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1

Advances in pulverized coal combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combustion system has been developed to operate cost effectively in the difficult regulatory and economic climate of the 1980's. The system is designed to reduce auxiliary fuel oil comsumption by at least 30% while meeting all relevant emissions limits. This is achieved with the fewest components consistent with practical reliable design criteria. The Controlled Flow Split/Flame low NO/sub x/ burner, MBF pulverizer and Two-Stage ignition system are integrated into a mutually supporting system which is applicable to both new steam generators and, on a retrofit basis, to existing units. In the future, a pulverized coal ignition system will be available to eliminate fuel oil use within the boiler.

Vatsky, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

CoalFleet Guideline for Advanced Pulverized Coal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CoalFleet Guideline for Advanced Pulverized Coal Power Plants provides an overview of state-of-the art and emerging technologies for pulverized coal-fired generating units along with lessons learned for current plants worldwide. The Guideline aims to facilitate the timely deployment of reliable, next-generation generating units that incorporate: Higher steam conditions for higher efficiency and reduced generation of pollutants Advanced environmental controls for reduced emissions and environmental im...

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

3

CoalFleet Guideline for Advanced Pulverized Coal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of state-of-the-art and emerging technologies for pulverized coal (PC) fired generating units along with lessons learned from current plants worldwide. The report also facilitates the timely deployment of reliable, next-generation units that incorporate: Higher steam conditions for improved efficiency and reduced pollutants and CO2 Advanced environmental controls for reduced emissions and environmental impacts Techniques for CO2 capture, or for future retrofit of CO2 capt...

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

4

CoalFleet Guideline for Advanced Pulverized Coal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of state-of-the-art and emerging technologies for pulverized coal (PC) fired generating units along with lessons learned from current plants worldwide. The report is designed to facilitate the timely deployment of reliable, next-generation units that incorporate higher steam conditions that improve efficiency and thereby decrease fuel consumption, CO2 emissions, and other environmental impacts; advanced environmental controls that reduce emissions and discharges of solid ...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

CoalFleet Guideline for Advanced Pulverized Coal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of state-of-the-art and emerging technologies for pulverized coal (PC-) fired generating units along with lessons learned from current plants worldwide. The report is designed to facilitate the timely deployment of reliable, next-generation units that incorporate higher steam conditions that improve efficiency and thereby decrease fuel consumption, CO2 emissions, and other environmental impacts; advanced environmental controls that reduce emissions and discharges of solid...

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

6

Performance and risks of advanced pulverized-coal plants  

SciTech Connect

This article is based on an in-depth report of the same title published by the IEA Clean Coal Centre, CCC/135 (see Coal Abstracts entry Sep 2008 00535). It discusses the commercial, developmental and future status of pulverized fuel power plants including subcritical supercritical and ultra supercritical systems of pulverized coal combustion, the most widely used technology in coal-fired power generation. 1 fig., 1 tab.

Nalbandian, H. [IEA Clean Coal Centre, London (United Kingdom)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

CoalFleet Guideline for Advanced Pulverized Coal Power Plants: Version 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of state-of-the-art and emerging technologies for pulverized coal (PC) fired generating units along with lessons learned from current plants worldwide. The report is designed to facilitate the timely deployment of reliable, next-generation units that incorporate higher steam conditions that improve efficiency and thereby decrease fuel consumption, CO2 emissions, and other environmental impacts; advanced environmental controls that reduce emissions and discharges of solid ...

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

8

CoalFleet Guideline for Advanced Pulverized Coal Power Plants: Version 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of state-of-the-art and emerging technologies for pulverized coal (PC) fired generating units along with lessons learned from current plants worldwide. The report is designed to facilitate timely deployment of reliable, next-generation units that incorporate higher steam conditions that improve efficiency and, thereby, decrease fuel consumption, CO2 emissions, and other environmental impacts; advanced environmental controls that reduce emissions and discharges of solid an...

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

9

CoalFleet Guideline for Advanced Pulverized Coal Power Plants: Verison 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of state-of-the-art and emerging technologies for pulverized coal (PC) fired generating units along with lessons learned from current plants worldwide. The report is designed to facilitate the timely deployment of reliable, next-generation units that incorporate higher steam conditions that improve efficiency and thereby decrease fuel consumption, CO2 emissions, and other environmental impacts; advanced environmental controls that reduce emissions and discharges of solid ...

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

10

Development and design of an advanced pulverized coal-fired system  

SciTech Connect

Under the US Department of Energy (DOE) project `Engineering Development of Advanced Coal-Fired Low-Emission Boiler Systems` (LEBS) the ABB team developed the design of a 400 MWe advanced pulverized coal fired electric generating system. The work and the results are described in the paper. Early work included concept development and evaluation of several subsystems for controlling the emission of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, particulates and for reducing wastes. Candidate technologies were then evaluated in various combinations as part of complete advanced supercritical power generation systems. One system was selected for the design of the advanced generating system. Pilot scale testing is now being conducted to support the design of subsystems. The design meets the overall objective of the LEBS Project by dramatically improving environmental performance of pulverized coal fired power plants without adversely impacting efficiency or the cost of electricity. Advanced technologies will be used to reduce NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, and particulate emissions to one-fifth to one-tenth of current NSPS limits. Air toxics will be in compliance, and wastes will be reduced and made more disposable. Net station (HHV) efficiency can be increased to 45 percent without increasing the cost of electricity.

Regan, J.W.; Borio, R.W.; Palkes, M. [ABB Power Plant Laboratories (United States); Mirolli, M.D. [ABB Combustion Engineering, Inc., Windsor, CT (United States); Wesnor, J.D. [ABB Environmental Systems, Birmingham, AL (United States); Bender, D.J. [Raytheon Engineers & Constructors, Inc. (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

11

Pulverized coal fuel injector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pulverized coal fuel injector contains an acceleration section to improve the uniformity of a coal-air mixture to be burned. An integral splitter is provided which divides the coal-air mixture into a number separate streams or jets, and a center body directs the streams at a controlled angle into the primary zone of a burner. The injector provides for flame shaping and the control of NO/NO.sub.2 formation.

Rini, Michael J. (Hebron, CT); Towle, David P. (Windsor, CT)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Demonstration Development Project: Readiness of Advanced Ultra-Supercritical Pulverized Coal Technology for Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) pulverized coal technology operates with main steam temperatures in the range of 700°C to 760°C (1290°F to 1400°F) and has the potential to raise net generating efficiency by up to 50% (HHV). Economic analysis indicates that, by lowering CO2/MWh, A-USC technology lowers the cost of CO2 capture and storage when it is integrated with the power plant. To achieve these higher operating temperatures, nickel alloys and associated fabrication procedures are b...

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

13

Advanced Pulverizer Control: Design and Testbed Implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal pulverizers play an important role in all aspects of power plant performance, including availability, efficiency, and responsiveness. In relationship to dynamic response, pulverizer control often limits a plant's maximum load rate-of-change. EPRI has been investigating the use of advanced multivariable control techniques on several plant subsystems and in this project is developing an advanced pulverizer control system. The ultimate goal is to design, implement, and test an advanced control system o...

2004-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

14

Pushing the pulverized coal envelope with LEBS  

SciTech Connect

In response to challenges from technologies such as IGCC and PFBC, the ABB LEBS Team has proposed removing the barrier to very large advances in environmental and thermal performance of pulverized coal plants. Pulverized coal will continue to be the source of more than half of our electric generation well into the next century and we must develop low-risk low-cost advances that will compete with the claimed performance of other technologies. This paper describes near-term PC technologies for new and retrofit applications which will accomplish this.

Regan, J.W.; Borio, R.W.; Palkes, M. [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

A pulverized coal fuel injector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pulverized coal fuel injector contains an acceleration section to improve the uniformity of a coal-air mixture to be burned. An integral splitter is provided which divides the coal-air mixture into a number separate streams or jets, and a center body directs the streams at a controlled angle into the primary zone of a burner. The injector provides for flame shaping and the control of NO/NO{sub 2} formation.

Rini, M.J.; Towle, D.P.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

16

Coal Direct Chemical Looping Retrofit for Pulverized Coal-Fired...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Direct Chemical Looping Retrofit for Pulverized Coal-Fired Power Plants with In-Situ CO 2 Capture Background Pulverized coal (PC)-fired power plants provide nearly 50% of...

17

Pulverized coal burner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A burner is described having lower emissions and lower unburned fuel losses by implementing a transition zone in a low NO{sub x} burner. The improved burner includes a pulverized fuel transport nozzle surrounded by the transition zone which shields the central oxygen-lean fuel devolatilization zone from the swirling secondary combustion air. The transition zone acts as a buffer between the primary and the secondary air streams to improve the control of near-burner mixing and flame stability by providing limited recirculation regions between primary and secondary air streams. These limited recirculation regions transport evolved NO{sub x} back towards the oxygen-lean fuel pyrolysis zone for reduction to molecular nitrogen. Alternate embodiments include natural gas and fuel oil firing. 8 figs.

Sivy, J.L.; Rodgers, L.W.; Koslosy, J.V.; LaRue, A.D.; Kaufman, K.C.; Sarv, H.

1998-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

18

Pulverized coal burner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A burner having lower emissions and lower unburned fuel losses by implementing a transition zone in a low NO.sub.x burner. The improved burner includes a pulverized fuel transport nozzle surrounded by the transition zone which shields the central oxygen-lean fuel devolatilization zone from the swirling secondary combustion air. The transition zone acts as a buffer between the primary and the secondary air streams to improve the control of near-burner mixing and flame stability by providing limited recirculation regions between primary and secondary air streams. These limited recirculation regions transport evolved NO.sub.x back towards the oxygen-lean fuel pyrolysis zone for reduction to molecular nitrogen. Alternate embodiments include natural gas and fuel oil firing.

Sivy, Jennifer L. (Alliance, OH); Rodgers, Larry W. (Canton, OH); Koslosy, John V. (Akron, OH); LaRue, Albert D. (Uniontown, OH); Kaufman, Keith C. (Canton, OH); Sarv, Hamid (Canton, OH)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An air-purged burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired without the coking thereof on the burner components. The air-purged burner is designed for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal in a tangentially fired boiler.

Derbidge, T. Craig (Sunnyvale, CA); Mulholland, James A. (Chapel Hill, NC); Foster, Edward P. (Macungie, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Coal char fragmentation during pulverized coal combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of investigations of coal and char fragmentation during pulverized coal combustion is reported for a suite of coals ranging in rank from lignite to low-volatile (lv) bituminous coal under combustion conditions similar to those found in commercial-scale boilers. Experimental measurements are described that utilize identical particle sizing characteristics to determine initial and final size distributions. Mechanistic interpretation of the data suggest that coal fragmentation is an insignificant event and that char fragmentation is controlled by char structure. Chars forming cenospheres fragment more extensively than solid chars. Among the chars that fragment, large particles produce more fine material than small particles. In all cases, coal and char fragmentation are seen to be sufficiently minor as to be relatively insignificant factors influencing fly ash size distribution, particle loading, and char burnout.

Baxter, L.L.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal  

SciTech Connect

A burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired successfully without any performance limitations and without the coking of the solvent refined coal on the burner components. The burner is provided with a tangential inlet of primary air and pulverized fuel, a vaned diffusion swirler for the mixture of primary air and fuel, a center water-cooled conical diffuser shielding the incoming fuel from the heat radiation from the flame and deflecting the primary air and fuel steam into the secondary air, and a watercooled annulus located between the primary air and secondary air flows.

Lennon, Dennis R. (Allentown, PA); Snedden, Richard B. (McKeesport, PA); Foster, Edward P. (Macungie, PA); Bellas, George T. (Library, PA)

1990-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

AVESTAR® - Supercritical Once-Through (SCOT) Pulverized Coal Dynamic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supercritical Once-Through (SCOT) Pulverized Coal Dynamic Simulator Supercritical Once-Through (SCOT) Pulverized Coal Dynamic Simulator A new U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cooperative research and development agreement to develop, test, and deploy a dynamic simulator and operator training system (OTS) could eventually help commercialize important carbon capture technologies at the nation's power plants. The high-fidelity, real-time OTS for a generic supercritical once-through (SCOT) pulverized-coal power plant will be installed at the National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL's) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTAR) Center in Morgantown, W.Va. It will be used for collaborative research, industry workforce training, and engineering education on SCOT plant operations and control under the agreement signed with Invensys Operations Management.

23

Investigation on the Dual Influence of Pansteel Pulverized Coal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Particle size of pulverized coal was divided into three levels, X10, X50 and X90 which respectively accounted for 10%, 50% and 90% of total pulverized coal ...

24

Numerical Simulation of Pulverized Coal Combustion Behavior in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Furthermore, the influence of increasing oxygen content on the pulverized coal combustion in oxygen blast furnace is small due to higher oxygen content.

25

Maximum Rate of Pulverized Coal Injection into Blast Furnace with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pulverized coal consumption efficiency is determined by means of microscopic and chemical analysis. The carbon structure of coke fines in the blast furnace ...

26

Mathematical modelling of the flow and combustion of pulverized coal injected in ironmaking blast furnace.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Pulverized coal injection (PCI) technology is widely practised in blast furnace ironmaking due to economic, operational and environmental benefits. High burnout of pulverized coal in… (more)

Shen, Yansong

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

NETL: Advanced Research - Coal Utilization Sciences/Sensors ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of pulverized coal with laser diagnostics. NETL's Advanced Research Coal Utilization Science (CUS) Program is a crosscutting research and development effort whose goal is to...

28

Fine ash formation during pulverized coal combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, 15 pulverized coal samples were burnt in a drop-tube furnace to investigate the formation of fine particulates and the influence of coal ash properties on their emission. Coal combustion was carried out at 1673 K in air. Fine particles were collected by a cyclone and a low-pressure impactor. The elemental compositions of the collected particles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. We examined the chemical compositions of the fine particles as a function of particle diameter and examined the proportions of the elements in the parent coal samples. We determined that almost all particles less than 0.22 {mu}m in diameter were formed by means of volatilization-condensation of SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the coal. We also demonstrated that the amount of SiO{sub 2} in particle size less than 0.22 {mu}m in diameter was related to the amount of fine included quartz and clay minerals in the parent coal. The primary components of particles greater than 0.76 {mu}m in diameter were SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and as the diameter of the particles decrease, the mass fractions of iron, magnesium, calcium, and phosphorus increased. However, the particle diameter at which this tendency commenced differed depending on the element. Particles between 0.22 and 0.76 {mu}m in diameter were thought to have been formed by the fragmentation and coalescence of particles in the coal and by the simultaneous condensation of volatilized elements onto other particles. 17 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Tsuyoshi Teramae; Takayuki Takarada [Idemitsu Kosan Company, Limited, Chiba (Japan). Coal and Environmental Research Laboratory

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

Hydrogen production with coal using a pulverization device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing hydrogen from coal is described wherein high temperature steam is brought into contact with coal in a pulverizer or fluid energy mill for effecting a steam-carbon reaction to provide for the generation of gaseous hydrogen. The high temperature steam is utilized to drive the coal particles into violent particle-to-particle contact for comminuting the particulates and thereby increasing the surface area of the coal particles for enhancing the productivity of the hydrogen.

Paulson, Leland E. (Morgantown, WV)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Stochastic simulation of pulverized coal (PC) processes  

SciTech Connect

An increasing population and electricity demand in the U.S. require capacity expansion of power systems. The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has invested considerable efforts on research and development to improve the design and simulation of these power plants. Incorporation of novel process synthesis techniques and realistic simulation methodologies yield optimal flowsheet configurations and accurate estimation of their performance parameters. To provide a better estimation of such performance indicators, simulation models should predict the process behavior based on not only deterministic values of well-known input parameters but also uncertain variables associated with simulation assumptions. In this work, the stochastic simulation of a load-following pulverized coal (PC) power plant takes into account the variation of three input variables, namely, atmospheric air temperature, atmospheric air humidity, and generation load. These uncertain variables are characterized with probability density functions (pdfs) obtained from available atmospheric and electrical energy generation data. The stochastic simulation is carried out by obtaining a sample of values from the pdfs that generates a set of scenarios under which the model is run. An efficient sampling technique [Hammersley sequence sampling (HSS)] guarantees a set of scenarios uniformly distributed throughout the uncertain variable range. Then, each model run generates results on performance parameters as cycle efficiency, carbon emissions, sulfur emissions, and water consumption that are statistically analyzed after all runs are completed. Among these parameters, water consumption is of importance because an increasing demand has been observed mostly in arid regions of the country and, therefore, constrains the operability of the processes. This water consumption is significantly affected by atmospheric uncertainties. The original deterministic process model simulation was designed in Aspen Plus, and a CAPE-OPEN compliant stochastic simulation capability is employed to run the uncertainty analysis. Initially, the influences of atmospheric conditions and load change on the performance parameters are analyzed separately to understand their individual influences on the process, and then their simultaneous variation is analyzed to generate more realistic estimations of the process performance.

Salazar, J.; Diwekar, U.; Zitney, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Quantitative characterization of pulverized coal and biomasscoal blends in pneumatic conveying pipelines using electrostatic sensor arrays and data fusion techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantitative characterization of pulverized coal and biomass­coal blends in pneumatic conveying.1088/0957-0233/23/8/085307 Quantitative characterization of pulverized coal and biomass­coal blends in pneumatic conveying pipelines using Quantitative data about the dynamic behaviour of pulverized coal and biomass­coal blends in fuel injection

Yan, Yong

32

EVALUATION OF DENSIFIED REFUSE DERIVED FUELS FOR USE IN PULVERIZED COAL-FIRED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EVALUATION OF DENSIFIED REFUSE DERIVED FUELS FOR USE IN PULVERIZED COAL-FIRED STEAM GENERATORS with coal. This paper discusses these successful tests and the feasibility of preparing a d-RDF which can be processed with coal using existing, unmodified coal handling equipment and fired in conventional pulverized

Columbia University

33

Combinatorial Optimization of Pulverizers for Blended-Coal-Fired Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal blending has become an important way to ease the tension of coal purchase for many Chinese power plants. Mixed by pulverizers which has been widely used, is considered the most reasonable and convenient approach of coal blending. The implementation ... Keywords: power plant, coal blending, combinatorial optimization, pulverizer, NSGA-II

Xia Ji; Peng Peng; Hua Zhigang; Lu Pan; Chen Gang

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Extending gear life in a coal pulverizer gearbox  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coal-fired power plant in the Western United States experienced short gearbox life in the 13 coal pulverizers operating at the plant. Wear on the bronze bull gear faces was suspected to have been caused by high particulate loading of coal dust and dirt in the gear oil, catalytic reaction between gear oil additives and some of the particulates generated, and high levels of copper in the gear oil. By addressing particulate ingress, adding filtration and switching to a synthetic gear oil, significant benefits were made to the power plant and gear oil life was extended. 2 photos., 1 tab.

Hansen, T.

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

Pneumatic conveying of pulverized solvent refined coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for pneumatically conveying solvent refined coal to a burner under conditions of dilute phase pneumatic flow so as to prevent saltation of the solvent refined coal in the transport line by maintaining the transport fluid velocity above approximately 95 ft/sec.

Lennon, Dennis R. (Allentown, PA)

1984-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

36

The demonstration of an advanced cyclone coal combustor, with internal sulfur, nitrogen, and ash control for the conversion of a 23 MMBTU/hour oil fired boiler to pulverized coal  

SciTech Connect

This work contains to the final report of the demonstration of an advanced cyclone coal combustor. Titles include: Chronological Description of the Clean Coal Project Tests,'' Statistical Analysis of Operating Data for the Coal Tech Combustor,'' Photographic History of the Project,'' Results of Slag Analysis by PA DER Module 1 Procedure,'' Properties of the Coals Limestone Used in the Test Effort,'' Results of the Solid Waste Sampling Performed on the Coal Tech Combustor by an Independent Contractor During the February 1990 Tests.'' (VC)

Zauderer, B.; Fleming, E.S.

1991-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

A centurial history of technological change and learning curves or pulverized coal-fired utility boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reason is that supercritical-coal boilers, at least in thenot operate well on U.S. coal with high sulfur and active32 (2007) 1996–2005 Pulverized Coal Installed Capacity (GW)

Yeh, Sonia; Rubin, Edward

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This is the ninth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture using power plant waste heat, prior to firing the coal in a pulverized coal boiler. During this last Quarter, comparative analyses were performed for lignite and PRB coals to determine how unit performance varies with coal product moisture. Results are given showing how the coal product moisture level and coal rank affect parameters such as boiler efficiency, station service power needed for fans and pulverizers and net unit heat rate. Results are also given for the effects of coal drying on cooling tower makeup water and comparisons are made between makeup water savings for various times of the year.

Edward Levy; Nenad Sarunac; Harun Bilirgen; Wei Zhang

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Engineering and Economic Evaluation of 1300F Series Ultra-Supercritical Pulverized Coal Power Plants: Phase 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The strategy for lowering the cost of CO2 capture from coal-based power plants includes raising generating efficiency. For pulverized coal (PC) plants this means progressing to ultra-supercritical (USC) steam conditions, arbitrarily defined as having temperatures above 593C (1100F). Currently, USC steam temperatures are limited to approximately 627C (1160F) by the use of ferritic steels, the most advanced commercially available steels. To go to higher temperatures, high-nickel alloys must be used, and th...

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

40

Investigations into the ignition behaviors of pulverized coals and coal blends in a drop tube furnace using flame monitoring techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fur- naces can simulate more closely the combustion conditions in industrial pulverized coal, Pan WP. Studying the mechanisms of ignition of coal particles by TG-DTA. Thermochim Acta 1996

Yan, Yong

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Combustion rates and mechanisms of pulverized coals and coal-derived fuels  

SciTech Connect

Increased use of coal, our most abundant fossil fuel resource, will be required to meet both immediate and long-term energy demands. Improvement in existing technologies of steam raising and industrial process heating through the clean, direct firing of pulverized coal will have major and immediate impact. Improvements are required because of the unacceptably high emissions from present coal combustion systems and because of the need to couple considerations of pollutant emissions and carbon conversion efficiencies. The rates and mechanisms of coal devolatilization and combustion are extremely sensitive to local details of the combustion process. Similarly, pollutants formed during the process are sensitive to the initial coal composition and local time and temperature histories of individual particles. Very little useful information is available by which the influence of combustion modifications on both the efficiency and pollutant emission characteristics can be predicted. The present understanding of the rates of coal and char combustion is summarized with the conclusion that heterogeneous chemical kinetic rates strongly influence the rates and mechanisms of coal and char combustion. If understood, adjustment and control of the rates and mechanisms by judicious adjustment of the combustion process and the initial fuel character should be possible. A proposal for a detailed theoretical and experimental study of the combustion rates of pulverized coal and coal-derived fuels is discussed.

Hardesty, D.R.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

Low rank fuels such as subbituminous coals and lignites contain significant amounts of moisture compared to higher rank coals. Typically, the moisture content of subbituminous coals ranges from 15 to 30 percent, while that for lignites is between 25 and 40 percent, where both are expressed on a wet coal basis. High fuel moisture has several adverse impacts on the operation of a pulverized coal generating unit. High fuel moisture results in fuel handling problems, and it affects heat rate, mass rate (tonnage) of emissions, and the consumption of water needed for evaporative cooling. This project deals with lignite and subbituminous coal-fired pulverized coal power plants, which are cooled by evaporative cooling towers. In particular, the project involves use of power plant waste heat to partially dry the coal before it is fed to the pulverizers. Done in a proper way, coal drying will reduce cooling tower makeup water requirements and also provide heat rate and emissions benefits. The technology addressed in this project makes use of the hot circulating cooling water leaving the condenser to heat the air used for drying the coal (Figure 1). The temperature of the circulating water leaving the condenser is usually about 49 C (120 F), and this can be used to produce an air stream at approximately 43 C (110 F). Figure 2 shows a variation of this approach, in which coal drying would be accomplished by both warm air, passing through the dryer, and a flow of hot circulating cooling water, passing through a heat exchanger located in the dryer. Higher temperature drying can be accomplished if hot flue gas from the boiler or extracted steam from the turbine cycle is used to supplement the thermal energy obtained from the circulating cooling water. Various options such as these are being examined in this investigation. This is the eleventh Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture using power plant waste heat, prior to firing the coal in a pulverized coal boiler. During this last Quarter, the development of analyses to determine the costs and financial benefits of coal drying was continued. The details of the model and key assumptions being used in the economic evaluation are described in this report.

Edward Levy

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This is the twelfth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture using power plant waste heat, prior to firing the coal in a pulverized coal boiler. During this last Quarter, the development of analyses to determine the costs and financial benefits of coal drying was continued. The details of the model and key assumptions being used in the economic evaluation are described in this report and results are shown for a drying system utilizing a combination of waste heat from the condenser and thermal energy extracted from boiler flue gas.

Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; Ursla Levy; John Sale; Nenad Sarunac

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

The fate of char-N at pulverized coal conditions Jennifer P. Spinti*, David W. Pershing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the fate of fuel-N was deter- mined experimentally with four of the parent coals of chars used been deter- mined experimentally for chars from five parent coals that were produced and subsequentlyThe fate of char-N at pulverized coal conditions Jennifer P. Spinti*, David W. Pershing Department

Utah, University of

45

Formation of NOx precursors during Chinese pulverized coal pyrolysis in an arc plasma jet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of NOx precursors (HCN and NH{sub 3}) from the pyrolysis of several Chinese pulverized coals in an arc plasma jet was investigated through both thermodynamic analysis of the C-H-O-N system and experiments. Results of thermodynamic analysis show that the dominant N-containing gaseous species is HCN together with a small amount of ammonia above the temperature of 2000 K. The increase of H content advances the formation of HCN and NH{sub 3}, but the yields of HCN and NH{sub 3} are decreased with a high concentration of O in the system. These results are accordant with the experimental data. The increasing of input power promotes the formation of HCN and NH{sub 3} from coal pyrolysis in an arc plasma jet. Tar-N is not formed during the process. The yield of HCN changes insignificantly with the changing of the residence time of coal particles in the reactor, but that of NH{sub 3} decreases as residence times increase because of the relative instability at high temperature. Adsorption and gasification of CO{sub 2} on the coal surface also can restrain the formation of HCN and NH{sub 3} compare to the results in an Ar plasma jet. Yields of HCN and NH{sub 3} are sensitive to the coal feeding rate, indicating that NOx precursors could interact with the nascent char to form other N-containing species. The formation of HCN and NH{sub 3} during coal pyrolysis in a H{sub 2}/Ar plasma jet are not dependent on coal rank. The N-containing gaseous species is released faster than others in the volatiles during coal pyrolysis in an arc plasma jet, and the final nitrogen content in the char is lower than that in the parent coal, which it is independent of coal type. 16 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Wei-ren Bao; Jin-cao Zhang; Fan Li; Li-ping Chang [Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan (China). Key Laboratory of Coal Science and Technology

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

On the burning behavior of pulverized coal chars  

SciTech Connect

A model that predicts the physical changes that pulverized coal char particles undergo during combustion has been developed. In the model, a burning particle is divided into a number of concentric annular volume elements. The mass loss rate, specific surface area, and apparent density in each volume element depend upon the local particle conditions, which vary as a consequence of the adsorbed oxygen and gas-phase oxygen concentration gradients inside the particle. The model predicts the particle's burning rate, temperature, diameter, apparent density, and specific surface area as combustion proceeds, given ambient conditions and initial char properties. A six-step heterogeneous reaction mechanism is used to describe carbon reactivity to oxygen. A distributed activation energy approach is used to account for the variation in desorption energies of adsorbed O-atoms on the carbonaceous surface. Model calculations support the three burning zones established for the oxidation of pulverized coal chars. The model indicates two types of zone II behavior, however. Under weak zone II burning conditions, constant-diameter burning occurs up to 30% to 50% conversion before burning commences with reductions in both size and apparent density. Under strong zone II conditions, particles burn with reductions in both size and apparent density after an initial short period (conversion) of constant-diameter burning. Model predictions reveal that early in the oxidation process, there is mass loss at constant diameter under all zone II burning conditions. Such weak and strong burning behavior cannot be predicted with the commonly used power-law model for the mode of burning employing a single value for the burning mode parameter. Model calculations also reveal how specific surface area evolves when oxidation occurs in the zone II burning regime. Based on the calculated results, a surface area submodel that accounts for the effects of pore growth and coalescence during combustion under zone I conditions was modified to permit the characterization of the variations in specific surface area that occur during char conversion under zones II conditions. The modified surface area model is applicable to all burning regimes. Calculations also indicate that the particle's effectiveness factor varies during conversion under zone II burning conditions. With the adsorption/desorption mechanism employed, a near first-order Thiele modulus-effectiveness factor relationship is obeyed over the particle's lifetime. (author)

Mitchell, Reginald E.; Ma, Liqiang; Kim, BumJick [Thermosciences Group, Mechanical Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-3032 (United States)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

Detailed model for practical pulverized coal furnaces and gasifiers  

SciTech Connect

The need to improve efficiency and reduce pollutant emissions commercial furnaces has prompted energy companies to search for optimized operating conditions and improved designs in their fossil-fuel burning facilities. Historically, companies have relied on the use of empirical correlations and pilot-plant data to make decisions about operating conditions and design changes. The high cost of collecting data makes obtaining large amounts of data infeasible. The main objective of the data book is to provide a single source of detailed three-dimensional combustion and combustion-related data suitable for comprehensive combustion model evaluation. Five tasks were identified as requirements to achieve the main objective. First, identify the types of data needed to evaluate comprehensive combustion models, and establish criteria for selecting the data. Second, identify and document available three-dimensional combustion data related to pulverized coal combustion. Third, collect and evaluate three-dimensional data cases, and select suitable cases based on selection criteria. Fourth, organize the data sets into an easy-to-use format. Fifth, evaluate and interpret the nature and quality of the data base. 39 refs., 15 figs., 14 tabs.

Philips, S.D.; Smoot, L.D.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Capacity mapping for optimum utilization of pulverizers for coal fired boilers - article no. 032201  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Capacity mapping is a process of comparison of standard inputs with actual fired inputs to assess the available standard output capacity of a pulverizer. The base capacity is a function of grindability; fineness requirement may vary depending on the volatile matter (VM) content of the coal and the input coal size. The quantity and the inlet will change depending on the quality of raw coal and output requirement. It should be sufficient to dry pulverized coal (PC). Drying capacity is also limited by utmost PA fan power to supply air. The PA temperature is limited by air preheater (APH) inlet flue gas temperature; an increase in this will result in efficiency loss of the boiler. The higher PA inlet temperature can be attained through the economizer gas bypass, the steam coiled APH, and the partial flue gas recirculation. The PS/coal ratioincreases with a decrease in grindability or pulverizer output and decreases with a decrease in VM. The flammability of mixture has to be monitored on explosion limit. Through calibration, the PA flow and efficiency of conveyance can be verified. The velocities of coal/air mixture to prevent fallout or to avoid erosion in the coal carrier pipe are dependent on the PC particle size distribution. Metal loss of grinding elements inversely depends on the YGP index of coal. Variations of dynamic loading and wearing of grinding elements affect the available milling capacity and percentage rejects. Therefore, capacity mapping in necessary to ensure the available pulverizer capacity to avoid overcapacity or undercapacity running of the pulverizing system, optimizing auxiliary power consumption. This will provide a guideline on the distribution of raw coal feeding in different pulverizers of a boiler to maximize system efficiency and control, resulting in a more cost effective heat rate.

Bhattacharya, C. [National Power Training Institute, Durgapur (India)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Gasification in pulverized coal flames. Semi-annual progress report, September 1977--March 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project concerns the production of power and synthesis gases from pulverized coal via suspension gasification. Cyclone and confined jet gasifier configurations with swirling flow are being investigated. Emphasis is on the final design and construction of the test facility and the two experimental reactors. Calibration procedures are presented, as are data reduction techniques and preliminary experimental results for methane and coal combustion tests.

Barnhart, J. S.; George, P. E.; Thomas, J. F.; Laurendeau, N. M.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Tire-Derived Fuel Cofiring Test in a Pulverized Coal Utility Boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several utilities are cofiring tire-derived fuel (TDF) with coal and other fuels in stoker, fluidized-bed, and cyclone-fired boilers. The field tests described in this report provide data on and will be of interest to utilities evaluating TDF cofiring in pulverized coal (PC) boilers.

1995-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

51

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This is the seventh Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture, prior to firing in a pulverized coal boiler. Coal drying experiments were performed with lignite and Powder River Basin coals to determine the effects of inlet air moisture level on the equilibrium relationship between coal moisture and exit air relative humidity and temperature. The results show that, for lignite, there is a slight dependence of equilibrium moisture on inlet humidity level. However, the equilibrium relationship for PRB coal appears to be independent of inlet air humidity level. The specific equilibrium model used for computing lignite coal dryer performance has a significant effect on the prediction accuracy for exit air relative humidity; but its effects on predicted coal product moisture, exit air temperature and specific humidity are minimal. Analyses were performed to determine the effect of lignite product moisture on unit performance for a high temperature drying system. With this process design, energy for drying is obtained from the hot flue gas entering the air preheater and the hot circulating cooling water leaving the steam condenser. Comparisons were made to the same boiler operating with lignite which had been dried off-site.

Edward K. Levy; Nenad Sarunac; Wei Zhang

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

High gradient magnetic beneficiation of dry pulverized coal via upwardly directed recirculating fluidization  

SciTech Connect

This invention relates to an improved device and method for the high gradient magnetic beneficiation of dry pulverized coal, for the purpose of removing sulfur and ash from the coal whereby the product is a dry environmentally acceptable, low-sulfur fuel. The process involves upwardly directed recirculating air fluidization of selectively sized powdered coal in a separator having sections of increasing diameters in the direction of air flow, with magnetic field and flow rates chosen for optimum separations depending upon particulate size.

Eissenberg, David M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Liu, Yin-An (Opelika, AL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

A diffusion-kinetic model for pulverized-coal combustion and heat-and-mass transfer in a gas stream  

SciTech Connect

A diffusion-kinetic model for pulverized-coal combustion and heat-and-mass transfer in a gas stream is proposed, and the results of numerical simulation of the burnout dynamics of Kansk-Achinsk coals in the pulverized state at different treatment conditions and different model parameters are presented. The mathematical model describes the dynamics of thermochemical conversion of solid organic fuels with allowance for complex physicochemical phenomena of heat-and-mass exchange between coal particles and the gaseous environment.

E.A. Boiko; S.V. Pachkovskii [Polytechnic Institute, Federal University of Siberia, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

EPRI's Pulverized Coal Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Retrofit Study Summary (Supplemental Project Funders' Issue)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is currently examining the feasibility of retrofitting post-combustion capture (PCC) of CO2 to existing pulverized coal (PC) and/or circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) power plants for five different "host" participants. Knowledge gained from previous CoalFleet ultra-supercritical (USC) PCC design studies is being applied directly to specific site conditions, plant design, and operating data provided by each host utility participant. This overall project intends t...

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

55

EPRI's Pulverized Coal Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Retrofit Study Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is currently examining the feasibility of retrofitting post-combustion capture (PCC) to existing pulverized coal (PC) and/or circulating fluidized-bed power plants, for five different "host" participants. Knowledge gained from previous ultra supercritical (USC) PCC design studies by CoalFleet is being applied directly to specific site conditions, plant design, and operating data provided by each host utility participant. This overall project aims to highlight ...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

56

Survey of Ultra-Supercritical Pulverized Coal Power Plants in Japan and China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within the United States, there is interest in pulverized coal (PC) units operating at ultra-supercritical (USC) conditions, arbitrarily defined as having main steam temperatures of 1100186F (595186C) and above. Such units have higher efficiency than conventional supercritical (SC) PC units with corresponding reductions in emissions8212on a lb/MWh basis8212for CO2, criteria pollutants, and mercury. Some power producers also consider the improved efficiency a hedge against future coal price increases. To ...

2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

57

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This is the third Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture, prior to firing in a pulverized coal boiler. A description is given of the equipment, instrumentation and procedures being used for the fluidized bed drying experiments. Laboratory data are presented on the effects of bed depth on drying rate. These show that drying rate decreased strongly with an increase in bed depth as the settled bed depth varied from 0.25 to 0.65 m. These tests were performed with North Dakota lignite having a 6.35 mm (1/4 inch) top size, constant inlet air and heater surface temperatures, constant rate of heat addition per unit initial mass of wet coal and constant superficial air velocity. A theoretical model of the batch dryer is described. This model uses the equations for conservation of mass and energy and empirical data on the relationship between relative humidity of the air and coal moisture content at equilibrium. Outputs of the model are coal moisture content, bed temperature, and specific humidity of the outlet air as functions of time. Preliminary comparisons of the model to laboratory drying data show very good agreement.

Edward K. Levy; Hugo Caram; Zheng Yao; Gu Feng

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Thermodynamic properties of pulverized coal during rapid heating devolatilization processes  

SciTech Connect

The thermodynamic properties of coal under conditions of rapid heating have been determined using a combination of UTRC facilities including a proprietary rapid heating rate differential thermal analyzer (RHR-DTA), a microbomb calorimeter (MBC), an entrained flow reactor (EFR), an elemental analyzer (EA), and a FT-IR. The total heat of devolatilization, was measured for a HVA bituminous coal (PSOC 1451D, Pittsburgh No. 8) and a LV bituminous coal (PSOC 1516D, Lower Kittaning). For the HVA coal, the contributions of each of the following components to the overall heat of devolatilization were measured: the specific heat of coal/char during devolatilization, the heat of thermal decomposition of the coal, the specific heat capacity of tars, and the heat of vaporization of tars. Morphological characterization of coal and char samples was performed at the University of Pittsburgh using a PC-based image analysis system, BET apparatus, helium pcynometer, and mercury porosimeter. The bulk density, true density, CO{sub 2} surface area, pore volume distribution, and particle size distribution as a function of extent of reaction are reported for both the HVA and LV coal. Analyses of the data were performed to obtain the fractal dimension of the particles as well as estimates for the external surface area. The morphological data together with the thermodynamic data obtained in this investigation provides a complete database for a set of common, well characterized coal and char samples. This database can be used to improve the prediction of particle temperatures in coal devolatilization models. Such models are used both to obtain kinetic rates from fundamental studies and in predicting furnace performance with comprehensive coal combustion codes. Recommendations for heat capacity functions and heats of devolatilization for the HVA and LV coals are given. Results of sample particle temperature calculations using the recommended thermodynamic properties are provided.

Proscia, W.M.; Freihaut, J.D. [United Technologies Research Center, E. Hartford, CT (United States); Rastogi, S.; Klinzing, G.E. [Univ. of Pittsburg, PA (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Combustion Behavior of Pulverized Coal Injection in Corex Melter ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to increase the utilization of fine coal, reduce coke consumption and enhance the competitiveness of the technology, the combustion behavior of ...

60

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This is the sixth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture, prior to firing in a pulverized coal boiler. Coal drying experiments were performed with a Powder River Basin coal to measure the effects of fluidization velocity and drying temperature on rate of drying in a batch drying process. Comparisons to computational results using the batch bed drying model show good agreement. Comparisons to drying results with North Dakota lignite at the same process conditions confirm the lignite dries slightly more rapidly than the PRB. Experiments were also carried out to determine the effects of inlet air humidity on drying rate. The specific humidity ranged from a value typical for air at temperatures near freezing to a value for 30 C air at 90 percent relative humidity. The experimental results show drying rate is strongly affected by inlet air humidity, with the rate decreasing with more humid inlet air. The temperature of the drying process also plays a strong role, with the negative impacts of high inlet moisture being less of a factor in a higher temperature drying process. Concepts for coal drying systems integrated into a power plant were developed. These make use of hot circulating cooling water from the condenser, steam extraction from the turbine cycle and thermal energy extracted from hot flue gas, in various combinations. Analyses are under way to calculate the effects of drying system design and process conditions on unit performance, emissions, and cooling tower makeup water.

