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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced reactivity controlled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Advanced gray rod control assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced gray rod control assembly (GRCA) for a nuclear reactor. The GRCA provides controlled insertion of gray rod assemblies into the reactor, thereby controlling the rate of power produced by the reactor and providing reactivity control at full power. Each gray rod assembly includes an elongated tubular member, a primary neutron-absorber disposed within the tubular member said neutron-absorber comprising an absorber material, preferably tungsten, having a 2200 m/s neutron absorption microscopic capture cross-section of from 10 to 30 barns. An internal support tube can be positioned between the primary absorber and the tubular member as a secondary absorber to enhance neutron absorption, absorber depletion, assembly weight, and assembly heat transfer characteristics.

Drudy, Keith J; Carlson, William R; Conner, Michael E; Goldenfield, Mark; Hone, Michael J; Long, Jr., Carroll J; Parkinson, Jerod; Pomirleanu, Radu O

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

2

Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor comprises supports stacked above reactor core for holding control rods. Couplers associated with the supports and a vertically movable drive shaft have lugs at their lower ends for engagement with the supports.

Bollinger, Lawrence R. (Schenectady, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Characterization of Dual-Fuel Reactivity Controlled Compression...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Dual-Fuel Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Using Hydrated Ethanol and Diesel Fuel Characterization of Dual-Fuel Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI)...

4

Controlling uranium reactivity March 18, 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the last decade. Most of their work involves depleted uranium, a more common form of uraniumMarch 2008 Controlling uranium reactivity March 18, 2008 Uranium is an often misunderstood metal uranium research. In reality, uranium presents a wealth of possibilities for funda- mental chemistry. Many

Meyer, Karsten

5

Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor. [LMFBR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention, which resulted from a contact with the United States Department of Energy, relates to a control mechanism for a nuclear reactor and, more particularly, to an assembly for selectively shifting different numbers of reactivity modifying rods into and out of the core of a nuclear reactor. It has been proposed heretofore to control the reactivity of a breeder reactor by varying the depth of insertion of control rods (e.g., rods containing a fertile material such as ThO/sub 2/) in the core of the reactor, thereby varying the amount of neutron-thermalizing coolant and the amount of neutron-capturing material in the core. This invention relates to a mechanism which can advantageously be used in this type of reactor control system.

Bollinger, L.R.

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

6

Lighting Group: Controls: Advanced Digital Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Digital Controls Advanced Digital Controls HPCBS Advanced Digital Controls Objective The goal of this project is to hasten the adoption of digital lighting control systems to allow commercial building operators to optimize the neergy performance of their lighting systems, implement demand responsive control, and improve occupant comfort and productivity. The specific objectives are as follows: (1) Advance the adoption of digital lighting control systems by working with industry to embed IBECS technology into existing analog control and DALI products, and by developing compelling demonstrations of digital control systems for evaluation by early adopters. (2) In collaboration with equipment manufacturers, produce digital lighting system prototypes that demonstrate the advantages of digitally controlled lighting systems to innovative property managers and other energy stakeholders. A digitally controlled lighting system consists of lights that are individually controllable via a network. The advantages of digital control are:

7

Layered reactive particles with controlled geometries, energies, and reactivities, and methods for making the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An energetic composite having a plurality of reactive particles each having a reactive multilayer construction formed by successively depositing reactive layers on a rod-shaped substrate having a longitudinal axis, dividing the reactive-layer-deposited rod-shaped substrate into a plurality of substantially uniform longitudinal segments, and removing the rod-shaped substrate from the longitudinal segments, so that the reactive particles have a controlled, substantially uniform, cylindrically curved or otherwise rod-contoured geometry which facilitates handling and improves its packing fraction, while the reactant multilayer construction controls the stability, reactivity and energy density of the energetic composite.

Fritz, Gregory M; Knepper, Robert Allen; Weihs, Timothy P; Gash, Alexander E; Sze, John S

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

8

ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS  

SciTech Connect

Conventional sulfur removal in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants involves numerous steps: COS (carbonyl sulfide) hydrolysis, amine scrubbing/regeneration, Claus process, and tail-gas treatment. Advanced sulfur removal in IGCC systems involves typically the use of zinc oxide-based sorbents. The sulfides sorbent is regenerated using dilute air to produce a dilute SO{sub 2} (sulfur dioxide) tail gas. Under previous contracts the highly effective first generation Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) for catalytic reduction of this SO{sub 2} tail gas to elemental sulfur was developed. This process is currently undergoing field-testing. In this project, advanced concepts were evaluated to reduce the number of unit operations in sulfur removal and recovery. Substantial effort was directed towards developing sorbents that could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur in an Advanced Hot Gas Process (AHGP). Development of this process has been described in detail in Appendices A-F. RTI began the development of the Single-step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP) to eliminate the use of sorbents and multiple reactors in sulfur removal and recovery. This process showed promising preliminary results and thus further process development of AHGP was abandoned in favor of SSRP. The SSRP is a direct Claus process that consists of injecting SO{sub 2} directly into the quenched coal gas from a coal gasifier, and reacting the H{sub 2}S-SO{sub 2} mixture over a selective catalyst to both remove and recover sulfur in a single step. The process is conducted at gasifier pressure and 125 to 160 C. The proposed commercial embodiment of the SSRP involves a liquid phase of molten sulfur with dispersed catalyst in a slurry bubble-column reactor (SBCR).

Apostolos A. Nikolopoulos; Santosh K. Gangwal; William J. McMichael; Jeffrey W. Portzer

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems or GDI Engines Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems or GDI Engines 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

10

A Reactive Control Approach for Pipeline Inspection with an AUV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Reactive Control Approach for Pipeline Inspection with an AUV Pedro K. Paim, Bruno Jouvencel and research activities, performing tasks such as survey, inspection of sub-sea pipelines and object recovery of mission. This paper proposes a reactive control approach for pipeline following by a torpedo- like

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

11

Reactive Support and Voltage Control Service: Key Issues and Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reactive Support and Voltage Control Service: Key Issues and Challenges George Gross^, Paolo of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA, e-mail gross@uiuc.edu ° Dipartimento di Ingegneria

Gross, George

12

Advanced nuclear plant control complex  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Local Control of Reactive Power by Distributed Photovoltaic Generators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit may severely degrade power quality due to voltage sags and swells caused by rapidly varying PV generation during cloud transients coupled with the slow response of existing utility compensation and regulation equipment. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We suggest a local control scheme that dispatches reactive power from each PV inverter based on local instantaneous measurements of the real and reactive components of the consumed power and the re...

Turitsyn, Konstantin S; Backhaus, Scott; Chertkov, Misha

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

NETL: Advanced Research - Sensors & Controls Innovations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensors & Controls Sensors & Controls Advanced Research Sensors & Controls Innovations OSU's O2 Sensor Ohio State University's reference-free potentiometric oxygen sensor capable of withstanding temperatures of 800 °C. Novel Sensors and Advanced Process Control Novel Sensors and Advanced Process Control are key enabling technologies for advanced near zero emission power systems. NETL's Advanced Research Program is leading the effort to develop sensing and control technologies and methods to achieve seamless, integrated, automated, optimized, and intelligent power systems. Today, the performance of advanced power systems is limited by the lack of sensors and controls capable of withstanding high temperature and pressure conditions. Harsh environments are inherent to new systems that aim to

15

SSC analysis of the GEMs for reactivity control in PRISM  

SciTech Connect

The performance of three Gas Expansion Modules (GEMS) utilized the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) concept, PRISM, was analyzed using the computer code, SSC. GE has submitted the PRISM design for a Preapplication Safety Evaluation Report (PSER). The draft PSER indicated a potential weakness in the Unscrammed Loss of Flow (ULOF) event, and GE modified the design by adding three GEMs. The PRISM design was analyzed by SSC for two cases. First, the design`s original response to a ULOF where one Electro Magnetic (EM) pump fails to produce a coastdown was analyzed. Then the revised design with the GEMs included was analyzed. The original design had little or no safety margin for this case. The peak fuel temperature in the hot channel was predicted to be 1358K, which is above the solidus temperature of the fuel. However, after the GEMs were added, the loss of one EM pump coastdown became a benign event. The GEM feedback was predicted by SSC to dominate the other reactivity feedbacks and the GEMS, essentially, responded like passive control rods. The fuel temperature quickly dropped below operating temperatures, while the margin to sodium boiling was predicted to be greater than 350K.

Slovik, G.C.; Rodnizki, J.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

16

SSC analysis of the GEMs for reactivity control in PRISM  

SciTech Connect

The performance of three Gas Expansion Modules (GEMS) utilized the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) concept, PRISM, was analyzed using the computer code, SSC. GE has submitted the PRISM design for a Preapplication Safety Evaluation Report (PSER). The draft PSER indicated a potential weakness in the Unscrammed Loss of Flow (ULOF) event, and GE modified the design by adding three GEMs. The PRISM design was analyzed by SSC for two cases. First, the design's original response to a ULOF where one Electro Magnetic (EM) pump fails to produce a coastdown was analyzed. Then the revised design with the GEMs included was analyzed. The original design had little or no safety margin for this case. The peak fuel temperature in the hot channel was predicted to be 1358K, which is above the solidus temperature of the fuel. However, after the GEMs were added, the loss of one EM pump coastdown became a benign event. The GEM feedback was predicted by SSC to dominate the other reactivity feedbacks and the GEMS, essentially, responded like passive control rods. The fuel temperature quickly dropped below operating temperatures, while the margin to sodium boiling was predicted to be greater than 350K.

Slovik, G.C.; Rodnizki, J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution in CO2-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution in CO2- Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution in CO2- and Water-Based Geothermal Reservoirs Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution in CO2- and Water-Based Geothermal Reservoirs Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 Tracers and Tracer Interpretation Project Description The concepts and theory behind the use of heat-sensitive tracers to study the thermal evolution of geothermal reservoirs was developed in the late 1980's under the Hot Dry Rock Project. Those studies described-conceptually and mathematically-the application of reactive tracers to tracking thermal fronts and to reservoir sizing. Later mathematical treatments focused on application of a single reactive tracer test to recover the temperature profile of a single streamtube. Previous tracer work has mainly focused on identifying conservative tracers. In these studies, chemicals that degraded at reservoir temperatures were discarded. Benzoic acids and dicarboxylic acids, which were found by Adams to degrade, may be useful as reactive tracers. Organic esters and amide tracers that undergo hydrolysis have been investigated and their use as reactive tracers appears feasible over a temperature range of 100ºC to 275ºC. However their reaction rates are pH dependent and sorption reactions have not been evaluated. While reactive tracer parameters have been measured in the lab, reactive tracers have not been extensively tested in the field. Thus, while reactive tracers appear to be a promising means of monitoring the thermal evolution of a geothermal reservoir, the concept has yet to be tested at the scale necessary for successful implementation, and tools for analyzing results of such tracer tests under the non-ideal conditions of an actual geothermal system have yet to be developed.

18

Neutron economic reactivity control system for light water reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron reactivity control system for a LWBR incorporating a stationary seed-blanket core arrangement. The core arrangement includes a plurality of contiguous hexagonal shaped regions. Each region has a central and a peripheral blanket area juxapositioned an annular seed area. The blanket areas contain thoria fuel rods while the annular seed area includes seed fuel rods and movable thoria shim control rods.

Luce, Robert G. (Glenville, NY); McCoy, Daniel F. (Latham, NY); Merriman, Floyd C. (Rotterdam, NY); Gregurech, Steve (Scotia, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Advanced hydraulic fracturing methods to create in situ reactive barriers  

SciTech Connect

Many contaminated areas consist of a source area and a plume. In the source area, the contaminant moves vertically downward from a release point through the vadose zone to an underlying saturated region. Where contaminants are organic liquids, NAPL may accumulate on the water table, or it may continue to migrate downward through the saturated region. Early developments of permeable barrier technology have focused on intercepting horizontally moving plumes with vertical structures, such as trenches, filled with reactive material capable of immobilizing or degrading dissolved contaminants. This focus resulted in part from a need to economically treat the potentially large volumes of contaminated water in a plume, and in part from the availability of construction technology to create the vertical structures that could house reactive compounds. Contaminant source areas, however, have thus far remained largely excluded from the application of permeable barrier technology. One reason for this is the lack of conventional construction methods for creating suitable horizontal structures that would place reactive materials in the path of downward-moving contaminants. Methods of hydraulic fracturing have been widely used to create flat-lying to gently dipping layers of granular material in unconsolidated sediments. Most applications thus far have involved filling fractures with coarse-grained sand to create permeable layers that will increase the discharge of wells recovering contaminated water or vapor. However, it is possible to fill fractures with other compounds that alter the chemical composition of the subsurface. One early application involved development and field testing micro-encapsulated sodium percarbonate, a solid compound that releases oxygen and can create aerobic conditions suitable for biodegradation in the subsurface for several months.

Murdoch, L. [FRx Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States); [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Siegrist, B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Vesper, S. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)] [and others

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

Research on fuzzy logic based dynamic boundary voltage and reactive power integrated control method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aiming at the existing problems of conventional substation voltage and reactive power integrated control method, a new fuzzy logic based dynamic reactive power boundary voltage and reactive power integrated control method is proposed. Fuzzy logic control ... Keywords: dynamic boundary, fuzzy logic, reactive power, voltage

Zigang Xu; Fei Wang

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced reactivity controlled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Options for Control of Reactive Power by Distributed Photovoltaic Generators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic(PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit present several challenges and opportunities for distribution utilities. Rapidly varying irradiance conditions may cause voltage sags and swells that cannot be compensated by slowly responding utility equipment resulting in a degradation of power quality. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We discuss and compare via simulation various design options for control systems to manage the reactive power generated by these inverters. An important design de...

Sulc, Petr; Backhaus, Scott; Chertkov, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Engine combustion control at low loads via fuel reactivity stratification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compression ignition (diesel) engine uses two or more fuel charges during a combustion cycle, with the fuel charges having two or more reactivities (e.g., different cetane numbers), in order to control the timing and duration of combustion. By appropriately choosing the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot). At low load and no load (idling) conditions, the aforementioned results are attained by restricting airflow to the combustion chamber during the intake stroke (as by throttling the incoming air at or prior to the combustion chamber's intake port) so that the cylinder air pressure is below ambient pressure at the start of the compression stroke.

Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M; Splitter, Derek A; Kokjohn, Sage L

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

23

Advanced hydraulic fracturing methods to create in situ reactive barriers  

SciTech Connect

This article describes the use of hydraulic fracturing to increase permeability in geologic formations where in-situ remedial action of contaminant plumes will be performed. Several in-situ treatment strategies are discussed including the use of hydraulic fracturing to create in situ redox zones for treatment of organics and inorganics. Hydraulic fracturing methods offer a mechanism for the in-situ treatment of gently dipping layers of reactive compounds. Specialized methods using real-time monitoring and a high-energy jet during fracturing allow the form of the fracture to be influenced, such as creation of assymmetric fractures beneath potential sources (i.e. tanks, pits, buildings) that should not be penetrated by boring. Some examples of field applications of this technique such as creating fractures filled with zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate halogenated hydrocarbons, and the use of granular activated carbon to adsorb compounds are discussed.

Murdoch, L. [FRX Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)]|[Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Siegrist, B.; Meiggs, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

24

Dependency Analysis for Control Flow Cycles in Reactive Communicating Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the system. The way in which cycle executions are combined is not ar- bitrary since cycles may depend are combined is certainly not arbitrary. For instance, the repetition of one cycle may rely on the repetitionsDependency Analysis for Control Flow Cycles in Reactive Communicating Processes Stefan Leue1 , Alin

Leue, Stefan

25

Dependency Analysis for Control Flow Cycles in Reactive Communicating Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

processes of the system. The way in which cycle executions are combined is not ar- bitrary since cycles may in which cycle executions are combined is certainly not arbitrary. For instance, the repetition of oneDependency Analysis for Control Flow Cycles in Reactive Communicating Processes Stefan Leue1 , Alin

Reiterer, Harald

26

Reactive materials can quickly form plugs for blowout control  

SciTech Connect

Various types of reactive materials, or gunk, can react directly with produced fluids (oil, condensate, or brine) or with an additionally injected fluid to form a plug to kill blowout wells or shut off large flow paths. Several recent blowouts were successfully controlled with reactive plugs; other conventional methods would have been more difficult operationally and cost more. Several plug mixtures are available on the market and can be made to suit the type of application and any particular environmental concerns. With proper planning and application, reactive plugs should be considered as a prime well control method when injection into the blowout flow path is available. This method of blowout control can save significant time and expense. The paper discusses the two basic methods of using reactive fluids depending on the flow path available, the use of cements, application steps, environmental concerns, and three case histories: a horizontal well in Texas, a high pressure, high temperature well offshore Louisiana, and a gas blowout in Argentina.

Flak, L.H. [Wright Boots and Coots, Houston, TX (United States)

1995-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

27

Local control of reactive power by distributed photovoltaic generators  

SciTech Connect

High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit may severely degrade power quality due to voltage sags and swells caused by rapidly varying PV generation during cloud transients coupled with the slow response of existing utility compensation and regulation equipment. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We suggest a local control scheme that dispatches reactive power from each PV inverter based on local instantaneous measurements of the real and reactive components of the consumed power and the real power generated by the PVs. Using one adjustable parameter per circuit, we balance the requirements on power quality and desire to minimize thermal losses. Numerical analysis of two exemplary systems, with comparable total PV generation albeit a different spatial distribution, show how to adjust the optimization parameter depending on the goal. Overall, this local scheme shows excellent performance; it's capable of guaranteeing acceptable power quality and achieving significant saving in thermal losses in various situations even when the renewable generation in excess of the circuit own load, i.e. feeding power back to the higher-level system.

Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turitsyn, Konstantin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sulc, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Backhaus, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Reducing Safety Flaring through Advanced Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An advanced process control application, using DMCplus (Aspen Technology, Inc.), was developed to substantially reduce fuel gas losses to the flare at a large integrated refining / petrochemical complex. Fluctuations in internal fuel gas system...

Hokanson, D.; Lehman, K.; Matsumoto, S.; Takai, N.; Takase, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Optimization of an Advanced Passive/Active Diesel Emission Control...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

an Advanced PassiveActive Diesel Emission Control System Optimization of an Advanced PassiveActive Diesel Emission Control System Evaluation of PM exhaust aftertreatment...

30

Development and Deployment of Advanced Emission Controls for...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Deployment of Advanced Emission Controls for the Retrofit Market Development and Deployment of Advanced Emission Controls for the Retrofit Market 2003 DEER Conference Presentation:...

31

Advanced Emissions Control Development Program  

SciTech Connect

Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W?s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

A. P. Evans

1998-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

32

Advanced Emission Control Development Program.  

SciTech Connect

Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

Evans, A.P.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

33

Etching radical controlled gas chopped deep reactive ion etching  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for silicon micromachining techniques based on high aspect ratio reactive ion etching with gas chopping has been developed capable of producing essentially scallop-free, smooth, sidewall surfaces. The method uses precisely controlled, alternated (or chopped) gas flow of the etching and deposition gas precursors to produce a controllable sidewall passivation capable of high anisotropy. The dynamic control of sidewall passivation is achieved by carefully controlling fluorine radical presence with moderator gasses, such as CH.sub.4 and controlling the passivation rate and stoichiometry using a CF.sub.2 source. In this manner, sidewall polymer deposition thicknesses are very well controlled, reducing sidewall ripples to very small levels. By combining inductively coupled plasmas with controlled fluorocarbon chemistry, good control of vertical structures with very low sidewall roughness may be produced. Results show silicon features with an aspect ratio of 20:1 for 10 nm features with applicability to nano-applications in the sub-50 nm regime. By comparison, previous traditional gas chopping techniques have produced rippled or scalloped sidewalls in a range of 50 to 100 nm roughness.

Olynick, Deidre; Rangelow, Ivo; Chao, Weilun

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

The Advanced Photon Source main control room  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory is a third-generation light source built in the 1990s. Like the machine itself, the Main Control Room (MCR) employs design concepts based on today`s requirements. The discussion will center on ideas used in the design of the MCR, the comfort of personnel using the design, and safety concerns integrated into the control room layout.

Pasky, S.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

DOE/EA-1310: Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Dismantlement of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility and Couples Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 March 2000 Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Dismantlement of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility and Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory DOE/EA-1310 Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Dismantlement of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility and Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Published March 2000 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office iii CONTENTS ACRONYMS ............................................................................................................................... v HELPFUL INFORMATION ........................................................................................................

36

NETL: Control Technology: Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector Under DOE-NETL sponsorship, the University of North Dakota, Energy and Environmental Research Center (UND-EERC) has developed a new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC). In addition to DOE and the EERC, the project team includes W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., Allied Environmental Technologies, Inc., and the Otter Tail Power Company. The AHPC utilizes both electrostatic collection and filtration in a unique geometric configuration that achieves ultrahigh particle collection with much less collection area than conventional particulate control devices. The primary technologies for state-of-the-art particulate control are fabric filters (baghouses) and electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). A major limitation of ESPs is that the fractional penetration of 0.1- to 1.0-µm particles is typically at least an order of magnitude greater than for 10-µm particles, so a situation exists where the particles that are of greatest health concern are collected with the lowest efficiency. Fabric filters are currently considered to be the best available control technology for fine particles, but emissions are dependent on ash properties and typically increase if the air-to-cloth (A/C) ratio is increased. In addition, many fabrics cannot withstand the rigors of high-SO2 flue gases, which are typical for bituminous fuels. Fabric filters may also have problems with bag cleanability and high pressure drop, which has resulted in conservatively designed, large, costly baghouses.

37

Monaco-A domain-specific language solution for reactive process control programming with hierarchical components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we present Monaco - a domain-specific language for developing event-based, reactive process control programs - and its visual interactive programming environment. The main purpose of the language is to bring process control programming ... Keywords: Automation control, Component-based systems, Domain-specific languages, Reactive programming

Herbert Prhofer; Roland Schatz; Christian Wirth; Dominik Hurnaus; Hanspeter Mssenbck

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Comparison of Alternative Control Structures for an Ideal Two-Product Reactive Distillation Column  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of Alternative Control Structures for an Ideal Two-Product Reactive Distillation Column distillation columns have been explored in many papers, very few papers have dealt with closed-loop control. Most of these control papers consider reactive distillation columns in which there is only one product

Al-Arfaj, Muhammad A.

39

Control of nanoparticle size, reactivity and magnetic properties during the bioproduction of magnetite by Geobacter sulfurreducens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control of nanoparticle size, reactivity and magneticbenign route to magnetic nanoparticle synthesis. Here, wed In both thin film and nanoparticle formation, the dominant

Byrne, J. M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Advanced (AI-Based) Nonlinear Controllers for Industrial Processes -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced (AI-Based) Nonlinear Controllers for Industrial Processes Advanced (AI-Based) Nonlinear Controllers for Industrial Processes Capabilities Nuclear Systems Technologies Nuclear Criticality Safety Research Reactor Analysis Decontamination and Decommissioning Systems/Process Monitoring, Diagnostics and Control Overview Process Monitoring & Signal Validation Diagnostic & Advisory Systems Advanced (AI-based) Nonlinear Controllers for Industrial Processes Artificial intelligence Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Systems/Process Monitoring, Diagnostics and Control Advanced (AI-Based) Nonlinear Controllers for Industrial Processes Bookmark and Share Advanced (AI-Based) Nonlinear Controllers for Industrial Processes The overall objective of this research is to explore and demonstrate the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced reactivity controlled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Advanced Petroleum-Based fuels - Diesel Emissions Control (APBF...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Petroleum-Based fuels - Diesel Emissions Control (APBF-DEC) Activity Advanced Petroleum-Based fuels - Diesel Emissions Control (APBF-DEC) Activity 2003 DEER Conference...

42

Advanced Laser-Based Sensors for Industrial Process Control  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Laser-Based Sensors for Industrial Process Control Increased Efficiency and Reduced Emissions Using Advanced Laser-Based Sensors for Process Control Monitoring in Electric Arc...

43

Advanced PHEV Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

PHEV Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis Advanced PHEV Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program,...

44

Intelligent Voltage and Reactive Power Control of Mini-Hydro Power Stations for Maximisation of Real  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a Mini-Hydro Power Generator to the Rural Grid The UK distribution network has been significantly exten1 Intelligent Voltage and Reactive Power Control of Mini-Hydro Power Stations for Maximisation Control (APFC) modes. The ability to export active and reactive power from mini-hydro power generators

Harrison, Gareth

45

Passive Ozone Control Through Use of Reactive Indoor Wall and Ceiling Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passive Ozone Control Through Use of Reactive Indoor Wall and Ceiling Materials Paper # 715 Donna A and unpainted drywall as passive ozone control surfaces in a room-sized laboratory chamber. Mean deposition-50%, resulted in increased reactivity for activated carbon. In our model for a typical house, about 35

Siegel, Jeffrey

46

Advanced nuclear plant control room complex  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

IEP - Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Regulatory Drivers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IEP - Advanced NOx Emissions Control Regulatory Drivers Regulatory Drivers for Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants Regulatory and legislative requirements have predominantly driven the need to develop NOx control technologies for existing coal-fired power plants. The first driver was the Title IV acid rain program, established through the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA). This program included a two-phase strategy to reduce NOx emissions from coal-fired power plants – Phase I started January 1, 1996 and Phase II started January 1, 2000. The Title IV NOx program was implemented through unit-specific NOx emission rate limits ranging from 0.40 to 0.86 lb/MMBtu depending on the type of boiler/burner configuration and based on application of LNB technology.

48

Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - Second Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Second Generation Advanced Reburning Second Generation Advanced Reburning General Electric - Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE-EER) is carrying out a two Phase research program to develop novel Advanced Reburning (AR) concepts for high efficiency and low cost NOx control from coal-fired utility boilers. AR technologies are based on combination of basic reburning and N-agent/promoter injections. Phase I of the project was successfully completed and EER was selected to continue to develop AR technology during Phase II. Phase I demonstrated that AR technologies are able to provide effective NOx control for coal-fired combustors. Three technologies were originally envisioned for development: AR-Lean, AR-Rich, and Multiple Injection AR (MIAR). Along with these, three additional technologies were identified during the project: reburning plus promoted SNCR; AR-Lean plus promoted SNCR; and AR-Rich plus promoted SNCR. The promoters are sodium salts, in particular sodium carbonate. These AR technologies have different optimum reburn heat input levels and furnace temperature requirements. For full scale application, an optimum technology can be selected on a boiler-specific basis depending on furnace temperature profile and regions of injector access.

49

Joint optimization algorithm for network reconfiguration and reactive power control of wind farm in distribution system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent years, the number of small size wind farms used as DG sources located within the distribution system are rapidly increasing. Wind farm made up with doubly fed induction generators (DFIG) is proposed in this paper as the continuous reactive ... Keywords: DFIG wind turbine, network reconfiguration, particle swarm optimization, reactive power control, wind farm

Jingjing Zhao; Xin Li; Jiping Lu; Congli Zhang

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Advanced Laser-Based Sensors for Industrial Process Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fact Sheet About Increased Efficiency and Reduced Emissions Using Advanced Laser-Based Sensors for Process Control Monitoring in Electric Arc Furnaces

51

Fuzzy Control on Voltage/Reactive Power in Electric Power Substation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A fuzzy method using in voltage and reactive power control in electric substation is proposed based on the improved 17 ... times at the tap positions of transformers in substation are much less than usual. So,...

Xiu-hua Wu; Jun-cheng Wang; Ping Yang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Controllable generation of reactive oxygen species by femtosecond-laser irradiation  

SciTech Connect

Femtosecond lasers have been advancing Biophotonics research in the past two decades with multiphoton microscopy, microsurgery, and photodynamic therapy. Nevertheless, laser irradiation is identified to bring photodamage to cells via reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation with unclear mechanism. Meanwhile, currently in biological researches, there is no effective method to provide controllable ROS production precisely, which originally is leaked from mitochondria during respiration and plays a key role in a lot of important cellular processes and cellular signaling pathways. In this study, we show the process of how the tightly focused femtosecond-laser induces ROS generation solely in mitochondria at the very beginning and then release to cytosol if the stimulus is intense enough. At certain weak power levels, the laser pulses induce merely moderate Ca{sup 2+} release but this is necessary for the laser to generate ROS in mitochondria. Cellular original ROS are also involved with a small contribution. When the power is above a threshold, ROS are then released to cytosol, indicating photodamage overwhelming cellular repair ability. The mechanisms in those two cases are quite different. Those results clarify parts of the mechanism in laser-induced ROS generation. Hence, it is possible to further this optical scheme to provide controllable ROS generation for ROS-related biological researches including mitochondrial diseases and aging.

Yan, Wei; He, Hao, E-mail: haohe@tju.edu.cn; Wang, Yintao; Wang, Yisen; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue [Ultrafast Laser Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Information Technology (Ministry of Education), College of Precision Instrument and Optoelectronics Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

53

Advanced, Integrated Control for Building Operations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced, Integrated Control for Building Advanced, Integrated Control for Building Operations Advanced, Integrated Control for Building Operations The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently conducting research into advanced integrated controls for building operations and seeking to validate energy savings strategies by simulations. Project Description This project will develop an advanced, integrated control for the following building systems: Cooling and heating Lighting Ventilation Window and blind operation. A variety of operation and energy saving control strategies will be evaluated on a building equipped with alternative cooling and heating methods, including fan coil units, radiant mullions, and motorized window and blinds. Project Partners Research is being undertaken by DOE, Siemens Corporate Research, Siemens

54

Reactive power control of grid-connected wind farm based on adaptive dynamic programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is widely used in the wind power system for its advantages over other two types [5]. The characteristicsReactive power control of grid-connected wind farm based on adaptive dynamic programming Yufei Tang Wind farm Power system Adaptive control a b s t r a c t Optimal control of large-scale wind farm has

He, Haibo

55

ADCHEM 2006 International Symposium on Advanced Control of Chemical Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ADCHEM 2006 International Symposium on Advanced Control of Chemical Processes Gramado, Brazil-Morten Godhavn Audun Faanes Sigurd Skogestad ,1 Department of Chemical Engineering, Norwegian University instead of being transported up to the platform. Several challenges conserning process control need

Skogestad, Sigurd

56

Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Filtration Systems for GDI Engines (ANLCorningHyundai CRADA) June 19, 2014 DOE Annual Merit Review & Peer Evaluation Meeting PI: Kyeong Lee Co-investigators: Seung Choi,...

57

Advanced Sensors, Control, Platforms, and Modeling  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

112 productivity and safety, and boost the U.S. sensor and automation industry. 113 2. Technology Assessment and Potential 114 2.1 Performance advances 115 DRAFT -...

58

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - ALTA for Cyclone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Full-Scale Demonstration of ALTA NOx Control for Cyclone-Fired Boilers Full-Scale Demonstration of ALTA NOx Control for Cyclone-Fired Boilers The primary goal of this project was to evaluate a technology called advanced layered technology application (ALTA) as a means to achieve NOx emissions below 0.15 lb/MMBtu in a cyclone boiler. Reaction Engineering International (REI) conducted field testing and combustion modeling to refine the process design, define the optimum technology parameters, and assess system performance. The ALTA NOx control technology combines deep staging from overfire air, rich reagent injection (RRI), and selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR). Field testing was conducted during May-June 2005 at AmerenUE's Sioux Station Unit 1, a 500 MW cyclone boiler unit that typically burns an 80/20 blend of Powder River Basin subbituminous coal and Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal. Parametric testing was also conducted with 60/40 and 0/100 blends. The testing also evaluated process impacts on balance-of-plant issues such as the amount of unburned carbon in the ash, slag tapping, waterwall corrosion, ammonia slip, and heat distribution.

59

Systems and Controls Analysis and Testing; Harvesting More Wind Energy with Advanced Controls Technology (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet outlines the systems and controls analysis and testing that takes place at the NWTC on the Controls Advanced Research Turbines.

Not Available

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Advanced Utility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field Testing Program Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field Testing Program Sorbent Technologies Corporation, will test an advanced halgenated activated carbon to determine the mercury removal performance and relative costs of sorbent injection for advanced sorbent materials in large-scale field trials of a variety of combinations of coal-type and utility plant-configuration. These include one site (Detroit Edison's St. Clair Station) with a cold-side ESP using subbituminous coal, or blend of subbituminous and bituminous coal, and one site (Duke Energy's Buck Plant) with a hot-side ESP which burns a bituminous coal. Related Papers and Publications: Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report for the period April 1 - October 31, 2004 [PDF-2275KB] Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report for the period of October 2003 - March 2004 [PDF-1108KB]

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced reactivity controlled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The California Advanced Lighting Controls Training Program (CALCTP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The California Advanced Lighting Controls Training Program (CALCTP) The California Advanced Lighting Controls Training Program (CALCTP) Speaker(s): Bernie Kotlier Date: March 2, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Sila Kiliccote CALCTP is a broad based partnership that is dedicated to advancing the California State policy of energy conservation as the first priority for serving the state's future energy needs. CALCTP is supported, operated and directed by representatives of the California Lighting Technology Center, the California Energy Commission, the California Community College system, investor owned utilities, municipal utilities, electrical contractors, electrical workers, and manufacturers of advanced, high efficiency lighting and lighting control systems. The mission of the California Advanced Lighting Controls Training Program (CALCTP) is to make

62

Comparison of advanced distillation control methods. First annual report  

SciTech Connect

A detailed dynamic simulator of a propylene/propane (C{sub 3}) splitter, which was bench-marked against industrial data, has been used to compare dual composition control performance for a diagonal PI controller and several advanced controllers. The advanced controllers considered are dynamic matrix control (DMC), nonlinear process model based control, and artificial neutral networks. Each controller was tuned based upon setpoint changes in the overhead product composition using 50% changes in the impurity levels. Overall, there was not a great deal of difference in controller performance based upon the setpoint and disturbance tests. Periodic step changes in feed composition were also used to compare controller performance. In this case, oscillatory variations of the product composition were observed and the variabilities of the DC and nonlinear process model based controllers were substantially smaller than that of the PI controller. The sensitivity of each controller to the frequency of the periodic step changes in feed composition was also investigated.

Riggs, J.B.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Anode reactive bleed and injector shift control strategy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for correcting a large fuel cell voltage spread for a split sub-stack fuel cell system. The system includes a hydrogen source that provides hydrogen to each split sub-stack and bleed valves for bleeding the anode side of the sub-stacks. The system also includes a voltage measuring device for measuring the voltage of each cell in the split sub-stacks. The system provides two levels for correcting a large stack voltage spread problem. The first level includes sending fresh hydrogen to the weak sub-stack well before a normal reactive bleed would occur, and the second level includes sending fresh hydrogen to the weak sub-stack and opening the bleed valve of the other sub-stack when the cell voltage spread is close to stack failure.

Cai, Jun [Rochester, NY; Chowdhury, Akbar [Pittsford, NY; Lerner, Seth E [Honeoye Falls, NY; Marley, William S [Rush, NY; Savage, David R [Rochester, NY; Leary, James K [Rochester, NY

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

64

Using Agents to Secure the Internet Marketplace Reactive Security and Social Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using Agents to Secure the Internet Marketplace Reactive Security and Social Control Lars Rasmusson present the idea to let agents handle security issues in Internet markets. The motivation for this is the difficulties in having external or centralized control over a system as open as the Internet. The agents use

65

Comparison of advanced distillation control methods. First annual report  

SciTech Connect

A detailed dynamic simulator of a propylene/propane (C3) splitter, which was bench-marked against industrial data, has been used to compare dual composition control performance for a diagonal PI controller and several advanced controllers. The advanced controllers considered are DMC, nonlinear process model based control, and articial neutral networks. Each controller was tuned based upon setpoint changes in the overhead product composition using 50% changes in the impurity levels. Overall, there was not a great deal of difference in controller performance based upon the setpoint and disturbance tests. Periodic step changes in feed composition were also used to compare controller performance. In this case, oscillatory variations of the product composition were observed and the variabilities of the DMC and nonlinear process model based controllers were substantially smaller than that of the PI controller. The sensitivity of each controller to the frequency of the periodic step changes in feed composition was also investigated.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Flicker mitigation by reactive power control in wind farm with doubly fed induction generators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a novel wind farm control with the purpose to mitigate the flicker emission of doubly fed induction generators. The presented control strategy is implemented in a wind farm connected to a distribution grid with consumers. The control system is composed by two controllers in cascade, the wind farm control and the local wind turbine controller. The wind farm control adapts itself to the consumptions of the distribution network and generates the minimal reactive power which allows smoothing the fast variations of wind power output. In this sense, the wind farm control facilitates the integration of wind farm into weak power grids by exchanging reactive power with network. Moreover, the wind farm controller has to be stable, fast and robust and the wind farm dispatch function has to guarantees that the local wind turbine controller can exchange the reactive power set point with network. This controller has been developed with the simulation tool DigSilent PowerFactory v14.1.

Francesc Girbau-Llistuella; Andreas Sumper; Francisco Daz-Gonzlez; Samuel Galceran-Arellano

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced control techniques Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

techniques Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced control techniques Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Advanced Photogrammetric and...

