008 - Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Facilitiesof Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Facilities

Tierney, Ed., Brian L

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

FES Science Network Requirements - Report of the Fusion Energy Sciences Network Requirements Workshop Conducted March 13 and 14, 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Facilitiesof Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)

Dart, Eli

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

CRITICAL ISSUES IN HIGH END COMPUTING - FINAL REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-End computing (HEC) has been a driver for advances in science and engineering for the past four decades. Increasingly HEC has become a significant element in the national security, economic vitality, and competitiveness of the United States. Advances in HEC provide results that cut across traditional disciplinary and organizational boundaries. This program provides opportunities to share information about HEC systems and computational techniques across multiple disciplines and organizations through conferences and exhibitions of HEC advances held in Washington DC so that mission agency staff, scientists, and industry can come together with White House, Congressional and Legislative staff in an environment conducive to the sharing of technical information, accomplishments, goals, and plans. A common thread across this series of conferences is the understanding of computational science and applied mathematics techniques across a diverse set of application areas of interest to the Nation. The specific objectives of this program are: Program Objective 1. To provide opportunities to share information about advances in high-end computing systems and computational techniques between mission critical agencies, agency laboratories, academics, and industry. Program Objective 2. To gather pertinent data, address specific topics of wide interest to mission critical agencies. Program Objective 3. To promote a continuing discussion of critical issues in high-end computing. Program Objective 4.To provide a venue where a multidisciplinary scientific audience can discuss the difficulties applying computational science techniques to specific problems and can specify future research that, if successful, will eliminate these problems.

Corones, James [Krell Institute

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

407

Mathematics and Computer Science | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New international partnership to prepare for emerging simulation platforms New international partnership to prepare for emerging simulation platforms More New technique enables event tracing on extreme-scale systems More MCS and ALCF establish joint lab for evaluating computing platforms More New initiative on runtime compatibility for MPI implementations More Hybrid approach for better failure prediction on advanced computing systems More Vishwanath describes new tool for optimizing data movement on HPC systems More Argonne researcher and his colleagues receive best paper prize More A leader in the computing sciences, the MCS Division provides the numerical tools and technology for solving some of our nation's most critical scientific problems. Video Highlight "Ask Argonne" - Robert Jacob, Climate Scientist, Part 1 A leader in the computing sciences, the MCS Division provides the numerical

408

INCITE grants awarded to 59 computational research projects | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INCITE grants awarded to 59 computational research projects INCITE grants awarded to 59 computational research projects November 16, 2013 Printer-friendly version ARGONNE, IL., November 18, 2013-The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science announced 59 projects, promising to accelerate scientific discovery and innovation, that will share nearly 6 billion core hours on two of America's fastest supercomputers dedicated to open science. Their work will advance knowledge in critical areas from sustainable energy technologies to the environmental consequences of energy use. The allocations come from the Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment, or INCITE, program. Through it, the world's most advanced computational research projects from academia, government, and industry are given access to the Department of Energy's (DOE's)

409

Accelerating Scientific Discovery Through Computation and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Acknowledgments Fontainebleau sandstone images were prepared by John Dunsmuir of Exxon Research & Engineering Co. ...

2001-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

410

Accelerating Scientific Discovery through Computation and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 10 Acknowledgements Fontainebleau sandstone images were prepared by John Dunsmuir of Exxon Research Engineering Co. ...

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

411

Accelerating Scientific Discovery Through Computation and  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Examples include oil recovery, the spread of haz-ardous wastes in soils, and ... films.The most important feature is the evolution of the peak near -2 to ...