Edward K. Levy; Nenad Sarunac; Wei Zhang

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Minimizing the Derate of Adding Post-Combustion Capture to Pulverized Coal Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previously published evaluations of the post-combustion capture (PCC) of CO2 by Parsons and co-funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) concluded that the technology was not an efficient or cost-effective way to proceed. Follow-on studies, particularly as documented in EPRI report 1017515, An Engineering and Economic Assessment of Post-Combustion CO2 Capture for 1100°F Ultra- Supercritical Pulverized Coal Power Plant ...

2013-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

62

Computational tools for pulverized-coal combustion. Third quarterly report, October 1981-December 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work conducted to develop and verify a computer code capable of modeling the major aspects of pulverized-coal combustion. Achieving this objective will lead to design methods applicable to industrial and utility furnaces. The combustion model (COMO) consists of a number of relatively independent modules that represent the major processes involved in pulverized-coal combustion. These modules will be continually upgraded over the course of the contract. Three distinct versions of the COMO will be developed over the duration of the contract. Version 1 of COMO will model all of the major features of pulverized-coal combustion but with a number of simplifying assumptions. It will be used primarily to determine a satisfactory means of integrating the numerical models of the combustion processes into an overall combustion model, since this is perhaps the major challenge. Later versions will relax these assumptions and incorporate state-of-the-art combustion information. Guidelines were prepared and reviewed to allow process modules to be developed relatively independently, while providing for the subsequent integration of these modules into COMO. The formulation and coding of the Version 1 gas-phase turbulence, chemistry and radiation models were completed. Test cases were run for each model, and good agreement was obtained with other analyses and with data when available. A formal method for documenting COMO was investigated, and preliminary specifications were developed.

Oberjohn, W.J.; Cornelius, D.K.; Fiveland, W.A.; Schnipke, R.J.; Wang, J.H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Hydrogen production with coal using a pulverization device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates generally to the production of gaseous hydrogen with carbonous materials in the presence of steam by the steam-carbon reaction, and more particularly to such generation of hydrogen by rapidly comminuting coal in the presence of high-temperature steam.

Paulson, L.E.

1986-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

64

Mathematical modeling of MILD combustion of pulverized coal  

SciTech Connect

MILD (flameless) combustion is a new rapidly developing technology. The IFRF trials have demonstrated high potential of this technology also for N-containing fuels. In this work the IFRF experiments are analyzed using the CFD-based mathematical model. Both the Chemical Percolation Devolatilization (CPD) model and the char combustion intrinsic reactivity model have been adapted to Guasare coal combusted. The flow-field as well as the temperature and the oxygen fields have been accurately predicted by the CFD-based model. The predicted temperature and gas composition fields have been uniform demonstrating that slow combustion occurs in the entire furnace volume. The CFD-based predictions have highlighted the NO{sub x} reduction potential of MILD combustion through the following mechanism. Before the coal devolatilization proceeds, the coal jet entrains a substantial amount of flue gas so that its oxygen content is typically not higher than 3-5%. The volatiles are given off in a highly sub-stoichiometric environment and their N-containing species are preferentially converted to molecular nitrogen rather than to NO. Furthermore, there exists a strong NO-reburning mechanism within the fuel jet and in the air jet downstream of the position where these two jets merge. In other words, less NO is formed from combustion of volatiles and stronger NO-reburning mechanisms exist in the MILD combustion if compared to conventional coal combustion technology. (author)

Schaffel, N. [Silesian University of Technology, Institute of Thermal Technology, Konarskiego 22, 44-101 Gliwice (Poland); Clausthal University of Technology, Institute of Energy Process Engineering and Fuel Technology, Agricolastrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Mancini, M.; Weber, R. [Clausthal University of Technology, Institute of Energy Process Engineering and Fuel Technology, Agricolastrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Szlek, A. [Silesian University of Technology, Institute of Thermal Technology, Konarskiego 22, 44-101 Gliwice (Poland)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Coal Technology Program Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration A DOE Assessment DOENETL-20051217 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy National Energy...

66

Evaluation of Stringent Emission Control Options for Pulverized Coal Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the results from one of a series of studies sponsored by the Canadian Clean Power Coalition (CCPC), EPRI, and the International Energy Agency (IEA). The CCPC established a goal to develop projects to demonstrate technology at a commercial utility scale for retrofit to existing plants, or for use in new coal-fired power plants, that would allow all emissions, including CO2, to be controlled to meet foreseeable new regulatory requirements. The purpose of this study conducted by Neill &...

2004-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

67

Detailed model for practical pulverized coal furnaces and gasifiers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study has been supported by a consortium of nine industrial and governmental sponsors. Work was initiated on May 1, 1985 and completed August 31, 1989. The central objective of this work was to develop, evaluate and apply a practical combustion model for utility boilers, industrial furnaces and gasifiers. Key accomplishments have included: Development of an advanced first-generation, computer model for combustion in three dimensional furnaces; development of a new first generation fouling and slagging submodel; detailed evaluation of an existing NO{sub x} submodel; development and evaluation of an improved radiation submodel; preparation and distribution of a three-volume final report: (a) Volume 1: General Technical Report; (b) Volume 2: PCGC-3 User's Manual; (c) Volume 3: Data Book for Evaluation of Three-Dimensional Combustion Models; and organization of a user's workshop on the three-dimensional code. The furnace computer model developed under this study requires further development before it can be applied generally to all applications; however, it can be used now by specialists for many specific applications, including non-combusting systems and combusting geseous systems. A new combustion center was organized and work was initiated to continue the important research effort initiated by this study. 212 refs., 72 figs., 38 tabs.

Smith, P.J.; Smoot, L.D.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Pilot-Scale Demonstration of ALTA for NOx Control in Pulverized Coal-Fired Boilers  

SciTech Connect

This report describes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and pilot-scale testing conducted to demonstrate the ability of the Advanced Layered Technology Approach (ALTA) to reduce NO{sub x} emissions in a pulverized coal (PC) boiler. Testing specifically focused on characterizing NO{sub x} behavior with deep burner staging combined with Rich Reagent Injection (RRI). Tests were performed in a 4 MBtu/hr pilot-scale furnace at the University of Utah. Reaction Engineering International (REI) led the project team which included the University of Utah and Combustion Components Associates (CCA). Deep burner staging and RRI, combined with selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR), make up the Advanced Layered Technology Approach (ALTA) for NO{sub x} reduction. The application of ALTA in a PC environment requires homogenization and rapid reaction of post-burner combustion gases and has not been successfully demonstrated in the past. Operation of the existing low-NO{sub x} burner and design and operation of an application specific ALTA burner was guided by CFD modeling conducted by REI. Parametric pilot-scale testing proved the chemistry of RRI in a PC environment with a NOx reduction of 79% at long residence times and high baseline NOx rate. At representative particle residence times, typical operation of the dual-register low-NO{sub x} burner provided an environment that was unsuitable for NO{sub x} reduction by RRI, showing no NOx reduction. With RRI, the ALTA burner was able to produce NO{sub x} emissions 20% lower than the low-NO{sub x} burner, 76 ppmv vs. 94 ppmv, at a burner stoichiometric ratio (BSR) of 0.7 and a normalized stoichiometric ratio (NSR) of 2.0. CFD modeling was used to investigate the application of RRI for NO{sub x} control on a 180 MW{sub e} wall-fired, PC boiler. A NO{sub x} reduction of 37% from baseline (normal operation) was predicted using ALTA burners with RRI to produce a NO{sub x} emission rate of 0.185 lb/MBtu at the horizontal nose of the boiler. When combined with SNCR, a NO{sub x} emission rate of 0.12-0.14 lb/MBtu can be expected when implementing a full ALTA system on this unit. Cost effectiveness of the full ALTA system was estimated at $2,152/ton NO{sub x} removed; this was less than 75% of the cost estimated for an SCR system on a unit of this size.

Andrew Fry; Devin Davis; Marc Cremer; Bradley Adams

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

69

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Figures Figure ES-1. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Basicviii Figure 1. Advanced-Coal Wind Hybrid: Basic29 Figure 9. Sensitivity to Coal

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Residual carbon from pulverized coal fired boilers 1: Size distribution and combustion reactivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The amount of residual, or unburned, carbon in fly ash is an important concern in the design and operation of pulverized coal-fired boilers. Char oxidation is the slowest step in the coal combustion process, and the rate at which this heterogeneous reaction-proceeds has an important effect on the degree of carbon burnout. There is an extensive literature on char combustion kinetics based on data in the early and intermediate stages of carbon conversion. A critical fundamental question is whether the small fraction of the fuel carbon that passes unreacted through a boiler is representative of the char during the main portion of the combustion process. This article addresses that question through a detailed characterization of eight carbon-containing fly ash samples acquired from commercial-scale combustion systems. The fly ash characterization included measurement-of joint carbon/size distribution and determination.of the combustion reactivity of the residual carbon. To minimize mineral matter interactions in the reactivity tests, the technique of incipient fluidization was developed for separation of carbon-rich extracts from the inorganic portion of the fly ash. Reactivity measurements were made at 1400--1800 K to represent conditions in pulverized coal fired boilers. Measurements were also made at 700--1100 K to. minimize transport effects and isolate the influence of char chemistry and microstructure. In both temperature regimes, the residual carbon extracts. were significantly less reactive than chars extracted from a laboratory-scale laminar flow reactor in the early-to-intermediate stages of combustion. It is concluded that the boiler environment deactivates chars, making high carbon burnout more difficult to achieve than is predicted by existing char combustion kinetic models that were developed from data on the laboratory chars. Finally, the results are used to discuss potential char deactivation mechanisms, both thermal and oxidative, in coal-fired boilers.

Hurt, R.H. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Gibbins, J.R. [Imperial Coll. of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Combustion of single CWF droplets of either pulverized or micronized coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on new experimental findings on the combustion behavior of coal-water fuels (CWF) consisting of either pulverized coal (average size ca. 40{mu}m) or of micronized coal (averaae size ca. 4{mu}m). The former CWF is considered as a fuel in, utility boilers to substitute petroleum. The latter is considered as a fuel in diesel engines, gas turbines, etc. There are differences in the physical and chemical properties of these fuels since the size of the coal particles differs by an order of magnitude, the resulting packing factor is unequal and the mineral content is different by an order of magnitude as well, since the micronized slurries are also beneficiated. This work concentrated on the combustion of the solid agglomerated particles that remain upon completion of water evaporation. Experiments were conducted in a bench scale high-temperature drop-tube furnace, electrically heated to gas temperatures of 1450 K. Single CWF agglomerates (200--500 {mu}m, in diameter) were introduced in the furnace, and upon ignition their combustion behavior was monitored with a specially developed three wavelength (640, 810 and 998 nm) pyrometer. Results showed that the overall combustion behavior of Agglomerates of the same size from the two coal grinds was similar when burned under the same conditions.

Levendis, Y.A.; Atal, A.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

feasibility of combining wind farms with advanced coalfeasibility of combining wind farms with advanced coal

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

The simulation with the finite element method of the velocity and temperature fields for a nonturbionar jet burner of 35MW feeding with pulverized coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the analysis of coal particle combustion in nonturbionar jet burner of 35MW used the Finite Element Method made with aid of the FLUENT programme. The pulverized coal combustion simulation involves modeling a continuous gas phase flow ... Keywords: FLUENT, coal-air mixture, combustion, finite element method, injection coal, nonturbionar jet

Mihai D. L. Talu; Stefan D. L. Talu; Mihai Negru

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Renewable wood fuel: Fuel feed system for a pulverized coal boiler. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report evaluates a pilot test program conducted by New York State Gas & Electric Corporation to evaluate the feasibility of co-firing a pulverized coal plant with renewable wood fuels. The goal was to establish that such a co-firing system can reduce air emissions while maintaining good operational procedures and cost controls. The test fuel feed system employed at Greenidge Station`s Boiler 6 was shown to be effective in feeding wood products. Emission results were promising and an economic analysis indicates that it will be beneficial to pursue further refinements to the equipment and systems. The report recommends further evaluation of the generation and emission impacts using woods of varied moisture contents and at varied Btu input rates to determine if a drying system would be a cost-effective option.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

A Summary of EPRI's Pulverized Coal (PC) and Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) Post Combustion CO2 Capture Retrofit Studies: The Five North American Retrofit Cases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the feasibility of retrofitting post-combustion capture (PCC) technology to existing pulverized coal (PC) and/or circulating fluidized bed (CFB) power plants, for five different host participant sites. The knowledge gained from previous CoalFleet ultra-supercritical PCC design studies—described in the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report An Engineering and Economic Assessment of Post-Combustion CO2 Capture for 1100 F Ultra-Supercritical Pulverized ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Figures Figure ES-1. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Basicviii Figure 1. Advanced-Coal Wind Hybrid: Basic21 Figure 6. Comparison of ACWH and CCGT-Wind

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis Title Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2008 Authors Phadke, Amol, Charles A....

78

Oxy-coal combustion: stability of coaxial pulverized coal flames in O2/CO2 environments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Oxy-coal combustion, in which air is replaced by an O2/ CO2 mixture, is one of the few technologies that may allow CO2 capture and sequestration… (more)

Zhang, Jingwei

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Impact of Pulverizer Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pulverized fuel systems are critical to the availability, efficiency, and responsiveness of pulverized coal-fired boilers. This technical update report describes techniques that offer the capability to assess the integrated operation of the pulverized fuel system mechanical equipment and its instrumentation and controls. Evaluation of the signatures and patterns developed by these techniques will provide a basis for differentiating between mechanical problems, I&C problems, and operational ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

80

EFFECT OF HEATING RATE ON THE THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF PULVERIZED COAL  

SciTech Connect

This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed under DOE Grant No. DE-FG22-96PC96224 during the period September 24, 1998 to March 23, 1999 which covers the fifth six months of the project. Devolatilization is an important initial step in virtually all commercial fossil fuel applications such as combustion, gasification, and liquefaction. Characterization of the temperature history of pulverized coal particles under high heating rates, representative of coal combustors, is critical to the understanding of devolatilization. During this reporting period, characterization experiments were continued from the previous reporting period and completed to a total of 28 single coal particles. These particles were caught in the electrodynamic balance and their volume, external surface area, mass, and density were measured. The same single particles were then heated bidirectionally with a pulsed (10 ms pulse width) Nd:YAG laser beams of equal intensity with heating rates (10{sup 4} - 10{sup 7} K/s) representative of coal combustors. The temporal power variation in the laser pulse was monitored for use in the heat transfer analysis by an ultra-fast fiber optic uv light transmitter included in the beam path and coupled to a silicon photodiode. Transient surface temperatures of the particles were measured using a single-color pyrometer. Dynamics of volatile evolution and particle swelling were recorded using well established time-resolved high-speed cinematography. Presently, extraction of devolatilization time-scales and temperature data at these time-scales running the high-speed films taken during the experiments employing a 16mm movie projector are in progress. Heat transfer analyses for the devolatilization time-scales, and temperature measurements (and hence an understanding of the effect of heating rates on coal thermal properties) are also in progress. Shipment of the donated heated grid system components from our industrial partner, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), CT to CAU was complete during the previous reporting period. Testing of the heated grid system components at CAU and sensitivity analyses of the heated grid heat transfer calculations are also in progress.

Ramanathan Sampath

1999-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

MARKET-BASED ADVANCED COAL POWER SYSTEMS FINAL REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MARKET-BASED ADVANCED MARKET-BASED ADVANCED COAL POWER SYSTEMS FINAL REPORT MAY 1999 DOE/FE-0400 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy Washington, DC 20585 Market-Based Advanced Coal Power Systems 1-1 December 1998 1. INTRODUCTION As deregulation unfolds and privatization of the utility market takes shape, priorities for power plant economics have shifted toward those of a "bottom-line" business and away from a regulated industry. Competition in utility generation and the exposure risks of large capital investments have led to a preference to minimize capital costs and fixed and variable operation and maintenance costs. With global competition from independent power producers (IPPs), non- utility generators, and utilities, the present trend of investments is with conventional pulverized

82

Cold flow modeling of pulverized coal combustors for magnetohydrodynamic channel applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes an experimental program and techniques for studying the internal aerodynamics of pulverized coal combustors of the type used in magnetohydrodynamic test trains at The University of Tennessee Space Institute. The combustors are modeled with small scale, cold flow models that permit both flow visualization and velocity field surveys to be performed. Water was selected as the working fluid so that the model flow fields had the same Reynolds number as the actual reactive combustors, and also to facilitate flow visualization. The systems used for flow visualization and velocity field surveying are described in detail. The velocity field survey equipment is based on a vector-velocity, laser doppler velocimeter coupled to a controllable field scanning device and a microprocessor for on-line data reduction. Results are presented that were obtained from a laser velocimeter study of recirculating flows in a combustor model. The results show that, even for exceedingly simple geometrical arrangements of oxidant injector configurations, complex three dimensional highly turbulent flow fields exist in the combustor. A brief discussion of the impact of the results on fuel injector positioning is presented.

Schulz, R.J.; Giel, T.V.; Ghosh, A.; Morris, R.D.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Optimization under Uncertainty for Water Consumption in a Pulverized Coal Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

Pulverized coal (PC) power plants are widely recognized as major water consumers whose operability has started to be affected by drought conditions across some regions of the country. Water availability will further restrict the retrofitting of existing PC plants with water-expensive carbon capture technologies. Therefore, national efforts to reduce water withdrawal and consumption have been intensified. Water consumption in PC plants is strongly associated to losses from the cooling water cycle, particularly water evaporation from cooling towers. Accurate estimation of these water losses requires realistic cooling tower models, as well as the inclusion of uncertainties arising from atmospheric conditions. In this work, the cooling tower for a supercritical PC power plant was modeled as a humidification operation and used for optimization under uncertainty. Characterization of the uncertainty (air temperature and humidity) was based on available weather data. Process characteristics including boiler conditions, reactant ratios, and pressure ratios in turbines were calculated to obtain the minimum water consumption under the above mentioned uncertainties. In this study, the calculated conditions predicted up to 12% in reduction in the average water consumption for a 548 MW supercritical PC power plant simulated using Aspen Plus. Optimization under uncertainty for these large-scale PC plants cannot be solved with conventional stochastic programming algorithms because of the computational expenses involved. In this work, we discuss the use of a novel better optimization of nonlinear uncertain systems (BONUS) algorithm which dramatically decreases the computational requirements of the stochastic optimization.

Juan M. Salazar; Stephen E. Zitney; Urmila Diwekar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Optimization Under Uncertainty for Water Consumption in a Pulverized Coal Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pulverized coal (PC) power plants are widely recognized as major water consumers whose operability has started to be affected by drought conditions across some regions of the country. Water availability will further restrict the retrofitting of existing PC plants with water-expensive carbon capture technologies. Therefore, national efforts to reduce water withdrawal and consumption have been intensified. Water consumption in PC plants is strongly associated to losses from the cooling water cycle, particularly water evaporation from cooling towers. Accurate estimation of these water losses requires realistic cooling tower models, as well as the inclusion of uncertainties arising from atmospheric conditions. In this work, the cooling tower for a supercritical PC power plant was modeled as a humidification operation and used for optimization under uncertainty. Characterization of the uncertainty (air temperature and humidity) was based on available weather data. Process characteristics including boiler conditions, reactant ratios, and pressure ratios in turbines were calculated to obtain the minimum water consumption under the above mentioned uncertainties. In this study, the calculated conditions predicted up to 12% in reduction in the average water consumption for a 548 MW supercritical PC power plant simulated using Aspen Plus. Optimization under uncertainty for these large-scale PC plants cannot be solved with conventional stochastic programming algorithms because of the computational expenses involved. In this work, we discuss the use of a novel better optimization of nonlinear uncertain systems (BONUS) algorithm which dramatically decreases the computational requirements of the stochastic optimization.

Juan M. Salazara; Stephen E. Zitney; Urmila M. Diwekara

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-1248E Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis Principal Authors Amol Phadke1 , Charles;Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis ii LBNL-1248E Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. #12;#12;Advanced Coal

86

Clean coal reference plants: Pulverized encoal PDF fired boiler. Topical report  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT) is a government and industry cofunded technology development effort to demonstrate a new generation of innovative coal utilization processes in a series of full-scale facilities. The goal of the program is to provide the U.S. energy marketplace with a number of advanced, more efficient, and environmentally responsive coal-using technologies. To achieve this goal, a multiphased effort consisting of five separate solicitations has been completed. The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has the responsibility for monitoring the CCT Projects within certain technology categories, which, in general, correspond to the center`s areas of technology development. Primarily the categories of METC CCT projects are: atmospheric fluid bed combustion, pressurized fluidized bed combustion, integrated gasification combined cycle, mild gasification, and industrial applications. This report describes the plant design.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Pulverizer Operational and Performance Upgrades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1997, a survey of coal pulverizer operating experience was performed at the request of the funders of the EPRI Pulverizer Interest Group (PIG). The primary purpose of the survey was to determine the distributions of pulverizer manufacturers, types, models and sizes among the fleet of existing pulverizers operated by the PIG members. This effort was undertaken in order to optimally direct an R&D program8217s tasks focusing on field testing and physical and computer modeling.

2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

88

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis Title Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-1248E Year of Publication 2008 Authors...

89

COMPUTATIONAL MODELING AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES ON NOx REDUCTION UNDER PULVERIZED COAL COMBUSTION CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect

In this work, both computer simulation and experimental studies were conducted to investigate several strategies for NO{sub x} reduction under pulverized coal combustion conditions with an aim to meet the stringent environmental standards for NO{sub x} control. Both computer predictions and reburning experiments yielded favorable results in terms of NO{sub x} control by reburning with a combination of methane and acetylene as well as non-selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with ammonia following reburning with methane. The greatest reduction was achieved at the reburning stoichiometric ratio of 0.9; the reduction was very significant, as clearly shown in Chapters III and V. Both the experimental and computational results favored mixing gases: methane and acetylene (90% and 10% respectively) and methane and ammonia (98% and 2%) in order to get optimum reduction levels which can not be achieved by individual gases at any amounts. Also, the above gaseous compositions as reburning fuels seemed to have a larger window of stoichiometric ratio (SR2 < 0.9) as opposed to just methane (SR2=0.9) so as to reduce and keep NO{sub x} at low ppm levels. From the various computational runs, it has been observed that although there are several pathways that contribute to NO{sub x} reduction, the key pathway is NO {r_arrow} HCN {r_arrow} NH{sub 3} {r_arrow} N{sub 2} + H{sub 2}. With the trends established in this work, it is possible to scale the experimental results to real time industrial applications using computational calculations.

Subha K. Kumpaty; Kannikeswaran Subramanian; Victor P. Nokku; Tyrus L. Hodges; Adel Hassouneh; Ansumana Darboe; Sravan K. Kumpati

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

NETL: Turbine Projects - Advanced Coal Power Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Coal Power Systems Turbine Projects Advanced Coal Power Systems SOFC Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation DataFact Sheets SOFC Hybrid System PDF In-House FCT...

91

In situ parametric study of alkali release in pulverized coal combustion: Effects of operating conditions and gas composition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work concerns a parametric study of alkali release in a lab-scale, pulverized coal combustor (drop tube reactor) at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were made at steady reactor conditions using excimer laser fragmentation fluorescence (ELIF) and with direct optical access to the flue gas pipe. In this way, absolute gas-phase alkali species could be determined in situ, continuously, with sub-ppb sensitivity, directly in the flue gas. A hard coal was fired in the range 1000-1300{sup o}C, for residence times in the range 3-5 s and for air numbers {lambda} (air/fuel ratios) from 1.15 to 1.50. In addition, the amount of chlorine, water vapor and sulfur, respectively, was increased in known amounts by controlled dosing of HCl, H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2} into the combustion gas to determine effects of these components on release or capture of the alkali species. The experimental results are also compared with values calculated using ash/fuel analyses and sequential extraction to obtain a fuller picture of alkali release in pulverized fuel combustion. 27 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

H. Schuermann; P.B. Monkhouse; S. Unterberger; K.R.G. Hein [Universitaet Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany). Institut fuer Verfahrenstechnik und Dampfkesselwesen

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

A role of hydrocarbon reaction for NO{sub x} formation and reduction in fuel-rich pulverized coal combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have investigated an index for modeling a NO{sub x} reaction mechanism of pulverized coal combustion. The reaction mechanism of coal nitrogen was examined by drop-tube furnace experiments under various burning conditions. We proposed the gas phase stoichiometric ratio (SRgas) as a key index to evaluate NO{sub x} concentration in fuel-rich flames. The SRgas was defined as: SRgas {identical_to} amount of fuel required for stoichiometry combustion/amount of gasified fuel where, the amount of gasified fuel was defined as the amount of fuel which had been released to the gas phase by pyrolysis, oxidation and gasification reactions. When SRgas estimate the total concentration of hydrocarbons in coal flame. The reaction of heavy hydrocarbons which had plural aromatic rings was very important to analyze the reaction mechanism of hydrocarbons for coal combustion in detail. When burning temperature and SRgas were the same, total hydrocarbon concentration in a coal flame was larger than that of a light gaseous hydrocarbon flame. Total hydrocarbon concentration in oxy-fuel combustion was lower than that in air combustion. We verified the proposed model by experimental results obtained for a drop-tube furnace and a laboratory-scale furnace that had an installed low-NO{sub x} burner. (author)

Taniguchi, Masayuki; Kamikawa, Yuki; Okazaki, Teruyuki; Yamamoto, Kenji; Orita, Hisayuki [Energy and Environmental Systems Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd. Power Systems Company, 7-2-1 Omika-cho, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken 319-1292 (Japan)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Eight Advanced Coal Projects Chosen for Further Development by...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Eight Advanced Coal Projects Chosen for Further Development by DOE's University Coal Research Program Eight Advanced Coal Projects Chosen for Further Development by DOE's...

94

Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Coal Technology Program Clean Coal Technology Program Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration A DOE Assessment DOE/NETL-2005/1217 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory April 2005 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name,

95

A centurial history of technological change and learning curves or pulverized coal-fired utility boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Japan, where higher coal prices justi?ed the higher costof the total O&M cost and the coal price remained relatively

Yeh, Sonia; Rubin, Edward S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

A centurial history of technological change and learning curves or pulverized coal-fired utility boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the total O&M cost and the coal price remained relativelyand Japan, where higher coal prices justi?ed the higher cost

Yeh, Sonia; Rubin, Edward S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Mechanisms of fouling, slagging and corrosion by pulverized coal combustion. Quarterly technical progress report No. 1, March 11-June 30, 1981  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported on a program in which the objective is to conduct a detailed and comprehensive study of the mechanisms of fouling, slagging and corrosion in pulverized coal combustors by employing well controlled model systems which simulate the coal combustion environment. Emphasis during this period has been on design and construction of the combustion test rig. All design phases are complete. Construction of the diffuser and test sections is also complete.

Gulden, M. E.; Hsu, L. L.; Stetson, A. R.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Oxy-Fired 1100°F (593°C) Ultra-Supercritical Pulverized Coal Power Plant with CO2 Capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxy-combustion of coal has been proposed as a way to reduce the costs of capturing CO2 from coal-fired steam-electric power plants at a purity adequate for geological storage. Various efforts are underway worldwide to develop oxy-combustion technology for deployment at full scale (600-800 MWe). This report describes the design of a 700-MWe (gross) oxy-pulverized coal power plant for comparison with a more familiar conventional air-coal power plant with the same steam cycle.

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

99

Engineering and Economic Analysis of an Oxy-Fired 1100ºF (593ºC) Ultra-Supercritical Pulverized Coal Power Plant with CO2Capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxy-combustion of coal has been proposed as a way to reduce the costs of capturing CO2 from coal-fired steam-electric power plants at a purity adequate for geological storage. Various efforts are underway worldwide to develop oxy-combustion technology for deployment at full scale (600–800 MWe). This report describes the design of a 700-MWe (gross) oxy-pulverized coal power plant along with a more familiar conventional air-coal power plant with the same steam cycle.

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

Optimizing Pulverizer and Riffler Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pulverizer problems rank high on the list of leading outage causes for coal-fired power plants (EPRI TR-101692). This document is an interim report that provides guidelines, descriptions, explanations, maintenance suggestions, and examples of the pulverizer and riffler systems. (A broader and more comprehensive report covering all aspects of the fuel delivery system will be issued as a final report in due course.) This document also discusses why and how the various components of a pulverizer influence s...

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Control of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions from Pulverized Coal-Fired Boilers by Dry Removal with Lime and Limestone Sorbants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the past decade increasing concern over the potential environmental impact associated with the emissions of both gaseous and particulate pollutants has resulted in the promulgation of strict regulatory standards governing such emissions. In this regard, particular attention has been placed upon the control of sulfur dioxide (SO2) from major fuel burning installations. The provisions of the 1977 Amendments to the Clean Air Act which relate to the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) and the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) have made consideration of this problem of significant additional importance in the context of increased coal utilization. There exist three general methods for the control of sulfur dioxide emissions from pulverized coal-fired boiler equipment. These are: (1) coal cleaning to remove pyritic sulfur, (2) conventional wet, nonregenerable scrubbing with alkaline slurry and solution processes, and (3) dry processes which involve direct introduction of lime or limestone into the firebox, or a spray dryer operated with nonregenerable alkaline sorbents coupled with a fabric filter collector. Equipment requirements, SO2 removal criteria, general economics, and potential applications of these latter two approaches within category (3) will be discussed.

Schwartz, M. H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Design of a laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy system for on-line quality analysis of pulverized coal in power plants  

SciTech Connect

It is vitally important for a power plant to determine the chemical composition of coal prior to combustion in order to obtain optimal boiler control. In this work, a fully software-controlled laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system comprising a LIBS apparatus and sampling equipment has been designed for possible application to power plants for on-line quality analysis of pulverized coal. Special attention was given to the LIBS system, the data processing methods (especially the normalization with Bode Rule/DC Level) and the specific settings (the software-controlled triggering source, high-pressure gas cleaning device, sample preparation module, sampling module, etc.), which gave the best direct measurement for C, H, Si, Na, Mg, Fe, Al, and Ti with measurement errors less than 10% for pulverized coal. Therefore, the apparatus is accurate enough to be applied to industries for on-line monitoring of pulverized coal. The method of proximate analysis was also introduced and the experimental error of A(ad) (Ash, 'ad' is an abbreviation for 'air dried') was shown in the range of 2.29 to 13.47%. The programmable logic controller (PLC) controlled on-line coal sampling equipment, which is designed based upon aerodynamics, and is capable of performing multipoint sampling and sample-preparation operation.

Yin, W.B.; Zhang, L.; Dong, L.; Ma, W.G.; Jia, S.T. [Shanxi Agricultural University, Taiyuan (China)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IGCC PC advanced coal-wind hybrid combined cycle power plantnatural gas combined cycle gas turbine power plant carboncrude gasification combined cycle power plant with carbon

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

FUNDAMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF FUEL TRANSFORMATIONS IN PULVERIZED COAL COMBUSTION AND GASIFICATION TECHNOLOGIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to carry out the necessary experiments and analyses to extend current capabilities for modeling fuel transformations to the new conditions anticipated in next-generation coal-based, fuel-flexible combustion and gasification processes. This multi-organization, multi-investigator project has produced data, correlations, and submodels that extend present capabilities in pressure, temperature, and fuel type. The combined experimental and theoretical/computational results are documented in detail in Chapters 1-8 of this report, with Chapter 9 serving as a brief summary of the main conclusions. Chapters 1-3 deal with the effect of elevated pressure on devolatilization, char formation, and char properties. Chapters 4 and 5 deal with advanced combustion kinetic models needed to cover the extended ranges of pressure and temperature expected in next-generation furnaces. Chapter 6 deals with the extension of kinetic data to a variety of alternative solid fuels. Chapter 7 focuses on the kinetics of gasification (rather than combustion) at elevated pressure. Finally, Chapter 8 describes the integration, testing, and use of new fuel transformation submodels into a comprehensive CFD framework. Overall, the effects of elevated pressure, temperature, heating rate, and alternative fuel use are all complex and much more work could be further undertaken in this area. Nevertheless, the current project with its new data, correlations, and computer models provides a much improved basis for model-based design of next generation systems operating under these new conditions.

Robert Hurt; Joseph Calo; Thomas H. Fletcher; Alan Sayre

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

105

Measurement and capture of fine and ultrafine particles from a pilot-scale pulverized coal combustor with an electrostatic precipitator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments were carried out in a pilot-scale pulverized coal combustor at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) burning a Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and an electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) were used to measure the particle size distributions (PSDs) in the range of 17 nm to 10 m at the inlet and outlet of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP). At the ESP inlet, a high number concentration of ultrafine particles was found, with the peak at approximately 75 nm. A trimodal PSD for mass concentration was observed with the modes at approximately 80-100 nm, 1-2 {mu}m, and 10 {mu}m. The penetration of ultrafine particles through the ESP increased dramatically as particle size decreased below 70 nm, attributable to insufficient or partial charging of the ultrafine particles. Injection of nanostructured fine-particle sorbents for capture of toxic metals in the flue gas caused high penetration of the ultrafine particles through the ESP. The conventional ESP was modified to enhance charging using soft X-ray irradiation. A slipstream of flue gas was introduced from the pilot-scale facility and passed through this modified ESP. Enhancement of particle capture was observed with the soft X-ray irradiation when moderate voltages were used in the ESP, indicating more efficient charging of fine particles. 32 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Ying Li; Achariya Suriyawong; Michael Daukoru; Ye Zhuang; Pratim Biswas [Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States). Aerosol and Air Quality Research Laboratory

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008. “Annual Report on US Wind Power Installation, Cost,Feed Sequestration Site Wind Power Figure ES-1. AdvancedFeed Sequestration Site Wind Power Figure 1. Advanced-Coal

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Materials challenges in advanced coal conversion technologies  

SciTech Connect

Coal is a critical component in the international energy portfolio, used extensively for electricity generation. Coal is also readily converted to liquid fuels and/or hydrogen for the transportation industry. However, energy extracted from coal comes at a large environmental price: coal combustion can produce large quantities of ash and CO{sub 2}, as well as other pollutants. Advanced technologies can increase the efficiencies and decrease the emissions associated with burning coal and provide an opportunity for CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration. However, these advanced technologies increase the severity of plant operating conditions and thus require improved materials that can stand up to the harsh operating environments. The materials challenges offered by advanced coal conversion technologies must be solved in order to make burning coal an economically and environmentally sound choice for producing energy.

Powem, C.A.; Morreale, B.D. [National Energy Technology Laboratory, Albany, OR (United States)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Advanced Research Robert R. Romanosky  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in advanced ultra supercritical (USC) coal-fired power plants. The advanced materials developed in this project are essential for construction of coal-fired boilers with advanced steam cycles involving much higher temperatures and pressures than those presently used in conventional pulverized coal (PC) power

109

Modeling the behavior of selenium in Pulverized-Coal Combustion systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The behavior of Se during coal combustion is different from other trace metals because of the high degree of vaporization and high vapor pressures of the oxide (SeO{sub 2}) in coal flue gas. In a coal-fired boiler, these gaseous oxides are absorbed on the fly ash surface in the convective section by a chemical reaction. The composition of the fly ash (and of the parent coal) as well as the time-temperature history in the boiler therefore influences the formation of selenium compounds on the surface of the fly ash. A model was created for interactions between selenium and fly ash post-combustion. The reaction mechanism assumed that iron reacts with selenium at temperatures above 1200 C and that calcium reacts with selenium at temperatures less than 800 C. The model also included competing reactions of SO{sub 2} with calcium and iron in the ash. Predicted selenium distributions in fly ash (concentration versus particle size) were compared against measurements from pilot-scale experiments for combustion of six coals, four bituminous and two low-rank coals. The model predicted the selenium distribution in the fly ash from the pilot-scale experiments reasonably well for six coals of different compositions. (author)

Senior, Constance; Otten, Brydger Van; Wendt, Jost O.L.; Sarofim, Adel [Reaction Engineering International, 77 W. 200 South, Salt Lake City, UT 84101 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

A centurial history of technological change and learning curves or pulverized coal-fired utility boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

construction time of thermal power plants. The World Bankthe overall thermal ef?ciency of PC power plants, as well ascurve; Thermal ef?ciency; Coal-?red power plant; Learning-

Yeh, Sonia; Rubin, Edward

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

A centurial history of technological change and learning curves or pulverized coal-fired utility boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

allow ultra-supercritical boilers to achieve still higherthat supercritical-coal boilers, at least in the 1970s, didGW/year) by type of boiler. Source: [25]. Net Efficiency (

Yeh, Sonia; Rubin, Edward S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Credit Applications for 2007-2008 Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Credit Applications for...

113

Characteristics of carbonized sludge for co-combustion in pulverized coal power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Co-combustion of sewage sludge can destabilize its combustion profile due to high volatility, which results in unstable flame. We carried out fuel reforming for sewage sludge by way of carbonization at pyrolysis temperature of 300-500 deg. C. Fuel characteristics of carbonized sludge at each temperature were analyzed. As carbonization temperature increased, fuel ratio increased, volatile content reduced, and atomic ratio relation of H/C and O/C was similar to that of lignite. The analysis result of FT-IR showed the decrease of aliphatic C-H bond and O-C bond in carbonization. In the analysis result of TG-DTG, the thermogravimetry reduction temperature of carbonized sludge (CS400) was proven to be higher than that of dried sludge, but lower than that of sub-bituminous coal. Hardgrove grindability index increased in proportion to fuel ratio increase, where the carbonized sludge value of 43-110 was similar or higher than the coal value of 49-63. As for ash deposits, slagging and fouling index were higher than that of coal. When carbonized sludge (CS400) and coal were co-combusted in 1-10% according to calorific value, slagging tendency was low in all conditions, and fouling tendency was medium or high according to the compositions of coal.

Park, Sang-Woo [Department of Environmental Engineering, Hanbat National University, Daejeon 305-719 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Cheol-Hyeon, E-mail: jangch@hanbat.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Hanbat National University, Daejeon 305-719 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

EFFECT OF HEATING RATE ON THE THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF PULVERIZED COAL  

SciTech Connect

This final technical report describes work performed under DOE Grant No. DE-FG22-96PC96224 during the period September 24, 1996 to September 23, 1999 which covers the entire performance period of the project. During this period, modification, alignment, and calibration of the measurement system, measurement of devolatilization time-scales for single coal particles subjected to a range of heating rates and temperature data at these time-scales, and analysis of the temperature data to understand the effect of heating rates on coal thermal properties were carried out. A new thermodynamic model was developed to predict the heat transfer behavior for single coal particles using one approach based on the analogy for thermal property of polymers. Results of this model suggest that bituminous coal particles behave like polymers during rapid heating on the order of 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} K/s. At these heating rates during the early stages of heating, the vibrational part of the heat capacity of the coal molecules appears to be still frozen but during the transition from heat-up to devolatilization, the heat capacity appears to attain a sudden jump in its value as in the case of polymers. There are a few data available in the coal literature for low heating rate experiments (10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} K/s) conducted by UTRC, our industrial partner, in this project. These data were obtained for a longer heating duration on the order of several seconds as opposed to the 10 milliseconds heating time of the single particle experiments discussed above. The polymer analogy model was modified to include longer heating time on the order of several seconds to test these data. However, the model failed to predict these low heating rate data. It should be noted that UTRC's work showed reasonably good agreement with Merrick model heat capacity predictions at these low heating rates, but at higher heating rates UTRC observed that coal thermal response was heat flux dependent. It is concluded that at combustion level heating rates (10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} K/s) coal structural changes are delayed and attendant increases in heat capacity and thermal conductivity are pushed to higher temperatures or require significant hold times to become manifest.