68

Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Controls of Wave Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Facility Tool at SWiFT Makes Rotor Work More Efficient Advanced Controls of Wave Energy Converters May Increase Power Capture Up to 330% On January 21, 2014, in...

69

Diesel Engine Advanced Multi-Mode Combustion Control and Generalized Nonlinear Transient Trajectory Shaping Control Methods.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This dissertation addresses the Diesel engine advanced combustion mode switching transient control and the generalized nonlinear non-equilibrium transient trajectory shaping (NETTS) control problem.Control-oriented models (more)

Yan, Fengjun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

DOE/EA-1310: Finding of No Significant Impact for the Decontamination and Dismantlement of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility and Couples Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR THE DECONTAMINATION AND FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR THE DECONTAMINATION AND DISMANTLEMENT OF THE ADVANCED REACTIVITY MEASUREMENT FACILITY AND COUPLED FAST REACTIVITY MEASUREMENTS FACILITY AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY Agency: U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Action: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) Summary: The DOE prepared a Draft Environmental Assessment (EA) for the proposed "Decontamination and Dismantlement of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility and Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurement Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory" (DOE/EA-1310). The EA was prepared in accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) Regulations for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (40 CFR 1500-1508), and the

71

Advanced Control Methodology for Biomass Combustion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents a feasibility study for a low cost sensor-based combustion control system using a predictive chemical kinetic model that captures efficiencies and pollution (more)

Bjornsson, Stefan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Elements of an advanced integrated operator control station  

SciTech Connect

One of the critical determinants of peformance for any remotely operated maintenance system is the compatibility achieved between elements of the man/machine interface (e.g., master manipulator controller, controls, displays, etc.) and the human operator. In the Remote Control Engineering task of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program, considerable attention has been devoted to optimizing the man/machine interface of the operator control station. This system must be considered an integral element of the overall maintenance work system which includes transporters, manipulators, remote viewing, and other parts. The control station must reflect the integration of the operator team, control/display panels, manipulator master controllers, and remote viewing monitors. Human factors principles and experimentation have been used in the development of an advanced integrated operator control station designed for the advance servomanipulator. Key features of this next-generation design are summarized in this presentation. 7 references, 4 figures.

Clarke, M.M.; Kreifeldt, J.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Elements of an advanced integrated operator control station  

SciTech Connect

One of the critical determinants of performance for any remotely operated maintenance system is the compatibility achieved between elements of the man/machine interface (e.g., master manipulator controller, controls, displays) and the human operator. In the remote control engineering task of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program, considerable attention has been devoted to optimizing the man/machine interface of the operator control station. This system must be considered an integral element of the overall maintenance work system which includes transporters, manipulators, remote viewing, and other parts. The control station must reflect the integration of the operator team, control/display panels, manipulator master controllers, and remote viewing monitors. Human factors principles and experimentation have been used in the development of an advanced integrated operator control station designed for the advance servomanipulator. Key features of this next-generation design are summarized in this presentation. 7 references, 4 figures.

Clarke, M.M.; Kreifeldt, J.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Advanced Lighting Controls - My Venture from the Ivory Tower  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Lighting Controls - My Venture from the Ivory Tower Advanced Lighting Controls - My Venture from the Ivory Tower Speaker(s): Charlie Huizenga Date: June 15, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Dragan Charlie Curcija Lighting energy represents 30-40% of commercial building electricity consumption, yet very few buildings have advanced lighting controls. The potential energy savings are tremendous as is the opportunity to reduce demand on the grid during critical peak use periods. Charlie will describe how low-cost wireless radio technology developed at UC Berkeley and commercialized by Adura Technologies is creating a paradigm shift in the way we think about controlling lighting. Beyond deep energy savings and demand response, the technology offers personal control for occupants and

75

Voltage Control of Distribution Networks with Distributed Generation using Reactive Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Voltage Control of Distribution Networks with Distributed Generation using Reactive Power. Nasiruzzaman Abstract--Voltage profile of distribution networks with dis- tributed generation are affected significantly due to the integra- tion of distributed generation (DG) on it. This paper presents a way

Pota, Himanshu Roy

76

Discrete sliding mode control strategy for direct real and reactive power regulation of wind driven DFIG  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper investigates a discrete sliding mode control (DSMC) strategy for direct real and reactive power regulation for wind driven doubly fed induction generator (DFIG). The real and reactive power errors are eliminated by directly calculating the rotor control voltages through DSMC. In the stator stationary reference frame, direct real and reactive power control strategy is implemented. Therefore, it does not require the angular information of the stator and rotor currents or voltages. It does not involve any extra current loops which results into simple design. The use of constant converter switching frequency via space vector pulse width modulation eases the AC harmonic filter design and improves the power quality. The use of fast and flexible discrete controller makes the system competent with modern digital world. Detailed simulations have been carried out to validate the method. The simulation results reveal that the real and reactive power references are followed smoothly even in the presence of speed perturbations and performance of the system is robust against parameter variations and system disturbances.

V.N. Pande; U.M. Mate; Shailaja Kurode

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion on a Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Diesel Engine  

SciTech Connect

Reactivity controlled compression ignition is a low-temperature combustion technique that has been shown, both in computational fluid dynamics modeling and single-cylinder experiments, to obtain diesel-like efficiency or better with ultra-low nitrogen oxide and soot emissions, while operating primarily on gasoline-like fuels. This paper investigates reactivity controlled compression ignition operation on a four-cylinder light-duty diesel engine with production-viable hardware using conventional gasoline and diesel fuel. Experimental results are presented over a wide speed and load range using a systematic approach for achieving successful steady-state reactivity controlled compression ignition combustion. The results demonstrated diesel-like efficiency or better over the operating range explored with low engine-out nitrogen oxide and soot emissions. A peak brake thermal efficiency of 39.0% was demonstrated for 2600 r/min and 6.9 bar brake mean effective pressure with nitrogen oxide emissions reduced by an order of magnitude compared to conventional diesel combustion operation. Reactivity controlled compression ignition emissions and efficiency results are compared to conventional diesel combustion operation on the same engine.

Curran, Scott [ORNL; Hanson, Reed M [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Dysprosium as a resonance absorber and its effect on the coolant void reactivity in Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dysprosium has been used as a slow neutron absorber in the fuel assembly of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) to achieve a negative coolant void reactivity. Dysprosium as occurring in nature has as many as seven isotopes namely, 156Dy, 158Dy, 160Dy, 161Dy, 162Dy, 163Dy, and 164Dy. Of these, the isotope 164Dy has the largest absorption cross section for thermal neutrons. In the past, nuclear data libraries used in our studies have considered only 164Dy isotope and this was sufficient for performing foil activation studies of Dy. The other isotopes of Dy have significant resonances and could affect the design. The treatment of the dysprosium isotopes with resonance tabulations is required for a more accurate estimation of the lattice characteristics like the coolant void reactivity. The use of resonance tabulations for the dysprosium isotopes and its effect on the coolant void reactivity of AHWR fuel cluster has been studied in this paper. Also, the treatment of the stand-alone structural rod with dysprosium as burnable absorber having resonance tabulations has been done for the first time.

Umasankari Kannan; S. Ganesan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Advanced mobile networking, sensing, and controls.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an integrated approach for designing communication, sensing, and control systems for mobile distributed systems. Graph theoretic methods are used to analyze the input/output reachability and structural controllability and observability of a decentralized system. Embedded in each network node, this analysis will automatically reconfigure an ad hoc communication network for the sensing and control task at hand. The graph analysis can also be used to create the optimal communication flow control based upon the spatial distribution of the network nodes. Edge coloring algorithms tell us that the minimum number of time slots in a planar network is equal to either the maximum number of adjacent nodes (or degree) of the undirected graph plus some small number. Therefore, the more spread out that the nodes are, the fewer number of time slots are needed for communication, and the smaller the latency between nodes. In a coupled system, this results in a more responsive sensor network and control system. Network protocols are developed to propagate this information, and distributed algorithms are developed to automatically adjust the number of time slots available for communication. These protocols and algorithms must be extremely efficient and only updated as network nodes move. In addition, queuing theory is used to analyze the delay characteristics of Carrier Sense Multiple Access (CSMA) networks. This report documents the analysis, simulation, and implementation of these algorithms performed under this Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) effort.

Feddema, John Todd; Kilman, Dominique Marie; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Young, Joseph G.; Lewis, Christopher L.; Van Leeuwen, Brian P.; Robinett, Rush D. III; Harrington, John J.

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Advanced concepts for controlling energy surety microgrids.  

SciTech Connect

Today, researchers, engineers, and policy makers are seeking ways to meet the world's growing demand for energy while addressing critical issues such as energy security, reliability, and sustainability. Many believe that distributed generators operating within a microgrid have the potential to address most of these issues. Sandia National Laboratories has developed a concept called energy surety in which five of these 'surety elements' are simultaneously considered: energy security, reliability, sustainability, safety, and cost-effectiveness. The surety methodology leads to a new microgrid design that we call an energy surety microgrid (ESM). This paper discusses the unique control requirement needed to produce a microgrid system that has high levels of surety, describes the control system from the most fundamental level through a real-world example, and discusses our ideas and concepts for a complete system.

Menicucci, David F.; Ortiz-Moyet, Juan

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced reactivity controlled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Advanced Controls Technologies and Strategies Linking Energy Efficiency and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Controls Technologies and Strategies Linking Energy Efficiency and Advanced Controls Technologies and Strategies Linking Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Speaker(s): Sila Kiliccote Date: October 6, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Reliable supply of affordable electricity has been in the spotlight since the blackouts in California, the grid shutdown events in New England and the terrorist threats nationwide. While the array of generation technologies and transmission safety issues have been widely discussed, capacity requirements and demand side management issues have also been revisited. This presentation will concentrate on a preliminary framework to describe how advanced controls can support multiple modes of operations including both energy efficiency and demand response (DR). A general description of DR, its benefits, and nationwide status will be outlined.

82

Argonne TTRDC - Engines - Emissions Control - Advanced Diesel Particulate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration Systems Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration Systems The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations require that on-highway diesel vehicles have filtration systems to reduce tail-pipe soot emissions, known as particulate matter (PM). Diesel particulate filtration (DPF) systems are currently the most efficient at directly controlling PM. Argonne researchers, working with Corning, Inc., and Caterpillar, Inc., through a cooperative research and development agreement, are exploiting previously unavailable technology and research results on diesel PM filtration and regeneration processes, aiming to the technology transfer of advanced PM emission control to industry. Argonne's Research In operation of DPF systems, the filtration and regeneration of particulate emissions are the key processes to be controlled for high efficiency. Due to difficulties in accessing the micro-scaled structures of DPF membranes and monitoring particulate filtration and high-temperature thermal processes, however, research has been limited to macroscopic observation for the product.

83

Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measurement of Thermal Evolution in Geothermal Reservoirs: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The injection of cold fluids into engineered geothermal system (EGS) and conventional geothermal reservoirs may be done to help extract heat from the subsurface or to maintain pressures within the reservoir (e.g., Rose et al., 2001). As these injected fluids move along fractures, they acquire heat from the rock matrix and remove it from the reservoir as they are extracted to the surface. A consequence of such injection is the migration of a cold-fluid front through the reservoir (Figure 1) that could eventually reach the production well and result in the lowering of the temperature of the produced fluids (thermal breakthrough). Efficient operation of an EGS as well as conventional geothermal systems involving cold-fluid injection requires accurate and timely information about thermal depletion of the reservoir in response to operation. In particular, accurate predictions of the time to thermal breakthrough and subsequent rate of thermal drawdown are necessary for reservoir management, design of fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting of economic return. A potential method for estimating migration of a cold front between an injection well and a production well is through application of reactive tracer tests, using chemical whose rate of degradation is dependent on the reservoir temperature between the two wells (e.g., Robinson 1985). With repeated tests, the rate of migration of the thermal front can be determined, and the time to thermal breakthrough calculated. While the basic theory behind the concept of thermal tracers has been understood for some time, effective application of the method has yet to be demonstrated. This report describes results of a study that used several methods to investigate application of reactive tracers to monitoring the thermal evolution of a geothermal reservoir. These methods included (1) mathematical investigation of the sensitivity of known and hypothetical reactive tracers, (2) laboratory testing of novel tracers that would improve method sensitivity, (3) development of a software tool for design and interpretation of reactive tracer tests and (4) field testing of the reactive tracer temperature monitoring concept.

Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; Laurence C. Hull; George D. Redden

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Comparison of Advanced Distillation Control Methods, Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

Detailed dynamic simulations of three industrial distillation columns (a propylene/propane splitter, a xylene/toluene column, and a depropanizer) have been used to evaluate configuration selections for single-ended and dual-composition control, as well as to compare conventional and advanced control approaches. In addition, a simulator of a main fractionator was used to compare the control performance of conventional and advanced control. For each case considered, the controllers were tuned by using setpoint changes and tested using feed composition upsets. Proportional Integral (PI) control performance was used to evaluate the configuration selection problem. For single ended control, the energy balance configuration was found to yield the best performance. For dual composition control, nine configurations were considered. It was determined that the use of dynamic simulations is required in order to identify the optimum configuration from among the nine possible choices. The optimum configurations were used to evaluate the relative control performance of conventional PI controllers, MPC (Model Predictive Control), PMBC (Process Model-Based Control), and ANN (Artificial Neural Networks) control. It was determined that MPC works best when one product is much more important than the other, while PI was superior when both products were equally important. PMBC and ANN were not found to offer significant advantages over PI and MPC. MPC was found to outperform conventional PI control for the main fractionator. MPC was applied to three industrial columns: one at Phillips Petroleum and two at Union Carbide. In each case, MPC was found to significantly outperform PI controls. The major advantage of the MPC controller is its ability to effectively handle a complex set of constraints and control objectives.

Dr. James B. Riggs

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

85

Numerical study on the combustion and emission characteristics of a methanol/diesel reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An improved multi-dimensional model coupled with detailed chemical kinetics mechanism was applied to investigate the combustion and emission characteristics of a methanol/diesel reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) engine. The fuel was supplied separately by directly injecting diesel fuel into cylinder well before top dead center, while premixing methanol through the intake port in the tested methanol/diesel RCCI engine. The effects of mass fraction of premixed methanol, start of injection (SOI) of diesel and initial in-cylinder temperature at intake valve closing (IVC) on engine combustion and emission were investigated in detail. The results show that both methanol mass fraction and SOI have a significant impact on cetane number (CN) distribution, i.e. fuel reactivity distribution, which determines the ignition delay and peak of heat release rate (HRR). Due to larger area with high-temperature region and more homogeneous fuel distribution with increased methanol, and the oxygen atom contained by methanol molecule, all the emissions are reduced with moderate methanol addition. Advanced SOI with high combustion temperature is favorable to hydrocarbon (HC) and soot reduction, yet not to the decrease of nitrogen oxide (NOx) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions. Both increasing methanol fraction and advancing the SOI are beneficial to improve fuel economy and avoid engine knock. Moreover, it was revealed that the initial temperature must be increased with increased methanol fraction to keep the 50% burn point (CA50) constant, which results in decrease of the equivalent indicated specific fuel consumption (EISFC) and all emissions, except for slight increase in \\{NOx\\} due to the higher burning temperature.

Yaopeng Li; Ming Jia; Yaodong Liu; Maozhao Xie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Advanced Burners and Combustion Controls for Industrial Heat Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ADVANCED BURNERS AND COMBUSTION CONTROLS FOR INDUSTRIAL HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEMS J.L.FERRI GTE PRODUCTS CORPORATION TOWANDA, PA ABSTRACT When recuperators are installed on indus trial furnaces, burners and ratio control systems must... recuperators by demonstrating their technical and economi cal feasibility in well monitored field installations (1). During the contract, it became evident to GTE that a systems approach (recuperator, burner, and con troIs) is necessary to be accepted...

Ferri, J. L.

87

Distributed control of reactive power flow in a radial distribution circuit with high photovoltaic penetration  

SciTech Connect

We show how distributed control of reactive power can serve to regulate voltage and minimize resistive losses in a distribution circuit that includes a significant level of photovoltaic (PV) generation. To demonstrate the technique, we consider a radial distribution circuit with a single branch consisting of sequentially-arranged residential-scale loads that consume both real and reactive power. In parallel, some loads also have PV generation capability. We postulate that the inverters associated with each PV system are also capable of limited reactive power generation or consumption, and we seek to find the optimal dispatch of each inverter's reactive power to both maintain the voltage within an acceptable range and minimize the resistive losses over the entire circuit. We assume the complex impedance of the distribution circuit links and the instantaneous load and PV generation at each load are known. We compare the results of the optimal dispatch with a suboptimal local scheme that does not require any communication. On our model distribution circuit, we illustrate the feasibility of high levels of PV penetration and a significant (20% or higher) reduction in losses.

Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turitsyn, Konstantin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Backhaus, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sule, Petr [NEW MEXICO CONSORTIUM

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation Title Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5968E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Turner, William J. N., and Iain S. Walker Date Published 12/2012 Keywords ashrae standard 62,2, california title 24, passive ventilation, residential ventilation, ventilation controller Abstract Whole-house ventilation systems are becoming commonplace in new construction, remodeling/renovation, and weatherization projects, driven by combinations of specific requirements for indoor air quality (IAQ), health, and compliance with standards, such as ASHRAE 62.2. At the same time we wish to reduce the energy use in homes and therefore minimize the energy used to provide ventilation. This study examined several approaches to reducing the energy requirements of providing acceptable IAQ in residential buildings. Two approaches were taken. The first used RIVEC - the Residential Integrated VEntilation Controller - a prototype ventilation controller that aims to deliver whole-house ventilation rates that comply with ventilation standards, for the minimum use of energy. The second used passive and hybrid ventilation systems, rather than mechanical systems, to provide whole-house ventilation.

89

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced control concept Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

concept Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced control concept Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 MIT LINCOLN LABORATORY ORGANIZATION OF...

90

Optimizing human performance in the advanced CANDU control room  

SciTech Connect

Human performance in existing Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) nuclear power plants has been considerably enhanced by the extensive use of computers for automatic plant control and operator interface functions. This includes a number of relatively advanced functions such as alarm conditioning, trip setpoint conditioning, signal checks and intercomparisons, special-purpose information displays, and computerized safety system testing. The CANDU supervisory control philosophy has been quite successful and well received by CANDU operators and has provided a solid foundation to build upon. Optimization of human performance in the advanced CANDU control room is being achieved by systematic integration of human factors and computer technology in an intensive Canadian program of research, design, and development.

Pauksens, J. (Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)); Lupton, L.R. (Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, Ontario (Canada))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Integrated intelligent systems in advanced reactor control rooms  

SciTech Connect

An intelligent, reactor control room, information system is designed to be an integral part of an advanced control room and will assist the reactor operator's decision making process by continuously monitoring the current plant state and providing recommended operator actions to improve that state. This intelligent system is an integral part of, as well as an extension to, the plant protection and control systems. This paper describes the interaction of several functional components (intelligent information data display, technical specifications monitoring, and dynamic procedures) of the overall system and the artificial intelligence laboratory environment assembled for testing the prototype. 10 refs., 5 figs.

Beckmeyer, R.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

ANN-based reactive power controller with real-time web monitoring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study introduced a real-time reactive power controller based on artificial neural network with web-based monitoring. A feed-forward employing back-propagation was used as training technique. The inputs to the network were the active and reactive power of each load. The targets were to switch on/off the capacitor banks during normal and abnormal conditions. The network was trained using developed MATLAB program and the weights resulted to minimum mean-square-error were fed to the microcontroller unit. The method was then tested in a three-bus radial distribution system model and implemented using Zilog microcontroller. The system actions were monitored using web-based monitoring application. The method was validated in actual operation of the system using the test data and results were satisfactorily obtained.

Carl John O. Salaan; Mark Joseph M. Victoria; Noel R. Estoperez

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Comparison of Conventional Diesel and Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion in a Light-Duty Engine  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

CFD modeling was used to compare conventional diesel and dual-fuel Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition combustion at US Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx levels, while accounting for Diesel Exhaust Fluid needed to meet NOx constraints with aftertreatment.

94

Advanced Control Design for Wind Turbines; Part I: Control Design, Implementation, and Initial Tests  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to give wind turbine engineers information and examples of the design, testing through simulation, field implementation, and field testing of advanced wind turbine controls.

Wright, A. D.; Fingersh, L. J.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - NOx Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control Options and Integration Control Options and Integration Reaction Engineering International (REI) is optimizing the performance of, and reduce the technical risks associated with the combined application of low-NOx firing systems (LNFS) and post combustion controls through modeling, bench-scale testing, and field verification. Teaming with REI are the University of Utah and Brown University. During this two-year effort, REI will assess real-time monitoring equipment to evaluate waterwall wastage, soot formation, and burner stoichiometry, demonstrate analysis techniques to improve LNFS in combination with reburning/SNCR, assess selective catalytic reduction catalyst life, and develop UBC/fly ash separation processes. The REI program will be applicable to coal-fired boilers currently in use in the United States, including corner-, wall-, turbo-, and cyclone-fired units. However, the primary target of the research will be cyclone boilers, which are high NOx producing units and represent about 20% of the U.S. generating capacity. The results will also be applicable to all U.S. coals. The research will be divided into four key components:

96

Comparison of advanced distillation control methods. Fourth annual report  

SciTech Connect

Detailed dynamic simulations of three industrial columns (a propylene/propane splitter, a xylene/toluene column, and a depropanizer) have been used to evaluate configuration selection for single-ended and dual-composition control as well as compare conventional and advanced control approaches. For each case considered, the controllers were tuned by using setpoint changes and tested using feed composition upsets. Proportional Integral (PI) control performance was used to evaluate the configuration selection problem. For single ended control, the energy balance configuration was found to yield the best performance. For dual composition control, nine configurations were considered. It was determined that in order to identify the optimum configuration, detailed testing using dynamic simulation is required. The optimum configurations were used to evaluate the control performance of conventional PI controllers, DMC (Dynamic Matrix Control), PMBC (Process Model Based Control), and ANN (Artificial Neural Networks) control. It was determined that DMC works best when one product is much more important than the other while PI was superior when both products were equally important. PMBC and ANN were not found to offer significant advantages over PI and DMC.

Riggs, J.B.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - NOx Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions from Multi-Burners Emissions from Multi-Burners The University of Utah working with Reaction Engineering International and Brigham Young University is investigating a project that consists of integrated experimental, theoretical and computational modeling efforts. The primary objective is to evaluate NOx formation/destruction processes as they occur in multi-burner arrays, a geometry almost always utilized in utility practice. Most controlled experimental work examining NOx has been conducted on single burners. The range of potential intra-burner interactions are likely to provide added degrees of freedom for reducing NOx. The resultant findings may allow existing utilities to arrange fuel and air distribution to minimize NOx. In new applications, orientation of individual burners within an array may also be altered to reduce NOx. Comprehensive combustion codes will be modified to incorporate the latest submodels of nitrogen release and heterogeneous chemistry. Comparison of pilot scale experiments and simulations will be utilized to validate/develop theory.

98

Advanced Rooftop Control (ARC) Retrofit: Field-Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The multi-year research study was initiated to find solutions to improve packaged equipment operating efficiency in the field. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) Building Technologies Office (BTO) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) conducted this research, development and demonstration (RD&D) study. Packaged equipment with constant speed supply fans is designed to provide ventilation at the design rate at all times when the fan is operating as required by building code. Although there are a number of hours during the day when a building may not be fully occupied or the need for ventilation is lower than designed, the ventilation rate cannot be adjusted easily with a constant speed fan. Therefore, modulating the supply fan in conjunction with demand controlled ventilation (DCV) will not only reduce the coil energy but also reduce the fan energy. The objective of this multi-year research, development and demonstration project was to determine the magnitude of energy savings achievable by retrofitting existing packaged rooftop air conditioners with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for packaged units. First, through detailed simulation analysis, it was shown that significant energy (between 24% and 35%) and cost savings (38%) from fan, cooling and heating energy consumption could be realized when packaged air conditioning units with gas furnaces are retrofitted with advanced control packages (combining multi-speed fan control, integrated economizer controls and DCV). The simulation analysis also showed significant savings for heat pumps (between 20% and 60%). The simulation analysis was followed by an extensive field test of a retrofittable advanced rooftop unit (RTU) controller.

Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Ngo, Hung; Underhill, Ronald M.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Lutes, Robert G.

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

99

Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - Second Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In Situ Device for Real-Time Catalyst Deactivation Measurements in Full-Scale SCR Systems In Situ Device for Real-Time Catalyst Deactivation Measurements in Full-Scale SCR Systems To support trends in the electric generating industry of moving from seasonal to year-round operation of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) for control of NOx and mercury, as well as extending the time between generating unit outages, Fossil Energy Research Corporation (FERCo) is developing technology to determine SCR catalyst activity and remaining life without requiring an outage to obtain and analyze catalyst samples. FERCo intends to use SCR catalyst performance results measured with their in situ device at Alabama Power’s Plant Gorgas during the 2005 and 2006 ozone seasons, along with EPRI’s CatReactTM catalyst management software, to demonstrate the value of real-time activity measurements with respect to the optimization of catalyst replacement strategy. Southern Company and the Electric Power Research Institute are co-funding the project.

100

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - SCNR Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SNCR Field Demonstration SNCR Field Demonstration American Electric Power (AEP), in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy, FuelTech, the Ohio Coal Development Office, and fourteen EPRI member utilities, performed a full-scale demonstration of a urea-based Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) system at Cardinal Unit 1. Cardinal Unit 1 is a 600MWe opposed-wall dry bottom pulverized coal-fired boiler that began service in 1967. This unit burns eastern bituminous high-sulfur coal, (3.72%S). This unit was retrofitted with low NOx burners (LNB's) during its scheduled fall 1998 outage and the SNCR system was installed concurrently. SNCR is a post-combustion NOx control process developed to reduce NOx emissions from fossil-fuel combustion systems. SNCR processes involve the injection of a chemical containing nitrogen into the combustion products, where the temperature is in the range of 1600°F - 2200°F (870°C - 1205°C). In this temperature range, the chemical reacts selectively with NOx in the presence of oxygen, forming primarily nitrogen and water. Although a number of chemicals have been investigated and implemented for SNCR NOx reduction, urea and ammonia have been most widely used for full-scale applications.

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101

Coal surface control for advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies  

SciTech Connect

This final report presents the research work carried out on the Coal Surface Control for Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning Technologies project, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE/PETC). The project was to support the engineering development of the selective agglomeration technology in order to reduce the sulfur content of US coals for controlling SO[sub 2] emissions (i.e., acid rain precursors). The overall effort was a part of the DOE/PETCs Acid Rain Control Initiative (ARCI). The overall objective of the project is to develop techniques for coal surface control prior to the advanced physical fine coal cleaning process of selective agglomeration in order to achieve 85% pyrite sulfur rejection at an energy recovery greater than 85% based on run-of-mine coal. The surface control is meant to encompass surface modification during grinding and laboratory beneficiation testing. The project includes the following tasks: Project planning; methods for analysis of samples; development of standard beneficiation test; grinding studies; modification of particle surface; and exploratory R D and support. The coal samples used in this project include three base coals, Upper Freeport - Indiana County, PA, Pittsburgh NO. 8 - Belmont County, OH, and Illinois No. 6 - Randolph County, IL, and three additional coals, Upper Freeport - Grant County- WV, Kentucky No. 9 Hopkins County, KY, and Wyodak - Campbell County, WY. A total of 149 drums of coal were received.

Morsi, B.I.; Chiang, S.H.; Sharkey, A.; Blachere, J.; Klinzing, G.; Araujo, G.; Cheng, Y.S.; Gray, R.; Streeter, R.; Bi, H.; Campbell, P.; Chiarlli, P.; Ciocco, M.; Hittle, L.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.; Perez, L.; Venkatadri, R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Refinements and Tests of an Advanced Controller to Mitigate Fatigue Loads in the Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Wind turbines are complex, nonlinear, dynamic systems forced by aerodynamic, gravitational, centrifugal, and gyroscopic loads. The aerodynamics of wind turbines are nonlinear, unsteady, and complex. Turbine rotors are subjected to a complicated 3-D turbulent wind inflow field, with imbedded coherent vortices that drive fatigue loads and reduce lifetime. Design of control algorithms for wind turbines must account for multiple control objectives. Future large multi-megawatt turbines must be designed with lighter weight structures, using active controls to mitigate fatigue loads, while maximizing energy capture. Active damping should be added to these dynamic structures to maintain stability for operation in a complex environment. At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), we have designed, implemented, and tested advanced controls to maximize energy extraction and reduce structural dynamic loads. These control designs are based on linear models of the turbine that are generated by specialized modeling software. In this paper, we present field test results of an advanced control algorithm to mitigate blade, tower, and drivetrain loads in Region 3.

Wright, A.; Fleming, P.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Active and reactive power ripple minimization in direct power control of matrix converter-fed DFIG  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Despite the advantages of matrix converters (MCs) compared with standard voltage source converters (VSCs), all of the direct power control (DPC) strategies for doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) reported in the literature, only utilize VSCs. In this paper, the influence of MC voltage vectors on active and reactive powers variation is investigated. Compared with VSCs, \\{MCs\\} generate higher number of voltage vectors. Using this inherent advantage of MC, the main contribution of this paper is to reduce large active and reactive power ripples which is one of the main drawbacks of conventional DPC method. Utilizing a wide range of voltage vectors with different amplitudes, a new switching table is derived which using this table, not only large power ripple is compensated but also, a close to unity input power factor for MC can be achieved. In the other word, the presented scheme adds the advantages of MC and DPC together. Moreover, Owing to the operation of MC in direct acac form, the presented scheme effectively eliminates the need for the grid side converter used in conventional DPC, which has a complicated control method is eliminated. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed method and have a reasonable correspondence with theoretical and mathematical analysis.

Arjang Yousefi-Talouki; Edris Pouresmaeil; Bo Nrregaard Jrgensen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

DEMONSTRATION OF ADVANCED COMBUSTION NO X CONTROL TECHNIQUES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ADVANCED COMBUSTION NO ADVANCED COMBUSTION NO X CONTROL TECHNIQUES FOR A WALL-FIRED BOILER PROJECT PERFORMANCE SUMMARY CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM JANUARY 2001 SOUTHERN COMPANY SERVICES, INC. DOE/FE-0429 Disclaimer This report was prepared using publicly available information, including the Final Technical Report and other reports prepared pursuant to a cooperative agreement partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. Neither the United States Government nor any agency, employee, contractor, or representative thereof, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe upon privately

105

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced control strategies Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and control and is committed to advancing this flourishing field. The Robotics... -robot simulation environments, motion planning and control ... Source: Ma, Bin - Departments...

106

Indicator system for advanced nuclear plant control complex  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation  

SciTech Connect

The initial goal of the research project was to develop methods of coal surface control in advanced froth flotation to achieve 90% pyritic sulfur rejection, while operating at Btu recoveries above 90% based on run-of-mine quality coal. Moreover, the technology is to concomitantly reduce the ash content significantly (to six percent or less) to provide a high-quality fuel to the boiler (ash removal also increases Btu content, which in turn decreases a coal's emission potential in terms of lbs SO{sub 2}/million Btu). (VC)

Fuerstenau, D.W.; Hanson, J.S.; Diao, J.; Harris, G.H.; De, A.; Sotillo, F. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)); Somasundaran, P.; Harris, C.C.; Vasudevan, T.; Liu, D.; Li, C. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)); Hu, W.; Zou, Y.; Chen, W. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)); Choudhry, V.; Shea, S.; Ghosh, A.; Sehgal, R. (Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Advancing reactive tracer methods for measuring thermal evolution in CO2-and water-based geothermal reservoirs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. This project aims to develop reactive tracer method for monitoring thermal drawdown in enhanced geothermal systems.

109

Characterization of Dual-Fuel Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Using Hydrated Ethanol and Diesel Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This study uses numerical simulations to explore the use of wet ethanol as the low-reactivity fuel and diesel as the high-reactivity fuel for RCCI operation in a heavy-duty diesel engine.

110

Effectiveness of Diesel Oxidation Catalyst in Reducing HC and CO Emissions from Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition  

SciTech Connect

Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) has been shown to allow for diesel-like or better brake thermal efficiency with significant reductions in nitrogen oxide (NOX) particulate matter (PM) emissions. Hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emission levels, on the other hand, are similar to those of port fuel injected gasoline engines. The higher HC and CO emissions combined with the lower exhaust temperatures with RCCI operation present a challenge for current exhaust aftertreatments. The reduction of HC and CO emissions in a lean environment is typically achieved with an oxidation catalyst. In this work, several diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC) with different precious metal loadings were evaluated for effectiveness to control HC and CO emissions from RCCI combustion in a light-duty multi-cylinder engine operating on gasoline and diesel fuels. Each catalyst was evaluated in a steady-state engine operation with temperatures ranging from 160 to 260 C. A shift to a higher light-off temperature was observed during the RCCI operation. In addition to the steady-state experiments, the performances of the DOCs were evaluated during multi-mode engine operation by switching from diesel-like combustion at higher exhaust temperature and low HC/CO emissions to RCCI combustion at lower temperature and higher HC/CO emissions. High CO and HC emissions from RCCI generated an exotherm keeping the catalyst above the light-off temperature.

Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Voltage/Pitch Control for Maximization and Regulation of Active/Reactive Powers in Wind Turbines with Uncertainties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of controlling a variable-speed wind turbine with a Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG), modeled as an electromechanically-coupled nonlinear system with rotor voltages and blade pitch angle as its inputs, active and reactive powers as its outputs, and most of the aerodynamic and mechanical parameters as its uncertainties. Using a blend of linear and nonlinear control strategies (including feedback linearization, pole placement, uncertainty estimation, and gradient-based potential function minimization) as well as time-scale separation in the dynamics, we develop a controller that is capable of maximizing the active power in the Maximum Power Tracking (MPT) mode, regulating the active power in the Power Regulation (PR) mode, seamlessly switching between the two modes, and simultaneously adjusting the reactive power to achieve a desired power factor. The controller consists of four cascaded components, uses realistic feedback signals, and operates without knowledge of the C_p-...

Guo, Yi; Jiang, John N; Tang, Choon Yik; Ramakumar, Rama G

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

E-Print Network 3.0 - advance stringent control Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: % since 1995. Acid gases have dropped by about 80%. ADVANCES IN AIR POLLUTION CONTROL TECHNOLOGY... Municipal Waste Combustors (MWCs), owners and operators of...

113

Improving the Performance of a Two-Shell Column with Advanced Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

column has yielded stable operation with reduced utility consumption and increased capacity. Prior to the application of advanced controls this column was a plant capacity limit and composition control was very difficult. The advanced controls now... allow composition to be controlled within 15% of setpoint at both ends of the column. specific energy consumption has been reduced significantly, yielding higher potential capacity. The control strategies implemented include analyzer composition...

Morrison, T. A.; Laflamme, D.

114

Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this research project is to develop advanced flotation methods for coal cleaning in order to achieve near total pyritic-sulfur removal at 90% Btu recovery, using coal samples procured from six major US coal seams. Concomitantly, the ash content of these coals is to be reduced to 6% or less. Work this quarter concentrated on the following: washability studies, which included particle size distribution of the washability samples, and chemical analysis of washability test samples; characterization studies of induction time measurements, correlation between yield, combustible-material recovery (CMR), and heating-value recovery (HVR), and QA/QC for standard flotation tests and coal analyses; surface modification and control including testing of surface-modifying reagents, restoration of hydrophobicity to lab-oxidized coals, pH effects on coal flotation, and depression of pyritic sulfur in which pyrite depression with calcium cyanide and pyrite depression with xanthated reagents was investigated; flotation optimization and circuitry included staged reagent addition, cleaning and scavenging, and scavenging and middling recycling. Weathering studies are also discussed. 19 figs., 28 tabs.

Fuerstenau, D.W.; Sastry, K.V.S.; Hanson, J.S.; Harris, G.; Sotillo, F.; Diao, J. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA)); Somasundaran, P.; Harris, C.C.; Vasudevan, T.; Liu, D.; Li, C. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (USA)); Hu, Weibai; Zou, Y.; Chen, W. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (USA)); Choudhry, V.; Sehgal, R.; Ghosh, A. (Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (USA))

1990-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Advanced Boiler Load Monitoring Controllers, Chicago, Illinois  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In this project, the Building America team Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit (PARR) installed and monitored an ALM aftermarket controller, the M2G from Greffen Systems, at two Chicago area multifamily buildings with existing OTR control.

116

Advanced Metal Fiber Wall-Flow DPF For Diesel Emission Control...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Metal Fiber Wall-Flow DPF For Diesel Emission Control Advanced Metal Fiber Wall-Flow DPF For Diesel Emission Control A new metal fiber wall-flow DPF with up to 99% efficiency and...

117

US DRIVE Advanced Combustion and Emission Control Technical Team Roadmap  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ACEC focuses on advanced engine and aftertreatment technology for three major combustion strategies: (1) Low-Temperature Combustion, (2) Dilute Gasoline combustion, and (3) Clean Diesel Combustion.