412

Scientific Computing Kernels on the Cell Processor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

entire matrix via standard row blocking. If synchronizationoverhead, when rows are short. A variant on this standard

Williams, Samuel W.; Shalf, John; Oliker, Leonid; Kamil, Shoaib; Husbands, Parry; Yelick, Katherine

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Scientific Computing Kernels on the Cell Processor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

200 lines of common code. The programming overhead of theselines results in high bandwidth utiliza- tion and su?ciently amortizes the omnipresent 1000 cycle DMA latency overhead,

Williams, Samuel W.; Shalf, John; Oliker, Leonid; Kamil, Shoaib; Husbands, Parry; Yelick, Katherine

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Accelerating Scientific Discovery Through Computation and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Nano- particles are typically 1 nm to 10 nm in size with a thou- sand to a million atoms. ... III. Tight-Binding Wave Functions for Quantum Dots ...

2010-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

415

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Scientific Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

data from the Large Area Telescope, the main instrument on the orbiting Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. SLAC staff also contributes to the software that makes Fermi LAT...

416

NERSC National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Science for Humanity NERSC users share Nobel Peace Prize, among other honors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32...

417

Berkeley Lab Computing Sciences: Accelerating Scientific Discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Katherine Yelick (right) NERSC Division Directornational user facilities NERSC and ESnet and by conduct-and applied mathematics. NERSC serves more than 3,000

Hules, John A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Scientific Software Engineering: High Performance Computing,...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Home Services Software Quality Assurance Software Engineering CONTACTS Group Leader Steve Painter Deputy Group Leader Cecilia Rivenburgh Software Engineering Lead Scott Matthews...

419

Accelerating Scientific Discovery Through Computation and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... electronic structure of GaAs nanocrystals, inclu- sion of ... lowest hole state in a CdS nano- crystal. ... well region of a nanoheterostructured nanocrystal. ...

2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

420

Accelerating Scientific Discovery Through Computation and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... We have implemented our GP system [76] using a somewhat unconventional representation for individual (evolvable) programs. ...

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Multiscale Problems: Numerical Analysis and Scientific Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Underground Nuclear Longterm Disposal of Radioactive Waste Underground Reactor Safety: Neutron Diffusion Multilevel Iterative Methods (homogeneous coefficients in PDE) Multigrid, AMG, DDM (with theory!) R. Scheichl theory!) Multiscale/Upscaling Methods (heterogeneous coefficients in PDE) Homogenisation (with theory

Mitchener, Paul

422

Berkeley Lab Computing Sciences: Accelerating Scientific Discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sciences national user facilities, services, and researchoperating two national user facilities NERSC and ESnet

Hules, John A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;Then a1 = - e1/2 2 + - e -s2 2 s cos sds = 0, a2 = - e1/2 2 + - e -s2 2 s sin sds = -1, Substituting

424

University Program in Advanced Technology | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

& Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D Programs > Institutional Research & Development > University Program in Advanced...

425

Advance Network Reservation and Provisioning for Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We are witnessing a new era that offers new opportunities to conduct scientific research with the help of recent advancements in computational and storage technologies. Computational intensive science spans multiple scientific domains, such as particle physics, climate modeling, and bio-informatics simulations. These large-scale applications necessitate collaborators to access very large data sets resulting from simulations performed in geographically distributed institutions. Furthermore, often scientific experimental facilities generate massive data sets that need to be transferred to validate the simulation data in remote collaborating sites. A major component needed to support these needs is the communication infrastructure which enables high performance visualization, large volume data analysis, and also provides access to computational resources. In order to provide high-speed on-demand data access between collaborating institutions, national governments support next generation research networks such as Internet 2 and ESnet (Energy Sciences Network). Delivering network-as-a-service that provides predictable performance, efficient resource utilization and better coordination between compute and storage resources is highly desirable. In this paper, we study network provisioning and advanced bandwidth reservation in ESnet for on-demand high performance data transfers. We present a novel approach for path finding in time-dependent transport networks with bandwidth guarantees. We plan to improve the current ESnet advance network reservation system, OSCARS [3], by presenting to the clients, the possible reservation options and alternatives for earliest completion time and shortest transfer duration. The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) provides high bandwidth connections between research laboratories and academic institutions for data sharing and video/voice communication. The ESnet On-Demand Secure Circuits and Advance Reservation System (OSCARS) establishes guaranteed bandwidth of secure virtual circuits at a certain time, for a certain bandwidth and length of time. Though OSCARS operates within the ESnet, it also supplies end-to-end provisioning between multiple autonomous network domains. OSCARS gets reservation requests through a standard web service interface, and conducts a Quality-of-service (QoS) path for bandwidth guarantees. Multi-protocol Label Switching (MPLS) and the Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) enable to create a virtual circuit using Label Switched Paths (LSP's). It contains three main components: a reservation manager, a bandwidth scheduler, and a path setup subsystem. The bandwidth scheduler needs to have information about the current and future states of the network topology in order to accomplish end-to-end bandwidth guaranteed paths.

