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1

Advances in pulverized coal combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A combustion system has been developed to operate cost effectively in the difficult regulatory and economic climate of the 1980's. The system is designed to reduce auxiliary fuel oil comsumption by at least 30% while meeting all relevant emissions limits. This is achieved with the fewest components consistent with practical reliable design criteria. The Controlled Flow Split/Flame low NO/sub x/ burner, MBF pulverizer and Two-Stage ignition system are integrated into a mutually supporting system which is applicable to both new steam generators and, on a retrofit basis, to existing units. In the future, a pulverized coal ignition system will be available to eliminate fuel oil use within the boiler.

Vatsky, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Performance and risks of advanced pulverized-coal plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article is based on an in-depth report of the same title published by the IEA Clean Coal Centre, CCC/135 (see Coal Abstracts entry Sep 2008 00535). It discusses the commercial, developmental and future status of pulverized fuel power plants including subcritical supercritical and ultra supercritical systems of pulverized coal combustion, the most widely used technology in coal-fired power generation. 1 fig., 1 tab.

Nalbandian, H. [IEA Clean Coal Centre, London (United Kingdom)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Catalytic Effects of Main Metals in Coal Ash on Advanced Reburning of Pulverized Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Catalytic Effects of Main Metals in Coal Ash on Advanced Reburning of Pulverized Coal ... To further reduce the NOx emission from power plants, an experimental study on the NO reduction during advanced reburning with reburning fuel of raw coal and coals loaded with four kinds of main metals in coal ash (Na, K, Fe, Ca) was performed in a two-staged drop flow reactor (TSDFR). ... By comparing the conversion of five main products during the reactions when using raw coal and coals loaded with different metals as reburning fuel, it is found that some types of metals can improve the NO reduction in reburning via increasing the concentration of CH4 and CO during the reactions. ...

Penghua Qiu; Hui Huang; Jianqiang Zhang; Li Liu; Yuqing Chen

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

Pulverized coal fuel injector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pulverized coal fuel injector contains an acceleration section to improve the uniformity of a coal-air mixture to be burned. An integral splitter is provided which divides the coal-air mixture into a number separate streams or jets, and a center body directs the streams at a controlled angle into the primary zone of a burner. The injector provides for flame shaping and the control of NO/NO.sub.2 formation.

Rini, Michael J. (Hebron, CT); Towle, David P. (Windsor, CT)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Advanced steam parameters for pulverized coal fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After the enormous efforts made in the eighties towards minimization of pollutant concentration in flue gases from power stations, public attention today has turned increasingly toward CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuel fired plants. This interest has, in turn, renewed interest in increasing the efficiency of thermal power plants, as this approach is by far the most practical means of reducing the specific CO{sub 2} emission rate. The Rankine steam cycle is the workhorse of the power industry. However, the steam power cycle is often regarded as having reached a maximum practical efficiency, and development effort has shifted to indirect fired cycles. In reality, Rankine cycle efficiencies equivalent to the combined Brayton/Rankine cycles are possible, and may be economically practical. The development work which would allow such steam cycle efficiencies to be realized has been limited in recent years, due to low growth rates, falling energy prices, and tying up of investment funds in environmental control equipment. This paper presents a short survey of the application for advanced steam parameters in power generation and discusses critical areas in more detail. A program undertaken by a consortium of European manufacturers and EC governments for the advancement of steam cycle efficiency is described.

Heiermann, G.; Husemann, R.U.; Kather, A.; Knizia, M.; Hougaard, P.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

6

Improving pulverized coal plant performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major deliverable of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project ``Engineering Development of Advanced Coal-Fired Low-Emissions Boiler Systems`` (LEBS) is the design of a large, in this case 400 MWe, commercial generating unit (CGU) which will meet the Project objectives. The overall objective of the LEBS Project is to dramatically improve environmental performance of future pulverized coal fired power plants without adversely impacting efficiency or the cost of electricity. The DOE specified the use of near-term technologies, i.e., advanced technologies that partially developed, to reduce NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2} and particulate emissions to be substantially less than current NSPS limits. In addition, air toxics must be in compliance and waste must be reduced and made more disposable. The design being developed by the ABB Team is projected to meet all the contract objectives and to reduce emission of NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2} and particulates to one-fifth to one-tenth NSPS limits while increasing net station efficiency significantly and reducing the cost of electricity. This design and future work are described in the paper.

Regan, J.W.; Borio, R.W.; Palkes, M.; Mirolli, M. [ABB Combustion Engineering, Inc., Windsor, CT (United States); Wesnor, J.D. [ABB Environmental Systems, Birmingham, AL (United States); Bender, D.J. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Inc., New York, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

Pulverized coal burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A burner is described having lower emissions and lower unburned fuel losses by implementing a transition zone in a low NO{sub x} burner. The improved burner includes a pulverized fuel transport nozzle surrounded by the transition zone which shields the central oxygen-lean fuel devolatilization zone from the swirling secondary combustion air. The transition zone acts as a buffer between the primary and the secondary air streams to improve the control of near-burner mixing and flame stability by providing limited recirculation regions between primary and secondary air streams. These limited recirculation regions transport evolved NO{sub x} back towards the oxygen-lean fuel pyrolysis zone for reduction to molecular nitrogen. Alternate embodiments include natural gas and fuel oil firing. 8 figs.

Sivy, J.L.; Rodgers, L.W.; Koslosy, J.V.; LaRue, A.D.; Kaufman, K.C.; Sarv, H.

1998-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

8

Pulverized coal burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A burner having lower emissions and lower unburned fuel losses by implementing a transition zone in a low NO.sub.x burner. The improved burner includes a pulverized fuel transport nozzle surrounded by the transition zone which shields the central oxygen-lean fuel devolatilization zone from the swirling secondary combustion air. The transition zone acts as a buffer between the primary and the secondary air streams to improve the control of near-burner mixing and flame stability by providing limited recirculation regions between primary and secondary air streams. These limited recirculation regions transport evolved NO.sub.x back towards the oxygen-lean fuel pyrolysis zone for reduction to molecular nitrogen. Alternate embodiments include natural gas and fuel oil firing.

Sivy, Jennifer L. (Alliance, OH); Rodgers, Larry W. (Canton, OH); Koslosy, John V. (Akron, OH); LaRue, Albert D. (Uniontown, OH); Kaufman, Keith C. (Canton, OH); Sarv, Hamid (Canton, OH)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An air-purged burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired without the coking thereof on the burner components. The air-purged burner is designed for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal in a tangentially fired boiler.

Derbidge, T. Craig (Sunnyvale, CA); Mulholland, James A. (Chapel Hill, NC); Foster, Edward P. (Macungie, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

9 - An economic and engineering analysis of a 700 °C advanced ultra-supercritical pulverized coal power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: EPRI has completed an engineering and economic evaluation of advanced ultra-supercritical pulverized coal (A-USC PC) technology to determine its generating efficiency and cost effectiveness. For a location in the United States, absent any cost imposed for CO2 emissions, the cost of electricity from the A-USC PC design is slightly higher than that from a conventional supercritical PC design. However, as the CO2/MWh emitted by the A-USC PC plant is lower, imposing a relatively modest cost of $25 per tonne of CO2 shifts the economics in its favor. The lower CO2 emissions also lower the cost of carbon capture and storage once integrated with the A-USC PC power plant.

J.M. Wheeldon; J.N. Phillips

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Advanced pulverized-coal power plants: A U.S. export opportunity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of Low Emission Boiler System (LEBS) power generation systems and its potential for generating power worldwide. Based on the fuel availability, power requirements, and environmental regulations, countries have been identified that need to build advanced, clean, efficient, and economical power generation, systems. It is predicted that ``more electrical generation capacity will be built over the next 25 years than was built in the previous century``. For example, China and India alone, with less than 10% of today`s demand, plan to build what would amount to a quarter of the world`s new capacity. For the near- to mid-term, the LEBS program of Combustion 2000 has the promise to fill some of the needs of the international coal-fired power generation market. The high efficiency of LEBS, coupled with the use of advanced, proven technologies and low emissions, make it a strong candidate for export to those areas whose need for additional power is greatest. LEBS is a highly advanced version of conventional coal-based power plants that have been utilized throughout the world for decades. LEBS employs proven technologies and doesn`t require gasification and/or an unconventional combustion environment (e.g., fluidized bed). LEBS is viewed by the utility industry as technically acceptable and commercially feasible.

Ruth, L.A. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States); Ramezan, M.; Izsak, M.S. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

PARAMETRIC STUDY OF SUBMICRON PARTICULATES FROM PULVERIZED COAL COMBUSTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D. , Trace Element Chemistry of Coal during Combustion andthe Emissions from Coal-Fired Plants. Prog. Energy Combust.Combustion of Pulverized Coal, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

Pennucci, J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired successfully without any performance limitations and without the coking of the solvent refined coal on the burner components. The burner is provided with a tangential inlet of primary air and pulverized fuel, a vaned diffusion swirler for the mixture of primary air and fuel, a center water-cooled conical diffuser shielding the incoming fuel from the heat radiation from the flame and deflecting the primary air and fuel steam into the secondary air, and a watercooled annulus located between the primary air and secondary air flows.

Lennon, Dennis R. (Allentown, PA); Snedden, Richard B. (McKeesport, PA); Foster, Edward P. (Macungie, PA); Bellas, George T. (Library, PA)

1990-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

Coal pulverizing systems for power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pulverized coal-fired boiler for power generation is a mature technology which requires the production of fine coal for combustion. The product material particle size is smaller than 250 microns and about 70 percent smaller than 75 microns. It is no coincidence that most of the new coal technologies for combustion or gasification require a product with a similar particle size distribution for complete reaction. This particle size distribution provides coal particles which can react with oxygen in the air at local velocities and resident times in the boiler furnace to result in almost complete combustion or gasification with 1 or 2 percent carbon loss in the resulting ash. Size reduction, while being one of the most common unit operations on material is also one of the least understood, requiring a high energy input. When pulverizing coal of the particle size required there is an added complication that the product may spontaneously ignite, particularly if the process passes through a stage when an explosive or at least highly combustible mixture of fine coal and air is present. The pulverized coal system covers that portion of the power station from coal bunkers to feeders, pulverizers and delivery system to the boiler burner or gasifier injection point. The transport medium has traditionally been air and in some cases inert gases. The system has usually been lean phase with air to coal ratios in excess of 1:4:1. More recently, a few systems have been dense phase with air to coal ratios of 1:30 up to 1:100. This has the distinct advantage of reduced transport pipe diameter. The key element in the system, the coal pulverizer, will be considered first.

Sligar, J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

AVESTAR® - Supercritical Once-Through (SCOT) Pulverized Coal Dynamic  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Supercritical Once-Through (SCOT) Pulverized Coal Dynamic Simulator Supercritical Once-Through (SCOT) Pulverized Coal Dynamic Simulator A new U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cooperative research and development agreement to develop, test, and deploy a dynamic simulator and operator training system (OTS) could eventually help commercialize important carbon capture technologies at the nation's power plants. The high-fidelity, real-time OTS for a generic supercritical once-through (SCOT) pulverized-coal power plant will be installed at the National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL's) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTAR) Center in Morgantown, W.Va. It will be used for collaborative research, industry workforce training, and engineering education on SCOT plant operations and control under the agreement signed with Invensys Operations Management.

16

Mathematical modelling of the flow and combustion of pulverized coal injected in ironmaking blast furnace.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Pulverized coal injection (PCI) technology is widely practised in blast furnace ironmaking due to economic, operational and environmental benefits. High burnout of pulverized coal in… (more)

Shen, Yansong

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Flamelet model for pulverized coal combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A new flamelet model applicable to the simulation of pulverized coal combustion has been developed. First, a modeling approach that considers the coupling with both devolatilization and char combustion was adopted. We changed the fuel composition of the flamelet equation relative to the states of devolatilization and char combustion. In order to determine the fuel composition coming through the char combustion, all the gasified char was assumed to be converted into CO by the oxidation reaction. The validity of the developed flamelet model was examined in a simple two-dimensional pulverized coal jet field ignited by burnt co-flows. The accuracy of the model was evaluated by comparing its instantaneous distributions of temperature, CO2 mass fraction, and OH mass fraction with those of a detailed chemistry model. Good agreement was obtained in terms of the overall features of turbulent structures and combustion state, although the flamelet model showed slightly quicker ignition due to the transitional state in the ignition process being insufficiently reproducible.