118

FY2000 Progress Report for Combustion and Emission Control for Advanced CIDI Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Energy Office of Transportation Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2000 Progress Report for Combustion and Emission Control for Advanced CIDI Engines Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation Technologies Approved by Steven Chalk November 2000 Combustion and Emission Control for Advanced CIDI Engines FY 2000 Progress Report CONTENTS Page iii I. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 II. EMISSION CONTROL SUBSYSTEM DEVELOPMENT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 A. Emission Control Subsystem Evaluation for Light-Duty CIDI Vehicles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

119

Development of Computational Approaches for Simulation and Advanced Controls for Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computational Approaches Computational Approaches for Simulation and Advanced Controls for Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Background The United States Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) develops affordable and clean energy from coal and other fossil fuels to secure a sustainable energy economy. To further this mission, NETL funds research and development of advanced control technologies, including chemical looping (CL)

120

In-Cylinder Mechanisms of PCI Heat-Release Rate Control by Fuel Reactivity Stratification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Explores in-cylinder mechanisms by which fuel reactivity stratification via a two fuel system affects premixed charge compression ignition heat release rate to achieve diesel-like efficiency

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced reactivity controlled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Real Power and Reactive Power Control of a Three-Phase Single-Stage-PV System and PV voltage Stability  

SciTech Connect

Grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems with power electronic interfaces can provide both real and reactive power to meet power system needs with appropriate control algorithms. This paper presents the control algorithm design for a three-phase single-stage grid-connected PV inverter to achieve either maximum power point tracking (MPPT) or a certain amount of real power injection, as well as the voltage/var control. The switching between MPPT control mode and a certain amount of real power control mode is automatic and seamless. Without the DC-to-DC booster stage, PV DC voltage stability is an important issue in the control design especially when the PV inverter is operating at maximum power point (MPP) with voltage/var control. The PV DC voltage collapse phenomenon and its reason are discussed. The method based on dynamic correction of the PV inverter output is proposed to ensure PV DC voltage stability. Simulation results of the single-stage PV system during system disturbances and fast solar irradiation changes confirm that the proposed control algorithm for single-stage PV inverters can provide appropriate real and reactive power services and ensure PV DC voltage stability during dynamic system operation and atmospheric conditions.

Li, Huijuan [ORNL] [ORNL; Xu, Yan [ORNL] [ORNL; Adhikari, Sarina [ORNL] [ORNL; Rizy, D Tom [ORNL] [ORNL; Li, Fangxing [ORNL] [ORNL; Irminger, Philip [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Advanced HD Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Meeting vss089daw2012p.pdf More Documents & Publications Evaluation of 2010 Urea-SCR Technology for Hybrid Vehicles using PSAT System Simulations Advanced LD Engine Systems...

123

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Advanced Mercury Sorbents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Mercury Sorbents with Low Impact on Power Plant Operations Advanced Mercury Sorbents with Low Impact on Power Plant Operations Apogee Scientific, Inc. (Apogee) will lead a Team comprised of Southern Company Services, TXU, Tennessee Valley Authority, EPRI, URS Group, University of Illinois-Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS), Southern Research Institute (SRI), Calgon Carbon, and TDA Research, Inc., to evaluate a number of advanced sorbents for removing vapor-phase mercury from coal-fired flue gas that have minimal impact on by-product utilization and/or on existing particulate collection devices (PCD). The main objective of this program is to evaluate several advanced sorbents for removing mercury from coal-fired flue gas while posing minimal impact on plant operations through three advanced sorbent concepts: 1) Sorbents which minimize impact on concrete production through selective chemical passivation of activated carbon and use of non-carbon material, 2) sorbents that minimize baghouse pressure drop and ESP emissions, and 3) sorbents that can be recovered and reused.

124

DRIVE CYCLE EFFICIENCY AND EMISSIONS ESTIMATES FOR REACTIVITY CONTROLLED COMPRESSION IGNITION IN A MULTI-CYLINDER LIGHT-DUTY DIESEL ENGINE  

SciTech Connect

In-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel to achieve Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) has been shown to reduce NOx and PM emissions while maintaining or improving brake thermal efficiency as compared to conventional diesel combustion (CDC). The RCCI concept has an advantage over many advanced combustion strategies in that by varying both the percent of premixed gasoline and EGR rate, stable combustion can be extended over more of the light-duty drive cycle load range. Changing the percent premixed gasoline changes the fuel reactivity stratification in the cylinder providing further control of combustion phasing and pressure rise rate than the use of EGR alone. This paper examines the combustion and emissions performance of light-duty diesel engine using direct injected diesel fuel and port injected gasoline to carry out RCCI for steady-state engine conditions which are consistent with a light-duty drive cycle. A GM 1.9L four-cylinder engine with the stock compression ratio of 17.5:1, common rail diesel injection system, high-pressure EGR system and variable geometry turbocharger was modified to allow for port fuel injection with gasoline. Engine-out emissions, engine performance and combustion behavior for RCCI operation is compared against both CDC and a premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) strategy which relies on high levels of EGR dilution. The effect of percent of premixed gasoline, EGR rate, boost level, intake mixture temperature, combustion phasing and pressure rise rate is investigated for RCCI combustion for the light-duty modal points. Engine-out emissions of NOx and PM were found to be considerably lower for RCCI operation as compared to CDC and PCCI, while HC and CO emissions were higher. Brake thermal efficiency was similar or higher for many of the modal conditions for RCCI operation. The emissions results are used to estimate hot-start FTP-75 emissions levels with RCCI and are compared against CDC and PCCI modes.

Curran, Scott [ORNL; Briggs, Thomas E [ORNL; Cho, Kukwon [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

A comparison of advanced distillation control techniques for a propylene/propane splitter  

SciTech Connect

A detailed dynamic simulator of a propylene/propane (C{sub 3}) splitter, which was bench-marked against industrial data, has been used to compare dual composition control performance for a diagonal PI controller and several advanced controllers. The advanced controllers considered are DMC, nonlinear process model based control, and artificial neural networks. Each controller was tuned based upon setpoint changes in the overhead production composition using 50% changes in the impurity levels. Overall, there was not a great deal of difference in controller performance based upon the setpoint and disturbance tests. Periodic step changes in feed composition were also used to compare controller performance. In this case, oscillatory variations of the product composition were observed and the variabilities of the DMC and nonlinear process model based controllers were substantially smaller than that of the PI controller. The sensitivity of each controller to the frequency of the periodic step changes in feed composition was also investigated.

Gokhale, V.; Hurowitz, S.; Riggs, J.B. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

APPLICATION EXAMPLES OF ADVANCED DIGITAL CONTROL IN WIRE INDUSTRY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In wire and cable industry, mass production is done for enamel wire production and foamed insulated cable for telephone line. This paper presents applications of multivariable control to these production processes. The control systems are designed based on state space approach using the computer aided design package. The temperature distribution control of enamelling oven is presented first, and in the second, the simultaneous control of the capacitance and diameter of the foamed insulated cable is discribed. Both control systems are now practically used with satisfactory results. Keywords. Multivariable control; Enamelling oven; Temperature distribution control foamed insulated cable.

K. Furuta; M. Sampei; Y. Nakamura; K. Asaka

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Topographic control of asynchronous glacial advances: A case study from Annapurna, Nepal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Topographic control of asynchronous glacial advances: A case study from Annapurna, Nepal Beth Pratt of asynchronous glacial advances: A case study from Annapurna, Nepal, Geophys. Res. Lett., 38, L24502, doi:10 10 Be dating [Zech et al., 2009]. Further east in Nepal, other glacial dating studies [Finkel et al

Heimsath, Arjun M.

128

A Planning, Scheduling and Control Architecture for Advanced Life Support Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Planning, Scheduling and Control Architecture for Advanced Life Support Systems V. Jorge Leon 77058 Abstract This paper describes an integrated planning, schedul- ing and control architecture and the requirements for plan- ning, scheduling and control architectures are pre- sented. Next, the main components

Kortenkamp, David

129

Advance of Systematic Design Methods on Fuzzy Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) system possesses some characteristics such as multi-parameters, nonlinear, and coupled parameters. Aimed at control problems, the author targets real-time fuzzy control and research systematically...

Zhang, J.; Chen, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Evaluation of traffic operations at diamond interchanges using advanced actuated control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis documents an operational analysis of ographics. advanced actuated traffic control at signalized diamond interchanges. The study attempts to determine the benefits a "flexible'' phasing strategy provides to the interchange. Flexible...

Koonce, Peter John Vincent

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Advanced Powerhouse Controls Save Pulp Mill $500 in Purchased Energy in First Month  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This case study describes the application of advanced regulatory and supervisory controls to powerhouse operations at a large pulp mill in central British Columbia. Substantial reductions in mill operating costs were achieved by actively managing...

Morrison, R.; Hilder, S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Advanced regulatory control and coordinated plant-wide control strategies for IGCC targeted towards improving power ramp-rates  

SciTech Connect

As part of ongoing R&D activities at the National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training & Research (AVESTAR) Center, this paper highlights strategies for enhancing low-level regulatory control and system-wide coordinated control strategies implemented in a high-fidelity dynamic simulator for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant with carbon capture. The underlying IGCC plant dynamic model contains 20 major process areas, each of which is tightly integrated with the rest of the power plant, making individual functionally-independent processes prone to routine disturbances. Single-loop feedback control although adequate to meet the primary control objective for most processes, does not take into account in advance the effect of these disturbances, making the entire power plant undergo large offshoots and/or oscillations before the feedback action has an opportunity to impact control performance. In this paper, controller enhancements ranging from retuning feedback control loops, multiplicative feed-forward control and other control techniques such as split-range control, feedback trim and dynamic compensation, applicable on various subsections of the integrated IGCC plant, have been highlighted and improvements in control responses have been given. Compared to using classical feedback-based control structure, the enhanced IGCC regulatory control architecture reduces plant settling time and peak offshoots, achieves faster disturbance rejection, and promotes higher power ramp-rates. In addition, improvements in IGCC coordinated plant-wide control strategies for Gasifier-Lead, GT-Lead and Plantwide operation modes have been proposed and their responses compared. The paper is concluded with a brief discussion on the potential IGCC controller improvements resulting from using advanced process control, including model predictive control (MPC), as a supervisory control layer.

Mahapatra, P.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Advanced Petroleum-Based fuels - Diesel Emissions Control (APBF...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

unregulated pollutants beyond 2010 APBF-DEC Structure DOE, EPA, additive companies, automobile manufacturers, engine manufacturers, energy companies, emission control mfrs.,...

134

An experimental system for advanced heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While having the potential to significantly improve heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) system performance, advanced (e.g., optimal, robust and various forms of adaptive) controllers have yet to be incorporated into commercial systems. Controllers consisting of distributed proportional-integral (PI) control loops continue to dominate commercial HVAC systems. Investigation into advanced HVAC controllers has largely been limited to proposals and simulations, with few controllers being tested on physical systems. While simulation can be insightful, the only true means for verifying the performance provided by HVAC controllers is by actually using them to control an HVAC system. The construction and modeling of an experimental system for testing advanced HVAC controllers, is the focus of this article. A simple HVAC system, intended for controlling the temperature and flow rate of the discharge air, was built using standard components. While only a portion of an overall HVAC system, it is representative of a typical hot water to air heating system. In this article, a single integrated environment is created that is used for data acquisition, controller design, simulation, and closed loop controller implementation and testing. This environment provides the power and flexibility needed for rapid prototyping of various controllers and control design methodologies.

Michael Anderson; Michael Buehner; Peter Young; Douglas Hittle; Charles Anderson; Jilin Tu; David Hodgson

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Comparison of advanced distillation control methods. Third annual report  

SciTech Connect

Detailed dynamic simulations of three industrial distillation columns (a propylene/propane splitter, a xylene/toluene column, and a depropanizer) have been used to study the issue of configuration selection for diagonal PI dual composition controls, feedforward from a feed composition analyzer, and decouplers. Auto Tune Variation (ATV) identification with on-line detuning for setpoint changes was used for tuning the diagonal proportional integral (PI) composition controls. In addition, robustness tests were conducted by inducting reboiler duty upsets. For single composition control, the (L, V) configuration was found to be best. For dual composition control, the optimum configuration changes from one column to another. Moreover, the use of analysis tools, such as RGA, appears to be of little value in identifying the optimum configuration for dual composition control. Using feedforward from a feed composition analyzer and using decouplers are shown to offer significant advantages for certain specific cases.

Riggs, J.B.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies Technical Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

Reliable instrumentation, information, and control (II&C) systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration.

Bruce Hallbert

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Basics of Advanced Software Systems Static cyclic scheduling on automotive Electronic Control Units (ECU)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basics of Advanced Software Systems Static cyclic scheduling on automotive Electronic Control Units Systems ­ Coursework ­ March 9, 2012. lic scheduling on automotive Electronic Control Units (ECU) (nicolas - Name, - Execution time, - Period of execution, - First activation date, also cal period. The scheduling

Navet, Nicolas

138

Development of dynamic models of reactive distillation columns for simulation and determination of control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

variables were simulated. The data generated by the step responses was used for fitting transfer functions between the manipulated and the controlled variables. RGA analysis was performed to find the optimal pairing for controller design. Feedback...

Chakrabarty, Arnab

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

139

The advanced-step %MPC controller - Optimization Online  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and F() o e tAf e pahg amet g ic pig oqp lemsr N(p ) ahg e t t ice con- tinuously diff evg ...... and one control v corresponding to the cooling w a- ter ? o w rate.

140

Real?Time Plasma Control Tools for Advanced Tokamak Operation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Real?time control will play an important role in the operation and scientific exploitation of the new generation fusion devices. This paper summarizes the real?time systems and diagnostics developed by the Portuguese Fusion Euratom Association based on digital signal processors and field programmable gate arrays.

C. A. F. Varandas; J. Sousa; A. P. Rodrigues; B. B. Carvalho; H. Fernandes; A. J. Batista; N. Cruz; A. Combo; R. C. Pereira; CFN Control and Data Acquisition Group

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced reactivity controlled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

An advanced STEP-NC controller for intelligent machining processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Major improvements in high speed machining technologies are not followed by suitable evolutions of the programming standard ISO 6983, also called G-code. New STEP-NC standard aims at performing high level intelligent NC programming adapted to modern ... Keywords: CNC Controller, Multiprocess manufacturing, Optimization, STEP-NC, Simulation

Matthieu Rauch; Raphael Laguionie; Jean-Yves Hascoet; Suk-Hwan Suh

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

A modeling and control approach to advanced nuclear power plants with gas turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Advanced nuclear power plants are currently being proposed with a number of various designs. However, there is a lack of modeling and control strategies to deal with load following operations. This research investigates a possible modeling approach and load following control strategy for gas turbine nuclear power plants in order to provide an assessment way to the concept designs. A load frequency control strategy and average temperature control mechanism are studied to get load following nuclear power plants. The suitability of the control strategies and concept designs are assessed through linear stability analysis methods. Numerical results are presented on an advanced molten salt reactor concept as an example nuclear power plant system to demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the proposed modeling and load following control strategies.

Gnyaz Ablay

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Energy savings and economics of advanced control strategies for packaged air conditioners with gas heat  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an evaluation of the potential energy savings from adding advanced control to existing packaged air conditioners. Advanced control options include air-side economizer, multi-speed fan control, demand control ventilation and staged cooling. The energy and cost savings from the different control strategies individually and in combination are estimated using the EnergyPlus detailed energy simulation program for four building types, namely, a small office building, a stand-alone retail building, a strip mall building and a supermarket building. For each of the four building types, the simulation was run for 16 locations covering all 15 climate zones in the U.S. The maximum installed cost of a replacement controller that provides acceptable payback periods to owners is estimated.

Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Huang, Yunzhi; Brambley, Michael R.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Advanced Controls for Residential Whole-House Ventilation Systems  

SciTech Connect

Whole-house ventilation systems are becoming commonplace in new construction, remodeling/renovation, and weatherization projects, driven by combinations of specific requirements for indoor air quality (IAQ), health and compliance with standards, such as ASHRAE 62.2. Ventilation systems incur an energy penalty on the home via fan power used to drive the airflow, and the additional space-conditioning load associated with heating or cooling the ventilation air. Finding a balance between IAQ and energy use is important if homes are to be adequately ventilated while not increasing the energy burden. This study used computer simulations to examine RIVEC the Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller - a prototype ventilation controller that aims to deliver whole-house ventilation rates that comply with ventilation standards, for the minimum use of energy. Four different whole-house ventilation systems were simulated, both with and without RIVEC, so that the energy and IAQ results could be compared. Simulations were conducted for 13 US climate zones, three house designs, and three envelope leakage values. The results showed that the RIVEC controller could typically return ventilation energy savings greater than 40percent without compromising long-term chronic or short-term acute exposures to relevant indoor contaminants. Critical and average peak power loads were also reduced as a consequence of using RIVEC.

Turner, William; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Comparison of advanced distillation control methods. Second annual report  

SciTech Connect

Detailed dynamic simulations of two industrial distillation columns (a propylene/propane splitter and a xylene/toluene column) have been used to study the issue of configuration selection for diagonal PI dual composition controls. Auto Tune Variation (ATV) identification with on-line detuning was used for tuning the diagonal proportional integral (PI) composition controls. Each configuration was evaluated with respect to steady-state relative gain array (RGA) values, sensitivity to feed composition changes, and open loop dynamic performance. Each configuration was tuned using setpoint changes over a wider range of operation for robustness and tested for feed composition upsets. Overall, configuration selection was shown to have a dominant effect upon control performance. Configuration analysis tools (e.g., RGA, condition number, disturbance sensitivity) were found to reject configuration choices that are obviously poor choices, but were unable to critically differentiate between the remaining viable choices. Configuration selection guidelines are given although it is demonstrated that the most reliable configuration selection approach is based upon testing the viable configurations using dynamic column simulators.

Riggs, J.B.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Comparison of advanced distillation control methods. Second annual report  

SciTech Connect

Detailed dynamic simulations of three industrial distillation columns (a propylene/propane splitter, a xylene/toluene column, and a depropanizer) have been used to study the issue of configuration selection for diagonal PI dual composition controls. ATV identification with on-line detuning was used for tuning the diagonal PI composition controllers. Each configuration was evaluated with respect to steady-state RGA values, sensitivity to feed composition changes, and open loop dynamic performance. Each configuration was tuned using setpoint changes over a wider range of operation for robustness and tested for feed composition upsets. Overall, configuration selection was shown to have a dominant effect upon control performance. Configuration analysis tools (e.g., RGA, condition number, disturbance sensitivity), were found to reject configuration choices that are obviously poor choices, but were unable to critically differentiate between the remaining viable choices. Configuration selection guidelines are given although it is demonstrated that the most reliable configuration selection approach is based upon testing the viable configurations using dynamic column simulators.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY ALSTOM ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR AN ADVANCE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ALSTOM ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR AN ADVANCE ALSTOM ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF PATENT RIGHTS TO INVENTIONS MADE UNDER SUBCONTRACT QZ001 UNDER COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-03NT41986; W(A) 05-004; CH-1268 As set out in the attached waiver petition and in subsequent discussions with DOE Patent Counsel, Alstom Environmental Control Systems (Alstom) has requested an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions made under the above subject subcontract. The waiver will apply only to inventions made by Alstom employees under the subcontract. Alstom is a subcontractor to ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES). under the subject cooperative agreement. ADA-ES is eligible to retain title to its inventions pursuant to P.L. 96- 517. Referring to item 2 of Alstom's petition, the purpose of the subcontract is to evaluate full-

148

Advanced turbine systems sensors and controls needs assessment study. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Instrumentation and Controls Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory performed an assessment of the sensors and controls needs for land-based advanced gas turbines being designed as a part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program for both utility and industrial applications. The assessment included visits to five turbine manufacturers. During these visits, in-depth discussions were held with design and manufacturing staff to obtain their views regarding the need for new sensors and controls for their advanced turbine designs. The Unsteady Combustion Facilities at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center was visited to assess the need for new sensors for gas turbine combustion research. Finally, a workshop was conducted at the South Carolina Energy Research and Development Center which provided a forum for industry, laboratory, and university engineers to discuss and prioritize sensor and control needs. The assessment identified more than 50 different measurement, control, and monitoring needs for advanced turbines that cannot currently be met from commercial sources. While all the identified needs are important, some are absolutely critical to the success of the ATS Program.

Anderson, R.L.; Fry, D.N.; McEvers, J.A.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Advanced combustion methods for simultaneous reduction of emissions and fuel consumption of compression ignition engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, advanced combustion modes i.e. improved low-temperature combustion (LTC) and reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) have been achieved in a diesel engine. LTC mode has been improved us...

P. Brijesh; A. Chowdhury; S. Sreedhara

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Recent VOC Control Test Data for a Reactive VOC Converter- Scrubber System for Non-Thermal Control of VOCs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of real estate. Non-thermal VOHAP (Volatile Organic Hazardous Air Pollutant) emission control devices require additional maintenance. They also require the replacement of costly consumables such as activated carbon or they use large amounts of energy...

McGinness, M.

151

Energy Savings and Economics of Advanced Control Strategies for Packaged Heat Pumps  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) Building Technologies Program (BTP), evaluated a number of control strategies for packaged cooling equipment that can be implemented in an advanced controller, which can be retrofit into existing packaged heat pump units to improve their operational efficiency. This report documents the results of that analysis.

Wang, Weimin; Huang, Yunzhi; Katipamula, Srinivas

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

In-Situ UV Absorption CF2 Sensor for Reactive Ion Etch Process Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

source of this absorption spectroscopy is a 100 W high pressure mercury arc lamp. To compensate and correlation of data from this and other plasma sensors to the etch rate of Si02 and a-Si in CF4/CHF3 plasmas-time feedback control could be used to reduce these problems provided that adequate plasma state sensors

Terry, Fred L.

153

Control System Development for an Advanced-Technology Medium-Duty Hybrid Electric Truck  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

diesel engine, an electric motor, a Lithium-Ion battery, and an Eaton automated manual transmission03TB-45 Control System Development for an Advanced-Technology Medium-Duty Hybrid Electric Truck and vehicle test results for a medium-duty hybrid electric truck are reported in this paper. The design

Grizzle, Jessy W.

154

Project Information Form Project Title Using Connected Vehicle Technology for Advanced Signal Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,387 Total Project Cost $59,387 Agency ID or Contract Number DTRT13-G-UTC29 Start and End Dates 4/14/2014 ­ 9Project Information Form Project Title Using Connected Vehicle Technology for Advanced Signal/30/15 Brief Description of Research Project Today's conventional traffic control strategies typically rely

California at Davis, University of

155

CENPES/EB-AB-G&E/AEDC Corporativo Advanced Control System Industrial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the specification of products, Minimize energy consumption, Minimizes the process variability which increases safety in the propane refrigeration system Limitations due to low thermal exchange area were generating saturationCENPES/EB-AB-G&E/AEDC Corporativo Advanced Control System ­ Industrial Results and New Challenges

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

156

RECENT ADVANCES IN SMART-MATERIAL ROTOR CONTROL ACTUATION. Victor Giurgiutiu*,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RECENT ADVANCES IN SMART-MATERIAL ROTOR CONTROL ACTUATION. Victor Giurgiutiu*, University of South achievements in the application of active-materials actuation to counteract aeroelastic and vibration effects and capabilities is done first. Attention is focused on the smart rotor-blade applications. The induced twist

Giurgiutiu, Victor

157

Advanced FMEA using meta behavior modeling for concurrent design of products and controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the use of Advanced Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (AFMEA) as a methodology for the concurrent design of electro-mechanical products and their control systems. The past two years have seen the extension of AFMEA to simulate dynamic changes of device operations using meta-behavior modeling. This approach can help engineers identify failure modes associated with controls and their interaction with physical systems and drive system design toward more reliable solutions. The proposed method uses behavior modeling to map control functions to physical entities and identifies failure modes as the departure from intended control functions. AFMEA provides a framework for controls and hardware developers to discuss and understand the relationship between sub-systems, controls, and overall system performance. An example of a power generation system illustrates how AFMEA applies to the early stages of layout and controls design.

Steven Kmenta

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Advanced Control Technologies and Strategies Linking DemandResponse and Energy Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a preliminary framework to describe how advanced controls can support multiple modes of operations including both energy efficiency and demand response (DR). A general description of DR, its benefits, and nationwide status is outlined. The role of energy management and control systems for DR is described. Building systems such as HVAC and lighting that utilize control technologies and strategies for energy efficiency are mapped on to DR and demand shedding strategies are developed. Past research projects are presented to provide a context for the current projects. The economic case for implementing DR from a building owner perspective is also explored.

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2005-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

159

Enhancing Carbon Reactivity in Mercury Control in Lignite-Fired Systems  

SciTech Connect

This project was awarded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory Program Solicitation DE-PS26-03NT41718-01. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) led a consortium-based effort to resolve mercury (Hg) control issues facing the lignite industry. The EERC team-the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); the URS Corporation; the Babcock & Wilcox Company; ADA-ES; Apogee; Basin Electric Power Cooperative; Otter Tail Power Company; Great River Energy; Texas Utilities; Montana-Dakota Utilities Co.; Minnkota Power Cooperative, Inc.; BNI Coal Ltd.; Dakota Westmoreland Corporation; the North American Coal Corporation; SaskPower; and the North Dakota Industrial Commission-demonstrated technologies that substantially enhanced the effectiveness of carbon sorbents to remove Hg from western fuel combustion gases and achieve a high level ({ge} 55% Hg removal) of cost-effective control. The results of this effort are applicable to virtually all utilities burning lignite and subbituminous coals in the United States and Canada. The enhancement processes were previously proven in pilot-scale and limited full-scale tests. Additional optimization testing continues on these enhancements. These four units included three lignite-fired units: Leland Olds Station Unit 1 (LOS1) and Stanton Station Unit 10 (SS10) near Stanton and Antelope Valley Station Unit 1 (AVS1) near Beulah and a subbituminous Powder River Basin (PRB)-fired unit: Stanton Station Unit 1 (SS1). This project was one of three conducted by the consortium under the DOE mercury program to systematically test Hg control technologies available for utilities burning lignite. The overall objective of the three projects was to field-test and verify options that may be applied cost-effectively by the lignite industry to reduce Hg emissions. The EERC, URS, and other team members tested sorbent injection technologies for plants equipped with electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and spray dryer absorbers combined with fabric filters (SDAs-FFs). The work focused on technology commercialization by involving industry and emphasizing the communication of results to vendors and utilities throughout the project.

Chad Wocken; Michael Holmes; John Pavlish; Jeffrey Thompson; Katie Brandt; Brandon Pavlish; Dennis Laudal; Kevin Galbreath; Michelle Olderbak

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

160

Direct active and reactive power control of 3-level NPC-fed DFIG considering power ripple minimisation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Despite the advantages of three-level neutral point clamp (NPC) converters compared with standard voltage source inverters (VSIs), most of the direct power control (DPC) strategies for doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) reported in the literature, only utilise VSIs. As regards three-level NPC converter generates higher number of voltage vectors compared with standard VSIs, This paper presents a DPC strategy for DFIG using three-level NPC converters in which three-level NPC voltage vectors are employed to reduce large power ripples of conventional DPC. Therefore, a new optimised switching table is derived. Using this table, DFIG provides not only elaborate active and reactive powers which track their reference values very well, but also large power ripple is compensated. Also, because of ripple reduction, total harmonic distortion of rotor current, stator current, stator voltage and grid line-to-line voltage is reduced in proposed strategy compared with conventional DPC. Simulation results show the effectiveness of proposed method and have a reasonable correspondence with theoretical and mathematical analysis.

Milad Yousefi-Talouki; Parviz Ramezanpour

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced reactivity controlled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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161

A fuzzy logic supervisor for active and reactive power control of a variable speed wind energy conversion system associated to a flywheel storage system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a Wind Energy Conversion System (WECS) at variable speed using a Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG) controlled on the rotor side through converters. A Flywheel Energy Storage System (FESS) is connected to the studied wind generator at the DC bus in order to evaluate its capacity to participate to the ancillary services. We study the improvement of the active and reactive power quality produced by the wind generator and its effect on the load voltage regulation connected to the wind generator. For that, a fuzzy logic supervisor is established to control the FESS operation and the DC bus voltage in order to smooth the active power fluctuations due to the random wind speed variations. A control law is also described to smooth the reactive power at the connection node to the grid.

Lilia Jerbi; Lotfi Krichen; Abderrazak Ouali

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

FY2001 Progress Report for Combusion and Emission Control for Advanced CIDI Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COMBUSTION AND COMBUSTION AND EMISSION CONTROL FOR ADVANCED CIDI ENGINES 2 0 0 1 A N N U A L P R O G R E S S R E P O R T U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation Technologies A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T We would like to express our sincere appreciation to Argonne National Laboratory and QSS Group, Inc., for their artistic, editorial and technical contributions in preparing and publishing this report. In addition, we would like to thank all our program participants for their contributions to the programs and all the authors who prepared the project abstracts that comprise this report. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Transportation Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2001 Progress Report for Combustion and Emission Control for Advanced CIDI Engines

163

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - Ultra Low-NOx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ultra Low NOx Integrated System Ultra Low NOx Integrated System TFS 2000(tm) Low NOx Firing System Project Summary: ALSTOM Power Inc.'s Power Plant Laboratories, working in concert with ALSTOM Power's Performance Projects Group, has teamed with the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) to conduct a comprehensive study to develop/evaluate low-cost, efficient NOx control technologies for retrofit to pulverized coal fired utility boilers. The objective of this project was to develop retrofit NOx control technology to achieve less than 0.15 lb/MMBtu NOx (for bituminous coals) and 0.10 lb/MMBtu NOx (for subbituminous coals) from existing pulverized coal fired utility boilers at a cost which is at least 25% less than SCR technology. Efficient control of NOx is seen as an important,

164

Advanced Sensor Approaches for Monitoring and Control of Gas Turbine Combustors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seitzman and T. Lieuwen Seitzman and T. Lieuwen SCIES Project 02- 01- SR102 DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-02NT41431 Tom J. George, Program Manager, DOE/NETL Richard Wenglarz, Manager of Research, SCIES Project Awarded (5/1/2002, 36 Month Duration) $337,501 Total Contract Value ($327,501 DOE) Advanced Sensor Approaches For Monitoring and Control Of Gas Turbine Combustors Georgia Institute of Technology JS/TL 10/19/05 Advanced Sensors 10/19/05 2 Gas Turbine Need * Gas turbines must operate with ultra-low levels of pollutant emissions - Problem: lean, premixed operation causes minimal pollutant generation but introduces combustion problems, such as instabilities and blowoff * Combustor health and performance information needed to optimize engine across competing demands of emissions levels, power output, and

165

Control of xenon oscillations in Advanced Heavy Water Reactor via two-stage decomposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Xenon induced spatial oscillations developed in large nuclear reactors, like Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) need to be controlled for safe operation. Otherwise, a serious situation may arise in which different regions of the core may undergo variations in neutron flux in opposite phase. If these oscillations are left uncontrolled, the power density and rate of change of power at some locations in the reactor core may exceed their respective thermal limits, resulting in fuel failure. In this paper, a state feedback based control strategy is investigated for spatial control of AHWR. The nonlinear model of AHWR including xenon and iodine dynamics is characterized by 90 states, 5 inputs and 18 outputs. The linear model of AHWR, obtained by linearizing the nonlinear equations is found to be highly ill-conditioned. This higher order model of AHWR is first decomposed into two comparatively lower order subsystems, namely, 73rd order slow subsystem and 17th order fast subsystem using two-stage decomposition. Composite control law is then derived from individual subsystem feedback controls and applied to the vectorized nonlinear model of AHWR. Through the dynamic simulations it is observed that the controller is able to suppress xenon induced spatial oscillations developed in AHWR and the overall performance is found to be satisfactory.

R.K. Munje; J.G. Parkhe; B.M. Patre

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Rooftop Unit Suite: RTU Challenge, RTU Advanced Controls and RTU Smart Monitoring and Diagnostic System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Suite of Projects Suite of Projects RTU Suite: RTU Challenge, RTU Advanced Controls and RTU Smart Monitoring and Diagnostic System Michael Brambley, Ph.D. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Michael.Brambley@pnnl.gov (509) 375-6875 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Packaged air conditioners and heat pumps (RTUs) are used in about 58% of all cooled commercial buildings, serving about 69% of the cooled commercial building floor space (EIA 2003) - Navigant estimates that packaged air conditioners

167

Rooftop Unit Suite: RTU Challenge, RTU Advanced Controls and RTU Smart Monitoring and Diagnostic System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Suite of Projects Suite of Projects RTU Suite: RTU Challenge, RTU Advanced Controls and RTU Smart Monitoring and Diagnostic System Michael Brambley, Ph.D. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Michael.Brambley@pnnl.gov (509) 375-6875 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Packaged air conditioners and heat pumps (RTUs) are used in about 58% of all cooled commercial buildings, serving about 69% of the cooled commercial building floor space (EIA 2003) - Navigant estimates that packaged air conditioners

168

Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation. Final report, October 1, 1988--March 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The initial goal of the research project was to develop methods of coal surface control in advanced froth flotation to achieve 90% pyritic sulfur rejection, while operating at Btu recoveries above 90% based on run-of-mine quality coal. Moreover, the technology is to concomitantly reduce the ash content significantly (to six percent or less) to provide a high-quality fuel to the boiler (ash removal also increases Btu content, which in turn decreases a coal`s emission potential in terms of lbs SO{sub 2}/million Btu). (VC)

Fuerstenau, D.W.; Hanson, J.S.; Diao, J.; Harris, G.H.; De, A.; Sotillo, F. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Somasundaran, P.; Harris, C.C.; Vasudevan, T.; Liu, D.; Li, C. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Hu, W.; Zou, Y.; Chen, W. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Choudhry, V.; Shea, S.; Ghosh, A.; Sehgal, R. [Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Building America Case Study: Advanced Boiler Load Monitoring Controllers, Chicago, Illinois (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Beyond these initial system efficiency upgrades are an emerging class of Advanced Load Monitoring (ALM) aftermarket controllers that dynamically respond to the boiler load, with claims of 10% to 30% of fuel savings over a heating season. For hydronic boilers specifically, these devices perform load monitoring, with continuous measurement of supply and in some cases return water temperatures. Energy savings from these ALM controllers are derived from dynamic management of the boiler differential, where a microprocessor with memory of past boiler cycles prevents the boiler from firing for a period of time, to limit cycling losses and inefficient operation during perceived low load conditions. These differ from OTR controllers, which vary boiler setpoint temperatures with ambient conditions while maintaining a fixed differential. PARR installed and monitored the performance of one type of ALM controller, the M2G from Greffen Systems, at multifamily sites in the city of Chicago and its suburb Cary, IL, both with existing OTR control. Results show that energy savings depend on the degree to which boilers are over-sized for their load, represented by cycling rates. Also savings vary over the heating season with cycling rates, with greater savings observed in shoulder months. Over the monitoring period, over-sized boilers at one site showed reductions in cycling and energy consumption in line with prior laboratory studies, while less over-sized boilers at another site showed muted savings.

PARR

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Final Report - ADVANCED LASER-BASED SENSORS FOR INDUSTRIAL PROCESS CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to capture the potential of real-time monitoring and overcome the challenges of harsh industrial environments, Los Gatos Research (LGR) is fabricating, deploying, and commercializing advanced laser-based gas sensors for process control monitoring in industrial furnaces (e.g. electric arc furnaces). These sensors can achieve improvements in process control, leading to enhanced productivity, improved product quality, and reduced energy consumption and emissions. The first sensor will utilize both mid-infrared and near-infrared lasers to make rapid in-situ measurements of industrial gases and associated temperatures in the furnace off-gas. The second sensor will make extractive measurements of process gases. During the course of this DOE project, Los Gatos Research (LGR) fabricated, tested, and deployed both in-situ tunable diode laser absorption spectrometry (TDLAS) analyzers and extractive Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (Off-Axis ICOS) analyzers.

Gupta, Manish; Baer, Douglas

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

171

Technology Reinvestment Program/Advanced ``Zero Emission'' Control Valve (Phase II)  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this effort are to determine, develop and demonstrate the feasibility of significantly reducing the cost and expanding the applications for a family of Advanced Zero Emissions Control Valves that meets the fugitive emissions requirements of the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act. This program is a direct technology spin-off from the valve technology that is critical to the US Navy's Nuclear Powered Fleet. These zero emissions valves will allow the Hydrocarbon and Chemical Processing Industries, etc., to maintain their competitiveness and still meet environmental and safety requirements. Phase 2 is directed at refining the basic technologies developed during Phase 1 so that they can be more readily selected and utilized by the target market. In addition to various necessary certifications, the project will develop a full featured digital controller with ``smart valve'' growth capability, expanding valve sizes/applications and identifying valve materials to permit applications in severe operational environments.

J. Napoleon

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Reactive Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Reactive maintenance follows a run-it-until-it-breaks strategy where no actions or efforts are taken to maintain equipment as intended by the manufacturer. Studies indicate this is still the predominant mode of maintenance for Federal facilities.