Balman, Mehmet; Chaniotakis, Evangelos; Shoshani, Arie; Sim, Alex

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

426

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Scientific Knowledge and Advancement U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Scientific and Technical...

427

Berkeley Lab Computing Sciences: Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sciences organization enables and advances computational research throughout the DOE science community. NERSC and ESnet provide high performance computing and networking...

428

PNNL: Computational Sciences & Mathematics - Fundamental and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(CM4) Northwest Institute for Advanced Computing Seminar Series Frontiers in Computational and Information Sciences Lecture Series Fundamental & Computational Sciences Home...

429

Computational Biology & KBase | Clean Energy| ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computational Biology and KBase SHARE Computational Biology and KBase The ever-increasing scale and complexity of biological data require advanced computational tools and resources...

430

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1 : ASC software quality engineering practices version 1.0.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in DOE/AL Quality Criteria (QC-1) as conformance to customer requirements and expectations. This quality plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirements (CPR 1.3.2 and CPR 1.3.6) and the Department of Energy (DOE) document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines (GP&G). This quality plan identifies ASC management and software project teams' responsibilities for cost-effective software engineering quality practices. The SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitment to improving software products by applying cost-effective software engineering quality practices. This document explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices; enumerates the practices that compose the development of SNL ASC's software products; and includes a sample assessment checklist that was developed based upon the practices in this document.

Minana, Molly A.; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1 : ASC software quality engineering practices version 1.0.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in DOE/AL Quality Criteria (QC-1) as conformance to customer requirements and expectations. This quality plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirements (CPR 1.3.2 and CPR 1.3.6) and the Department of Energy (DOE) document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines (GP&G). This quality plan identifies ASC management and software project teams' responsibilities for cost-effective software engineering quality practices. The SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitment to improving software products by applying cost-effective software engineering quality practices. This document explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices; enumerates the practices that compose the development of SNL ASC's software products; and includes a sample assessment checklist that was developed based upon the practices in this document.

Minana, Molly A.; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Simulations for Complex Fluid Flow Problems from Berkeley Lab's Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering (CCSE)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering (CCSE) develops and applies advanced computational methodologies to solve large-scale scientific and engineering problems arising in the Department of Energy (DOE) mission areas involving energy, environmental, and industrial technology. The primary focus is in the application of structured-grid finite difference methods on adaptive grid hierarchies for compressible, incompressible, and low Mach number flows. The diverse range of scientific applications that drive the research typically involve a large range of spatial and temporal scales (e.g. turbulent reacting flows) and require the use of extremely large computing hardware, such as the 153,000-core computer, Hopper, at NERSC. The CCSE approach to these problems centers on the development and application of advanced algorithms that exploit known separations in scale; for many of the application areas this results in algorithms are several orders of magnitude more efficient than traditional simulation approaches.