Ramanathan Sampath

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

FUNDAMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF FUEL TRANSFORMATIONS IN PULVERIZED COAL COMBUSTION AND GASIFICATION TECHNOLOGIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to carry out the necessary experiments and analyses to extend leading submodels of coal transformations to the new conditions anticipated in next-generation energy technologies. During the first two projects years, significant progress was made on most of the tasks, as described in detail in the two previous annual reports. In the current third annual report, we report in detail on the BYU task on the properties and intrinsic reactivities of chars prepared at high-pressure. A flat-flame burner was used in a high pressure laminar flow facility to conduct high temperature, high heating rate coal pyrolysis experiments. Heating rates were approximately 10{sup 5} K/s, which is higher than in conventional drop tube experiments. Char samples from a Pitt No.8 coal and lignite were collected at 1300 C at 1, 6, 10, and 15 atm. Swelling ratios of the lignite were less than 1.0, and only about 1.3 for the Pitt No.8 coal. All coals showed slight increases in swelling behavior as pressure increased. The swelling behavior observed for the Pitt No.8 coal at each pressure was lower than reported in high pressure drop tube experiments, indicating the effect of heating rate on particle swelling. This heating rate effect was similar to that observed previously at atmospheric pressure. SEM photos revealed that bituminous coal has large physical structure transformations, with popped bubbles due to the high heating rate. TGA char oxidation reactivities were measured at the same total pressure as the char preparation pressure. The general trend was that the TGA reactivity on a gram per gram available basis decreased for both Pitt No.8 and Knife River lignite coal chars with increasing char formation pressure. The Pitt No.8 char intrinsic activation energy and oxygen reaction order remained relatively constant with increasing pressure. This new data provides some of the only information available on the morphology, structure, and reactivity of chars prepared in high pressure flames.

Robert Hurt; Joseph Calo; Thomas Fletcher; Alan Sayre

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Climate VISION: Events - Advanced Clean Coal Workshop  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Advanced Clean Coal Workshop Advanced Clean Coal Workshop Objective: Industry and government discussion of key issues and policy options related to deploying clean coal power plants in the marketplace. The following documents are available for download as Adobe PDF documents. Download Acrobat Reader AGENDA July 29, 2004 EEI Conference Center 701 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 8:15 Welcome from Host Thomas Kuhn, President, EEI Opening (Context & Goals) & Introduction Larisa Dobriansky, DOE Kyle McSlarrow, Deputy Secretary, DOE James E. Rogers, Chairman, Cinergy 8:45 Framing the Risks and Challenges for Commercial Clean Coal Plants Results of Risk Framework Analysis, David Berg, DOE (PDF 267 KB) Cost Comparison of IGCC and Advanced Clean Coal Plants, Stu Dalton, EPRI (PDF 684 KB)

117

Possible Effects of Chlorine Content of Coal on Fireside Corrosion in Pulverized Coal-Fired Boilers: Volumes 1-3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Illinois Basin coals represent a source of high-calorific value, relatively low-medium sulfur-content fuel. Currently, this fuel is underutilized because of chlorine limitations based upon negative experience in the United Kingdom. It is, however, not clear whether the U.K. experience can be applied to U.S. coals and boilers. This three-volume report attempts to clarify the U.K. experience and its applicability to the U.S. situation.

1997-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

118

Suppression of fine ash formation in pulverized coal flames. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory work and studies of full-scale coal-fired boilers have identified two general mechanisms for ash production. The vast majority of the ash is formed from mineral matter that coalesces as the char burns, yielding particles that are normally larger than 0.5 {mu}m. The second major mechanism is the generation of a submicron aerosol through a vaporization/condensation mechanism. Previous work has shown that pulverized bituminous coals that were treated by coal cleaning (via froth flotation) or aerodynamic sizing exhibited altered aerosol emission characteristics. Specifically, the emissions of aerosol for the cleaned and sized coals increased by as much as one order of magnitude. The goals of the present progress are to: (1) perform measurements on carefully characterized coals to identify the means by which the coal treatment increases aerosol yields; (2) investigate means by which coal cleaning can be done in a way that will not increase aerosol yields; (3) identify whether this mechanism can be used to reduce aerosol yields from systems burning straight coal. This paper discusses model description and model formulation, and reports on the progress of furnace design and construction, and coal selection.

Kramlich, J.C.; Hoffman, D.A.; Butcher, E.K.

1993-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

119

EFFECT OF HEATING RATE ON THE THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF PULVERIZED COAL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed under DOE Grant No. DE-FG22-96PC96224 during the period March 24, 1999 to September 23, 1999 which covers the last (sixth) six months of the project. During this reporting period, extraction of devolatilization time-scales and temperature data at these time-scales analyzing the high-speed films taken during the experiments was complete. Also a new thermodynamic model was developed to predict the heat transfer behavior for coal particles subjected to a range of heating rates using one approach based on the analogy of polymers. Sensitivity analyses of this model suggest that bituminous coal particles behave like polymers during rapid heating on the order of 10{sup 4}-10{sup 7} K/s. At these heating rates during the early stages within the first few milliseconds of heating time, the vibrational part of the heat capacity of the coal molecules appears to be still frozen but during the transition from heat-up to devolatization, the heat capacity appears to attain a sudden jump in its value as in the case of polymers. There are few data available in the coal literature for 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} K/s obtained by UTRC in their previous studies. These data were obtained for a longer heating duration on the order of several seconds as opposed to the 10 milliseconds heating time in the single particle experiments discussed above. The polymer analogy model is being modified to include longer heating time on the order of several seconds to test these data. It is expected that the model might still do a good job in the case of these larger heating time but very low heating rate experiments. Completion of the numerical analysis of the experimental data and preparation of the final report are in progress.

Ramanathan Sampath

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

120

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

G+CC+CCS IGCC+CCS FT HVAC HVDC IGCC PC advanced coal-windthan the Base Case (HVDC Only Transmission) Sensitivity toused in the FEAST model. HVDC transmission lines have lower

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Coal-Wind Non-Hybrid SNG IGCC+CCS PC CCGT Windor a synthetic natural gas (SNG) production facility) and anwithout Fuel With with SNG Production or Syncrude Production

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

A centurial history of technological change and learning curves or pulverized coal-fired utility boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

change; Steam plant; Steam turbine; Electricity 1.housed ?ve 10,000 kW steam turbines and typically requiredAdvances in boiler and steam turbine technology, materials

Yeh, Sonia; Rubin, Edward

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Combustion of pulverized coal in vortex structures. Final report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of the project were: (i) to understand the effects of heating one of the streams on the characteristics of shear layers, (ii) to investigate the changes in the characteristics of large scale vortex structures in the shear layer caused by the introduction of inert solid particles in one of the feed streams; (iii) to understand the effects of pyrolyzing solids on the shear layer behavior; and (iv) to study the effects of combustion of particles and their pyrolysis products on the shear layer structure, heat release rate, and pollutant emission characteristics. An experimental facility for generating two-dimensional shear layers containing vortex structures has been designed and fabricated. The experimental facility is essentially a low speed wind tunnel designed to (i) provide two gas streams, initially with uniform velocity profiles and isotropic turbulence, mixing at the end of a splitter plate, (ii) introduce vorticity by passively perturbing one of the streams, (iii) allow heating of one of the streams to temperatures high enough to cause pyrolysis of coal particles, and (iv) provide a natural gas flame in one of the streams to result in ignition and burning of coal particles.

Gollahalli, S.R.; Butuk, N.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration (Project)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains a description of technical progress made on the Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration Project (ACCP). The project is a US Department of Energy Innovative Clean Coal Technology Project. The cooperative agreement defining the project is between DOE and the Rosebud SynCoal Partnership RSCP. The RSCP is a partnership between Western Energy Company (WECo), a subsidiary of Entech, Montana Power's non-utility group, and NRG, a subsidiary of Northern States Power. The ACCP is a method of upgrading low ranked coals by reducing the moisture and sulfur content and increasing the heating value. The facility is being constructed at WECo's Rosebud No. 6 coal mine, west of Colstrip, Montana. This report contains both a history of the process development and a report of technical progress made since the beginning of the Clean Coal 1 cooperative agreement.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect

Several technology advances since the early coal-fueled turbine programs that address technical issues of coal as a turbine fuel have been developed in the early 1980s: Coal-water suspensions as fuel form, improved methods for removing ash and contaminants from coal, staged combustion for reducing NO{sub x} emissions from fuel-bound nitrogen, and greater understanding of deposition/erosion/corrosion and their control. Several Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Systems programs were awarded to gas turbine manufacturers for for components development and proof of concept tests; one of these was Allison. Tests were conducted in a subscale coal combustion facility and a full-scale facility operating a coal combustor sized to the Allison Model 501-K industrial turbine. A rich-quench-lean (RQL), low nitrogen oxide combustor design incorporating hot gas cleanup was developed for coal fuels; this should also be applicable to biomass, etc. The combustor tests showed NO{sub x} and CO emissions {le} levels for turbines operating with natural gas. Water washing of vanes from the turbine removed the deposits. Systems and economic evaluations identified two possible applications for RQL turbines: Cogeneration plants based on Allison 501-K turbine (output 3.7 MW(e), 23,000 lbs/hr steam) and combined cycle power plants based on 50 MW or larger gas turbines. Coal-fueled cogeneration plant configurations were defined and evaluated for site specific factors. A coal-fueled turbine combined cycle plant design was identified which is simple, compact, and results in lower capital cost, with comparable efficiency and low emissions relative to other coal technologies (gasification, advanced PFBC).

Wenglarz, R.A.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

EFFECT OF HEATING RATE ON THE THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF PULVERIZED COAL  

SciTech Connect

This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed under DOE Grant No. DE-FG22-96PC96224 during the period March 24, 1998 to September 23, 1998 which covers the fourth six months of the project. Existing laser heating set-up at the Single Particle Laboratory, Federal Energy Technology Center, Morgantown, WV would work only in the range of 10 to 10 4 5 K/s. During this reporting period, appropriate changes were made to the laser heating system to heat particles in the range of 10 to 10 K/s. Also, calibration for all the components of the 4 7 electrodynamic balance measurement system including single-color pyrometer and heating laser was successfully completed. Following the calibration, a large number of single coal particles were caught in the electrodynamic balance and their volume, external surface area, mass, and density were measured. The same single particles were then heated bidirectionally with a pulsed (10 ms pulse width) Nd:YAG laser beams of equal intensity. The temporal power variation in the laser pulse was monitored for use in the heat transfer analysis by an ultra-fast fiber optic uv light transmitter included in the beam path and coupled to a silicon photodiode. Measurements of changes in particle size that accompanied rapid heating was made by means of the high-speed diode array imaging system discussed in our previous reports. Dynamics of volatile evolution and particle swelling were recorded using well established time-resolved high-speed cinematography. Measurements of the radiant emissive power from the heated and cooled (when the laser is turned off) particles was made using the single-color pyrometer. The above experiments are being repeated for a significant number of coal particles for a number of heating rates in between 10 - 10 K/s at FETC, Morgantown. 4 7 Shipment of the donated heated grid system components from our industrial partner, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), CT to CAU was complete during this reporting period. Testing of the heated grid system components at CAU is also in progress.

RAMANATHAN SAMPATH

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

127

NETL: News Release - Advanced Coal Dryer Boosts Power Plant Performanc...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Release Date: May 24, 2006 Advanced Coal Dryer Boosts Power Plant Performance Latest Project in President's Clean Coal Power Initiative Begins Operations in North Dakota...

128

Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two dimensional, steady-state model for describing a variety of reactive and nonreactive flows, including pulverized coal combustion and gasification, is presented. The model, referred to as 93-PCGC-2 is applicable to cylindrical, axi-symmetric systems. Turbulence is accounted for in both the fluid mechanics equations and the combustion scheme. Radiation from gases, walls, and particles is taken into account using a discrete ordinates method. The particle phase is modeled in a lagrangian framework, such that mean paths of particle groups are followed. A new coal-general devolatilization submodel (FG-DVC) with coal swelling and char reactivity submodels has been added.

Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Effect of Heating Rate on the Thermodynamic Properties of Pulverized Coal  

SciTech Connect

This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed under DOE Grant No.DE-FG22-96PC96224 during the period September 24, 1997 to April 23, 1998 which covers the third six months of the project. During this reporting period, several components of the electrodynamic balance measurement system, Single Particle Laboratory, Federal Energy Technology center, Morgantown, WV, were successfully calibrated. A large number of single polystyrenespheres covering a size range of 80 - 200 microns in diameter were caught in the electrodynamic balance. The size counts of their projected images obtained using the top video-based imaging system, bottom video-based imaging system, and diode-array imaging system were calibrated against the actual size of the particles to within ± 3 microns. Signals obtained by the particle position control system were also calibrated against the actual movement of a polystyrene particle in the balance to within ± 1 microns. Presently, calibration of the Single Color Pyrometer to measure coal particle temperature histories is in progress. Donation agreement for the Heated-Grid measurement system from our industrial partner, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), CT, was obtained and the arrangement for the completion of the shipment of the grid system components from UTRC to CAU is in progress. Several theoretical analyses were conducted to improve the model performance of the present work and the results were compared with data available from our previous studies. These activities resulted in several publications including three conference papers, and one student poster paper during this reporting period.

Ramanathan Sampath

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

University Advanced Coal Generation Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2012, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) was a sponsor of projects conducted under the auspices of two consortia that support university research for coal-based power generation: the Biomass and Fossil Fuel Research Alliance (BF2RA) in the United Kingdom and the University Turbine System Research (UTSR) program of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). This technical update report describes the progress made in both of those ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

131

Measurements of the flame emissivity and radiative properties of particulate medium in pulverized-coal-fired boiler furnaces by image processing of visible radiation  

SciTech Connect

Due to the complicated processes for coal particles burning in industrial furnaces, their radiative properties, such as the absorption and scattering coefficients, which are essential to make reliable calculation of radiative transfer in combustion computation, are hard to be given exactly by the existing methods. In this paper, multiple color image detectors were used to capture approximately red, green, and blue monochromatic radiative intensity images in the visible wavelength region, and the flame emissivity and the radiative properties of the particulate media in three pulverized-coal-fired boiler furnaces were got from the flame images. It was shown that as the load increased, the flame emissivity and the radiative properties increased too; these radiative parameters had the largest values near the burner zone, and decreased along the combustion process. Compared with the combustion medium with a low-volatile anthracite coal burning in a 670 t/h boiler, the emissivity and the absorption coefficient of the medium with a high-volatile bituminous coal burning in a 1025 t/h boiler were smaller near the outlet zone, but were larger near the burner zone of the furnace, due to the significant contribution of soot to the radiation. This work will be of practical importance in modeling and calculating the radiative heat transfer in combustion processes, and improving the technology for in situ, multi-dimensional visualization of large-scale combustion processes in coal-fired furnaces of power plants. 18 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.

Chun Lou; Huai-Chun Zhou; Peng-Feng Yu; Zhi-Wei Jiang [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China). State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Investigation of the relationship between particulate-bound mercury and properties of fly ash in a full-scale 100 MWe pulverized coal combustion boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The properties of fly ash in coal-fired boilers influence the emission of mercury from power plants into the environment. In this study, seven different bituminous coals were burned in a full-scale 100 MWe pulverized coal combustion boiler and the derived fly ash samples were collected from a mechanical hopper (MH) and an electrostatic precipitator hopper (ESP). The mercury content, specific surface area (SSA), unburned carbon, and elemental composition of the fly ash samples were analyzed to evaluate the correlation between the concentration of particulate-bound mercury and the properties of coal and fly ash. For a given coal, it was found that the mercury content in the fly ash collected from the ESP was greater than in the fly ash samples collected from the MHP. This phenomenon may be due to a lower temperature of flue gas at the ESP (about 135{sup o}C) compared to the temperature at the air preheater (about 350{sup o}C). Also, a significantly lower SSA observed in MH ash might also contribute to the observation. A comparison of the fly ash samples generated from seven different coals using statistical methods indicates that the mercury adsorbed on ESP fly ashes has a highly positive correlation with the unburned carbon content, manganese content, and SSA of the fly ash. Sulfur content in coal showed a significant negative correlation with the Hg adsorption. Manganese in fly ash is believed to participate in oxidizing volatile elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) to ionic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}). The oxidized mercury in flue gas can form a complex with the fly ash and then get removed before the flue gas leaves the stack of the boiler.

Sen Li; Chin-Min Cheng; Bobby Chen; Yan Cao; Jacob Vervynckt; Amanda Adebambo; Wei-Ping Pan [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Eight Advanced Coal Projects Chosen for Further Development by DOE's  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Eight Advanced Coal Projects Chosen for Further Development by Eight Advanced Coal Projects Chosen for Further Development by DOE's University Coal Research Program Eight Advanced Coal Projects Chosen for Further Development by DOE's University Coal Research Program July 5, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Department of Energy has selected eight new projects to further advanced coal research under the University Coal Research Program. The selected projects will improve coal conversion and use and will help propel technologies for future advanced coal power systems. The selections will conduct investigations in three topic areas -- computational energy sciences, material science, and sensors and controls -- and will be funded at a maximum of $300,000 for 36 months. The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) will manage

134

Combustion characteristics and NOx emissions of two kinds of swirl burners in a 300-MWe wall-fired pulverized-coal utility boiler  

SciTech Connect

Measurements were performed in a 300-MWe wall-fired pulverized-coal utility boiler. Enhanced ignition-dual register (EI-DR) burners and centrally fuel rich (CFR) swirl coal combustion burners were installed in the bottom row of the furnace during experiments. Local mean concentrations of O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2} and NOx gas species, gas temperatures, and char burnout were determined in the region of the two types of burners. For centrally fuel rich swirl coal combustion burners, local mean CO concentrations, gas temperatures and the temperature gradient are higher and mean concentrations of O{sub 2} and NOx along the jet flow direction in the burner region are lower than for the enhanced ignition-dual register burners. Moreover, the mean O{sub 2} concentration is higher and the gas temperature and mean CO concentration are lower in the side wall region. For centrally fuel rich swirl coal combustion burners in the bottom row, the combustion efficiency of the boiler increases from 96.73% to 97.09%, and NOx emission decreases from 411.5 to 355 ppm at 6% O{sub 2} compared to enhanced ignition-dual register burners and the boiler operates stably at 110 MWe without auxiliary fuel oil.

Li, Z.Q.; Jing, J.P.; Chen, Z.C.; Ren, F.; Xu, B.; Wei, H.D.; Ge, Z.H. [Harbin Institute for Technology, Harbin (China). School for Energy Science & Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Alkali removal at about 1400{sup o}C for the pressurized pulverized coal combustion combined cycle. 1. Thermodynamics and concept  

SciTech Connect

The limitation of fossil fuel resources and the necessity of reducing CO{sub 2} emission require an increase of the efficiency of power plants by using combined cycle power systems. The pressurized pulverized coal combustion (PPCC) combined cycle is a coal fired combined cycle concept which is able to achieve efficiencies in excess of 53%. The direct use of the hot flue gas for driving a gas turbine requires a hot gas cleanup to achieve corrosion prevention of the turbine blading. One of the main problems is the release of alkalis during the coal combustion process. Therefore, the thermodynamic basics for the control of alkali vapor pressures in the hot flue gas of PPCC have been investigated by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations and Knudsen effusion mass spectrometric measurements on alkali oxide activities in and alkali partial pressures over coal ash slags with and without additives and alkali laden model sorbents. The obtained results reveal that the requirements of the gas turbine manufacturers regarding alkali concentration in the hot flue gas should be satisfiable by certain aluminosilicate sorbents. On the basis of these results, a concept for alkali vapor removal is proposed. 20 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Winfried Willenborg; Michael Mueller; Klaus Hilpert [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prices in 2007 real $ Coal Prices Coal prices have been farprices. Factors like coal prices and EOR revenues affect theCoal Prices..

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Seven Projects Aimed at Advancing Coal Research Selected for DOE's  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seven Projects Aimed at Advancing Coal Research Selected for DOE's Seven Projects Aimed at Advancing Coal Research Selected for DOE's University Coal Research Program Seven Projects Aimed at Advancing Coal Research Selected for DOE's University Coal Research Program May 13, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- Seven projects aimed at advancing coal research and development while providing research exposure to a new generation of scientists and engineers have been selected to participate in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) University Coal Research (UCR) program. The projects aim to improve the basic understanding of the chemical and physical processes that govern coal conversion and utilization, by-product utilization, and technological development for advanced energy systems. These advanced systems -- efficient, ultra-clean energy plants -- are

138

Value Operating Flexibility in Advanced Coal Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a preliminary study of the potential value of the operating flexibility available from advanced coal plant designs and carbon capture and storage (CCS) systems. Assessing value requires new analytical approaches capable of examining plant outputs (e.g., syngas, air products, electricity, emissions) in the context of varying power market conditions and significant climate policy and fuel price uncertainties. Accounting for flexibility options in capacity planning may create opportuni...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

139

An evaluation of integrated-gasification-combined-cycle and pulverized-coal-fired steam plants: Volume 1, Base case studies: Final report  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation of the performance and costs for a Texaco-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant as compared to a conventional pulverized coal-fired steam (PCFS) power plant with flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is provided. A general set of groundrules was used within which each plant design was optimized. The study incorporated numerous sensitivity cases along with up-to-date operating and cost data obtained through participation of equipment vendors and process developers. Consequently, the IGCC designs presented in this study use the most recent data available from Texaco's ongoing international coal gasification development program and General Electric's continuing gas turbine development efforts. The Texaco-based IGCC has advantages over the conventional PCFS technology with regard to environmental emissions and natural resource requirements. SO/sub 2/, NOx, and particulate emissions are lower. Land area and water requirements are less for IGCC concepts. Coal consumption is less due to the higher plant thermal efficiency attainable in the IGCC plant. The IGCC plant also has the capability to be designed in several different configurations, with and without the use of natural gas or oil as a backup fuel. This capability may prove to be particularly advantageous in certain utility planning and operation scenarios. 107 figs., 114 tabs.

Pietruszkiewicz, J.; Milkavich, R.J.; Booras, G.S.; Thomas, G.O.; Doss, H.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

An evaluaton of integrated-gasification-combined-cycle and pulverized-coal-fired steam plants: Volume 2, Sensitivity studies and appendixes: Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Research Institute contracted with Bechtel Group, Inc., to provide an evaluation of the performance and costs for a Texaco-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant as compared to a conventional pulverized coal-fired steam (PCFS) power plant with flue gas desulfurization (FGD). A general set of groundrules was used within which each plant design was optimized. The study incorporated numerous sensitivity cases along with up-to-date operating and cost data obtained through participation of equipment vendors and process developers. Consequently, the IGCC designs presented in this study use the most recent data available from Texaco's ongoing international coal gasification development program and General Electric's continuing gas turbine development efforts. The study confirms that the Texaco-based IGCC has advantages over the conventional PCFS technology with regard to environmental emissions and natural resource requirements. SO/sub 2/, NOx, and particulate emissions are lower. Land area and water requirements are less for IGCC concepts. In addition, coal consumption is less due to the higher plant thermal efficiency attainable in the IGCC plant. The IGCC plant also has the capability to be designed in several different configurations, with and without the use of natural gas or oil as a backup fuel. This capability may prove to be particularly advantageous in certain utility planning and operation scenarios.

Pietruszkiewicz, J.; Milkavich, R.J.; Booras, G.S.; Thomas, G.O.; Doss, H.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Thermodynamic properties of pulverized coal during rapid heating devolatilization processes. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowledge of the thermodynamic and morphological properties of coal associated with rapid heating decomposition pathways is essential to progress in coal utilization technology. Specifically, knowledge of the heat of devolatilization, surface area and density of coal as a function of rank characteristics, temperature and extent of devolatilization in the context of rapid heating conditions is essential to the fundamental determination of kinetic parameters of coal devolatilization. These same properties are also needed to refine existing devolatilization sub-models utilized in large-scale modeling of coal combustion systems. The objective of this research is to obtain data on the thermodynamic properties and morphology of coal under conditions of rapid heating. Specifically, the total heat of devolatilization, external surface area, BET surface area and true density will be measured for representative coal samples. The coal ranks to be investigated will include a high volatile A bituminous (PSOC 1451 D) and a low volatile bituminous (PSOC 1516D). An anthracite (PSOC 1468) will be used as a non-volatile coal reference. In addition, for one coal, the contribution of each of the following components to the overall heat of devolatilization will be measured: the specific heat of coal/char during devolatilization, the heat of thermal decomposition of the coal, the specific heat capacity of tars, and the heat of vaporization of tars.

Proscia, W.M.; Freihaut, J.D.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Growing concern over climate change is prompting new thinking about the technologies used to generate electricity. In the future, it is possible that new government policies on greenhouse gas emissions may favor electric generation technology options that release zero or low levels of carbon emissions. The Western U.S. has abundant wind and coal resources. In a world with carbon constraints, the future of coal for new electrical generation is likely to depend on the development and successful application of new clean coal technologies with near zero carbon emissions. This scoping study explores the economic and technical feasibility of combining wind farms with advanced coal generation facilities and operating them as a single generation complex in the Western US. The key questions examined are whether an advanced coal-wind hybrid (ACWH) facility provides sufficient advantages through improvements to the utilization of transmission lines and the capability to firm up variable wind generation for delivery to load centers to compete effectively with other supply-side alternatives in terms of project economics and emissions footprint. The study was conducted by an Analysis Team that consists of staff from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Western Interstate Energy Board (WIEB). We conducted a screening level analysis of the economic competitiveness and technical feasibility of ACWH generation options located in Wyoming that would supply electricity to load centers in California, Arizona or Nevada. Figure ES-1 is a simple stylized representation of the configuration of the ACWH options. The ACWH consists of a 3,000 MW coal gasification combined cycle power plant equipped with carbon capture and sequestration (G+CC+CCS plant), a fuel production or syngas storage facility, and a 1,500 MW wind plant. The ACWH project is connected to load centers by a 3,000 MW transmission line. In the G+CC+CCS plant, coal is gasified into syngas and CO{sub 2} (which is captured). The syngas is burned in the combined cycle plant to produce electricity. The ACWH facility is operated in such a way that the transmission line is always utilized at its full capacity by backing down the combined cycle (CC) power generation units to accommodate wind generation. Operating the ACWH facility in this manner results in a constant power delivery of 3,000 MW to the load centers, in effect firming-up the wind generation at the project site.

Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles; Larson, Doug; Carr, Tom; Rath, Larry; Balash, Peter; Yih-Huei, Wan

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

143

DOE Selects Nine New University Coal Research Projects to Advance Coal-Based Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Selects Nine New University Coal Research Projects to Advance Coal-Based Power Selects Nine New University Coal Research Projects to Advance Coal-Based Power Systems Nine new projects selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the University Coal Research program will seek long-term solutions for the clean and efficient use of our nation's abundant coal resources. The announcement today of the selections marks the 34 th round of the Department's longest-running coal program, which began in 1979. This research continues DOE efforts to improve the understanding of the chemical and physical processes governing coal conversion and utilization, and support the technological development of the advanced coal power systems of the future. These advanced systems include ultra-clean

144

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 Syngas (H2 + CO + CO2) Coal Gasifier coal Fuel Production/2 Syngas (H2 + CO + CO2) Coal Gasifier coal Fuel Production/this operational mode, the gasifiers and other parts of the

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Thermodynamic properties of pulverized coal during rapid heating devolatilization processes. Quarterly progress report, January--March 1993  

SciTech Connect

Knowledge of the thermodynamic and morphological properties of coal associated with rapid heating decomposition pathways is essential to progress in coal utilization technology. Specifically, knowledge of the heat of devolatilization, surface area and density of coal as a function of rank characteristics, temperature and extent of devolatilization in the context of rapid heating conditions is required both, for the fundamental determination of kinetic parameters of coal devolatilization, and to refine existing devolatilization sub-models used in comprehensive coal combustion codes. The objective of this research is to obtain data on the thermodynamic properties and morphology of coal under conditions of rapid heating. Specifically, the total heat of devolatilization, external surface area, BET surface area and true density will be measured for representative coal samples. In addition, for one coal, the contribution of each of the following components to the overall heat of devolatilization will be measured: the specific heat of coal/char during devolatilization, the heat of thermal decomposition of the coal, the specific heat capacity of tars, and the heat of vaporization of tars. Morphological characterization of the parent coal samples has been completed by the University of Pittsburgh. Results are presented for true density, CO{sub 2} surface area, mercury porosimetry, and particle size and shape measurements using image analysis. The heat of thermal decomposition of PSOC 1451D (Task 5) will be calculated from the data reported here. The Task 10 effort, Morphological Characterization of Coal/Char Samples as a Function of Extent of Devolatilization, will continue at the University of Pittsburgh. Work will focus on measurement of the morphological characteristics of the char samples as a function of extent of reaction.

Proscia, W.M.; Freihaut, J.D.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Advanced Turbine Systems Program and coal applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a program to develop ultra high-efficiency, cost-effective, environmentally benign gas turbine systems for industrial and utility applications. The Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program, jointly managed by the DOE's Office of Fossil Energy (DOE/FE) and Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy (DOE/CE), will lead to the commercial offering by industry of systems meeting full program goals by the years 2000--2002. It is expected that some advanced technology will already have been commercialized in intermediate systems before that time. Teams, led by US turbine manufacturers, will conduct most of the development work in the ATS Program. However, a substantial technology base element of the program see universities and others conduct significant research and development (R D) on generic technology issues relevant to the program. The program is primarily aimed at developing natural gas-fired turbine systems. Although the conversion of ATS to firing with coal or biomass fuels will be addressed in the analysis of ATS, tests will not be conducted in the program to verify conversion to alternate fuel firing. The program will however, include work to transfer advanced technology to the coal- and biomass-fueled systems being developed in other DOE programs.

Webb, H.A. Jr.; Bajura, R.A.; Parsons, E.L. Jr.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Advanced Turbine Systems Program and coal applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a program to develop ultra high-efficiency, cost-effective, environmentally benign gas turbine systems for industrial and utility applications. The Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program, jointly managed by the DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy (DOE/FE) and Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy (DOE/CE), will lead to the commercial offering by industry of systems meeting full program goals by the years 2000--2002. It is expected that some advanced technology will already have been commercialized in intermediate systems before that time. Teams, led by US turbine manufacturers, will conduct most of the development work in the ATS Program. However, a substantial technology base element of the program see universities and others conduct significant research and development (R&D) on generic technology issues relevant to the program. The program is primarily aimed at developing natural gas-fired turbine systems. Although the conversion of ATS to firing with coal or biomass fuels will be addressed in the analysis of ATS, tests will not be conducted in the program to verify conversion to alternate fuel firing. The program will however, include work to transfer advanced technology to the coal- and biomass-fueled systems being developed in other DOE programs.

Webb, H.A. Jr.; Bajura, R.A.; Parsons, E.L. Jr.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

DOE's Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Program to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Program to Develop Low-carbon Emission Coal Technologies DOE's Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Program to Develop Low-carbon Emission Coal Technologies March 11, 2009 - 3:18pm Addthis Statement of Victor K. Der, Acting Assistant Secretary, Office of Fossil Energy before the Subcommittee on Energy and Environment, Committee on Science and Technology, U.S. House of Representatives. Thank you, Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee. I appreciate this opportunity to provide testimony on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced coal research, development, and demonstration program to develop low-carbon emission coal technologies. Introduction Fossil fuel resources represent a tremendous national asset. An abundance

149

DOE's Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Program to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE's Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration DOE's Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Program to Develop Low-carbon Emission Coal Technologies DOE's Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Program to Develop Low-carbon Emission Coal Technologies March 11, 2009 - 3:18pm Addthis Statement of Victor K. Der, Acting Assistant Secretary, Office of Fossil Energy before the Subcommittee on Energy and Environment, Committee on Science and Technology, U.S. House of Representatives. Thank you, Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee. I appreciate this opportunity to provide testimony on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced coal research, development, and demonstration program to develop low-carbon emission coal technologies. Introduction Fossil fuel resources represent a tremendous national asset. An abundance

150

Friction Stir Welding and Processing of Advanced Materials for Coal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Friction Stir Welding and Processing of Advanced Materials for Coal and Nuclear Power Applications. Author(s), Glenn J. Grant, Scott Weil, ...

151

Optical Gas Sensors for Advanced Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Optical Gas Sensors for Advanced Coal-Fired Power Plants. Author(s), Paul Ohodnicki, Congjun Wang, Douglas Kauffman, Kristi Kauffman, ...

152

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Westinghouse's Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine System Program (DE-AC2l-86MC23167) was originally split into two major phases - a Basic Program and an Option. The Basic Program also contained two phases. The development of a 6 atm, 7 lb/s, 12 MMBtu/hr slagging combustor with an extended period of testing of the subscale combustor, was the first part of the Basic Program. In the second phase of the Basic Program, the combustor was to be operated over a 3-month period with a stationary cascade to study the effect of deposition, erosion and corrosion on combustion turbine components. The testing of the concept, in subscale, has demonstrated its ability to handle high- and low-sulfur bituminous coals, and low-sulfur subbituminous coal. Feeding the fuel in the form of PC has proven to be superior to CWM type feed. The program objectives relative to combustion efficiency, combustor exit temperature, NO[sub x] emissions, carbon burnout, and slag rejection have been met. Objectives for alkali, particulate, and SO[sub x] levels leaving the combustor were not met by the conclusion of testing at Textron. It is planned to continue this testing, to achieve all desired emission levels, as part of the W/NSP program to commercialize the slagging combustor technology.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

An Engineering and Economic Assessment of Alstom's Chilled Ammonia Process Development Unit (PDU) Design Applied at Full Scale to a n 1100 F Ultra-Supercritical Pulverized Coal Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI’s CO2 capture program aims to assess promising CO2 capture processes for pulverized coal-fired boilers, assist in developing lower cost options than the best technologies/processes available to date, and accelerate promising capture technologies to full-scale commercialization. This report presents the findings and conclusions from EPRI’s Economic and Engineering Assessment of the initial Alstom chilled ammonia process (CAP) design, scaled up, and applied to ...

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

154

Pulverizer performance upgrades lower fuel costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Between 2002 and 2005, combustion equipment modifications were carried out at St. Johns River Power Plant in Jacksonville, FL. The effort succeeded in obtaining the desired emission reductions and to increase petroleum coke consumption. Since 2005 the boilers typically fired a blend of 70% Colombia coal and 30% delayed petroleum coke. To realize significant fuel savings, the pulverizer capacity was increased by 14% to allow a lower grade coal to be used. The article describes the changes made to the pulverizer to allow 11,800 Btu/pound coal to be burnt, with annual savings of $6.3 m beginning in 2006. 4 figs., 1 tab.

Hansen, T.

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Hg and Se capture and fly ash carbons from combustion of complex pulverized feed blends mainly of anthracitic coal rank in Spanish power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, the petrology and chemistry of fly ashes produced in a Spanish power plant from the combustion of complex pulverized feed blends made up of anthracitic/meta-anthracitic coals, petroleum, and natural coke are investigated. It was found that the behavior of fly ash carbons derived from anthracitic coals follows relatively similar patterns to those established for the carbons from the combustion of bituminous coals. Fly ashes were sampled in eight hoppers from two electrostatic precipitator (ESP) rows. The characterization of the raw ashes and their five sieved fractions (from {gt}150 to {lt}25 {mu}m) showed that glassy material, quartz, oxides, and spinels in different proportions are the main inorganic components. As for the organic fraction, the dominant fly ash carbons are anisotropic carbons, mainly unburned carbons derived from anthracitic vitrinite. The concentration of Se and Hg increased in ashes of the second ESP row, this increase being related to the higher proportion of anisotropic unburned carbons, particularly those largely derived from anthracitic vitrinite in the cooler ashes of the ESP (second row) and also related to the decrease in the flue gas temperature. This suggests that the flue gas temperature plays a major role in the concentration of mercury for similar ratios of unburned carbons. It was also found that Hg is highly concentrated in the medium-coarser fractions of the fly ashes ({gt} 45 {mu}m), there being a positive relationship between the amount of these carbons, which are apparently little modified during the combustion process, in the medium-coarse fractions of the ashes and the Hg retention. According to the results obtained, further research on this type of fly ash could be highly productive. 28 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.

I. Surez-Ruiz; J.C. Hower; G.A. Thomas [Instituto Nacional del Carbon (INCAR-CSIC), Oviedo (Spain)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

CO-FIRING COAL: FEEDLOT AND LITTER BIOMASS (CFB AND CLB) FUELS IN PULVERIZED FUEL AND FIXED BED BURNERS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Intensive animal feeding operations create large amounts of animal waste that must be safely disposed of in order to avoid environmental degradation. Cattle feedlots and chicken houses are two examples. In feedlots, cattle are confined to small pens and fed a high calorie grain-diet diet in preparation for slaughter. In chicken houses, thousands of chickens are kept in close proximity. In both of these operations, millions of tons of manure are produced every year. The manure could be used as a fuel by mixing it with coal in a 90:10 blend and firing it in an existing coal suspension fired combustion systems. This technique is known as co-firing, and the high temperatures produced by the coal will allow the biomass to be completely combusted. Reburn is a process where a small percentage of fuel called reburn fuel is injected above the NO{sub x} producing, conventional coal fired burners in order to reduce NO{sub x}. The manure could also be used as reburn fuel for reducing NO{sub x} in coal fired plants. An alternate approach of using animal waste is to adopt the gasification process using a fixed bed gasifier and then use the gases for firing in gas turbine combustors. In this report, the cattle manure is referred to as feedlot biomass (FB) and chicken manure as litter biomass (LB). The report generates data on FB and LB fuel characteristics. Co-firing, reburn, and gasification tests of coal, FB, LB, coal: FB blends, and coal: LB blends and modeling on cofiring, reburn systems and economics of use of FB and LB have also been conducted. The biomass fuels are higher in ash, lower in heat content, higher in moisture, and higher in nitrogen and sulfur (which can cause air pollution) compared to coal. Small-scale cofiring experiments revealed that the biomass blends can be successfully fired, and NO{sub x} emissions will be similar to or lower than pollutant emissions when firing coal. Further experiments showed that biomass is twice or more effective than coal when used in a reburning process. Computer simulations for coal: LB blends were performed by modifying an existing computer code to include the drying and phosphorus (P) oxidation models. The gasification studies revealed that there is bed agglomeration in the case of chicken litter biomass due to its higher alkaline oxide content in the ash. Finally, the results of the economic analysis show that considerable fuel cost savings can be achieved with the use of biomass. In the case of higher ash and moisture biomass, the fuel cost savings is reduced.

Kalyan Annamalai; John Sweeten; Saqib Mukhtar; Ben Thein; Gengsheng Wei; Soyuz Priyadarsan; Senthil Arumugam; Kevin Heflin

2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

157

NETL: News Release -Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, 2007 7, 2007 Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Credit Applications for 2007-2008 WASHINGTON, DC - The Treasury Department and the Department of Energy (DOE) released today new instructions for applying for the tax credits for advanced coal projects and gasification projects. The new instructions provide additional time to submit applications for the credits. For the 2007-2008 allocation round, applications for DOE certification are not due to the Energy Department until October 31, 2007. "To further advance our nation's energy security, this Administration had made sustained investments in research, development, and wider use of advanced coal technologies a priority," Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell said. "Through new and innovative programs such as the Clean Coal Power Initiative and FutureGen demonstration, private sector partnerships, and use of tax credits and loan guarantees, the Department of Energy is advancing research to further develop and deploy advanced coal technologies to meet growing energy demand."