173

Advanced Combustion, Emission Control, Health Impacts, and Fuels Merit Review and Peer Evaluation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

06 06 a n n u a l p r o g r e s s r e p o r t L e s s d e p e n d e n c e o n f o r e i g n o i l t o d a y, a n d t r a n s i t i o n t o a p e t r o l e u m - f r e e , e m i s s i o n s - f r e e v e h i c l e t o m o r r o w . F r e e d o m C A r A n d V e h i C l e T e C h n o l o g i e s P r o g r A m AdvAnced combustion, emission controls, HeAltH impActs, And Fuels merit review And peer evAluAtion Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 October 2006 Dear Colleague: This document summarizes the comments provided by the Review Panel for the FY 2006 Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Combustion, Emission Controls, Health Impacts, and Fuels Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, the "ACE Review," held on May 15-18, 2006 at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The raw evaluations and comments of the panel were provided (with reviewers' names deleted) to the presenters in early June and were used by national laboratory

174

Controlling O&M Costs of Advanced SMRs using Prognostics and Enhanced Risk Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Advanced small modular reactors (AdvSMRs) can contribute to safe, sustainable, and carbon-neutral energy production. The economics of small reactors (including AdvSMRs) will be impacted by the reduced economy-of-scale savings when compared to traditional light water reactors. The most significant controllable element of the day-to-day costs involves operations and maintenance (O&M). Enhancing affordability of AdvSMRs through technologies that help control O&M costs will be critical to ensuring their practicality for wider deployment.A significant component of O&M costs is the management and mitigation of degradation of components due to their impact on planning maintenance activities and staffing levels. Technologies that help characterize real-time risk of failure of key components are important in this context. Given the possibility of frequently changing AdvSMR plant configurations, approaches are needed to integrate three elements advanced plant configuration information, equipment condition information, and risk monitors to provide a measure of risk that is customized for each AdvSMR unit and support real-time decisions on O&M. This article describes an overview of ongoing research into diagnostics/prognostics and enhanced predictive risk monitors (ERM) for this purpose.

Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Coles, Garill A.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Coble, Jamie B.; Wood, Richard T.

2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

175

Geometry and Structural Properties for the Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART) from Model Tuning: August 25, 2003--November 30, 2003  

SciTech Connect

The Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART) is a modified Westinghouse WWG-0600 machine rated at 600 kW. It is located at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) in Boulder, Colorado, and has been installed to test new control schemes for power and load regulation. In its original configuration, the WWG-0600 uses a synchronous generator, fluid coupling, and hydraulic collective pitch actuation. However, the CART is fitted with an induction generator, rigid coupling, and individual electromechanical pitch actuators. The rotor runs upwind of the tower and consists of two blades and a teetering hub. In order to design advanced control schemes for the CART, representative computational models are essential.

Stol, K. A.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Reactive Power Compensator.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation. 26 figs.

El-Sharkawi, M.A.; Venkata, S.S.; Chen, M.; Andexler, G.; Huang, T.

1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

177

Reactive power compensator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation.

El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A. (Renton, WA); Venkata, Subrahmanyam S. (Woodinville, WA); Chen, Mingliang (Kirkland, WA); Andexler, George (Everett, WA); Huang, Tony (Seattle, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Advanced Instrumentation and Control Methods for Small and Medium Reactors with IRIS Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

Development and deployment of small-scale nuclear power reactors and their maintenance, monitoring, and control are part of the mission under the Small Modular Reactor (SMR) program. The objectives of this NERI-consortium research project are to investigate, develop, and validate advanced methods for sensing, controlling, monitoring, diagnosis, and prognosis of these reactors, and to demonstrate the methods with application to one of the proposed integral pressurized water reactors (IPWR). For this project, the IPWR design by Westinghouse, the International Reactor Secure and Innovative (IRIS), has been used to demonstrate the techniques developed under this project. The research focuses on three topical areas with the following objectives. Objective 1 - Develop and apply simulation capabilities and sensitivity/uncertainty analysis methods to address sensor deployment analysis and small grid stability issues. Objective 2 - Develop and test an autonomous and fault-tolerant control architecture and apply to the IRIS system and an experimental flow control loop, with extensions to multiple reactor modules, nuclear desalination, and optimal sensor placement strategy. Objective 3 - Develop and test an integrated monitoring, diagnosis, and prognosis system for SMRs using the IRIS as a test platform, and integrate process and equipment monitoring (PEM) and process and equipment prognostics (PEP) toolboxes. The research tasks are focused on meeting the unique needs of reactors that may be deployed to remote locations or to developing countries with limited support infrastructure. These applications will require smaller, robust reactor designs with advanced technologies for sensors, instrumentation, and control. An excellent overview of SMRs is described in an article by Ingersoll (2009). The article refers to these as deliberately small reactors. Most of these have modular characteristics, with multiple units deployed at the same plant site. Additionally, the topics focus on meeting two of the eight needs outlined in the recently published 'Technology Roadmap on Instrumentation, Control, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) to Support DOE Advanced Nuclear Energy Programs' which was created 'to provide a systematic path forward for the integration of new ICHMI technologies in both near-term and future nuclear power plants and the reinvigoration of the U.S. nuclear ICHMI community and capabilities.' The research consortium is led by The University of Tennessee (UT) and is focused on three interrelated topics: Topic 1 (simulator development and measurement sensitivity analysis) is led by Dr. Mike Doster with Dr. Paul Turinsky of North Carolina State University (NCSU). Topic 2 (multivariate autonomous control of modular reactors) is led by Dr. Belle Upadhyaya of the University of Tennessee (UT) and Dr. Robert Edwards of Penn State University (PSU). Topic 3 (monitoring, diagnostics, and prognostics system development) is led by Dr. Wes Hines of UT. Additionally, South Carolina State University (SCSU, Dr. Ken Lewis) participated in this research through summer interns, visiting faculty, and on-campus research projects identified throughout the grant period. Lastly, Westinghouse Science and Technology Center (Dr. Mario Carelli) was a no-cost collaborator and provided design information related to the IRIS demonstration platform and defining needs that may be common to other SMR designs. The results of this research are reported in a six-volume Final Report (including the Executive Summary, Volume 1). Volumes 2 through 6 of the report describe in detail the research and development under the topical areas. This volume serves to introduce the overall NERI-C project and to summarize the key results. Section 2 provides a summary of the significant contributions of this project. A list of all the publications under this project is also given in Section 2. Section 3 provides a brief summary of each of the five volumes (2-6) of the report. The contributions of SCSU are described in Section 4, including a summary of undergraduate research exper

J. Wesley Hines; Belle R. Upadhyaya; J. Michael Doster; Robert M. Edwards; Kenneth D. Lewis; Paul Turinsky; Jamie Coble

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

Integration of Advanced Emissions Controls to Produce Next-Generation Circulating Fluid Bed Coal Generating Unit (withdrawn prior to award)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

contacts contacts Brad tomer Director Office of Major Demonstrations National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4692 brad.tomer@netl.doe.gov PaRtIcIPant Colorado Springs Utilities Colorado Springs, CO aDDItIonaL tEaM MEMBERs Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. Clinton, NJ IntegratIon of advanced emIssIons controls to Produce next-generatIon cIrculatIng fluId Bed coal generatIng unIt (wIthdrawn PrIor to award) Project Description Colorado Springs Utilities (Springs Utilities) and Foster Wheeler are planning a joint demonstration of an advanced coal-fired electric power plant using advanced, low-cost emission control systems to produce exceedingly low emissions. Multi- layered emission controls will be

180

Controlling reactivity of nanoporous catalyst materials by tuning reaction product-pore interior interactions: Statistical mechanical modeling  

SciTech Connect

Statistical mechanical modeling is performed of a catalytic conversion reaction within a functionalized nanoporous material to assess the effect of varying the reaction product-pore interior interaction from attractive to repulsive. A strong enhancement in reactivity is observed not just due to the shift in reaction equilibrium towards completion but also due to enhanced transport within the pore resulting from reduced loading. The latter effect is strongest for highly restricted transport (single-file diffusion), and applies even for irreversible reactions. The analysis is performed utilizing a generalized hydrodynamic formulation of the reaction-diffusion equations which can reliably capture the complex interplay between reaction and restricted transport.

Wang, Jing [Ames Laboratory; Ackerman, David M. [Ames Laboratory; Lin, Victor S.-Y. [Ames Laboratory; Pruski, Marek [Ames Laboratory; Evans, James W. [Ames Laboratory

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced reactivity controlled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Production of potato minitubers using advanced environmental control technologies developed for growing plants in space  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Development of plant growth systems for use in outer space have been modified for use on earth as the backbone of a new system for rapid growth of potato minitubers. The automation of this new biotechnology provides for a fully controllable method of producing pathogen-free nuclear stock potato minitubers from tissue cultured clones of varieties of potato in a biomanufacturing facility. These minitubers are the beginning stage of seed potato production. Because the new system provides for pathogen-free minitubers by the tens-of-millions rather than by the thousands which are currently produced in advanced seed potato systems a new-dimension in seed potato development breeding and multiplication has been achieved. The net advantage to earth-borne agricultural farming systems will be the elimination of several years of seed multiplication from the current system higher quality potato production and access to new potato varieties resistant to diseases and insects which will eliminate the need for chemical controls.

Robert G. Britt

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Advanced Communication and Control for Distributed Energy Resource Integration: Phase 2 Scientific Report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project is to demonstrate sensing, communication, information and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of multivendor distributed energy resource (DER) units at aggregation levels that meet individual user requirements for facility operations (residential, commercial, industrial, manufacturing, etc.) and further serve as resource options for electric and natural gas utilities. The fully demonstrated DER aggregation system with embodiment of communication and control technologies will lead to real-time, interactive, customer-managed service networks to achieve greater customer value. Work on this Advanced Communication and Control Project (ACCP) consists of a two-phase approach for an integrated demonstration of communication and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of DER units to reach progressive levels of aggregated power output. Phase I involved design and proof-of-design, and Phase II involves real-world demonstration of the Phase I design architecture. The scope of work for Phase II of this ACCP involves demonstrating the Phase I design architecture in large scale real-world settings while integrating with the operations of one or more electricity supplier feeder lines. The communication and control architectures for integrated demonstration shall encompass combinations of software and hardware components, including: sensors, data acquisition and communication systems, remote monitoring systems, metering (interval revenue, real-time), local and wide area networks, Web-based systems, smart controls, energy management/information systems with control and automation of building energy loads, and demand-response management with integration of real-time market pricing. For Phase II, BPL Global shall demonstrate the Phase I design for integrating and controlling the operation of more than 10 DER units, dispersed at various locations in one or more Independent System Operator (ISO) Control Areas, at an aggregated scale of more than 1 MW, to provide grid support. Actual performance data with respect to each specified function above is to be collected during the Phase II field demonstration. At a minimum, the Phase II demonstration shall span one year of field operations. The demonstration performance will need to be validated by the target customer(s) for acceptance and subsequent implementation. An ISO must be involved in demonstration planning and execution. As part of the Phase II work, BPL Global shall develop a roadmap to commercialization that identifies and quantifies the potential markets for the integrated, aggregated DER systems and for the communication and control technologies demonstrated in Phase I. In addition, the roadmap must identify strategies and actions, as well as the regional and national markets where the aggregated DER systems with communication and control solutions will be introduced, along with a timeline projected for introduction into each identified market. In Phase I of this project, we developed a proof-of-concept ACCP system and architecture and began to test its functionality at real-world sites. These sites had just over 10 MW of DERs and allowed us to identify what needed to be done to commercialize this concept. As a result, we started Phase II by looking at our existing platform and identified its strengths and weaknesses as well as how it would need to evolve for commercialization. During this process, we worked with different stakeholders in the market including: Independent System Operators, DER owners and operators, and electric utility companies to fully understand the issues from all of the different perspectives. Once we had an understanding of the commercialized ACCP system, we began to document and prepare detailed designs of the different system components. The components of the system with the most significant design improvements were: the on-site remote terminal unit, the communication technology between the remote site and the data center, and the scalability and reliability of the data center application.

BPL Global

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

183

OSCAR API v2.1: Extensions for an Advanced Accelerator Control Scheme to a Low-Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OSCAR API v2.1: Extensions for an Advanced Accelerator Control Scheme to a Low-Power Multicore API optimization and low-power optimization, has been developed. Furthermore, the OSCAR API has been also developed, AMD, Tilera, Fujitsu, Renesas Electronics, and so on. The OSCAR API v1.0 and v2.0 have been opened

Kasahara, Hironori

184

Demonstrations of Integrated Advanced Rooftop Unit Controls and Automated Fault Detection and Diagnostics- 2014 BTO Peer Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presenter: Srinivas Katipamula, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory This multiyear research and development project aims to determine the magnitude of energy savings achievable by retrofitting existing packaged rooftop air conditioner units (RTUs) with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for packaged units.

185

DOE Project: Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies "University Research in Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control" Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the present technology development was to increase the efficiency of internal combustion engines while minimizing the energy penalty of meeting emissions regulations. This objective was achieved through experimentation and the development of advanced combustion regimes and emission control strategies, coupled with advanced petroleum and non-petroleum fuel formulations. To meet the goals of the project, it was necessary to improve the efficiency of expansion work extraction, and this required optimized combustion phasing and minimized in-cylinder heat transfer losses. To minimize fuel used for diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration, soot emissions were also minimized. Because of the complex nature of optimizing production engines for real-world variations in fuels, temperatures and pressures, the project applied high-fidelity computing and high-resolution engine experiments synergistically to create and apply advanced tools (i.e., fast, accurate predictive models) developed for low-emission, fuel-efficient engine designs. The companion experiments were conducted using representative single- and multi-cylinder automotive and truck diesel engines.

Reitz, Rolf; Foster, D.; Ghandhi, J.; Rothamer, D.; Rutland, C.; Sanders, S.; Trujillo, M.

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

186

Spacetime kinetics modeling of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor for control studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper presents the mathematical modeling of the spacetime kinetics phenomena in Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR), a 920MW (thermal), vertical pressure tube type thorium based nuclear reactor. The physical dimensions and the internal feedback effects of the AHWR are such that it is susceptible to xenon induced spatial oscillations. For the study of spatial effects and design of suitable control strategy, the need for a suitable mathematical model which is not of a very large order arises. In this paper, a mathematical model of the reactor within the framework of nodal modeling is derived with the two group neutron diffusion equation as the basis. A linear model in standard state space form is formulated from the set of equations so obtained. It has been shown that comparison of linear system properties could be helpful in deciding upon an appropriate nodalization scheme and thus obtaining a reasonably accurate model. For validation, the transient response of the simplified model has been compared with those from a rigorous finite-difference model.

S.R. Shimjith; A.P. Tiwari; M. Naskar; B. Bandyopadhyay

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Force-optimized alignment for optical control of the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present formalism and analysis of three active alignment reconstruction techniques applied to the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope. The three reconstructors generate optical...

Upton, Robert; Cho, Myung; Rimmele, Thomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced vehicle control Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a resolution of major vehicle components for advanced class vehicles and systems. The Cost Model ASCM estimates... -duty EPA vehicle classes can be considered for the life cycle...

189

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced vehicle control systems Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a resolution of major vehicle components for advanced class vehicles and systems. The Cost Model ASCM estimates... Automotive System Cost Modeling Tool (ASCM) T he affordability...

190

Development, Implementation, and Testing of Fault Detection Strategies on the National Wind Technology Center's Controls Advanced Research Turbines  

SciTech Connect

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Wind Technology Center dedicates two 600 kW turbines for advanced control systems research. A fault detection system for both turbines has been developed, analyzed, and improved across years of experiments to protect the turbines as each new controller is tested. Analysis of field data and ongoing fault detection strategy improvements have resulted in a system of sensors, fault definitions, and detection strategies that have thus far been effective at protecting the turbines. In this paper, we document this fault detection system and provide field data illustrating its operation while detecting a range of failures. In some cases, we discuss the refinement process over time as fault detection strategies were improved. The purpose of this article is to share field experience obtained during the development and field testing of the existing fault detection system, and to offer a possible baseline for comparison with more advanced turbine fault detection controllers.

Johnson, K. E.; Fleming, P. A.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Qualification issues associated with the use of advanced instrumentation and control systems hardware in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

The instrumentation and control (I&C) systems in advanced reactors will make extensive use of digital controls, microprocessors, multiplexing, and Tiber-optic transmission. Elements of these advances in I&C have been implemented on some current operating plants. However, the widespread use of the above technologies, as well as the use of artificial intelligence with minimum reliance on human operator control of reactors, highlights the need to develop standards for qualifying I&C used in the next generation of nuclear power plants. As a first step in this direction, the protection system I&C for present-day plants was compared to that proposed for advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). An evaluation template was developed by assembling a configuration of a safety channel instrument string for a generic ALWR, then comparing the impact of environmental stressors on that string to their effect on an equivalent instrument string from an existing light water reactor. The template was then used to address reliability issues for microprocessor-based protection systems. Standards (or lack thereof) for the qualification of microprocessor-based safety I&C systems were also identified. This approach addresses in part issues raised in Nuclear Regulatory Commission policy document SECY-91-292. which recognizes that advanced I&C systems for the nuclear industry are ``being developed without consensus standards, as the technology available for design is ahead of the technology that is well understood through experience and supported by application standards.``

Korsah, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Antonescu, C. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Rockville, MD (United States). Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Advanced Power Electronic Interfaces for Distributed Energy Systems, Part 2: Modeling, Development, and Experimental Evaluation of Advanced Control Functions for Single-Phase Utility-Connected Inverter  

SciTech Connect

Integrating renewable energy and distributed generations into the Smart Grid architecture requires power electronic (PE) for energy conversion. The key to reaching successful Smart Grid implementation is to develop interoperable, intelligent, and advanced PE technology that improves and accelerates the use of distributed energy resource systems. This report describes the simulation, design, and testing of a single-phase DC-to-AC inverter developed to operate in both islanded and utility-connected mode. It provides results on both the simulations and the experiments conducted, demonstrating the ability of the inverter to provide advanced control functions such as power flow and VAR/voltage regulation. This report also analyzes two different techniques used for digital signal processor (DSP) code generation. Initially, the DSP code was written in C programming language using Texas Instrument's Code Composer Studio. In a later stage of the research, the Simulink DSP toolbox was used to self-generate code for the DSP. The successful tests using Simulink self-generated DSP codes show promise for fast prototyping of PE controls.

Chakraborty, S.; Kroposki, B.; Kramer, W.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

DAINTREE NETWORKS PARTNERS WITH CLTC TO ADVANCE LIGHTING CONTROLS UC Davis' California Lighting Technology Center (CLTC) and Daintree team up to increase adoption with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- more - DAINTREE NETWORKS PARTNERS WITH CLTC TO ADVANCE LIGHTING CONTROLS UC Davis' California affiliate partnership with UC Davis' California Lighting Technology Center (CLTC) with the goal of advancing wireless smart building solutions for enterprise control and energy management, today announced its

California at Davis, University of

194

Proceedings of the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting: Volume 1, Plenary session; Advanced reactor research; advanced control system technology; advanced instrumentation and control hardware; human factors research; probabilistic risk assessment topics; thermal hydraulics; thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs  

SciTech Connect

This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25--27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. This document, Volume 1 covers the following topics: Advanced Reactor Research; Advanced Instrumentation and Control Hardware; Advanced Control System Technology; Human Factors Research; Probabilistic Risk Assessment Topics; Thermal Hydraulics; and Thermal Hydraulic Research for Advanced Passive Light Water Reactors.

Monteleone, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [comp.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

The US Department of Energy`s advanced environmental control technology program  

SciTech Connect

The US electric-utility industry faces a number of environmental challenges. Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAA) is requiring significant reductions in sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) from coal-fired electric-utility boilers. Under Tide III of the CAA, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is evaluating the emission of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from electric-utility steam generating units and is conducting a separate assessment of the potential health and environmental effects of mercury. These studies will serve as the basis for determining whether or not there is a need to regulate HAP emissions from the utility sector. In addition, EPA has recently issued draft revised National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for both fine particulates and ozone. Point sources of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} including coal-fired boilers, will be reviewed as States move to comply with the revised NAAQS. Finally, recent debate concerning greenhouse gases has included proposals to reduce the level of carbon dioxide (CO) emitted from large, stationary sources. The continued production of low-cost, environmentally sound electricity will require a well-focused, cooperative research and development (R&D) effort between government and industry. To this end, the U.S. Department of Energy`s Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) is carrying out an R&D program aimed at the development of environmental control technology suitable for incorporation into existing plants and/or integrated into advanced power systems. The program encompasses a wide-range of R&D projects, from laboratory investigations to pilot-scale testing and evaluation. A summary of FETC`s environmental technology R&D activities in the areas of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and fine particulates, HAPs (air toxics), and CO{sub 2} is provided.

Feeley, T.J. III; Ruth, L.A. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Fuel Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity  

SciTech Connect

A method for measuring the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity in a heterogeneous nuclear reactor is presented. The method, which is used during normal operation, requires that calibrated control rods be oscillated in a special way at a high reactor power level. The value of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity is found from the measured flux responses to these oscillations. Application of the method in a Savannah River reactor charged with natural uranium is discussed.

Loewe, W.E.

2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

Survey of advances in guidance, navigation, and control of unmanned rotorcraft systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently, there has been growing interest in developing unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) with advanced onboard autonomous capabilities. This paper describes the current state of the art in autonomous rotorcraft UAS (RUAS) and provides a detailed literature ...

Farid Kendoul

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Coal surface control for advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies. Final report, September 19, 1988--August 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This final report presents the research work carried out on the Coal Surface Control for Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning Technologies project, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE/PETC). The project was to support the engineering development of the selective agglomeration technology in order to reduce the sulfur content of US coals for controlling SO{sub 2} emissions (i.e., acid rain precursors). The overall effort was a part of the DOE/PETCs Acid Rain Control Initiative (ARCI). The overall objective of the project is to develop techniques for coal surface control prior to the advanced physical fine coal cleaning process of selective agglomeration in order to achieve 85% pyrite sulfur rejection at an energy recovery greater than 85% based on run-of-mine coal. The surface control is meant to encompass surface modification during grinding and laboratory beneficiation testing. The project includes the following tasks: Project planning; methods for analysis of samples; development of standard beneficiation test; grinding studies; modification of particle surface; and exploratory R&D and support. The coal samples used in this project include three base coals, Upper Freeport - Indiana County, PA, Pittsburgh NO. 8 - Belmont County, OH, and Illinois No. 6 - Randolph County, IL, and three additional coals, Upper Freeport - Grant County- WV, Kentucky No. 9 Hopkins County, KY, and Wyodak - Campbell County, WY. A total of 149 drums of coal were received.

Morsi, B.I.; Chiang, S.H.; Sharkey, A.; Blachere, J.; Klinzing, G.; Araujo, G.; Cheng, Y.S.; Gray, R.; Streeter, R.; Bi, H.; Campbell, P.; Chiarlli, P.; Ciocco, M.; Hittle, L.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.; Perez, L.; Venkatadri, R.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

Chemistry & Physics at Interfaces | Advanced Materials | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxide Interfaces Chemical Imaging Grain Boundaries Related Research Materials Synthesis from Atoms to Systems Materials Characterization Materials Theory and Simulation Energy Frontier Research Centers Advanced Materials Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials | Research Areas | Chemistry and Physics at Interfaces SHARE Chemistry and Physics at Interfaces Chemical transformations and physical phenomena at gas, liquid and solid interfaces lie at the heart of today's energy technologies. They underpin ORNL's research strategies to deliver scientific discoveries and technical breakthroughs that will accelerate the development and deployment of solutions in clean energy. Understanding, predicting and controlling the structure, transport and reactivity at interfaces will lead to advances in

200

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced process control Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: Reinforcement Learning Based Neural Controllers for Dynamic Processes without Exploration Frank... , the controller is able to learn offline on observed training data...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced reactivity controlled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced branching control Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

control... caused by hard-to-predict branch mispredictions, by collapsing multiple control flow paths and scheduling... - tion of the branch guarding predicate. Depending on...

202

Microsoft Word - Advanced Control Methods_Final_v2_0.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and control are normally integrated with a station computer, providing human-machine interface for local control, monitoring, and system configuration. * Makes the substation...

203

An advanced economizer controller for dual-duct air-handling systems -- with a case application  

SciTech Connect

A heating penalty is expected when economizers are applied to dual-duct air-handling systems. The heating penalty can be even higher than the cooling savings when the hot airflow is higher than the cold airflow. To avoid the excessive heating penalty, advanced economizers are developed in this paper. The application of the advanced economizer has resulted in savings of $7,000/yr in one 95,000-ft{sup 2} (8,800-m{sup 2}) school building since 1993. The impacts of cold and hot deck settings on the energy consumption are also discussed.

Liu, M.; Claridge, D.E. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Park, B.Y. [Engineering Education Inst., Inchon (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Architectural Engineering

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

204

BioSim: An Integrated Simulation of an Advanced Life Support System for Intelligent Control Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waste heat. · Waste: collects and conditions waste material from anywhere in the vehicle revitalization, water recovery, food production, solid waste processing and the crew. The goal of autonomously acceptable food, and managing wastes. A typical advanced life support system consists of the following

Kortenkamp, David

205

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced control methods Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

network is largely deter- mined by its flow-control: the method used... -the-fly scheduling of existing flow-control methods idles each buffer for a considerable period...

206

Experimental Investigation of Fuel-Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion Mode in a Multi-Cylinder, Light-Duty Diesel Engine  

SciTech Connect

An experimental study was performed to provide the combustion and emission characteristics resulting from fuel-reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) combustion mode utilizing dual-fuel approach in a light-duty, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In-cylinder fuel blending using port fuel injection of gasoline before intake valve opening (IVO) and early-cycle, direct injection of diesel fuel was used as the charge preparation and fuel blending strategy. In order to achieve the desired auto-ignition quality through the stratification of the fuel-air equivalence ratio ( ), blends of commercially available gasoline and diesel fuel were used. Engine experiments were performed at an engine speed of 2300rpm and an engine load of 4.3bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP). It was found that significant reduction in both nitrogen oxide (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was realized successfully through the RCCI combustion mode even without applying exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). However, high carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions were observed. The low combustion gas temperature during the expansion and exhaust processes seemed to be the dominant source of high CO emissions in the RCCI combustion mode. The high HC emissions during the RCCI combustion mode could be due to the increased combustion quenching layer thickness as well as the -stratification at the periphery of the combustion chamber. The slightly higher brake thermal efficiency (BTE) of the RCCI combustion mode was observed than the other combustion modes, such as the conventional diesel combustion (CDC) mode, and single-fuel, premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) combustion mode. The parametric study of the RCCI combustion mode revealed that the combustion phasing and/or the peak cylinder pressure rise rate of the RCCI combustion mode could be controlled by several physical parameters premixed ratio (rp), intake swirl intensity, and start of injection (SOI) timing of directly injected fuel unlike other low temperature combustion (LTC) strategies.

Cho, Kukwon [ORNL] [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL] [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL] [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL] [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced stability control Sample Search...  

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Stability Radius of an Optimal or an Approximate... background in production planning, scheduling and control, and in other real-life problems with sequencing... and the...

208

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced motion control Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sciences 4 An Efficient Method for Composing Whole Body Motions of a Humanoid Robot Summary: developments, there have been numerous studies about controlling whole body...

209

Real time voltage control using emergency demand response in distribution system by integrating advanced metering infrastructure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper an analytical study is reported to demonstrate the effects of demand response on distribution network voltages profile. Also a new approach for real time voltage control is proposed which uses emergency demand response program aiming at maintaining voltage profile in an acceptable range with minimum cost. This approach will be active in emergency conditions where in real time the voltages in some nodes leave their permissible ranges. These emergency conditions are Distributed Generation (DG) units and lines outage and unpredictable demand and renewable generations' fluctuations. The proposed approach does not need the load and renewable generation forecast data to regulate voltage. To verify the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed control scheme the proposed voltage control scheme is tested on a typical distribution network. The simulation results show the effectiveness and capability of the proposed real time voltage control model to maintain smart distribution network voltage in specified ranges in both normal and emergency conditions.

Alireza Zakariazadeh; Shahram Jadid

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

A Versatile and Powerful Simulator for Design, Advanced Control and Expert Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and powerful steady state simulator which has been satisfactorily applied to both on-line and off-line applications for plant utility and other process systems. Designated as MASSBAL MK II, the simulator has a unique architecture, menu/and or graphic... optimization Process synthesis Start-up,shut-down,on-line changes Training Debugging, trouble-shooting and monitoring Control Plantwide control, scheduling and Economic management [1] MASSBAL MK II was developed over a two-year period by SACDA...

Schindler, H. E.; Leaver, E. W.; Shewchuk, C. F.

211

Modular Inverter for Advanced Control Applications In the fall of 2003, a team of graduate students was assembled to design and construct a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a set of well-documented inverters of various ratings capable of quickly implementing a new control-powernts2\\ece power design archives\\documents\\specification documents\\sd00004-001 modular inverter systemModular Inverter for Advanced Control Applications May 2006 In the fall of 2003, a team of graduate

Kimball, Jonathan W.

212

PILOT-AND FULL-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF ADVANCED MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR LIGNITE-FIRED POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

North Dakota lignite-fired power plants have shown a limited ability to control mercury emissions in currently installed electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), dry scrubbers, and wet scrubbers (1). This low level of control can be attributed to the high proportions of Hg{sup 0} present in the flue gas. Speciation of Hg in flue gases analyzed as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) information collection request (ICR) for Hg data showed that Hg{sup 0} ranged from 56% to 96% and oxidized mercury ranged from 4% to 44%. The Hg emitted from power plants firing North Dakota lignites ranged from 45% to 91% of the total Hg, with the emitted Hg being greater than 85% elemental. The higher levels of oxidized mercury were only found in a fluidized-bed combustion system. Typically, the form of Hg in the pulverized and cyclone-fired units was dominated by Hg{sup 0} at greater than 85%, and the average amount of Hg{sup 0} emitted from North Dakota power plants was 6.7 lb/TBtu (1, 2). The overall objective of this Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) project is to develop and evaluate advanced and innovative concepts for controlling Hg emissions from North Dakota lignite-fired power plants by 50%-90% at costs of one-half to three-fourths of current estimated costs. The specific objectives are focused on determining the feasibility of the following technologies: Hg oxidation for increased Hg capture in wet and dry scrubbers, incorporation of additives and technologies that enhance Hg sorbent effectiveness in ESPs and baghouses, the use of amended silicates in lignite-derived flue gases for Hg capture, and the use of Hg adsorbents within a baghouse. The scientific approach to solving the problems associated with controlling Hg emissions from lignite-fired power plants involves conducting testing of the following processes and technologies that have shown promise on a bench, pilot, or field scale: (1) activated carbon injection (ACI) upstream of an ESP combined with sorbent enhancement, (2) Hg oxidation and control using wet and dry scrubbers, (3) enhanced oxidation at a full-scale power plant using tire-derived fuel (TDF) and oxidizing catalysts, and (4) testing of Hg control technologies in the Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter insert.

Steven A. Benson; Charlene R. Crocker; Kevin C. Galbreath; Jay R. Gunderson; Mike J. Holmes; Jason D. Laumb; Michelle R. Olderbak; John H. Pavlish; Li Yan; Ye Zhuang; Jill M. Zola

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Field Test Results from Lidar Measured Yaw Control for Improved Yaw Alignment with the NREL Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes field tests of a light detection and ranging (lidar) device placed forward looking on the nacelle of a wind turbine and used as a wind direction measurement to directly control the yaw position of a wind turbine. Conventionally, a wind turbine controls its yaw direction using a nacelle-mounted wind vane. If there is a bias in the measurement from the nacelle-mounted wind vane, a reduction in power production will be observed. This bias could be caused by a number of issues such as: poor calibration, electromagnetic interference, rotor wake, or other effects. With a lidar mounted on the nacelle, a measurement of the wind could be made upstream of the wind turbine where the wind is not being influenced by the rotor's wake or induction zone. Field tests were conducted with the lidar measured yaw system and the nacelle wind vane measured yaw system. Results show that a lidar can be used to effectively measure the yaw error of the wind turbine, and for this experiment, they also showed an improvement in power capture because of reduced yaw misalignment when compared to the nacelle wind vane measured yaw system.

Scholbrock, A.; Fleming, P.; Wright, A.; Slinger, C.; Medley, J.; Harris, M.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Status Report on the Development of Micro-Scheduling Software for the Advanced Outage Control Center Project  

SciTech Connect

The long-term viability of existing nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States (U.S.) is dependent upon a number of factors, including maintaining high capacity factors, maintaining nuclear safety, and reducing operating costs, particularly those associated with refueling outages. Refueling outages typically take 20-30 days, and for existing light water NPPs in the U.S., the reactor cannot be in operation during the outage. Furthermore, given that many NPPs generate between $1-1.5 million/day in revenue when in operation, there is considerable interest in shortening the length of refueling outages. Yet, refueling outages are highly complex operations, involving multiple concurrent and dependent activities that are difficult to coordinate. Finding ways to improve refueling outage performance while maintaining nuclear safety has proven to be difficult. The Advanced Outage Control Center project is a research and development (R&D) demonstration activity under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program. LWRS is a R&D program which works with industry R&D programs to establish technical foundations for the licensing and managing of long-term, safe, and economical operation of current NPPs. The Advanced Outage Control Center project has the goal of improving the management of commercial NPP refueling outages. To accomplish this goal, this INL R&D project is developing an advanced outage control center (OCC) that is specifically designed to maximize the usefulness of communication and collaboration technologies for outage coordination and problem resolution activities. This report describes specific recent efforts to develop a capability called outage Micro-Scheduling. Micro-Scheduling is the ability to allocate and schedule outage support task resources on a sub-hour basis. Micro-Scheduling is the real-time fine-tuning of the outage schedule to react to the actual progress of the primary outage activities to ensure that support task resources are optimally deployed with the least amount of delay and unproductive use of resources. The remaining sections of this report describe in more detail the scheduling challenges that occur during outages, how a Micro-Scheduling capability helps address those challenges, and provides a status update on work accomplished to date and the path forward.

Shawn St. Germain; Kenneth Thomas; Ronald Farris; Jeffrey Joe

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Pre-Commercial Demonstration of Cost-Effective Advanced HVAC Controls- 2014 BTO Peer Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presenter: Hayden Reeve, United Technologies Research Center Optimal control coordination of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment can reduce energy by more than 20% over current building automation systems (BASs) but is not widely deployed due to challenges with complexity, scalability, and deployment.

216

Advanced emissions control development program. Quarterly technical progress report No. 9, October 1--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emission compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emission control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

Evans, A.P.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

217

Advanced control for power density maximization of the brushless DC generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-to line EMF............................... 129 96 Original phase EMF and current reference waveform................................... 130 97 Original phase EMF, current reference waveform, and controlled current... 130 98 Impact of the current... ................. 6 A. Mechanical structure of the BLDC generator .............................. 7 B. Permanent magnets of the BLDC generator................................. 10 C. Induced EMF of the BLDC generator...

Lee, Hyung-Woo

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

218

Advanced semiconductor fabrication process control using dual filter exponentially weighted moving average  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Semiconductor industry needs to meet high standards to ensure survival and success in the 21st century. Rising expectations from the customers are demanding the semiconductor industry to manufacture products with both accuracy and precision. To comply ... Keywords: Dual filter EWMA, EWMA, Process control, Run-to-run, Semiconductor fabrication process

Hyo-Heon Ko; Jihyun Kim; Sang-Hoon Park; Jun-Geol Baek; Sung-Shick Kim

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Reactivating personal memory 1 RUNNING HEAD: Reactivating personal memory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reactivating personal memory 1 RUNNING HEAD: Reactivating personal memory Modifying memory: Selectively enhancing and updating personal memories for a museum; Reactivating personal memory 2 Abstract Memory can be modified when reactivated

Schacter, Daniel

220

Joint System Prognostics For Increased Efficiency And Risk Mitigation In Advanced Nuclear Reactor Instrumentation and Control  

SciTech Connect

The science of prognostics is analogous to a doctor who, based on a set of symptoms and patient tests, assesses a probable cause, the risk to the patient, and a course of action for recovery. While traditional prognostics research has focused on the aspect of hydraulic and mechanical systems and associated failures, this project will take a joint view in focusing not only on the digital I&C aspect of reliability and risk, but also on the risks associated with the human element. Model development will not only include an approximation of the control system physical degradation but also on human performance degradation. Thus the goal of the prognostic system is to evaluate control room operation; to identify and potentially take action when performance degradation reduces plant efficiency, reliability or safety.