433

Scientific Visualization in Astronomy: Towards the Petascale Astronomy Era  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Astronomy is entering a new era of discovery, coincident with the establishment of new facilities for observation and simulation that will routinely generate petabytes of data. While an increasing reliance on automated data analysis is anticipated, a critical role will remain for visualization-based knowledge discovery. We have investigated scientific visualization applications in astronomy through an examination of the literature published during the last two decades. We identify the two most active fields for progress - visualization of large-N particle data and spectral data cubes - discuss open areas of research, and introduce a mapping between astronomical sources of data and data representations used in general purpose visualization tools. We discuss contributions using high performance computing architectures (e.g: distributed processing and GPUs), collaborative astronomy visualization, the use of workflow systems to store metadata about visualization parameters, and the use of advanced interaction dev...

Hassan, Amr

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Empirical Performance Analysis of High Performance Computing Benchmarks Across Variations in Cloud Computing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??High Performance Computing (HPC) applications are data-intensive scientific software requiring significant CPU and data storage capabilities. Researchers have examined the performance of Amazon Elastic Compute (more)

Mani, Sindhu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Computational Methods in Materials Education  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

search. faq. home. FORUMS > COMPUTATIONAL METHODS ... Search Category: [ advanced search ]. rss feed. Spacer Use this area to submit digital resources...

436

Protein Puzzles and Scientific Solutions  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Articles » 2014 » Protein Articles » 2014 » Protein Puzzles and Scientific Solutions News Featured Articles 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 01.06.14 Protein Puzzles and Scientific Solutions Researchers at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory solve fiendishly complicated structures using X-ray savvy and serious computing power. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo The Coherent X-ray Imaging experimental station at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source. Photo courtesy of Brad Plummer/SLAC In crystallography experiments at the Coherent X-ray Imaging experimental

437

Secretary Bodman in Illinois Highlights Scientific Research Investments to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Illinois Highlights Scientific Research Illinois Highlights Scientific Research Investments to Advance America's Innovation Secretary Bodman in Illinois Highlights Scientific Research Investments to Advance America's Innovation April 11, 2007 - 12:36pm Addthis ROMEOVILLE, IL - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel Bodman today joined Rep. Judy Biggert (IL-13th) at a technology firm in Illinois to highlight scientific research investments that have led to partnerships between DOE's National laboratories and private industry. At Advanced Diamond Technologies, Inc., Secretary Bodman touted the key contributions of scientists and engineers across the country and the importance of sustaining innovation and entrepreneurship in advancing energy and economic security. "Moving technologies from the laboratory setting to commercial

438

Advanced Statistical Computing Course Notes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Newton methods to accelerate the search, can form practical algorithms for rigorously finding all roots do occur at such points in the second problem. nle-1 This one-dimensional problem is given __ Its roots are at x = 2 52 [ 4:237; 4:236] and x = 3 82 [ 5:829; 5:828]. nle-2

Lee, Stephen

439

BL-722 ADVANCED COMPUTER VISION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

outperform STIP Classification accuracy 12 #12;13 · Temporal model helps · Our object-centric features outperform STIP · Visual phrases improves accuracy Classification accuracy 13 #12;14 · Temporal model helps · Our object-centric features outperform STIP · Visual phrases improves accuracy · Ideal object

Erdem, Erkut

440

Advances in Computational Solvation Thermodynamics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of this thesis is to develop improved methods for calculating the free energy, entropy and enthalpy of solvation from molecular simulations. Solvation thermodynamics (more)

Wyczalkowski, Matthew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Expanding Robust HCCI Operation with Advanced Valve and Fuel Control Technologies Pub ID 38707 Title Expanding Robust HCCI Operation with Advanced Valve and Fuel Control Technologies Status Distributed Communication Type ORNL report ORNL Review? Scientific communication that requires ORNL review Information Category Protected CRADA Information ORNL Report Classification Final Expanding Robust HCCI Operation with Advanced Valve and Fuel Control Technologies  