158

NETL: News Release -Eight Advanced Coal Projects Chosen for Further  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, 2011 5, 2011 Eight Advanced Coal Projects Chosen for Further Development by DOE's University Coal Research Program Washington, D.C. - The Department of Energy has selected eight new projects to further advanced coal research under the University Coal Research Program. The selected projects will improve coal conversion and use and will help propel technologies for future advanced coal power systems. The selections will conduct investigations in three topic areas - computational energy sciences, material science, and sensors and controls - and will be funded at a maximum of $300,000 for 36 months. The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) will manage the projects, which include ultra-clean energy plants that could co-produce electric power, fuels, chemicals and other high-value products from coal with near-zero emissions and substantial increases in efficiency.

159

Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low Rank Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 Capture Technology for Low Rank Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems Background Gasification of coal or other solid feedstocks (wood waste, petroleum coke, etc.) is a clean way to produce electricity and produce or co-produce a variety of commercial products. The major challenge is cost reduction; current integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology is estimated to produce power at a cost higher than that of pulverized coal combustion. However, the Gasification

160

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal prices have been far less volatile than natural gas prices.Coal Prices Figure 9 is similar to Figure 8 except the natural gas pricesCoal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis interested in natural gas prices

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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161

NETL: News Release - Seven Projects Aimed at Advancing Coal Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 13, 2010 May 13, 2010 Seven Projects Aimed at Advancing Coal Research Selected for DOE's University Coal Research Program Department's Longest Running Student-Teacher Initiative Provides Research Exposure for Future Scientists and Engineers Washington, D.C. - Seven projects aimed at advancing coal research and development while providing research exposure to a new generation of scientists and engineers have been selected to participate in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) University Coal Research (UCR) program. The projects aim to improve the basic understanding of the chemical and physical processes that govern coal conversion and utilization, by-product utilization, and technological development for advanced energy systems. These advanced systems - efficient, ultra-clean energy plants - are envisioned to co-produce electric power, fuels, chemicals and other high-value products from coal with near-zero emissions, including greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide.

162

Cast Alloys for Advanced Ultra Supercritical Steam Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Develop advanced coal-based power systems capable of 45–50 % efficiency at cost of electricity in an IGCC-based plant • cost of electricity for pulverized coal boilers Demonstrate coal-based energy plants that offer near-zero emissions (including CO2) with multiproduct production

G. R. Holcomb, P. D. Jablonski, and P. Wang

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Task 4 -- Conversion to a coal-fueled advanced turbine system (CFATS)  

SciTech Connect

Solar is developing the technologies for a highly efficient, recuperated, Advanced Turbine System (ATS) that is aimed at the dispersed power generation market. With ultra-low-emissions in mind the primary fuel selected for this engine system is natural gas. Although this gas fired ATS (GFATS) will primarily employ natural gas the use of other fuels particular those derived from coal and renewable resources cannot be overlooked. The enabling technologies necessary to direct fire coal in gas turbines were developed during the 1980`s. This Solar development co-sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) resulted in the testing of a full size coal-water-slurry fired combustion system. In parallel with this program the DOE funded the development of integrated gasification combined cycle systems (IGCC). This report describes the limitations of the Solar ATs (recuperated engine) and how these lead to a recommended series of modifications that will allow the use of these alternate fuels. Three approaches have been considered: direct-fired combustion using either a slagging combustor, or a pressurized fluidized bed (PFBC), externally or indirectly fired approaches using pulverized fuel, and external gasification of the fuel with subsequent direct combustion of the secondary fuel. Each of these approaches requires substantial hardware and system modifications for efficient fuel utilization. The integration issues are discussed in the sections below and a recommended approach for gasification is presented.

1996-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Assessment of pulverized-coal-fired combustion performance: Final report for the period September 1980--September 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this program was to evaluate an engineering analysis procedure which could be used to assess the impact on thermal performance of converting gas and oil fired equipment to coal. The program consisted of four major tasks: (1) Engineering Analysis. The objective was to evaluate currently available models which could be used to predict combustor performance and to define a procedure which could be used to assess the impact of a coal firing in a boiler or furnace; (2) Reactor Studies. The purpose was to evaluate, under controlled conditions, the radiative properties of fly ash clouds; (3) Pilot Scale Experiments. This involved a combustion trial with gas and coals which were burned at 0.7 /times/ 10/sup 6/ Btu/hr in a pilot-scale combustor. The purpose was to verify and supplement the results of the small-scale reactor studies on the radiant properties of coal flames at larger scale; (4) Reporting. Engineering analysis procedures were used to identify those fuels related properties which had a major impact on the thermal performance of furnaces. The major result of the study is that thermal performance of coal-fired furnaces is dominated by the formation of fly ash deposits on the heat transfer surfaces. The key parameters which influence thermal performance are: thickness, thermal conductivity, and surface emissivity or absorptivity. 105 refs., 170 figs., 29 tabs.

Richter, W.F.; Clark, W.; Pohl, J.H.; Payne, R.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Program  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the original Request for Proposal was to establish the technological bases necessary for the subsequent commercial development and deployment of advanced coal-fueled gas turbine power systems by the private sector. The offeror was to identify the specific application or applications, toward which his development efforts would be directed; define and substantiate the technical, economic, and environmental criteria for the selected application; and conduct such component design, development, integration, and tests as deemed necessary to fulfill this objective. Specifically, the offeror was to choose a system through which ingenious methods of grouping subcomponents into integrated systems accomplishes the following: (1) Preserve the inherent power density and performance advantages of gas turbine systems. (2) System must be capable of meeting or exceeding existing and expected environmental regulations for the proposed application. (3) System must offer a considerable improvement over coal-fueled systems which are commercial, have been demonstrated, or are being demonstrated. (4) System proposed must be an integrated gas turbine concept, i.e., all fuel conditioning, all expansion gas conditioning, or post-expansion gas cleaning, must be integrated into the gas turbine system.

Horner, M.W.; Ekstedt, E.E.; Gal, E.; Jackson, M.R.; Kimura, S.G.; Lavigne, R.G.; Lucas, C.; Rairden, J.R.; Sabla, P.E.; Savelli, J.F.; Slaughter, D.M.; Spiro, C.L.; Staub, F.W.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Construction Begins on First-of-its-Kind Advanced Clean Coal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction Begins on First-of-its-Kind Advanced Clean Coal Electric Generating Facility Construction Begins on First-of-its-Kind Advanced Clean Coal Electric Generating Facility...

167

CO-FIRING COAL, FEEDLOT, AND LITTER BIOMASS (CFB AND LFB) FUELS IN PULVERIZED FUEL AND FIXED BED BURNERS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Intensive animal feeding operations create large amounts of animal waste that must be safely disposed of in order to avoid environmental degradation. Cattle feedlots and chicken houses are two examples. In feedlots, cattle are confined to small pens and fed a high calorie grain diet in preparation for slaughter. In chicken houses, thousands of chickens are kept in close proximity. In both of these operations, millions of tons of manure are produced every year. In this project a co-firing technology is proposed which would use manure that cannot be used for fertilizer, for power generation. Since the animal manure has economic uses as both a fertilizer and as a fuel, it is properly referred to as feedlot biomass (FB) for cow manure, or litter biomass (LB) for chicken manure. The biomass will be used a as a fuel by mixing it with coal in a 90:10 blend and firing it in existing coal fired combustion devices. This technique is known as co-firing, and the high temperatures produced by the coal will allow the biomass to be completely combusted. Therefore, it is the goal of the current research to develop an animal biomass cofiring technology. A cofiring technology is being developed by performing: (1) studies on fundamental fuel characteristics, (2) small scale boiler burner experiments, (3) gasifier experiments, (4) computer simulations, and (5) an economic analysis. The fundamental fuel studies reveal that biomass is not as high a quality fuel as coal. The biomass fuels are higher in ash, higher in moisture, higher in nitrogen and sulfur (which can cause air pollution), and lower in heat content than coal. Additionally, experiments indicate that the biomass fuels have higher gas content, release gases more readily than coal, and less homogeneous. Small-scale boiler experiments revealed that the biomass blends can be successfully fired, and NO{sub x} pollutant emissions produced will be similar to or lower than pollutant emissions when firing coal. This is a surprising result as the levels of N are higher in the biomass fuel than in coal. Further experiments showed that biomass is twice or more effective than coal when used in a reburning process to reduce NO{sub x} emissions. Since crushing costs of biomass fuels may be prohibitive, stoker firing may be cost effective; in order simulate such a firing, future work will investigate the performance of a gasifier when fired with larger sized coal and biomass. It will be a fixed bed gasifier, and will evaluate blends, coal, and biomass. Computer simulations were performed using the PCGC-2 code supplied by BYU and modified by A&M with three mixture fractions for handling animal based biomass fuels in order to include an improved moisture model for handling wet fuels and phosphorus oxidation. Finally the results of the economic analysis show that considerable savings can be achieved with the use of biomass. In the case of higher ash and moisture biomass, the fuel cost savings will be reduced, due to increased transportation costs. A spreadsheet program was created to analyze the fuel savings for a variety of different moisture levels, ash levels, and power plant operating parameters.

Kalyan Annamalai; John Sweeten; Saqib Mukhtar; Ben Thien; Gengsheng Wei; Soyuz Priyadarsan

2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

Pulverizer Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pulverizer Maintenance Guide, Volume 3: Ball/Tube Mills provides fossil plant personnel with current maintenance information on ball/tube mills from different manufacturers. This guide will assist a plant in improving the maintenance of their pulverizer mills.

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Credit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Credit Applications for 2007-2008 Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Credit Applications for 2007-2008 June 7, 2007 - 1:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Treasury Department and the Department of Energy (DOE) released today new instructions for applying for the tax credits for advanced coal projects and gasification projects. The new instructions provide additional time to submit applications for the credits. For the 2007-2008 allocation round, applications for DOE certification are not due to the Energy Department until October 31, 2007. "To further advance our nation's energy security, this Administration had made sustained investments in research, development, and wider use of

170

Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Credit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Credit Applications for 2007-2008 Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Credit Applications for 2007-2008 June 7, 2007 - 1:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Treasury Department and the Department of Energy (DOE) released today new instructions for applying for the tax credits for advanced coal projects and gasification projects. The new instructions provide additional time to submit applications for the credits. For the 2007-2008 allocation round, applications for DOE certification are not due to the Energy Department until October 31, 2007. "To further advance our nation's energy security, this Administration had made sustained investments in research, development, and wider use of

171

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hybrid combined cycle power plant natural gas combined cyclePower Plants study, Volume 1: Bituminous Coal and Natural Gas

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

COMBUSTION OF COAL IN AN OPPOSED FLOW DIFFUSION BURNER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and N.M. Laurendeau, "Gasification of Pulverized Coal Withininformation on the gasification and combustion of coal with

Chin, W.K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Operating Experience and Risk Assessment of Clean Coal Technologies 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent advances in ultra super-critical (USC) pulverized coal (PC) and atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) plants provide the base line competition for the newer clean coal technologies (CCTs). Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) are examples of CCTs now accumulating commercial experience.

1999-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

174

Operating Experience and Risk Assessment of Clean Coal Technologies -- 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent advances in ultra-supercritical (USC) pulverized coal (PC) and atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) plants provide the baseline competition for the newer clean coal technologies (CCTs). Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) are examples of CCTs now accumulating commercial experience.

2000-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

175

Technology status and project development risks of advanced coal power generation technologies in APEC developing economies  

SciTech Connect

The report reviews the current status of IGCC and supercritical/ultrasupercritical pulverized-coal power plants and summarizes risks associated with project development, construction and operation. The report includes an economic analysis using three case studies of Chinese projects; a supercritical PC, an ultrasupercritical PC, and an IGCC plant. The analysis discusses barriers to clean coal technologies and ways to encourage their adoption for new power plants. 25 figs., 25 tabs.

Lusica, N.; Xie, T.; Lu, T.

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Portfolio evaluation of advanced coal technology : research, development, and demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the advanced coal technology research, development and demonstration programs at the U.S. Department of Energy since the 1970s. The evaluation is conducted from a portfolio point of view and derives ...

Naga-Jones, Ayaka

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Modeling The NOx Emissions In A Low NOx Burner While Fired With Pulverized Coal And Dairy Biomass Blends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New regulations like the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) will pose greater challenges for Coal fired power plants with regards to pollution reduction. These new regulations plan to impose stricter limits on NOX reduction. The current regulations by themselves already require cleanup technology; newer regulations will require development of new and economical technologies. Using a blend of traditional fuels & biomass is a promising technology to reduce NOX emissions. Experiments conducted previously at the Coal and Biomass energy lab at Texas A&M reported that dairy biomass can be an effective Reburn fuel with NOX reduction of up to 95%; however little work has been done to model such a process with Feedlot Biomass as a blend with the main burner fuel. The present work concerns with development of a zero dimensional for a low NOx burner (LNB) model in order to predict NOX emissions while firing a blend of Coal and dairy biomass. Two models were developed. Model I assumes that the main burner fuel is completely oxidized to CO,CO2,H20 and fuel bound nitrogen is released as HCN, NH3, N2; these partially burnt product mixes with tertiary air, undergoes chemical reactions specified by kinetics and burns to complete combustion. Model II assumes that the main burner solid fuel along with primary and secondary air mixes gradually with recirculated gases, burn partially and the products from the main burner include partially burnt solid particles and fuel bound nitrogen partially converted to N2, HCN and NH3. These products mix gradually with tertiary air, undergo further oxidation-reduction reactions in order to complete the combustion. The results are based on model I. Results from the model were compared with experimental findings to validate it. Results from the model recommend the following conditions for optimal reduction of NOx: Equivalence Ratio should be above 0.95; mixing time should be below 100ms. Based on Model I, results indicate that increasing percentage of dairy biomass in the blend increases the NOx formation due to the assumption that fuel N compounds ( HCN, NH3) do not undergo oxidation in the main burner zone. Thus it is suggested that model II must be adopted in the future work.

Uggini, Hari

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Alstom's Chemical Looping Combustion Prototype for CO{sub 2} Capture from Existing Pulverized Coal-Fired Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

Alstom’s Limestone Chemical Looping (LCL™) process has the potential to capture CO{sub 2} from new and existing coal-fired power plants while maintaining high plant power generation efficiency. This new power plant concept is based on a hybrid combustion- gasification process utilizing high temperature chemical and thermal looping technology. This process could also be potentially configured as a hybrid combustion-gasification process producing a syngas or hydrogen for various applications while also producing a separate stream of CO{sub 2} for use or sequestration. The targets set for this technology is to capture over 90% of the total carbon in the coal at cost of electricity which is less than 20% greater than Conventional PC or CFB units. Previous work with bench scale test and a 65 kWt Process Development Unit Development (PDU) has validated the chemistry required for the chemical looping process and provided for the investigation of the solids transport mechanisms and design requirements. The objective of this project is to continue development of the combustion option of chemical looping (LCL-C™) by designing, building and testing a 3 MWt prototype facility. The prototype includes all of the equipment that is required to operate the chemical looping plant in a fully integrated manner with all major systems in service. Data from the design, construction, and testing will be used to characterize environmental performance, identify and address technical risks, reassess commercial plant economics, and develop design information for a demonstration plant planned to follow the proposed Prototype. A cold flow model of the prototype will be used to predict operating conditions for the prototype and help in operator training. Operation of the prototype will provide operator experience with this new technology and performance data of the LCL-C™ process, which will be applied to the commercial design and economics and plan for a future demonstration plant.

Andrus, Herbert; Chiu, John; Edberg, Carl; Thibeault, Paul; Turek, David

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

179

Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This program will merge significant advances made in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior. Comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors.

Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. (Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States) Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

ADVANCED SOLIDS NMR STUDIES OF COAL STRUCTURE AND CHEMISTRY  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utilization of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. The main activity during this granting period was a completion of a detailed comparative analysis of the suite of spectral editing techniques developed in our laboratory for this purpose. The appended report is a manuscript being submitted to the Journal of Magnetic Resonance on this subject.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

NETL: News Release - Tax Credit Program Promotes Advanced Coal Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

December 5, 2007 December 5, 2007 Tax Credit Program Promotes Advanced Coal Power Generation and Gasification Technologies DOE Will Assist Internal Revenue Service in Project Selection WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is partnering with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to evaluate five projects that have recently applied for tax credits under the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005). Accepted projects will help bring about rapid deployment of advanced coal-based power generation and gasification technologies and enable the clean and efficient use of coal, America's most abundant energy resource. In June 2007, the Treasury Department and DOE released revised guidance on the procedures for awarding the tax credits authorized under EPAct 2005 for qualifying advanced coal projects and qualifying gasification projects. Under the revised guidance, applications for DOE certification received before October 31, 2007, will be acted on in 2008.

182

DOE-Supported Project Advances Clean Coal, Carbon Capture Technology |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-Supported Project Advances Clean Coal, Carbon Capture DOE-Supported Project Advances Clean Coal, Carbon Capture Technology DOE-Supported Project Advances Clean Coal, Carbon Capture Technology January 29, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Researchers at The Ohio State University (OSU) have successfully completed more than 200 hours of continuous operation of their patented Coal-Direct Chemical Looping (CDCL) technology - a one-step process to produce both electric power and high-purity carbon dioxide (CO2). The test, led by OSU Professor Liang-Shih Fan, represents the longest integrated operation of chemical looping technology anywhere in the world to date. The test was conducted at OSU's 25 kilowatt thermal (kWt) CDCL combustion sub-pilot unit under the auspices of DOE's Carbon Capture Program, which is developing innovative environmental control technologies to foster the

183

DOE-Supported Project Advances Clean Coal, Carbon Capture Technology |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-Supported Project Advances Clean Coal, Carbon Capture DOE-Supported Project Advances Clean Coal, Carbon Capture Technology DOE-Supported Project Advances Clean Coal, Carbon Capture Technology January 29, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Researchers at The Ohio State University (OSU) have successfully completed more than 200 hours of continuous operation of their patented Coal-Direct Chemical Looping (CDCL) technology - a one-step process to produce both electric power and high-purity carbon dioxide (CO2). The test, led by OSU Professor Liang-Shih Fan, represents the longest integrated operation of chemical looping technology anywhere in the world to date. The test was conducted at OSU's 25 kilowatt thermal (kWt) CDCL combustion sub-pilot unit under the auspices of DOE's Carbon Capture Program, which is developing innovative environmental control technologies to foster the

184

Pulverizer Maintenance Guide, Volume 2: Babcock & Wilcox Roll Wheel Pulverizers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The "Pulverizer Maintenance Guide, Volume 2: B&W Roll Wheel™ Pulverizers" provides fossil plant personnel with current maintenance information on this specific mill design. This guide will assist a plant in improving the maintenance of their pulverizer mills.

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

185

Soviets welcome advanced coal mining technology  

SciTech Connect

The coal production target for the Soviet Union for 1985 is 770 - 800 million tonnes. In 1981, surface mining provided 38% of output, this should increase to 40% by 1985. Soviet coal reserves are quoted as 8.6 x 10/sup 12/ tons, of which 90% are in the east. Many of the deposits are in areas where climate and transportation pose major problems. The location of the principal coal deposits is shown and their reserves are indicated. The emphasis in future production will be on surface mining, in very large units.

Swiss, M.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Coal pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for pressurizing pulverized coal and circulating a carrier gas is disclosed. This device has utility in a coal gasification process and eliminates the need for a separate collection hopper and eliminates the separate compressor.

Bonin, John H. (Sunnyvale, CA); Meyer, John W. (Palo Alto, CA); Daniel, Jr., Arnold D. (Alameda County, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Pneumatic Transport of Pulverized Wood Pellets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of biomass fuels poses new issues for utilities seeking to employ these resources to augment their contributions to renewable energy. The direct combustion of biomass in a conventional utility boiler will almost always involve pneumatic transport and injection as is currently done with pulverized coal. However, differences in physical properties between biomass fuels and coal are evident. For instance, the large particle size range of a typical biomass fuel (13 mm) is far greater than that of pul...

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

188

ADVANCED SOLIDS NMR STUDIES OF COAL STRUCTURE AND CHEMISTRY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utilization of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. Our goals are twofold. First, we are interested in developing new methods that will enable us to measure important structural parameters in whole coals not directly accessible by other techniques. In parallel with these efforts we will apply these NMR methods in a study of the chemical differences between gas-sourcing and oil-sourcing coals. The NMR methods work will specifically focus on determination of the number and types of methylene groups, determination of the number and types of methane groups, identification of carbons adjacent to nitrogen and sites with exchangeable protons, and methods to more finely characterize the distribution of hydrogen in coals. The motivation for investigating these specific structural features of coals arises from their relevance to the chemical reactivity of coals, and their suitability for possible correlations with the oil sourcing potential of some types of coals. The coals to be studied and contrasted include oil-prone coals from Australia and Indonesia, those comprising the Argonne Premium Coal Sample bank, and other relevant samples. In this report period we have focused our work on 1 segment of the program. Our last report outlined progress in using our NMR editing methods with higher field operation where higher magic angle spinning rates are required. Significant difficulties were identified, and these have been the main subject of study during the most recent granting period.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Strategic evaluation of investments in coal-dust fuel for blast furnaces  

SciTech Connect

The paper discusses the evaluation of venture investment projects in pulverized coal injection into blast furnaces.

S.V. Bogdanov; S.M. Kornilaev [State University of Management, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Clean coal technologies market potential  

SciTech Connect

Looking at the growing popularity of these technologies and of this industry, the report presents an in-depth analysis of all the various technologies involved in cleaning coal and protecting the environment. It analyzes upcoming and present day technologies such as gasification, combustion, and others. It looks at the various technological aspects, economic aspects, and the various programs involved in promoting these emerging green technologies. Contents: Industry background; What is coal?; Historical background of coal; Composition of coal; Types of coal; Environmental effects of coal; Managing wastes from coal; Introduction to clean coal; What is clean coal?; Byproducts of clean coal; Uses of clean coal; Support and opposition; Price of clean coal; Examining clean coal technologies; Coal washing; Advanced pollution control systems; Advanced power generating systems; Pulverized coal combustion (PCC); Carbon capture and storage; Capture and separation of carbon dioxide; Storage and sequestration of carbon dioxide; Economics and research and development; Industry initiatives; Clean Coal Power Initiative; Clean Coal Technology Program; Coal21; Outlook; Case Studies.

Drazga, B. (ed.)

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

191

NETL: News Release - Clean Coal Technology Report Showcases Advanced Iron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 6, 2000 April 6, 2000 Clean Coal Technology Report Showcases Advanced Iron Making Process, Benefits for the Environment Topical Report Profiles Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection System; Now Available on DOE's Fossil Energy Web Site An advanced iron making technology demonstrated in the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program stands out for its potential to provide major environmental and financial benefits to the United States steel industry. Bethlehem Steel Topical Report The Energy Department has profiled the project in a topical report entitled Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection System Demonstration Project. The report describes the federal government's partnership demonstration project with Bethlehem Steel Corporation, which tested a new method for reducing

192

Flue Gas Cleanup at Temperatures about 1400 C for a Coal Fired Combined Cycle Power Plant: State and Perspectives in the Pressurized Pulverized Coal Combustion (PPCC) Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The PPCC technology, a combined cycle, requires comprehensive cleaning of the flue gases because coal contains a large variety of minerals and other substances. This would lead to fast destruction of the gas turbine blades due to erosion and corrosion. The present specifications of the turbine manufacturers for the required flue gas quality are at a maximum particulate content of 5 mg/m3 s.t.p., diameter of Kraftwerke GmbH, SaarEnergie GmbH, Siemens AG, and Steag AG.

Foerster, M.E.C.; Oeking, K.; Hannes, K.

2002-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

193

Engineering-Economic Evaluations of Advanced Coal Technologies with Carbon Capture and Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the current update in a continuing report series that distills the results of engineering and economic studies, by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and others, to furnish an overview of the expected costs and performance for fossil-fuel-based power plants with carbon dioxide capture and sequestration, including pulverized coal, fluidized-bed combustion, integrated gasification combined cycle, and natural gas combined cycle. The report surveys publicly reported cost estimates and statu...

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

194

Engineering/Economic Evaluations of Advanced Coal Technologies with Carbon Capture and Storage - 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the 2012 update in an annual report series that distills the results of engineering and economic studies by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and others to provide an overview of the expected costs and performance for fossil-fuel-based power plants with carbon capture and storage (CCS). Power plant types covered in the report include pulverized coal, fluidized-bed combustion, integrated-gasification combined-cycle, and natural-gas combined-cycle. The report surveys publicly ...

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

Engineering-Economic Evaluations of Advanced Coal Technologies with Carbon Capture and Storage -- 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the 2011 update in a continuing report series that distills the results of engineering and economic studies by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and others to furnish an overview of the expected costs and performance for fossil-fuel-based power plants with carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and sequestration, including pulverized coal, fluidized-bed combustion, integrated-gasification combined-cycle, and natural-gas combined-cycle plants. The report surveys publicly reported cost estimates a...

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

196

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system  

SciTech Connect

Advances in coal-fueled gas turbine technology over the past few years, together with recent DOE-METC sponsored studies, have served to provide new optimism that the problems demonstrated in the past can be economically resolved and that the coal-fueled gas turbine can ultimately be the preferred system in appropriate market application sectors. The objective of the Solar/METC program is to prove the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of a coal-fired gas turbine for cogeneration applications through tests of a Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal fuel throughout the engine design operating range. The five-year program consists of three phases, namely: (1) system description; (2) component development; (3) prototype system verification. A successful conclusion to the program will initiate a continuation of the commercialization plan through extended field demonstration runs.

LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

CoalFleet Advanced Combustion IGCC Permits Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CoalFleet Advanced Combustion IGCC Permits Database presents comprehensive information on permitting requirements and permit conditions for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants in an online database format. This Technical Update is a compilation of the Database contents as of March 31, 2008.

2008-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

198

Operating Experience, Risk, and Market Assessment of Advanced Coal Technologies: 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plans to build almost 15 GW of supercritical pulverized coal (PC) plants in the US were made during 2006. Conventional supercritical plants accounted for 76 percent of this capacity, and the others are ultra supercritical plants with main steam temperatures at, or just above, 590C (1100F). A driving force for the move from sub-critical designs is as a hedge against increasing fuel prices by increasing efficiency to lower coal consumption. At the same time this also lowers emission rates. Over 73 percent ...

2006-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

199

Drying of pulverized material with heated condensible vapor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for drying pulverized material utilizes a high enthalpy condensable vapor such as steam for removing moisture from the individual particles of the pulverized material. The initially wet particulate material is tangentially delivered by a carrier vapor flow to an upper portion of a generally vertical cylindrical separation drum. The lateral wall of the separation drum is provided with a plurality of flow guides for directing the vapor tangentially therein in the direction of particulate material flow. Positioned concentrically within the separation drum and along the longitudinal axis thereof is a water-cooled condensation cylinder which is provided with a plurality of collection plates, or fines, on the outer lateral surface thereof. The cooled collection fines are aligned counter to the flow of the pulverized material and high enthalpy vapor mixture to maximize water vapor condensation thereon. The condensed liquid which includes moisture removed from the pulverized materials then flows downward along the outer surface of the coolant cylinder and is collected and removed. The particles travel in a shallow helix due to respective centrifugal and vertical acceleration forces applied thereto. The individual particles of the pulverized material are directed outwardly by the vortex flow where they contact the inner cylindrical surface of the separation drum and are then deposited at the bottom thereof for easy collection and removal. The pulverized material drying apparatus is particularly adapted for drying coal fines and facilitates the recovery of the pulverized coal. 2 figs.

Carlson, L.W.

1984-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

200

Kinetic extruder - a dry pulverized solid material pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus are shown for the continuous feeding of pulverized material to a high pressure container. A rotor is located within the high pressure container. The pulverized material is fed from a feed hopper through a stationary feed pipe to a vented spin-up chamber to a plurality of two-stage sprues mounted in the rotor. Control nozzles downstream from the sprues meter the flow of coal through the sprues.

Meyer, John W. (Palo Alto, CA); Bonin, John H. (Sunnyvale, CA); Daniel, Jr., Arnold D. (Pleasanton, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Kinetic extruder - a dry pulverized solid material pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus are shown for the continuous feeding of pulverized material to a high pressure container. A rotor is located within the high pressure container. The pulverized material is fed from a feed hopper through a stationary feed pipe to a vented spin-up chamber to a plurality of two-stage sprues mounted in the rotor. Control nozzles downstream from the sprues meter the flow of coal through the sprues. 19 figs.

Meyer, J.W.; Bonin, J.H.; Daniel, A.D. Jr.

1983-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

NETL: News Release - DOE Advances Production of Hydrogen from Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 , 2006 6 , 2006 DOE Advances Production of Hydrogen from Coal Projects Selected to Address Technological Challenges of Hydrogen Production in Large-Scale Facilities WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy today announced the selection of six research and development projects that will promote the production of hydrogen from coal at large-scale facilities. This central approach will combat climate change by allowing for the capture - and subsequent sequestration - of carbon dioxide generated during hydrogen production. The selections support President Bush's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative, which provides funding for research and technology development to realize a future hydrogen economy that minimizes America's dependence on foreign oil and reduces greenhouse gas emissions.

203

Coal Direct Chemical Looping (CDCL) Process Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Direct Chemical Looping (CDCL) Retrofit to Pulverized Coal Power Plants for In-Situ CO 2 Capture William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering The Ohio...

204

Investigation of the Relationship Between Particulate Bound Mercury and Properties of Fly Ash in a Full-Scale 100 MWE Pulverized Coal Combustion Boiler.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??There is an increasing concern over mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. Coal-fired power generation accounts for approximately 33% of total mercury emission in the United… (more)

Li, Sen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

GEOTECHNICAL/GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ADVANCED COAL PROCESS WASTE STREAMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thirteen solid wastes, six coals and one unreacted sorbent produced from seven advanced coal utilization processes were characterized for task three of this project. The advanced processes from which samples were obtained included a gas-reburning sorbent injection process, a pressurized fluidized-bed coal combustion process, a coal-reburning process, a SO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, RO{sub x}, BOX process, an advanced flue desulfurization process, and an advanced coal cleaning process. The waste samples ranged from coarse materials, such as bottom ashes and spent bed materials, to fine materials such as fly ashes and cyclone ashes. Based on the results of the waste characterizations, an analysis of appropriate waste management practices for the advanced process wastes was done. The analysis indicated that using conventional waste management technology should be possible for disposal of all the advanced process wastes studied for task three. However, some wastes did possess properties that could present special problems for conventional waste management systems. Several task three wastes were self-hardening materials and one was self-heating. Self-hardening is caused by cementitious and pozzolanic reactions that occur when water is added to the waste. All of the self-hardening wastes setup slowly (in a matter of hours or days rather than minutes). Thus these wastes can still be handled with conventional management systems if care is taken not to allow them to setup in storage bins or transport vehicles. Waste self-heating is caused by the exothermic hydration of lime when the waste is mixed with conditioning water. If enough lime is present, the temperature of the waste will rise until steam is produced. It is recommended that self-heating wastes be conditioned in a controlled manner so that the heat will be safely dissipated before the material is transported to an ultimate disposal site. Waste utilization is important because an advanced process waste will not require ultimate disposal when it is put to use. Each task three waste was evaluated for utilization potential based on its physical properties, bulk chemical composition, and mineral composition. Only one of the thirteen materials studied might be suitable for use as a pozzolanic concrete additive. However, many wastes appeared to be suitable for other high-volume uses such as blasting grit, fine aggregate for asphalt concrete, road deicer, structural fill material, soil stabilization additives, waste stabilization additives, landfill cover material, and pavement base course construction.

Edwin S. Olson; Charles J. Moretti

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Advanced design nuclear power plants: Competitive, economical electricity. An analysis of the cost of electricity from coal, gas and nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an updated analysis of the projected cost of electricity from new baseload power plants beginning operation around the year 2000. Included in the study are: (1) advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants; (2) low emissions coal-fired power plants; (3) gasified coal-fired power plants; and (4) natural gas-fired power plants. This analysis shows that electricity from advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants will be economically competitive with all other baseload electric generating system alternatives. This does not mean that any one source of electric power is always preferable to another. Rather, what this analysis indicates is that, as utilities and others begin planning for future baseload power plants, advanced-design nuclear plants should be considered an economically viable option to be included in their detailed studies of alternatives. Even with aggressive and successful conservation, efficiency and demand-side management programs, some new baseload electric supply will be needed during the 1990s and into the future. The baseload generating plants required in the 1990s are currently being designed and constructed. For those required shortly after 2000, the planning and alternatives assessment process must start now. It takes up to ten years to plan, design, license and construct a new coal-fired or nuclear fueled baseload electric generating plant and about six years for a natural gas-fired plant. This study indicates that for 600-megawatt blocks of capacity, advanced-design nuclear plants could supply electricity at an average of 4.5 cents per kilowatt-hour versus 4.8 cents per kilowatt-hour for an advanced pulverized-coal plant, 5.0 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gasified-coal combined cycle plant, and 4.3 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gas-fired combined cycle combustion turbine plant.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Moving baseline for evaluation of advanced coal-extraction systems  

SciTech Connect

This document reports results from the initial effort to establish baseline economic performance comparators for a program whose intent is to define, develop, and demonstrate advanced systems suitable for coal resource extraction beyond the year 2000. Systems used in this study were selected from contemporary coal mining technology and from conservative conjectures of year 2000 technology. The analysis was also based on a seam thickness of 6 ft. Therefore, the results are specific to the study systems and the selected seam thickness. To be more beneficial to the program, the effort should be extended to other seam thicknesses. This document is one of a series which describe systems level requirements for advanced underground coal mining equipment. Five areas of performance are discussed: production cost, miner safety, miner health, environmental impact, and recovery efficiency. The projections for cost and production capability comprise a so-called moving baseline which will be used to assess compliance with the systems requirement for production cost. Separate projections were prepared for room and pillar, longwall, and shortwall technology all operating under comparable sets of mining conditions. This work is part of an effort to define and develop innovative coal extraction systems suitable for the significant resources remaining in the year 2000.

Bickerton, C.R.; Westerfield, M.D.

1981-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Integration of carbonate fuel cells with advanced coal gasification systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbonate fuel cells have attributes which make them ideally suited to operate on coal-derived fuel gas; they can convert the methane, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide present in coal derived fuel gas directly to electricity, are not subject to thermodynamic cycle limits as are heat engines, and operate at temperatures compatible with coal gasifiers. Some new opportunities for improved efficiency have been identified in integrated coal gasification/carbonate fuel cells which take advantage of low temperature catalytic coal gasification producing a methane-rich fuel gas, and the internal methane reforming capabilities of Energy Research Corporation's carbonate fuel cells. By selecting the appropriate operating conditions and catalyst in the gasifier, methane formation is maximized to improve gasification efficiency and to take advantage of the heat management aspects of the internal reforming carbonate fuel cell. These advanced integrated gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems are projected to have better efficiencies than gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems employing conventional gasification, and also competing non-fuel cell systems. These improved efficiencies would be accompanied by a corresponding reduction in impact on the environment as well.

Steinfeld, G. (Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States)); Meyers, S.J. (Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)); Hauserman, W.B. (North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Integration of carbonate fuel cells with advanced coal gasification systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbonate fuel cells have attributes which make them ideally suited to operate on coal-derived fuel gas; they can convert the methane, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide present in coal derived fuel gas directly to electricity, are not subject to thermodynamic cycle limits as are heat engines, and operate at temperatures compatible with coal gasifiers. Some new opportunities for improved efficiency have been identified in integrated coal gasification/carbonate fuel cells which take advantage of low temperature catalytic coal gasification producing a methane-rich fuel gas, and the internal methane reforming capabilities of Energy Research Corporation`s carbonate fuel cells. By selecting the appropriate operating conditions and catalyst in the gasifier, methane formation is maximized to improve gasification efficiency and to take advantage of the heat management aspects of the internal reforming carbonate fuel cell. These advanced integrated gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems are projected to have better efficiencies than gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems employing conventional gasification, and also competing non-fuel cell systems. These improved efficiencies would be accompanied by a corresponding reduction in impact on the environment as well.

Steinfeld, G. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States); Meyers, S.J. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States); Hauserman, W.B. [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Advanced Coal Power Plant Model (ACCPM) Version 1.1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the purchase of a license for the appropriate SimTech IPSEpro modules and library, users can quickly generate performance and capital cost estimates of new, advanced coal power plants. The application allows users to screen integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technologies prior to engaging in more extensive studies of their preferred choice. Such screening activities generally require sophisticated software and qualified staff to run the models, which takes time and significant investment....

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

211

Process for blending coal with water immiscible liquid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous process for blending coal with a water immiscible liquid produces a uniform, pumpable slurry. Pulverized raw feed coal and preferably a coal derived, water immiscible liquid are continuously fed to a blending zone (12 and 18) in which coal particles and liquid are intimately admixed and advanced in substantially plug flow to form a first slurry. The first slurry is withdrawn from the blending zone (12 and 18) and fed to a mixing zone (24) where it is mixed with a hot slurry to form the pumpable slurry. A portion of the pumpable slurry is continuously recycled to the blending zone (12 and 18) for mixing with the feed coal.

Heavin, Leonard J. (Olympia, WA); King, Edward E. (Gig Harbor, WA); Milliron, Dennis L. (Lacey, WA)

1982-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

212

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activity towards completing Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Phase I work was begun again in December. Effort to complete the Phase I work was temporarily suspended upon receipt of the ATS Phase II RFP the last week in August. The Westinghouse ATS team's efforts were directed at preparing the ATS Phase II proposal which was submitted November 18. It is planned to finish Phase I work and submit the topical report by the end of February 1993. The objective of the four slogging combustor tests conducted during this reporting period (i.e., tests SL3-1 through SL3-4) were to perform sulfur capture experiments using limestoneand iron oxide based sorbents and to collect exhaust vapor phase and solids bound alkali measurements using the Westinghouse and Ames Laboratory alkali probes/monitors. The most significant, if not outstanding result revealed by these tests is that the Ames alkali monitor indicates that the vapor phase sodium is approximately 23--30 ppbw and the vapor phase potassium is approximately 5--20 ppbw. For reference, alkalilevels of 20 ppbw are acceptable in Westinghouse gas turbines fueled with crude oil.

Not Available

1993-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

213

Suppression of fine ash formation in pulverized coal flames. Quarterly technical progress report No. 10, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The production of ash particles from coal combustion limits it`s use as a fuel. On mechanism by which small ash particles are formed is the generation of submicron aerosols through a vaporization/condensation mechanism. Previous work has shown that coal cleaning can lead to increased emissions of aerosols. This research will investigate the means or aerosol formation in coals and the effects that various methods of coal cleaning have on aerosol production, and whether or not cleaning can be performed in a manner that will not lend itself to aerosol formation.

Kramlich, J.C.; Chenevert, B.; Park, J.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Advanced Development Of The Coal Fired Oxyfuel Process With CO2...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal Fired Oxyfuel Process With CO2 Separation ADECOS Jump to: navigation, search Name Advanced Development Of The Coal-Fired Oxyfuel Process With CO2 Separation (ADECOS) Place...