Junya Watanabe; Kenji Yamamoto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Enhanced Combustion Low NOx Pulverized Coal Burner  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For more than two decades, Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom) has developed a range of low cost, infurnace technologies for NOx emissions control for the domestic U.S. pulverized coal fired boiler market. This includes Alstom's internally developed TFS 2000{trademark} firing system, and various enhancements to it developed in concert with the U.S. Department of Energy. As of the date of this report, more than 270 units representing approximately 80,000 MWe of domestic coal fired capacity have been retrofit with Alstom low NOx technology. Best of class emissions range from 0.18 lb/MMBtu for bituminous coal to 0.10 lb/MMBtu for subbituminous coal, with typical levels at 0.24 lb/MMBtu and 0.13 lb/MMBtu, respectively. Despite these gains, NOx emissions limits in the U.S. continue to ratchet down for new and existing boiler equipment. On March 10, 2005, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR). CAIR requires 25 Eastern states to reduce NOx emissions from the power generation sector by 1.7 million tons in 2009 and 2.0 million tons by 2015. Low cost solutions to meet such regulations, and in particular those that can avoid the need for a costly selective catalytic reduction system (SCR), provide a strong incentive to continue to improve low NOx firing system technology to meet current and anticipated NOx control regulations. The overall objective of the work is to develop an enhanced combustion, low NOx pulverized coal burner, which, when integrated with Alstom's state-of-the-art, globally air staged low NOx firing systems will provide a means to achieve: Less than 0.15 lb/MMBtu NOx emissions when firing a high volatile Eastern or Western bituminous coal, Less than 0.10 lb/MMBtu NOx emissions when firing a subbituminous coal, NOx reduction costs at least 25% lower than the costs of an SCR, Validation of the NOx control technology developed through large (15 MWt) pilot scale demonstration, and Documentation required for economic evaluation and commercial application. During the project performance period, Alstom performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and large pilot scale combustion testing in its Industrial Scale Burner Facility (ISBF) at its U.S. Power Plant Laboratories facility in Windsor, Connecticut in support of these objectives. The NOx reduction approach was to optimize near-field combustion to ensure that minimum NOx emissions are achieved with minimal impact on unburned carbon in ash, slagging and fouling, corrosion, and flame stability/turn-down. Several iterations of CFD and combustion testing on a Midwest coal led to an optimized design, which was extensively combustion tested on a range of coals. The data from these tests were then used to validate system costs and benefits versus SCR. Three coals were evaluated during the bench-scale and large pilot-scale testing tasks. The three coals ranged from a very reactive subbituminous coal to a moderately reactive Western bituminous coal to a much less reactive Midwest bituminous coal. Bench-scale testing was comprised of standard ASTM properties evaluation, plus more detailed characterization of fuel properties through drop tube furnace testing and thermogravimetric analysis. Bench-scale characterization of the three test coals showed that both NOx emissions and combustion performance are a strong function of coal properties. The more reactive coals evolved more of their fuel bound nitrogen in the substoichiometric main burner zone than less reactive coal, resulting in the potential for lower NOx emissions. From a combustion point of view, the more reactive coals also showed lower carbon in ash and CO values than the less reactive coal at any given main burner zone stoichiometry. According to bench-scale results, the subbituminous coal was found to be the most amenable to both low NOx, and acceptably low combustibles in the flue gas, in an air staged low NOx system. The Midwest bituminous coal, by contrast, was predicted to be the most challenging of the three coals, with the Western bituminous coal predicted to beh

David Towle; Richard Donais; Todd Hellewell; Robert Lewis; Robert Schrecengost

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

19

Hydrogen production with coal using a pulverization device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing hydrogen from coal is described wherein high temperature steam is brought into contact with coal in a pulverizer or fluid energy mill for effecting a steam-carbon reaction to provide for the generation of gaseous hydrogen. The high temperature steam is utilized to drive the coal particles into violent particle-to-particle contact for comminuting the particulates and thereby increasing the surface area of the coal particles for enhancing the productivity of the hydrogen.

Paulson, Leland E. (Morgantown, WV)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Coal Particle Measurement in a Pulverized Coal Flame with Digital Inline Holography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Digital inline holography with pulse illumination was applied to measure the 3D position and size of the burning coal particles in a laboratory-scale pulverized coal flame under strong...

Wu, Yingchun; Wu, Xuecheng; Zhou, Binwu; Yang, Jing; Chen, Linghong; Peng, Yueyu; Qiu, Kunzan; Grehan, Gerard; Cen, Kefa

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Analysis of coal-firing modes shows pulverized least costly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A plant owner opting to build a new coal-fired facility has several processes from which to choose. Among the most common are the spreader-stoker- and the pulverized-coal-fired boiler. Since pollution control is now an integral part of any coal-fired operation, fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) is becoming increasingly popular. Reason: This process does not require auxiliary equipment to control SO/sub 2/. Comparing the operation and economics of four coal-burning processes can help make this selection a somewhat easier one. This analysis examines four types of combustion: spreader stoker, pulverized coal, bubbling fluidized bed, and circulating fluidized bed. The descriptions are for a 200,000-lb/hr unit operating under like conditions.

Lutwen, R.C.; Fitzpatrick, T.J.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Morphological Characterization of Superfine Pulverized Coal Particles. 1. Fractal Characteristics and Economic Fineness  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Finally, a new method for identifying the economic granule size of pulverized coal particles, that is, economic fineness based on the power consumption of coal mills, E2, was proposed by a utilizing neural network method. ... Therefore, we can draw the conclusion that the economic fineness of pulverized coal particles which is related to the coal quantity varies with different coals. ... Furthermore, a conclusion can be drawn that the economic fineness of pulverized coal particles related to the coal quantity varies with different coals. ...

Jiaxun Liu; Xiumin Jiang; Xiangyong Huang; Shaohua Wu

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

23

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the eighth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture, prior to firing in a pulverized coal boiler. Analyses were performed to determine the effects of coal product moisture on unit performance. Results are given showing how the coal product moisture level affects parameters such as boiler efficiency, power required to drive the fluidizing air fan, other station service power needed for fans and pulverizers, net unit heat rate, thermal energy rejected by the cooling tower, and stack emissions.

Nenad Sarunac; Edward Levy

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the ninth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture using power plant waste heat, prior to firing the coal in a pulverized coal boiler. During this last Quarter, comparative analyses were performed for lignite and PRB coals to determine how unit performance varies with coal product moisture. Results are given showing how the coal product moisture level and coal rank affect parameters such as boiler efficiency, station service power needed for fans and pulverizers and net unit heat rate. Results are also given for the effects of coal drying on cooling tower makeup water and comparisons are made between makeup water savings for various times of the year.

Edward Levy; Nenad Sarunac; Harun Bilirgen; Wei Zhang

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Ash & Pulverized Coal Deposition in Combustors & Gasifiers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Further progress in achieving the objectives of the project was made in the period of October 1 to December 31, 1996. In particular, the sublayer model for evaluating the particle deposition in turbulent flows was extended to include the effect of particle rebound. A new more advance flow model for the near wall vortices is also used in these analysis. The computational model for simulating particle transport in turbulent flows was used to analyze the dispersion and deposition of particles in a recirculating flow region. The predictions of the particle resuspension model is compared with the experimental data. It is shown that when the effects of the near wall flow structure, as we as the surface roughness are included the model agrees with the available experimental data. Considerable progress was also made in the direct numerical simulation of particle removal process in turbulent gas flows. Experimental data for transport and deposition of glass fiber in the aerosol wind tunnel was also obtained.

Goodarz Ahmadi

1998-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

26

Large-Eddy Simulation of Pulverized Coal Jet Flame -Effect of Oxygen Concentration on NOx formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

than those by using other fossil fuels [1]. It is therefore important to develop clean coal technology for pulverized coal fired power plants, in order to control such emissions and to reduce the environmental impact. Regarding the reduction...

Muto, Masaya; Watanabe, Hiroaki; Kurose, Ryoichi; Komori, Satoru; Balusamy, Saravanan; Hochgreb, Simone

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Ash & Pulverized Coal Deposition in Combustors & Gasifiers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Further progress in achieving the objectives of the project was made in the period of October I to December 31, 1997. The direct numerical simulation of particle removal process in turbulent gas flows was continued. Variations of vorticity contours which are averaged over a short time duration are studied. It is shown that the near wall vortices profoundly affect the particle removal process in turbulent boundary layer flows. The sublayer model for evaluating the particle deposition in turbulent flows was extended to include the effect of particle rebound. A new more advance flow model for the near wall vortices is also used in these analysis. Sample particle trajectories are obtained and discussed. Experimental data for transport and deposition of fibrous particles in the aerosol wind tunnel was obtained. The measured deposition velocity is compared with the empirical correlation and the available data and discussed. Particle resuspension process in turbulent flows are studied. The model is compared with the experimental data. It is shown that when the effects of the near wall flow structure, as well as the surface roughness are included the model agrees with the available experimental data.

Goodarz Ahmadi

1998-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

28

Ash & Pulverized Coal Deposition in Combustors & Gasifiers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Further progress in achieving the objectives of the project was made in the period of July 1 to September 30, 1997. The direct numerical simulation of particle removal process in turbulent gas flows was continued. Variations of vorticity contours which are averaged over a short time duration are studied. It is shown that the near wall vortices profoundly affect the particle removal process in turbulent boundary layer flows. The sublayer model for evaluating the particle deposition in turbulent flows was extended to include the effect of particle rebound. A new more advance flow model for the near wall vortices is also used in these analysis. Sample particle trajectories are obtained and discussed. Experimental data for transport and deposition of fibrous particles in the aerosol wind tunnel was obtained. The measured deposition velocity is compared with the empirical correlation and the available data and discussed. Particle resuspension process in turbulent flows are studied. The model is compared with the experimental data. It is shown that when the effects of the near wall flow structure, as well as the surface roughness are included the model agrees with the available experimental data.

Goodarz Ahmadi

1998-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

29

Prediction of ash deposition in pulverized coal combustion systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A predictive scheme based on CCSEM flyash data and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been developed to study the slagging propensity of coals. The model has been applied to predict the deposition potential of three UK coals; Bentinck, Daw Mill and Silverdale, in a pilot scale single burner ash deposition test facility and an utility size multi-burner front wall-fired furnace. The project is part of a collaborative research program sponsored by the UK Department of Trade and Industry and involved various industrial organizations and universities. The objective of the project is to understand the fundamental aspects of slagging in pulverized coal-fired combustion systems. This paper is a sequel to the poster paper entitled: The Prediction of Ash Deposition in a Coal Fired Axi-symmetric Furnace, presented in the last Engineering Foundation Conference. The present model predicts the relative slagging propensity of the three coals correctly. The predicted deposition patterns are also consistent with the observations. The results from the model indicate a preferential deposition of iron during the initial stage of ash deposition. The average compositions of the deposits become closer to that of the bulk ash when the accumulation of ash deposits is taken into account.

Lee, F.C.C.; Riley, G.S. [National Power PLC, Swindon (United Kingdom); Lockwood, F.C. [Imperial Coll. of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low rank fuels such as subbituminous coals and lignites contain significant amounts of moisture compared to higher rank coals. Typically, the moisture content of subbituminous coals ranges from 15 to 30 percent, while that for lignites is between 25 and 40 percent, where both are expressed on a wet coal basis. High fuel moisture has several adverse impacts on the operation of a pulverized coal generating unit. High fuel moisture results in fuel handling problems, and it affects heat rate, mass rate (tonnage) of emissions, and the consumption of water needed for evaporative cooling. This project deals with lignite and subbituminous coal-fired pulverized coal power plants, which are cooled by evaporative cooling towers. In particular, the project involves use of power plant waste heat to partially dry the coal before it is fed to the pulverizers. Done in a proper way, coal drying will reduce cooling tower makeup water requirements and also provide heat rate and emissions benefits. The technology addressed in this project makes use of the hot circulating cooling water leaving the condenser to heat the air used for drying the coal (Figure 1). The temperature of the circulating water leaving the condenser is usually about 49 C (120 F), and this can be used to produce an air stream at approximately 43 C (110 F). Figure 2 shows a variation of this approach, in which coal drying would be accomplished by both warm air, passing through the dryer, and a flow of hot circulating cooling water, passing through a heat exchanger located in the dryer. Higher temperature drying can be accomplished if hot flue gas from the boiler or extracted steam from the turbine cycle is used to supplement the thermal energy obtained from the circulating cooling water. Various options such as these are being examined in this investigation. This is the eleventh Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture using power plant waste heat, prior to firing the coal in a pulverized coal boiler. During this last Quarter, the development of analyses to determine the costs and financial benefits of coal drying was continued. The details of the model and key assumptions being used in the economic evaluation are described in this report.