SciTech Connect

Delphi Automotive Systems and ORNL established this CRADA to advance the commercialization potential of the homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) advanced combustion strategy for gasoline engine platforms. HCCI combustion has been shown by others to produce high diesel-like efficiency on a gasoline engine platform while simultaneously producing low NOX and particulate matter emissions. However, the commercialization barriers that face HCCI combustion are significant, with requirements for a more active engine control system, likely with next-cycle closed-loop feedback control, and with advanced valve train technologies to enable negative valve overlap conditions. In the partnership between Delphi and ORNL, each organization brought a unique and complementary set of skills to the project. Delphi has made a number of breakthroughs with production-intent valve train technologies and controls in recent years to make a part time production-intent HCCI engine plausible. ORNL has extensive knowledge and expertise with HCCI combustion, and also has a versatile research engine with hydraulic valve actuation (HVA) that is useful for guiding production of a cam-based HCCI system. Partnering these knowledge bases and capabilities was essential towards making progress to better understand HCCI combustion and the commercialization barriers that it faces. ORNL and Delphi maintained strong collaboration throughout the project. Meetings were held regularly, with additional reports, presentations, and meetings as necessary to maintain progress. Delphi provided guidance to ORNL regarding operational strategies to investigate on their single-cylinder research engine with HVA and data from their experimental multi-cylinder engine for modeling. ORNL provided single-cylinder engine data and modeling results.

Szybist, J.P.; Confer, K. (Delphi Automotive Systems)

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

442

Slide08 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Discovery. Collaborative search, enhancing knowledge, advancing science The return on investment in science depends on the diffusion of scientific knowledge. The opportunity...

443

Slide18 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Discovery - Collaborative search, enhancing knowledge, advancing science The return on investment in science depends on this diffusion of scientific knowledge. The opportunity...

444

DOE O 241.1B, Scientific and Technical Information Management  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The purpose of this directive is to ensure that STI is appropriately managed as part of the DOE mission to enable the advancement of scientific knowledge and ...

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

445

Delivering Insight The History of the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative  

SciTech Connect

The history of the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) tells of the development of computational simulation into a third fundamental piece of the scientific method, on a par with theory and experiment. ASCI did not invent the idea, nor was it alone in bringing it to fruition. But ASCI provided the wherewithal - hardware, software, environment, funding, and, most of all, the urgency - that made it happen. On October 1, 2005, the Initiative completed its tenth year of funding. The advances made by ASCI over its first decade are truly incredible. Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, and Sandia National Laboratories, along with leadership provided by the Department of Energy's Defense Programs Headquarters, fundamentally changed computational simulation and how it is used to enable scientific insight. To do this, astounding advances were made in simulation applications, computing platforms, and user environments. ASCI dramatically changed existing - and forged new - relationships, both among the Laboratories and with outside partners. By its tenth anniversary, despite daunting challenges, ASCI had accomplished all of the major goals set at its beginning. The history of ASCI is about the vision, leadership, endurance, and partnerships that made these advances possible.

Larzelere II, A R

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

446

Capturing and supporting contexts for scientific data sharing via the biological sciences collaboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scientific collaboration is largely focused on the sharing and joint analysis of scientific data and results. Today, a movement is afoot within the scientific computing community to shift "collaboratory" development from traditional tool-centric approaches ... Keywords: collaboratory, data provenance, data sharing, data sharing contexts, data-centric collaboration, metadata, scientific workflow, tool-centric collaboration

George Chin, Jr.; Carina S. Lansing

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Slide10 Slide10 Slide11 Slide12 Slide13 Slide9 Forging New Ground Fostering a Knowledge of Science Slide01 Dr. Walter Warnick, Director U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) Web-Enabled Government Conference Washington, DC June 2, 2005 Forging New Ground Fostering a Knowledge of Science Slide02 OSTI's Mission We are a component of the DOE Office of Science. Our mission is to advance science and sustain technological creativity by making R&D findings available and useful to DOE researchers and the American people. Forging New Ground Fostering a Knowledge of Science Slide03 OSTI's Vision Our vision for the future rests on the premise that emerging computing power and fast networks have only just begun to revolutionize scientific