215

Advanced Development Of The Coal Fired Oxyfuel Process With CO2 Separation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal Fired Oxyfuel Process With CO2 Separation Coal Fired Oxyfuel Process With CO2 Separation ADECOS Jump to: navigation, search Name Advanced Development Of The Coal-Fired Oxyfuel Process With CO2 Separation (ADECOS) Place Germany Product Dresden based initiative that has been formed to assess oxyfuel CCS technology. References Advanced Development Of The Coal-Fired Oxyfuel Process With CO2 Separation (ADECOS)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Advanced Development Of The Coal-Fired Oxyfuel Process With CO2 Separation (ADECOS) is a company located in Germany . References ↑ "Advanced Development Of The Coal-Fired Oxyfuel Process With CO2 Separation (ADECOS)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Advanced_Development_Of_The_Coal_Fired_Oxyfuel_Process_With_CO2_Separation_ADECOS&oldid=341776

216

Development of an advanced high efficiency coal combustor for boiler retrofit. Summary report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the program was to develop an advanced coal combustion system for firing beneficiated coal fuels (BCFs) capable of being retrofitted to industrial boilers originally designed for firing natural gas. The High Efficiency Advanced Coal Combustor system is capable of firing microfine coal-water fuel (MCWF), MCWF with alkali sorbent (for SO{sub 2} reduction), and dry microfine coal. Design priorities for the system were that it be simple to operate and offer significant reductions in NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and particulate emissions as compared with current coal-fired combustor technology. (VC)

LaFlesh, R.C.; Rini, M.J.; McGowan, J.G.; Beer, J.M.; Toqan, M.A.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Development of an advanced high efficiency coal combustor for boiler retrofit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the program was to develop an advanced coal combustion system for firing beneficiated coal fuels (BCFs) capable of being retrofitted to industrial boilers originally designed for firing natural gas. The High Efficiency Advanced Coal Combustor system is capable of firing microfine coal-water fuel (MCWF), MCWF with alkali sorbent (for SO{sub 2} reduction), and dry microfine coal. Design priorities for the system were that it be simple to operate and offer significant reductions in NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and particulate emissions as compared with current coal-fired combustor technology. (VC)

LaFlesh, R.C.; Rini, M.J.; McGowan, J.G.; Beer, J.M.; Toqan, M.A.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Steam Turbine Materials for Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lack of materials with the necessary fabricability and resistance to creep, oxidation, corrosion, and fatigue at the higher steam temperatures and pressures currently limits adoption of advanced ultra supercritical (USC) steam conditions in pulverized coal-fired plants. A major five-year national effort sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) to develop materials for USC boilers for operation at 760C (1400F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) has been in progress and is be...

2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

219

The Value of the Option to Capture and Store CO2 From Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Pulverized Coal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of different generation technologies are vying for the next round of generation investment including new coal generation, but new coal faces a number of challenges. While technology solutions are available to comply with currently contemplated regulations on SO2, NOX, and mercury, methods to capture and store CO2 are just beginning to be tested at small scale. Potential future climate policies that limit the emissions of CO2 by charging for CO2 emissions can significantly affect the cost of coal...

2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

220

NETL: CCPI - Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant - Project Brief PDF-78KB University of Kentucky Research Foundation, Ghent, Kentucky PROJECT FACT SHEET Advanced...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Economic feasibility study: CFR advanced direct coal liquefaction process. Volume 4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary technical and economic data are presented on the CFR Advanced Coal Liquefaction Process. Operating cost estimates and material balances are given.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Industrial Applications Advanced Cyclone Combustor with Internal Sulfur, Nitrogen, and Ash Control - Project Brief [PDF-302KB] Coal Tech Corp., Williamsport, PA PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Demonstration of an Advanced Cyclone Coal Combustor with Internal Sulfur Nitrogen, and Ash Control for the Conversion of a 23-MMBtu/Hour Oil Fired Boiler to Pulverized Coal (Aug 1991) Volume 1: Final Technical Report [PDF-5.9MB] Appendixes I through VI [PDF-8.9MB] CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports The Coal Tech Advanced Cyclone Combustor Demonstration Project -- A DOE Assessment [PDF-234KB] (May 1993) Environmental Reports Annual Environmental Report for The Demonstration of an Advanced Cyclone Coal Combustor, with Internal Sulfur, Nitrogen, and Ash Control for the Conversion of a 23 MMBtu/Hour Boiler to Coal [PDF-812KB] (Sept 1987)

223

Coal surface control for advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies. Final report, September 19, 1988--August 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This final report presents the research work carried out on the Coal Surface Control for Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning Technologies project, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE/PETC). The project was to support the engineering development of the selective agglomeration technology in order to reduce the sulfur content of US coals for controlling SO{sub 2} emissions (i.e., acid rain precursors). The overall effort was a part of the DOE/PETCs Acid Rain Control Initiative (ARCI). The overall objective of the project is to develop techniques for coal surface control prior to the advanced physical fine coal cleaning process of selective agglomeration in order to achieve 85% pyrite sulfur rejection at an energy recovery greater than 85% based on run-of-mine coal. The surface control is meant to encompass surface modification during grinding and laboratory beneficiation testing. The project includes the following tasks: Project planning; methods for analysis of samples; development of standard beneficiation test; grinding studies; modification of particle surface; and exploratory R&D and support. The coal samples used in this project include three base coals, Upper Freeport - Indiana County, PA, Pittsburgh NO. 8 - Belmont County, OH, and Illinois No. 6 - Randolph County, IL, and three additional coals, Upper Freeport - Grant County- WV, Kentucky No. 9 Hopkins County, KY, and Wyodak - Campbell County, WY. A total of 149 drums of coal were received.

Morsi, B.I.; Chiang, S.H.; Sharkey, A.; Blachere, J.; Klinzing, G.; Araujo, G.; Cheng, Y.S.; Gray, R.; Streeter, R.; Bi, H.; Campbell, P.; Chiarlli, P.; Ciocco, M.; Hittle, L.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.; Perez, L.; Venkatadri, R.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Markets for small-scale, advanced coal-combustion technologies  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the potential of using US-developed advanced coal technologies (ACTs) for small combustors in foreign markets; in particular, the market potentials of the member countries of the Organization of Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) were determined. First, the United States and those OECD countries with very low energy demands were eliminated. The remaining 15 countries were characterized on the basis of eight factors that would influence their decision to use US ACTs: energy plan and situation, dependence on oil and gas imports, experience with coal, residential/commercial energy demand, industrial energy demand, trade relationship with the United States, level of domestic competition with US ACT manufacturers, and environmental pressure to use advanced technology. Each country was rated high, medium-high, low-medium, or low on each factor, based on statistical and other data. The ratings were then used to group the countries in terms of their relative market potential (good, good but with impediments, or limited). The best potential markets appear to be Spain, Italy, turkey, Greece, and Canada. 25 refs., 1 fig., 37 tabs.

Placet, M.; Kenkeremath, L.D.; Streets, D.G.; Dials, G.E.; Kern, D.M.; Nehring, J.L.; Szpunar, C.B.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Engineering design and analysis of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies  

SciTech Connect

This project is sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for the Engineering Design and Analysis of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning Technologies. The major goal is to provide the simulation tools for modeling both conventional and advanced coal cleaning technologies. This DOE project is part of a major research initiative by the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) aimed at advancing three advanced coal cleaning technologies-heavy-liquid cylconing, selective agglomeration, and advanced froth flotation through the proof-of-concept (POC) level.

1992-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

226

NETL: Gasification - Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas Processing Systems Syngas Processing Systems Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Coal Gasification Praxair Inc. Project Number: FE0004908 Project Description Praxair is conducting research to develop hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) technology to separate carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen (H2) in coal-derived syngas for IGCC applications. The project team has fabricated palladium based membranes and measured hydrogen fluxes as a function of pressure, temperature, and membrane preparation conditions. Membranes are a commercially-available technology in the chemical industry for CO2 removal and H2 purification. There is, however, no commercial application of membrane processes that aims at CO2 capture for IGCC syngas. Due to the modular nature of the membrane process, the design does not exhibit economy of scale-the cost of the system will increase linearly as the plant system scale increases making the use of commercially available membranes, for an IGCC power plant, cost prohibitive. For a membrane process to be a viable CO2 capture technology for IGCC applications, a better overall performance is required, including higher permeability, higher selectivity, and lower membrane cost.

227

Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Program. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the original Request for Proposal was to establish the technological bases necessary for the subsequent commercial development and deployment of advanced coal-fueled gas turbine power systems by the private sector. The offeror was to identify the specific application or applications, toward which his development efforts would be directed; define and substantiate the technical, economic, and environmental criteria for the selected application; and conduct such component design, development, integration, and tests as deemed necessary to fulfill this objective. Specifically, the offeror was to choose a system through which ingenious methods of grouping subcomponents into integrated systems accomplishes the following: (1) Preserve the inherent power density and performance advantages of gas turbine systems. (2) System must be capable of meeting or exceeding existing and expected environmental regulations for the proposed application. (3) System must offer a considerable improvement over coal-fueled systems which are commercial, have been demonstrated, or are being demonstrated. (4) System proposed must be an integrated gas turbine concept, i.e., all fuel conditioning, all expansion gas conditioning, or post-expansion gas cleaning, must be integrated into the gas turbine system.

Horner, M.W.; Ekstedt, E.E.; Gal, E.; Jackson, M.R.; Kimura, S.G.; Lavigne, R.G.; Lucas, C.; Rairden, J.R.; Sabla, P.E.; Savelli, J.F.; Slaughter, D.M.; Spiro, C.L.; Staub, F.W.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems: Technical progress report No. 16, July-September 1996  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Project is the expedited commercialization of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. The Project is under budget and generally on schedule. The current status is shown in the Milestone Schedule Status Report included as Appendix A. Under Task 7--Component development and optimization, the CeraMem filter testing was completed. Due to an unacceptably high flue gas draft loss, which will not be resolved in the POCTF timeframe, a decision was made to change the design of the flue gas cleaning system from Hot SNO{sub x}{sup {trademark}} to an advanced dry scrubber called New Integrated Desulfurization (NID). However, it is recognized that the CeraMem filter still has the potential to be viable in pulverized coal systems. In Task 8-- Preliminary POCTF design, integrating and optimizing the performance and design of the boiler, turbine/generator and heat exchangers of the Kalina cycle as well as the balance of plant design were completed. Licensing activities continued. A NID system was substituted for the SNO{sub x} Hot Process.

Barcikowski, G.F.; Borio, R.W.; Bozzuto, C.R.; Burr, D.H.; Cellilli, L.; Fox, J.D.; Gibbons, T.B.; Hargrove, M.J.; Jukkola, G.D.; King, A.M.

1996-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

229

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial Readiness for Coal Power – Revisited. Powerof New Zealand industrial coals. Energy News, 16(3), p. 69-elements during pulverized coal combustion. Energy & Fuels,

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Advanced coal-gasification technical analyses. Appendix 2: coal fines disposal. Final report, December 1982-September 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of several studies conducted by KRSI under the Advanced Coal Gasification Technical Analyses contract with GRI. It addresses the issue of disposal and/or utilization of the coal fines that cannot be used as feedstock for fixed-bed (i.e. Lurgi) gasifiers. Specific items addressed are: (1) Technical, legal and economic aspects of fines burial, (2) Estimation of the premium for fines-free coal delivered to an SNG plant and resulting reduction in SNG production costs, (3) Comparison of the relative advantages and limitations of Winkler and GKT gasifiers to consuming fines, (4) Review of coal-size consist curves in the GRI Guidelines to assess the fines content of ROM coals, (5) a first-pass design and cost estimate using GKT gasifiers in tandem with Lurgi gasifiers in an North Dakota lignite-to-SNG plant to consume full range of coal-size consist, (6) Evaluation of the General Electric technology for extrusion of coal fines and testing of the extrudates in a fixed-bed gasifier, and (7) Investigation of equipment and variables involved in briquetting of coal fines, such that fines could be fed to the gasifiers along with the lump coal.

Cover, A.E.; Hubbard, D.A.; Jain, S.K.; Shah, K.V.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

New Projects Set to Target Efficiency, Environmental Gains at Advanced Coal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Projects Set to Target Efficiency, Environmental Gains at Projects Set to Target Efficiency, Environmental Gains at Advanced Coal Gasification Facilities New Projects Set to Target Efficiency, Environmental Gains at Advanced Coal Gasification Facilities July 27, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- Four projects that will demonstrate an innovative technology that could eventually enhance hydrogen fuel production, lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, improve efficiencies and lower consumer electricity costs from advanced coal gasification power systems have been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The projects will test membrane technology to separate hydrogen and carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal or coal/biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas), such as from Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power systems.

232

Low-rank coal research: Volume 2, Advanced research and technology development: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Volume II contains articles on advanced combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation; coal/char reactivity; liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, and fine particulate emissions. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

Mann, M.D.; Swanson, M.L.; Benson, S.A.; Radonovich, L.; Steadman, E.N.; Sweeny, P.G.; McCollor, D.P.; Kleesattel, D.; Grow, D.; Falcone, S.K.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Construction Begins on First-of-its-Kind Advanced Clean Coal Electric  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction Begins on First-of-its-Kind Advanced Clean Coal Construction Begins on First-of-its-Kind Advanced Clean Coal Electric Generating Facility Construction Begins on First-of-its-Kind Advanced Clean Coal Electric Generating Facility September 10, 2007 - 3:16pm Addthis ORLANDO, Fla. - Officials representing the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Southern Company, KBR Inc. and the Orlando Utilities Commission (OUC) today broke ground to begin construction of an advanced 285-megawatt integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) facility near Orlando, Fla. The new generating station will be among the cleanest, most efficient coal-fueled power plants in the world. Southern Company will operate the facility through its Southern Power subsidiary, which builds, owns, and manages the company's competitive generation assets. It will be located at OUC's Stanton Energy Center in

234

Advanced turbine design for coal-fueled engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this task is to perform a technical assessment of turbine blading for advanced second generation PFBC conditions, identify specific problems/issues, and recommend an approach for solving any problems identified. A literature search was conducted, problems associated with hot corrosion defined and limited experiments performed. Sulfidation corrosion occurs in industrial, marine and aircraft gas turbine engines and is due to the presence of condensed alkali (sodium) sulfates. The principle source of the alkali in industrial, marine and aircraft gas turbine engines is sea salt crystals. The principle source of the sulfur is not the liquid fuels, but the same ocean born crystals. Moreover deposition of the corrosive salt occurs primarily by a non-equilibrium process. Sodium will be present in the cleaned combusted gases that enter the PFBC turbine. Although equilibrium condensation is not favored, deposition via impaction is probable. Marine gas turbines operate in sodium chloride rich environments without experiencing the accelerated attack noted in coal fired boilers where condensed chlorides contact metallic surfaces. The sulfates of calcium and magnesium are the products of the reactions used to control sulfur. Based upon industrial gas turbine experience and laboratory tests, calcium and magnesium sulfates are, at temperatures up to 1500[degrees]F (815[degrees]C), relatively innocuous salts. In this study it is found that at 1650[degrees]F (900[degrees]C) and above, calcium sulfate becomes an aggressive corrodent.

Bornstein, N.S.

1992-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

235

ADVANCED HETEROGENEOUS REBURN FUEL FROM COAL AND HOG MANURE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was performed to investigate whether the nitrogen content inherent in hog manure and alkali used as a catalyst during processing could be combined with coal to produce a reburn fuel that would result in advanced reburning NO{sub x} control without the addition of either alkali or ammonia/urea. Fresh hog manure was processed in a cold-charge, 1-gal, batch autoclave system at 275 C under a reducing atmosphere in the presence of an alkali catalyst. Instead of the expected organic liquid, the resulting product was a waxy solid material. The waxy nature of the material made size reduction and feeding difficult as the material agglomerated and tended to melt, plugging the feeder. The material was eventually broken up and sized manually and a water-cooled feeder was designed and fabricated. Two reburn tests were performed in a pilot-scale combustor. The first test evaluated a reburn fuel mixture comprising lignite and air-dried, raw hog manure. The second test evaluated a reburn fuel mixture made of lignite and the processed hog manure. Neither reburn fuel reduced NO{sub x} levels in the combustor flue gas. Increased slagging and ash deposition were observed during both reburn tests. The material-handling and ash-fouling issues encountered during this study indicate that the use of waste-based reburn fuels could pose practical difficulties in implementation on a larger scale.

Melanie D. Jensen; Ronald C. Timpe; Jason D. Laumb

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes. Annual report, October 1990--September 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This program will merge significant advances made in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior. Comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors.

Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. [Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States)]|[Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

237

Advanced Coal Power Systems with CO2 Capture: EPRI's CoalFleet for Tomorrow® Vision—2011 Upd ate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has examined current and potential options for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the electric sector. EPRIs analysis shows that a significant contribution from advanced coal power systems with carbon capture and storage (CCS) will likely be required to achieve economical GHG reductions; however, CCS technology has not yet been deployed at commercial scale.

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

238

Comparative Assessment of Coal-and Natural Gas-fired Power Plants under a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparative Assessment of Coal- and Natural Gas-fired Power Plants under a CO2 Emission Performance standard (EPS) for pulverized coal (PC) and natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants; · Evaluate · Coal-fired Power Plant: Supercritical pulverized coal (SC PC) Illinois #6 Coal Capacity Factor 75

239

Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study are to establish the mechanisms and rates of basic steps in coal conversion processes, to integrate and incorporate this information into comprehensive computer models for coal conversion processes, to evaluate these models and to apply them to gasification, mild gasification and combustion in heat engines.

Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. (Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States)); Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. (Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Coal combustion science. Quarterly progress report, April 1993--June 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a quarterly status report of the Coal Combustion Science Project that is being conducted at the Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories. The information reported is for Apr-Jun 1993. The objective of this work is to support the Office of Fossil Energy in executing research on coal combustion science. This project consists of basic research on coal combustion that supports both the PETC Direct Utilization Advanced Research and Technology Development Program, and the International Energy Agency Coal Combustion Science Project. The objective of the kinetics and mechanisms of pulverized coal char combustion task is to characterize the combustion behavior of selected US coals under conditions relevant to industrial pulverized coal-fired furnaces. Work is being done in four areas: kinetics of heterogeneous fuel particle populations; char combustion kinetics at high carbon conversion; the role of particle structure and the char formation process in combustion and; unification of the Sandia char combustion data base. This data base on the high temperature reactivities of chars from strategic US coals will permit identification of important fuel-specific trends and development of predictive capabilities for advanced coal combustion systems. The objective of the fate of inorganic material during coal combustion task is the establish a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms and rates of transformation, fragmentation, and deposition of inorganic material during coal combustion as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, the initial forms and distribution of inorganic species in the unreacted coal, and the local gas temperature and composition. In addition, optical diagnostic capabilities are being developed for in situ, real-time detection of inorganic vapor species and surface species during ash deposition. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Hardesty, D.R. [ed.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

THE SCALE-UP OF LARGE PRESSURIZED FLUIDIZED BEDS FOR ADVANCED COAL-FIRED POWER PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor an agency thereof, nor any of the their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, A combined-cycle High Performance Power System (HIPPS) capable of overall cycle efficiencies approaching 50% has been proposed and designed by Foster Wheeler Development Corporation (FWDC). A pyrolyzer in the first stage of the HIPPS process converts a coal feedstock into fuel gas and char at an elevated pressure of 1.4 Map. (206 psia) and elevated temperature of 930 C (1700 F). The generated char serves as the feedstock for a Pulverized Coal (PC) boiler operating at atmospheric pressure, and the fuel gas is directly fired in a gas turbine. The hydrodynamic behavior of the pyrolyzer strongly influences the quality of both the fuel gas and the generated char, the energy split between the gas turbine and the steam turbine, and hence the overall efficiency of the system. By utilizing a simplified set of scaling parameters (Glicksman et al.,1993), a 4/7th labscale cold model of the pyrolyzer operating at ambient temperature and pressure was constructed and tested. The scaling parameters matched include solid to gas density ratio, Froude number, length to diameter ratio; dimensionless superficial gas velocity and solid recycle rate, particle sphericity and particle size distribution (PSD).

Leon R. Glicksman; Michael Louge; Hesham F. Younis; Richard Tan; Mathew Hyre; Mark Torpey

2003-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

242

Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

coAl utilizAtion By-Product Processing PlAnt (withdrAwn) Project Description The University of Kentucky Research Foundation (UKRF) of Lexington, Kentucky, in partnership...

243

DOE-Supported Project Advances Clean Coal, Carbon Capture Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2. OSU reports that the CDCL plant's 200+ hours of operation, using metallurgical coke and subbituminous and lignite coals, shows the robustness of its novel moving-bed...

244

Engineering/Economic Evaluations of Advanced Coal Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The continued escalation of power plant capital costs, legislative uncertainty with regard to CO2 emissions regulation, and widely fluctuating fuel prices make this an extremely challenging time for the power industry as they seek to make decisions on multi-billion dollar investments in needed new power plants. In this report the capital and operating costs, performance, and Costs of Electricity (COE) are estimated for various coals, locations, and coal technologies (PC, CFB and IGCC with and without CO2...

2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

245

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the Solar/METC program is to prove the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of coal-fired gas turbine for cogeneration applications through tests of a Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal fuel throughout the engine design operating range. This quarter, work was centered on design, fabrication, and testing of the combustor, cleanup, fuel specifications, and hot end simulation rig. 2 refs., 59 figs., 29 tabs.

LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama. Technical progress report, Run 243 with Illinois 6 coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the operating results for Run 243 at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R and D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. This run was made in an Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (ITSL) mode using Illinois 6 coal from the Burning Star mine. The primary objective was to demonstrate the effect of a dissolver on the ITSL product slate, especially on the net C/sub 1/-C/sub 5/ gas production and hydrogen consumption. Run 243 began on 3 February 1983 and continued through 28 June 1983. During this period, 349.8 tons of coal was fed in 2947 hours of operation. Thirteen special product workup material balances were defined, and the results are presented herein. 29 figures, 19 tables.

Not Available

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Pulverized Coal OxyCombustion Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HHV Higher heating value hp Horsepower HP High pressure HRSG Heat Recovery Steam Generator HSS Heat stable salts HVAC Heating, ventilating, and air conditioning HWT Hot water...

248

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems reference system definition update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the the Direct Coal-Fueled 80 MW Combustion Turbine Program is to establish the technology required for private sector use of an advanced coal-fueled combustion turbine power system. Under this program the technology for a direct coal-fueled 80 MW combustion turbine is to be developed. This unit would be an element in a 207 MW direct coal-fueled combustion turbine combined cycle which includes two combustion turbines, two heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. Key to meeting the program objectives is the development of a successful high pressure slagging combustor that burns coal, while removing sulfur, particulates, and corrosive alkali matter from the combustion products. Westinghouse and Textron (formerly AVCO Research Laboratory/Textron) have designed and fabricated a subscale slagging combustor. This slagging combustor, under test since September 1988, has been yielding important experimental data, while having undergone several design iterations.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Numerical Simulation Of Utility Boilers With Advanced Combustion Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents calculations of a pulverized coal flame and a coal-fired utility boiler with advanced combustion technologies. A combustion model based on an extended Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC) combined with finite rate chemistry is described and some applications are shown. This model can be regarded as an extension of the previously used Eddy Breakup model (EBU) where infinite fast chemistry is assumed. It is part of a 3D-prediction code for quasi-stationary turbulent reacting flows which is based on a conservative finite-volume solution procedure. Equations are solved for the conservation of mass, momentum and scalar quantities. A domain decomposition method is used to introduce locally refined grids. Validation and comparison of both combustion models are made by comparison with measurement data of a swirled flame with air staging in a semi-industrial pulverized coal combustion facility. The application to three-dimensional combustion systems is demonstrated by the simulati...

H. C. Magel; R. Schneider; B. Risio; U. Schnell; K. R. G. Hein

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Clean Coal Power Initiative Round 1 Demonstration Projects Applying Advanced Technologies to Lower Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 JUNE 2012 7 JUNE 2012 Clean Coal Power Initiative Round 1 Demonstration Projects Applying Advanced Technologies to Lower Emissions and Improve Efficiency 2 Cover Photos: * Top left: Great River Energy's Coal Creek Station * Top right: We Energy's Presque Isle Power Plant * Bottom: Dynegy's Baldwin Energy Complex A report on three projects conducted under separate cooperative agreements between the U.S. Department of Energy and: * Great River Energy * NeuCo. , Inc. * WeEnergies 3 Executive Summary 4 Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program 5 CCPI Program 6 Demonstration of Integrated Optimization Software at

251

Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume III  

SciTech Connect

A generalized one-dimensional, heterogeneous, steady-state, fixed-bed model for coal gasification and combustion is presented. The model, FBED-1, is a design and analysis tool that can be used to simulate a variety of gasification, devolatilization, and combustion processes. The model considers separate gas and solid temperatures, axially variable solid and gas flow rates, variable bed void fraction, coal drying, devolatilization based on chemical functional group composition, depolymerization, vaporization and crosslinking, oxidation, and gasification of char, and partial equilibrium in the gas phase.

Ghani, M.U.; Hobbs, M.L.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology jointly sponsored research  

SciTech Connect

Accomplishments for the quarter are presented for the following areas of research: oil shale, tar sand, coal, advanced exploratory process technology, and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research includes; oil shale process studies, environmental base studies for oil shale, and miscellaneous basic concept studies. Tar sand research covers process development. Coal research includes; underground coal gasification, coal combustion, integrated coal processing concepts, and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes; advanced process concepts, advanced mitigation concepts, and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesa Verde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced recovery techniques; and menu driven access to the WDEQ Hydrologic Data Management Systems.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE EIA WEEKLY COAL ... Coal Prices and Earnings (updated April 28, 2004) Spot coal prices in the East rose steadily since Labor Day 2003, with rapid escalations ...

254

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE EIA WEEKLY COAL ... Coal Prices and Earnings (updated September 26) The average spot prices for reported coal purchases rose once again ...

255

Upgraded Coal Interest Group. Technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report presents information from the coal interest group. Topics of discussion at the meeting included the current political views concerning the Department of Energy and programs contained therein. The group met on January 10 and 11, in Nashville, TN. The status of various coal upgrading technologies was also reviewed. Four new technology opportunities were given reviews, Coal/Waste pellets, Custom Coals advanced technology, CSRC sulfur removing bacteria and a Mag-Mill which is a magnetic separation done within the pulverizer. Coal Waste pellets is a technology for making pellets of coal and fiber waste from recycling plants. The incentives are low cost and low sulfur and nitrogen. Lebowitz made a field trip to the pilot unit in Canton Ohio. The Mag Mill takes advantage of the natural concentration of pyrite in the pulverizer recycle stream (due to its hardness). Special magnets are installed in the mill to remove pyrite from this stream. Custom Coals reported on an advanced two step process for removal of organic sulfur from coal. Consolidated Sulfur Reduction Co. reported on a two step microbial desulfurization process.

Weber, W. [Electric Power Research Institute, Chattanooga, TN (United States); Lebowitz, H.E. [Fossil Fuel Sciences, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal Prices and Earnings (updated August 12) According to Platts Coal Outlook’s Weekly Price Survey (August 11), the ...

257

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal Prices and Earnings (updated September 2) The average spot prices for coal traded last week were relatively ...

258

Steam Turbine Materials for Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lack of materials that can be readily fabricated and that are resistant to creep, oxidation, corrosion, and fatigue at higher steam temperatures and pressures limits adoption of advanced ultrasupercritical (USC) steam conditions in pulverized coal-fired plants. An ongoing major five-year national effort8212sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO)8212to develop materials for USC boilers for operation at 760C (1400F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) is being carried ou...

2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

259

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the activity during the period from 2 June 1991 to 1 June 1992. The major areas of work include: the combustor sub-scale and full size testing, cleanup, coal fuel specification and processing, the Hot End Simulation rig and design of the engine parts required for use with the coal-fueled combustor island. To date Solar has demonstrated: Stable and efficient combustion burning coal-water mixtures using the Two Stage Slagging Combustor; Molten slag removal of over 97% using the slagging primary and the particulate removal impact separator; and on-site preparation of CWM is feasible. During the past year the following tasks were completed: The feasibility of on-site CWM preparation was demonstrated on the subscale TSSC. A water-cooled impactor was evaluated on the subscale TSSC; three tests were completed on the full size TSSC, the last one incorporating the PRIS; a total of 27 hours of operation on CWM at design temperature were accumulated using candle filters supplied by Refraction through Industrial Pump Filter; a target fuel specification was established and a fuel cost model developed which can identify sensitivities of specification parameters; analyses of the effects of slag on refractory materials were conducted; and modifications continued on the Hot End Simulation Rig to allow extended test times.

LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; When, C.S.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Projects Aimed at Advancing State-of-the-Art Carbon Capture from Coal Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Projects Aimed at Advancing State-of-the-Art Carbon Capture from Projects Aimed at Advancing State-of-the-Art Carbon Capture from Coal Power Plants Selected for Further Development Projects Aimed at Advancing State-of-the-Art Carbon Capture from Coal Power Plants Selected for Further Development August 15, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Four projects aimed at reducing the energy and cost penalties of advanced carbon capture systems applied to power plants have been selected for further development by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (FE). Valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million in non-federal cost sharing) over four years, the overall goal of the research is to develop carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and separation technologies that can achieve at least 90 percent CO2 removal at no more than a 35 percent

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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261

Assessment of coal gasification/hot gas cleanup based advanced gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect

The major objectives of the joint SCS/DOE study of air-blown gasification power plants with hot gas cleanup are to: (1) Evaluate various power plant configurations to determine if an air-blown gasification-based power plant with hot gas cleanup can compete against pulverized coal with flue gas desulfurization for baseload expansion at Georgia Power Company's Plant Wansley; (2) determine if air-blown gasification with hot gas cleanup is more cost effective than oxygen-blown IGCC with cold gas cleanup; (3) perform Second-Law/Thermoeconomic Analysis of air-blown IGCC with hot gas cleanup and oxygen-blown IGCC with cold gas cleanup; (4) compare cost, performance, and reliability of IGCC based on industrial gas turbines and ISTIG power island configurations based on aeroderivative gas turbines; (5) compare cost, performance, and reliability of large (400 MW) and small (100 to 200 MW) gasification power plants; and (6) compare cost, performance, and reliability of air-blown gasification power plants using fluidized-bed gasifiers to air-blown IGCC using transport gasification and pressurized combustion.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system. Annual report, June 1990--June 1991  

SciTech Connect

Advances in coal-fueled gas turbine technology over the past few years, together with recent DOE-METC sponsored studies, have served to provide new optimism that the problems demonstrated in the past can be economically resolved and that the coal-fueled gas turbine can ultimately be the preferred system in appropriate market application sectors. The objective of the Solar/METC program is to prove the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of a coal-fired gas turbine for cogeneration applications through tests of a Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal fuel throughout the engine design operating range. The five-year program consists of three phases, namely: (1) system description; (2) component development; (3) prototype system verification. A successful conclusion to the program will initiate a continuation of the commercialization plan through extended field demonstration runs.

LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (ABB CE) to perform work on the Engineering Development of Advanced Coal-Fired Low-Emission Boiler Systems'' Project and has authorized ABB CE to complete Phase I on a cost-reimbursable basis. The overall objective of the Project is the expedited commercialization of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. The specified primary objectives are: NO[sub x] emissions not greater than one-third NSPS; SO[sub x] emissions not greater than one-third NSPS; and particulate emissions not greater than one-half NSPS. The specific secondary objectives are: Improved ash disposability and reduced waste generation; reduced air toxics emissions; increased generating efficiency. The final deliverables are a design data base that will allow future coal-fired power plants to meet the stated objectives and a preliminary design of a commercial generation unit.

Not Available

1993-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

264

The Coal-Seq Consortium: Advancing the Science of Carbon Dioxide...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Suite 520 Houston, TX 77077-6841 281-558-9200 (extension 1) sreeves@adv-res-hou.com The Coal-Seq ConSorTium: advanCing The SCienCe of Carbon dioxide SequeSTraTion in deep,...

265

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research  

SciTech Connect

Accomplishments for the past quarter are presented for the following five tasks: oil shale; tar sand; coal; advanced exploratory process technology; and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research covers oil shale process studies. Tar sand research is on process development of Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) Process. Coal research covers: coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts;advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process; NMR analysis of samples from the ocean drilling program; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; and solid state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens.

Speight, J.G.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED PHYSICAL FINE COAL CLEANING FOR PREMIUM FUEL APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Bechtel, together with Amax Research and Development Center (Amax R&D), has prepared this study which provides conceptual cost estimates for the production of premium quality coal-water slurry fuel (CWF) in a commercial plant. Two scenarios are presented, one using column flotation technology and the other the selective agglomeration to clean the coal to the required quality specifications. This study forms part of US Department of Energy program ?Engineering Development of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning for Premium Fuel Applications,? (Contract No. DE-AC22- 92PC92208), under Task 11, Project Final Report. The primary objective of the Department of Energy program is to develop the design base for prototype commercial advanced fine coal cleaning facilities capable of producing ultra-clean coals suitable for conversion to stable and highly loaded CWF. The fuels should contain less than 2 lb ash/MBtu (860 grams ash/GJ) of HHV and preferably less than 1 lb ash/MBtu (430 grams ash/GJ). The advanced fine coal cleaning technologies to be employed are advanced column froth flotation and selective agglomeration. It is further stipulated that operating conditions during the advanced cleaning process should recover not less than 80 percent of the carbon content (heating value) in the run-of-mine source coal. These goals for ultra-clean coal quality are to be met under the constraint that annualized coal production costs does not exceed $2.5 /MBtu ($ 2.37/GJ), including the mine mouth cost of the raw coal. A further objective of the program is to determine the distribution of a selected suite of eleven toxic trace elements between product CWF and the refuse stream of the cleaning processes. Laboratory, bench-scale and Process Development Unit (PDU) tests to evaluate advanced column flotation and selective agglomeration were completed earlier under this program with selected coal samples. A PDU with a capacity of 2 st/h was designed by Bechtel and installed at Amax R&D, Golden, Colorado by Entech Global for process evaluation tests. The tests successfully demonstrated the capability of advanced column flotation as well as selective agglomeration to produce ultra-clean coal at specified levels of purity and recovery efficiency. Test results and the experience gained during the operation of the PDU have provided valuable insights into the processes studied. Based on the design data obtained from the test work and a set of project design criteria, two sets of conceptual designs for commercial CWF production plants have been developed, one using column flotation and the other using selective agglomeration process. Using these designs, Capital as well as Operating and Maintenance (O&M) cost estimates for the plants have been compiled. These estimates have then been used to derive the annualized cost of production of premium CWF on a commercial scale. Further, a series of sensitivity analysis have been completed to evaluate the effects of variations in selected cost components and process parameters on the overall economics of premium fuel production

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

The fate of alkali species in advanced coal conversion systems  

SciTech Connect

The fate of species during coal combustion and gasification was determined experimentally in a fluidized bed reactor. A molecular-beam sampling mags spectrometer was used to identify and measure the concentration of vapor phase sodium species in the high temperature environment. Concurrent collection and analysis of the ash established the distribution of sodium species between gas-entrained and residual ash fractions. Two coals, Beulah Zap lignite and Illinois No. 6 bituminous, were used under combustion and gasification conditions at atmospheric pressure. Steady-state bed temperatures were in the range 800--950[degree]C. An extensive calibration procedure ensured that the mass spectrometer was capable of detecting sodium-containing vapor species at concentrations as low as 50 ppb. In the temperature range 800[degree] to 950[degree]C, the concentrations of vapor phase sodium species (Na, Na[sub 2]O, NaCl, and Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4]) are less than 0.05 ppm under combustion conditions with excess air. However, under gasification conditions with Beulah Zap lignite, sodium vapor species are present at about 14 ppm at a temperature of 820[degree]. Of this amount, NaCl vapor constitutes about 5 ppm and the rest is very likely NAOH. Sodium in the form of NaCl in coal enhances the vaporization of sodium species during combustion. Vapor phase concentration of both NaCl and Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4] increased when NaCl was added to the Beulah Zap lignite. Ash particles account for nearly 100% of the sodium in the coal during combustion in the investigated temperature range. The fine fly-ash particles (<10 [mu]m) are enriched in sodium, mainly in the form of sodium sulfate. The amount of sodium species in this ash fraction may be as high as 30 wt % of the total sodium. Sodium in the coarse ash particle phase retained in the bed is mainly in amorphous forms.

Krishnan, G.N.; Wood, B.J.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Technical Research of Thermal Adjusting in Pulverizing System Intermediate Storage Bunker  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the temperature change effect of the primary air and powder mixture in storage-type milling system, it is difficult to obtain accurate results of the direct measurement of the primary wind speed, resulting in this type of boiler system, the thermal ... Keywords: pulverizing system intermediate storage bunker, thermal adjustment, coal concentration, heat balance

Zhenning Zhao; Yaqin Ge; Hongwei Chen; Ying Zhang; Tao Sun; Xiao Lu

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

The Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama  

SciTech Connect

The investigation of various Two-Stage Liquefaction (TSL) process configurations was conducted at the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction R D Facility between July 1982 and September 1986. The facility combines three process units. There are the liquefaction unit, either thermal (TLU) or catalytic, for the dissolution of coal, the Critical Solvent Deashing unit (CSD) for the separation of ash and undissolved coal, and a catalytic hydrogenation unit (HTR) for product upgrading and recycle process solvent replenishment. The various TSL process configurations were created by changing the process sequence of these three units and by recycling hydrotreated solvents between the units. This report presents a description of the TSL configurations investigated and an analysis of the operating and performance data from the period of study. Illinois No. 6 Burning Star Mine coal Wyodak Clovis Point Mine coal were processed. Cobalt-molybdenum and disposable iron-oxide catalysts were used to improve coal liquefaction reactions and nickel-molybdenum catalysts were used in the hydrotreater. 28 refs., 31 figs., 13 tabs.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research  

SciTech Connect

Progress made in five research programs is described. The subtasks in oil shale study include oil shale process studies and unconventional applications and markets for western oil shale.The tar sand study is on recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction (ROPE) process. Four tasks are described in coal research: underground coal gasification; coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and sold waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research covers: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; NMR analysis of sample from the ocean drilling program; and menu driven access to the WDEQ hydrologic data management system.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Design manual for management of solid by-products from advanced coal technologies  

SciTech Connect

Developing coal conversion technologies face major obstacles in byproduct management. This project has developed several management strategies based on field trials of small-scale landfills in an earlier phase of the project, as well as on published/unpublished sources detailing regulatory issues, current industry practice, and reuse opportunities. Field testing, which forms the basis for several of the disposal alternatives presented in this design manual, was limited to byproducts from Ca-based dry SO{sub 2} control technologies, circulating fluidized bed combustion ash, and bubbling bed fluidized bed combustion ash. Data on byproducts from other advanced coal technologies and on reuse opportunities are drawn from other sources (citations following Chapter 3). Field results from the 5 test cases examined under this project, together with results from other ongoing research, provide a basis for predictive modeling of long-term performance of some advanced coal byproducts on exposure to ambient environment. This manual is intended to provide a reference database and development plan for designing, permitting, and operating facilities where advanced coal technology byproducts are managed.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Advanced Coal-Based Power and Environmental Systems ‘97 Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conference Sponsor: Federal Energy Technology Center- Morgantown and PittsburghDisclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. UPGRADING LOW RANK COAL USING THE KOPPELMAN SERIES C PROCESS

N. W. Merriam

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Advanced coal gasifier designs using large-scale simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Porting of the legacy code MFIX to a high performance computer (HPC) and the use of high resolution simulations for the design of a coal gasifier are described here. MFIX is based on a continuum multiphase flow model that considers gas and solids to form interpenetrating continua. Low resolution simulations of a commercial scale gasifier with a validated MFIX model revealed interesting physical phenomena with implications on the gasifier design, which prompted the study reported here. To be predictive, the simulations need to model the spatiotemporal variations in gas and solids volume fractions, velocities, temperatures with any associated phase change and chemical reactions. These processes occur at various time- and length-scales requiring very high spatial resolution and large number of iterations with small time-steps. We were able to perform perhaps the largest known simulations of gas-solids reacting flows, providing detailed information about the gas-solids flow structure and the pressure, temperature and species distribution in the gasifier. One key finding is the new features of the coal jet trajectory revealed with the high spatial resolution, which provides information on the accuracy of the lower resolution simulations. Methodologies for effectively combining high and low resolution simulations for design studies must be developed. From a computational science perspective, we found that global communication has to be reduced to achieve scalability to 1000s of cores, hybrid parallelization is required to effectively utilize the multicore chips, and the wait time in the batch queue significantly increases the actual time-to-solution. From our experience, development is required in the following areas: efficient solvers for heterogeneous, massively parallel systems; data analysis tools to extract information from large data sets; and programming environments for easily porting legacy codes to HPC.