Edward Levy

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Experimental research on combustion characteristics of pulverized-coal fluidized bed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new, efficient clean coal combustion method, pulverized-coal fluidized bed combustion (PC-FBC) is proposed firstly in this paper. Research has been conducted on the combustion characteristics of PC-FBC on an experimental rig with 0.3 MW heat input. PC-FBC uses pulverized-coal as its fuel and integrates the characters of the pulverized coal boiler and the fluidized bed boiler. In 850 to 880 C fluidized-bed combustion zone (FBCZ) of PC-FBC, the pulverized coal can be ignited stably and releases 57.7 to 84.2% volatile substance. Seventy (70%) of the released volatile and a part of carbon are burnt in FBCZ. The highest and average gas temperatures are 1100 C and 950 to 1000 C respectively in PC-FBC. A combustion efficiency of 98 to 99% can be reached.

Cheng, H. [North China Electric Power Univ., Baoding, Hebei (China); Jin, B.; Xu, Y. [Southeast Univ., Nanjing, Jiangshu (China)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

32

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the twelfth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture using power plant waste heat, prior to firing the coal in a pulverized coal boiler. During this last Quarter, the development of analyses to determine the costs and financial benefits of coal drying was continued. The details of the model and key assumptions being used in the economic evaluation are described in this report and results are shown for a drying system utilizing a combination of waste heat from the condenser and thermal energy extracted from boiler flue gas.

Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; Ursla Levy; John Sale; Nenad Sarunac

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Water Use at Pulverized Coal Power Plants with Postcombustion Carbon Capture and Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water Use at Pulverized Coal Power Plants with Postcombustion Carbon Capture and Storage ... (24) When CO2 is captured, the heat rejected around the primary condenser does not include the steam extracted for CO2 regeneration. ...

Haibo Zhai; Edward S. Rubin; Peter L. Versteeg

2011-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

34

Capacity mapping for optimum utilization of pulverizers for coal fired boilers - article no. 032201  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Capacity mapping is a process of comparison of standard inputs with actual fired inputs to assess the available standard output capacity of a pulverizer. The base capacity is a function of grindability; fineness requirement may vary depending on the volatile matter (VM) content of the coal and the input coal size. The quantity and the inlet will change depending on the quality of raw coal and output requirement. It should be sufficient to dry pulverized coal (PC). Drying capacity is also limited by utmost PA fan power to supply air. The PA temperature is limited by air preheater (APH) inlet flue gas temperature; an increase in this will result in efficiency loss of the boiler. The higher PA inlet temperature can be attained through the economizer gas bypass, the steam coiled APH, and the partial flue gas recirculation. The PS/coal ratioincreases with a decrease in grindability or pulverizer output and decreases with a decrease in VM. The flammability of mixture has to be monitored on explosion limit. Through calibration, the PA flow and efficiency of conveyance can be verified. The velocities of coal/air mixture to prevent fallout or to avoid erosion in the coal carrier pipe are dependent on the PC particle size distribution. Metal loss of grinding elements inversely depends on the YGP index of coal. Variations of dynamic loading and wearing of grinding elements affect the available milling capacity and percentage rejects. Therefore, capacity mapping in necessary to ensure the available pulverizer capacity to avoid overcapacity or undercapacity running of the pulverizing system, optimizing auxiliary power consumption. This will provide a guideline on the distribution of raw coal feeding in different pulverizers of a boiler to maximize system efficiency and control, resulting in a more cost effective heat rate.

Bhattacharya, C. [National Power Training Institute, Durgapur (India)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

The fate of char-N at pulverized coal conditions Jennifer P. Spinti*, David W. Pershing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-free oxidant was 50­60% for lignites and 40­50% for bituminous coals. In char flames doped with NOx The Combustion Institute. All rights reserved. Keywords: Pulverized coal combustion; Char nitrogen; NOx formation The Combustion Institute. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/S0010-2180(03)00168-8 #12;the temperature

Utah, University of

36

High gradient magnetic beneficiation of dry pulverized coal via upwardly directed recirculating fluidization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to an improved device and method for the high gradient magnetic beneficiation of dry pulverized coal, for the purpose of removing sulfur and ash from the coal whereby the product is a dry environmentally acceptable, low-sulfur fuel. The process involves upwardly directed recirculating air fluidization of selectively sized powdered coal in a separator having sections of increasing diameters in the direction of air flow, with magnetic field and flow rates chosen for optimum separations depending upon particulate size.

Eissenberg, David M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Liu, Yin-An (Opelika, AL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. low rank coals contain relatively large amounts of moisture, with the moisture content of subbituminous coals typically ranging from 15 to 30 percent and that for lignites from 25 and 40 percent. High fuel moisture has several adverse impacts on the operation of a pulverized coal generating unit, for it can result in fuel handling problems and it affects heat rate, stack emissions and maintenance costs. Theoretical analyses and coal test burns performed at a lignite fired power plant show that by reducing the fuel moisture, it is possible to improve boiler performance and unit heat rate, reduce emissions and reduce water consumption by the evaporative cooling tower. The economic viability of the approach and the actual impact of the drying system on water consumption, unit heat rate and stack emissions will depend critically on the design and operating conditions of the drying system. The present project evaluated the low temperature drying of high moisture coals using power plant waste heat to provide the energy required for drying. Coal drying studies were performed in a laboratory scale fluidized bed dryer to gather data and develop models on drying kinetics. In addition, analyses were carried out to determine the relative costs and performance impacts (in terms of heat rate, cooling tower water consumption and emissions) of drying along with the development of optimized drying system designs and recommended operating conditions.

Edward K. Levy; Nenad Sarunac; Harun Bilirgen; Hugo Caram

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

A diffusion-kinetic model for pulverized-coal combustion and heat-and-mass transfer in a gas stream  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A diffusion-kinetic model for pulverized-coal combustion and heat-and-mass transfer in a gas stream is proposed, and the results of numerical simulation of the burnout dynamics of Kansk-Achinsk coals in the pu...

E. A. Boiko; S. V. Pachkovskii

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

PARAMETRIC STUDY OF SUBMICRON PARTICULATES FROM PULVERIZED COAL COMBUSTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Element Enrichment in Fly-Ash During Coal Combustion, Paperof the Mechanism of Fly-Ash Formation in Coal Fired Utilitymatter in the coal is necessarily con- verted to ash during

Pennucci, J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

TRW advanced slagging coal combustor utility demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The TRW Advanced Entrained Coal Combustor Demonstration Project consists of retrofitting Orange and Rockland (O R) Utility Corporation's Lovett Plant Unit No. 3 with four (4) slagging combustors which will allow the gas/oil unit to fire 2.5% sulfur coal. The slagging combustor process will provide NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions that meet NSPS and New York State Environmental Standards. The TRW-Utility Demonstration Unit (UDU) is responsible for the implementation of program policies and overall direction of the project. The following projects will be carried out: process and design development of clean coal technology CCT-1 the development and operation of the entrained coal combustor will enable the boiler to burn low and medium sulfur coal while meeting all the Federal/State emission requirements; demonstrate sulfur dioxide emissions control by pulverized limestone injection into the entrained coal combustor system.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Influence of combustion conditions and coal properties on physical properties of fly ash generated from pulverized coal combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To develop combustion technology for upgrading the quality of fly ash, the influences of the coal properties, such as the size of pulverized coal particles and the two-stage combustion ratio during the combustion, on the fly ash properties were investigated using our test furnace. The particle size, density, specific surface area (obtained by the Blaine method), and shape of fly ash particles of seven types of coal were measured. It was confirmed that the size of pulverized coal particles affects the size of the ash particles. Regarding the coal properties, the fuel ratio affected the ash particle size distribution. The density and shape of the ash particles strongly depended on their ash size. Our results indicated that the shape of the ash particles and the concentration of unburned carbon affected the specific surface area. The influence of the two-stage combustion ratio was limited. 8 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

Hiromi Shirai; Hirofumi Tsuji; Michitaka Ikeda; Toshinobu Kotsuji [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Kanagawa (Japan)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

Ash transformations in the real-scale pulverized coal combustion of South African and Colombian coals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, the formation of ash particles in the combustion of South African Klein Kropie coal and a Colombian coal was studied by measuring the ash particle characteristics upstream of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) at a 510 MW{sub e} pulverized coal fired power plant. The authors measured the ash particle mass size distributions in the size range 0.01--50 {micro}m using low-pressure impactors and precutter cyclones. Also, samples were collected for computer controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSEM) with a cyclone with an aerodynamic cut-diameter of about 1 {micro}m. The cyclone-collected samples were analyzed with standard CCSEM procedure by depositing the particles on a filter, and by embedding the particles in epoxy hence acquiring the cross-section analysis of the sample. All major mineral classes in both coals were found to undergo extensive coalescence during combustion. Iron, calcium and magnesium rich particles resulting from the decomposition of pyrite, calcite and dolomite were found to coalesce with quartz and aluminosilicate particles. The size distributions of the fly ash determined with CCSEM and low-pressure impactor-cyclone sampler were found to be similar.

Lind, T.; Kauppinen, E.I.; Valmari, T. [VTT (Finland); Klippel, N. [ABB Corporate Research, Baden (Switzerland); Mauritzson, C. [ABB Flaekt Industri AB, Vaexjoe (Sweden)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

Influence of turbulence–chemical interaction on CFD pulverized coal MILD combustion modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

MILD (Moderate and Intensive Low oxygen Dilution) combustion is a novel approach to reducing \\{NOx\\} emissions and improving combustion efficiency in fossil fuels power plants. It is characterized by elevated temperature and high dilution of reactants and strong recirculation inside the combustion chamber which produce a low temperature increase, thus reducing \\{NOx\\} formation. The main differences with conventional combustion concern the chemical reactions that take place in almost the entire volume of the combustion chamber and the uniformity of both temperature and the chemical species concentration. For this reason advanced turbulence-chemistry interaction models with detailed kinetic mechanisms are required to accurately simulate MILD by means of CFD calculations. The main aim of this work is to deepen the influence of turbulence-chemistry interaction on pulverized coal MILD combustion and to understand which models are more accurate and suitable to reproduce the process. In particular, two turbulence-chemistry interaction models are analyzed. On one hand, a conventional model based on infinitely fast chemistry Eddy Dissipation Model with a two-step global kinetic mechanism is considered. On the other hand, an advanced model based on finite rate chemistry Eddy Dissipation Concept is considered and used with both a global and detailed kinetic mechanisms. The results are finally compared with an experimental test-case. From the comparison, advanced turbulence-chemistry models used with complex kinetic mechanisms give, as expected, the best agreement with numerical results, despite the higher computational resources required.

M. Vascellari; G. Cau

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Pulverized Coal-Fired Boilers and Pollution Control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fossil fuels, such as coal, natural gas, and fuel oil, are used to generate electric power for industrial, commercial, and residential use. ... production and approximately 41% of the world power generation was s...

David K. Moyeda

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

TRP0033 - PCI Coal Combustion Behavior and Residual Coal Char Carryover in the Blast Furnace of 3 American Steel Companies during Pulverized Coal Injection (PCI) at High Rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combustion behavior of pulverized coals (PC), gasification and thermal annealing of cokes were investigated under controlled environments. Physical and chemical properties of PCI, coke and carbon residues of blast furnace dust/sludge samples were characterized. The strong influence of carbon structure and minerals on PCI reactivity was demonstrated. A technique to characterize char carryover in off gas emissions was established.

Veena Sahajwalla; Sushil Gupta

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Low NOx modifications on front-fired pulverized coal fuel burners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Burner optimizations and modifications were performed on Public Service of New Hampshire`s Schiller Units 4, 5, and 6. These are Foster-Wheeler 50 MWg pulverized coal and No.6 fuel oil-fired boilers with six burners each. Burner optimizations consisted of fuel flow, primary air, secondary air testing and balancing. Burner modifications consisted of the addition of circumferentially and radially staged flame stabilizers, circumferentially-staged coal spreaders, and modifications to the existing pulverized coal pipe. NO{sub x} emissions on Unit 6 of .41 lb/mmBtu were achieved at optimized burner settings at full load with all burners in service and without the use of overfire air or bias firing. This represented a 50% NO{sub x} reduction from the average pre-modification baseline NO{sub x} emissions of .81 lb/mmBtu prior to the optimizations and burner modification program. NO{sub x} emissions as low as .38 lb/mmBtu were achieved with the use of overfire air. There was essentially no quantifiable change in LOIs (baseline LOIs averaged 40%). Furnace excess O{sub 2} as low as 1.2% was achieved with CO emissions of less than 200 ppm. Total installed costs including the overfire air system were approximately $7/kW.