448

The Effect of a Contrast Agent on Proton Beam Range in Radiotherapy Planning Using Computed Tomography for Patients With Locoregionally Advanced Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We evaluated the effect of a contrast agent (CA) on proton beam range in a treatment planning system (TPS) for patients with locoregionally advanced lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Two sets of computed tomography (CT) images (with and without CA) were obtained from 20 patients with lung cancer. Because the increase in Hounsfield unit ( Increment HU) value of the heart and great vessels due to the effect of CA is most prominent among thoracic structures, to evaluate the effect of CA on proton beam range in the TPS, we compared the calculated distal ranges in the plan with CA-enhanced CT with those with corrected CT, in which the HU values of the heart and great vessels in the CA-enhanced CT were replaced by average HU values obtained from the unenhanced CT. Results: The mean Increment HU value and the longest length of the heart and great vessels within the proton beam path in the field that passed through these structures were 189 {+-} 29 HU (range, 110-250 HU) and 7.1 {+-} 1.1 cm (range, 2.6-11.2 cm), respectively. The mean distal range error in the TPS because of the presence of CA was 1.0 {+-} 0.7 cm (range, 0.2-2.6 cm). Conclusion: If CA-enhanced CT images are used for radiotherapy planning using a proton beam for the treatment of lung cancer, our results suggest that the HU values of the heart and great vessels should be replaced by the average HU values of soft tissue to avoid discrepancies between planned and delivered doses.

Hwang, Ui-Jung; Shin, Dong Ho [Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hyun, E-mail: k2onco@naver.com [Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Sung Ho; Lim, Young Kyung; Jeong, Hojin; Rah, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, Joo-Young; Kim, Dae Yong; Park, Sung Yong; Cho, Kwan Ho [Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

18.337J / 6.338J Applied Parallel Computing (SMA 5505), Spring 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applied Parallel Computing is an advanced interdisciplinary introduction to applied parallel computing on modern supercomputers.

Edelman, Alan

450

Scientific Interest Groups  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalysis High Pressure LiquidSoft-Matter Surface Scattering Powder Diffraction SAXS Surface & Interface Scattering XAS X-ray Micros.Imaging Scientific Interest Groups...

451

Conference on Advances in Materials Science - Presentations ...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

- Presentations Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing Institutional Research...

452

DOE Science Showcase - Computing Research | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Computing Research Computing Research For the growing number of problems where experiments are impossible, dangerous, or inordinately costly, exascale computing will enable the solution of vastly more accurate predictive models and the analysis of massive quantities of data, producing advances in areas of science and technology that are essential to DOE and Office of Science missions and, in the hands of the private sector, drive U.S. competitiveness. Courtesy of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Courtesy of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Computational Research in DOE Databases Energy Citations Database DOE Data Explorer Science.gov WorldWideScience.gov More information DOE Office of Science Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Research ASCR Facilities

453

Advanced Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ductility EnhancEmEnt of molybDEnum Ductility EnhancEmEnt of molybDEnum PhasE by nano-sizED oxiDE DisPErsions Description Using computational modeling techniques, this research aims to develop predictive capabilities to facilitate the design and optimization of molybdenum (Mo), chromium (Cr), and other high-temperature structural materials to enable these materials to withstand the harsh environments of advanced power generation systems, such as gasification-based systems. These types of materials are essential to the development of highly efficient, clean energy technologies such as low-emission power systems that use coal or other fossil fuels.