Donald D. Dudenhoeffer; Tuan Q. Tran; Ronald L. Boring; Bruce P. Hallbert

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced reactivity controlled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

RM12-2703 Advanced Rooftop Unit Control Retrofit Kit Field Demonstration: Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

As part of its overall strategy to meet its energy goals, the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) partnered with U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to rapidly demonstrate and deploy cost-effective renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. This was one of several demonstrations of new and underutilized commercial energy efficiency technologies. The consistent year-round demand for air conditioning and dehumidification in Hawaii provides an advantageous demonstration location for advanced rooftop control (ARC) retrofit kits to packaged rooftop units (RTUs). This report summarizes the field demonstration of ARCs installed on nine RTUs serving a 70,000-ft2 exchange store (large retail) and two RTUs, each serving small office buildings located on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam (JBPHH).

Doebber, I.; Dean, J.; Dominick, J.; Holland, G.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Advanced Outage and Control Center: Strategies for Nuclear Plant Outage Work Status Capabilities  

SciTech Connect

The research effort is a part of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program. LWRS is a research and development program sponsored by the Department of Energy, performed in close collaboration with industry to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS Program serves to help the US nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. The Outage Control Center (OCC) Pilot Project was directed at carrying out the applied research for development and pilot of technology designed to enhance safe outage and maintenance operations, improve human performance and reliability, increase overall operational efficiency, and improve plant status control. Plant outage management is a high priority concern for the nuclear industry from cost and safety perspectives. Unfortunately, many of the underlying technologies supporting outage control are the same as those used in the 1980s. They depend heavily upon large teams of staff, multiple work and coordination locations, and manual administrative actions that require large amounts of paper. Previous work in human reliability analysis suggests that many repetitive tasks, including paper work tasks, may have a failure rate of 1.0E-3 or higher (Gertman, 1996). With between 10,000 and 45,000 subtasks being performed during an outage (Gomes, 1996), the opportunity for human error of some consequence is a realistic concern. Although a number of factors exist that can make these errors recoverable, reducing and effectively coordinating the sheer number of tasks to be performed, particularly those that are error prone, has the potential to enhance outage efficiency and safety. Additionally, outage management requires precise coordination of work groups that do not always share similar objectives. Outage managers are concerned with schedule and cost, union workers are concerned with performing work that is commensurate with their trade, and support functions (safety, quality assurance, and radiological controls, etc.) are concerned with performing the work within the plants controls and procedures. Approaches to outage management should be designed to increase the active participation of work groups and managers in making decisions that closed the gap between competing objectives and the potential for error and process inefficiency.

Gregory Weatherby

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

GUIDELINES FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF AN ADVANCED OUTAGE CONTROL CENTER TO IMPROVE OUTAGE COORDINATION, PROBLEM RESOLUTION, AND OUTAGE RISK MANAGEMENT  

SciTech Connect

This research effort is a part of the Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by Department of Energy (DOE) and performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs that provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS program serves to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. Managing NPP outages is a complex and difficult task due to the large number of maintenance and repair activities that are accomplished in a short period of time. During an outage, the outage control center (OCC) is the temporary command center for outage managers and provides several critical functions for the successful execution of the outage schedule. Essentially, the OCC functions to facilitate information inflow, assist outage management in processing information, and to facilitate the dissemination of information to stakeholders. Currently, outage management activities primarily rely on telephone communication, face to face reports of status, and periodic briefings in the OCC. It is a difficult task to maintain current the information related to outage progress and discovered conditions. Several advanced communication and collaboration technologies have shown promise for facilitating the information flow into, across, and out of the OCC. The use of these technologies will allow information to be shared electronically, providing greater amounts of real-time information to the decision makers and allowing OCC coordinators to meet with supporting staff remotely. Passively monitoring status electronically through advances in the areas of mobile worker technologies, computer-based procedures, and automated work packages will reduce the current reliance on manually reporting progress. The use of these technologies will also improve the knowledge capture and management capabilities of the organization. The purpose of this research is to improve management of NPP outages through the development of an advanced outage control center (AOCC) that is specifically designed to maximize the usefulness of communication and collaboration technologies for outage coordination and problem resolution activities. This technical report for industry implementation outlines methods and considerations for the establishment of an AOCC. This report provides a process for implementation of a change management plan, evaluation of current outage processes, the selection of technology, and guidance for the implementation of the selected technology. Methods are presented for both adoption of technologies within an existing OCC and for a complete OCC replacement, including human factors considerations for OCC design and setup.

Shawn St. Germain; Ronald Farris; April M. Whaley; Heather Medema; David Gertman

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Accelerating development of advanced inverters : evaluation of anti-islanding schemes with grid support functions and preliminary laboratory demonstration.  

SciTech Connect

The high penetration of utility interconnected photovoltaic (PV) systems is causing heightened concern over the effect that variable renewable generation will have on the electrical power system (EPS). These concerns have initiated the need to amend the utility interconnection standard to allow advanced inverter control functionalities that provide: (1) reactive power control for voltage support, (2) real power control for frequency support and (3) better tolerance of grid disturbances. These capabilities are aimed at minimizing the negative impact distributed PV systems may have on EPS voltage and frequency. Unfortunately, these advanced control functions may interfere with island detection schemes, and further development of advanced inverter functions requires a study of the effect of advanced functions on the efficacy of antiislanding schemes employed in industry. This report summarizes the analytical, simulation and experimental work to study interactions between advanced inverter functions and anti-islanding schemes being employed in distributed PV systems.

Neely, Jason C.; Gonzalez, Sigifredo; Ropp, Michael [Northern Plains Power Technologies, Brookings, SD] [Northern Plains Power Technologies, Brookings, SD; Schutz, Dustin [Northern Plains Power Technologies, Brookings, SD] [Northern Plains Power Technologies, Brookings, SD

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Advanced Models and Controls for Prediction and Extension of Battery Lifetime (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Predictive models of capacity and power fade must consider a multiplicity of degradation modes experienced by Li-ion batteries in the automotive environment. Lacking accurate models and tests, lifetime uncertainty must presently be absorbed by overdesign and excess warranty costs. To reduce these costs and extend life, degradation models are under development that predict lifetime more accurately and with less test data. The lifetime models provide engineering feedback for cell, pack and system designs and are being incorporated into real-time control strategies.

Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G.; Pesaran, A.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Advanced Sensing and Control Techniques to Facilitate Semi-Autonomous Decommissioning of Hazardous Sites - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes work after 4 years of a 3-year project (no-cost extension of the above-referenced project for a period of 12 months granted). The fourth generation of a vision sensing head for geometric and photometric scene sensing has been built and tested. Estimation algorithms for automatic sensor calibration updating under robot motion have been developed and tested. We have modified the geometry extraction component of the rendering pipeline. Laser scanning now produces highly accurate points on segmented curves. These point-curves are input to a NURBS (non-uniform rational B-spline) skinning procedure to produce interpolating surface segments. The NURBS formulation includes quadrics as a sub-class, thus this formulation allows much greater flexibility without the attendant instability of generating an entire quadric surface. We have also implemented correction for diffuse lighting and specular effects. The QRobot joint level control was extended to a complete semi-autonomous robot control system for D and D operations. The imaging and VR subsystems have been integrated and tested.

Schalkoff, R.J.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Finding the Controls of a Go-To Enzyme | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Watching Liquids Separate at White Heat Watching Liquids Separate at White Heat A New Spin on Inducing Chirality in Pre-biological Molecules How Ancient Rock Got Off to a Hot Start A Quantum of Vibration in an Unexpected Place A Virus That Can Infect Lung Cancer Cells Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Finding the Controls of a Go-To Enzyme DECEMBER 16, 2008 Bookmark and Share Overall structure shows of the calpain enzyme as determined by x-ray crystallography. A molecular enzyme that is involved in many necessary and beneficial cellular processes would seem to be a friend best left to go about its business. But when a defective or overactive variation of that same enzyme,

228

248 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER DELIVERY, VOL. 17, NO. 1, JANUARY 2002 Modeling, Analysis, and Control of a Current Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

--This paper presents a new approach for the dy- namic control of a current source inverter (CSI)-based STATic-commutated inverters to achieve advanced reactive power control have been confirmed by many researchers [1248 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER DELIVERY, VOL. 17, NO. 1, JANUARY 2002 Modeling, Analysis

Lehn, Peter W.

229

Advanced Rooftop Unit Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources News & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Energy Efficiency Emerging Technologies Current Research Portfolio Behavior Based...

230

Advanced Thermal Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of vendor heat exchanger NREL Data on heat flux (No Fins) NREL Data on pressure loss (No Fins) Heat Flux Accomplishments 20 16 12 8 4 0 Pressure Drop (psi) 47 47...

231

Instrumentation and Control and Human Machine Interface Science and Technology Roadmap in Support of Advanced Reactors and Fuel Programs in the U.S.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the current status of the Instrumentation, Control and Human Machine Interface (ICHMI) Science and Technology Roadmap (Reference xi) that was developed to address the major challenges in this technical area for the Gen IV and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiatives that support future deployments of nuclear energy systems. Reliable, capable ICHMI systems will be necessary for the advanced nuclear plants to be economically competitive. ICHMI enables measurement, control, protection, monitoring, and maintenance for processes and components. Through improvements in the technologies and demonstration of their use to facilitate licensing, ICHMI can contribute to the reduction of plant operations and maintenance costs while helping to ensure high plant availability. The impact of ICHMI can be achieved through effective use of the technologies to improve operational efficiency and optimize use of human resources. However, current licensing experience with digital I&C systems has provided lessons learned concerning the difficulties that can be encountered when introducing advanced technologies with expanded capabilities. Thus, in the development of advanced nuclear power designs, it will be important to address both the technical foundations of ICHMI systems and their licensing considerations. The ICHMI roadmap will identify the necessary research, development and demonstration activities that are essential to facilitate necessary technology advancement and resolve outstanding issues.

Miller, Don W.; Arndt, Steven A.; Dudenhoeffer, Donald D.; Hallbert, Bruce P.; Bond, Leonard J.; Holcomb, David E.; Wood, Richard T.; Naser, Joseph A.; O'Hara, John M.; Quinn, Edward L.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Reliability Analysis for the Advanced Electric Power Grid: From Cyber Control and Communication to Physical Manifestations of Failure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The advanced electric power grid is a cyber-physical system comprised of ... of the device and the reliability of the power grid on which they are deployed. The IEEE118...

Ayman Z. Faza; Sahra Sedigh

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Heavy-Duty Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced heavy...

234

Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Microminerals  

SciTech Connect

The overall purpose of the project is to explore and quantify the processes that control the formation and reactivity of biogenic iron microminerals and their impact on the solubility of metal contaminants. The research addresses how surface components of bacterial cells, extracellular organic material, and the aqueous geochemistry of the DIRB microenvironment impacts the mineralogy, chemical state and micromorphology of reduced iron phases.

Beveridge, Terrance J.; Glasauer, Susan; Korenevsky, Anton; Ferris, F. Grant

2000-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

235

Abstract. Current profile evolution will be controlled and sustained in the Alcator C-Mod Advanced Tokamak Lower  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tokamak Lower Hybrid Current Drive Experiment by use of 3 MW of 4.6 GHz Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD-Mod tokamak will allow research in advanced tokamak (AT) physics operation [1]. Three MW of power at 4.6 GHz

Basse, Nils Plesner

236

Oxyferryl Heme Reactivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxyferryl Heme Reactivity Using both Radiation and Photochemical Oxyferryl Heme Reactivity Using both Radiation and Photochemical Techniques A. M. English, T. Fox, G. Tsaprailis, C. W. Fenwick, J. F. Wishart, J. T. Hazzard, and G. Tollin Adv. Chem. Ser. 254, Ch. 6, pp. 81-98 Abstract: Flash photolysis and pulse radiolysis were used to generate reductants in situ to study the electron-transfer (ET) reactivity of the FeIV=O heme centers in myoglobin and cytochrome c peroxidase. Reduction of a5RuIII groups covalently bound to surface histidines allowed intramolecular RuII --> FeIV=O ET rates to be measured. Protonation of the oxene ligand was found to be largely rate determining in myoglobin, consistent with the lack of proton donors in its heme pocket. The large distance (21-23 Å) between surface histidines and the heme in wild-type

237

Reactivity of Acid Generators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactivity of Acid Generators for Chemically Amplified Resists with Reactivity of Acid Generators for Chemically Amplified Resists with Low-Energy Electrons Atsuro Nakano, Takahiro Kozawa, Seiichi Tagawa, Tomasz Szreder, James F. Wishart, Toshiyuki Kai and Tsutomu Shimokawa Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., 45, L197-L200 (2006). [Find paper at the Japanese Journal of Applied Physics] Abstract: In chemically amplified resists for ionizing radiations such as electron beams and extreme ultraviolet (EUV), low-energy electrons play an important role in the pattern formation processes. The reactivity of acid generators with low-energy electrons was evaluated using solvated electrons in tetrahydrofuran, which were generated by a pulsed electron beam. The rate constants of acid generators with the solvated electrons ranged from 0.6 to 1.9 x 1011 M-1s-1

238

Advanced Combustion Concepts - Enabling Systems and Solutions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

engine installed and vehicle available for application, emission and fuel economy optimization with advanced combustion modes. 4 Advanced combustion control strategy, capable of...

239

Reactive Gliosis Reactive Oxygen Species: Superoxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

motor output. Reafferent Control in Electric Communication Reafferent Control in Electric Communication Electrocommunication; Electrical communication Definition Every motor act that an animal produces will elicit sensory the night, and sensory feedback from skeletal muscles can be used to improve motor control. On the other

240

Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Combustion Advanced Combustion Engines to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Advanced Combustion Engines Combustion Engines Emission Control Waste Heat Recovery Fuels & Lubricants Materials Technologies Advanced Combustion Engines

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced reactivity controlled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Reactive Power Compensating System.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The circuit was designed for the specific application of wind-driven induction generators. It has great potential for application in any situation where a varying reactive power load is present, such as with induction motors or generators, or for transmission network compensation.

Williams, Timothy J.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.

1985-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

242

Reactive power compensating system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The reactive power of an induction machine is compensated by providing fixed capacitors on each phase line for the minimum compensation required, sensing the current on one line at the time its voltage crosses zero to determine the actual compensation required for each phase, and selecting switched capacitors on each line to provide the balance of the compensation required.

Williams, Timothy J. (Redondo Beach, CA); El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A. (Renton, WA); Venkata, Subrahmanyam S. (Seattle, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Biodiesel Fuel Property Effects on Particulate Matter Reactivity  

SciTech Connect

Controlling diesel particulate emissions to meet the 2007 U.S. standard requires the use of a diesel particulate filter (DPF). The reactivity of soot, or the carbon fraction of particulate matter, in the DPF and the kinetics of soot oxidation are important in achieving better control of aftertreatment devices. Studies showed that biodiesel in the fuel can increase soot reactivity. This study therefore investigated which biodiesel fuel properties impact reactivity. Three fuel properties of interest included fuel oxygen content and functionality, fuel aromatic content, and the presence of alkali metals. To determine fuel effects on soot reactivity, the performance of a catalyzed DPF was measured with different test fuels through engine testing and thermo-gravimetric analysis. Results showed no dependence on the aromatic content or the presence of alkali metals in the fuel. The presence and form of fuel oxygen was the dominant contributor to faster DPF regeneration times and soot reactivity.

Williams, A.; Black, S.; McCormick, R. L.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Proceedings of the 2002 Advanced Vehicle Control Conference, Hiroshima, Japan, September 2002 Control of a Hybrid Electric Truck Based on Driving  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is proposed. The design goal of the control strategy is to minimize fuel consumption and engine-out NOx and PM studied in this paper is a Class VI, 7.3L diesel engine truck (International Truck, 4700 series), mainly) and a 49KW electric motor was developed, and a sub-optimal controller which considers only fuel consumption

Peng, Huei

245

Reactive Air Aluminization  

SciTech Connect

Ferritic stainless steels and other alloys are of great interest to SOFC developers for applications such as interconnects, cell frames, and balance of plant components. While these alloys offer significant advantages (e.g., low material and manufacturing cost, high thermal conductivity, and high temperature oxidation resistance), there are challenges which can hinder their utilization in SOFC systems; these challenges include Cr volatility and reactivity with glass seals. To overcome these challenges, protective coatings and surface treatments for the alloys are under development. In particular, aluminization of alloy surfaces offers the potential for mitigating both evaporation of Cr from the alloy surface and reaction of alloy constituents with glass seals. Commercial aluminization processes are available to SOFC developers, but they tend to be costly due to their use of exotic raw materials and/or processing conditions. As an alternative, PNNL has developed Reactive Air Aluminization (RAA), which offers a low-cost, simpler alternative to conventional aluminization methods.

Choi, Jung-Pyung; Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

246

Application of Multivariable Model Predictive Advanced Control for a 2310T/H CFB Boiler Unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When a CFB boiler is in automatic control, there are ... non-linear combustion model, based on the CFB combustion characteristics of bed fuel inventory, heating values, bed lime inventory and consumption. CFB adv...

Zhao Weijie; Dai Zongllao; Gou Rong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

LIGHT WATER REACTOR SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM ADVANCED INSTRUMENTATION, INFORMATION, AND CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGIES TECHNICAL PROGRAM PLAN FOR 2013  

SciTech Connect

Reliable instrumentation, information, and control (II&C) systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration.

Bruce Hallbert; Ken Thomas

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Reactive Maintenance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactive Maintenance Reactive Maintenance Reactive Maintenance October 7, 2013 - 9:40am Addthis Reactive maintenance follows a run-it-until-it-breaks strategy where no actions or efforts are taken to maintain equipment as intended by the manufacturer. Studies indicate this is still the predominant mode of maintenance for Federal facilities. Advantages Reactive maintenance advantages are a double-edged sword. Federal agencies following a purely reactive maintenance strategy can expect little expenditures for manpower or system upkeep until something breaks. However, systems do break. With new equipment, Federal agencies can expect minimal incidents of failure. However, older equipment often experiences higher failure incidents and costlier repairs. Other advantages of reactive maintenance are:

249

In-Cylinder Mechanisms of PCI Heat-Release Rate Control by Fuel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Mechanisms of PCI Heat-Release Rate Control by Fuel Reactivity Stratification In-Cylinder Mechanisms of PCI Heat-Release Rate Control by Fuel Reactivity Stratification Explores...

250

U.S. Department Of Energy Advanced Small Modular Reactor R&D Program: Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) Pathway  

SciTech Connect

Instrumentation, controls, and human-machine interfaces (ICHMI) are essential enabling technologies that strongly influence nuclear power plant performance and operational costs. The nuclear power industry is currently engaged in a transition from traditional analog-based instrumentation, controls, and human-machine interface systems to implementations employing digital technologies. This transition has primarily occurred in an ad hoc fashion through individual system upgrades at existing plants and has been constrained by licenseability concerns. Although the recent progress in constructing new plants has spurred design of more fully digital plant-wide ICHMI systems, the experience base in the nuclear power application domain is limited. Additionally, development of advanced reactor concepts, such as Generation IV designs and small modular reactors, introduces different plant conditions (e.g., higher temperatures, different coolants, etc.) and unique plant configurations (e.g., multiunit plants with shared systems, balance of plant architectures with reconfigurable co-generation options) that increase the need for enhanced ICHMI capabilities to fully achieve industry goals related to economic competitiveness, safety and reliability, sustainability, and proliferation resistance and physical protection. As a result, significant challenges remain to be addressed to enable the nuclear power industry to complete the transition to safe and comprehensive use of modern ICHMI technology. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized that ICHMI research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) is needed to resolve the technical challenges that may compromise the effective and efficient utilization of modern ICHMI technology and consequently inhibit realization of the benefits offered by expanded utilization of nuclear power. Consequently, several DOE programs have substantial ICHMI RD&D elements within their respective research portfolios. This paper describes current ICHMI research in support of advanced small modular reactors. The objectives that can be achieved through execution of the defined RD&D are to provide optimal technical solutions to critical ICHMI issues, resolve technology gaps arising from the unique measurement and control characteristics of advanced reactor concepts, provide demonstration of needed technologies and methodologies in the nuclear power application domain, mature emerging technologies to facilitate commercialization, and establish necessary technical evidence and application experience to enable timely and predictable licensing. 1 Introduction Instrumentation, controls, and human-machine interfaces are essential enabling technologies that strongly influence nuclear power plant performance and operational costs. The nuclear power industry is currently engaged in a transition from traditional analog-based instrumentation, controls, and human-machine interface (ICHMI) systems to implementations employing digital technologies. This transition has primarily occurred in an ad hoc fashion through individual system upgrades at existing plants and has been constrained by licenseability concerns. Although the recent progress in constructing new plants has spurred design of more fully digital plant-wide ICHMI systems, the experience base in the nuclear power application domain is limited. Additionally, development of advanced reactor concepts, such as Generation IV designs and small modular reactors, introduces different plant conditions (e.g., higher temperatures, different coolants, etc.) and unique plant configurations (e.g., multiunit plants with shared systems, balance of plant architectures with reconfigurable co-generation options) that increase the need for enhanced ICHMI capabilities to fully achieve industry goals related to economic competitiveness, safety and reliability, sustainability, and proliferation resistance and physical protection. As a result, significant challenges remain to be addressed to enable the nuclear power industry to complete the transition to safe and comprehensive use of m

Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Wood, Richard Thomas [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Development of advanced direct perception displays for nuclear power plants to enhance monitoring, control and fault management. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

With recent theoretical and empirical research in basic and applied psychology, human factors, and engineering, it is now sufficient to define an integrated approach to the deign of advanced displays for present and future nuclear power plants. Traditionally, the conventional displays have shown operators the individual variables on gauges, meters, strip charts, etc. This design approach requires the operators to mentally integrate the separately displayed variables and determine the implications for the plant state. This traditional approach has been known as the single-sensor-single-indicator display design and it places an intolerable amount of mental workload on operators during transients and abnormal conditions. This report discusses a new alternative approach which is the use of direct perception interfaces. Direct perception a interfaces display the underlying physical and system constraints of the situation in a directly perceptual way, such that the viewer need not reason about what is seen to identify system states, but can identify the state of the system perceptually. It is expected that displays which show the dynamics of fundamental physical laws should better support operator decisions and diagnoses of plant states. The purpose of this research project is to develop a suite of direct perception displays for PWR nuclear power plant operations.

Jones, B.; Shaheen, S.; Moray, N.; Sanderson, P.; Reising, D.V.

1993-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

252

An advanced control system for fine coal flotation. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

A model-based flotation control scheme is being implemented to achieve optimal performance in the handling and treatment of fine coal. The control scheme monitors flotation performance through on-line analysis of ash content. Then, based on the economic and metallurgical performance of the circuit, variables such as reagent dosage, pulp density and pulp level are adjusted using model-based control algorithms to compensate for feed variations and other process disturbances. Recent developments in sensor technology are being applied for on-line determination of slurry ash content. During the fourth quarter of this project, a final attempt was made to calibrate a video-based ash analyzer for use in this application. It was concluded that the low ash content and the coarse particle size of the flotation tailings slurry at the Maple Meadow plant site made the video-based system unsuitable for this application. Plans are now underway to lease a nuclear-based analyzer as the primary sensor for this project.

Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.

1997-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

253

Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning: Recent Advances in Diagnostics and Controls to Improve Air-Handling System Performance  

SciTech Connect

The performance of air-handling systems in buildings needs to be improved. Many of the deficiencies result from myths and lore and a lack of understanding about the non-linear physical principles embedded in the associated technologies. By incorporating these principles, a few important efforts related to diagnostics and controls have already begun to solve some of the problems. This paper illustrates three novel solutions: one rapidly assesses duct leakage, the second configures ad hoc duct-static-pressure reset strategies, and the third identifies useful intermittent ventilation strategies. By highlighting these efforts, this paper seeks to stimulate new research and technology developments that could further improve air-handling systems.

Wray, Craig; Wray, Craig P.; Sherman, Max H.; Walker, I.S.; Dickerhoff, D.J.; Federspiel, C.C.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

AVESTAR® - Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control Control AVESTAR control system efforts are focused on development of computational approaches for simulation and advanced controls for energy systems. Power generation technologies are growing more sophisticated and require control strategies and systems to be updated to allow plant owners to take full advantage of their increased capabilities. A well designed control system can provide the ability to hit and maintain setpoints without oscillation for optimum power plant operation. Implementation of complex control systems developed through advanced computational approaches will increase efficiency and reduce emissions. The AVESTAR team is focusing on the following three areas of process control research: 1) Plant-wide control system design, 2) Advanced regulatory control, and 3) Advanced process control. Process control models, methods, and tools are developed and applied to a wide variety of energy systems ranging from smart plant to smart grid.

255

Advanced Reduction Processes - A New Class of Treatment Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new class of treatment processes called Advanced Reduction Processes (ARP) has been proposed. The ARPs combine activation methods and reducing agents to form highly reactive reducing radicals that degrade oxidized contaminants. Batch screening...

Vellanki, Bhanu Prakash

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

256

Technology advances for magnetic bearings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the state?of?the?art in magnetic bearing technology and applications and some of advances under development through the joint efforts of Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International and Auburn University. Advances in the areas of nonlinear control systems design digital controller implementation and power electronics are discussed.

Steve Nolan; John Y. Hung

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Advanced Windows Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exterior of Advanced Windows Test Facility Exterior of Advanced Windows Test Facility Advanced Windows Test Facility This multi-room laboratory's purpose is to test the performance and properties of advanced windows and window systems such as electrochromic windows, and automatically controlled shutters and blinds. The lab simulates real-world office spaces. Embedded instrumentation throughout the lab records solar gains and losses for specified time periods, weather conditions, energy use, and human comfort indicators. Electrochromic glazings promise to be a major advance in energy-efficient window technology, helping to achieve the goal of transforming windows and skylights from an energy liability in buildings to an energy source. The glazing can be reversibly switched from a clear to a transparent, colored

258

Compatibility Analysis on Existing Reactivity Devices in CANDU 6 Reactors for DUPIC Fuel Cycle  

SciTech Connect

The performance of reactivity devices for a Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) 6 reactor loaded with Direct Use of Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel In CANDU reactors (DUPIC) fuel is assessed. The reactivity devices studied are the zone controller units, the adjuster rods, and the mechanical control absorbers. For the zone controller system, the bulk reactivity control, spatial power control, and damping capability for spatial oscillation are investigated. For the adjusters, the xenon override, restart after a poison-out, shim operation, and power step-back capabilities are confirmed. The mechanical control absorber is assessed for the function of compensating temperature reactivity feedback following a power reduction. This study shows that the current reactivity device system of a CANDU 6 reactor is compatible with DUPIC fuel for normal and transient operations.

Jeong, Chang-Joon; Choi, Hangbok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2000-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactive Reactive Maintenance to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Federal Requirements Program Management Commissioning Metering Computerized Maintenance Management Systems Maintenance Types Reactive Preventive Predictive Reliability-Centered Major Equipment Types

260

Mechanical-plowing-based high-speed patterning on hard material via advanced-control and ultrasonic probe vibration  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we present a high-speed direct pattern fabrication on hard materials (e.g., a tungsten-coated quartz substrate) via mechanical plowing. Compared to other probe-based nanolithography techniques based on chemical- and/or physical-reactions (e.g., the Dip-pen technique), mechanical plowing is meritorious for its low cost, ease of process control, and capability of working with a wide variety of materials beyond conductive and/or soft materials. However, direct patterning on hard material faces two daunting challenges. First, the patterning throughput is ultimately hindered by the writing (plowing) speed, which, in turn, is limited by the adverse effects that can be excited/induced during high-speed, and/or large-range plowing, including the vibrational dynamics of the actuation system (the piezoelectric actuator, the cantilever, and the mechanical fixture connecting the cantilever to the actuator), the dynamic cross-axis coupling between different axes of motion, and the hysteresis and the drift effects related to the piezoelectric actuators. Secondly, it is very challenging to directly pattern on ultra-hard materials via plowing. Even with a diamond probe, the line depth of the pattern via continuous plowing on ultra-hard materials such as tungsten, is still rather small (<0.5 nm), particularly when the writing speed becomes high. To overcome these two challenges, we propose to utilize a novel iterative learning control technique to achieve precision tracking of the desired pattern during high-speed, large-range plowing, and introduce ultrasonic vibration of the probe in the normal (vertical) direction during the plowing process to enable direct patterning on ultra hard materials. The proposed approach was implemented to directly fabricate patterns on a mask with tungsten coating and quartz substrate. The experimental results demonstrated that a large-size pattern of four grooves (20 ?m in length with 300 nm spacing between lines) can be fabricated at a high speed of ?5 mm/s, with the line width and the line depth at ?95 nm and 2 nm, respectively. A fine pattern of the word NANO is also fabricated at the speed of ?5 mm/s.

Wang, Zhihua; Zou, Qingze, E-mail: qzzou@rci.rutgers.edu [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)] [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Tan, Jun; Jiang, Wei [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)] [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced reactivity controlled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Voltage Regulation through Smart Utilization of Potential Reactive Power Resources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The introduction of demand response concept, in addition to increment of penetration of distributed generation (DG) based on renewable energies, make opportunities for the novel control schemes to be integrated in power system on a smart grid framework. ... Keywords: Demand response, distributed generation, reactive power, renewable energy, smart grid, voltage control

H. Kazari; A. Abbaspour-Tehrani Fard; A. S. Dobakhshari; A. M. Ranjbar

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Goldschmidt Conference Abstracts 2008A888 Advances in elucidating reactivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, ZOJA VUKMANOVI! 2 AND ELMER WIERSMA 2 1 Dept. Geology & Mineralogy, Kyoto University, Japan (spengler@kueps.kyoto-u.ac.jp) 2 Institute Earth Sci, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, NL (gareth.davies@falw.vu.nl, elmer.wiersma

Sparks, Donald L.

263

Advancing reactive tracer methods for measuring thermal evolution...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

et al. (2003) - Use simplified geometry of hypothetical fracture system - Develop in MATLAB, to allow distribution to industry via the MATLAB compiler * Conducted 2-D finite...

264

Thermal Control & System Integration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The thermal control and system integration activity focuses on issues such as the integration of motor and power control technologies and the development of advanced thermal control technologies....

265

Effect of Fuel Wobbe Number on Pollutant Emissions from Advanced Technology Residential Water Heaters: Results of Controlled Experiments  

SciTech Connect

The research summarized in this report is part of a larger effort to evaluate the potential air quality impacts of using liquefied natural gas in California. A difference of potential importance between many liquefied natural gas blends and the natural gas blends that have been distributed in California in recent years is the higher Wobbe number of liquefied natural gas. Wobbe number is a measure of the energy delivery rate for appliances that use orifice- or pressure-based fuel metering. The effect of Wobbe number on pollutant emissions from residential water heaters was evaluated in controlled experiments. Experiments were conducted on eight storage water heaters, including five with ultra low-NO{sub X} burners, and four on-demand (tankless) water heaters, all of which featured ultra low-NO{sub X} burners. Pollutant emissions were quantified as air-free concentrations in the appliance flue and fuel-based emission factors in units of nanogram of pollutant emitter per joule of fuel energy consumed. Emissions were measured for carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub X}), nitrogen oxide (NO), formaldehyde and acetaldehyde as the water heaters were operated through defined operating cycles using fuels with varying Wobbe number. The reference fuel was Northern California line gas with Wobbe number ranging from 1344 to 1365. Test fuels had Wobbe numbers of 1360, 1390 and 1420. The most prominent finding was an increase in NO{sub X} emissions with increasing Wobbe number: all five of the ultra low-NO{sub X} storage water heaters and two of the four ultra low-NO{sub X} on-demand water heaters had statistically discernible (p<0.10) increases in NO{sub X} with fuel Wobbe number. The largest percentage increases occurred for the ultra low-NO{sub X} water heaters. There was a discernible change in CO emissions with Wobbe number for all four of the on-demand devices tested. The on-demand water heater with the highest CO emissions also had the largest CO increase with increasing fuel Wobbe number.

Rapp, VH; Singer, BC

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Lger A., Duval C., Weber P., Levrat E., Farret R. "BAYESIAN NETWORK MODELLING THE RISK ANALYSIS OF COMPLEX SOCIO TECHNICAL SYSTEMS". Submitted to: 4th Workshop on Advanced Control and Diagnosis, Nancy -France, 16 et 17 nov., 2006.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Probabilistic risk assessment. 1. INTRODUCTION In classified installations1 (nuclear power plants, chemical OF COMPLEX SOCIO TECHNICAL SYSTEMS". Submitted to: 4th Workshop on Advanced Control and Diagnosis, Nancy - France, 16 et 17 nov., 2006. BAYESIAN NETWORK MODELLING THE RISK ANALYSIS OF COMPLEX SOCIO TECHNICAL

Boyer, Edmond

267

E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic reactive power Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

power Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Power control of a wind farm with active stall wind turbines and AC grid connection Summary: , reactive power control and automatic voltage...

268

Metal-based reactive nanomaterials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent developments in materials processing and characterization resulted in the discovery of a new type of reactive materials containing nanoscaled metal components. The well-known high oxidation energies of metallic fuels can now be released very rapidly because of the very high reactive interface areas in such metal-based reactive nanomaterials. Consequently, these materials are currently being examined for an entire range of applications in energetic formulations inappropriate for conventional, micron-sized metal fuels having relatively low reaction rates. New application areas, such as reactive structural materials, are also being explored. Research remains active in manufacturing and characterization of metal-based reactive nanomaterials including elemental metal nanopowders and various nanocomposite material systems. Because of the nanometer scale of the individual particles, or phase domains, and because of the very high enthalpy of reaction between components of the nanocomposite materials, the final phase compositions, morphology, and thermodynamic properties of the reactive nanocomposite materials may be different from those of their micron-scaled counterparts. Ignition mechanisms in such materials can be governed by heterogeneous reactions that are insignificant for materials with less developed reactive interface areas. New combustion regimes are being observed that are affected by very short ignition delays combined with very high metal combustion temperatures. Current progress in this rapidly growing research area is reviewed and some potential directions for the future research are discussed.

Edward L. Dreizin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

COAL SLAGGING AND REACTIVITY TESTING  

SciTech Connect

Union Fenosa's La Robla I Power Station is a 270-MW Foster Wheeler arch-fired system. The unit is located at the mine that provides a portion of the semianthracitic coal. The remaining coals used are from South Africa, Russia, Australia, and China. The challenges at the La Robla I Station stem from the various fuels used, the characteristics of which differ from the design coal. The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) and the Lehigh University Energy Research Center (LUERC) undertook a program to assess problematic slagging and unburned carbon issues occurring at the plant. Full-scale combustion tests were performed under baseline conditions, with elevated oxygen level and with redistribution of air during a site visit at the plant. During these tests, operating information, observations and temperature measurements, and coal, slag deposit, and fly ash samples were obtained to assess slagging and unburned carbon. The slagging in almost all cases appeared due to elevated temperatures rather than fuel chemistry. The most severe slagging occurred when the temperature at the sampling port was in excess of 1500 C, with problematic slagging where first-observed temperatures exceeded 1350 C. The presence of anorthite crystals in the bulk of the deposits analyzed indicates that the temperatures were in excess of 1350 C, consistent with temperature measurements during the sampling period. Elevated temperatures and ''hot spots'' are probably the result of poor mill performance, and a poor distribution of the coal from the mills to the specific burners causes elevated temperatures in the regions where the slag samples were extracted. A contributing cause appeared to be poor combustion air mixing and heating, resulting in oxygen stratification and increased temperatures in certain areas. Air preheater plugging was observed and reduces the temperature of the air in the windbox, which leads to poor combustion conditions, resulting in unburned carbon as well as slagging. A second phase of the project involved advanced analysis of the baseline coal along with an Australian coal fired at the plant. These analysis results were used in equilibrium thermodynamic modeling along with a coal quality model developed by the EERC to assess slagging, fouling, and opacity for the coals. Bench-scale carbon conversion testing was performed in a drop-tube furnace to assess the reactivity of the coals. The Australian coal had a higher mineral content with significantly more clay minerals present than the baseline coal. The presence of these clay minerals, which tend to melt at relatively low temperatures, indicated a higher potential for problematic slagging than the baseline coal. However, the pyritic minerals, comprising over 25% of the baseline mineral content, may form sticky iron sulfides, leading to severe slagging in the burner region if local areas with reducing conditions exist. Modeling results indicated that neither would present significant fouling problems. The Australian coal was expected to show slagging behavior much more severe than the baseline coal except at very high furnace temperatures. However, the baseline coal was predicted to exhibit opacity problems, as well as have a higher potential for problematic calcium sulfate-based low-temperature fouling. The baseline coal had a somewhat higher reactivity than the Australian coal, which was consistent with both the lower average activation energy for the baseline coal and the greater carbon conversion at a given temperature and residence time. The activation energy of the baseline coal showed some effect of oxygen on the activation energy, with E{sub a} increasing at the lower oxygen concentration, but may be due to the scatter in the baseline coal kinetic values at the higher oxygen level tested.