Owens, B.; Hitchko, M. [Public Service of New Hampshire, Manchester, NH (United States); Broderick, R.G. [RJM Corp., Ridgefield, CT (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Effects of pulverized coal fly-ash addition as a wet-end filler in papermaking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This experimental study is based on the innovative idea of using pulverized coal fly ash as a wet-end filler in papermaking. This is the first evaluation of the possible use of fly ash in the paper industry. Coal-based thermal power plants throughout the world are generating fly ash as a solid waste product. The constituents of fly ash can be used effectively in papermaking. Fly ash has a wide variation in particle size, which ranges from a few micrometers to one hundred micrometers. Fly ash acts as an inert material in acidic, neutral, and alkaline papermaking processes. Its physical properties such as bulk density (800-980 kg/m{sup 3}), porosity (45%-57%), and surface area (0.138-2.3076 m{sup 2}/g) make it suitable for use as a paper filler. Fly ash obtained from thermal power plants using pulverized coal was fractionated by a vibratory-sieve stack. The fine fraction with a particle size below 38 micrometers was used to study its effect on the important mechanical-strength and optical properties of paper. The effects of fly-ash addition on these properties were compared with those of kaolin clay. Paper opacity was found to be much higher with fly ash as a filler, whereas brightness decreased as the filler percentage increased Mechanical strength properties of the paper samples with fly ash as filler were superior to those with kaolin clay.

Sinha, A.S.K. [SLIET, Longowal (India). Dept. of Chemical Technology

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Determining the radiative properties of pulverized-coal particles from experiments. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive coupled experimental-theoretical study has been performed to determine the effective radiative properties of pulverized-coal/char particles. The results obtained show that the ``effective`` scattering phase function of coal particles are highly forward scattering and show less sensitivity to the size than predicted from the Lorenz-Mie theory. The main reason for this is the presence of smaller size particles associated with each larger particle. Also, the coal/char particle clouds display more side scattering than predicted for the same size range spheres, indicating the irregular shape of the particles and fragmentation. In addition to these, it was observed that in the visible wavelength range the coal absorption is not gray, and slightly vary with the wavelength. These two experimental approaches followed in this study are unique in a sense that the physics of the problem are not approximated. The properties determined include all uncertainties related to the particle shape, size distribution, inhomogeneity and spectral complex index of refraction data. In order to obtain radiative property data over a wider wavelength spectrum, additional ex-situ experiments have been carried out using a Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectrometer. The spectral measurements were performed over the wavelength range of 2 to 22 {mu}m. These results were interpreted to obtain the ``effective`` efficiency factors of coal particles and the corresponding refractive index values. The results clearly show that the coal/char radiative properties display significant wavelength dependency in the infrared spectrum.

Menguec, M.P.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Assessment of the effect of high ash content in pulverized coal combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The existing literature on CFD-based coal combustion modelling is applicable mainly for coals of low ash content and the calculations are done on an ash-free basis. In Indian coals, the ash content may be significantly higher, up to 40% or more. Studies reported in the literature show that the mineral matter in the coal may have a number of effects on the combustion characteristics. In the present study, a sensitivity analysis is performed, using the CFD code CFX of AEA Technology, on the likely effect of ash content on the char reactivity, oxygen diffusion rate for char combustion and on the radiative heat transfer parameters. The results show that the effect of enhanced char reactivity is negligible whereas reduced oxygen diffusion rates due to a thicker ash layer may result in a significant reduction in char oxidation rates with a resultant decrease in the peak temperature in the furnace. The global parameters such as the peak temperature and the flue gas temperature remain relatively insensitive to the presence of high ash content. These results are consistent with the experimental observations of Kurose et al. . Kurose, M. Ikeda, H. Makino, Combustion characteristics of high ash coal in pulverized coal combustion, J. Fuel 80 (2001) 1447-1455).

Jayanti, S.; Maheswaran, K.; Saravanan, V. [Indian Institute of Technology, Madras (India). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Ash pulverized coal deposition in combustors and gasifiers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Further progress in achieving the objectives of the project was made in the period of April 1 to June 30, 1997. The computational modeling of particle transport, dispersion and deposition in a recirculating turbulent flows was completed. Considerable progress was also made in the direct numerical simulation of particle removal process in turbulent gas flows. It is shown that the near wall vortices profoundly affect the particle removal process in turbulent boundary layer flows. The predictions of the particle resuspension model is compared with the experimental data. It is shown that when the effects of the near wall flow structure, as well as the surface roughness are included the model agrees with the available experimental data. The sublayer model for evaluating the particle deposition in turbulent flows was extended to include the effect of particle rebound. A new more advanced flow model for the near wall vortices is also used in these analyses. Experimental data for transport and deposition of glass fibers in the aerosol wind tunnel was obtained. The measured deposition velocity is compared with the empirical correlation and the available data and discussed.

Ahmadi, G.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Modeling for High Rate Pulverized Coal Injection (PCI) into the Blast Furnace  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pulverized coal injection (PCI) into the blast furnace (BF) has been recognized as an effective way to decrease the coke and total energy consumption along with minimization of environmental impacts. However, increasing the amount of coal injected into the BF is currently limited by the lack of knowledge of some issues related to the process. It is therefore important to understand the complex physical and chemical phenomena in the PCI process. Due to the difficulty in attaining trus BF measurements, Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling has been identified as a useful technology to provide such knowledge. CFD simulation is powerful for providing detailed information on flow properties and performing parametric studies for process design and optimization. In this project, comprehensive 3-D CFD models have been developed to simulate the PCI process under actual furnace conditions. These models provide raceway size and flow property distributions. The results have provided guidance for optimizing the PCI process.

Dr. Chenn Zhou

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

Reductive burning of high-yield spent pulping liquors by the addition of pulverized coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the reductive burning of high-yield spent pulping liquors which can be accomplished by the addition of pulverized coal to increase the heat content and generate the proper reducing conditions. Samples from a 78%-yield sodium bisulfite pulping process employing a hardwood furnish were mixed with 10-50% pulveriized coal and burned at 950[degrees]C under reducing conditions in a box furnace. Even in these uncontrolled combustion conditions 76. 5% of the sulfur found in the soluble portion of the smelt was converted from lignousulfonates to useful sulfide ion. For the remainder of the sulfur, analyses determined it to be 19. 5% as sulfite ion, 3. 1% as thiosulfate ion, and 0.9% as sulfate ion.

Sell, N.J.; Norman, J.C. (Natural and Applied Sciences, Univ. of Wisconsin-Green Bay, Green Bay, WI (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Experiment Investigation on Concentration and Mass Flow Measurement of Pulverized Coal Using Electrical Capacitance Tomography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accurate measurement of the concentration of pulverized coal in various pipes plays a key role in assuring safe and economic operation in a pulverized coal?fired boiler in the process of combustion. In this paper experimental studies are implemented on the measurement of a lean mass flow in a pneumatic conveying pipeline using electrical capacitance tomography (ECT). In this system a cyclone separator is employed where the sensors are placed in order to compensate the inhomogeneity of the sensor sensitivity. The mass flow rate is determined from the solids velocity and the volumetric concentration. The former is measured by cross?correlating the capacitance fluctuations caused by the conveyed solids and the latter by an image reconstruction method and then this two parameters are combined to give the solids mass flow rate. The distribution of void fraction in radial direction the average void fraction and the wavy characteristics are analyzed. The feasibility and reliability of the method are verified by the experimental results.

J. Liu; M. Sun; X. Y. Wang; S. Liu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Industrial pulverized coal low-NO{sub x} burner. Phase 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arthur D. Little, Inc., jointly with its university partner, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and its industrial partner, Hauck Manufacturing Corporation, is developing a low NO{sub x} pulverized coal burner for use in industrial processes, including those which may require preheated air or oxygen enrichment. The design of the burner specifically addresses the critical performance requirements of industrial systems, namely: high heat release rates, short flames, even heat flux distribution, and high combustion efficiency. The design is applicable to furnaces, industrial boilers, and cement kilns. The development program for this burner includes a feasibility analysis, performance modelling, development of the burner prototype design, and assessment of the economic viability of the burner. The Phase 1 activities covered by this report consisted of three principal tasks: preliminary burner design; fluid flow/combustion modelling and analyses; and market evaluation. The preliminary design activities included the selection of a design coal for the Phase 1 design, preliminary design layout, and preliminary sizing of the burner components. Modelling and analysis were conducted for the coal pyrolysis zone, the rich combustion zone and the lean bumout zone. Both chemical kinetics and one-dimensional coal combustion modelling were performed. The market evaluation included a review of existing industrial coal use, identification of potential near- and long-term markets and an assessment of the optimum burner sizes.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Figures Figure ES-1. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Basicviii Figure 1. Advanced-Coal Wind Hybrid: Basic29 Figure 9. Sensitivity to Coal

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Biopower Report Presents Methodology for Assessing the Value of Co-Firing Biomass in Pulverized Coal Plants  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A joint Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) report presents the results of an evaluation funded by the Bioenergy Technologies Office that examines the effects of substituting up to 20% renewable biomass for coal in electricity production. This report is the first publically available assessment of its kind to investigate the impacts of co-firing biomass with coal at concentrations greater than 10% biomass without modification to the pulverized coal plant or its feed system. Findings have expanded the methodology that communities and energy providers can use to evaluate the potential economic and environmental benefits of using biomass in their coal plants.

57

Ash Transformations in the Real-Scale Pulverized Coal Combustion of South African and Colombian Coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, the formation of ash particles in the combustion of South African Klein Kopie coal and a Colombian coal was studied by measuring the ash particle characteristics upstream of the electrostatic precip...

Terttaliisa Lind; Esko I. Kauppinen…

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Renewable wood fuel: Fuel feed system for a pulverized coal boiler. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates a pilot test program conducted by New York State Gas & Electric Corporation to evaluate the feasibility of co-firing a pulverized coal plant with renewable wood fuels. The goal was to establish that such a co-firing system can reduce air emissions while maintaining good operational procedures and cost controls. The test fuel feed system employed at Greenidge Station`s Boiler 6 was shown to be effective in feeding wood products. Emission results were promising and an economic analysis indicates that it will be beneficial to pursue further refinements to the equipment and systems. The report recommends further evaluation of the generation and emission impacts using woods of varied moisture contents and at varied Btu input rates to determine if a drying system would be a cost-effective option.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

FURN3D: A computer code for radiative heat transfer in pulverized coal furnaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computer code FURN3D has been developed for assessing the impact of burning different coals on heat absorption pattern in pulverized coal furnaces. The code is unique in its ability to conduct detailed spectral calculations of radiation transport in furnaces fully accounting for the size distributions of char, soot and ash particles, ash content, and ash composition. The code uses a hybrid technique of solving the three-dimensional radiation transport equation for absorbing, emitting and anisotropically scattering media. The technique achieves an optimal mix of computational speed and accuracy by combining the discrete ordinate method (S[sub 4]), modified differential approximation (MDA) and P, approximation in different range of optical thicknesses. The code uses spectroscopic data for estimating the absorption coefficients of participating gases C0[sub 2], H[sub 2]0 and CO. It invokes Mie theory for determining the extinction and scattering coefficients of combustion particulates. The optical constants of char, soot and ash are obtained from dispersion relations derived from reflectivity, transmissivity and extinction measurements. A control-volume formulation is adopted for determining the temperature field inside the furnace. A simple char burnout model is employed for estimating heat release and evolution of particle size distribution. The code is written in Fortran 77, has modular form, and is machine-independent. The computer memory required by the code depends upon the number of grid points specified and whether the transport calculations are performed on spectral or gray basis.

Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

FURN3D: A computer code for radiative heat transfer in pulverized coal furnaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computer code FURN3D has been developed for assessing the impact of burning different coals on heat absorption pattern in pulverized coal furnaces. The code is unique in its ability to conduct detailed spectral calculations of radiation transport in furnaces fully accounting for the size distributions of char, soot and ash particles, ash content, and ash composition. The code uses a hybrid technique of solving the three-dimensional radiation transport equation for absorbing, emitting and anisotropically scattering media. The technique achieves an optimal mix of computational speed and accuracy by combining the discrete ordinate method (S{sub 4}), modified differential approximation (MDA) and P, approximation in different range of optical thicknesses. The code uses spectroscopic data for estimating the absorption coefficients of participating gases C0{sub 2}, H{sub 2}0 and CO. It invokes Mie theory for determining the extinction and scattering coefficients of combustion particulates. The optical constants of char, soot and ash are obtained from dispersion relations derived from reflectivity, transmissivity and extinction measurements. A control-volume formulation is adopted for determining the temperature field inside the furnace. A simple char burnout model is employed for estimating heat release and evolution of particle size distribution. The code is written in Fortran 77, has modular form, and is machine-independent. The computer memory required by the code depends upon the number of grid points specified and whether the transport calculations are performed on spectral or gray basis.

Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Oxy-coal combustion: stability of coaxial pulverized coal flames in O2/CO2 environments.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Oxy-coal combustion, in which air is replaced by an O2/ CO2 mixture, is one of the few technologies that may allow CO2 capture and sequestration… (more)

Zhang, Jingwei

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Transformations and affinities for sulfur of Chinese Shenmu coal ash in a pulverized coal-fired boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The self-desulfurization efficiency of Shenmu coal with a high initial Ca/S molar ratio of 2.02 was measured in a 1,025 t/h pulverized coal-fired boiler. It increases from 29% to 32% when the power capacity decreases from 100% to 70%. About 60% of the mineral matter and calcium element fed into the furnace is retained in the fly ash, while less than 10% is retained in the bottom ash. About 70% of the sulfur element fed into the furnace is emitted as SO{sub 2} in the flue gas, while less than 10% is retained in the fly ash and less than 1% is retained in the bottom ash. The mineralogical compositions of feed coal, fly ash, and bottom ash were obtained by X-ray diffraction analysis. It is found that the initial amorphous phase content is 91.17% and the initial CaCO{sub 3} phase content is 2.07% in Shenmu coal. The vitreous phase and sulfation product CaSO{sub 4} contents are, respectively, 70.47% and 3.36% in the fly ash obtained at full capacity, while the retained CaCO{sub 3} and CaO contents are, respectively, 4.73% and 2.15%. However, the vitreous phase content is only 25.68% and no CaSO{sub 4} is detected in the bottom ash obtained at full capacity. When the power capacity decreases from 100% to 70%, the vitreous phase content in fly ash decreases from 70.47% to 67.41% and that in bottom ash increases from 25.68% to 28.10%.

Cheng, J.; Zhou, J.H.; Liu, J.Z.; Cao, X.Y.; Cen, K.F. [Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Effect of CO2 gasification reaction on oxycombustion of pulverized coal char.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For oxy-combustion with flue gas recirculation, as is commonly employed, it is recognized that elevated CO{sub 2} levels affect radiant transport, the heat capacity of the gas, and other gas transport properties. A topic of widespread speculation has concerned the effect of the CO{sub 2} gasification reaction with coal char on the char burning rate. To give clarity to the likely impact of this reaction on the oxy-fuel combustion of pulverized coal char, the Surface Kinetics in Porous Particles (SKIPPY) code was employed for a range of potential CO{sub 2} reaction rates for a high-volatile bituminous coal char particle (130 {micro}m diameter) reacting in several O{sub 2} concentration environments. The effects of boundary layer chemistry are also examined in this analysis. Under oxygen-enriched conditions, boundary layer reactions (converting CO to CO{sub 2}, with concomitant heat release) are shown to increase the char particle temperature and burning rate, while decreasing the O{sub 2} concentration at the particle surface. The CO{sub 2} gasification reaction acts to reduce the char particle temperature (because of the reaction endothermicity) and thereby reduces the rate of char oxidation. Interestingly, the presence of the CO{sub 2} gasification reaction increases the char conversion rate for combustion at low O{sub 2} concentrations, but decreases char conversion for combustion at high O{sub 2} concentrations. These calculations give new insight into the complexity of the effects from the CO{sub 2} gasification reaction and should help improve the understanding of experimentally measured oxy-fuel char combustion and burnout trends in the literature.

Molina, Alejandro (Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Medellin, Colombia); Hecht, Ethan S.; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Haynes, Brian S. (University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia)

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Experimental characterization of an industrial pulverized coal-fired furnace under deep staging conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements have been performed in a 300 MWe, front-wall-fired, pulverized-coal, utility boiler. This boiler was retrofitted with boosted over fire air injectors that allowed the operation of the furnace under deeper staging conditions. New data are reported for local mean gas species concentration of O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, NOx, gas temperatures and char burnout measured at several ports in the boiler including those in the main combustion and staged air regions. Comparisons of the present data with our previous measurements in this boiler, prior to the retrofitting with the new over fire system, show lower O{sub 2} and higher CO concentrations for the new situation as a consequence of the lower stoichiometry in the main combustion zone associated with the present boiler operating condition. Consistently, the measured mean NOx concentrations in the main combustion zone are now lower than those obtained previously, yielding emissions below 500 mg/Nm{sup 3}at 6% O{sub 2}. Finally, the measured values of particle burnout at the furnace exit are acceptable being those measured in the main combustion zone comparable with those obtained with the conventional over fire system.

Costa, M.; Azevedo, J.L.T. [Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Investigation of swirling flow mixing for application in an MHD pulverized coal combustor using isothermal modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to investigate combustor reactant mixing with swirling oxidizer flow. The combustor configuration that was considered was designed to simulate a 4 lbm/sec mas flow pulverized coal combustor being tested in The University of Tennessee Space Institute MHD Facility. A one-fourth dimensionally scaled combustor model was developed for isothermal flow testing. A comparison was made of cold flow tests using 3 swirler designs with a base case oxidizer injector design of perforated plated which demonstrated acceptable performance in the 4 lbm/sec MHD combustor. The three swirlers that were evaluated were designed to allow a wide range of swirl intensity to be investigated. The design criterion of the swirler was the swirl number which has been related to swirler geometry. The results of the study showed that the swirlers that were tested fell short of the mixing characteristics displayed with the perforated plate base case oxidizer injector. Test data obtained with the cold flow model established that the actual swirl numbers of two of the swirlers were much lower than the design swirl numbers. Recirculation zones were defined for all configurations that were tested, and a comparison of velocity profiles was made for the configurations.

Power, W. H.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

MARKET-BASED ADVANCED COAL POWER SYSTEMS FINAL REPORT  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MARKET-BASED ADVANCED MARKET-BASED ADVANCED COAL POWER SYSTEMS FINAL REPORT MAY 1999 DOE/FE-0400 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy Washington, DC 20585 Market-Based Advanced Coal Power Systems 1-1 December 1998 1. INTRODUCTION As deregulation unfolds and privatization of the utility market takes shape, priorities for power plant economics have shifted toward those of a "bottom-line" business and away from a regulated industry. Competition in utility generation and the exposure risks of large capital investments have led to a preference to minimize capital costs and fixed and variable operation and maintenance costs. With global competition from independent power producers (IPPs), non- utility generators, and utilities, the present trend of investments is with conventional pulverized

67

A centurial history of technological change and learning curves or pulverized coal-fired utility boilers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Energy Agency’s Clean Coal Centre CoalPower5Press; 2002. [25] IEA Clean Coal Centre. CoalPower5 (CD-from fossil fuels. In: IEA clean coal conference, Sardinia,

Yeh, Sonia; Rubin, Edward S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Optimal Synthesis of a Pulverized Coal Power Plant with Carbon Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal constitutes an important source of fuel for the production of power in the United States. For instance, in January 2009, pulverized coal (PC) power plants alone contributed to over 45 percent of the Nation's total electric power production. However, PC power plants also contribute to increased emissions of greenhouse gases principally carbon-dioxide (CO2). Recently, various carbon capture strategies have been under active investigation so as to make these plants compete with the more environmental friendly renewable energy sources. One such technology that has received considerable success is the capture of CO2 by an amine-based solvent extraction process. However, an aqueous absorption/stripping technology when used in a PC power plant can reduce the net power output of the plant by as much as 20-40%. The energy penalty comes from heating up the solvent in the regenerator, balancing the enthalpy of reaction, and water stripping. This energy penalty poses considerable limitations on commercial viability of the solvent extraction process and, as a result, various energy-saving modifications have been proposed in the literature ranging from the use of hybrid solvents to novel stripper configurations. In this paper, we show that the energy penalty can be further reduced by heat integration of various PC plant components with the carbon capture system. In addition to the release of greenhouse gases to the environment, PC plants also consume a large amount of freshwater. It is estimated that subcritical and supercritical PC plants have water losses of 714 gal/MWh and 639 gal/MWh, respectively. Water loss is based on an overall balance of the plant source and exit streams. This includes coal moisture, air humidity, process makeup, cooling tower makeup (equivalent to evaporation plus blowdown), process losses (including losses through reactions, solids entrainment, and process makeup/blowdown) and flue gas losses. The primary source of water used in PC power plants is the closed-loop steam-based (Rankine) power cycles. These plants need to condense large quantities of low-pressure steam back to water so that it can be reused to produce high pressure steam. However, this requires the removal of large quantities of heat from the low pressure steam in the condensation process. This is usually done by transferring the heat to cooling water, which in turn transfers this heat to the environment by evaporation to the atmosphere. Also, the inclusion of a carbon capture process can increase the raw water usage by as much as 95 percent. In this work, we use heat exchanger network synthesis followed by an optimization approach to process synthesis for developing strategies for reducing water use in a supercritical PC power plant with a carbon capture and compression system. Uncertainties associated with dry bulb temperature, relative humidity, and demand will also be considered in this analysis.

Prakash R. Kotecha; Juan M. Salazar; Stephen Zitney

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

The effect of wood biomass blending with pulverized coal on combustion characteristics under oxy-fuel condition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this study, combustion from the co-firing of coal and wood biomass, and thermal characteristics such as ignition temperature, burn-out temperature, and activation energy were discussed using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). We investigated the effects of biomass blending with two kinds of pulverized coal (bituminous Shenhua, and sub-bituminous Adaro) under air and oxy-fuel conditions. The coal fraction in the blended samples was set to 1, 0.8, and 0.5. The oxygen fraction in the oxidant was set to 0.21, 0.3, 0.5, and 0.8. The ignition temperature was governed by the fuel composition, particularly in the blended biomass which has a much higher content of volatile matter comparing to coal. However, the burnout temperature, which shows a strong relationship with char combustion, depended on the oxidant ingredients rather than on the fuel components. Thermal characteristics such as ignition, burnout temperature, reaction region, and heat flow were very similar between air and a 0.3 oxygen concentration under oxy-fuel conditions with Shenhua coal.

Seongyool Ahn; Gyungmin Choi; Duckjool Kim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Integrating coal cleaning with pulverized coal and fluidized bed boilers to meet the Clean Air Act Amendment and for new plant construction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrating coal cleaning into a two boiler, pulverized coal-fired/fluidized bed (PC/FBC) power plant can reduce emissions at low cost for both retrofit projects and new power plants. The technology, because it relies on proven equipment and practices, albeit in a novel context, is low risk and near term. Its low cost makes it particularly suitable to retrofit many of the older coal- fired power plants in the US, and also for retrofitting power plants in the less affluent Eastern European and Asian countries that rely on coal for power generation and need to reduce emission but cannot afford scrubbers. In retrofit applications the technology involves a simple coal cleaning plant and the addition of a small fluidized bed boiler with its steam circuitry integrated into the plant's steam cycle. The clean coal stream will be fired in the existing boiler while the fluidized bed will use the low grade (waste) stream from the coal cleaning plant. This paper reports that this approach is particularly applicable to the many power plants along the Ohio River.

Miliaras, E.S.; Lawrence, D.W. (Energotechnology Corp., Cambridge, MA (United States))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

A centurial history of technological change and learning curves or pulverized coal-fired utility boilers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Japan, where higher coal prices justi?ed the higher costof the total O&M cost and the coal price remained relatively

Yeh, Sonia; Rubin, Edward

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Revised users manual, Pulverized Coal Gasification or Combustion: 2-dimensional (87-PCGC-2): Final report, Volume 2. [87-PCGC-2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two-dimensional, steady-state model for describing a variety of reactive and non-reactive flows, including pulverized coal combustion and gasification, is presented. Recent code revisions and additions are described. The model, referred to as 87-PCGC-2, is applicable to cylindrical axi-symmetric systems. Turbulence is accounted for in both the fluid mechanics equations and the combustion scheme. Radiation from gases, walls, and particles is taken into account using either a flux method or discrete ordinates method. The particle phase is modeled in a Lagrangian framework, such that mean paths of particle groups are followed. Several multi-step coal devolatilization schemes are included along with a heterogeneous reaction scheme that allows for both diffusion and chemical reaction. Major gas-phase reactions are modeled assuming local instantaneous equilibrium, and thus the reaction rates are limited by the turbulent rate mixing. A NO/sub x/ finite rate chemistry submodel is included which integrates chemical kinetics and the statistics of the turbulence. The gas phase is described by elliptic partial differential equations that are solved by an iterative line-by-line technique. Under-relaxation is used to achieve numerical stability. The generalized nature of the model allows for calculation of isothermal fluid mechanicsgaseous combustion, droplet combustion, particulate combustion and various mixtures of the above, including combustion of coal-water and coal-oil slurries. Both combustion and gasification environments are permissible. User information and theory are presented, along with sample problems. 106 refs.