454

Superlative Supercomputers: Argonne's Mira to Accelerate Scientific  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Superlative Supercomputers: Argonne's Mira to Accelerate Superlative Supercomputers: Argonne's Mira to Accelerate Scientific Discoveries, Societal Benefits Superlative Supercomputers: Argonne's Mira to Accelerate Scientific Discoveries, Societal Benefits December 2, 2011 - 2:01pm Addthis This is a computer simulation of a Class 1a supernova. Argonne National Laboratory's Mira will have enough computing power to help researchers run simulations of exploding stars, specifically, of the turbulent nuclear combustion that sets off type 1a supernovae. | Photo courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory This is a computer simulation of a Class 1a supernova. Argonne National Laboratory's Mira will have enough computing power to help researchers run simulations of exploding stars, specifically, of the turbulent nuclear

455

Superlative Supercomputers: Argonne's Mira to Accelerate Scientific  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Superlative Supercomputers: Argonne's Mira to Accelerate Superlative Supercomputers: Argonne's Mira to Accelerate Scientific Discoveries, Societal Benefits Superlative Supercomputers: Argonne's Mira to Accelerate Scientific Discoveries, Societal Benefits December 2, 2011 - 2:01pm Addthis This is a computer simulation of a Class 1a supernova. Argonne National Laboratory's Mira will have enough computing power to help researchers run simulations of exploding stars, specifically, of the turbulent nuclear combustion that sets off type 1a supernovae. | Photo courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory This is a computer simulation of a Class 1a supernova. Argonne National Laboratory's Mira will have enough computing power to help researchers run simulations of exploding stars, specifically, of the turbulent nuclear

456

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS CLASS ADVANCE WAIVER OF THE GOVERNMENT'S DOMESTIC AND  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FASTFORWARD FASTFORWARD PROJECT; DOE WAIVER NO. W(C) 2012-003 The Department of Energy (DOE) has a long history of deploying leading-edge computing capability for science and national security. Going forward, DOE's compelling science, energy assurance and national security needs will require a thousand-fold increase in usable computing power, delivered as quickly and energy-efficiently as possible. Within DOE's Office of Science (SC), the mission of the Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program is to discover, develop, and deploy computational and networking capabilities to analyze, model, simulate, and predict complex phenomena. A particular challenge of this program is fulfilling the science potential of emerging computing systems and other novel computing architectures,

457

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS CLASS ADVANCE WAIVER OF THE GOVERNMENT'S DOMESTIC AND  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DESIGNFORWARD DESIGNFORWARD PROJECT; DOE WAIVER NO. W(C) 2012-006 The Department of Energy (DOE) has a long history of deploying leading-edge computing capability for science and national security. Going forward, DOE' s compelling science, energy assurance and national security needs will require a thousand-fold increase in usable computing power, delivered as quickly and energy-efficiently as possible. Within DOE' s Office of Science (SC), the mission of the Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program is to discover, develop, and deploy computational and networking capabilities to analyze, model, simulate, and predict complex phenomena. A particular challenge of this program is fulfilling the science potential of emerging computing systems and other novel computing architectures,

458

APS Scientific Advisory Committee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) The SAC is responsible for advising the APS Associate Laboratory Director in the following areas: To evaluate the scientific output and facility utilization for all APS sectors. To examine performance and recommend appropriate beamtime allocation for existing Collaborative Access Teams (CATs). To evaluate Letters of Intent and scientific proposals for new and reconstituted CATs. To provide advice to and review decisions by APS management on special operations support for CATs. To review Special Program proposals, a new mode of access that will guarantee 10-30% the beam time per year on any sector for a finite period of time. To assist the APS with development of policies and other issues as appropriate. SAC members Participants in the Scientific Advisory Committee.