Donald P. McCollor; Kurt E. Eylands; Jason D. Laumb

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Spatial xenon oscillation control with expert systems  

SciTech Connect

Spatial power oscillations were attributed to the xenon transients in a reactor core in 1958 by Randall and St. John. These transients are usually initiated by a local reactivity insertion and lead to divergent axial flux oscillations in the core at constant power. Several heuristic manual control strategies and automatic control methods were developed to damp the xenon oscillations at constant power operations. However, after the load-follow operation of the reactors became a necessity of life, a need for better control strategies arose. Even though various advanced control strategies were applied to solve the xenon oscillation control problem for the load-follow operation, the complexity of the system created difficulties in modeling. The strong nonlinearity of the problem requires highly sophisticated analytical approaches that are quite inept for numerical solutions. On the other hand, the complexity of a system and heuristic nature of the solutions are the basic reasons for using artificial intelligence techniques such as expert systems.

Alten, S. (Turkish Atomic Energy Authority, Ankara (Turkey)); Danofsky, R.A. (Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Electrocatalytic Reactivity for Oxygen Reduction of Palladium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactivity for Oxygen Reduction of Palladium-Modified Carbon Nanotubes Synthesized in Supercritical Fluid. Electrocatalytic Reactivity for Oxygen Reduction of Palladium-Modified...

272

Chemically Reactive Working Fluids | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chemically Reactive Working Fluids for the Capture and Transport of Concentrated Solar Thermal Energy for Power Generation Chemically Reactive Working Fluids SunShot CSP...

273

Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen on BaOPt(111). Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen on BaOPt(111). Abstract: The formation...

274

Rational Catalyst Design Applied to Development of Advanced Oxidation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Catalyst Design Applied to Development of Advanced Oxidation Catalysts for Diesel Emission Control Rational Catalyst Design Applied to Development of Advanced Oxidation...

275

Conservation of reactive electromagnetic energy in reactive time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The complex Poynting theorem (CPT) is extended to a canonical time-scale domain $(t,s)$. Time-harmonic phasors are replaced by the positive-frequency parts of general fields, which extend analytically to complex time $t+is$, with $s>0$ interpreted as a time resolution scale. The real part of the extended CPT gives conservation in $t$ of a time-averaged field energy, and its imaginary part gives conservation in $s$ of a time-averaged reactive energy. In both cases, the averaging windows are determined by a Cauchy kernel of width $\\Delta t\\sim \\pm s$. This completes the time-harmonic CPT, whose imaginary part is generally supposed to be vaguely `related to' reactive energy without giving a conservation law, or even an expression, for the latter. The interpretation of $s$ as reactive time, tracking the leads and lags associated with stored capacitative and inductive energy, gives a simple explanation of the volt-ampere reactive (var) unit measuring reactive power: a var is simply one Joule per reactive second. T...

Kaiser, Gerald

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

NETL: Advanced Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AR AR Coal and Power Systems Advanced Research 12.11.13: Request for Information entitled "Novel Crosscutting Research and Development to Support Advanced Energy Systems". Application due date is January 15, 2014. The RFI and/or instructions can be found on the FedConnect site at FedConnect. Achieving Successes in High Performance Materials, Coal Utilization Sciences, Sensors & Controls Innovations, Computational Energy Sciences, Cooperative Research and Development, and sponsoring Education Initiatives. The Advanced Research (AR) program within NETL's Office of Coal and Power Systems fosters the development of innovative, cost-effective technologies for improving the efficiency and environmental performance of advanced coal and power systems. In addition, AR bridges the gap between fundamental

277

Effect of burnup on ACR-700 3-D reactivity devices cross sections  

SciTech Connect

Full core analysis of typical power reactors being generally performed using few groups diffusion theory, it is necessary to generate beforehand, using a lattice code, the required few group cross sections and diffusion coefficients associated with each region in the core. For CANDU-type reactors including the Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR), the problem is more complex because these reactors contain vertical reactivity devices that are located between two horizontal fuel bundles. The usual calculation scheme relies in this case on a 2-D fuel cell calculation to generate the few group fuel properties and on a 3-D supercell calculation for the analysis of the reactivity devices present in the core. Because of its complexity, the supercell calculations are generally performed using simplified fuel geometries. In this paper, the different stages involved in the reactor physics simulations for ACR will be explained focusing particularly on a study of the burnup dependence of the incremental cross section associated with zone control units (ZCU). The use of these incremental cross sections for finite core calculations will also be presented. (authors)

Dahmani, M.; Marleau, G.; Varin, E. [Institut de Genie Nucleaire, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, 2900 Boulevard Edouard-Montpetit, Montreal, Que. H3T 1J4 (Canada)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Advanced Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Express Licensing Active Terahertz Metamaterial Devices Express Licensing Anion-Conducting Polymer, Composition, And Membrane Express Licensing Analysis Of Macromolecule, Liggands And Macromolecule-Lingand Complexes Express Licensing Carbon Microtubes Express Licensing Chemical Synthesis Of Chiral Conducting Polymers Express Licensing Forming Adherent Coatings Using Plasma Processing Express Licensing Hydrogen Scavengers Express Licensing Laser Welding Of Fused Quartz Express Licensing Multiple Feed Powder Splitter Negotiable Licensing Boron-10 Neutron Detectors for Helium-3 Replacement Negotiable Licensing Insensitive Extrudable Explosive Negotiable Licensing Durable Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) Express Licensing Method of Synthesis of Proton Conducting Materials

279

Advanced steel reheat furnace  

SciTech Connect

Energy and Environmental Research Corp. (EER) under a contract from the Department of Energy is pursuing the development and demonstration of an Advanced Steel Reheating Furnace. This paper reports the results of Phase 1, Research, which has evaluated an advanced furnace concept incorporating two proven and commercialized technologies previously applied to other high temperature combustion applications: EER`s gas reburn technology (GR) for post combustion NOx control; and Air Product`s oxy-fuel enrichment air (OEA) for improved flame heat transfer in the heating zones of the furnace. The combined technologies feature greater production throughput with associated furnace efficiency improvements; lowered NOx emissions; and better control over the furnace atmosphere, whether oxidizing or reducing, leading to better control over surface finish.

Moyeda, D.; Sheldon, M.; Koppang, R. [Energy and Environmental Research Corp., Irvine, CA (United States); Lanyi, M.; Li, X.; Eleazer, B. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Development of Methodologies for Technology Deployment for Advanced Outage Control Centers that Improve Outage Coordination, Problem Resolution and Outage Risk Management  

SciTech Connect

This research effort is a part of the Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by Department of Energy (DOE) and performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs that provides the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS program serves to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. The long term viability of existing nuclear power plants in the U.S. will depend upon maintaining high capacity factors, avoiding nuclear safety issues and reducing operating costs. The slow progress in the construction on new nuclear power plants has placed in increased importance on maintaining the output of the current fleet of nuclear power plants. Recently expanded natural gas production has placed increased economic pressure on nuclear power plants due to lower cost competition. Until recently, power uprate projects had steadily increased the total output of the U.S. nuclear fleet. Errors made during power plant upgrade projects have now removed three nuclear power plants from the U.S. fleet and economic considerations have caused the permanent shutdown of a fourth plant. Additionally, several utilities have cancelled power uprate projects citing economic concerns. For the past several years net electrical generation from U.S. nuclear power plants has been declining. One of few remaining areas where significant improvements in plant capacity factors can be made is in minimizing the duration of refueling outages. Managing nuclear power plant outages is a complex and difficult task. Due to the large number of complex tasks and the uncertainty that accompanies them, outage durations routinely exceed the planned duration. The ability to complete an outage on or near schedule depends upon the performance of the outage management organization. During an outage, the outage control center (OCC) is the temporary command center for outage managers and provides several critical functions for the successful execution of the outage schedule. Essentially, the OCC functions to facilitate information inflow, assist outage management in processing information and to facilitate the dissemination of information to stakeholders. Currently, outage management activities primarily rely on telephone communication, face to face reports of status and periodic briefings in the OCC. Much of the information displayed in OCCs is static and out of date requiring an evaluation to determine if it is still valid. Several advanced communication and collaboration technologies have shown promise for facilitating the information flow into, across and out of the OCC. Additionally, advances in the areas of mobile worker technologies, computer based procedures and electronic work packages can be leveraged to improve the availability of real time status to outage managers.

Shawn St. Germain; Ronald Farris; Heather Medeman

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced reactivity controlled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Joint Energy and Reactive Power Market Considering Coupled Active and Reactive Reserve Market Ensuring System Security  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reactive power market is usually held as independent from energy and reserved active power markets; however, active and reactive power are ... synchronous generator capacity curve. Therefore, reactive power market

Hamed Ahmadi; Asghar Akbari Foroud

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) - Cooperative multi...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

- Cooperative multi-party effort to characterize emissions and possible health effects of new advanced heavy duty engine and control systems and fuels in the market 2007 - 2010...

283

Advanced Photovoltaic Inverter Functionality using 500 kW Power Hardware-in-Loop Complete System Laboratory Testing: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

With the increasing penetration of distribution connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, more and more PV developers and utilities are interested in easing future PV interconnection concerns by mitigating some of the impacts of PV integration using advanced PV inverter controls and functions. This paper describes the testing of a 500 kW PV inverter using Power Hardware-in-Loop (PHIL) testing techniques. The test setup is described and the results from testing the inverter in advanced functionality modes, not commonly used in currently interconnected PV systems, are presented. PV inverter operation under PHIL evaluation that emulated both the DC PV array connection and the AC distribution level grid connection are shown for constant power factor (PF) and constant reactive power (VAr) control modes. The evaluation of these modes was completed under varying degrees of modeled PV variability.

Mather, B. A.; Kromer, M. A.; Casey, L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Advanced Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Systems: Advanced Systems: high Performance fenestration systems Research areas: Research activities to improve the performance of windows and other fenestration products must address window systems issues as well as Glazing Materials research. LBNL activities in the area of Advanced Systems include research at both the product level and the building envelope and building systems levels. Highly insulating windows - using non structural center layers Lower cost solutions to more insulating three layer glazing systems, with the potential to turn windows in U.S. heating dominated residential applications into net-energy gainers. Highly Insulating Window Frames In collaboration with the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, we are researching the potentials for highly insulating window frames. Our initial work examines European frames with reported U-factors under 0.15 Btu/hr-ft2-F. Future research aims to analyze these designs, verify these performance levels and ensure that procedures used to calculate frame performance are accurate.

285

NETL: Advanced Research - Successes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Successes Successes Advanced Research Successes Sensors & Controls "...Optical grade single-crystal sapphire optical fiber waveguides are especially attractive for fabricating sensors for the harsh high-temperature, corrosive environments found in gasifiers." Read More... "Industry adoption of CCADS will open the door to a new generation of more efficient, ultra-low emission turbines in advanced energy systems" Read More... Bioprocessing " Successful development and commercial application of this environmentally safe bacterial toxin will allow power plants to reduce or eliminate the use of chlorination, reducing the risk of harmful effects on aquatic ecosystems." Advanced Materials " This project will benefit gasification technology development and deployment by improving materials to contain and monitor gasification processes." Read More...

286

Fundamentals of Capacity Control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Whereas capacity planning determines in advance the capacities required to implement a production program, capacity control determines the actual capacities implemented shortly beforehand. The capacity control...

Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Hermann Ldding

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Triclosan Reactivity in Chloraminated Waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Triclosan Reactivity in Chloraminated Waters ... Triclosan, widely employed as an antimicrobial additive in many household personal care products, has recently been detected in wastewater treatment plant effluents and in source waters used for drinking water supplies. ... Chloramines used either as alternative disinfectants in drinking water treatment or formed during chlorination of nonnitrified wastewater effluents have the potential to react with triclosan. ...

Aimee E. Greyshock; Peter J. Vikesland

2006-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

288

Shaping the Next - Buildings and Energy: Advanced Lighting  

SciTech Connect

short bit on advanced lighting for the future relating specifically to controls and new tech such as LEDs

Richman, Eric E.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

A review of international cases of fault reactivation during mining subsidence and fluid abstraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reactivation, during coal mining subsidence, has been...intrusion at a longwall coal mine in Appalachia. 22nd International...on Ground Control in Mining, Morgantown, West Virginia...Muller, R.A. 1986. Coal mining under gas pipelines...

L.J. Donnelly

290

Using a DFIG-based wind farm for grid node reactive power compensation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Grid nodes voltages are not allowed to deviate excessively from nominal value. Appropriate measures should be taken to prevent such a deviation. The voltage difference between two nodes is strongly affected by reactive power flow. In contrast to frequency control, node voltage control must be achieved locally. This article investigates the use of a wind farm based on a doubly fed induction generators (DFIG) for reactive power compensation of a grid node. A wind speed variation sample is applied to the model of a wind power unit. The power flow between the stator of the DFIG-based wind power unit and the grid is controlled by using the decoupled active and reactive power vector control method. The limits or capacity of the stator and power converters to consume or provide reactive power are discussed. SIMULINK software has been used for the simulation of the system.

Mohamed Kesraoui; Ahmed Chaib; Abdullah Madri; Bilal Hammani

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Definition: Reactive Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reactive Power Reactive Power Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reactive Power The portion of electricity that establishes and sustains the electric and magnetic fields of alternating-current equipment. Reactive power must be supplied to most types of magnetic equipment, such as motors and transformers. It also must supply the reactive losses on transmission facilities. Reactive power is provided by generators, synchronous condensers, or electrostatic equipment such as capacitors and directly influences electric system voltage. It is usually expressed in kilovars (kvar) or megavars (Mvar).[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition In electric power transmission and distribution, volt-ampere reactive (var) is a unit used to measure reactive power in an AC electric

292

Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mitochondria produce reactive oxygen species (mROS) as a natural by-product of electron transport chain activity. While initial studies focused on the damaging effects of reactive oxygen species, a recent paradigm shift ...

Chandel, Navdeep S

293

Reactive Power Support Services in Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reactive Power Support Services in Electricity Markets Costing and Pricing of Ancillary Services Final Project Report Power Systems Engineering Research Center A National Science Foundation Industry Reactive Power Support Services in Electricity Markets Costing and Pricing of Ancillary Services Project

294

Advancement of Electrochromic Windows  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advancement of Electrochromic Windows Advancement of Electrochromic Windows Title Advancement of Electrochromic Windows Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-59821 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Lee, Eleanor S., Stephen E. Selkowitz, Robert D. Clear, Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, Joseph H. Klems, Luis L. Fernandes, Gregory J. Ward, Vorapat Inkarojrit, and Mehry Yazdanian Date Published 04/2006 Other Numbers CEC-500-2006-052 Keywords commercial buildings, daylight, daylighting controls, Electrochromic windows, energy efficiency, human factors, peak demand, switchable windows, visual comfort Abstract This guide provides consumer-oriented information about switchable electrochromic (EC) windows. Electrochromic windows change tint with a small applied voltage, providing building owners and occupants with the option to have clear or tinted windows at any time, irrespective of whether it's sunny or cloudy. EC windows can be manually or automatically controlled based on daylight, solar heat gain, glare, view, energy-efficiency, peak electricity demand response, or other criteria. Window controls can be integrated with other building systems, such as lighting and heating/cooling mechanical systems, to optimize interior environmental conditions, occupant comfort, and energy-efficiency.

295

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS (ACCEPTED NOVEMBER 8, 2014) 1 Stochastic Reactive Power Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

response, and electric vehicles. Advances in photovoltaic (PV) inverters offer new opportunitiesIEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS (ACCEPTED NOVEMBER 8, 2014) 1 Stochastic Reactive Power are being challenged by reverse power flows and voltage fluctuations due to renewable generation, demand

Giannakis, Georgios

296

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center Technical Advisory Group Meeting August 31, 2007 10:30 AM - Noon Meeting Agenda * Introductions (10 minutes) * Main Presentation (~ 1 hour) * Questions, comments from panel (15 minutes) Project History * Lighting Scoping Study (completed January 2007) - Identified potential for energy and demand savings using demand responsive lighting systems - Importance of dimming - New wireless controls technologies * Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) Objectives * Provide up-to-date information on the reliability, predictability of dimmable lighting as a demand resource under realistic operating load conditions * Identify potential negative impacts of DR lighting on lighting quality Potential of Demand Responsive Lighting Control

297

Advanced Search  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Publications Advanced Search Most publications by Environmental Energy Technologies Division authors are searchable from this page, including peer-reviewed publications, book chapters, conference proceedings and LBNL reports. Filter Advanced Search Publications list This publications database is an ongoing project, and not all Division publications are represented here yet. For additional help see the bottom of this page. Documents Found: 4418 Title Keyword LBNL Number Author - Any - Abadie, Marc O Abbey, Chad Abdolrazaghi, Mohamad Aberg, Annika Abhyankar, Nikit Abraham, Marvin M Abshire, James B Abushakra, Bass Acevedo-Ruiz, Manuel Aceves, Salvador Ache, Hans J Ackerly, David D Ackerman, Andrew S Adamkiewicz, Gary Adams, J W Adams, Carl Adamson, Bo Addy, Nathan Addy, Susan E Aden, Nathaniel T Adesola, Bunmi Adhikari,

298

Advanced Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Systems Systems Advanced Combustion Background Conventional coal-fired power plants utilize steam turbines to generate electricity, which operate at efficiencies of 35-37 percent. Operation at higher temperatures and pressures can lead to higher efficiencies, resulting in reduced fuel consumption and lower greenhouse gas emissions. Higher efficiency also reduces CO2 production for the same amount of energy produced, thereby facilitating a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. When combined, oxy-combustion comes with an efficiency hit, so it will actually increase the amount of CO2 to be captured. But without so much N2 in the flue gas, it will be easier and perhaps more efficient to capture, utilize and sequester. NETL's Advanced Combustion Project and members of the NETL-Regional University

299

Reactive Ion Benjamin A. Small  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(torr) plasma etching reactive ion etching ion milling m cm 100µm µm #12;5 Mechanics ~40 mTorrE380 kHz, 13.56 MHz ~30 sccm #12;6 Chemistry X X X X F- F- F-F- X F-F- F- F- F- R++ R++ R++ #12;7 Chemistry before opening · Silanes are explosive in the atmosphere #12;13 Bibliography Campbell, Stephen A

Garmestani, Hamid

300

Analysis of fuel options for the breakeven core configuration of the Advanced Recycling Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A trade-off study is performed to determine the impacts of various fuel forms on the core design and core physics characteristics of the sodium-cooled Toshiba- Westinghouse Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR). The fuel forms include oxide, nitride, and metallic forms of U and Th. The ARR core configuration is redesigned with driver and blanket regions in order to achieve breakeven fissile breeding performance with the various fuel types. State-of-the-art core physics tools are used for the analyses. In addition, a quasi-static reactivity balance approach is used for a preliminary comparison of the inherent safety performances of the various fuel options. Thorium-fueled cores exhibit lower breeding ratios and require larger blankets compared to the U-fueled cores, which is detrimental to core compactness and increases reprocessing and manufacturing requirements. The Th cores also exhibit higher reactivity swings through each cycle, which penalizes reactivity control and increases the number of control rods required. On the other hand, using Th leads to drastic reductions in void and coolant expansion coefficients of reactivity, with the potential for enhancing inherent core safety. Among the U-fueled ARR cores, metallic and nitride fuels result in higher breeding ratios due to their higher heavy metal densities. On the other hand, oxide fuels provide a softer spectrum, which increases the Doppler effect and reduces the positive sodium void worth. A lower fuel temperature is obtained with the metallic and nitride fuels due to their higher thermal conductivities and compatibility with sodium bonds. This is especially beneficial from an inherent safety point of view since it facilitates the reactor cool-down during loss of power removal transients. The advantages in terms of inherent safety of nitride and metallic fuels are maintained when using Th fuel. However, there is a lower relative increase in heavy metal density and in breeding ratio going from oxide to metallic or nitride Th fuels relative to the U counterpart fuels. (authors)

Stauff, N.E.; Klim, T.K.; Taiwo, T.A. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Fiorina, C. [Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy); Franceschini, F. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC., Cranberry Township, Pennsylvania (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced reactivity controlled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Degradation of Vinyl Chloride and 1,2-Dichloroethane by Advanced Reduction Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new treatment technology, called Advanced Reduction Process (ARP), was developed by combining UV irradiation with reducing reagents to produce highly reactive species that degrade contaminants rapidly. Vinyl chloride (VC) and 1,2-dichloroethane (1...

Liu, Xu

2013-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

302

Advanced Mud System for Microhole Coiled Tubing Drilling  

SciTech Connect

An advanced mud system was designed and key components were built that augment a coiled tubing drilling (CTD) rig that is designed specifically to drill microholes (less than 4-inch diameter) with advanced drilling techniques. The mud system was tailored to the hydraulics of the hole geometries and rig characteristics required for microholes and is capable of mixing and circulating mud and removing solids while being self contained and having zero discharge capability. Key components of this system are two modified triplex mud pumps (High Pressure Slurry Pumps) for advanced Abrasive Slurry Jetting (ASJ) and a modified Gas-Liquid-Solid (GLS) Separator for well control, flow return and initial processing. The system developed also includes an additional component of an advanced version of ASJ which allows cutting through most all materials encountered in oil and gas wells including steel, cement, and all rock types. It includes new fluids and new ASJ nozzles. The jetting mechanism does not require rotation of the bottom hole assembly or drill string, which is essential for use with Coiled Tubing (CT). It also has low reactive forces acting on the CT and generates cuttings small enough to be easily cleaned from the well bore, which is important in horizontal drilling. These cutting and mud processing components and capabilities compliment the concepts put forth by DOE for microhole coiled tubing drilling (MHTCTD) and should help insure the reality of drilling small diameter holes quickly and inexpensively with a minimal environmental footprint and that is efficient, compact and portable. Other components (site liners, sump and transfer pumps, stacked shakers, filter membranes, etc.. ) of the overall mud system were identified as readily available in industry and will not be purchased until we are ready to drill a specific well.

Kenneth Oglesby

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Advanced photovoltaic/hydro hybrid renewable energy system for remote areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents modeling and simulation of the advanced photovoltaic (PV)/hydro based Hybrid Renewable Energy System (HRES) to electrify such isolated/remote areas where grid accessibility is not possible. For 7.5?kW hydro generation system a Self Excited Induction Generator (SEIG) with improved technique is used to optimize the utilization of hydro power. To achieve this aim an uncontrolled bridge rectifier coupled with Hydro side Voltage Source Inverter is implemented for the SEIG based advanced hydro system. The PV system is configured by PV array battery DC/DC converter maximum power point tracking controller and PV side Voltage Source Inverter. A Constant Current Control scheme is developed in this paper to control active and reactive power flow and to synchronize hydro and PV systems. The proposed system uses fewer controlled switches hence complexity of control has been reduced and system has higher efficiency and lower switching losses. The performance analysis of the HRES has been done to authenticate the existence of the system using the MATLAB software and results demonstrate that power quality of the proposed system is better and HRES is able to put into services.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Low-rank coal research: Volume 2, Advanced research and technology development: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Volume II contains articles on advanced combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation; coal/char reactivity; liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, and fine particulate emissions. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

Mann, M.D.; Swanson, M.L.; Benson, S.A.; Radonovich, L.; Steadman, E.N.; Sweeny, P.G.; McCollor, D.P.; Kleesattel, D.; Grow, D.; Falcone, S.K.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Reactive composite compositions and mat barriers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hazardous material storage area has a reactive multi-layer composite mat which lines an opening into which a reactive backfill and hazardous material are placed. A water-inhibiting cap may cover the hazardous material storage area. The reactive multi-layer composite mat has a backing onto which is placed an active layer which will neutralize or stabilize hazardous waste and a fronting layer so that the active layer is between the fronting and backing layers. The reactive backfill has a reactive agent which can stabilize or neutralize hazardous material and inhibit the movement of the hazardous material through the hazardous material storage area.

Langton, Christine A. (Aiken, SC); Narasimhan, Rajendran (Evans, GA); Karraker, David G. (Aiken, SC)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Permeable Reactive Barriers | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Permeable Reactive Barriers Permeable Reactive Barriers Permeable Reactive Barriers Permeable Reactive Barrier Field Projects Durango, Colorado DOE installed a PRB in October 1995 to treat ground water from a uranium mill tailings disposal site at Durango, Colorado Read more Cañon City, Colorado ESL personnel conduct tests and help evaluate performance at other PRB sites, such as Cotter Corporation's Cañon City site in Colorado. Read more Monticello, Utah Installation of a PRB hydraulically downgradient of the Monticello, Utah, millsite was completed June 30, 1999, as an Interim Remedial Action. Read more A permeable reactive barrier (PRB) is a zone of reactive material placed underground to intercept and react with a contaminant plume in ground water. Typically, PRBs are emplaced by replacing soils with reactive

307

Reactive capability limits of wind farms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS) technology can be classified into two main types: fixed speed and variable speed. Fixed speed WECS use an induction generator connected directly to the grid while variable speed WECS use a power converter to connect the generator to the grid. Fixed speed WECS require shunt capacitors for reactive power compensation, while variable speed WECS have reactive power capability. Under the Spanish grid code, wind farms have to operate in a range of power factor values. This paper determines the reactive power capability of wind farms equipped with both fixed and variable speed WECS. The reactive power capability can be represented as a reactive capability curve. In this paper, the reactive capability curve is used to calculate the additional reactive power compensation needed to meet the requirements of the Spanish grid code.

Alberto Rios Villacorta; Santiago Arnaltes Gomez; Jose Luis Rodriguez-Amenedo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Advanced in-duct sorbent injection for SO{sub 2} control. Topical report number 3, Subtask 2.3: Sorbent optimization  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project is to develop second-generation duct injection technology as a cost-effective compliance option for the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Specific process performance goals are to achieve 90% SO{sub 2} removal and 60% sorbent utilization efficiency. Research is focused on the Advanced Coolside process, which has shown the potential of achieving these targets. The objective of Subtask 2.3, Sorbent Optimization, was to explore means of improving performance and economics of the Advanced Coolside process through optimizing the sorbent system. Pilot plant tests of commercial and specially prepared hydrated limes showed that the process is relatively insensitive to sorbent source. This can be an important economic advantage, allowing the use of the lowest cost sorbent available at a site. A pilot plant hydration study conducted in cooperation with Dravo Lime Company further indicated the relative insensitivity of process performance to lime source and to lime physical properties. Pilot plant tests indicated that the use of very small amounts of additives in the Advanced Coolside process can improve performance under some circumstances; however, additives are not necessary to exceed process performance targets.

Rosenhoover, W.A.; Maskew, J.T.; Withum, J.A.; Stouffer, M.R.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Advanced Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ductility EnhancEmEnt of molybDEnum Ductility EnhancEmEnt of molybDEnum PhasE by nano-sizED oxiDE DisPErsions Description Using computational modeling techniques, this research aims to develop predictive capabilities to facilitate the design and optimization of molybdenum (Mo), chromium (Cr), and other high-temperature structural materials to enable these materials to withstand the harsh environments of advanced power generation systems, such as gasification-based systems. These types of materials are essential to the development of highly efficient, clean energy technologies such as low-emission power systems that use coal or other fossil fuels.

310

Advanced Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Super HigH-TemperaTure alloyS and Super HigH-TemperaTure alloyS and CompoSiTeS From nb-W-Cr SySTemS Description The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (DOE-FE) has awarded a three-year grant to the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to jointly explore the high-temperature properties of alloys composed of niobium (Nb), tungsten (W), and chromium (Cr). The grant is administered by the Advanced Research (AR) program of the National

311

Mission Advancing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NETL Accomplishments NETL Accomplishments - the lab 2 Mission Advancing energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security, and improve our environment. Renewed Prosperity Through Technological Innovation - Letter from the Director NETL: the ENERGY lab 4 6 3 Contents Technology Transfer Patents and Commercialization Sharing Our Expertise Noteworthy Publications 60 62 63 64 66 Environment, Economy, & Supply Carbon Capture and Storage Partnerships Work to Reduce Atmospheric CO 2 Demand-Side Efficiencies New NETL Facility Showcases Green Technologies Environment & Economy Materials Mercury Membranes NETL Education Program Produces Significant Achievement Monitoring Water Economy & Supply NETL's Natural Gas Prediction Tool Aids Hurricane Recovery Energy Infrastructure

312

Probing Material Reactivity Using X-ray Pair Distribution Function Methods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Reactivity Using X-ray Pair Distribution Material Reactivity Using X-ray Pair Distribution Function Methods Karena W. Chapman X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439, USA Understanding how advanced functional materials react and transform, at an atomic scale, is a characterization challenge with many diverse phenomena possible; components with varying particle size, morphology, and microstructure can evolve from multi-atom clusters to multi-million atom crystals. The pair distribution function (PDF) method shows great promise for providing quantitative insight such reactions. Recent advances in experimental methods, have improved the efficiency of X-ray PDF measurements, to allow time-resolved experiments with sufficient resolution to study reactions in solid

313

Advanced Vehicle Testing & Evaluation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Provide benchmark data for advanced technology vehicles Develop lifecycle cost data for production vehicles utilizing advanced power trains Provide fleet...

314

Advanced LIGO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are second generation instruments designed and built for the two LIGO observatories in Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA. The two instruments are identical in design, and are specialized versions of a Michelson interferometer with 4 km long arms. As in initial LIGO, Fabry-Perot cavities are used in the arms to increase the interaction time with a gravitational wave, and power recycling is used to increase the effective laser power. Signal recycling has been added in Advanced LIGO to improve the frequency response. In the most sensitive frequency region around 100 Hz, the design strain sensitivity is a factor of 10 better than initial LIGO. In addition, the low frequency end of the sensitivity band is moved from 40 Hz down to 10 Hz. All interferometer components have been replaced with improved technologies to achieve this sensitivity gain. Much better seismic isolation and test mass suspensions are responsible for the gains at lower frequencies. Higher laser power, larger test masses and improved mirror coatings lead to the improved sensitivity at mid- and high- frequencies. Data collecting runs with these new instruments are planned to begin in mid-2015.

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

315

Effectiveness of a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) to control...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Effectiveness of a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) to control CO and hydrocarbon emissions from Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) combustion Effectiveness of a...

316

Advanced servo manipulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced servo manipulator has modular parts. Modular motor members drive individual input gears to control shoulder roll, shoulder pitch, elbow pitch, wrist yaw, wrist pitch, wrist roll, and tong spacing. The modules include a support member, a shoulder module for controlling shoulder roll, and a sleeve module attached to the shoulder module in fixed relation thereto. The shoulder roll sleeve module has an inner cylindrical member rotatable relative to the outer cylindrical member, and upon which a gear pod assembly is mounted. A plurality of shafts are driven by the gears, which are in turn driven by individual motor modules to transmit rotary power to control elbow pitch as well as to provide four different rotary shafts across the bendable elbow joint to supply rotary motive power to a wrist member and tong member.

Holt, William E. (Knoxville, TN); Kuban, Daniel P. (Oak Ridge, TN); Martin, H. Lee (Knoxville, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Advanced servo manipulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced servo manipulator has modular parts. Modular motor members drive individual input gears to control shoulder roll, shoulder pitch, elbow pitch, wrist yaw, wrist pitch, wrist roll, and tong spacing. The modules include a support member, a shoulder module for controlling shoulder roll, and a sleeve module attached to the shoulder module in fixed relation thereto. The shoulder roll sleeve module has an inner cylindrical member rotatable relative to the outer cylindrical member, and upon which a gear pod assembly is mounted. A plurality of shafts are driven by the gears, which are in turn driven by individual motor modules to transmit rotary power to control elbow pitch as well as to provide four different rotary shafts across the bendable elbow joint to supply rotary motive power to a wrist member and tong member. 41 figs.

Holt, W.E.; Kuban, D.P.; Martin, H.L.

1988-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

318

NREL: Advanced Power Electronics - Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Development Research and Development The Advanced Power Electronics activity focuses on the electric drive system for hybrid electric and fuel cell vehicles. At NREL, we research and develop electronic components and systems that will overcome major technical barriers to commercialization of hybrid, advanced internal combustion, and fuel cell vehicle technologies. Researchers focus on developing advanced power electronics and electric machinery technologies that improve reliability, efficiency, and ruggedness, and dramatically decrease systems costs for advanced vehicles. To accomplish this, the power electronics team investigates cooling and heating of advanced vehicles by looking at the thermal management of motor controllers, inverters, and traction motors with one- and two-phase cooling

319

Advanced Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

05/2007 05/2007 NitrogeN evolutioN aNd CorrosioN MeChaNisMs With oxyCoMbustioN of Coal Description Under a grant from the University Coal Research (UCR) program, Brigham Young University (BYU) is leading a three-year research effort to investigate the physical processes that several common types of coal undergo during oxy-fuel combustion. Specifically, research addresses the mixture of gases emitted from burning, particularly such pollutants as nitrogen oxides (NO X ) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), and the potential for corrosion at the various stages of combustion. The UCR program is administered by the Advanced Research Program at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), under the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of

320

Development of advanced, dry, SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} emission control technologies for high-sulfur coal. Final report, April 1, 1993--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Dry Scrubbing is a common commercial process that has been limited to low- and medium-sulfur coal applications because high-sulfur coal requires more reagent than can be efficiently injected into the process. Babcock & Wilcox has made several advances that extend dry scrubbing technologies to higher sulfur coals by allowing deposit-free operation at low scrubber exit temperatures. This not only increases the amount of reagent that can be injected into the scrubber, but also increases SO{sub 2} removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The objectives of this project were to demonstrate, at pilot scale, that advanced, dry-scrubbing-based technologies can attain the performance levels specified by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions while burning high-sulfur coal, and that these technologies are economically competitive with wet scrubber systems. The use of these technologies by utilities in and around Ohio, on new or retrofit applications, will ensure the future of markets for high-sulfur coal by creating cost effective options to coal switching.

Amrhein, G.T.

1994-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced reactivity controlled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Non-Energetic Reactive Armor (NERA) and Semi-Energetic Reactive Armor (SERA) FY13 Final Report  

SciTech Connect

INL researchers have proposed prototypes for future lightweight armor systems that reside in a technology gap between explosive reactive armor and passive armor. The targets were designed to react under impact and throw a steel front plate into the path of the projectile, forcing the projectile to engage more of the front plate during its penetration process. These prototypes are intended to exhibit the enhanced efficiency of explosive reactive armor without the collateral damage often associated with explosive reactive armor. One of the prototype systems, Semi Energetic Reactive Armor (SERA), functions similarly to explosive reactive armor, but features a reactive material that reacts much slower than explosive reactive armor. Two different SERA test groups were built and featuring different ratios of aluminum Teflon(copyright) powders pressed into 0.5 in. thick energetic tiles and sandwiched between 0.25 in. thick RHA plates. The other prototype system, Non Energetic Reactive Armor (NERA), utilizes the strain energy in compressed rubber to launch a front flyer plate into the path of an incoming projectile. It is comprised of a 1 in. thick rubber layer sandwiched between two 0.25 in. thick RHA plates with bolt holes around the perimeter. Bolts are inserted through the entire target and tightened to compress the rubber sheet to significant strain levels (approximately 40%). A fourth group of targets was tested as a control group. It featured a 0.5 in. thick rubber sheet sandwiched between two 0.25 in. thick RHA plates, similar to the NERA test articles, but the rubber is uncompressed. The four test groups (uncompressed rubber, compressed rubber, 70/30 Al/PTFE, 50/50 Al/PTFE) were each fabricated with three identical test articles in each group. All twelve targets were subjected to ballistic testing at the National Security Test Range on July 17, 2013. They were tested with 0.5 in. diameter steel rods shot at a consistent velocity at each target. In order to characterize the energetic materials, break wires were embedded in the targets and burn velocities were measured. The residual mass method was used to compare the target performance of each group and final performance data is presented below.

Ben Langhorst; Nikki Rasmussen; Andrew Robinson

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Advanced fuel chemistry for advanced engines.  

SciTech Connect

Autoignition chemistry is central to predictive modeling of many advanced engine designs that combine high efficiency and low inherent pollutant emissions. This chemistry, and especially its pressure dependence, is poorly known for fuels derived from heavy petroleum and for biofuels, both of which are becoming increasingly prominent in the nation's fuel stream. We have investigated the pressure dependence of key ignition reactions for a series of molecules representative of non-traditional and alternative fuels. These investigations combined experimental characterization of hydroxyl radical production in well-controlled photolytically initiated oxidation and a hybrid modeling strategy that linked detailed quantum chemistry and computational kinetics of critical reactions with rate-equation models of the global chemical system. Comprehensive mechanisms for autoignition generally ignore the pressure dependence of branching fractions in the important alkyl + O{sub 2} reaction systems; however we have demonstrated that pressure-dependent 'formally direct' pathways persist at in-cylinder pressures.

Taatjes, Craig A.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Zador, Judit; Fernandes, Ravi X.; Miller, James A.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Final Report:Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing,U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 8 Support.August 2004

324

Exploring the reactivity of bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 1. Introduction: The Reactivity of Bacterial Multicomponent Monooxygenases Bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases constitute a remarkable family of enzymes that oxidize small, inert hydrocarbon substrates using ...