Smith, P.J.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Clean Coal Technology Program Clean Coal Technology Program Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration A DOE Assessment DOE/NETL-2005/1217 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory April 2005 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name,

74

Process simulation of oxy-fuel combustion for a 300 MW pulverized coal-fired power plant using Aspen Plus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work focuses on the amounts and components of flue gas for oxy-fuel combustion in a coal-fired power plant (CFPP). The combustion process of pulverized coal in a 300 MW power plant is studied using Aspen Plus software. The amount of each component in flue gas in coal-fired processes with air or O2/CO2 as oxidizer is obtained. The differences between the two processes are identified, and the influences of temperature, excess oxygen ratio and molar fraction of O2/CO2 on the proportions of different components in flue gas are examined by sensitivity analysis. The process simulation results show that replacing atmospheric air by a 21%O2/79%CO2 mixture leads the decrease of the flame temperature from 1789 °C to 1395 °C. The equilibrium amount of \\{NOx\\} declines obviously but the \\{SOx\\} are still at the same level. The mass fraction of CO2 in flue gas increased from 21.3% to 81.5%. The amount of \\{NOx\\} is affected sensitively by the change of temperature and the excess oxygen ratio, but the change of O2/CO2 molar fraction has a little influence to the generation of NOx. With the increasing of O2 concentration, the flame temperature and \\{NOx\\} emission enhance rapidly. When the molar fraction of O2 increases to 30%, the flame temperature is similar and the mass fraction of \\{NOx\\} is about 1/8 of that air atmosphere.

Xiaohui Pei; Boshu He; Linbo Yan; Chaojun Wang; Weining Song; Jingge Song

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Formation of fine particles in co-combustion of coal and solid recovered fuel in a pulverized coal-fired power station  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fine particles formed from combustion of a bituminous coal and co-combustion of coal with 7 th% (thermal percentage) solid recovered fuel (SRF) in a pulverized coal-fired power plant were sampled and characterized in this study. The particles from dedicated coal combustion and co-combustion both showed an ultrafine mode centered at approximately 0.1 ?m. Compared with coal combustion, co-combustion of coal and SRF increased the formation of submicron particles, especially ultrafine particles below 0.2 ?m. The morphology of the particles indicated that supermicron particles were primarily formed by the melting of minerals. The ultrafine particles were generated through nucleation and coagulation of vaporized inorganic species, while for the particles in between supermicron and ultrafine particles, condensation of vaporized species or aggregation of nucleates on the existing spherical submicron particles appear to be an important formation mechanism. The elemental composition of the particles from coal combustion showed that S and Ca were significantly enriched in ultrafine particles and P was also enriched considerably. However, compared with supermicron particles, the contents of Al, Si and K were depleted in ultrafine particles. The observed high volatility of Ca was likely related with the high combustion temperature and relative low oxygen condition in the boiler which may promote vaporization of Ca during char oxidation. The discrepancies on the observed volatilities of Ca and alkalis between some laboratory experiments and full-scale measurements were discussed. The composition of the fine particles from co-combustion was generally similar to those from coal combustion. The ultrafine particles from co-combustion were of slightly higher Ca, P, and K contents, and lower S content.

H. Wu; A.J. Pedersen; P. Glarborg; F.J. Frandsen; K. Dam-Johansen; B. Sander

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Coal Direct Chemical Looping Retrofit to Pulverized Coal Power Plants for In-Situ CO2 Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel Coal Direct Chemical Looping (CDCL) system is proposed to effectively capture CO2 from existing PC power plants. The work during the past three years has led to an oxygen carrier particle with satisfactory performance. Moreover, successful laboratory, bench scale, and integrated demonstrations have been performed. The proposed project further advanced the novel CDCL technology to sub-pilot scale (25 kWth). To be more specific, the following objectives attained in the proposed project are: 1. to further improve the oxygen carrying capacity as well as the sulfur/ash tolerance of the current (working) particle; 2. to demonstrate continuous CDCL operations in an integrated mode with > 99% coal (bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite) conversion as well as the production of high temperature exhaust gas stream that is suitable for steam generation in existing PC boilers; 3. to identify, via demonstrations, the fate of sulfur and NOx; 4. to conduct thorough techno-economic analysis that validates the technical and economical attractiveness of the CDCL system. The objectives outlined above were achieved through collaborative efforts among all the participants. CONSOL Energy Inc. performed the techno-economic analysis of the CDCL process. Shell/CRI was able to perform feasibility and economic studies on the large scale particle synthesis and provide composite particles for the sub-pilot scale testing. The experience of B&W (with boilers) and Air Products (with handling gases) assisted the retrofit system design as well as the demonstration unit operations. The experience gained from the sub-pilot scale demonstration of the Syngas Chemical Looping (SCL) process at OSU was able to ensure the successful handling of the solids. Phase 1 focused on studies to improve the current particle to better suit the CDCL operations. The optimum operating conditions for the reducer reactor such as the temperature, char gasification enhancer type, and flow rate were identified. The modifications of the existing bench scale reactor were completed in order to use it in the next phase of the project. In Phase II, the optimum looping medium was selected, and bench scale demonstrations were completed using them. Different types of coal char such as those obtained from bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite were tested. Modifications were made on the existing sub-pilot scale unit for coal injection. Phase III focused on integrated CDCL demonstration in the sub-pilot scale unit. A comprehensive ASPEN® simulations and economic analysis was completed by CONSOL t is expected that the CDCL process will be ready for further demonstrations in a scale up unit upon completion of the proposed project.

Zeng, Liang; Li, Fanxing; Kim, Ray; Bayham, Samuel; McGiveron, Omar; Tong, Andrew; Connell, Daniel; Luo, Siwei; Sridhar, Deepak; Wang, Fei; Sun, Zhenchao; Fan, Liang-Shih

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

77

Design of a laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy system for on-line quality analysis of pulverized coal in power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is vitally important for a power plant to determine the chemical composition of coal prior to combustion in order to obtain optimal boiler control. In this work, a fully software-controlled laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system comprising a LIBS apparatus and sampling equipment has been designed for possible application to power plants for on-line quality analysis of pulverized coal. Special attention was given to the LIBS system, the data processing methods (especially the normalization with Bode Rule/DC Level) and the specific settings (the software-controlled triggering source, high-pressure gas cleaning device, sample preparation module, sampling module, etc.), which gave the best direct measurement for C, H, Si, Na, Mg, Fe, Al, and Ti with measurement errors less than 10% for pulverized coal. Therefore, the apparatus is accurate enough to be applied to industries for on-line monitoring of pulverized coal. The method of proximate analysis was also introduced and the experimental error of A(ad) (Ash, 'ad' is an abbreviation for 'air dried') was shown in the range of 2.29 to 13.47%. The programmable logic controller (PLC) controlled on-line coal sampling equipment, which is designed based upon aerodynamics, and is capable of performing multipoint sampling and sample-preparation operation.

Yin, W.B.; Zhang, L.; Dong, L.; Ma, W.G.; Jia, S.T. [Shanxi Agricultural University, Taiyuan (China)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

78

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IGCC PC advanced coal-wind hybrid combined cycle power plantnatural gas combined cycle gas turbine power plant carboncrude gasification combined cycle power plant with carbon

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Modeling the behavior of selenium in Pulverized-Coal Combustion systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behavior of Se during coal combustion is different from other trace metals because of the high degree of vaporization and high vapor pressures of the oxide (SeO{sub 2}) in coal flue gas. In a coal-fired boiler, these gaseous oxides are absorbed on the fly ash surface in the convective section by a chemical reaction. The composition of the fly ash (and of the parent coal) as well as the time-temperature history in the boiler therefore influences the formation of selenium compounds on the surface of the fly ash. A model was created for interactions between selenium and fly ash post-combustion. The reaction mechanism assumed that iron reacts with selenium at temperatures above 1200 C and that calcium reacts with selenium at temperatures less than 800 C. The model also included competing reactions of SO{sub 2} with calcium and iron in the ash. Predicted selenium distributions in fly ash (concentration versus particle size) were compared against measurements from pilot-scale experiments for combustion of six coals, four bituminous and two low-rank coals. The model predicted the selenium distribution in the fly ash from the pilot-scale experiments reasonably well for six coals of different compositions. (author)

Senior, Constance; Otten, Brydger Van; Wendt, Jost O.L.; Sarofim, Adel [Reaction Engineering International, 77 W. 200 South, Salt Lake City, UT 84101 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

A centurial history of technological change and learning curves or pulverized coal-fired utility boilers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

allow ultra-supercritical boilers to achieve still higherthat supercritical-coal boilers, at least in the 1970s, didGW/year) by type of boiler. Source: [25]. Net Efficiency (

Yeh, Sonia; Rubin, Edward S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Characteristics of carbonized sludge for co-combustion in pulverized coal power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Co-combustion of sewage sludge can destabilize its combustion profile due to high volatility, which results in unstable flame. We carried out fuel reforming for sewage sludge by way of carbonization at pyrolysis temperature of 300-500 deg. C. Fuel characteristics of carbonized sludge at each temperature were analyzed. As carbonization temperature increased, fuel ratio increased, volatile content reduced, and atomic ratio relation of H/C and O/C was similar to that of lignite. The analysis result of FT-IR showed the decrease of aliphatic C-H bond and O-C bond in carbonization. In the analysis result of TG-DTG, the thermogravimetry reduction temperature of carbonized sludge (CS400) was proven to be higher than that of dried sludge, but lower than that of sub-bituminous coal. Hardgrove grindability index increased in proportion to fuel ratio increase, where the carbonized sludge value of 43-110 was similar or higher than the coal value of 49-63. As for ash deposits, slagging and fouling index were higher than that of coal. When carbonized sludge (CS400) and coal were co-combusted in 1-10% according to calorific value, slagging tendency was low in all conditions, and fouling tendency was medium or high according to the compositions of coal.

Park, Sang-Woo [Department of Environmental Engineering, Hanbat National University, Daejeon 305-719 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Cheol-Hyeon, E-mail: jangch@hanbat.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Hanbat National University, Daejeon 305-719 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

Coal surface control for advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report presents the research work carried out on the Coal Surface Control for Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning Technologies project, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE/PETC). The project was to support the engineering development of the selective agglomeration technology in order to reduce the sulfur content of US coals for controlling SO[sub 2] emissions (i.e., acid rain precursors). The overall effort was a part of the DOE/PETCs Acid Rain Control Initiative (ARCI). The overall objective of the project is to develop techniques for coal surface control prior to the advanced physical fine coal cleaning process of selective agglomeration in order to achieve 85% pyrite sulfur rejection at an energy recovery greater than 85% based on run-of-mine coal. The surface control is meant to encompass surface modification during grinding and laboratory beneficiation testing. The project includes the following tasks: Project planning; methods for analysis of samples; development of standard beneficiation test; grinding studies; modification of particle surface; and exploratory R D and support. The coal samples used in this project include three base coals, Upper Freeport - Indiana County, PA, Pittsburgh NO. 8 - Belmont County, OH, and Illinois No. 6 - Randolph County, IL, and three additional coals, Upper Freeport - Grant County- WV, Kentucky No. 9 Hopkins County, KY, and Wyodak - Campbell County, WY. A total of 149 drums of coal were received.

Morsi, B.I.; Chiang, S.H.; Sharkey, A.; Blachere, J.; Klinzing, G.; Araujo, G.; Cheng, Y.S.; Gray, R.; Streeter, R.; Bi, H.; Campbell, P.; Chiarlli, P.; Ciocco, M.; Hittle, L.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.; Perez, L.; Venkatadri, R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Utilization of blended fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash and pulverized coal combustion (PCC) fly ash in geopolymer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, synthesis of geopolymer from fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash and pulverized coal combustion (PCC) fly ash was studied in order to effectively utilize both ashes. FBC-fly ash and bottom ash were inter-ground to three different finenesses. The ashes were mixed with as-received PCC-fly ash in various proportions and used as source material for synthesis of geopolymer. Sodium silicate (Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}) and 10 M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions at mass ratio of Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}/NaOH of 1.5 and curing temperature of 65 deg. C for 48 h were used for making geopolymer. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), degree of reaction, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were performed on the geopolymer pastes. Compressive strength was also tested on geopolymer mortars. The results show that high strength geopolymer mortars of 35.0-44.0 MPa can be produced using mixture of ground FBC ash and as-received PCC-fly ash. Fine FBC ash is more reactive and results in higher degree of reaction and higher strength geopolymer as compared to the use of coarser FBC ash. Grinding increases reactivity of ash by means of increasing surface area and the amount of reactive phase of the ash. In addition, the packing effect due to fine particles also contributed to increase in strength of geopolymers.