459

Extraordinary Tools for Extraordinary Science: The Impact of SciDAC on Accelerator Science & Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR).the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR),

Ryne, Robert D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

A Multifaceted Mathematical Approach for Complex Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research of the U.S.DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)

Alexander, F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced scientific computing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Morse-Smale Regression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Office ofOffice of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Office of

Gerber, Samuel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Evaluating the Benefits of An Extended Memory Hierarchy for Parallel Streamline Algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office and Advanced Scientific Computing Research, of theOffice and Advanced Scientific Computing Research, of the

Childs, Hank

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Bulk Data Movement for Climate Dataset: Efficient Data Transfer Management with Dynamic Transfer Adjustment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR),Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Office of

Sim, Alexander

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Taking scientific visualization to the masses  

SciTech Connect

The paper offers the premise that scientific visualization capabilities are generally available only to a limited subset of scientists. Several reasons for this are presented. The paper describes a collaborative project between scientists of the Defense Nuclear Agency and computer scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This project's goal is to get visualization capabilities into the hands of many more scientists.

Vigil, M.; Bouchier, S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Matchmaking scientific workflows in grid environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we analyze the scientific workflow matchmaking problem in Grid environments and combine workflow mapping and scheduling. Based on the characteristics of Grids, a new resource model is proposed. Motivated by the observations that not all ... Keywords: grid computing, matchmaking algorithm, resource model, workflow

Yili Gong; Marlon E. Pierce; Geoffrey C. Fox

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Scientific workflow design for mere mortals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent years have seen a dramatic increase in research and development of scientific workflow systems. These systems promise to make scientists more productive by automating data-driven and compute-intensive analyses. Despite many early achievements, ... Keywords: Automatic optimization, COMAD, Collection, Desiderata, Provenance, Resilience, Workflow

Timothy McPhillips; Shawn Bowers; Daniel Zinn; Bertram Ludscher

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Supercomputing & Computation | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects Projects Educational Outreach News & Awards Events and Conferences Supporting Organizations Follow ORNL at SC13 Titan Propels GE Wind Turbine Research into New Territory Full Story Home | Science & Discovery | Supercomputing and Computation Supercomputing and Computational Science | Supercomputing and Computational Science SHARE ORNL's computational expertise is built on a foundation of computer science, mathematics, and "big data"-or data science. The projects we undertake run the gamut from basic to applied research, and our ability to efficiently apply the massive computing power available at ORNL across a range of scientific disciplines sets us apart from other computing centers. We have decades of experience in developing applications to support basic

468

COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER  

SciTech Connect

The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security.

DAVENPORT,J.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Computational Scientist / Scientific programmer at C2SM ETH The Center for Climate Systems Modeling (C2SM, www.c2sm.ethz.ch) at ETH Zurich is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

programmer (duration: 1.5 years, 100%) in the area of high performance computing (HPC) and weather but will be considered an advantage: - Experience in parallel I/O - Background in High Performance Computing - Experience-risk/high-payoff software development project at the leading-edge of high performance computing and gain insight

Fischlin, Andreas

470

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences Research  

SciTech Connect

The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the leading scientific computing facility supporting research within the Department of Energy's Office of Science. NERSC provides high-performance computing (HPC) resources to approximately 4,000 researchers working on about 400 projects. In addition to hosting large-scale computing facilities, NERSC provides the support and expertise scientists need to effectively and efficiently use HPC systems. In February 2010, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOE's Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for BES research through 2013. The workshop was part of NERSC's legacy of anticipating users future needs and deploying the necessary resources to meet these demands. Workshop participants reached a consensus on several key findings, in addition to achieving the workshop's goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. The key requirements for scientists conducting research in BES are: (1) Larger allocations of computational resources; (2) Continued support for standard application software packages; (3) Adequate job turnaround time and throughput; and (4) Guidance and support for using future computer architectures. This report expands upon these key points and presents others. Several 'case studies' are included as significant representative samples of the needs of science teams within BES. Research teams scientific goals, computational methods of solution, current and 2013 computing requirements, and special software and support needs are summarized in these case studies. Also included are researchers strategies for computing in the highly parallel, 'multi-core' environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. NERSC has strategic plans and initiatives already underway that address key workshop findings. This report includes a brief summary of those relevant to issues raised by researchers at the workshop.

Gerber, Richard; Wasserman, Harvey

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

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