Syamlal, M [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL); Guenther, Chris [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL); Gel, Aytekin [Aeolus Research Inc.; Pannala, Sreekanth [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE EIA WEEKLY COAL ... Coal Prices and Earnings (updated July 7, 2004) In the trading week ended July 2, the average spot coal prices tracked by EIA were mixed.

275

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - Enhanced...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pulverized Coal Burner" PDF-561KB Contacts: For further information on this project, contact the NETL Project Manager, Barbara Carney, or ALSTOM's Project Manager Galen Richards...

276

Advanced Materials and Processes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall goals of this presentation are (1) to report recently discovered ... A14: Study on the Combustion Characteristics and Kinetics of Pulverized Coal in ...

277

Advanced coal fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system. Final report, June 1986--April 1994  

SciTech Connect

Demonstration of a direct coal-fueled gas turbine system that is environmentally, technically, and economically viable depends on the satisfactory resolution of several key issues. Solar Turbines, Incorporates technical approach to these issues was to advance a complete direct coal-fueled gas turbine system that incorporated near-term technology solutions to both historically demonstrated problem areas such as deposition, erosion, and hot end corrosion, and to the emergent environmental constraints based on NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and particulates. Solar`s program approach was keyed to the full commercialization of the coal-fueled cogeneration gas turbine which would occur after extended field verification demonstrations conducted by the private sector. The program was structured in three phases plus an optional fourth phase: Phase 1 -- system description; Phase 2 -- component development; Phase 3 -- prototype system verification; and Phase 4 -- field evaluation.

LeCren, R.T.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Advanced turbine design for coal-fueled engines  

SciTech Connect

The investigators conclude that: (1) Turbine erosion resistance was shown to be improved by a factor of 5 by varying the turbine design. Increasing the number of stages and increasing the mean radius reduces the peak predicted erosion rates for 2-D flows on the blade airfoil from values which are 6 times those of the vane to values of erosion which are comparable to those of the vane airfoils. (2) Turbine erosion was a strong function of airfoil shape depending on particle diameter. Different airfoil shapes for the same turbine operating condition resulted in a factor of 7 change in airfoil erosion for the smallest particles studied (5 micron). (3) Predicted erosion for the various turbines analyzed was a strong function of particle diameter and weaker function of particle density. (4) Three dimensional secondary flows were shown to cause increases in peak and average erosion on the vane and blade airfoils. Additionally, the interblade secondary flows and stationary outer case caused unique erosion patterns which were not obtainable with 2-D analyses. (5) Analysis of the results indicate that hot gas cleanup systems are necessary to achieve acceptable turbine life in direct-fired, coal-fueled systems. In addition, serious consequences arise when hot gas filter systems fail for even short time periods. For a complete failure of the filter system, a 0.030 in. thick corrosion-resistant protective coating on a turbine blade would be eroded at some locations within eight minutes.

Wagner, J.H.; Johnson, B.V.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Development of an Integrated Multicontaminant Removal Process Applied to Warm Syngas Cleanup for Coal-Based Advanced Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

an Integrated an Integrated Multicontaminant Removal Process Applied to Warm Syngas Cleanup for Coal-Based Advanced Gasification Systems Background The U.S. has more coal than any other country, and it can be converted through gasification into electricity, liquid fuels, chemicals, or hydrogen. However, for coal gasification to become sufficiently competitive to benefit the U.S. economy and help reduce our dependence on foreign fuels, gasification costs must be reduced

280

Fuel supply system and method for coal-fired prime mover  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A coal-fired gas turbine engine is provided with an on-site coal preparation and engine feeding arrangement. With this arrangement, relatively large dry particles of coal from an on-site coal supply are micro-pulverized and the resulting dry, micron-sized, coal particulates are conveyed by steam or air into the combustion chamber of the engine. Thermal energy introduced into the coal particulates during the micro-pulverizing step is substantially recovered since the so-heated coal particulates are fed directly from the micro-pulverizer into the combustion chamber.

Smith, William C. (Morgantown, WV); Paulson, Leland E. (Morgantown, WV)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system: Hot End Simulation Rig  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Hot End Simulation Rig (HESR) was an integral part of the overall Solar/METC program chartered to prove the technical, economic, an environmental feasibility of a coal-fueled gas turbine, for cogeneration applications. The program was to culminate in a test of a Solar Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal slurry fuel throughput the engine design operating range. This particular activity was designed to verify the performance of the Centaur Type H engine hot section materials in a coal-fired environment varying the amounts of alkali, ash, and sulfur in the coal to assess the material corrosion. Success in the program was dependent upon the satisfactory resolution of several key issues. Included was the control of hot end corrosion and erosion, necessary to ensure adequate operating life. The Hot End Simulation Rig addressed this important issue by exposing currently used hot section turbine alloys, alternate alloys, and commercially available advanced protective coating systems to a representative coal-fueled environment at turbine inlet temperatures typical of Solar`s Centaur Type H. Turbine hot end components which would experience material degradation include the transition duct from the combustor outlet to the turbine inlet, the shroud, nozzles, and blades. A ceramic candle filter vessel was included in the system as the particulate removal device for the HESR. In addition to turbine material testing, the candle material was exposed and evaluated. Long-term testing was intended to sufficiently characterize the performance of these materials for the turbine.

Galica, M.A.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Carbon formation and metal dusting in advanced coal gasification processes  

SciTech Connect

The product gases generated by coal gasification systems contain high concentrations of CO and, characteristically, have relatively high carbon activities. Accordingly, carbon deposition and metal dusting can potentially degrade the operation of such gasifier systems. Therefore, the product gas compositions of eight representative gasifier systems were examined with respect to the carbon activity of the gases at temperatures ranging from 480 to 1,090 C. Phase stability calculations indicated that Fe{sub 3}C is stable only under very limited thermodynamic conditions and with certain kinetic assumptions and that FeO and Fe{sub 0.877}S tend to form instead of the carbide. As formation of Fe{sub 3}C is a necessary step in the metal dusting of steels, there are numerous gasifier environments where this type of carbon-related degradation will not occur, particularly under conditions associated with higher oxygen and sulfur activities. These calculations also indicated that the removal of H{sub 2}S by a hot-gas cleanup system may have less effect on the formation of Fe{sub 3}C in air-blown gasifier environments, where the iron oxide phase can exist and is unaffected by the removal of sulfur, than in oxygen-blown systems, where iron sulfide provides the only potential barrier to Fe{sub 3}C formation. Use of carbon- and/or low-alloy steels dictates that the process gas composition be such that Fe{sub 3}C cannot form if the potential for metal dusting is to be eliminated. Alternatively, process modifications could include the reintroduction of hydrogen sulfide, cooling the gas to perhaps as low as 400 C and/or steam injection. If higher-alloy steels are used, a hydrogen sulfide-free gas may be processed without concern about carbon deposition and metal dusting.

DeVan, J.H.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Judkins, R.R.; Wright, I.G.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Coal-Fired  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants: A Real Options Analysis May 2005 MIT LFEE 2005. LFEE 2005-002 Report #12;#12;i ABSTRACT Investments in three coal-fired power generation technologies environment. The technologies evaluated are pulverized coal (PC), integrated coal gasification combined cycle

284

Repowering flexibility of coal-based advanced power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) helps enhance the economic competitiveness, environmental quality, and national well-being of the U.S. by developing advanced power-generation systems. The potential market for advanced power-generation systems is large. In the U.S., electric demand is estimated to grow at about 1 percent per year through the year 2010. The total power generation market also includes new-capacity as well as replacement of existing power plants as they age. Thus, the market for power systems over the next 15 years is estimated to be about 279,000 megawatts (MW), but could range from as much as 484,000 MW to as little as 153,000 MW. These predictions are summarized. Over the next 15 years, the replacement market is potentially much larger than the expansion market because of the large base of aging power plants in the U.S.

Bajura, R.A.; Bechtel, T.F.; Schmidt, D.K.; Wimer, J.G.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Trace component analysis of process hydrogen streams at the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes subcontracted work done by the Radian Corporation to analyze trace components in process hydrogen streams at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The data will be used to help define whether the gas streams to be treated in the hydrogen processing unit in the SRC-I Demonstration Plant will require further treatment to remove trace contaminants that could be explosive under certain conditions. 2 references.

Bronfenbrenner, J.C.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Evaluation of ADAM/1 model for advanced coal-extraction concepts  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Coal Extraction Project is sponsored by the Department of Energy at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to define and develop advanced underground coal extraction systems which: (1) are suitable for significant remaining resources after the year 2000, and (2) promise a significant improvement in production cost and miner safety, with no degradation in miner health, environmental quality and resource recovery. System requirements in the five performance areas have been defined by Goldsmith and Lavin (1980). Several existing computer programs for estimating life-cycle cost of mining systems have been evaluated. A commercially available program ADAM/1 was found to be satisfactory in relation to the needs of the Advanced Coal Extraction Project. Two test cases were run to confirm the ability of the program to handle non-conventional mining equipment and procedures. The results were satisfactory. The model, therefore, is recommended to the project team for evaluation of their conceptual designs. Since the model is commercially available, data preparation instructions are not reproduced in this document; instead the reader is referred to the original documents for this information.

Deshpande, G. K.; Gangal, M. D.

1982-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

Prediction of nitric oxide in advanced combustion systems  

SciTech Connect

A computer model to predict nitric oxide (NO) concentrations has been applied to advanced-concept pulverized coal systems and evaluated by comparing model predictions with experimental data. Specifically, the effects of pressure, stoichiometric ratio, air stage location, temperature, and inert gas type on NO concentrations were predicted by the model and compared to experimental data. This work is a continuation of previous model evaluations, which found favorable prediction of NO concentrations for variation of stoichiometric air/fuel ratio, coal moisture content, particle size, and swirling and nonswirling diffusion flames.

Boardman, R.D.; Smoot, L.D.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Impact of Advanced Turbine Systems on coal-based power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The advanced power-generation products currently under development in our program show great promise for ultimate commercial use. Four of these products are referred to in this paper: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC), Externally Fired Combined Cycle (EFCC), and Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell (IGFC). Three of these products, IGCC, PFBC, and EFCC, rely on advanced gas turbines as a key enabling technology and the foundation for efficiencies in the range of 52 to 55 percent. DOE is funding the development of advanced gas turbines in the newly instituted Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program, one of DOE`s highest priority natural gas initiatives. The turbines, which will have natural gas efficiencies of 60 percent, are being evaluated for coal gas compatibility as part of that program.

Bechtel, T.F.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

Advanced solids NMR studies of coal structure and chemistry. Progress report, September 1, 1995--February 28, 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utilization of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. Our goals are twofold. First, we are interested in developing new methods that will enable us to measure important structural parameters in whole coals not directly accessible by other techniques. In parallel with these efforts we will apply these NMR methods in a study of the chemical differences between gas-sourcing and oil-sourcing coals. The NMR methods work will specifically focus on determination of the number and types of methylene groups, determination of the number and types of methine groups, identification of carbons adjacent to nitrogen and sites with exchangeable protons, and methods to more finely characterize the distribution of hydrogen in coals. We will also develop NMR methods for probing coal macropore structure using hyperpolarized {sup 129}Xe as a probe, and study the molecular dynamics of what appear to be mobile, CH{sub 2} rich, long chain hydrocarbons. The motivation for investigating these specific structural features of coals arises from their relevance to the chemical reactivity of some types of coals. The coals to be studied and contrasted include oil-prone coals from Australia and Indonesia, those comprising the Argonne Premium Coal Sample bank, and other relevant samples.

Zilm, K.W.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell technology advancement for coal-based power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program is conducted by a team consisting of AiResearch Los Angeles Division of Allied-Signal Aerospace Company and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The objective of the program is to advance materials and fabrication methodologies to develop a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) system capable of meeting performance, life, and cost goals for coal-based power generation. The program focuses on materials research and development, fabrication process development, cell/stack performance testing and characterization, cost and system analysis, and quality development.

Not Available

1992-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

291

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This sixteenth quarterly report describes work done during the sixteenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, giving a presentation, and making and responding to several outside contacts.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced Clean Coal Technology by-products  

SciTech Connect

This eleventh quarterly report describes work done during the eleventh three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ``Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, preparing and giving presentations, and making and responding to two outside contacts.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini; Wiles Elder

1999-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

293

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This seventeenth quarterly report describes work done during the seventeenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, giving a presentation, submitting a manuscript and making and responding to one outside contact.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems. Annual report, July 1991--June 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Westinghouse`s Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine System Program (DE-AC2l-86MC23167) was originally split into two major phases - a Basic Program and an Option. The Basic Program also contained two phases. The development of a 6 atm, 7 lb/s, 12 MMBtu/hr slagging combustor with an extended period of testing of the subscale combustor, was the first part of the Basic Program. In the second phase of the Basic Program, the combustor was to be operated over a 3-month period with a stationary cascade to study the effect of deposition, erosion and corrosion on combustion turbine components. The testing of the concept, in subscale, has demonstrated its ability to handle high- and low-sulfur bituminous coals, and low-sulfur subbituminous coal. Feeding the fuel in the form of PC has proven to be superior to CWM type feed. The program objectives relative to combustion efficiency, combustor exit temperature, NO{sub x} emissions, carbon burnout, and slag rejection have been met. Objectives for alkali, particulate, and SO{sub x} levels leaving the combustor were not met by the conclusion of testing at Textron. It is planned to continue this testing, to achieve all desired emission levels, as part of the W/NSP program to commercialize the slagging combustor technology.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume I, Part 1. Final report, September 1986--September 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this program was the development of a predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. The foundation to describe coal specific conversion behavior was AFR`s Functional Group and Devolatilization, Vaporization and Crosslinking (DVC) models, which had been previously developed. The combined FG-DVC model was integrated with BYU`s comprehensive two-dimensional reactor model for combustion and coal gasification, PCGC-2, and a one-dimensional model for fixed-bed gasifiers, FBED-1. Progress utilizing these models is described.

Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Bull Run Fossil Plant Online Coal Flow Adjustable Riffler Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boiler optimization at fossil-fired power plants would be enhanced if the flow of coal and air in individual pulverizer fuel delivery lines could be balanced. The static splitter devices currently in service do not adequately maintain coal balance, especially when plant conditions change. This report summarizes the results of a test program to demonstrate the feasibility of using a novel riffler to make online adjustments to a stream of pneumatically conveyed pulverized coal at a working plant. The demon...

2008-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

297

Coal-oil slurry preparation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pumpable slurry of pulverized coal in a coal-derived hydrocarbon oil carrier which slurry is useful as a low-ash, low-sulfur clean fuel, is produced from a high sulfur-containing coal. The initial pulverized coal is separated by gravity differentiation into (1) a high density refuse fraction containing the major portion of non-coal mineral products and sulfur, (2) a lowest density fraction of low sulfur content and (3) a middlings fraction of intermediate sulfur and ash content. The refuse fraction (1) is gasified by partial combustion producing a crude gas product from which a hydrogen stream is separated for use in hydrogenative liquefaction of the middlings fraction (3). The lowest density fraction (2) is mixed with the liquefied coal product to provide the desired fuel slurry. Preferably there is also separately recovered from the coal liquefaction LPG and pipeline gas.

Tao, John C. (Perkiomenville, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Field study of disposed wastes from advanced coal processes. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy/Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) has initiated research on the disposal of solid wastes from advanced coal processes. The objective of this research is to develop information to be used by private industry and government agencies for planning waste disposal practices associated with advanced coal processes. To accomplish this objective, DOE has contracted Radian Corporation and the North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) to design, construct, and monitor a limited number of field disposal tests with advanced coal process wastes. These field tests will be monitored over a three year period with the emphasis on collecting data on the field disposal of these wastes. There has been considerable research on the characteristics and laboratory leaching behavior of coal wastes -- a lesser amount on wastes from advanced coal processes. However, very little information exists on the field disposal behavior of these wastes. Information on field disposal behavior is needed (a) as input to predictive models being developed, (b) as input to the development of rule of thumb design guidelines for the disposal of these wastes, and (c) as evidence of the behavior of these wastes in the natural environment.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

299

Toxic emissions from a cyclone burner boiler with an ESP and with the SNOX demonstration and from a pulverized coal burner boiler with an ESP/wet flue gas desulfurization system  

SciTech Connect

Emission factors for VOC and aldehydes, dioxins/furans, and PAH/SVOC are presented in Tables 6--8, respectively. Each table includes results for Coal Creek, Niles Boiler, and the SNOX process. As shown in Table 6, benzene and toluene were measured in the Coal Creek, Niles Boiler, and SNOX stack emissions in highly variable concentrations. Over 90 percent of the VOC analyzed were not detected in the stack gases, and the emission factor for these VOC ranges from 1.1 to 1.4 {mu}g/MJ for the three systems. Emission factors for the four aldehydes that were measured range from 0.47 to 31 {mu}g/MJ for Coal Creek, 1.7 to 38 {mu}g/MJ for the Niles Boiler, and 3.6 to 167 {mu}g/MJ for the SNOX process. Acetaldehyde is at the highest concentration of the four aldehydes in all three units, a finding which is consistent with previous work. Dioxin/furan emission factors are provided in Table 7. Emission, factors for these compounds range from 0.40 to 6.51 pg/MJ for Coal Creek and 0.45 to 8.14 pg/MJ for the Niles Boiler. Dioxins/furans were not determined in the SNOX process. The compounds 1,2,3,4,6,7,8heptachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran were detected in both units. The predominance of these species in high SO{sub 2} environments has been previously observed. All other 2,3,7,8 substituted dioxin/furan isomers listed in Table 8 were not detected in either unit. Table 8 lists the emission factors for PAH/SVOC. Emission factors range from 0.3 to 233 ng/MJ for Coal Creek, 0.5 to 273 ng/MJ for the Niles Boiler, and 0.3 to 130 ng/MJ for the SNOX process. Acetophenone is at the highest concentration of the PAH/SVOC in all three units. Naphthalene, dibenzofuran, phenanthrene, and fluoranthene are also present at relatively high concentrations in comparison to the other PAH/SVOC.

Sverdrup, G.M.; Riggs, K.B.; Kelly, T.J.; Barrett, R.E. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States); Peltier, R.G.; Cooper, J.A. [Chester Environmental, Monroeville, PA (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Carbon dioxide capture from coal-fired power plants : a real potions analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investments in three coal-fired power generation technologies are valued using the "real options" valuation methodology in an uncertain carbon dioxide (CO2) price environment. The technologies evaluated are pulverized coal ...

Sekar, Ram Chandra

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Evaluation of sorbents for the cleanup of coal-derived synthesis gas at elevated temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) with carbon dioxide capture is a promising technology to produce electricity from coal at a higher efficiency than with traditional subcritical pulverized coal (PC) power plants. ...

Couling, David Joseph

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

DOE/EA-1498: Advanced Coal Utilization Byproduct Beneficiation Processing Plant Ghent Power Station, Carroll County, Kentucky (01/05)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1498 EA-1498 Advanced Coal Utilization Byproduct Beneficiation Processing Plant Ghent Power Station, Carroll County, Kentucky Final Environmental Assessment January 2005 Note: No comments were received during the public comment period from September 25 to October 25, 2004. Therefore, no changes to the Draft Environmental Assessment were necessary. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Cover Sheet Proposed Action: The proposed Federal action is to provide funding, through a cooperative agreement with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation (UKRF), Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), for the design, construction, and operation of an advanced coal ash beneficiation processing plant at Kentucky Utilities (KU) Ghent Power Station in Carroll County, Kentucky.

303

Proceedings of the coal-fired power systems 94: Advances in IGCC and PFBC review meeting. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Coal-Fired Power Systems 94 -- Advances in IGCC and PFBC Review Meeting was held June 21--23, 1994, at the Morgantown Energy Center (METC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. This Meeting was sponsored and hosted by METC, the Office of Fossil Energy, and the US Department of Energy (DOE). METC annually sponsors this conference for energy executives, engineers, scientists, and other interested parties to review the results of research and development projects; to discuss the status of advanced coal-fired power systems and future plans with the industrial contractors; and to discuss cooperative industrial-government research opportunities with METC`s in-house engineers and scientists. Presentations included industrial contractor and METC in-house technology developments related to the production of power via coal-fired Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) systems, the summary status of clean coal technologies, and developments and advancements in advanced technology subsystems, such as hot gas cleanup. A keynote speaker and other representatives from the electric power industry also gave their assessment of advanced power systems. This meeting contained 11 formal sessions and one poster session, and included 52 presentations and 24 poster presentations. Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions: filter technology issues; hazardous air pollutants; sorbents and solid wastes; and membranes. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

McDaniel, H.M.; Staubly, R.K.; Venkataraman, V.K. [eds.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

High pressure rotary piston coal feeder for coal gasification applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The subject development is directed to an apparatus for feeding pulverized coal into a coal gasifier operating at relatively high pressures and elevated temperatures. This apparatus is a rotary piston feeder which comprises a circular casing having a coal loading opening therein diametrically opposed from a coal discharge and contains a rotatable discoid rotor having a cylinder in which a reciprocateable piston is disposed. The reciprocation of the piston within the cylinder is provided by a stationary conjugate cam arrangement whereby the pulverized coal from a coal hopper at atmospheric pressure can be introduced into the cylinder cavity and then discharged therefrom into the high-pressure gasifier without the loss of high pressure gases from within the latter.

Gencsoy, Hasan T. (Morgantown, WV)

1977-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

305

Decaking of coal or oil shale during pyrolysis in the presence of iron oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing a fuel from the pyrolysis of coal or oil shale in the presence of iron oxide in an inert gas atmosphere. The method includes the steps of pulverizing feed coal or oil shale, pulverizing iron oxide, mixing the pulverized feed and iron oxide, and heating the mixture in a gas atmosphere which is substantially inert to the mixture so as to form a product fuel, which may be gaseous, liquid and/or solid. The method of the invention reduces the swelling of coals, such as bituminous coal and the like, which are otherwise known to swell during pyrolysis.

Khan, M. Rashid (Morgantown, WV)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Decaking of coal or oil shale during pyrolysis in the presence of iron oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing a fuel from the pyrolysis of coal or oil shale in the presence of iron oxide in an inert gas atmosphere is described. The method includes the steps of pulverizing feed coal or oil shale, pulverizing iron oxide, mixing the pulverized feed and iron oxide, and heating the mixture in a gas atmosphere which is substantially inert to the mixture so as to form a product fuel, which may be gaseous, liquid and/or solid. The method of the invention reduces the swelling of coals, such as bituminous coal and the like, which are otherwise known to swell during pyrolysis. 4 figs., 8 tabs.

Rashid Khan, M.

1988-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

307

Integration of Advanced Emissions Controls to Produce Next-Generation Circulating Fluid Bed Coal Generating Unit (withdrawn prior to award)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

contacts contacts Brad tomer Director Office of Major Demonstrations National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4692 brad.tomer@netl.doe.gov PaRtIcIPant Colorado Springs Utilities Colorado Springs, CO aDDItIonaL tEaM MEMBERs Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. Clinton, NJ IntegratIon of advanced emIssIons controls to Produce next-generatIon cIrculatIng fluId Bed coal generatIng unIt (wIthdrawn PrIor to award) Project Description Colorado Springs Utilities (Springs Utilities) and Foster Wheeler are planning a joint demonstration of an advanced coal-fired electric power plant using advanced, low-cost emission control systems to produce exceedingly low emissions. Multi- layered emission controls will be

308

Research investigations in oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, and advanced fuels research: Volume 1 -- Base program. Final report, October 1986--September 1993  

SciTech Connect

Numerous studies have been conducted in five principal areas: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuels research. In subsequent years, underground coal gasification was broadened to be coal research, under which several research activities were conducted that related to coal processing. The most significant change occurred in 1989 when the agreement was redefined as a Base Program and a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP). Investigations were conducted under the Base Program to determine the physical and chemical properties of materials suitable for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels, to test and evaluate processes and innovative concepts for such conversions, to monitor and determine environmental impacts related to development of commercial-sized operations, and to evaluate methods for mitigation of potential environmental impacts. This report is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 consists of 28 summaries that describe the principal research efforts conducted under the Base Program in five topic areas. Volume 2 describes tasks performed within the JSRP. Research conducted under this agreement has resulted in technology transfer of a variety of energy-related research information. A listing of related publications and presentations is given at the end of each research topic summary. More specific and detailed information is provided in the topical reports referenced in the related publications listings.

Smith, V.E.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to conduct extensive studies on the surface reactivity and surface hydrophobicity of coal-pyrites using various surface characterization techniques and to correlate the alteration of the coal-pyrite surface with the efficiency of pyrite rejection in coal flotation. The flotation characteristics of coal-pyrites under various conditions was studied and compared with ore-pyrite and coal to determine the causes of pyrite rejection difficulties in coal flotation. Both the native and induced floatabilities of pyrites were investigated. It was found that both coal- and ore-pyrites, ff prepared by dry-grinding, show little or no floatability in the absence of any chemical reagents. After ultrasonic pretreatment, ore-pyrite floats effectively in the acidic to neutral pH range. Kentucky No. 9 coal-pyrite (KYPY) shows significant flotation in the pH range 7--10. With ethyl xanthate as collector, ore-pyrite floats well up to pH = 10; while coal-pyrite reveals no flotation above pH = 6. For the first time, the effect of coal collector on the floatability of coal-pyrite has been studied. It was shown that in the presence of fuel oil--a widely used collector for promoting coal flotation, coal-pyrite, particularly for the fine sizes, shows good flotation below pH = 11, whereas ore-pyrite has no or little floatability. These studies demonstrate that one of the main causes of the coal-pyrite flotation in coal separation is the oil-induced floatability due to adsorption/attachment of oil droplets on the coal-pyrite surfaces, the native'' or self-induced'' floatability of pyrite is no as profound as the oil-induced flotation.

Wang, Xiang-Huai; Leonard, J.W.; Parekh, B.K.; Jiang, Chengliang; Raichur, A.M.

1992-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

310

Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies - froth flotation. Quarterly technical progress report No. 24, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

A study conducted by Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of sulfur emissions from about 1,300 United States coal-fired utility boilers indicated that half of the emissions were the result of burning coals having greater than 1.2 pounds of SO{sub 2} per million BTU. This was mainly attributed to the high pyritic sulfur content of the boiler fuel. A significant reduction in SO{sub 2} emissions could be accomplished by removing the pyrite from the coals by advanced physical fine coal cleaning. An engineering development project was prepared to build upon the basic research effort conducted under a solicitation for research into Fine Coal Surface Control. The engineering development project is intended to use general plant design knowledge and conceptualize a plant to utilize advanced froth flotation technology to process coal and produce a product having maximum practical pyritic sulfur reduction consistent with maximum practical BTU recovery.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system. Annual report, 2 June 1992--1 June 1993  

SciTech Connect

This program was initiated in June of 1986 because advances in coal-fueled gas turbine technology over the previous few years, together with DOE-METC sponsored studies, served to provide new optimism that the problems demonstrated in the past can be economically resolved and that the coal-fueled gas turbine could ultimately be the preferred system in appropriate market application sectors. In early 1991 it became evident that a combination of low natural gas prices, stringent emission limits of the Clean Air Act and concerns for CO{sub 2} emissions made the direct coal-fueled gas turbine less attractive. In late 1991 it was decided not to complete this program as planned. The objective of the Solar/METC program was to prove the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of a coal-fired gas turbine for cogeneration applications through tests of a Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal fuel throughout the engine design operating range. Component development of the coal-fueled combustor island and cleanup system while not complete indicated that the planned engine test was feasible. Preliminary designs of the engine hardware and installation were partially completed. A successful conclusion to the program would have initiated a continuation of the commercialization plan through extended field demonstration runs. After notification of the intent not to complete the program a replan was carried out to finish the program in an orderly fashion within the framework of the contract. A contract modification added the first phase of the Advanced Turbine Study whose objective is to develop high efficiency, natural gas fueled gas turbine technology.

LeCren, L.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project is to conduct extensive fundamental studies on the surface reactivity and surface hydrophobicity of coal-pyrites using various surface characterization techniques and to understand how the alteration of the coal-pyrite surface affects the efficiency of pyrite rejection in coal flotation. During this reporting period, the influence of the impurity content, particularly coal/carbon content, on the electrochemical oxidation of pyrite surfaces was investigated. The studies demonstrate that the coal/carbon content in coal-pyrite has a determining effect on the surface reactivity of pyrite. The oxidation behavior of high carbon-content coal-pyrite is completely different from that of purer coal-pyrite and ore-pyrite. The effects of flotation gases on the flotation behavior of coal and the surface hydrophobicity of various coal-pyrite were investigated. It was found from the lab-scale column flotation studies that among the various gases studied (air, oxygen, argon, nitrogen and carbon dioxide), carbon dioxide produced the best results with a combustible recovery of 90% and ash-content of less than 9 percent. Finally, the surface energetic studies revealed that the surfaces of pyrites and coals produced by wet grinding is more heterogenous than that prepared by dry grinding.

Wang, X.H.; Leonard, J.W.; Parekh, B.K.; Raichur, A.M.; Jiang, C.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal-laden wastes can be stabilized and solidified using advanced clean coal technology by-products (CCTBs)--fluid bed combustor ash and spray drier solids. These utility-generated treatment chemicals are available for purchase through brokers, and commercial applications of this process are being practiced by treaters of metal-laden hazardous waste. A complex of regulations governs this industry, and sensitivities to this complex has discouraged public documentation of treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with CCTBs. This report provides a comprehensive public documentation of laboratory studies that show the efficacy of the stabilization and solidification of metal-laden hazardous wastes--such as lead-contaminated soils and sandblast residues--through treatment with CCTBs. It then describes the extensive efforts that were made to obtain the permits allowing a commercial hazardous waste treater to utilize CCTBs as treatment chemicals and to install the equipment required to do so. It concludes with the effect of this lengthy process on the ability of the treatment company to realize the practical, physical outcome of this effort, leading to premature termination of the project.

James T. Cobb, Jr.

2003-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

314

Multiplexed Optical Fiber Sensors for Coal Fired Advanced Fossil Energy Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes technical progress on the program â??Multiplexed Optical Fiber Sensors for Coal Fired Advanced Fossil Energy Systemsâ?ť funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed jointly by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Virginia Tech. This three-year project started on October 1, 2008. In the project, a fiber optical sensing system based on intrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometer (IFPI) was developed for strain and temperature measurements for Ultra Supercritical boiler condition assessment. Investigations were focused on sensor design, fabrication, attachment techniques and novel materials for high temperature and strain measurements. At the start of the project, the technical requirements for the sensing technology were determined together with our industrial partner Alstom Power. As is demonstrated in Chapter 4, all the technical requirements are successfully met. The success of the technology extended beyond laboratory test; its capability was further validated through the field test at DOE NETL, in which the sensors yielded distributed temperature mapping of a testing coupon installed in the turbine test rig. The measurement results agreed well with prior results generated with thermocouples. In this project, significant improvements were made to the IFPI sensor technology by splicing condition optimization, transmission loss reduction, sensor signal demodulation and sensor system design.

Anbo Wang; Gary Pickrell

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

315

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a three-year project on Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.'' The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are being run at the cleaning facility in Homer City, Pennsylvania, to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE's laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CVVT) or a dry microfine pulverized coal (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. Subcontractors to CE to perform parts of the test work are the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Physical Science, Inc. Technology Company (PSIT) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC). Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFS, and two conventionally cleaned coals for full-scale tests. Approximately, nine BCFs will be in dry microfine coal (DMPC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Task 3.0: Advanced power systems. Semi-annual report, April 1--June 30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of activities are incorporated into the Advanced Power Systems program. Tasks included are (1) fuel utilization properties, (2) pressurized combustion, (3) catalytic gasification, and (4) hot-gas cleanup. ATRAN is stochastic and combines initial coal inorganics in a random manner in order to predict the resulting fly ash particle size and composition. ASHPERT, is an expert system yielding a first-order estimate of fly ash size and composition. Both models are designed to emulate pulverized-coal combustion. Input data required include identity, chemistry, size, quantity, and mineral-to-coal associations. The pressurized combustion task has focused on the construction of a versatile reactor system to simulate pressurized fluidized-bed combustion. Both castable and monolithic refractories have been investigated in determining slag prevention under a variety of conditions. Catalytic gasification coupled with a molten carbonate fuel cell offers an extremely efficient and environmentally sound power generating system using coal. Work with an Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal has not been successful. Continued efforts will focus on using the more reactive low-rank coals to try to achieve this goal. Hot-gas cleanup is the critical issue in many of the proposed advanced power system operations on coal. The key to successful ash removal is an understanding of the properties of the ash to be collected as well as the interactions of this material with the barrier itself. The knowledge base under development will assist in assessing many of these barrier material issues for a variety of coal ashes.

McCollor, D.P.; Zygarlicke, C.J.; Mann, M.D.; Willson, W.G.; Hurley, J.P.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Development of an advanced process for drying fine coal in an inclined fluidized bed  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project was to demonstrate a technically feasible and economically viable process for drying and stabilizing high-moisture subbituminous coal. Controlled thermal drying of coal fines was achieved using the inclined fluidized-bed drying and stabilization process developed by the Western Research Institute. The project scope of work required completion of five tasks: (1) project planning, (2) characterization of two feed coals, (3) bench-scale inclined fluidized-bed drying studies, (4) product characterization and testing, and (5) technical and economic evaluation of the process. High moisture subbituminous coals from AMAX Eagle Butte mine located in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and from Usibelli Coal Mine, Inc. in Healy, Alaska were tested in a 10-lb/hr bench-scale inclined fluidized-bed. Experimental results show that the dried coal contains less than 1.5% moisture and has a heating value over 11,500 Btu/lb. The coal fines entrainment can be kept below 15 wt % of the feed. The equilibrium moisture of dried coal was less than 50% of feed coal equilibrium moisture. 7 refs., 60 figs., 47 tabs.

Boysen, J.E.; Cha, C.Y.; Barbour, F.A.; Turner, T.F.; Kang, T.W.; Berggren, M.H.; Hogsett, R.F.; Jha, M.C.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Program on Technology Innovation: Advanced Concepts in Slurry-Fed Low-Rank Coal Gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a Technology Innovation screening study of concepts for improving the performance of slurry-fed gasification combined cycle power plants on low rank coals by using two innovative coal preparation technologies: coal slurries with liquid CO2 as the fluid, and hot water drying. Slurry-fed gasification technologies have a cost advantage over dry-fed systems, but they suffer a large performance penalty when used on low rank coals because of the large fraction of water and ...

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

The high moisture western coal processing system at the UTSI-DOE Coal Fired Flow Facility. Topical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The original eastern coal processing system at the Department of Energy`s Coal Fired Flow Facility (CFFF), located at the University of Tennessee Space Institute in Tullahoma, Tennessee, was modified to pulverize and dry Montana Rosebud, a western coal. Significant modifications to the CFFF coal processing system were required and the equipment selection criteria are reviewed. Coal processing system performance parameters are discussed. A summary of tests conducted and significant events are included.

Sanders, M.E.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Experimental Study on the Pulverization and Reduction Behavior of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through analyzing the results, the difference of pulverization and reduction behavior of ... Pilot Scale Measurements of NOx Emissions from the Silicon Process.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Advanced characterization of physical properties of coals with different coal structures by nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray computed tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to understand the correlation between coal structure and physical property of coal, samples with different coal structures were collected from the Late Permian period coal seams in the Laochang area, Yunnan Province, China. A set of experiments ... Keywords: Adsorption capacities, Coal structure, Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Seepage capacities, X-ray computed tomography (X-CT)

Song Li; Dazhen Tang; Hao Xu; Zi Yang

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Ignition Rate Measurement of Laser-Ignited Coals  

SciTech Connect

We established a novel experiment to study the ignition of pulverized coals under conditions relevant to utility boilers. Specifically, we determined the ignition mechanism of pulverized-coal particles under various conditions of particle size, coal type, and freestream oxygen concentration. We also measured the ignition rate constant of a Pittsburgh #8 high-volatile bituminous coal by direct measurement of the particle temperature at ignition, and incorporating this measurement into a mathematical model for the ignition process. The model, called Distributed Activation Energy Model of Ignition, was developed previously by our group to interpret conventional drop-tube ignition experiments, and was modified to accommodate the present study.

John C. Chen; Vinayak Kabadi

1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration - Project Brief PDF-192KB Rosebud SynCoal Partnership, Colstrip, MT PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Advanced Coal Conversion...

324

Modelling Pulverized Coal Injection in a Blast Furnace  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, CFD Modeling and Simulation in Materials Processing ... These models are useful for understanding the flow-thermo-chemical behaviours and then ...

325

Influence of volatile functionality on pulverized coal explosivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Energy Technologies and Carbon Dioxide Management. Presentation Title ...

326

Influence of the Pulverized Coal Ash on Theoretical Flame ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Moreover, the modified formula for calculating of theoretical flame temperature before tuyere is established. The effect of the ratio of reduced SiO2 in raceway ...

327

EPRI Coal-Flow Loop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is targeted at plant personnel responsible for coal-flow measurement and mill balancing that are using or are considering the use of online, in situ measurement technologies. Optimum combustion in a boiler requires careful control of coal and air flow to individual burners. Measuring in near real-time the mass flow rate of pneumatically conveyed pulverized coal in burner feed pipes is a critical element of such control. This report summarizes the findings for two online coal-flow instruments ...

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of deploying advanced coal power in the Chinese context,”12 2.6. International coal prices and12 III. Chinese Coal

Aden, Nathaniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Program on Technology Innovation: Advanced Concepts in Slurry Fed Low Rank Coal Gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports on experimental and theoretical analyses of low rank coal/liquid CO2 slurries (LRC/CO2(l)). The results showed that viscosities of LRC/CO2(l) were much lower than for LRC/water slurries of similar coal concentrations and higher coal concentrations could be obtained for liquid CO2 slurries than for water-based slurries at flow conditions typical of industrial scale gasification systems. ASPENplus analyses of a typical integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system showed no del...

2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

330

Exelon Power IGCC Executive Briefing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... All rights reserved. Advanced Coal Plants with CCS ... Advanced Coal Plants with CCS Pulverized Coal w/CCS Process Flow Diagram ...

2013-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

331

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 17, April--June 1993  

SciTech Connect

Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the third quarter of 1993, the following technical progress was made: Completed modeling calculations of coal mineral matter transformations, deposition behavior, and heat transfer impacts of six test fuels; and ran pilot-scale tests of Upper Freeport feed coal, microagglomerate product, and mulled product.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Mechanical and Transport Characteristics of Coal-Biomass Mixtures for Advanced IGCC Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Co-firing of coal-biomass is one effective means of reducing CO2 emissions as biomass is a carbon neutral supplementary fuel. Co-feeding of biomass is technically challenging… (more)

Chandra, Divya

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Operation of the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction R&D Facility, 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The addition of a hydrotreater launched the development of two-stage liquefaction at the Wilsonville test facility. This and other research undertaken during 1981 accelerated progress toward the production of high-quality, economical coal-derived liquid fuels.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Methodology for technology evaluation under uncertainty and its application in advanced coal gasification processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology has attracted interest as a cleaner alternative to conventional coal-fired power generation processes. While a number of pilot projects have been launched to ...