Chindaprasirt, Prinya [Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Rattanasak, Ubolluk, E-mail: ubolluk@buu.ac.t [Department of Chemistry and Center for Innovation in Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Burapha University, Chonburi 20131 (Thailand)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

Modelling the Fate of Sulphur During Pulverized Coal Combustion under Conventional and Oxy-fuel Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Focus of the present study is on the fate of sulphur during coal combustion and modelling of the corresponding \\{SOx\\} formation mechanisms. The sulphur chemistry during coal combustion in general is briefly described and potential effects of the oxy-fuel conditions are explained. Details about the developed sulphur chemistry model which covers both heterogeneous and homogeneous reaction pathways are given. The model describes the sulphur transformation in a sequence of stages: the release of coal-bound sulphur, gas phase reactions of sulphuric species, and self-retention of sulphur oxides by coal ash. The model is evaluated against experimental data from IFK's semi-industrial scale furnace (500 kWth) firing lignite at conventional and oxy-fuel combustion conditions. Four reference cases are considered, i.e. air and oxy-fuel mode in both non-staged and staged operation. Based on the results from the basic combustion simulation with AIOLOS, the sulphur chemistry model has been applied in a subsequent post-processing step. The sulphur related results show that the general trends regarding the species concentrations may be predicted correctly. The specific characteristics and the effect of oxy-fuel conditions and oxidant staging are captured correspondingly within the simulation results. Yet, certain deficiencies concerning the quantitative prediction could be identified which necessitate further investigations.

Michael Müller; Uwe Schnell; Günter Scheffknecht

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Co-combustion of pulverized coal and solid recovered fuel in an entrained flow reactor – General combustion and ash behaviour  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Co-combustion of a bituminous coal and a solid recovered fuel (SRF) was carried out in an entrained flow reactor, and the influence of additives such as NaCl, PVC, ammonium sulphate, and kaolinite on co-combustion was investigated. The co-combustion experiments were carried out with SRF shares of 7.9 wt.%, 14.8 wt.% and 25 wt.%, respectively. The effect of additives was evaluated by maintaining the share of secondary fuel (mixture of SRF and additive) at 14.8 wt.%. The experimental results showed that the fuel burnout, NO and SO2 emission in co-combustion of coal and SRF were decreased with increasing share of SRF. The majority of the additives inhibited the burnout, except for NaCl which seemed to have a promoting effect. The impact of additives on NO emission was mostly insignificant, except for ammonium sulphate which greatly reduced the NO emission. For SO2 emission, it was found that all of the additives increased the S-retention in ash. Analysis of the bulk composition of fly ash from different experiments indicated that the majority of S and Cl in the fuels were released to gas phase during combustion, whereas the K and Na in the fuels were mainly retained in ash. When co-firing coal and SRF, approximately 99 wt.% of the K and Na in fly ash was present in water insoluble form such as aluminosilicates or silicates. The addition of NaCl, PVC, and ammonium sulphate generally promoted the vaporization of Na and K, resulting in an increased formation of water soluble alkalis such as alkali chlorides or sulphates. The vaporization degree of Na and K was found to be correlated during the experiments, suggesting an interaction between the vaporization of Na and K during pulverized fuel combustion. By collecting deposits on an air-cooled probe during the experiments, it was found that the ash deposition propensity in co-combustion was decreased with increasing share of SRF. The addition of NaCl and PVC significantly increased the ash deposition propensity, whereas the addition of ammonium sulphate or kaolinite showed a slight reducing effect. The chlorine content in the deposits generally implied a low corrosion potential during co-combustion of coal and SRF, except for the experiments with NaCl or PVC addition.

Hao Wu; Peter Glarborg; Flemming Jappe Frandsen; Kim Dam-Johansen; Peter Arendt Jensen; Bo Sander

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Pulverized coal firing of aluminum melting furnances. Quarterly technical report, January 1, 1980-March 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ultimate objective of this program is the commercial demonstration of an efficient, environmentally acceptable coal firing process suitable for implementation on melting furnaces throughout the aluminum industry. To achieve this goal, the program has been divided into two phases. Phase I has begun with the design and construction of a 350 pound (coal) per hour staged slagging cyclone combustor (SSCC) attached to a 7-ft diameter aluminum melting ladle furnace. Process development will culminate with a 1000 pph prototype SSCC firing a 40,000 pound capacity open hearth melting furnace at the Alcoa Laboratories. Phase II implementation is currently planned for Alcoa's Lafayette, IN, Works, where two of the ingot plant's five open hearth melting furnaces will be converted to utilize coal. In addition to confirmation of data gathered in Phase I, the effect of extended production schedule operation on equipment and efficiencies will be determined. This work would begin in 1982 pursuant to technical and economic evaluation of the process development at that time.

West, C E

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Pulverized coal firing of aluminum melting furnaces. Second annual technical progress report, July 1979-June 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ultimate objective of this program is the commercial demonstration of an efficient, environmentally acceptable coal firing process suitable for implementation on melting furnaces throughout the aluminum industry. To achieve this goal, the program has been divided into two phases. Phase I has proceeded through design and construction of a 350 pound (coal) per hour staged slagging cyclone combustor (SSCC) attached to a 7-ft diameter aluminum melting ladle furnace. Process development will culminate with a 1000 pph prototype SSCC firing a 40,000 pound capacity open hearth melting furnace at the Alcoa Laboratories. Phase II implementation is currently planned for Alcoa's Lafayette, IN, Works, where two of the ingot plant's five open hearth melting furnaces will be converted to utilize coal. In addition to confirmation of data gathered in Phase I, the effect of extended production schedule operation on equipment and efficiencies will be determined. This work would begin in 1982 pursuant to technical and economic evaluation of the process development at that time.

West, C E; Stewart, D L

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Effects of surface voids on burning rate measurements of pulverized coal at diffusion-limited conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research explores the effects of voids (pores on the particle surface that are deeper than their surface radius) on burning area at diffusion-limited combustion conditions. Scanning electron microscopy and digital processing of images of quenched particles were used to quantify surface void area, perimeter, and reacting void wall area for voids with diameters larger than 1 {micro}m. After careful analysis, the most accurate determination of particle burning area at diffusion-limited conditions was achieved by measuring particle surface area using the technique of discrete revolution, subtracting surface void area, and adding reacting void wall area. In situ measurements of reacting coal particle temperatures and images were taken for three coals and spherocarb particles at conditions that limit the formation of CO{sub 2} from reacting carbon under various oxygen concentrations and heating rates. The results of these experiments indicate that correcting the measured surface area for void area and reacting void wall area produces calculated burning rates closely matching diffusion-limited burning rates for all conditions and all coals investigated. These results suggest that void area effects should be included for accurate determination of burning area at diffusion-limited conditions.

Bayless, D.J.; Schroeder, A.R.; Peters, J.E.; Buckius, R.O. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering] [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Climate VISION: Events - Advanced Clean Coal Workshop  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Advanced Clean Coal Workshop Advanced Clean Coal Workshop Objective: Industry and government discussion of key issues and policy options related to deploying clean coal power plants in the marketplace. The following documents are available for download as Adobe PDF documents. Download Acrobat Reader AGENDA July 29, 2004 EEI Conference Center 701 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 8:15 Welcome from Host Thomas Kuhn, President, EEI Opening (Context & Goals) & Introduction Larisa Dobriansky, DOE Kyle McSlarrow, Deputy Secretary, DOE James E. Rogers, Chairman, Cinergy 8:45 Framing the Risks and Challenges for Commercial Clean Coal Plants Results of Risk Framework Analysis, David Berg, DOE (PDF 267 KB) Cost Comparison of IGCC and Advanced Clean Coal Plants, Stu Dalton, EPRI (PDF 684 KB)

90

Waterwall corrosion in pulverized coal burning boilers: root causes and wastage predictions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waterwall corrosion has become a serious problem in the USA since the introduction of combustion systems, designed to lower NOx emissions. Previous papers have shown that the main cause of the increased corrosion is the deposition of corrodants, iron sulfides and alkali chlorides, which occurs under reducing conditions. In this paper, the contribution of various variables such as the amount of corrodant in the deposit, the flue gas composition and the metal temperature, is further quantified in laboratory tests, using a test furnace allowing thermal gradients across the deposit and the metal tube samples. Approximate deposit compositions were calculated from the coal composition, its associated ash constituents and corrosive impurities. A commercially available thermochemical equilibrium package was used, after modifications to reflect empirical alkali availability data. Predictions from these calculations agreed reasonably well with the alkali chloride and FeS content found in actual boiler deposits. Thus approximate corrosion rates can be predicted from the chemical composition of the coal using corrosion rates from laboratory tests, adjusted to account for the short duration (100 hours) of the laboratory tests. Reasonable agreement was again obtained between actual and predicted results.

Bakker, W.; Stanko, G.; Blough, J.; Seitz, W.; Niksa, S. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

A centurial history of technological change and learning curves or pulverized coal-fired utility boilers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

change; Steam plant; Steam turbine; Electricity 1.housed ?ve 10,000 kW steam turbines and typically requiredAdvances in boiler and steam turbine technology, materials

Yeh, Sonia; Rubin, Edward S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

advanced coal-wind hybrid combined cycle power plant naturalwhen the wind generation drops, the power plant needs toa CSP plant, a wind plant produces power during all hours of

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

G+CC+CCS IGCC+CCS FT HVAC HVDC IGCC PC advanced coal-windthan the Base Case (HVDC Only Transmission) Sensitivity toused in the FEAST model. HVDC transmission lines have lower

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The initial goal of the research project was to develop methods of coal surface control in advanced froth flotation to achieve 90% pyritic sulfur rejection, while operating at Btu recoveries above 90% based on run-of-mine quality coal. Moreover, the technology is to concomitantly reduce the ash content significantly (to six percent or less) to provide a high-quality fuel to the boiler (ash removal also increases Btu content, which in turn decreases a coal's emission potential in terms of lbs SO{sub 2}/million Btu). (VC)

Fuerstenau, D.W.; Hanson, J.S.; Diao, J.; Harris, G.H.; De, A.; Sotillo, F. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)); Somasundaran, P.; Harris, C.C.; Vasudevan, T.; Liu, D.; Li, C. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)); Hu, W.; Zou, Y.; Chen, W. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)); Choudhry, V.; Shea, S.; Ghosh, A.; Sehgal, R. (Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

INVESTIGATION OF FLY ASH AND ACTIVATED CARBON OBTAINED FROM PULVERIZED COAL BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the techniques for Hg capture in coal-fired boilers involves injection of activated carbon (AC) into the boiler downstream of the air preheater. Hg is adsorbed onto the AC particles and fly ash, which are then both removed in an electrostatic precipitator or baghouse. This project addresses the issues of Hg on activated carbon and on fly ash from a materials re-use point of view. It also addresses the possible connection between SCR reactors, fly ash properties and Hg capture. The project is determining the feasibility of separating AC from fly ash in a fluidized bed and of regenerating the separated AC by heating the AC to elevated temperatures in a fluidized bed. The temperatures needed to drive off the Hg from the ash in a fluidized bed are also being determined. Finally, samples of fly ash from power plants with SCR reactors for NO{sub x} control, are being analyzed to determine the effect of SCR on the ash.

Edward K. Levy; Christopher Kiely

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several technology advances since the early coal-fueled turbine programs that address technical issues of coal as a turbine fuel have been developed in the early 1980s: Coal-water suspensions as fuel form, improved methods for removing ash and contaminants from coal, staged combustion for reducing NO{sub x} emissions from fuel-bound nitrogen, and greater understanding of deposition/erosion/corrosion and their control. Several Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Systems programs were awarded to gas turbine manufacturers for for components development and proof of concept tests; one of these was Allison. Tests were conducted in a subscale coal combustion facility and a full-scale facility operating a coal combustor sized to the Allison Model 501-K industrial turbine. A rich-quench-lean (RQL), low nitrogen oxide combustor design incorporating hot gas cleanup was developed for coal fuels; this should also be applicable to biomass, etc. The combustor tests showed NO{sub x} and CO emissions {le} levels for turbines operating with natural gas. Water washing of vanes from the turbine removed the deposits. Systems and economic evaluations identified two possible applications for RQL turbines: Cogeneration plants based on Allison 501-K turbine (output 3.7 MW(e), 23,000 lbs/hr steam) and combined cycle power plants based on 50 MW or larger gas turbines. Coal-fueled cogeneration plant configurations were defined and evaluated for site specific factors. A coal-fueled turbine combined cycle plant design was identified which is simple, compact, and results in lower capital cost, with comparable efficiency and low emissions relative to other coal technologies (gasification, advanced PFBC).