Tinberg, Christine Elaine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Method for reactivating catalysts and a method for recycling supercritical fluids used to reactivate the catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thompson, David N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Anderson, Raymond P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

326

An Online Scheduling Algorithm with Advance Reservation for Large-Scale Data Transfers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flow scheduling and endpoint rate control in gridnetworks.granularity and ?ner control in scheduling with a cost ofMukherjee. Control plane for advance bandwidth scheduling in

Balman, Mehmet

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Reactivity of calcium sulfate from FBC systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A relative estimate of the reactivity of calcium sulfate in a number of coal combustion ash samples was obtained, using the rate of solution in water as a parameter. Measurements were also performed on standard samples of calcium sulfate prepared in different ways, for comparison. The temperature of previous treatment appeared as the most important factor determining the reactivity of CaSO4; the grain size distribution was less important, and the duration of heating (even to 105 days) had very little influence. No correlation between specific surface of ash samples and their reactivity was apparent. Calcium sulfate in FBC ash samples was much more reactive than that contained in high-temperature ashes, and than calcium sulfate heated, alone or with various additions, at 850C for 2 days. Of the six FBC samples tested, five showed similar behaviour, including a sample from a pressurized system; only a deposit from 96 days operation of an industrial CFBC boiler burning petroleum coke showed considerably less reactivity. Surprisingly, CaSO4 from two FBC samples placed in an oven for 60 days under sulfating conditions showed a very similar rate of solution to that of the other FBC samples, while a third sample kept in the oven for 105 days also showed no decrease in reactivity. Only when one of these samples had agglomerated (which occurred between 60 and 105 days) did it show decreased reactivity, suggesting that the agglomeration process rather than duration is significant in promoting sintering and reducing the sulfate reactivity.

Agripanea P. Iribarne; Julio V. Iribarne; Edward J. Anthony

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Kinetic azeotropy and design of reactive distillation columns  

SciTech Connect

The reactive fixed points in the distillation maps of a reactive distillation column (RDC) with kinetically controlled reactions are identified and their role in deciding the design feasibility has been elucidated. The fixed points at which both reaction and distillation vectors have zero magnitudes correspond to the equilibrium fixed point. It is known that the relative positions of these points for the rectifying and stripping sections determine the value of the minimum reflux ratio. However, apart from these fixed points, there are certain fixed points in the distillation map at which, though the reaction and distillation vectors have nonzero magnitudes, they nullify the effects of each other. These points correspond to the kinetic fixed points and have a special significance. Their positions have direct influence on the feasible product composition. A simple example of an ideal ternary system undergoing a reaction 2B {longleftrightarrow} A + c has been illustrated to show the importance of kinetic azeotropy in the design aspects of RDC.

Mahajani, S.M. [Monash Univ., Clayton, Victoria (Australia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Monash Univ., Clayton, Victoria (Australia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Advanced Editor Usage Advanced Editor Usage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Editor Usage Advanced Editor Usage Log in and click the edit icon How to navigate of the events will seek the video to where that event starts Page 1 of 11 #12;Advanced Editor Usage How Editor Usage 3. Type in the new caption name, enter any searchable metadata and click OK (the thumbnail

Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

330

Validation of ATR SINDA using SPERT-3 reactivity-initiated transient test data  

SciTech Connect

Thermal-hydraulic analyses of Special Power Excursion Reactor Test-3 (SPERT-3) reactivity-initiated accident (RIA) test data are presented to validate ATR SINDA, a three-dimensional thermal-hydraulic computer code used to conduct transient analysis of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel plates. Because SPERT-3-C core test results are the only existing data of reactivity insertions for plate-type reactors, validating ATR SINDA is important for safety analysis of postulated reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs) for the plate-type ATR operated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The SPERT-3 facility was designed to study the kinetic behavior and safety of pressurized, light water-moderated reactors.

Oh, C.H.; Ambrosek, R.G.; Wadkins, R.P. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Advanced Manufacturing Office Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Overview presentation by the Advanced Manufacturing Office for the Microwave (MW) and Radio Frequency (RF) as Enabling Technologies for Advanced Manufacturing

332

Advanced Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highly Insulating Windows Windows in the United States use approximately 2 quads a year in heating energy, approximately one third of all building space heating energy used and approximately 2% of total US energy consumption. Heating is the largest single end use attributed to windows. Even if all existing windows were replaced with today’s ENERGY STAR low-e products (U values < 0.35 Btu/hr-ft2-F), windows related heating would still be over 1 Quad. Because heating loads are strongly tied to conductive losses, technologies which lead to lower window U-factors are the key to reducing heating energy. In the long term a 0.1 Btu/hr-ft2-F window is targeted as a product, which will meet the requirements of zero-energy homes. Dynamic control of solar gains will further reduce heating needs by allowing winter

333

How Advanced Batteries Are Energizing the Economy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Earlier today, President Obama visited Johnson Controls in Holland, Michigan to highlight how this once shuttered factory is helping rev up the advanced battery industry in the United States. This...

334

In Situ Reactivity and TOF SIMS Analysis of Surfaces Prepared...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactivity and TOF SIMS Analysis of Surfaces Prepared by Soft and Reactive Landing of Mass Selected Ions. In Situ Reactivity and TOF SIMS Analysis of Surfaces Prepared by Soft and...

335

Stability analysis and reactive power compensation issue in a microgrid with a DFIG based WECS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a novel methodology for compensating reactive power in a microgrid, having a DFIG based winddiesel system, to enhance the voltage stability of the hybrid system. UPFC as a FACTS device is proposed in order to improve the control of reactive power mismatch and the stability of the system. A small signal model of the winddiesel system, DFIG based wind turbine system, UPFC and the controllers are designed for the stability analysis. Further, the voltage variation and reactive power compensation is analysed with the incorporation of proposed ANFIS based UPFC controller. Simulations are performed in MATLAB environment for transient stability analysis in a winddiesel based microgrid with different wind power input and 2% step increase in load demand. Simulation results illustrate the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed approach and its impact upon transient behaviour of the microgrid.

Asit Mohanty; Meera Viswavandya; Prakash K. Ray; Sandipan Patra

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Advanced Experimental Analysis of Controls on Microbial Fe(III) Oxide Reduction - Final Report - 09/16/1996 - 03/16/2001  

SciTech Connect

Considering the broad influence that microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction can have on subsurface metal/organic contaminant biogeochemistry, understanding the mechanisms that control this process is critical for predicting the behavior and fate of these contaminants in anaerobic subsurface environments. Knowledge of the factors that influence the rates of growth and activity of Fe(III) oxide-reducing bacteria is critical for predicting (i.e., modeling) the long-term influence of these organisms on the fate of contaminants in the subsurface, and for effectively utilizing Fe(III) oxide reduction and associated geochemical affects for the purpose of subsurface metal/organic contamination bioremediation. This research project will refine existing models for microbiological and geochemical controls on Fe(III) oxide reduction, using laboratory reactor systems that mimic, to varying degrees, the physical and chemical conditions of the subsurface. Novel experimental methods for studying the kinetics of microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction and measuring growth rates of Fe(III) oxide-reducing bacteria will be developed. These new methodologies will be directly applicable to studies on subsurface contaminant transformations directly coupled to or influenced by microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction.

Roden, Eric E.

2001-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

337

Advanced Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glazing Systems Glazing Systems Using Non-Structural Center Glazing Layers Windows in the United States use aproximately 2 quads a year in heating energy, approximately one third of all building space heating energy used and the largest single end use attributed to windows. Even if all existing windows were replaced with today’s ENERGY STAR low-e products (U values < 0.35 Btu/hr-ft2-F), windows related heating would still be over 1 Quad. Because heating loads are strongly tied to conductive losses, technologies which lead to lower window U-factors are the key to reducing heating energy. A 0.1 Btu/hr-ft2-F window is targeted as a product, which will meet the requirements of zero-energy homes. Dynamic control of solar gains will further reduce heating needs by allowing winter solar heat gains to be effectively utilized while limiting cooling season gains. Significant cooling load savings can also be expected from lower U-factor windows in certain climates and from dynamic windows in all climates.

338

Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing More Documents & Publications Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing Final Report - Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical

339

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update More Documents & Publications Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

340

Advanced process control and novel test methods for PVD silicon and elastomeric silicone coatings utilized on ion implant disks, heatsinks and selected platens  

SciTech Connect

Coatings play multiple key roles in the proper functioning of mature and current ion implanters. Batch and serial implanters require strategic control of elemental and particulate contamination which often includes scrutiny of the silicon surface coatings encountering direct beam contact. Elastomeric Silicone Coatings must accommodate wafer loading and unloading as well as direct backside contact during implant plus must maintain rigid elemental and particulate specifications. The semiconductor industry has had a significant and continuous effort to obtain ultra-pure silicon coatings with sustained process performance and long life. Low particles and reduced elemental levels for silicon coatings are a major requirement for process engineers, OEM manufacturers, and second source suppliers. Relevant data will be presented. Some emphasis and detail will be placed on the structure and characteristics of a relatively new PVD Silicon Coating process that is very dense and homogeneous. Wear rate under typical ion beam test conditions will be discussed. The PVD Silicon Coating that will be presented here is used on disk shields, wafer handling fingers/fences, exclusion zones of heat sinks, beam dumps and other beamline components. Older, legacy implanters can now provide extended process capability using this new generation PVD silicon - even on implanter systems that were shipped long before the advent of silicon coating for contamination control. Low particles and reduced elemental levels are critical performance criteria for the silicone elastomers used on disk heatsinks and serial implanter platens. Novel evaluation techniques and custom engineered tools are used to investigate the surface interaction characteristics of multiple Elastomeric Silicone Coatings currently in use by the industry - specifically, friction and perpendicular stiction. These parameters are presented as methods to investigate the critical wafer load and unload function. Unique tools and test methods have been developed that deliver accurate and repeatable data, which will be described.

Springer, J.; Allen, B.; Wriggins, W.; Kuzbyt, R.; Sinclair, R. [Core Systems, 1050 Kifer Road Sunnyvale, CA 94086 (United States); FI Silicon, 1050 Kifer Road Sunnyvale, CA 94086 (United States); Core Systems, 1050 Kifer Road Sunnyvale, CA 94086 (United States)

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced reactivity controlled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Anco Advance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anco Advance Anco Advance Jump to: navigation, search Name Anco Advance Place Longmont, Colorado Zip 80503 Sector Renewable Energy Product Focused on the delivery and operation of profitable renewable waste to energy plants. Coordinates 40.16394°, -105.100504° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.16394,"lon":-105.100504,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

342

News Releases | Advanced Materials | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News & Awards News & Awards News Releases Honors & Awards News Features Advanced Materials Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials | News & Awards | News Releases News Releases 1-7 of 7 Results ORNL devises recipe to fine-tune diameter of silica rods December 16, 2013 - OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Dec. 16, 2013 - By controlling the temperature of silica rods as they grow, researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory could be setting the stage for advances in anti-reflective solar cells, computer monitors, TV screens, eye glasses and more. ORNL's Bruce Pint elected 2014 NACE fellow December 13, 2013 - OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Dec. 13, 2013 - Bruce Pint, a research staff member at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has been elected a 2014 National Association of Corrosion

343

Consideration of spatial effects in reactivity measurements  

SciTech Connect

Various methods of considering spatial effects in reactivity measurements are presented. These methods are employed both at the critical (mainly fast-neutron) facilities and at the BN-600 reactor.

Matveenko, I. P., E-mail: matveenko@ippe.ru; Lititskii, V. A.; Shokod'ko, A. G. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (Russian Federation)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Systematic approach for chemical reactivity evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Screening Tool (RSST) and the Automatic Pressure Tracking Adiabatic Calorimeter (APTAC) were employed to evaluate the reactive systems experimentally. The RSST detected exothermic behavior and measured the overall liberated energy. The APTAC simulated...

Aldeeb, Abdulrehman Ahmed

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

345

Fossil plant layup and reactivation conference: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The Fossil Plant Layup and Reactivation Conference was held in New Orleans, Louisiana on April 14--15, 1992. The Conference was sponsored by EPRI and hosted by Entergy Services, Inc. to bring together representatives from utilities, consulting firms, manufacturers and architectural engineers. Eighteen papers were presented in three sessions. These sessions were devoted to layup procedures and practices, and reactivation case studies. A panel discussion was held on the second day to interactively discuss layup and reactivation issues. More than 80 people attended the Conference. This report contains technical papers and a summary of the panel discussion. Of the eighteen papers, three are related to general, one is related to regulatory issues, three are related to specific equipment, four are related to layup procedures and practices, and seven are layup and reactivation case studies.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Groundwater well with reactive filter pack  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques.

Gilmore, Tyler J. (Pasco, WA); Holdren, Jr., George R. (Kennewick, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Groundwater well with reactive filter pack  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques. 3 figs.

Gilmore, T.J.; Holdren, G.R. Jr.; Kaplan, D.I.

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

348

A Tariff for Reactive Power - IEEE  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a suggested tariff or payment for the local supply of reactive power from distributed energy resources. The authors consider four sample customers, and estimate the cost of supply of reactive power for each customer. The power system savings from the local supply of reactive power are also estimated for a hypothetical circuit. It is found that reactive power for local voltage regulation could be supplied to the distribution system economically by customers when new inverters are installed. The inverter would be supplied with a power factor of 0.8, and would be capable of local voltage regulation to a schedule supplied by the utility. Inverters are now installed with photovoltaic systems, fuel cells and microturbines, and adjustable-speed motor drives.

Kueck, John D [ORNL; Tufon, Christopher [Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Isemonger, Alan [California Independent System Operator; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Reactive Attachment Disorder: Concepts, Treatment, and Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reactive Attachment Disorder (RAD) is a disorder characterized by controversy, both with respect to its definition and its treatment. By definition, the RAD diagnosis attempts to characterize and explain the origin of ...

Walter, Uta M.; Petr, Chris

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Ionic Liquids: Radiation Chemistry, Solvation Dynamics and Reactivity Patterns  

SciTech Connect

Ionic liquids (ILs) are a rapidly expanding family of condensed-phase media with important applications in energy production, nuclear fuel and waste processing, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. ILs generally have low volatilities and are combustion-resistant, highly conductive, recyclable and capable of dissolving a wide variety of materials. They are finding new uses in chemical synthesis, catalysis, separations chemistry, electrochemistry and other areas. Ionic liquids have dramatically different properties compared to conventional molecular solvents, and they provide a new and unusual environment to test our theoretical understanding of primary radiation chemistry, charge transfer and other reactions. We are interested in how IL properties influence physical and dynamical processes that determine the stability and lifetimes of reactive intermediates and thereby affect the courses of reactions and product distributions. We study these issues by characterization of primary radiolysis products and measurements of their yields and reactivity, quantification of electron solvation dynamics and scavenging of electrons in different states of solvation. From this knowledge we wish to learn how to predict radiolytic mechanisms and control them or mitigate their effects on the properties of materials used in nuclear fuel processing, for example, and to apply IL radiation chemistry to answer questions about general chemical reactivity in ionic liquids that will aid in the development of applications listed above. Very early in our radiolysis studies it became evident that the slow solvation dynamics of the excess electron in ILs (which vary over a wide viscosity range) increase the importance of pre-solvated electron reactivity and consequently alter product distributions and subsequent chemistry. This difference from conventional solvents has profound effects on predicting and controlling radiolytic yields, which need to be quantified for the successful use under radiolytic conditions. Electron solvation dynamics in ILs are measured directly when possible and estimated using proxies (e.g. coumarin-153 dynamic emission Stokes shifts or benzophenone anion solvation) in other cases. Electron reactivity is measured using ultrafast kinetics techniques for comparison with the solvation process.

Wishart, J.F.

2011-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

351

ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR  

SciTech Connect

A new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC), is being developed under funding from the US Department of Energy. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in a manner that has not been done before. The AHPC concept consists of a combination of fabric filtration and electrostatic precipitation in the same housing, providing major synergism between the two collection methods, both in the particulate collection step and in the transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emission with conventional ESPs, and it solves the problem of reentrainment and collection of dust in conventional baghouses. The AHPC is currently being tested at the 2.7-MW scale at the Big Stone power station.

Stanley Miller; Rich Gebert; William Swanson

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive power control Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

controller, which does not need any... Coordinating Control of a Power System with Wind Farm Integration and Multiple FACTS Devices", Neural Networks... , "Coordinated Reactive...

353

Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing U. S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 8 Support January 2004 Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing More Documents & Publications Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing

354

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update More Documents & Publications Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

355

Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing More Documents & Publications Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report - Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 8 Support

356

Ancillary service details: Voltage control  

SciTech Connect

Voltage control is accomplished by managing reactive power on an alternating-current power system. Reactive power can be produced and absorbed by both generation and transmission equipment. Reactive-power devices differ substantially in the magnitude and speed of response and in their capital costs. System operators, transmission owners, generators, customers, power marketers, and government regulators need to pay close attention to voltage control as they restructure the U.S. electricity industry. Voltage control can affect reliability and commerce in three ways: (1) Voltages must be maintained within an acceptable range for both customer and power-system equipment to function properly. (2) The movement of reactive power consumes transmission resources, which limits the ability to move real power and worsens congestion. (3) The movement of reactive power results in real-power losses. When generators are required to supply excessive amounts of reactive power, their real-power production must be curtailed. These opportunity costs are not currently compensated for in most regions. Current tariffs are based on embedded costs. These embedded-cost tariffs average about $0.51/MWh, equivalent to $1.5 billion annually for the United States as a whole. Although this cost is low when compared with the cost of energy, it still aggregates to a significant amount of money. This report takes a basic look at why the power system requires reactive power (an appendix explains the fundamentals of real and reactive power). The report then examines the various types of generation and transmission resources used to supply reactive power and to control voltage. Finally it discusses how these resources are deployed and paid for in several reliability regions around the country. As the U.S. electricity industry is restructured, the generation, transmission, and system-control equipment and functions that maintain voltages within the appropriate ranges are being deintegrated.

Kirby, B.; Hirst, E.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Lillgrund Wind Farm Modelling and Reactive Power Control.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The installation of wind power plant has significantly increased since several years due to the recent necessity of creating renewable and clean energy sources. (more)

Boulanger, Isabelle

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Assessment of Controlling Processes for Field-Scale Uranium Reactive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

transport of U(VI) at the field-scale. The results indicate that multi-rate U(VI) sorptiondesorption, U(VI) surface complexation reactions, and initial U(VI) concentrations...

359

Advanced Critical Advanced Energy Retrofit Education and Training...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Critical Advanced Energy Retrofit Education and Training and Credentialing - 2014 BTO Peer Review Advanced Critical Advanced Energy Retrofit Education and Training and...

360

Chemical Imaging and Dynamical Studies of Reactivity and Emergent Behavior in Complex Interfacial Systems. Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

This research program explored the efficacy of using molecular-level manipulation, imaging and scanning tunneling spectroscopy in conjunction with supersonic molecular beam gas-surface scattering to significantly enhance our understanding of chemical processes occurring on well-characterized interfaces. One program focus was on the spatially-resolved emergent behavior of complex reaction systems as a function of the local geometry and density of adsorbate-substrate systems under reaction conditions. Another focus was on elucidating the emergent electronic and related reactivity characteristics of intentionally constructed single and multicomponent atom- and nanoparticle-based materials. We also examined emergent chirality and self-organization in adsorbed molecular systems where collective interactions between adsorbates and the supporting interface lead to spatial symmetry breaking. In many of these studies we combined the advantages of scanning tunneling (STM) and atomic force (AFM) imaging, scanning tunneling local electronic spectroscopy (STS), and reactive supersonic molecular beams to elucidate precise details of interfacial reactivity that had not been observed by more traditional surface science methods. Using these methods, it was possible to examine, for example, the differential reactivity of molecules adsorbed at different bonding sites in conjunction with how reactivity is modified by the local configuration of nearby adsorbates. At the core of this effort was the goal of significantly extending our understanding of interfacial atomic-scale interactions to create, with intent, molecular assemblies and materials with advanced chemical and physical properties. This ambitious program addressed several key topics in DOE Grand Challenge Science, including emergent chemical and physical properties in condensed phase systems, novel uses of chemical imaging, and the development of advanced reactivity concepts in combustion and catalysis including carbon management. These activities directly benefitted national science objectives in the areas of chemical energy production and advanced materials development.

Sibener, Steven J. [University of Chicago, IL (United States)] [University of Chicago, IL (United States)

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced reactivity controlled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced hydraulic studies Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SUBSIDENCE AND STRESS REORIENTATION Summary: 12;April 17, 2006 JIP on Sand Control and Hydraulic Fracturing 8 RESEARCH OBJECTIVES Advance... ;April 17, 2006 JIP on Sand Control...

362

AdvAnced  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AdvAnced test reActor At the InL advanced Unlike large, commercial power reactors, ATR is a low- temperature, low-pressure reactor. A nuclear reactor is basically an elaborate...

363

Advanced robot locomotion.  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the results of a research effort on advanced robot locomotion. The majority of this work focuses on walking robots. Walking robot applications include delivery of special payloads to unique locations that require human locomotion to exo-skeleton human assistance applications. A walking robot could step over obstacles and move through narrow openings that a wheeled or tracked vehicle could not overcome. It could pick up and manipulate objects in ways that a standard robot gripper could not. Most importantly, a walking robot would be able to rapidly perform these tasks through an intuitive user interface that mimics natural human motion. The largest obstacle arises in emulating stability and balance control naturally present in humans but needed for bipedal locomotion in a robot. A tracked robot is bulky and limited, but a wide wheel base assures passive stability. Human bipedal motion is so common that it is taken for granted, but bipedal motion requires active balance and stability control for which the analysis is non-trivial. This report contains an extensive literature study on the state-of-the-art of legged robotics, and it additionally provides the analysis, simulation, and hardware verification of two variants of a proto-type leg design.

Neely, Jason C.; Sturgis, Beverly Rainwater; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Feddema, John Todd; Spletzer, Barry Louis; Rose, Scott E.; Novick, David Keith; Wilson, David Gerald; Buerger, Stephen P.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sensors and Instrumentation Sensors and Instrumentation Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation The ASI subprogram plans to develop the scientific basis for sensors and supporting infrastructure technology that will address crosscutting technology gaps relating to measurements at existing and advanced nuclear power plants as well as within their fuel cycles. The focus of the program is on the following technical challenges and objectives: Identify needed physical measurement accuracy of nuclear system process parameters and minimize uncertainty. Identify and conduct research into monitoring and control technologies, including human factors, to achieve control of new nuclear energy processes, and new methodologies for monitoring to achieve high reliability and availability. Integrate control of multiple processes, potential reductions in

365

A source of reactive power at a 35-kV substation of the Vankor oilfield  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An SRP-35/10/10 source of reactive power based on a magnetically controlled RTMU-10000/35-UHL1-series shunt reactor and a capacitor bank rated at 10 MV A at voltage 35 kV is described in this work. It was put int...

B. I. Bazylev; M. A. Bryantsev; S. V. Dyagileva

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

High Performance Computations of Subsurface Reactive Transport Processes at the Pore Scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as carbon sequestration drive the geochemistry of porous media far from equilibrium in relatively short time in reservoir scale models. In the DOE Energy Frontier Research Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic Carbon such as reactive surface area or reaction rates as they affect CO2 sequestration, with an objective of upscaling

367

SiO2 Nanoparticle Sequestration via Reactive Functionalization in Holographic Polymer-Dispersed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SiO2 Nanoparticle Sequestration via Reactive Functionalization in Holographic Polymer addition of nanoparticles. Nanoparticles of many materials can be synthesized in sizes small enough are available to control the chemical interaction of the nanoparticles with the HPDLC system. Previous research

Braun, Paul

368

Advanced Search Search Tips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Search Search Tips Advanced Search Search Tips springerlink.com SpringerLink 2,000 40,000 20,000 2010 11 Please visit 7 http://www.springerlink.com GO 1997 1997 SpringerLink Advanced Search Search Tips CONTENT DOI CITATION DOI ISSN ISBN CATEGORY AND DATE LIMITERS Journals Books Protocols

Kinosita Jr., Kazuhiko

369

Improving waveform quality in direct power control of DFIG using fuzzy controller  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper proposes a new direct power control (DPC) strategy of double-fed induction generator using fuzzy logic controller. The active and reactive power equations are expanded, and effects of voltage vecto...

H. Z. Boroujeni; M. F. Othman; A. H. Shirdel

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Advanced isotope separation  

SciTech Connect

The Study Group briefly reviewed the technical status of the three Advanced Isotope Separation (AIS) processes. It also reviewed the evaluation work that has been carried out by DOE's Process Evaluation Board (PEB) and the Union Carbide Corporation-Nuclear Division (UCCND). The Study Group briefly reviewed a recent draft assessment made for DOE staff of the nonproliferation implications of the AIS technologies. The staff also very briefly summarized the status of GCEP and Advanced Centrifuge development. The Study Group concluded that: (1) there has not been sufficient progress to provide a firm scientific, technical or economic basis on which to select one of the three competing AIS processes for full-scale engineering development at this time; and (2) however, should budgetary restraints or other factors force such a selection, we believe that the evaluation process that is being carried out by the PEB provides the best basis available for making a decision. The Study Group recommended that: (1) any decisions on AIS processes should include a comparison with gas centrifuge processes, and should not be made independently from the plutonium isotope program; (2) in evaluating the various enrichment processes, all applicable costs (including R and D and sales overhead) and an appropriate discounting approach should be included in order to make comparisons on a private industry basis; (3) if the three AIS programs continue with limited resources, the work should be reoriented to focus only on the most pressing technical problems; and (4) if a decision is made to develop the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation process, the solid collector option should be pursued in parallel to alleviate the potential program impact of liquid collector thermal control problems.

Not Available

1982-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

371

ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas combustion turbines are rapidly becoming the primary technology of choice for generating electricity. At least half of the new generating capacity added in the US over the next twenty years will be combustion turbine systems. The Department of Energy has cosponsored with Siemens Westinghouse, a program to maintain the technology lead in gas turbine systems. The very ambitious eight year program was designed to demonstrate a highly efficient and commercially acceptable power plant, with the ability to fire a wide range of fuels. The main goal of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program was to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost effective competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Performance targets were focused on natural gas as a fuel and included: System efficiency that exceeds 60% (lower heating value basis); Less than 10 ppmv NO{sub x} emissions without the use of post combustion controls; Busbar electricity that are less than 10% of state of the art systems; Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) equivalent to current systems; Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals; and Commercial systems by the year 2000. In a parallel effort, the program was to focus on adapting the ATS engine to coal-derived or biomass fuels. In Phase 1 of the ATS Program, preliminary investigators on different gas turbine cycles demonstrated that net plant LHV based efficiency greater than 60% was achievable. In Phase 2 the more promising cycles were evaluated in greater detail and the closed-loop steam-cooled combined cycle was selected for development because it offered the best solution with least risk for achieving the ATS Program goals for plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity and RAM. Phase 2 also involved conceptual ATS engine and plant design and technology developments in aerodynamics, sealing, combustion, cooling, materials, coatings and casting development. The market potential for the ATS gas turbine in the 2000-2014 timeframe was assessed for combined cycle, simple cycle and integrated gasification combined cycle, for three engine sizes. The total ATS market potential was forecasted to exceed 93 GW. Phase 3 and Phase 3 Extension involved further technology development, component testing and W501ATS engine detail design. The technology development efforts consisted of ultra low NO{sub x} combustion, catalytic combustion, sealing, heat transfer, advanced coating systems, advanced alloys, single crystal casting development and determining the effect of steam on turbine alloys. Included in this phase was full-load testing of the W501G engine at the McIntosh No. 5 site in Lakeland, Florida.

Gregory Gaul

2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

372

Design and synthesis of reactive separation systems  

SciTech Connect

During the last decade there has been a rapid upturn in interest in reactive distillation. The chemical process industry recognizes the favorable economics of carrying out reaction simultaneously with distillation for certain classes of reacting systems, and many new processes have been built based on this technology. Interest is also increasing by academics and software vendors. Systematic design methods for reactive distillation systems have only recently begun to emerge. In this report we survey the available design techniques and point out the contributions made by our group at the University of Massachusetts.

Doherty, M.F.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into the fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

374

Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into a fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

375

Session: CSP Advanced Systems -- Advanced Overview (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

The project description is: (1) it supports crosscutting activities, e.g. advanced optical materials, that aren't tied to a single CSP technology and (2) it supports the 'incubation' of new concepts in preliminary stages of investigation.

Mehos, M.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Johnson Controls: Meeting Minutes | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Meeting Minutes Johnson Controls: Meeting Minutes Meeting with DOEOMB Officials on Advanced Technology Vehicle Loan Program Johnson Controls: Meeting Minutes More Documents &...

377

Human Factors Aspects of Advanced Process Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This interest was increased by the Three Mile Island-2 nuclear power plant accident, an incident widely believed to be caused, in part, by poor operator interface design [1]. Other industries are also considering improved operator interface design...

Shaw, J. A.

378

Advanced controls for floating wind turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Floating Offshore Wind Turbines (FOWT) is a technology that stands to spearhead the rapid growth of the offshore wind energy sector and allow the exploration of vast high quality wind resources over coastal and offshore ...

Casanovas, Carlos (Casanovas Bermejo)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Scheduling with Advanced Process Control Constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

companies have to pay great attention to lower their produc- tion costs and guarantee high quality machine parameters so as to achieve satisfactory product quality. When there is a conflict between quality and scheduling ob- jectives, quality usually has to be satisfied. This paper studies the interaction between

Hasenbein, John

380

Advanced Thermal Control | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

"Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland. merit08kelly.pdf More Documents & Publications Compact, Light-Weight, Single-Phase, Liquid-Cooled...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced reactivity controlled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3. Segregated flow solver (2 nd order convection scheme, URF 0.5P, 0.2V) 4. Convective heat loss 5. No flow in axial(z) direction in wall regions 6. PM is homogeneously...

382

Advanced Power Systems and Controls Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

photovoltaic generation facility. Solar panel output is in white, and the response of the XP DPR is in red Solar Power Generation Introduction The rapid growth of wind and solar power is a key driver of the development of grid-scale Battery Energy Storage Systems (BESS). A well implemented BESS co-located with solar

Ben-Yakar, Adela

383

Advanced particulate matter control apparatus and methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and methods for collection and removal of particulate matter, including fine particulate matter, from a gas stream, comprising a unique combination of high collection efficiency and ultralow pressure drop across the filter. The apparatus and method utilize simultaneous electrostatic precipitation and membrane filtration of a particular pore size, wherein electrostatic collection and filtration occur on the same surface.

Miller, Stanley J. (Grand Forks, ND); Zhuang, Ye (Grand Forks, ND); Almlie, Jay C. (East Grand Forks, MN)

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

384

Low Reactivity SI Engine Lubricant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Results showed that lubricant improvement allowed up to 4 degree improvement in spark advance at knock limited conditions resulting in potentially over 3 percent indicated efficiency improvement

385

Experimental Results Of Fuzzy Logic Control For Lateral Vehicle Guidance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. , Advances in Fuzzy Logic Control for Lateral VehicleExperimental Results of Fuzzy Logic Control for Lateral1425 Experimental Results of Fuzzy Logic Control for Lateral

Hessburg, Thomas; Peng, Hei; Zhang, Wei-bin; Arai, Alan; Tomizuka, Masayoshi

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

How Advanced Batteries Are Energizing the Economy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

How Advanced Batteries Are Energizing the Economy How Advanced Batteries Are Energizing the Economy How Advanced Batteries Are Energizing the Economy August 11, 2011 - 7:15pm Addthis Thanks in part to a $300 million grant through the Recovery Act, Johnson Controls has been able to retool a shuttered plant in Holland, Michigan to produce high-tech advanced batteries. John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Creates quality manufacturing jobs Positions America as a leader in the advanced battery industry Earlier today, President Obama visited Johnson Controls in Holland, Michigan to highlight how this once shuttered factory is helping rev up the advanced battery industry in the United States. This long dormant plant was revived by a $300 million Recovery Act grant which allowed Johnson Controls

387

Advanced Leds | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Leds Leds Jump to: navigation, search Name Advanced Leds Place Coventry, England, United Kingdom Zip CV5 6SP Product Advanced Leds develops LED technology for outdoor lighting, including street lighting applications. Coordinates 44.866737°, -72.263927° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.866737,"lon":-72.263927,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

388

2003-01-2546 Simulating Advanced Life Support Systems for Integrated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the simulation is a replacement for the Advanced Life Support (ALS) hardware and crew, allowing for testing2003-01-2546 Simulating Advanced Life Support Systems for Integrated Controls Research David of an integrated advanced life support system. It contains models of the major components of an Advanced Life

Kortenkamp, David

389

NREL: Wind Research - Controls Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Controls Analysis Controls Analysis Photo of a man working inside the hub of a large 3-blades turbine. Working in the hub of Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART) at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) Man in wind turbine hub viewed from inside a wind turbine's blade. At the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), we design, implement, and test advanced wind turbine controls to maximize energy extraction and reduce structural dynamic loads. These control designs are based on linear models of the turbine that are simulated using specialized modeling software. The resulting advanced controls algorithms are field tested on the NWTC's Controls Advanced Research Turbines (CARTs). NWTC researchers are also studying blade pitch and generator torque, and employing advanced sensors to optimize power capture and reduce wind

390

Reactive power interconnection requirements for PV and wind plants : recommendations to NERC.  

SciTech Connect

Voltage on the North American bulk system is normally regulated by synchronous generators, which typically are provided with voltage schedules by transmission system operators. In the past, variable generation plants were considered very small relative to conventional generating units, and were characteristically either induction generator (wind) or line-commutated inverters (photovoltaic) that have no inherent voltage regulation capability. However, the growing level of penetration of non-traditional renewable generation - especially wind and solar - has led to the need for renewable generation to contribute more significantly to power system voltage control and reactive power capacity. Modern wind-turbine generators, and increasingly PV inverters as well, have considerable dynamic reactive power capability, which can be further enhanced with other reactive support equipment at the plant level to meet interconnection requirements. This report contains a set of recommendations to the North-America Electricity Reliability Corporation (NERC) as part of Task 1-3 (interconnection requirements) of the Integration of Variable Generation Task Force (IVGTF) work plan. The report discusses reactive capability of different generator technologies, reviews existing reactive power standards, and provides specific recommendations to improve existing interconnection standards.

McDowell, Jason (General Electric, Schenectady, NY); Walling, Reigh (General Electric, Schenectady, NY); Peter, William (SunPower, Richmond, CA); Von Engeln, Edi (NV Energy, Reno, NV); Seymour, Eric (AEI, Fort Collins, CO); Nelson, Robert (Siemens Wind Turbines, Orlando, FL); Casey, Leo (Satcon, Boston, MA); Ellis, Abraham; Barker, Chris. (SunPower, Richmond, CA)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Cell Comp't Thermal Reactivity & Improvements | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Comp't Thermal Reactivity & Improvements Cell Comp't Thermal Reactivity & Improvements Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on...

392

Isotope effects in methanol synthesis and the reactivity of copper...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Isotope effects in methanol synthesis and the reactivity of copper formates on a CuSiO2 catalyst. Isotope effects in methanol synthesis and the reactivity of copper formates on a...

393

Design of processes with reactive distillation line diagrams  

SciTech Connect

On the basis of the transformation of concentration coordinates, the concept of reactive distillation lines is developed. It is applied to study the feasibility of a reactive distillation with an equilibrium reaction on all trays of a distillation column. The singular points in the distillation line diagrams are characterized in terms of nodes and saddles. Depending on the characterization of the reactive distillation line diagrams, it can be decided whether a column with two feed stages is required. On the basis of the reaction space concept, a procedure for identification of reactive distillation processes is developed, in which the reactive distillation column has to be divided into reactive and nonreactive sections. This can be necessary to overcome the limitations in separation which result from the chemical equilibrium. The concentration profile of this combined reactive/nonreactive distillation column is estimated using combined reactive/nonreactive distillation lines.