Gong, Bo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Advanced Concepts in Slurry-Fed Low-Rank Coal Gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After an initial scouting study (described in Electric Power Research Institute [EPRI] Technical Update 1014432) revealed that using liquid CO2 in place of water in coal slurries could have several beneficial effects on integrated-gasificationcombined-cycles (IGCCs) employing CO2 capture, EPRI's Program on Technology Innovation funded additional work on this subject. This report summarizes the results of rheological testing performed with slurries made from liquid CO2 and two types of subbituminous coal ...

2008-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

336

Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell technology advancement for coal-based power generation. Annual report, October 1991--September 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program is being conducted by a team consisting of AlliedSignal Aerospace Systems & Equipment (ASE) (formerly AiResearch Los Angeles Division) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The objective of the program is to advance materials and fabrication methodologies to develop a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) system capable of meeting performance, life, and cost goals for coal-based power generation. The program focuses on materials research and development, fabrication process development, cell/stack performance testing and characterization, cost and system analysis, and quality development.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Future Carbon Regulations and Current Investments in Alternative Coal-Fired Power Plant Designs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper assesses the role of uncertainty over future U.S. carbon regulations in shaping the current choice of which type of power plant to build. The pulverized coal technology (PC) still offer the lowest cost power— ...

Sekar, Ram C.

338

Method for reducing NOx during combustion of coal in a burner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An organically complexed nanocatalyst composition is applied to or mixed with coal prior to or upon introducing the coal into a coal burner in order to catalyze the removal of coal nitrogen from the coal and its conversion into nitrogen gas prior to combustion of the coal. This process leads to reduced NOx production during coal combustion. The nanocatalyst compositions include a nanoparticle catalyst that is made using a dispersing agent that can bond with the catalyst atoms. The dispersing agent forms stable, dispersed, nano-sized catalyst particles. The catalyst composition can be formed as a stable suspension to facilitate storage, transportation and application of the catalyst nanoparticles to a coal material. The catalyst composition can be applied before or after pulverizing the coal material or it may be injected directly into the coal burner together with pulverized coal.

Zhou, Bing (Cranbury, NJ); Parasher, Sukesh (Lawrenceville, NJ); Hare, Jeffrey J. (Provo, UT); Harding, N. Stanley (North Salt Lake, UT); Black, Stephanie E. (Sandy, UT); Johnson, Kenneth R. (Highland, UT)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Process for coal liquefaction employing selective coal feed  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved coal liquefaction process is provided whereby coal conversion is improved and yields of pentane soluble liquefaction products are increased. In this process, selected feed coal is pulverized and slurried with a process derived solvent, passed through a preheater and one or more dissolvers in the presence of hydrogen-rich gases at elevated temperatures and pressures, following which solids, including mineral ash and unconverted coal macerals, are separated from the condensed reactor effluent. The selected feed coals comprise washed coals having a substantial amount of mineral matter, preferably from about 25-75%, by weight, based upon run-of-mine coal, removed with at least 1.0% by weight of pyritic sulfur remaining and exhibiting vitrinite reflectance of less than about 0.70%.

Hoover, David S. (New Tripoli, PA); Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Bench-scale Development of an Advanced Solid sorbent-based CO2 Capture Process for Coal-fired Power Plalnts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

scale Development of an scale Development of an Advanced Solid Sorbent-based CO 2 Capture Process for Coal-fired Power Plants Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions, & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Advanced direct coal liquefaction concepts. Quarterly report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Six runs on the bench unit were successfully completed this quarter. The runs covered twenty five different operating conditions and yield periods, and involved 336 hours of operation. In the bench unit, increased temperature of first stage operation (410{degree}C) and direct addition of the powdered solid sodium aluminate to the feed as first stage catalyst improved both coal and carbon monoxide conversion. To achieve 90%+ overall coal conversion, temperatures of 430{degree}C+ were required in the second stage. Oil yields (pentane soluble liquid product) in excess of 65 wt % based on MAF Black Thunder coal, were achieved both with iron oxide/dimethyl disulfide and ammonium molybdate/carbon disulfide second stage catalysts. C{sub l}-C{sub 3} hydrogen gas yields were modest, generally 7-8 wt % on MAF coal, and overall hydrogen consumption (including first stage shift hydrogen) was in the order of 7-8 wt % on MAF coal. The ammonium molybdate catalyst system appeared to give slightly higher oil yields and hydrogen consumption, as was expected, but the differences may not be significant.

Berger, D.J.; Parker, R.J.; Simpson, P.L. [Canadian Energy Development, Inc., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

Advanced coal-gasification technical analyses. Project summary. Final report, December 1982-September 1985  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work performed by KRSI to support the GRI Fossil Fuels Gasification Program in identification and development of the most economical and technically feasible process(es) for production of SNG from coal. The work was performed under several tasks that fall under three topical categories: (1) Technology Review and Evaluations, (2) Coal Fines Disposal and (3) Technical/Economic Evaluations. The final task reports appear in the three appendices of the report. The Technology Review studies provide an overview of the coal gasification, shift/methanation, acid-gas removal, and sulfur-recovery technologies for use in coal-to-SNG plant design; Side-by-side comparisons of selected processes in each category provide background for process selection. The studies relating to Coal Fines Disposal allow comparison and guidance with regard to feedstock-management options when fixed-bed gasifiers are to be used. The first-pass designs and cost estimates prepared under Technical/Economic Evaluations compare and assess North Dakota lignite-to-SNG plants based on Lurgi, Westinghouse (now KRW) and Direct Methanation processes. A plant size vs. cost study provides an insight to selection of an economical plant size.

Cover, A.E.; Hubbard, D.A.; Jain, S.K.; Shah, K.V.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

EPRI Coal Flow Loop: Evaluation of Extractive Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extractive coal sampling methodologies are currently the principal method to estimate the flow of pulverized coal on the individual conveying lines of power boilers. The measurement uncertainty associated with the common methodologies is not well known. Parameters suspected to influence these types of measurement — such as distance from flow disturbances, flow regime, and air-to-coal ratio, among others — are difficult to control at a power plant. The Coal Flow Control and Measurement Laborat...

2005-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

344

Field study for disposal of solid wastes from Advanced Coal Processes: Ohio LIMB Site Assessment. Final report, April 1986--November 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New air pollution regulations will require cleaner, more efficient processes for converting coal to electricity, producing solid byproducts or wastes that differ from conventional pulverized-coal combustion ash. Large scale landfill test cells containing byproducts were built at 3 sites and are to be monitored over at least 3 years. This report presents results of a 3-y field test at an ash disposal site in northern Ohio; the field test used ash from a combined lime injection-multistage burner (LIMB) retrofit at the Ohio Edison Edgewater plant. The landfill test cells used LIMB ash wetted only to control dusting in one cell, and LIMB ash wetted to optimize compaction density in the other cell. Both test cells had adequate load-bearing strength for landfill stability but had continuing dimensional instability. Heaving and expansion did not affect the landfill stability but probably contributed to greater permeability to infiltrating water. Leachate migration occurred from the base, but effects on downgradient groundwater were limited to increased chloride concentration in one well. Compressive strength of landfilled ash was adequate to support equipment, although permeability was higher and strength was lower than anticipated. Average moisture content has increased to about 90% (dry weight basis). Significant water infiltration has occurred; the model suggests that as much as 20% of the incident rainfall will pass through and exit as leachate. However, impacts on shallow ground water is minimal. Results of this field study suggest that LIMB ash from combustion of moderate to high sulfur coals will perform acceptably if engineering controls are used to condition and compact the materials, reduce water influx to the landfill, and minimize leachate production. Handling of the ash did not pose serious problems during cell construction; steaming and heat buildup were moderate.

Weinberg, A.; Coel, B.J.; Butler, R.D.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system particle removal system development  

SciTech Connect

Solar Turbines developed a direct coal-fueled turbine system (DCFT) and tested each component in subscale facilities and the combustion system was tested at full-scale. The combustion system was comprised of a two-stage slagging combustor with an impact separator between the two combustors. Greater than 90 percent of the native ash in the coal was removed as liquid slag with this system. In the first combustor, coal water slurry mixture (CWM) was injected into a combustion chamber which was operated loan to suppress NO{sub x} formation. The slurry was introduced through four fuel injectors that created a toroidal vortex because of the combustor geometry and angle of orientation of the injectors. The liquid slag that was formed was directed downward toward an impaction plate made of a refractory material. Sixty to seventy percent of the coal-borne ash was collected in this fashion. An impact separator was used to remove additional slag that had escaped the primary combustor. The combined particulate collection efficiency from both combustors was above 95 percent. Unfortunately, a great deal of the original sulfur from the coal still remained in the gas stream and needed to be separated. To accomplish this, dolomite or hydrated lime were injected in the secondary combustor to react with the sulfur dioxide and form calcium sulfite and sulfates. This solution for the sulfur problem increased the dust concentrations to as much as 6000 ppmw. A downstream particulate control system was required, and one that could operate at 150 psia, 1850-1900{degrees}F and with low pressure drop. Solar designed and tested a particulate rejection system to remove essentially all particulate from the high temperature, high pressure gas stream. A thorough research and development program was aimed at identifying candidate technologies and testing them with Solar`s coal-fired system. This topical report summarizes these activities over a period beginning in 1987 and ending in 1992.

Stephenson, M.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1992  

SciTech Connect

Accomplishments for the quarter are presented for the following areas of research: oil shale, tar sand, coal, advanced exploratory process technology, and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research includes; oil shale process studies, environmental base studies for oil shale, and miscellaneous basic concept studies. Tar sand research covers process development. Coal research includes; underground coal gasification, coal combustion, integrated coal processing concepts, and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes; advanced process concepts, advanced mitigation concepts, and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesa Verde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced recovery techniques; and menu driven access to the WDEQ Hydrologic Data Management Systems.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Development and testing of a high efficiency advanced coal combustor: Phase 3, industrial boiler retrofit. Quarterly technical progress report number 12, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to retrofit the previously developed High Efficiency Advanced Coal Combustor (HEACC) to a standard gas/oil designed industrial boiler to assess the technical and economic viability of displacing premium fuels with microfine coal. During this reporting period, data reduction/evaluation and interpretation from the long term four hundred hours Proof-of-Concept System Test under Task 3 were completed. Cumulatively, a total of approximately 563 hours of coal testing was performed with 160 hrs on 100% coal and over 400 hours with co-firing coal and gas. The primary objectives of this testing were to: (1) obtain steady state operation consistently on 100% coal; (2) increase carbon conversion efficiency from 95% to the project goal of 98%; and (3) maintain NOx emissions at or below 0.6 lbs/MBtu. The following specific conclusions are based on results of coal-fired testing at Penn State and the initial economic evaluation of the HEACC system: a coal handling/preparation system can be designed to meet the technical requirements for retrofitting microfine coal combustion to a gas/oil-designed boiler; the boiler thermal performance requirements were met; the NOx emission target of was met; combustion efficiencies of 95% could be met on a daily average basis, somewhat below the target of 98%; the economic playback is very sensitive to fuel differential cost, unit size, and annual operating hours; continuous long term demonstration is needed to quantify ash effects and how to best handle ashes. The following modifications are recommended prior to the 1,000 hour demonstration phase testing: (1) coal feeding improvements--improved raw coal/storage and transport, installation of gravimetric feeder, and redesign/installation of surge bin bottom; (2) burner modification--minor modification to the tip of the existing HEACC burner to prevent change of flame shapes for no apparent reason.

Patel, R.L.; Borio, R. [ABB/Combustion Engineering, Windsor, CT (United States). Power Plant Labs.; Scaroni, A.W.; Miller, B.G. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); McGowan, J.G. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

1994-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

348

Capture-Ready Coal Plants -Options, Technologies and Economics Mark C. Bohm1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Capture-Ready Coal Plants - Options, Technologies and Economics Mark C. Bohm1 , Howard J. Herzog1 be employed during the initial design and construction of a both pulverized coal and integrated gasification the Internet in the summer of 2006 [7]. Introduction Interest in the construction of coal-fired power

349

Financing Capture Ready Coal-Fired Power Plants in China by Issuing Capture Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Financing Capture Ready Coal-Fired Power Plants in China by Issuing Capture Options Xi Liang, Jia Li, Jon Gibbons and David Reiner December 2007 EPRG 0728 & CWPE 0761 #12;FINANCING CAPTURE READY COAL supercritical pulverized coal power plant in China, using a cash flow model with Monte-Carlo simulations

Aickelin, Uwe

350

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

eliminates coal handling and pulverizing at the power plant.Plant - Without Coki ng ($1969) Component Capita 1 Cost 6,04xl0 6 $75.11xl0 6 Coal Handlingcoal and helps decrease transportation and handling costs. Moisture in coal also affects the heat rate at the power plant.

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

COMBINATION OF MSWC AND COAL FIRED POWER PLANT Jiirgen Vehlow, Hans Hunsinger, Siegfried Kreisz, Helmut Seifert  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMBINATION OF MSWC AND COAL FIRED POWER PLANT Jiirgen Vehlow, Hans Hunsinger, Siegfried Kreisz for the combination of a municipal solid waste combustion plant and a coal fired power plant in such a way that the dedusted and pre cleaned offgas of the waste combustion serves as carrier gas for the pulverized coal

Columbia University

352

Hardened, environmentally disposable composite granules of coal cleaning refuse, coal combustion waste, and other wastes, and method preparing the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hardened, environmentally inert and disposable composite granule of coal cleaning refuse and coal combustion waste, and method for producing the same, wherein the coal combustion waste is first granulated. The coal cleaning refuse is pulverized into fine particles and is then bound, as an outer layer, to the granulated coal combustion waste granules. This combination is then combusted and sintered. After cooling, the combination results in hardened, environmentally inert and disposable composite granules having cores of coal combustion waste, and outer shells of coal cleaning refuse. The composite particles are durable and extremely resistant to environmental and chemical forces.

Burnet, George (Ames, IA); Gokhale, Ashok J. (College Station, TX)

1990-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

353

Hardened, environmentally disposable composite granules of coal cleaning refuse, coal combustion waste, and other wastes, and method preparing the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hardened, environmentally inert and disposable composite granule of coal cleaning refuse and coal combustion waste and method for producing the same are disclosed, wherein the coal combustion waste is first granulated. The coal cleaning refuse is pulverized into fine particles and is then bound, as an outer layer, to the granulated coal combustion waste granules. This combination is then combusted and sintered. After cooling, the combination results in hardened, environmentally inert and disposable composite granules having cores of coal combustion waste, and outer shells of coal cleaning refuse. The composite particles are durable and extremely resistant to environmental and chemical forces. 3 figs.

Burnet, G.; Gokhale, A.J.

1990-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

354

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 9, April--June 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. During the second quarter of 1991, the following technical progress was made: completed drop tube furnace devolatilization tests of the spherical oil agglomeration beneficiated products; continued analyses of samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; continued analyses of the data and samples from the CE pilot-scale tests of nine fuels; completed writing a summary topical report including all results to date on he nine fuels tested; and presented three technical papers on the project results at the 16th International Conference on Coal & Slurry Technologies.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Development of a coal-fired gas turbine cogeneration system: Status report  

SciTech Connect

The Allison Advanced Coal-Fueled Turbine Program is now in the sixth year of a development effort that has led to a POC engine demonstration test on a Coal-Water-Slurry (CWS) fuel. Earlier forecasts by CWS suppliers that suitable CWS fuels would be commercially available at an economic price have not been realized. A program replan has, therefore, been executed that incorporates the use of readily available dry pulverized coal. To support this program, technology issues relating to combustor performance and emission control, hot gas cleanup, and turbine deposition, erosion and corrosion (DEC) have been addressed. In addition, system assessment studies have been performed to evaluate the commercial prospects for small (<8 MWe) coal-fired industrial cogeneration systems and the application of the rich-quench-lean (RQL) coal-combustion technology to larger (> 100 MWe) utility-sized gas turbines. These results are reported by Wenglarz (1992). Combustor and engine tests on dry coal are now planned in preparation for a commercial demonstration that will follow the completion of this program.

Wilkes, C.; Wenglarz, R.A.; Hart, P.J.; Thomas, W.H.; Rothrock, J.W.; Harris, C.N.; Bourke, R.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

NETL: Advanced Research - Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Performance Materials > Chrome Oxide Refractory High Performance Materials > Chrome Oxide Refractory Advanced Research High Performance Materials Chrome Oxide Refractory One notable NETL success is the development of a chrome oxide refractory material capable of working in slagging gasifier conditions. In this project, researchers first determined that one of the major failure mechanisms for chrome oxide refractories exposed to the intense heat and corrosive environment was spalling, or the chipping or flaking of refractory material from an exposed face. They used this information to formulate a high-chrome oxide refractory composition that resists spalling, resulting in a refractory with a longer service life in the gasifier. Inside an ultrasupercritical (USC) pulverized coal power plant, materials are exposed to temperatures up to 760°C and pressures up to 5,000 psi. Operating a USC system can improve power plant efficiency up to 47% and reduce emissions. However, finding boiler and turbine materials that can hold up under extreme conditions requires new high-temperature metal alloys and ceramic coatings, as well as computational modeling research to optimize the processing of these materials. Advanced Research Materials Development program successes in this area include the following:

357

Subtask 3.9 - Direct Coal Liquefaction Process Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC), in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Accelergy Corporation, an advanced fuels developer with technologies exclusively licensed from ExxonMobil, undertook Subtask 3.9 to design, build, and preliminarily operate a bench-scale direct coal liquefaction (DCL) system capable of converting 45 pounds/hour of pulverized, dried coal to a liquid suitable for upgrading to fuels and/or chemicals. Fabrication and installation of the DCL system and an accompanying distillation system for off-line fractionation of raw coal liquids into 1) a naphtha?middle distillate stream for upgrading and 2) a recycle stream was completed in May 2012. Shakedown of the system was initiated in July 2012. In addition to completing fabrication of the DCL system, the project also produced a 500-milliliter sample of jet fuel derived in part from direct liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 coal, and submitted the sample to the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) at Wright? Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio, for evaluation. The sample was confirmed by AFRL to be in compliance with all U.S. Air Force-prescribed alternative aviation fuel initial screening criteria.

Aulich, Ted; Sharma, Ramesh

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Engineering Development of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning for Premium Fuel Applications: Task 9 - Selective agglomeration Module Testing and Evaluation.  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of this project was the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope included laboratory research and bench-scale testing of both processes on six coals to optimize the processes, followed by the design, construction, and operation of a 2 t/hr process development unit (PDU). The project began in October, 1992, and is scheduled for completion by September 1997. This report summarizes the findings of all the selective agglomeration (SA) test work performed with emphasis on the results of the PDU SA Module testing. Two light hydrocarbons, heptane and pentane, were tested as agglomerants in the laboratory research program which investigated two reactor design concepts: a conventional two-stage agglomeration circuit and a unitized reactor that combined the high- and low-shear operations in one vessel. The results were used to design and build a 25 lb/hr bench-scale unit with two-stage agglomeration. The unit also included a steam stripping and condensation circuit for recovery and recycle of heptane. It was tested on six coals to determine the optimum grind and other process conditions that resulted in the recovery of about 99% of the energy while producing low ash (1-2 lb/MBtu) products. The fineness of the grind was the most important variable with the D80 (80% passing size) varying in the 12 to 68 micron range. All the clean coals could be formulated into coal-water-slurry-fuels with acceptable properties. The bench-scale results were used for the conceptual and detailed design of the PDU SA Module which was integrated with the existing grinding and dewatering circuits. The PDU was operated for about 9 months. During the first three months, the shakedown testing was performed to fine tune the operation and control of various equipment. This was followed by parametric testing, optimization/confirmatory testing, and finally a 72-hour round the clock production run for each of the three project coals (Hiawatha, Taggart, and Indiana VII). The parametric testing results confirmed that the Taggart coal ground to a D80 of 30 microns could be cleaned to 1 lb ash/MBtu, whereas the Hiawatha and Indiana Vil coals had to be ground to D80s of 40 and 20 microns, respectively, to be cleaned to 2 lb ash/MBtu. The percent solids, residence time, shear intensity (impeller tip speed and energy input per unit volume), and heptane dosage were the main variables that affected successful operation (phase inversion or microagglomerate formation in the high-shear reactor and their growth to 2-3 mm in size during low shear). Downward inclination of the vibrating screen and adequate spray water helped produce the low ash products. Btu recoveries were consistently greater than 98%. Two-stage steam stripping achieved about 99% heptane recovery for recycle to the process. Residual hydrocarbon concentrations were in the 3000 to 5000 ppm range on a dry solids basis.

Moro, N.` Jha, M.C.

1997-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

359

NETL: News Release - DOE Announces Further Field Testing of Advanced  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Announces Further Field Testing of Advanced Mercury Control Technologies DOE Announces Further Field Testing of Advanced Mercury Control Technologies Six Projects Selected in Round 2 to Address Future Power Plant Mercury Reduction Initiatives PITTSBURGH, PA - With an eye on future federal regulations aimed at reducing mercury emissions, the U.S. Department of Energy has selected six additional projects as part of a DOE research program to advance the technical readiness of mercury control options for the Nation's fleet of coal-fired power plants. The six projects in this second round of awards build on last year's selection of eight projects, and will verify technology performance, evaluate costs, and assess balance-of-plant impacts. The projects will field test advanced, post-combustion technologies involving all coal types at utilities using pulverized coal or cyclone-boiler configurations, and focus on technologies capable of removing mercury from flue gas containing higher concentrations of elemental mercury. The technologies include sorbent injection, wet flue gas desulfurization systems enhancement, and combustion optimization.

360

Pulverizer Maintenance Guide, Volume 1: Raymond Bowl Mills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide provides fossil plant personnel with current maintenance information on the Alstom Raymond Bowl mills and will assist a plant in improving the maintenance of the pulverizer mills.

2004-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

NETL: Advanced Research - Computation Energy Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MFIX MFIX Advanced Research Computational Energy Sciences MFIX MFIX (Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchanges) is a general-purpose computer code developed at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for describing the hydrodynamics, heat transfer and chemical reactions in fluid-solids systems. It has been used for describing bubbling and circulating fluidized beds and spouted beds. MFIX calculations give transient data on the three-dimensional distribution of pressure, velocity, temperature, and species mass fractions. MFIX code is based on a generally accepted set of multiphase flow equations. The code is used as a "test-stand" for testing and developing multiphase flow constitutive equations. MFIX Virtual Plant Consider a fluidized bed coal gasification reactor, in which pulverized

362

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 6, July 1990--September 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a three-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are being run at the cleaning facility in Homer City, Pennsylvania, to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CVVT) or a dry microfine pulverized coal (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. Subcontractors to CE to perform parts of the test work are the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Physical Science, Inc. Technology Company (PSIT) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC). Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFS, and two conventionally cleaned coals for full-scale tests. Approximately, nine BCFs will be in dry microfine coal (DMPC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

The low moisture eastern coal processing system at the UTSI-DOE Coal Fired Flow Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A low moisture, eastern coal processing system was constructed at the Department of Energy`s Coal Fired Flow Facility (CFFF), located at the University of Tennessee Space Institute in Tullahoma, Tennessee, to provide a metered and regulated supply of seeded, pulverized coal to support magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generation research. The original system configuration is described as well as major modifications made in response to specific operational problems. Notable among these was the in-house development of the Moulder flow control valve which exhibited marked improvement in durability compared to previous valves used with pulverized coal. Coal processing system performance parameters are discussed. A summary of tests conducted and significant events are included.

Evans, B.R.; Washington, E.S.; Sanders, M.E.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system. Annual report, June 1991--June 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the activity during the period from 2 June 1991 to 1 June 1992. The major areas of work include: the combustor sub-scale and full size testing, cleanup, coal fuel specification and processing, the Hot End Simulation rig and design of the engine parts required for use with the coal-fueled combustor island. To date Solar has demonstrated: Stable and efficient combustion burning coal-water mixtures using the Two Stage Slagging Combustor; Molten slag removal of over 97% using the slagging primary and the particulate removal impact separator; and on-site preparation of CWM is feasible. During the past year the following tasks were completed: The feasibility of on-site CWM preparation was demonstrated on the subscale TSSC. A water-cooled impactor was evaluated on the subscale TSSC; three tests were completed on the full size TSSC, the last one incorporating the PRIS; a total of 27 hours of operation on CWM at design temperature were accumulated using candle filters supplied by Refraction through Industrial Pump & Filter; a target fuel specification was established and a fuel cost model developed which can identify sensitivities of specification parameters; analyses of the effects of slag on refractory materials were conducted; and modifications continued on the Hot End Simulation Rig to allow extended test times.

LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; When, C.S.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for the Utilization of Low Rank Coals  

SciTech Connect

Air Products has developed a potentially ground-breaking technology – Sour Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) – to replace the solvent-based acid gas removal (AGR) systems currently employed to separate sulfur containing species, along with CO{sub 2} and other impurities, from gasifier syngas streams. The Sour PSA technology is based on adsorption processes that utilize pressure swing or temperature swing regeneration methods. Sour PSA technology has already been shown with higher rank coals to provide a significant reduction in the cost of CO{sub 2} capture for power generation, which should translate to a reduction in cost of electricity (COE), compared to baseline CO{sub 2} capture plant design. The objective of this project is to test the performance and capability of the adsorbents in handling tar and other impurities using a gaseous mixture generated from the gasification of lower rank, lignite coal. The results of this testing are used to generate a high-level pilot process design, and to prepare a techno-economic assessment evaluating the applicability of the technology to plants utilizing these coals.

Kloosterman, Jeff

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

Advanced Research Materials Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

materials requirements for all fossil energy systems, including materials for advanced power generation and coal fuels technologies. Examples of these technologies include coal...

367

Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler system. Technical progress report No. 1, August--December 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (ABB CE) to perform work on the ``Engineering Development of Advanced Coal-Fired Low-Emission Boiler Systems`` Project and has authorized ABB CE to complete Phase I on a cost-reimbursable basis. The overall objective of the Project is the expedited commercialization of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. The specified primary objectives are: NO{sub x} emissions not greater than one-third NSPS; SO{sub x} emissions not greater than one-third NSPS; and particulate emissions not greater than one-half NSPS. The specific secondary objectives are: Improved ash disposability and reduced waste generation; reduced air toxics emissions; increased generating efficiency. The final deliverables are a design data base that will allow future coal-fired power plants to meet the stated objectives and a preliminary design of a commercial generation unit.

Not Available

1993-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

368

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, January--March 1993  

SciTech Connect

Accomplishments for the past quarter are briefly described for the following areas of research: oil shale; tar sand; coal; advanced exploratory process technology; and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale and tar sand researches cover processing studies. Coal research includes: coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology covers: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW{sup TM} field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid-state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin tight gas sands; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process; oil field waste cleanup using tank bottom recovery process; remote chemical sensor development; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; solid-state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens; and development of an effective method for the clean-up of natural gas.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1992  

SciTech Connect

Accomplishments for the past quarter are presented for the following five tasks: oil shale; tar sand; coal; advanced exploratory process technology; and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research covers oil shale process studies. Tar sand research is on process development of Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) Process. Coal research covers: coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts;advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process; NMR analysis of samples from the ocean drilling program; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; and solid state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens.

Speight, J.G.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

370

Proceedings of the joint contractors meeting: FE/EE Advanced Turbine Systems conference FE fuel cells and coal-fired heat engines conference  

SciTech Connect

The joint contractors meeting: FE/EE Advanced Turbine Systems conference FEE fuel cells and coal-fired heat engines conference; was sponsored by the US Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy and held at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, West Virginia 26507-0880, August 3--5, 1993. Individual papers have been entered separately.

Geiling, D.W. [ed.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

[Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems]. Technical progress report, October--December 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Project is the expedited commercialization of advanced coal-fired low-emisssion boiler systems. The primary objectives are: NO{sub x} emissions, lb/million Btu; SO{sub 2} emissions, lb/million Btu; particulate emissions, lb/million Btu; and net plant efficiency, not less than 42%. The secondary objectives are: improved ash disposability; reduced waste generation; and reduced air toxics emissions. Accomplishments to date are summarized for the following tasks: task 1, project planning and management; task 7, component development and optimization; task 8, preliminary POC test facility design; task 9, subsystem test design and plan; task 10, subsystem test unit construction; and task 11, subsystem test operation and evaluation.

Wesnor, J.D.; Bakke, E. [ABB Environmental Systems, Birmingham, AL (United States); Bender, D.J.; Kaminski, R.S. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Inc., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

Center for Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research  

SciTech Connect

An unregulated conventional power station based on the Rankine Cycle typically bums pulverized coal in a boiler that exports steam for expansion through a steam turbine which ultimately drives an electric generator. The flue gases are normally cleaned of particulates by an electrostatic precipitator or bag house. A basic cycle such as this will have an efficiency of approximately 35% with 10% of the energy released through the stack and 55% to cooling water. Advanced gas turbine based combustion systems have the potential to be environmentally and commercially superior to existing conventional technology. however, to date, industry, academic, and government groups have not coordinated their effort to commercialize these technologies. The Center for Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research will provide the medium to support effective commercialization of this technology. Several cycles or concepts for advanced gas turbine systems that could be fired on natural gas or could be adapted into coal based systems have been proposed (for examples, see Figures 4, 5, 6, and 7) (2) all with vary degrees of complexity, research needs, and system potential. Natural gas fired power systems are now available with 52% efficiency ratings; however, with a focused base technology program, it is expected that the efficiency levels can be increased to the 60% level and beyond. This increase in efficiency will significantly reduce the environmental burden and reduce the cost of power generation.

Golan, L.P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

Center for Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research  

SciTech Connect

An unregulated conventional power station based on the Rankine Cycle typically bums pulverized coal in a boiler that exports steam for expansion through a steam turbine which ultimately drives an electric generator. The flue gases are normally cleaned of particulates by an electrostatic precipitator or bag house. A basic cycle such as this will have an efficiency of approximately 35% with 10% of the energy released through the stack and 55% to cooling water. Advanced gas turbine based combustion systems have the potential to be environmentally and commercially superior to existing conventional technology. however, to date, industry, academic, and government groups have not coordinated their effort to commercialize these technologies. The Center for Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research will provide the medium to support effective commercialization of this technology. Several cycles or concepts for advanced gas turbine systems that could be fired on natural gas or could be adapted into coal based systems have been proposed (for examples, see Figures 4, 5, 6, and 7) (2) all with vary degrees of complexity, research needs, and system potential. Natural gas fired power systems are now available with 52% efficiency ratings; however, with a focused base technology program, it is expected that the efficiency levels can be increased to the 60% level and beyond. This increase in efficiency will significantly reduce the environmental burden and reduce the cost of power generation.

Golan, L.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

The fate of alkali species in advanced coal conversion systems. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fate of species during coal combustion and gasification was determined experimentally in a fluidized bed reactor. A molecular-beam sampling mags spectrometer was used to identify and measure the concentration of vapor phase sodium species in the high temperature environment. Concurrent collection and analysis of the ash established the distribution of sodium species between gas-entrained and residual ash fractions. Two coals, Beulah Zap lignite and Illinois No. 6 bituminous, were used under combustion and gasification conditions at atmospheric pressure. Steady-state bed temperatures were in the range 800--950{degree}C. An extensive calibration procedure ensured that the mass spectrometer was capable of detecting sodium-containing vapor species at concentrations as low as 50 ppb. In the temperature range 800{degree} to 950{degree}C, the concentrations of vapor phase sodium species (Na, Na{sub 2}O, NaCl, and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) are less than 0.05 ppm under combustion conditions with excess air. However, under gasification conditions with Beulah Zap lignite, sodium vapor species are present at about 14 ppm at a temperature of 820{degree}. Of this amount, NaCl vapor constitutes about 5 ppm and the rest is very likely NAOH. Sodium in the form of NaCl in coal enhances the vaporization of sodium species during combustion. Vapor phase concentration of both NaCl and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} increased when NaCl was added to the Beulah Zap lignite. Ash particles account for nearly 100% of the sodium in the coal during combustion in the investigated temperature range. The fine fly-ash particles (<10 {mu}m) are enriched in sodium, mainly in the form of sodium sulfate. The amount of sodium species in this ash fraction may be as high as 30 wt % of the total sodium. Sodium in the coarse ash particle phase retained in the bed is mainly in amorphous forms.

Krishnan, G.N.; Wood, B.J.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Effect of liquefaction processing conditions on combustion characteristics of solvent-refined coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of several direct liquefaction processes currently under advanced stages of development is the Solvent-Refined Coal-I (SRC-I) process. A major SRC-1 product option is a low sulfur, low ash solid (SRC) which could be used as an electric utility boiler fuel much in the same manner that pulverized coal is currently fired in this type of combustion equipment. SRC-I processing has been performed using three variations in the manner in which mineral matter and unconverted coal are separated from the hot coal liquid. These processes are the Pressure Filtration Deashing (PFD), Anti-Solvent Deashing (ASD), and Critical Solvent Deashing (CSD). Since processing conditions may influence the combustion of SRC-I solids produced, an experimental program was carried out at both the bench and pilot plant scale to determine the influence of processing (i.e. solids separation method) and combustion conditions on carbon burnout of these three varieties of SRC solid boiler fuels. Included in this study was an examination of NO/sub x/ emissions (particularly for the CSD SRC and PFD SRC) with the objective of attaining low NO/sub x/ emissions without adversely affecting combustion efficiency. The work was carried out at the laboratory, bench and pilot plant scales employing Thermo-Gravimetric analyses, Drop Tube Furnace testing, and Controlled Mixing History furnace testing, respectively. Reactivity and NO/sub x/ emissions results were compared with those obtained from two coals previously tested and used as reference coals. One of these coals was a high reactivity Wyoming subbituminous coal and the other was a low reactivity Kentucky high volatile bituminous coal. The type of processing scheme used in the SRC-I deashing step was found to have a major impact on the combustion properties of the resultant solid SRC product.

Goetz, G.J.; Lao, T.C.; Mehta, A.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

NETL: News Release - Ten Projects Selected by DOE to Advance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, 2010 7, 2010 Ten Projects Selected by DOE to Advance State-of-the-Art Carbon Capture from Coal Power Plants Washington, D.C. -Ten projects aimed at developing advanced technologies for capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal combustion have been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under its Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Program. Valued at approximately $67 million ($15 million in non-federal cost sharing) over three years, the projects are focused on reducing the "energy and efficiency penalties" associated with applying currently available carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies to existing and new power plants. CO2 power plant capture systems currently require large amounts of energy for their operation, resulting in decreased efficiency and reduced net power output when compared to plants without CCS technology. These "penalties" can add as much as 80 percent to the cost of electricity for a new pulverized coal plant and about 35 percent to the cost of electricity for a new advanced gasification plant. The overall goal of research conducted by DOE's Office of Fossil Energy (FE) and managed by FE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is to improve efficiencies and reduce these costs to less than 30 percent and 10 percent, respectively.

377

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 8, January--March 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. During the third quarter of 1991, the following technical progress was made: Calculated the kinetic characteristics of chars from the combustion of spherical oil agglomeration beneficiated products; continued drop tube devolatilization tests of the spherical oil agglomeration beneficiated products; continued analyses of the data and samples from the CE pilot-scale tests of nine fuels; and started writing a summary topical report to include all results on the nine fuels tested.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 12, January--March 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the third quarter of 1992, the following technical progress was made: Continued analyses of drop tube furnace samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; completed editing of the fifth quarterly report and sent it to the publishing office; and prepared two technical papers for conferences.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 14, July--September 1992  

SciTech Connect

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the third quarter of 1992, the following technical progress was made: Continued analyses of drop tube furnace samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; published two technical papers at conferences; and prepared for upcoming tests of new BCFs being produced.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 10, July--September 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. During the third quarter of 1991, the following technical progress was made: Continued analyses of drop tube furnace samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; completed analyses of the samples from the pilot-scale ash deposition tests of unweathered Upper Freeport fuels; completed editing of the first three quarterly reports and sent them to the publishing office; presented the project results at the Annual Contractors` Conference.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell technology advancement for coal-based power generation. Final report, September 1989--March 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has successfully advanced the technology for MSOFCs for coal-based power generation. Major advances include: tape-calendering processing technology, leading to 3X improved performance at 1000 C; stack materials formulations and designs with sufficiently close thermal expansion match for no stack damage after repeated thermal cycling in air; electrically conducting bonding with excellent structural robustness; and sealants that form good mechanical seals for forming manifold structures. A stack testing facility was built for high-spower MSOFC stacks. Comprehensive models were developed for fuel cell performance and for analyzing structural stresses in multicell stacks and electrical resistance of various stack configurations. Mechanical and chemical compatibility properties of fuel cell components were measured; they show that the baseline Ca-, Co-doped interconnect expands and weakens in hydrogen fuel. This and the failure to develop adequate sealants were the reason for performance shortfalls in large stacks. Small (1-in. footprint) two-cell stacks were fabricated which achieved good performance (average area-specific-resistance 1.0 ohm-cm{sup 2} per cell); however, larger stacks had stress-induced structural defects causing poor performance.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1992  

SciTech Connect

Progress made in five research programs is described. The subtasks in oil shale study include oil shale process studies and unconventional applications and markets for western oil shale.The tar sand study is on recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction (ROPE) process. Four tasks are described in coal research: underground coal gasification; coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and sold waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research covers: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; NMR analysis of sample from the ocean drilling program; and menu driven access to the WDEQ hydrologic data management system.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

Comparison of intergrated coal gasification combined cycle power plants with current and advanced gas turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two recent conceptual design studies examined ''grass roots'' integrated gasification-combined cycle (IGCC) plants for the Albany Station site of Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation. One of these studies was based on the Texaco Gasifier and the other was developed around the British Gas Co.-Lurgi slagging gasifier. Both gasifiers were operated in the ''oxygen-blown'' mode, producing medium Btu fuel gas. The studies also evaluated plant performance with both current and advanced gas turbines. Coalto-busbar efficiencies of approximately 35 percent were calculated for Texaco IGCC plants using current technology gas turbines. Efficiencies of approximately 39 percent were obtained for the same plant when using advanced technology gas turbines.

Banda, B.M.; Evans, T.F.; McCone, A.I.; Westisik, J.H.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

RESIDUES FROM COAL CONVERSION AND UTILIZATION: ADVANCED MINERALOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND DISPOSED BYPRODUCT DIAGENESIS  

SciTech Connect

The goals of the project are two-fold: (1) to upgrade semi-quantitative X-ray diffraction (QXRD) methods presently used in analyzing complex coal combustion by-product (CCB) systems, with the quantitative Rietveld method, and (2) to apply this method to a set of by-product materials that have been disposed or utilized for a long period (5 years or more) in contact with the natural environment, to further study the nature of CCB diagenesis. The project is organized into three tasks to accomplish these two goals: (1) thorough characterization of a set of previously analyzed disposed by-product materials, (2) development of a set of CCB-specific protocols for Rietveld QXRD, and (3) characterization of an additional set of disposed CCB materials, including application of the protocols for Rietveld QXRD developed in Task 2.

Gregory J. McCarthy; Dean G. Grier

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. Technical progress report No. 4, July--September 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Project is the expedited commercialization of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. The specified primary objectives are: NOx emissions not greater than one-third NSPS; SOx emissions not greater than one-third NSPS; and particulate emissions not greater than one-half NSPS. The specific secondary objectives are: improved ash disposability and reduced waste generation; reduced air toxics emissions; and increased generating efficiency. The final deliverables are a design data base that will allow future coal-fired power plants to meet the stated objectives and a preliminary design of a commercial generation unit.

Not Available

1993-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

386

Advancements in low NOx tangential firing systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The most cost effective method of reducing nitrogen oxide emissions when burning fossil fuels, such as coal, is through in-furnace NOx reduction processes. ABB Combustion Engineering, Inc. (ABB CE), through its ABB Power Plant Laboratories has been involved in the development of such low NOx pulverized coal firing systems for many years. This development effort is most recently demonstrated through ABB CE`s involvement with the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) {open_quotes}Engineering Development of Advanced Coal Fired Low-Emission Boiler Systems{close_quotes} (LEBS) project. The goal of the DOE LEBS project is to use {open_quotes}near term{close_quotes} technologies to produce a commercially viable, low emissions boiler. This paper addresses one of the key technologies within this project, the NOx control subsystem. The foundation for the work undertaken at ABB CE is the TFS 2000{trademark} firing system, which is currently offered on a commercial basis. This system encompasses sub-stoichiometric combustion in the main firing zone for reduced NOx formation. Potential enhancements to this firing system focus on optimizing the introduction of the air and fuel within the primary windbox to provide additional horizontal and vertical staging. As is the case with all in-furnace NOx control processes, it is necessary to operate the system in a manner which does not decrease NOx at the expense of reduced combustion efficiency.

Hein, R. von; Maney, C.; Borio, R. [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

387

CoalFleet RD&D augmentation plan for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants  

SciTech Connect

To help accelerate the development, demonstration, and market introduction of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and other clean coal technologies, EPRI formed the CoalFleet for Tomorrow initiative, which facilitates collaborative research by more than 50 organizations from around the world representing power generators, equipment suppliers and engineering design and construction firms, the U.S. Department of Energy, and others. This group advised EPRI as it evaluated more than 120 coal-gasification-related research projects worldwide to identify gaps or critical-path activities where additional resources and expertise could hasten the market introduction of IGCC advances. The resulting 'IGCC RD&D Augmentation Plan' describes such opportunities and how they could be addressed, for both IGCC plants to be built in the near term (by 2012-15) and over the longer term (2015-25), when demand for new electric generating capacity is expected to soar. For the near term, EPRI recommends 19 projects that could reduce the levelized cost-of-electricity for IGCC to the level of today's conventional pulverized-coal power plants with supercritical steam conditions and state-of-the-art environmental controls. For the long term, EPRI's recommended projects could reduce the levelized cost of an IGCC plant capturing 90% of the CO{sub 2} produced from the carbon in coal (for safe storage away from the atmosphere) to the level of today's IGCC plants without CO{sub 2} capture. EPRI's CoalFleet for Tomorrow program is also preparing a companion RD&D augmentation plan for advanced-combustion-based (i.e., non-gasification) clean coal technologies (Report 1013221). 7 refs., 30 figs., 29 tabs., 4 apps.

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Quarterly technical progress report No. 7, April 1993--June 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to develop a new approach for the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrates coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, liquefaction, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and carrying out a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. The project is being carried out under contract to the United States Department of Energy. All three coals used in this study (Black Thunder, Burning Star bituminous, and Martin Lake lignite) are effectively swelled by a number of solvents. The most effective solvents are those having hetero-functionality. In addition, a synergistic effect has been demonstrated, in which solvent blends are more effective for coal swelling than the pure solvents alone. Therefore, it will be necessary to use only low levels of swelling agents and yet promote the impregnation of catalyst precursors. The rate of the impregnation of catalyst precursors into swollen coal increases greatly as the effectiveness of the solvent to swell the coal increases. This effect is also demonstrated by improved catalyst precursor impregnation with increased contact temperature. Laboratory- and bench-scale liquefaction experimentation is underway using swelled and catalyst impregnated coal samples. Higher coal conversions were observed for the SO{sub 2}-treated coal than the raw coal, regardless of catalyst type. Conversions of swelled coal were highest when Molyvan-L, molybdenum naphthenate, and nickel octoate, respectively, were added to the liquefaction solvent.

Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Chander, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Gutterman, C.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

ADVANCED MULTI-PRODUCT COAL UTILIZATION BY-PRODUCT PROCESSING PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utilities 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. This part of the study includes the examination of the feedstocks for the beneficiation plant. The ash, as produced by the plant, and that stored in the lower pond were examined. The ash produced by the plant was found to be highly variable as the plant consumes high and low sulfur bituminous coal, in Units 1 and 2 and a mixture of subbituminous and bituminous coal in Units 3 and 4. The ash produced reflected this consisting of an iron-rich ({approx}24%, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), aluminum rich ({approx}29% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and high calcium (6%-7%, CaO) ash, respectively. The LOI of the ash typically was in the range of 5.5% to 6.5%, but individual samples ranged from 1% to almost 9%. The lower pond at Ghent is a substantial body, covering more than 100 acres, with a volume that exceeds 200 million cubic feet. The sedimentation, stratigraphy and resource assessment of the in place ash was investigated with vibracoring and three-dimensional, computer-modeling techniques. Thirteen cores to depths reaching nearly 40 feet, were retrieved, logged in the field and transported to the lab for a series of analyses for particle size, loss on ignition, petrography, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray fluorescence. Collected data were processed using ArcViewGIS, Rockware, and Microsoft Excel to create three-dimensional, layered iso-grade maps, as well as stratigraphic columns and profiles, and reserve estimations. The ash in the pond was projected to exceed 7 million tons and contain over 1.5 million tons of coarse carbon, and 1.8 million tons of fine (<10 {micro}m) glassy pozzolanic material. The size, quality and consistency of the ponded material suggests that it is the better feedstock for the beneficiation plant.

Robert Jewell; Thomas Robl; John Groppo

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Assessment of instrumentation needs for advanced coal power plant applications: Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to identify contaminants, identify instrumentation needs, assess available instrumentation and identify instruments that should be developed for controlling and monitoring gas streams encountered in the following power plants: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle, Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion, and Gasification Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell. Emphasis was placed on hot gas cleanup system gas stream analysis, and included process control, research and environmental monitoring needs. Commercial process analyzers, typical of those currently used for process control purposes, were reviewed for the purpose of indicating commercial status. No instrument selection guidelines were found which were capable of replacing user interaction with the process analyzer vendors. This study leads to the following conclusions: available process analyzers for coal-derived gas cleanup applications satisfy current power system process control and regulatory requirements, but they are troublesome to maintain; commercial gas conditioning systems and in situ analyzers continue to be unavailable for hot gas cleanup applications; many research-oriented gas stream characterization and toxicity assessment needs can not be met by commercially available process analyzers; and greater emphasis should be placed on instrumentation and control system planning for future power plant applications. Analyzers for specific compounds are not recommended other than those needed for current process control purposes. Instead, some generally useful on-line laser-based and inductively coupled plasma methods are recommended for further development because of their potential for use in present hot gas cleanup research and future optimization, component protection and regulation compliance activities. 48 refs., 21 figs., 26 tabs.

Nelson, E.T.; Fischer, W.H.; Lipka, J.V.; Rutkowski, M.D.; Zaharchuk, R.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 18, July--September 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coal (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the third quarter of 1993, the following technical progress was made: Continued with data and sample analysis from the pilot-scale tests of Upper Freeport feed coal, air-dried and mulled microagglomerate products; air-dried Pittsburgh No. 8 as-is and mulled products for upcoming Task 3 combustion testing; and prepared two abstracts for presentation for the March 1 994 Coal Utilization and Fuel Systems Conference.

Chow, O.K.; Hargrove, M.J.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Intelligent Control via Wireless Sensor Networks for Advanced Coal Combustion Systems  

SciTech Connect

Numerical Modeling of Solid Gas Flow, System Identification for purposes of modeling and control, and Wireless Sensor and Actor Network design were pursued as part of this project. Time series input-output data was obtained from NETL's Morgantown CFB facility courtesy of Dr. Lawrence Shadle. It was run through a nonlinear kernel estimator and nonparametric models were obtained for the system. Linear and first-order nonlinear kernels were then utilized to obtain a state-space description of the system. Neural networks were trained that performed better at capturing the plant dynamics. It is possible to use these networks to find a plant model and the inversion of this model can be used to control the system. These models allow one to compare with physics based models whose parameters can then be determined by comparing them against the available data based model. On a parallel track, Dr. Kumar designed an energy-efficient and reliable transport protocol for wireless sensor and actor networks, where the sensors could be different types of wireless sensors used in CFB based coal combustion systems and actors are more powerful wireless nodes to set up a communication network while avoiding the data congestion. Dr. Ahmadi's group studied gas solid flow in a duct. It was seen that particle concentration clearly shows a preferential distribution. The particles strongly interact with the turbulence eddies and are concentrated in narrow bands that are evolving with time. It is believed that observed preferential concentration is due to the fact that these particles are flung out of eddies by centrifugal force.

Aman Behal; Sunil Kumar; Goodarz Ahmadi

2007-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

393

Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. Quarterly technical progress report No. 17, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the work performed between October 1 and December 31, 1996 by the ABB team on U.S. Department of Energy project ``Engineering Development of Advanced Coal-Fired Low-Emission Boiler Systems`` (LEBS), which is part of the DOE`s Combustion 2000 Program. The overall objective of the LEBS Project is to dramatically improve environmental performance of future coal-fired power plants without adversely impacting efficiency or the cost of electricity. Near-term technologies, i.e., advanced technologies that are partially developed, will be used to reduce NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} emission to one-sixth current NSPS limits and particulates to one- third current NSPS limits.

Regan, J.W.; Bender, D.J.; Clark, J.P.; Wesnor, J.D.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. Technical progress report No. 15, April 15 1996--June 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology center of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has contracted with Combustion Engineering; Inc. (ABB CE) to perform work on the {open_quotes}Engineering Development of Advanced Coal-Fired Low-Emission Boiler Systems{close_quote} Project and has authorized ABB CE to complete Phase I on a cost-reimbursable basis and Phases II and III on a cost-share basis.

1996-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

395

An analysis of markets for small-scale, advanced coal-combustion technology in Spain, Italy, and Turkey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the examination of potential overseas markets for using small-scale, US-developed, advanced coal-combustion technologies (ACTs). In previous work, member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) were rated on their potential for using ACTs through a comprehensive screening methodology. The three most promising OECD markets were found to be Spain, Italy, and Turkey. This report provides in-depth analyses of these three selected countries. First, it addresses changes in the European Community with particular reference to the 1992 restructuring and its potential effect on the energy situation in Europe, specifically in the three subject countries. It presents individual country studies that examine demographics, economics, building infrastructures, and energy-related factors. Potential niches for ACTs are explored for each country through regional analyses. Marketing channels, strategies, and the trading environments in each country are also discussed. The information gathered indicates that Turkey is a most promising market, Spain is a fairly promising market, and Italy appears to be a somewhat limited market for US ACTs. 76 refs., 16 figs., 14 tabs.

Placet, M.; Gerry, P.A.; Kenski, D.M.; Kern, D.M.; Nehring, J.L.; Szpunar, C.B.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Advanced coal-gasification technical analyses. Appendix 3: technical/economic evaluations. Final report, December 1982-September 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains the final report on four tasks performed by KRSI as part of the Advanced Coal Gasification Technical Analysis contract with GRI. It provides extensive, consistent technical and economic information regarding application of (1) Lurgi gasification, (2) Westinghouse (now KRW) gasification, and (3) Direct Methanation (with Lurgi gasifiers) processes to produce SNG from North Dakota lignite. The results of Lurgi and Westinghouse studies were used to develop a plant size vs. cost-of-SNG relationship. The report on each task consists of a block flow diagram, component material balance, process flow sheets showing operating conditions and principal equipment in each major process area, a narrative process description, utility balances, plant efficiency calculations, documentation of design and cost-estimation basis and an economic analysis performed in accordance with the GRI Guidelines. Economic analysis consisted of capital-cost breakdown according to plant areas, variable operating and maintenance costs, and calculation of levelized, constant-dollar cost-of-gas with and without process development allowances (PDA). The sensitivities of the gas cost to major variables are presented in graphical form. For the plant size vs. cost-of-SNG task, similar information is provided at eight different plant capacities based on both Lurgi or Westinghouse gasifiers.

Cover, A.E.; Hubbard, D.A.; Jain, S.K.; Shah, K.V.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Optical fiber evanescent wave adsorption sensors for high-temperature gas sensing in advanced coal-fired power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern advanced energy systems such as coal-fired power plants, gasifiers, or similar infrastructure present some of the most challenging harsh environments for sensors. The power industry would benefit from new, ultra-high temperature devices capable of surviving in hot and corrosive environments for embedded sensing at the highest value locations. For these applications, we are currently exploring optical fiber evanescent wave absorption spectroscopy (EWAS) based sensors consisting of high temperature core materials integrated with novel high temperature gas sensitive cladding materials. Mathematical simulations can be used to assist in sensor development efforts, and we describe a simulation code that assumes a single thick cladding layer with gas sensitive optical constants. Recent work has demonstrated that Au nanoparticle-incorporated metal oxides show a potentially useful response for high temperature optical gas sensing applications through the sensitivity of the localized surface plasmon resonance absorption peak to ambient atmospheric conditions. Hence, the simulation code has been applied to understand how such a response can be exploited in an optical fiber based EWAS sensor configuration. We demonstrate that interrogation can be used to optimize the sensing response in such materials.

Buric, M.; Ohodnicky, P.; Duy, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Advanced turbine design for coal-fueled engines. Topical report, Task 1.6, Task 1.7  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this task is to perform a technical assessment of turbine blading for advanced second generation PFBC conditions, identify specific problems/issues, and recommend an approach for solving any problems identified. A literature search was conducted, problems associated with hot corrosion defined and limited experiments performed. Sulfidation corrosion occurs in industrial, marine and aircraft gas turbine engines and is due to the presence of condensed alkali (sodium) sulfates. The principle source of the alkali in industrial, marine and aircraft gas turbine engines is sea salt crystals. The principle source of the sulfur is not the liquid fuels, but the same ocean born crystals. Moreover deposition of the corrosive salt occurs primarily by a non-equilibrium process. Sodium will be present in the cleaned combusted gases that enter the PFBC turbine. Although equilibrium condensation is not favored, deposition via impaction is probable. Marine gas turbines operate in sodium chloride rich environments without experiencing the accelerated attack noted in coal fired boilers where condensed chlorides contact metallic surfaces. The sulfates of calcium and magnesium are the products of the reactions used to control sulfur. Based upon industrial gas turbine experience and laboratory tests, calcium and magnesium sulfates are, at temperatures up to 1500{degrees}F (815{degrees}C), relatively innocuous salts. In this study it is found that at 1650{degrees}F (900{degrees}C) and above, calcium sulfate becomes an aggressive corrodent.

Bornstein, N.S.

1992-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

399

Research investigations in oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, and advanced fuels research: Volume 2 -- Jointly sponsored research program. Final report, October 1986--September 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerous studies have been conducted in five principal areas: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuels research. In subsequent years, underground coal gasification was broadened to be coal research, under which several research activities were conducted that related to coal processing. The most significant change occurred in 1989 when the agreement was redefined as a Base Program and a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP). Investigations were conducted under the Base Program to determine the physical and chemical properties of materials suitable for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels, to test and evaluate processes and innovative concepts for such conversions, to monitor and determine environmental impacts related to development of commercial-sized operations, and to evaluate methods for mitigation of potential environmental impacts. This report is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 consists of 28 summaries that describe the principal research efforts conducted under the Base Program in five topic areas. Volume 2 describes tasks performed within the JSRP. Research conducted under this agreement has resulted in technology transfer of a variety of energy-related research information. A listing of related publications and presentations is given at the end of each research topic summary. More specific and detailed information is provided in the topical reports referenced in the related publications listings.

Smith, V.E.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The experimental study of coal swelling ratios have been determined with a wide variety of solvents. Only marginal levels of coal swelling were observed for the hydrocarbon solvents, but high levels were found with solvents having heteroatom functionality. Blends were superior to pure solvents. The activity of various catalyst precursors for pyrene hydrogenation and coal conversion was measured. Higher coal conversions were observed for the S0{sub 2}-treated coal than the raw coal, regardless of catalyst type. Coal conversions were highest for Molyvan-L, molybdenum naphthenate, and nickel octoate, respectively. Bottoms processing consists of a combination of the ASCOT process coupling solvent deasphalting with delayed coking. Initial results indicate that a blend of butane and pentane used near the critical temperature of butane is the best solvent blend for producing a yield/temperature relationship of proper sensitivity and yet retaining an asphalt phase of reasonable viscosity. The literature concerning coal swelling, both alone and in combination with coal liquefaction, and the use of dispersed or unsupported catalysts in coal liquefaction has been updated.

Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Gutterman, C. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Chander, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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401

Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to design, construct, and operate an ash beneficiation facility that will generate several products from coal combustion ash stored in a utility ash pond. The site selected is LG&E's Ghent Station located in Carroll County, Kentucky. The specific site under consideration is the lower ash pond at Ghent, a closed landfill encompassing over 100 acres. Coring activities revealed that the pond contains over 7 million tons of ash, including over 1.5 million tons of coarse carbon and 1.8 million tons of fine (ash market is currently oversupplied by more than 500,000 tpy and distant markets (i.e. Florida) are oversupplied as well. While the total US demand for ultrafine pozzolan is currently equal to demand, there is no reason to expect a significant increase in demand. Despite the technical merits identified in the pilot plant work with regard to beneficiating the entire pond ash stream, market developments in the Ohio River Valley area during 2006-2007 were not conducive to demonstrating the project at the scale proposed in the Cooperative Agreement. As a result, Cemex withdrew from the project in 2006 citing unfavorable local market conditions in the foreseeable future at the demonstration site. During the Budget Period 1 extensions provided by the DOE, CAER has contacted several other companies, including cement producers and ash marketing concerns for private cost share. Based on the prevailing demand-supply situation, these companies had expressed interest only in limited product lines, rather than the entire ash beneficiation product stream. Although CAER had generated interest in the technology, a financial commitment to proceed to Budget Period 2 could not be obtained from private companies. Furthermore, the prospects of any decisions being reached within a reasonable time frame were dim. Thus, CAER concurred with the DOE to conclude the project at the end of Budget Period 1, March 31, 2007. The activities presented in this report were carried out during the Cooperative Agreement period 08 November 2004 through 31 March 2007.

Thomas Robl; John Groppo

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

402

Process to improve boiler operation by supplemental firing with thermally beneficiated low rank coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention described is a process for improving the performance of a commercial coal or lignite fired boiler system by supplementing its normal coal supply with a controlled quantity of thermally beneficiated low rank coal, (TBLRC). This supplemental TBLRC can be delivered either to the solid fuel mill (pulverizer) or directly to the coal burner feed pipe. Specific benefits are supplied based on knowledge of equipment types that may be employed on a commercial scale to complete the process. The thermally beneficiated low rank coal can be delivered along with regular coal or intermittently with regular coal as the needs require.

Sheldon, Ray W. (Huntley, MT)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1993  

SciTech Connect

Progress made in five areas of research is described briefly. The subtask in oil shale research is on oil shale process studies. For tar sand the subtask reported is on process development. Coal research includes the following subtasks: Coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes the following: Advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: Organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW{sup TM} field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; operation and evaluation of the CO{sup 2} HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid-state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; characterization of petroleum residua; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process;NMR analysis of samples from the ocean drilling program; oil field waste cleanup using tank bottom recovery process; remote chemical sensor development; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; solid-state NMR analysis of Mowry formation shale from different sedimentary basins; solid-state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens; and development of effective method for the clean-up of natural gas.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Technology Manager, Carbon Capture/Advanced Combustion Strategic Center for Coal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed therein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. DOE/NETL Advanced Carbon Dioxide Capture R&D Program Accomplishments

Capture R& d Program; Shailesh D. Vora; Jared P. Ciferno; Office Of Coal; Power R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Making Carbon Markets in Brazil and India SIMONE PULVER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Making Carbon Markets in Brazil and India SIMONE PULVER ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL markets for carbon emissions reductions in Brazil and India, she argues that the functioning data. Onsite interviews were conducted in both Brazil and India with carbon market experts

Milchberg, Howard

406

Technical Status, Operating Experience, and Risk Assessment of Clean Coal Technologies - 2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conventional pulverized coal (PC) plants provide the base line competition for the newer clean coal technologies (CCTs) such as ultra supercritical (USC) PC, atmospheric and pressurized fluidized bed combustion (AFBC and PFBC), and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that are now accumulating commercial experience. This topical report describes recent experience with the various CCTs and discusses prospects for their further deployment.

2002-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

407

Technical Status, Operating Experience and Risk Assessment of Clean Coal Technologies - 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conventional pulverized coal (PC) plants provide the baseline competition for newer clean coal technologies (CCTs) such as ultra supercritical (USC) PC, atmospheric and pressurized fluidized bed combustion (AFBC and PFBC), and integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) plants that are now accumulating commercial experience.

2001-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

408

NETL: Major Demonstrations Clean Coal Related Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shelf Clean Coal Related Information Advanced Power Systems General Low-Emission Boiler System High-Performance Coal-Fired Power Systems Alternative Fuels and Chemicals from...

409

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF COAL-FIRED HIGH-PERFORMANCE POWER SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

A High Performance Power System (HIPPS) is being developed. This system is a coal-fired, combined cycle plant with indirect heating of gas turbine air. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation and a team consisting of Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation, Bechtel Corporation, University of Tennessee Space Institute and Westinghouse Electric Corporation are developing this system. In Phase 1 of the project, a conceptual design of a commercial plant was developed. Technical and economic analyses indicated that the plant would meet the goals of the project which include a 47 percent efficiency (HHV) and a 10 percent lower cost of electricity than an equivalent size PC plant. The concept uses a pyrolyzation process to convert coal into fuel gas and char. The char is fired in a High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF). The HITAF is a pulverized fuel-fired boiler/air heater where steam is generated and gas turbine air is indirectly heated. The fuel gas generated in the pyrolyzer is then used to heat the gas turbine air further before it enters the gas turbine. The project is currently in Phase 2, which includes engineering analysis, laboratory testing and pilot plant testing. Research and development is being done on the HIPPS systems that are not commercial or being developed on other projects. Pilot plant testing of the pyrolyzer subsystem and the char combustion subsystem are being done separately, and after each experimental program has been completed, a larger scale pyrolyzer will be tested at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, AL. The facility is equipped with a gas turbine and a topping combustor, and as such, will provide an opportunity to evaluate integrated pyrolyzer and turbine operation. This report addresses the areas of technical progress for this quarter. In order to prepare the CETF for the HIPPS char combustion test program, the following three subsystems were designed during this quarter: (1) Flue Gas Recycle System; (2) Pulverized Coal Feed System; and (3) Limestone Feed System The flue gas recycle system is added to simulate the performance of a commercial char burner fired with gas turbine exhaust. Since synthetically made char will be used for the tests at the CETF, the limestone injection system was added to produce a char more representative of that from an actual pyrolyzer. The pulverized coal system is included to provide a supplemental support fuel if a stable flame can not be maintained with char firing only.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

RESIDUES FROM COAL CONVERSION AND UTILIZATION: ADVANCED MINERALOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND DISPOSED BYPRODUCT DIAGENESIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prior to the initiation of this study, understanding of the long-term behavior of environmentally-exposed Coal Combustion By-Products (CCBs) was lacking in (among others) two primary areas addressed in this work. First, no method had been successfully applied to achieve full quantitative analysis of the partitioning of chemical constituents into reactive or passive crystalline or noncrystalline compounds. Rather, only semi-quantitative methods were available, with large associated errors. Second, our understanding of the long-term behavior of various CCBs in contact with the natural environment was based on a relatively limited set of study materials. This study addressed these areas with two objectives, producing (1) a set of protocols for fully quantitative phase analysis using the Rietveld Quantitative X-ray Diffraction (RQXRD) method and (2) greater understanding of the hydrologic and geochemical nature of the long-term behavior of disposed and utilized CCBs. The RQXRD technique was initially tested using (1) mixtures of National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) crystalline standards, and (2) mixtures of synthetic reagents simulating various CCBs, to determine accuracy and precision of the method, and to determine the most favorable protocols to follow in order to efficiently quantify multi-phase mixtures. Four sets of borehole samples of disposed or utilized CCBs were retrieved and analyzed by RQXRD according to the protocols developed under the first objective. The first set of samples, from a Class F ash settling pond in Kentucky disposed for up to 20 years, showed little mineralogical alteration, as expected. The second set of samples, from an embankment in Indiana containing a mixture of chain-grate (stoker) furnace ash and fluidized bed combustion (FBC) residues, showed formation of the mineral thaumasite, as observed in previously studied exposed FBC materials. Two high-calcium CCBs studied, including a dry-process flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-product disposed in the Midwest, and a mixture of Class C fly ash and wet process FGD by-product codisposed in North Dakota, appeared relatively unchanged mineralogically over the up to 5 and 17 years of emplacement, respectively. Each of these two materials contained mineralogies consistent with short-term hydration products of their respective starting (dry) materials. The hydration product ettringite persisted throughout the duration of emplacement at each site, and the diagenetic ash alteration product thaumasite did not form at either site. Explanations for the absence of thaumasite in these two sites include a lack of significant carbonate, sulfate, and alkalinity sources in the case of the North Dakota site, and a lack of sulfate, alkalinity, and sufficient moisture in the Midwest site. Potential for future thaumasite formation in these materials may exist if placed in contact with cold, wet materials containing the missing components listed above. In the presence of the sulfite scrubber mineral hannebachite, the ettringites formed had crystallographic unit cell dimensions smaller than those of pure sulfate ettringite, suggesting either incorporation of sulfite ions into the ettringite structure, or incorporation of silicon and carbonate ions, forming a solid solution towards thaumasite.

Gregory J. McCarthy; Dean G. Grier

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to design, construct, and operate an ash beneficiation facility that will generate several products from coal combustion ash stored in a utility ash pond. The site selected is LG&E's Ghent Station located in Carroll County, Kentucky. The specific site under consideration is the lower ash pond at Ghent, a closed landfill encompassing over 100 acres. Coring activities revealed that the pond contains over 7 million tons of ash, including over 1.5 million tons of coarse carbon and 1.8 million tons of fine (<10 {micro}m) glassy pozzolanic material. These potential products are primarily concentrated in the lower end of the pond adjacent to the outlet. A representative bulk sample was excavated for conducting laboratory-scale process testing while a composite 150 ton sample was also excavated for demonstration-scale testing at the Ghent site. A mobile demonstration plant with a design feed rate of 2.5 tph was constructed and hauled to the Ghent site to evaluate unit processes (i.e. primary classification, froth flotation, spiral concentration, secondary classification, etc.) on a continuous basis to determine appropriate scale-up data. Unit processes were configured into four different flowsheets and operated at a feed rate of 2.5 tph to verify continuous operating performance and generate bulk (1 to 2 tons) products for product testing. Cementitious products were evaluated for performance in mortar and concrete as well as cement manufacture process addition. All relevant data from the four flowsheets was compiled to compare product yields and quality while preliminary flowsheet designs were generated to determine throughputs, equipment size specifications and capital cost summaries. A detailed market study was completed to evaluate the potential markets for cementitious products. Results of the study revealed that the Ghent local fly ash market is currently oversupplied by more than 500,000 tpy and distant markets (i.e. Florida) are oversupplied as well. While the total US demand for ultrafine pozzolan is currently equal to demand, there is no reason to expect a significant increase in demand. Despite the technical merits identified in the pilot plant work with regard to beneficiating the entire pond ash stream, market developments in the Ohio River Valley area during 2006-2007 were not conducive to demonstrating the project at the scale proposed in the Cooperative Agreement. As a result, Cemex withdrew from the project in 2006 citing unfavorable local market conditions in the foreseeable future at the demonstration site. During the Budget Period 1 extensions provided by the DOE, CAER has contacted several other companies, including cement producers and ash marketing concerns for private cost share. Based on the prevailing demand-supply situation, these companies had expressed interest only in limited product lines, rather than the entire ash beneficiation product stream. Although CAER had generated interest in the technology, a financial commitment to proceed to Budget Period 2 could not be obtained from private companies. Furthermore, the prospects of any decisions being reached within a reasonable time frame were dim. Thus, CAER concurred with the DOE to conclude the project at the end of Budget Period 1, March 31, 2007. The activities presented in this report were carried out during the Cooperative Agreement period 08 November 2004 through 31 March 2007.

Thomas Robl; John Groppo

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

412

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems. Quarterly report, January--March 1993  

SciTech Connect

All scheduled tests for the slagging combustor program were completed prior to this reporting period. The draft topical report for the slagging combustor testing was begun in January and the draft submitted to DOE/METC for review in March. Work was completed on the (Advanced Turbine Systems) Phase 1 program and the draft topical begun in January. The ATS Phase 1 draft topical report was submitted to DOE/METC in March. Comments to the report were received back from METC prior to the end of March allowing for the preparation of the final version of the report to begin. Conceptual design of a combustion turbine system that can be integrated in a pressurized fluidized bed combustor (PFBC) application was completed at the end of March. An intermediate design review was held in February with METC and a draft of the topical report was begun during the reporting period. Details of the individual subtask work for the first generation PFBC combustion turbine system conceptual design are discussed in the ``Generic Turbine Design Study Final Report`` which was issued June 1993 to DOE/METC.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems. Technical progress report, October--December 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activity towards completing Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Phase I work was begun again in December. Effort to complete the Phase I work was temporarily suspended upon receipt of the ATS Phase II RFP the last week in August. The Westinghouse ATS team`s efforts were directed at preparing the ATS Phase II proposal which was submitted November 18. It is planned to finish Phase I work and submit the topical report by the end of February 1993. The objective of the four slogging combustor tests conducted during this reporting period (i.e., tests SL3-1 through SL3-4) were to perform sulfur capture experiments using limestoneand iron oxide based sorbents and to collect exhaust vapor phase and solids bound alkali measurements using the Westinghouse and Ames Laboratory alkali probes/monitors. The most significant, if not outstanding result revealed by these tests is that the Ames alkali monitor indicates that the vapor phase sodium is approximately 23--30 ppbw and the vapor phase potassium is approximately 5--20 ppbw. For reference, alkalilevels of 20 ppbw are acceptable in Westinghouse gas turbines fueled with crude oil.

Not Available

1993-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

414

Use of Coal Drying to Reduce Water Consumed in Pulverized Coal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ANALYSIS METHODOLOGY AND ASSUMPTIONS 41 Fuel 41 Dryer Design 41 Air Preheater (APH) 41 Fan Power 42 Mill Power 42 Combustion Calculations 43 Energy Balance 45 RESULTS FOR LIGNITE...

415

Modeling of integrated environmental control systems for coal-fired power plants  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM) was designed to permit the systematic evaluation of environmental control options for pulverized coal-fired (PC) power plants. Of special interest was the ability to compare the performance and cost of advanced pollution control systems to conventional'' technologies for the control of particulate, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Of importance also was the ability to consider pre-combustion, combustion and post-combustion control methods employed alone or in combination to meet tough air pollution emission standards. Finally, the ability to conduct probabilistic analyses is a unique capability of the IECM. Key results are characterized as distribution functions rather than as single deterministic values. (VC)

Rubin, E.S.; Salmento, J.S.; Frey, H.C.; Abu-Baker, A.; Berkenpas, M.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Modeling of integrated environmental control systems for coal-fired power plants. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM) was designed to permit the systematic evaluation of environmental control options for pulverized coal-fired (PC) power plants. Of special interest was the ability to compare the performance and cost of advanced pollution control systems to ``conventional`` technologies for the control of particulate, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Of importance also was the ability to consider pre-combustion, combustion and post-combustion control methods employed alone or in combination to meet tough air pollution emission standards. Finally, the ability to conduct probabilistic analyses is a unique capability of the IECM. Key results are characterized as distribution functions rather than as single deterministic values. (VC)

Rubin, E.S.; Salmento, J.S.; Frey, H.C.; Abu-Baker, A.; Berkenpas, M.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes. Twenty-first quarterly report, October 1, 1991--December 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study are to establish the mechanisms and rates of basic steps in coal conversion processes, to integrate and incorporate this information into comprehensive computer models for coal conversion processes, to evaluate these models and to apply them to gasification, mild gasification and combustion in heat engines.

Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. [Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States); Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

418

US Department of Energy`s high-temperature and high-pressure particulate cleanup for advanced coal-based power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The availability of reliable, low-cost electricity is a cornerstone for the United States` ability to compete in the world market. The Department of Energy (DOE) projects the total consumption of electricity in the US to rise from 2.7 trillion kilowatt-hours in 1990 to 3.5 trillion in 2010. Although energy sources are diversifying, fossil fuel still produces 90 percent of the nation`s energy. Coal is our most abundant fossil fuel resource and the source of 56 percent of our electricity. It has been the fuel of choice because of its availability and low cost. A new generation of high-efficiency power systems has made it possible to continue the use of coal while still protecting the environment. Such power systems greatly reduce the pollutants associated with cola-fired plants built before the 1970s. To realize this high efficiency and superior environmental performance, advanced coal-based power systems will require gas stream cleanup under high-temperature and high-pressure (HTHP) process conditions. Presented in this paper are the HTHP particulate capture requirements for the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustion (PFBC) power systems, the HTHP particulate cleanup systems being implemented in the PFBC and IGCC Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Projects, and the currently available particulate capture performance results.

Dennis, R.A.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Upgraded Coal Interest Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Upgraded Coal Interest Group (UCIG) is an EPRI 'users group' that focuses on clean, low-cost options for coal-based power generation. The UCIG covers topics that involve (1) pre-combustion processes, (2) co-firing systems and fuels, and (3) reburn using coal-derived or biomass-derived fuels. The UCIG mission is to preserve and expand the economic use of coal for energy. By reducing the fuel costs and environmental impacts of coal-fired power generation, existing units become more cost effective and thus new units utilizing advanced combustion technologies are more likely to be coal-fired.

Evan Hughes

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

420

Impact of supplemental firing of tire-derived fuel (TDF) on mercury species and mercury capture with the advanced hybrid filter in a western subbituminous coal flue gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pilot-scale experimental studies were carried out to evaluate the impacts of cofiring tire-derived fuel and a western subbituminous coal on mercury species in flue gas. Mercury samples were collected at the inlet and outlet of the Advanced Hybrid filter to determine mercury concentrations in the flue gas with and without TDF cofiring, respectively. Cofiring of TDF with a subbituminous coal had a significant effect on mercury speciation in the flue gas. With 100% coal firing, there was only 16.8% oxidized mercury in the flue gas compared to 47.7% when 5% TDF (mass basis) was fired and 84.8% when 10% TDF was cofired. The significantly enhanced mercury oxidation may be the result of additional homogeneous gas reactions between Hg{sup 0} and the reactive chlorine generated in the TDF-cofiring flue gas and the in situ improved reactivity of unburned carbon in ash by the reactive chlorine species. Although the cofiring of TDF demonstrated limited improvement on mercury-emission control with the Advanced Hybrid filter, it proved to be a very cost-effective mercury control approach for power plants equipped with wet or dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems because of the enhanced mercury oxidation. 15 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Ye Zhuang; Stanley J. Miller [University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy & Environmental Research Center

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

POC-SCALE TESTING OF A DRY TRIBOELECTROSTATIC SEPARATOR FOR FINE COAL CLEANING  

SciTech Connect

Numerous advanced coal cleaning processes have been developed in recent years that are capable of substantially reducing both ash- and sulfur-forming minerals from coal. However, most of the processes involve fine grinding and use water as the cleaning medium; therefore, the clean coal products must be dewatered before they can be transported and burned. Unfortunately, dewatering fine coal is costly, which makes it difficult to deploy advanced coal cleaning processes for commercial applications. As a means of avoiding problems associated with the fine coal dewatering, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) developed a dry coal cleaning process in which mineral matter is separated from coal without using water. In this process, pulverized coal is subjected to triboelectrification before being placed in an electric field for electrostatic separation. The triboelectrification is accomplished by passing a pulverized coal through an in-line mixer made of copper. Copper has a work function that lies between that of carbonaceous material (coal) and mineral matter. Thus, coal particles impinging on the copper wall lose electrons to the metal thereby acquiring positive charges, while mineral matter impinging on the wall gain electrons to acquire negative charges. The charged particles then pass through an electric field where they are separated according to their charges into two or more products depending on the configuration of the separator. The results obtained at NETL showed that it is capable of removing more than 90% of the pyritic sulfur and 70% of the ash-forming minerals from a number of eastern U.S. coals. However, the BTU recoveries were less than desirable. The laboratory-scale batch triboelectrostatic separator (TES) used by NETL relied on adhering charged particles on parallel electrode surfaces and scraping them off. Therefore, its throughput will be proportional to the electrode surface area. If this laboratory device is scaled-up as is, it would suffer from low throughput capacities and high maintenance requirements. In general, surface area-based separators (e.g., shaking tables, magnetic drum separator, electrodynamic separator, etc.) have lower throughput capacities than volume-based separators (e.g., flotation cell, dense-medium bath, cyclones, etc.) by an order of magnitude. Furthermore, the electrodes of the laboratory unit need to be cleaned frequently, creating a high maintenance requirement if it is scaled-up to a commercial unit. The bench-scale continuous TES unit developed at NETL, on the other hand, separates positively and negatively charged particles by splitting the gaseous stream containing these particles in an electric field by means of a flow splitter, so that the oppositely charged particles can be directed into different compartments. This device is fundamentally different from the laboratory unit in that the former is a surface area-based separator, while the latter is a volume-based separator. The bench-scale unit is referred to as an entrained flow separator by the in-house researchers at NETL. Thus, the entrained flow TES unit is a significant improvement over the laboratory unit with regard to throughput capacity. In the present work, the entrained flow separator concept will be utilized for developing a proof-of concept (POC) separator that can be scaled-up to commercial size units. To accomplish this, it is necessary to develop a bench-scale separator that can achieve high Btu recoveries while maintaining the high degree of separation efficiencies. It is the objective of the present investigation to develop an efficient separator by studying the mechanisms of triboelectrification and investigating better ways of separating the charged particles. An important criterion for developing efficient separators is that they not only provide high separation efficiencies but also have high throughput capacities, which are essential ingredients for successful commercialization.

R.H. Yoon; G.H. Luttrell; E.S. Yan; A.D. Walters

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

422

Coke quality for blast furnaces with coal-dust fuel  

SciTech Connect

Recently, plans have been developed for the introduction of pulverized coal injection (PCI) at various Russian metallurgical enterprises. The main incentive for switching to PCI is the recent price rises for Russian natural gas. The paper discusses the quality of coke for PCI into blast furnaces.

Y.A. Zolotukhin; N.S. Andreichikov [Eastern Coal-Chemistry Institute, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

INTERACTION OF ORGANIC SOLVENTS WITH A SUBBITUMINOUS COAL BELOW PYROLYSIS TEMPERATURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and P. Fugassi, Phenanthrene Extraction of Bituminous Coal,Coal Science, Advances in Chemistry Series No. 55, 448 C.Mechanism of High Volatile Coal, Coal Science, Advances in

Dorighi, G.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Coal combustion system  

SciTech Connect

In a coal combustion system suitable for a gas turbine engine, pulverized coal is transported to a rich zone combustor and burned at an equivalence ratio exceeding 1 at a temperature above the slagging temperature of the coal so that combustible hot gas and molten slag issue from the rich zone combustor. A coolant screen of water stretches across a throat of a quench stage and cools the combustible gas an