Bessling, B. [BASF Ludwigshafen (Germany). Engineering Research and Development] [BASF Ludwigshafen (Germany). Engineering Research and Development; Schembecker, G.; Simmrock, K.H. [Univ. of Dortmund (Germany). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Univ. of Dortmund (Germany). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Development of Advanced Massive Heterogeneous Sensor Networks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Massive Heterogeneous Sensor Networks Research Team * Doug McCorkle * Kris Bryden * Mark Bryden Ames Laboratory U of Maryland * Ashwani Gupta * Miao Yu Power Plant Challenges * Conflicting goals of reliable low cost energy and climate change mitigation * Large investment in current infrastructure * Little implementation of information technologies Sensors ... * will be "free" * will be small (lick 'n stick) * will be smart * will be ubiquitous Low cost improvements in sensing for control and condition monitoring can result in big improvements in cost and carbon emissions * "... develop the understandings, algorithms, and control strategies needed to utilize large-scale, high- density sensor networks in advanced power plants." * Develop techniques for the

395

Advanced Materials | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Research Areas Research Highlights Facilities and Capabilities Science to Energy Solutions News & Awards Events and Conferences Supporting Organizations Directionally Solidified Materials Using high-temperature optical floating zone furnace to produce monocrystalline molybdenum alloy micro-pillars Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials Advanced Materials | Advanced Materials SHARE ORNL has the nation's most comprehensive materials research program and is a world leader in research that supports the development of advanced materials for energy generation, storage, and use. We have core strengths in three main areas: materials synthesis, characterization, and theory. In other words, we discover and make new materials, we study their structure,

396

Advanced Concepts Breakout Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop Workshop Advanced Concepts Working Group Facilitator: John J. Petrovic Scribe: Sherry Marin Advanced Storage Techniques/ Approaches in Priority Order 1. Crystalline Nanoporous Materials (15) 2. Polymer Microspheres (12) Self-Assembled Nanocomposites (12) 3. Advanced Hydrides (11) Metals - Organic (11) 4. BN Nanotubes (5) Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon (5) 5. Mesoporous materials (4) Bulk Amorphous Materials (BAMs) (4) 6. Iron Hydrolysis (3) 7. Nanosize powders (2) 8. Metallic Hydrogen (1) Hydride Alcoholysis (1) Overarching R&D Questions for All Advanced Materials * Maximum storage capacity - theoretical model * Energy balance / life cycle analysis * Hydrogen absorption / desorption kinetics * Preliminary cost analysis - potential for low cost, high

397

Institute for Advanced Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Institute for Advanced Studies Institute for Advanced Studies Institute for Advanced Studies NMC leverages the strengths of three research universities to build joint programs, develop strategic partnerships, provide common organization and facilities. Contact Leader TBD LANL Program Administrator Pam Hundley (505) 663-5453 Email Building regional partnerships in education, leveraging strengths of three research universities The Institute for Advanced Studies (IAS) works with the three New Mexico research universities (University of New Mexico, New Mexico Tech, and New Mexico State University) to develop research and educational collaborations and partnerships. To facilitate interactions between the universities and LANL, the three New Mexico schools established the New Mexico Consortium (NMC), a nonprofit

398

Advanced Cathode Catalysts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation, which focuses on advanced cathode catalysts, was given by Piotr Zelenay of Los Alamos National laboratory at a February 2007 meeting on new fuel cell projects.

399

Advance Care Planning Safeguards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Regardless of which goals of advance care planning are featured, safeguards, as reviewed in my article and by...5 we inadvertently may be doing harm.

J. Andrew Billings MD

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) program is designed to promote separate but parallel engine development between the major stationary, gaseous fueled engine manufacturers in the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced reactivity controlled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Advanced Fuel Cycle Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working with INL Community Outreach Visitor Information Calendar of Events ATR National Scientific User Facility Center for Advanced Energy Studies Light Water Reactor...

402

Advances in Physical Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hindawi Publishing Corporation Advances in Physical Chemistry Volume 2011, Article ID 907129, 18 pages doi:10.11552011907129 Review Article Contrast and Synergy between...

403

People | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Office Floor Coordinators Beamline Phones Sectors Directory Media Contact Rick Fenner (630) 252-5280 Webmaster Kelly Cunningham (630) 252-0619 Mailing Address Advanced...

404

Advances in photosynthesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advances in photosynthesis ... This article emphasizes the relation between photosynthetic chemistry and the molecular architecture of the photosynthetic center in plant cells. ...

Roderic B. Park

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Examining System-Wide Impacts of Solar PV Control Systems with a Power Hardware-in-the-Loop Platform  

SciTech Connect

High penetration levels of distributed solar PV power generation can lead to adverse power quality impacts such as excessive voltage rise, voltage flicker, and reactive power values that result in unacceptable voltage levels. Advanced inverter control schemes have been proposed that have the potential to mitigate many power quality concerns. However, closed-loop control may lead to unintended behavior in deployed systems as complex interactions can occur between numerous operating devices. In order to enable the study of the performance of advanced control schemes in a detailed distribution system environment, a Hardware-in-the-Loop (HIL) platform has been developed. In the HIL system, GridLAB-D, a distribution system simulation tool, runs in real-time mode at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and supplies power system parameters at a point of common coupling to hardware located at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Hardware inverters interact with grid and PV simulators emulating an operational distribution system and power output from the inverters is measured and sent to PNNL to update the real-time distribution system simulation. The platform is described and initial test cases are presented. The platform is used to study the system-wide impacts and the interactions of controls applied to inverters that are integrated into a simulation of the IEEE 8500-node test feeder, with inverters in either constant power factor control or active volt/VAR control. We demonstrate that this HIL platform is well-suited to the study of advanced inverter controls and their impacts on the power quality of a distribution feeder. Additionally, the results from HIL are used to validate GridLAB-D simulations of advanced inverter controls. ?

Williams, Tess L.; Fuller, Jason C.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Palmintier, Bryan; Lundstrom, Blake; Chakraborty, Sudipta

2014-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

406

Direct control of doubly fed induction generator fed by PWM converter with a variable structure control based on a sliding mode control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a direct control of doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) with a variable structure control based on ... and reactive power performance when it applies to DFIG. Simulation results and improvem...

Youcef Bekakra; Djilani Ben Attous

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Sensitivity analysis of reactivity responses using one-dimensional discrete ordinates and three-dimensional Monte Carlo methods  

SciTech Connect

The TSUNAMI computational sequences currently in the SCALE 5 code system provide an automated approach to performing sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for eigenvalue responses, using either one-dimensional discrete ordinates or three-dimensional Monte Carlo methods. This capability has recently been expanded to address eigenvalue-difference responses such as reactivity changes. This paper describes the methodology and presents results obtained for an example advanced CANDU reactor design. (authors)

Williams, M. L.; Gehin, J. C.; Clarno, K. T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Bldg. 5700, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6170 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Mined land reclamation by biological reactivation  

SciTech Connect

A mine reclamation technique, developed in Europe, restores land to full productivity within two years without topsoil replacement. The method deliberately reestablishes within one year following mining, the required biological balance between microbes, enzymes, and trace elements in the rock spoil rather than waiting five or more years for natural processes to restore balance. The technique is called Biological Reactivation (BR). This paper discusses the feasibility of BR reclamation after surface mining operations in the US. Staff of the Ohio Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute completed an OSM-sponsored research project on BR in which physical and chemical tests characterized 140 spoil samples obtained from 10 surface mining operations. Test results indicated that Biological Reactivation technology could be effectively applied, at least in the test areas sampled within Appalachia. Preliminary estimates make clear that the new technique reduces reclamation costs on prime farmland by approximately 95% compared to topsoil segregation and replacement methods.

Gozon, J.S.; Konya, C.J.; Lukovic, S.S.; Lundquist, R.G.; Olah, J.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project  

SciTech Connect

KASP (Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project) completed the new Layer 0 upgrade for D0, assumed key electronics projects for the US CMS project, finished important new physics measurements with the D0 experiment at Fermilab, made substantial contributions to detector studies for the proposed e+e- international linear collider (ILC), and advanced key initiatives in non-accelerator-based neutrino physics.

Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bolton, T.; Horton-Smith, G.; Maravin, Y.; Ratra, B.; Stanton, N.; von Toerne, E.; Wilson, G.

2007-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

410

TRC Advanced Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TRC Advanced Technologies Inc TRC Advanced Technologies Inc Jump to: navigation, search Logo: TRC Advanced Technologies Inc Name TRC Advanced Technologies Inc Address 8700 Commerce Park Place Houston, Texas Zip 77036 Sector Solar Product Remote power PV systems Website http://www.trcat.com/ Coordinates 29.685775°, -95.535791° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.685775,"lon":-95.535791,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

411

E-Print Network 3.0 - automotive emission control Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

emission control Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: automotive emission...

412

Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - SCR Catalyst Blinding  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SCR Catalyst Blinding SCR Catalyst Blinding University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UND-EERC) is determining the potential of low-rank coal ash to cause blinding or masking of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. A secondary goal will be to determine the degree of elemental mercury conversion across the catalysts. Specific objectives include (1) identify candidate coals and blends for testing under bench-scale conditions, (2) conduct bench-scale testing to screen coals and identify key conditions for full-scale testing, (3) design and construct an SCR slipstream test chamber for sampling at full-scale facilities, (4) conduct testing at full-scale testing, (5) identify SCR blinding mechanisms, rates, and cleaning methods as well as mercury conversion efficiencies, and (6) interpret data, prepare a report, and attend sponsor meetings to present information and recommendations.

413

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - Optimized Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimized Fuel Injector Design Optimized Fuel Injector Design This project includes fundamental research and engineering development of low NOx burners and reburning fuel injectors. The team of Reaction Engineering International (REI), the University of Utah, Brown University and DB Riley, Inc., will develop fundamental information on low NOx burners. The work has two phases. In the first phase, the University of Utah will examine two-phase mixing and near-field behavior of coal injectors using a 15-million Btu/hr bench-scale furnace, Brown University will examine char deactivation and effectiveness of reburning, and REI will develop a comprehensive burner model using the data produced by the University of Utah and Brown University. In the second phase, an optimized injector design will be tested at the 100-million Btu/hr Riley Coal Burner Test Facility. It is anticipated that this work will provide improved hardware designs and computer simulation models for reduced NOx emissions and minimized carbon loss.

414

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - Model for NOx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model for NOx Emissions in Biomass Cofiring Model for NOx Emissions in Biomass Cofiring Southern Research Institute is developing a validated tool or methodology to accurately and confidently design and optimize biomass-cofiring systems for full-scale utility boilers to produce the lowest NOX emissions and the least unburned carbon. The computer model will be validated through an extensive set of tests at the 6 MMBtu/hr pilot combustor in the Southern Company/Southern Research Institute Combustion Research Facility. Full-scale demonstration testing can be compared to the model for further validation. The project is designed to balance the development of a systematic and expansive database detailing the effects of cofiring parameters on NOx formation with the complementary modeling effort that will yield a capability to predict, and therefore optimize, NOx reductions by the selection of those parameters. The database of biomass cofiring results will be developed through an extensive set of pilot-scale tests at the Southern Company/Southern Research Institute Combustion Research Facility. The testing in this program will monitor NOx, LOI, and other emissions over a broad domain of biomass composition, coal quality, and cofiring injection configurations to quantify the dependence of NOx formation and LOI on these parameters. This database of cofiring cases will characterize an extensive suite of emissions and combustion properties for each of the fuel and injection configuration combinations tested.

415

Advanced Fuels Synthesis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Fuels Synthesis Advanced Fuels Synthesis Coal and Coal/Biomass to Liquids Advanced Fuels Synthesis The Advanced Fuels Synthesis Key Technology is focused on catalyst and reactor optimization for producing liquid hydrocarbon fuels from coal/biomass mixtures, supports the development and demonstration of advanced separation technologies, and sponsors research on novel technologies to convert coal/biomass to liquid fuels. Active projects within the program portfolio include the following: Fischer-Tropsch fuels synthesis Small Scale Coal Biomass Liquids Production Using Highly Selective Fischer Tropsch Catalyst Small Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal/Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels Via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Coal Fuels Alliance: Design and Construction of Early Lead Mini Fischer-Tropsch Refinery

416

Advanced Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Advanced Energy Name Advanced Energy Address 1625 Sharp Point Drive Place Fort Collins, Colorado Zip 80525 Sector Solar Product Solar cell, passive-solar architectural glass, solar grid-tie inverter, semiconductor, flat panel display, data storage Year founded 1981 Number of employees 1001-5000 Website http://www.advanced-energy.com Coordinates 40.565708°, -105.030749° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.565708,"lon":-105.030749,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

417

Chemistry 685 (CHE 685) Advanced Organic Chemistry: Organic Reaction Mechanisms and Molecular Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemistry 685 (CHE 685) Advanced Organic Chemistry: Organic Reaction Mechanisms and Molecular and physical chemistry Course description and rationale CHE685 is a graduate-level organic chemistry course. These two courses focus on physical organic chemistry, which deals with the structure and reactivity

Mather, Patrick T.

418

Advanced pressurized water reactor for improved resource utilization, part II - composite advanced PWR concept  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates the enhanced resource utilization in an advanced pressurized water reactor (PWR) concept using a composite of selected improvements identified in a companion study. The selected improvements were in the areas of reduced loss of neutrons to control poisons, reduced loss of neutrons in leakage from the core, and improved blanket/reflector concepts. These improvements were incorporated into a single composite advanced PWR. A preliminary assessment of resource requirements and costs and impact on safety are presented.

Turner, S.E.; Gurley, M.K.; Kirby, K.D.; Mitchell, W III

1981-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Optimal tuning of PI controller using PSO optimization for indirect power control for DFIG based wind turbine with MPPT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, an artificial intelligence method particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is presented for determining the optimal PI controller parameters for the indirect control active and reactive power of...

Youcef Bekakra; Djilani Ben Attous

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Water: Advanced Irrigation Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Limited opportunities to further expand the volume of global freshwaters allocated to irrigation means that advanced irrigation technologies, aiming to improve efficiency of existing systems, are timely needed and are of paramount importance. This article Advanced Irrigation Technologies describes the latest advances in irrigation application methods, irrigation management, and other novel developments. It provides a vision for the future, including emerging risks, opportunities, and technical challenges, as the world gears up to supply 50% more food to an additional 2 billion people by 2050.

C.B. Hedley; J.W. Knox; S.R. Raine; R. Smith

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced reactivity controlled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced reactivity measurement facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

< 1 2 3 4 5 > >> Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 41 STANDARDS FOR MEASUREMENTS AND TESTING OF WIND TURBINE POWER QUALITY Poul Srensen, Ris National Laboratory, P.O.Box 49, DK-4000...

422

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced reactivity measurement Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

< 1 2 3 4 5 > >> Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 41 STANDARDS FOR MEASUREMENTS AND TESTING OF WIND TURBINE POWER QUALITY Poul Srensen, Ris National Laboratory, P.O.Box 49, DK-4000...

423

Advances in Transportation Technologies | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Advances in Transportation Technologies Advances in Transportation Technologies Advances in Transportation Technologies More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups...

424

Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects Solicitation | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Projects Solicitation Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects Solicitation Federal loan guarantee solicitation announcement -- Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects. Draft Advanced...

425

Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects Solicitation | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects Solicitation Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects Solicitation INFORMATIONAL MATERIALS ADVANCED NUCLEAR ENERGY PROJECTS SOLICITATION Solicitation...

426

Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects Solicitation | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects Solicitation Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects Solicitation INFORMATIONAL MATERIALS DRAFT ADVANCED NUCLEAR ENERGY PROJECTS SOLICITATION...

427

Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Incentive Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Incentive Program Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Incentive Program A fact sheet detailling the advanced technology vehicles...

428

Advanced Manufacturing Use Cases and Early Results in GENI Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for controlling remote processes in manufacturing facilities. In addition, there is a need to suitably configureAdvanced Manufacturing Use Cases and Early Results in GENI Infrastructure Alex Berryman, Prasad to advanced manufacturing communities are exciting prospects due to the growth of the global marketplace

Calyam, Prasad

429

Advanced RISC Machines Document Number: ARM DDI 0035A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the ARM710 microprocessor, the ARM7100 integrates LCD control, glueless DRAM interface, UART with infraAdvanced RISC Machines ARM Document Number: ARM DDI 0035A Issued: January 1996 Copyright Advanced Data Sheet ARM DDI 0035A The ARM7100 is a high integration microcontroller particularly well

Grantner, Janos L.

430

Treatment of reactive dyes and textile finishing wastewater using Fenton's oxidation for reuse  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fenton's oxidation (FO) was used to decolourise and degrade some reactive dyes (Remazol Black 5, Remazol Red, Remazol Blue, Remazol Yellow) and raw textile finishing industry effluents (S1, S2, S3) containing mainly reactive dyes. The operational conditions for pH varied between 2.5 and 4.0 while temperature ranged from 30°C to 50°C. The concentrations of FeSO4 and H2O2 varied to a wide range (200??600 mg/l of FeSO4, 300??1000 mg/l of H2O2) depending on the type of the dyes and their mixture and textile additives used in the process. FO is highly effective for colour removal (>99%) for reactive dyes and (87??94%) for textile finishing wastewater. It can be applied as a pretreatment and the remaining total dissolved solids (TDS) can be removed by an additional advanced process, e.g. membrane process.

Sureyya Meric; Giusy Lofrano; Vincenzo Belgiorno

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Advanced Hydraulic Wind Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, has developed a novel advanced hydraulic wind energy design, which has up to 23% performance improvement over conventional wind turbine and conventional hydraulic wind energy systems ... Keywords: wind, tide, energy, power, hydraulic

Jack A. Jones; Allan Bruce; Adrienne S. Lam

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

The Advanced Manufacturing Partnership  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;ve Manufacturing Technologies (led by Dow, Honeywell and MIT) Manufacturing Ins;tutes (led, Honeywell and MIT GOALS § To launch public-private ini:a:ves to advance transforma

Das, Suman

433

Advance Care Planning Safeguards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To the Editors:We read with interest the recent article by Dr. Billings.1...In the article, Dr. Billings defines the goal of advance care planning as promoting the autonomy of decisionally incapac...

Sangeeta C. Ahluwalia PhD; MPH; Howard S. Gordon MD

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Search Asia Advanced Search  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Asia Times Search Asia Times Advanced Search Southeast Asia Malaysia tackles illegal logging:52:14 AM Search #12;Asia Times illegal logging," he said, adding that nine Malaysians had been arrested

435

Search Asia Advanced Search  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Asia Times Search Asia Times Advanced Search Southeast Asia Indonesia looks to curb log smuggling.html (1 of 2)9/4/2007 12:59:34 PM Search #12;Asia Times No material from Asia Times Online may

436

Advanced Review Geometry optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Review Geometry optimization H. Bernhard Schlegel Geometry optimization is an important part of most quantum chemical calcu- lations. This article surveys methods for optimizing equilibrium geometries, lo- cating transition structures, and following reaction paths. The emphasis is on optimizations

Schlegel, H. Bernhard

437

People | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

apsuser@aps.anl.gov (630) 252-9090 8:30 am - 5:30 pm, Monday-Friday Media Contact Rick Fenner (630) 252-5280 Webmaster Kelly Cunningham (630) 252-0619 Mailing Address Advanced...

438

HVDC control developments - addressing system requirements  

SciTech Connect

This article describes typical high voltage direct current (HVDC) control systems and some of the new developments in the control area. HVDC control systems are showing their flexible characteristics as demonstrated, for example, by the new modulation, torsional damping, and alternating current voltage and reactive power controllers. Extensive studies are conducted to design and integrate such controllers into HVDC systems and to assure against any detrimental interactions within the total control system. 8 figures.

Hauth, R.L.; Patel, H.S.; Piwko, R.J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Integration of Advanced Probabilistic Analysis Techniques with Multi-Physics Models  

SciTech Connect

An integrated simulation platform that couples probabilistic analysis-based tools with model-based simulation tools can provide valuable insights for reactive and proactive responses to plant operating conditions. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the benefits of a partial implementation of the Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Detailed Framework Specification through the coupling of advanced PRA capabilities and accurate multi-physics plant models. Coupling a probabilistic model with a multi-physics model will aid in design, operations, and safety by providing a more accurate understanding of plant behavior. This represents the first attempt at actually integrating these two types of analyses for a control system used for operations, on a faster than real-time basis. This report documents the development of the basic communication capability to exchange data with the probabilistic model using Reliability Workbench (RWB) and the multi-physics model using Dymola. The communication pathways from injecting a fault (i.e., failing a component) to the probabilistic and multi-physics models were successfully completed. This first version was tested with prototypic models represented in both RWB and Modelica. First, a simple event tree/fault tree (ET/FT) model was created to develop the software code to implement the communication capabilities between the dynamic-link library (dll) and RWB. A program, written in C#, successfully communicates faults to the probabilistic model through the dll. A systems model of the Advanced Liquid-Metal ReactorPower Reactor Inherently Safe Module (ALMR-PRISM) design developed under another DOE project was upgraded using Dymola to include proper interfaces to allow data exchange with the control application (ConApp). A program, written in C+, successfully communicates faults to the multi-physics model. The results of the example simulation were successfully plotted.

Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit; none,; Flanagan, George F. [ORNL] [ORNL; Poore III, Willis P. [ORNL] [ORNL; Muhlheim, Michael David [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

440

Reactive sticking coefficients of silane on silicon  

SciTech Connect

Reactive sticking coefficients (RSCs) were measured for silane and disilane on polycrystalline silicon for a wide range of temperature and flux (pressure) conditions. The data were obtained from deposition rate measurements using molecular beam scattering and a very low pressure cold wall reactor. The RSCs have non-Arrhenius temperature dependences and decreases with increasing flux at low (710/sup 0/) temperatures. A simple model involving dissociative adsorption of silane is consistent with these results. The results are compared with previous studies of the SiH/sub 4//Si(s) reaction.

Buss, R.J.; Ho, P.; Breiland, W.G.; Coltrin, M.E.

1988-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced reactivity controlled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Cellular-automaton model for reactive systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method for constructing a variety of probabilistic lattice-gas cellular automata for chemically reacting systems is described. The microscopic reactive dynamics give rise to a general fourth-order polynomial rate law for the average particle density. The reduction of the microdynamical equations to a discrete or continuous Boltzmann equation is presented. Connection between the linearized Boltzmann equations and a reaction-diffusion macroscopic equation is discussed. As an example of the general formalism a set of cellular automata rules that yield the Schlgl phenomenological model is constructed. Simulation results are presented.

David Dab; Anna Lawniczak; Jean-Pierre Boon; Raymond Kapral

1990-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

442

Theoretical and Experimental Evaluation of Chemical Reactivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

released and the rate of energy released for a specific reactive chemical. 2.1 DSC DSC is a popular screening tool (safe and fast) and can provide an overall indication of exothermic activity of the chemical being tested. In a DSC, a sample and a... endothermic or exothermic reaction. When the rate of heat generation in the sample exceeds a particular value, the heat supply to the sample is cut off and this additional heat gain is attributed to exothermic activity within the sample.17 From the DSC...

Wang, Qingsheng

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

443

Preparation of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to the preparation of fine particles of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate by means of a solid state process which comprises firing a mixture of calcium sulfate, silica and a reducing additive selected from the group consisting of calcium sulfide, carbon, carbon monoxide, methane and hydrogen, at a temperature of about 850.degree.-1000.degree. C. A carrier gas such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide may also be added, if desired. A high concentration of sulfur dioxide is a by-product of this process.

Shen, Ming-Shing (Laramie, WY, NJ); Chen, James M. (Rahway, NJ); Yang, Ralph T. (Amherst, NY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

IAEA sodium void reactivity benchmark calculations  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, the IAEA-1 992 ``Benchmark Calculation of Sodium Void Reactivity Effect in Fast Reactor Core`` problem is evaluated. The proposed design is a large axially heterogeneous oxide-fueled fast reactor as described in Section 2; the core utilizes a sodium plenum above the core to enhance leakage effects. The calculation methods used in this benchmark evaluation are described in Section 3. In Section 4, the calculated core performance results for the benchmark reactor model are presented; and in Section 5, the influence of steel and interstitial sodium heterogeneity effects is estimated.

Hill, R.N.; Finck, P.J.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

IAEA sodium void reactivity benchmark calculations  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, the IAEA-1 992 Benchmark Calculation of Sodium Void Reactivity Effect in Fast Reactor Core'' problem is evaluated. The proposed design is a large axially heterogeneous oxide-fueled fast reactor as described in Section 2; the core utilizes a sodium plenum above the core to enhance leakage effects. The calculation methods used in this benchmark evaluation are described in Section 3. In Section 4, the calculated core performance results for the benchmark reactor model are presented; and in Section 5, the influence of steel and interstitial sodium heterogeneity effects is estimated.

Hill, R.N.; Finck, P.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Implementation of Multi-valued Fuzzy Behavior Control for Robot Navigation in Cluttered  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, resulting in the development of reactive fuzzy behavior methods that use fuzzy logic controllers, which canImplementation of Multi-valued Fuzzy Behavior Control for Robot Navigation in Cluttered for navigation control of robotic vehicles using multivalued reactive fuzzy behaviors. This design allows

Collins, Emmanuel

447

Centralized wind power plant voltage control with optimal power flow algorithm.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents a method of controlling the reactive power injected into a medium-voltage collection system by multiple wind turbine generators such that the voltage (more)

Kline, Jared Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Reliability Modeling for the Advanced Electric Power Grid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The advanced electric power grid promises a self-healing infrastructure using distributed, ... and control network that can dynamically change the power grid to achieve higher dependability. The goal is ... them ...

Ayman Z. Faza; Sahra Sedigh

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Advanced Energy Conversion LLC AEC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LLC AEC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Advanced Energy Conversion LLC (AEC) Place: New York Zip: 12020 Product: R&D company focused on power electronics, motion control systems...

450

CO{sub 2}-gasification reactivity of different carbonaceous materials at elevated temperatures  

SciTech Connect

At the atmospheric pressure and at the temperatures between 1,223 and 1,673 K, the CO{sub 2} gasification reactivity of seven different carbonaceous materials comprising coal tar pitch coke, petroleum coke, natural graphite, carbon black and three coal chars was investigated by using thermogravimetric analysis. Their crystalline structures were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). It is found that the reactivity of the chars, pitch coke and petroleum coke produced from liquid phase carbonization, is several times poorer than that of the coal chars produced from solid phase carbonization and even lower than that of natural graphite. At the same time, it is obtained that under the condition of the chemical reaction control, the apparent activation energies of the former are in the range of 135.82-174.92 kJ/mol, while those of the latter are between 89.95 kJ/mol and 110.05 kJ/mol. Besides, the reactivity of the sample has a certain correlation with the crystalline structure of the sample, i.e., the larger the fraction of the relatively better crystalline structure is, the poorer the reactivity of the sample is.

Gu, J.; Wu, S.; Wu, Y.; Gao, J. [East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Science Highlights 2008 | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Finding the Controls of a Go-To Enzyme Finding the Controls of a Go-To Enzyme Finding the Controls of a Go-To Enzyme December 16, 2008 Research at three U.S. Department of Energy x-ray light sources, including the Advanced Photon Source, may provide the key to understanding how to better treat a wide array of disorders brought on by one of the body's workhorse molecular enzymes. Watching Liquids Separate at White Heat Watching Liquids Separate at White Heat October 30, 2008 Using temperatures approaching those found on the surface of the sun and intense x-ray beams from two synchrotron x-ray facilities, including the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, researchers have observed liquids separating into two different states - one lighter and more perfect than the other - the first time the

452

Atmospheric reactivity of gaseous dimethyl sulfate  

SciTech Connect

The atmospheric reactivity of dimethyl sulfate (DMS) with a series of atmospheric species has been investigated. Upper limits to the rate constants for the homogeneous gas-phase reactions of DMS with O{sub 3}, NH{sub 3}, and H{sub 2}O have been determined by using FTIR spectroscopy and are <1.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}21}, <1.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}21}, and <1.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}23} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, respectively. The reactivity of DMS toward ON radicals and Cl atoms has been determined by using relative rate techniques, and the rate constants for those reactions are <5 {times} 10{sup {minus}13} and (4.2 {plus minus} 0.5) {times} 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, respectively. These rate constants correspond to atmospheric lifetimes ranging from >23 days with respect to reaction with OH radicals to >33 years with respect to reaction with ozone. With the possible exception of its reaction with water, for which the calculated lifetime of DMS is >2 days, these results indicate that the atmospheric fate of DMS is not determined by its homogeneous gas-phase reactions with any of the atmosphere species studied.

Japar, S.M.; Wallington, T.J.; Andino, J.M.; Ball, J.C. (Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (USA))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Advanced Power Electronics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Research Search More Search Options Site Map The electric drive system is the technology foundation for hybrid electric and fuel cell vehicles. That's why NREL's Advanced Power Electronics project supports and promotes the design, development, and demonstration of power electronic components and systems that will overcome major technical barriers to the commercialization of hybrid, advanced internal combustion, and fuel cell vehicle technologies. In support of DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office, our researchers focus on developing advanced power electronics and electric machinery technologies that improve reliability, efficiency, and ruggedness, and dramatically decrease systems costs for advanced vehicles. Key components for these vehicles include the motor controller, DC to DC converters, and inverters

454

Advanced Photon Source research: Volume 1, Number 1, April 1998  

SciTech Connect

The following articles are included in this publication: (1) The Advanced Photon Source: A Brief Overview; (2) MAD Analysis of FHIT at the Structural Biology Center; (3) Advances in High-Energy-Resolution X-ray Scattering at Beamline 3-ID; (4) X-ray Imaging and Microspectroscopy of the Mycorrhyizal Fungus-Plant Symbiosis; (5) Measurement and Control of Particle-beam Trajectories in the Advanced Photon Storage Ring; (6) Beam Acceleration and Storage at the Advanced Photon Source; and (7) Experimental Facilities Operations and Current Status.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Secure control systems with application to cyber-physical systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Control systems are computer-based systems with networked units consisting of sensors, actuators, control processing units, and communication devices. The role of control system is to interact, monitor, and control physical processes. Reactive power ... Keywords: SCADA systems, cyber-physical systems, secure control, security

Jin Dong; Seddik. M. Djouadi; James J. Nutaro; Teja Kuruganti

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Effects of V2G Reactive Power Compensation on the Component Selection in an EV or PHEV Bidirectional Charger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, electric vehicle, EV, PHEV, reactive power, V2G. I. NOMENCLATURE Vde (t) instantaneous dc link voltage, [V electric vehicles throughout this paper. EV power electronics and related control systems are the system vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are becoming a part of the electric grid day

Tolbert, Leon M.

457

Measurement of VOC reactivities using a photochemical flow reactor  

SciTech Connect

A commercial ambient air monitoring instrument, the Airtrak 2000, has been modified for use as a photochemical flow reactor and used to measure the absolute and incremental reactivity of 18 single test VOCs and the incremental reactivity of six multicomponent VOC mixtures. A flow technique is a useful supplement to traditional static chamber experiments. The static chamber technique involves periodic sampling of an irradiated mixture in a photochemical chamber. Under these conditions, the irradiated mixture is always in transition. Using a flow system, a steady-state condition is established within the flow reactor that is representative, in this case, of the early stages of the smog forming process in the atmosphere. The measurement technique also allows changes in the background chamber reactivity to be monitored and taken into account. The incremental reactivity of 13 of the 18 test compounds measured is compared with previously reported results from a static chamber experiment, and the two data sets are generally in good agreement. The additivity of reactivity was tested by measuring the incremental reactivity of six multicomponent mixtures, the components being compounds measured individually in this study. The measured reactivity of a mixture was compared to that calculated from the sum of the measured reactivity of the mixture`s individual components. The results show that reactivity is additive for the concentration range studied.

Hurley, M.D.; Chang, T.Y.; Japar, S.M.; Wallington, T.J. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States). Ford Research Lab.] [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States). Ford Research Lab.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Reactive Dehydration technology for Production of Fuels and Chemicals...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Catalytic and Reactive Distillation) for compact, inexpensive production of biomass-based chemicals from complex aqueous mixtures. SeparationPurification of Biomass...

459

Airborne measurement of OH reactivity during INTEX-B  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plus OH sign), reactiv- propane ing different gases gases atisoprene (plus sign), propane (star) and propene (triangle).NMHC includes ethane, ethene, propane, propene, i-butane, n-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Reactive Landing of Peptide Ions on Self-Assembled Monolayer...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

were characterized ex situ using time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS). We demonstrate that reactive...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced reactivity controlled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Probing the structure and reactivity of gaseous ions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Studying ions in the gas phase provides the opportunity to observe their intrinsic structure and reactivity without extraneous perturbations such as solvent effects, aggregation or (more)

Meyer, Matthew Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Chemically Reactive Working Fluids for the Capture and Transport...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Optical Waveguide Coupler Transformers for High-Power Solar Enegy Collection and Transmission Chemically Reactive Working Fluids Low-Cost Light Weigh Thin Film Solar Concentrators...

463

Monitoring Single Molecule Reactivity On a Carbon Nanotube  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LETTERS Monitoring Single-Molecule Reactivity on a Carbondevice directly transduces single-molecule attachments andoptical methods in single-molecule research. Compared to

Collins, Philip G

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Physical Organic Chemistry of Reactive Intermediates | The Ames...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physical Organic Chemistry of Reactive Intermediates The Jenks group specializes in physical organic chemistry, the "how" of organic reactions. Much of the work has centered on...

465

Chemical Analysis of Complex Organic Mixtures Using Reactive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Spectrometry. Abstract: Reactive nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry was utilized for the analysis of...

466

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced turbine systems-research Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

models and advanced control strategies... .139) Track: Technical VARIABLE SPEED WIND TURBINES - FAULT RIDE-THROUGH AND GRID SUPPORT CAPABILITIES... is on the fault ride through...

467

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced non-polluting turbine Sample Search...  

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models and advanced control strategies... .139) Track: Technical VARIABLE SPEED WIND TURBINES - FAULT RIDE-THROUGH AND GRID SUPPORT CAPABILITIES... is on the fault ride through...

468

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced multistage turbine Sample Search...  

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models and advanced control strategies... .139) Track: Technical VARIABLE SPEED WIND TURBINES - FAULT RIDE-THROUGH AND GRID SUPPORT CAPABILITIES... is on the fault ride through...

469

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced wind turbine Sample Search Results  

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models and advanced control strategies... .139) Track: Technical VARIABLE SPEED WIND TURBINES - FAULT RIDE-THROUGH AND GRID SUPPORT CAPABILITIES... is on the fault ride through...

470

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced hydropower turbine Sample Search...  

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models and advanced control strategies... .139) Track: Technical VARIABLE SPEED WIND TURBINES - FAULT RIDE-THROUGH AND GRID SUPPORT CAPABILITIES... is on the fault ride through...

471

MATLAB muliplatform research license: Numeric computation, advanced graphics and visualization, and a high-level programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MATLAB muliplatform research license: Numeric computation, advanced graphics and visualization license allows research and includes the following: Feature # of users MATLAB 7 Simulink 6 Control System

Dawson, Jeff W.

472

Geothermal: Advanced Search  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Search Advanced Search Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection Help/FAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On Home/Basic Search About Publications Advanced Search New Hot Docs News Related Links You may need to turn on Javascript in your browser to use the Find Subject and Find Author features. Sort By: Relevance Publication Date System Entry Date Document Type Title Research Org Sponsoring Org OSTI Identifier Report Number DOE Contract Number Ascending Descending Enter search criteria into as few or as many fields as desired. Search In For Term(s) (Place phrase in "double quotes") All Fields: Bibliographic Data: Full Text: Creator/Author Select : Title: Subject Select : Identifier Numbers: Journal Info.: Conference Info.: Patent Info.: Research Org.: Sponsoring Org.:

473

NIST's Advanced Technology Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NIST's Advanced NIST's Advanced Technology Program NIST's Advanced Technology Program DOE Workshop on Hydrogen Separation and Purification Technologies Arlington, VA, Sept. 8-9, 2004 Jason Huang 301-975-4197 National Institute of Standards and Technology 100 Bureau Drive Stop 4730 Gaithersburg, MD 20899-4730 http://www.atp.nist.gov National Institute of Standards and Technology * Technology Administration * U.S. Department of Commerce ATP is part of NIST Helping America Measure Up NIST Mission ATP is part of NIST NIST Mission: Strengthen the U.S. economy and improve the quality of life by working with industry to develop and apply technology, measurements, and standards. * * * * * * 3,000 employees $771 million annual budget 2,000 field agents 1,800 guest researchers $2.2 billion co-funding of

474

Advanced AMR Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Advanced AMR Technologies Inc Advanced AMR Technologies Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Advanced AMR Technologies Inc Address 285 Newbury Street Place Peabody, Massachusetts Zip 01960 Sector Efficiency Product Energy management solutions Website http://www.advancedamr.com/ Coordinates 42.5547616°, -70.9800841° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.5547616,"lon":-70.9800841,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

475

Butamax Advanced Biofuels LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Butamax Advanced Biofuels LLC Butamax Advanced Biofuels LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Butamax Advanced Biofuels LLC Place Wilmington, Delaware Zip 19880-0268 Sector Biofuels Product Delaware-based biofuels joint venture between Dupont and BP that was formed in 2009 to develop biobutanol. Coordinates 42.866922°, -72.868494° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.866922,"lon":-72.868494,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

476

DKRW Advanced Fuels LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DKRW Advanced Fuels LLC DKRW Advanced Fuels LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name DKRW Advanced Fuels LLC Place Houston, Texas Zip 77056 Product Focues on projects that utilise coal gasification technology, including coal-to-liquids, methanation, and integrated coal gasification combined cycle power projects. Coordinates 29.76045°, -95.369784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.76045,"lon":-95.369784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

477

Advance Power Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Advance Power Co Advance Power Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Advance Power Co Place Calpella, California Zip 95418 Sector Hydro, Solar, Wind energy Product Distributor of stand alone and backup power systems based on solar, hydro, wind and fuel cell energy. Coordinates 39.23423°, -123.205162° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.23423,"lon":-123.205162,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

478

Advanced Energy Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Advanced Energy Solutions Advanced Energy Solutions Name Advanced Energy Solutions Address 192 Gates Road Place Pomona, Illinois Zip 62975 Sector Solar Year founded 1999 Company Type For Profit Phone number 618-893-1717 Website http://www.aessolar.com/ Coordinates 37.6281057°, -89.3367556° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":nul