Wenglarz, R.A.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research project is to develop advanced flotation methods for coal cleaning in order to achieve near total pyritic-sulfur removal at 90% Btu recovery, using coal samples procured from six major US coal seams. Concomitantly, the ash content of these coals is to be reduced to 6% or less. Work this quarter concentrated on the following: washability studies, which included particle size distribution of the washability samples, and chemical analysis of washability test samples; characterization studies of induction time measurements, correlation between yield, combustible-material recovery (CMR), and heating-value recovery (HVR), and QA/QC for standard flotation tests and coal analyses; surface modification and control including testing of surface-modifying reagents, restoration of hydrophobicity to lab-oxidized coals, pH effects on coal flotation, and depression of pyritic sulfur in which pyrite depression with calcium cyanide and pyrite depression with xanthated reagents was investigated; flotation optimization and circuitry included staged reagent addition, cleaning and scavenging, and scavenging and middling recycling. Weathering studies are also discussed. 19 figs., 28 tabs.

Fuerstenau, D.W.; Sastry, K.V.S.; Hanson, J.S.; Harris, G.; Sotillo, F.; Diao, J. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA)); Somasundaran, P.; Harris, C.C.; Vasudevan, T.; Liu, D.; Li, C. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (USA)); Hu, Weibai; Zou, Y.; Chen, W. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (USA)); Choudhry, V.; Sehgal, R.; Ghosh, A. (Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (USA))

1990-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The configuration of the subscale combustor has evolved during the six years of this program from a system using only an impact separator to remove particulates to a system which also included a slagging cyclone separator before the lean-quench combustor. The system also now includes active slag tapping after the impact separator rather than a bucket to collect the slag. The subscale 12 MM Btu/hr (higher heating value, HHV) slagging combustor has demonstrated excellent coal-fired operation at 6 atm. The combustor has fired both coal-water mixtures (CWM) and pulverized coal (PC). Three Wyoming subbituminous coals and two bituminous coals have been successfully fired in the TVC. As a result of this active testing, the following conclusions may be drawn: (1) it was possible to achieve the full design thermal capacity of 12 MM Btu/hr with the subscale slagging combustor, while burning 100% pulverized coal and operating at the design pressure of 6 atm; (2) because of the separate-chamber, rich-lean design of the subscale slagging combustor, NO{sub x} emissions that easily meet the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) limits were achieved; (3) carbon burnout efficiency was in excess of 99% when 100% coal-fired; (4) ninety percent of the ash can be separated as slag in the impact separator, and a total 98 to 99% removed with the addition of the slagging cyclone separator; (5) Objectives for third-stage exit temperature (1850{degrees}F), and exit temperature pattern factor (14%) were readily achieved; (6) overall pressure loss is currently an acceptable 5 to 6% without cyclone separator and 7 to 9% with the cyclone; and (7) feeding pulverized coal or sorbent into the combustor against 6 atm pressure is achievable.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Advanced direct coal liquefaction concepts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the first quarter of FY 1993, the Project proceeded close to the Project Plan. The analysis of the feed material has been completed as far as possible. Some unplanned distillation was needed to correct the boiling range of the Black Thunder solvent used during the autoclave tests. Additional distillation will be required if the same solvent is to be used for the bench unit tests. A decision on this is still outstanding. The solvent to be used with Illinois No. 6 coal has not yet been defined. As a result, the procurement of the feed and the feed analysis is somewhat behind schedule. Agglomeration tests with Black Thunder coal indicates that small agglomerates can be formed. However, the ash removal is quite low (about 10%), which is not surprising in view of the low ash content of the coal. The first series of autoclave tests with Black Thunder coal was completed as planned. Also, additional runs are in progress as repeats of previous runs or at different operating conditions based on the data obtained so far. The results are promising indicating that almost complete solubilization (close to 90%) of Black Thunder coal can be achieved in a CO/H[sub 2]O environment at our anticipated process conditions. The design of the bench unit has been completed. In contrast to the originally planned modifications, the bench unit is now designed based on a computerized control and data acquisition system. All major items of equipment have been received, and prefabrication of assemblies and control panels is proceeding on schedule. Despite a slight delay in the erection of the structural steel, it is anticipated that the bench unit will be operational at the beginning of April 1993.

Berger, D.J.; Parker, R.J.; Simpson, P.L. (Canadian Energy Development, Inc., Edmonton, AB (Canada))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Investigation of the relationship between particulate-bound mercury and properties of fly ash in a full-scale 100 MWe pulverized coal combustion boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The properties of fly ash in coal-fired boilers influence the emission of mercury from power plants into the environment. In this study, seven different bituminous coals were burned in a full-scale 100 MWe pulverized coal combustion boiler and the derived fly ash samples were collected from a mechanical hopper (MH) and an electrostatic precipitator hopper (ESP). The mercury content, specific surface area (SSA), unburned carbon, and elemental composition of the fly ash samples were analyzed to evaluate the correlation between the concentration of particulate-bound mercury and the properties of coal and fly ash. For a given coal, it was found that the mercury content in the fly ash collected from the ESP was greater than in the fly ash samples collected from the MHP. This phenomenon may be due to a lower temperature of flue gas at the ESP (about 135{sup o}C) compared to the temperature at the air preheater (about 350{sup o}C). Also, a significantly lower SSA observed in MH ash might also contribute to the observation. A comparison of the fly ash samples generated from seven different coals using statistical methods indicates that the mercury adsorbed on ESP fly ashes has a highly positive correlation with the unburned carbon content, manganese content, and SSA of the fly ash. Sulfur content in coal showed a significant negative correlation with the Hg adsorption. Manganese in fly ash is believed to participate in oxidizing volatile elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) to ionic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}). The oxidized mercury in flue gas can form a complex with the fly ash and then get removed before the flue gas leaves the stack of the boiler.

Sen Li; Chin-Min Cheng; Bobby Chen; Yan Cao; Jacob Vervynckt; Amanda Adebambo; Wei-Ping Pan [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Combustion characteristics and NOx emissions of two kinds of swirl burners in a 300-MWe wall-fired pulverized-coal utility boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements were performed in a 300-MWe wall-fired pulverized-coal utility boiler. Enhanced ignition-dual register (EI-DR) burners and centrally fuel rich (CFR) swirl coal combustion burners were installed in the bottom row of the furnace during experiments. Local mean concentrations of O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2} and NOx gas species, gas temperatures, and char burnout were determined in the region of the two types of burners. For centrally fuel rich swirl coal combustion burners, local mean CO concentrations, gas temperatures and the temperature gradient are higher and mean concentrations of O{sub 2} and NOx along the jet flow direction in the burner region are lower than for the enhanced ignition-dual register burners. Moreover, the mean O{sub 2} concentration is higher and the gas temperature and mean CO concentration are lower in the side wall region. For centrally fuel rich swirl coal combustion burners in the bottom row, the combustion efficiency of the boiler increases from 96.73% to 97.09%, and NOx emission decreases from 411.5 to 355 ppm at 6% O{sub 2} compared to enhanced ignition-dual register burners and the boiler operates stably at 110 MWe without auxiliary fuel oil.

Li, Z.Q.; Jing, J.P.; Chen, Z.C.; Ren, F.; Xu, B.; Wei, H.D.; Ge, Z.H. [Harbin Institute for Technology, Harbin (China). School for Energy Science & Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Eight Advanced Coal Projects Chosen for Further Development by DOE's  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Eight Advanced Coal Projects Chosen for Further Development by Eight Advanced Coal Projects Chosen for Further Development by DOE's University Coal Research Program Eight Advanced Coal Projects Chosen for Further Development by DOE's University Coal Research Program July 5, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Department of Energy has selected eight new projects to further advanced coal research under the University Coal Research Program. The selected projects will improve coal conversion and use and will help propel technologies for future advanced coal power systems. The selections will conduct investigations in three topic areas -- computational energy sciences, material science, and sensors and controls -- and will be funded at a maximum of $300,000 for 36 months. The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) will manage

103

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coal Prices..AEO 2007 forecast for coal prices for PRB coal. Transmissionregimes. Sensitivity to Coal Prices Figure 9 is similar to

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Seven Projects Aimed at Advancing Coal Research Selected for DOE's  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Seven Projects Aimed at Advancing Coal Research Selected for DOE's Seven Projects Aimed at Advancing Coal Research Selected for DOE's University Coal Research Program Seven Projects Aimed at Advancing Coal Research Selected for DOE's University Coal Research Program May 13, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- Seven projects aimed at advancing coal research and development while providing research exposure to a new generation of scientists and engineers have been selected to participate in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) University Coal Research (UCR) program. The projects aim to improve the basic understanding of the chemical and physical processes that govern coal conversion and utilization, by-product utilization, and technological development for advanced energy systems. These advanced systems -- efficient, ultra-clean energy plants -- are

105

An evaluation of integrated-gasification-combined-cycle and pulverized-coal-fired steam plants: Volume 1, Base case studies: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation of the performance and costs for a Texaco-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant as compared to a conventional pulverized coal-fired steam (PCFS) power plant with flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is provided. A general set of groundrules was used within which each plant design was optimized. The study incorporated numerous sensitivity cases along with up-to-date operating and cost data obtained through participation of equipment vendors and process developers. Consequently, the IGCC designs presented in this study use the most recent data available from Texaco's ongoing international coal gasification development program and General Electric's continuing gas turbine development efforts. The Texaco-based IGCC has advantages over the conventional PCFS technology with regard to environmental emissions and natural resource requirements. SO/sub 2/, NOx, and particulate emissions are lower. Land area and water requirements are less for IGCC concepts. Coal consumption is less due to the higher plant thermal efficiency attainable in the IGCC plant. The IGCC plant also has the capability to be designed in several different configurations, with and without the use of natural gas or oil as a backup fuel. This capability may prove to be particularly advantageous in certain utility planning and operation scenarios. 107 figs., 114 tabs.

Pietruszkiewicz, J.; Milkavich, R.J.; Booras, G.S.; Thomas, G.O.; Doss, H.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Thermodynamic properties of pulverized coal during rapid heating devolatilization processes. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowledge of the thermodynamic and morphological properties of coal associated with rapid heating decomposition pathways is essential to progress in coal utilization technology. Specifically, knowledge of the heat of devolatilization, surface area and density of coal as a function of rank characteristics, temperature and extent of devolatilization in the context of rapid heating conditions is essential to the fundamental determination of kinetic parameters of coal devolatilization. These same properties are also needed to refine existing devolatilization sub-models utilized in large-scale modeling of coal combustion systems. The objective of this research is to obtain data on the thermodynamic properties and morphology of coal under conditions of rapid heating. Specifically, the total heat of devolatilization, external surface area, BET surface area and true density will be measured for representative coal samples. The coal ranks to be investigated will include a high volatile A bituminous (PSOC 1451 D) and a low volatile bituminous (PSOC 1516D). An anthracite (PSOC 1468) will be used as a non-volatile coal reference. In addition, for one coal, the contribution of each of the following components to the overall heat of devolatilization will be measured: the specific heat of coal/char during devolatilization, the heat of thermal decomposition of the coal, the specific heat capacity of tars, and the heat of vaporization of tars.

Proscia, W.M.; Freihaut, J.D.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

DOE Selects Nine New University Coal Research Projects to Advance Coal-Based Power  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Selects Nine New University Coal Research Projects to Advance Coal-Based Power Selects Nine New University Coal Research Projects to Advance Coal-Based Power Systems Nine new projects selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the University Coal Research program will seek long-term solutions for the clean and efficient use of our nation's abundant coal resources. The announcement today of the selections marks the 34 th round of the Department's longest-running coal program, which began in 1979. This research continues DOE efforts to improve the understanding of the chemical and physical processes governing coal conversion and utilization, and support the technological development of the advanced coal power systems of the future. These advanced systems include ultra-clean

108

Characterization of the Products of the Clay Mineral Thermal Reactions during Pulverization Coal Combustion in Order to Study the Coal Slagging Propensity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Slagging is well-known as one problem threatening safe, economic operation of coal-fired boilers. ... (1-4) Today, more and more power plants use new coals or coal blends because of the low availability of the original design fuels, which has increased the demand for predictions of coal slagging characteristics. ...

Sida Tian; Yuqun Zhuo; Changhe Chen

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

109

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Growing concern over climate change is prompting new thinking about the technologies used to generate electricity. In the future, it is possible that new government policies on greenhouse gas emissions may favor electric generation technology options that release zero or low levels of carbon emissions. The Western U.S. has abundant wind and coal resources. In a world with carbon constraints, the future of coal for new electrical generation is likely to depend on the development and successful application of new clean coal technologies with near zero carbon emissions. This scoping study explores the economic and technical feasibility of combining wind farms with advanced coal generation facilities and operating them as a single generation complex in the Western US. The key questions examined are whether an advanced coal-wind hybrid (ACWH) facility provides sufficient advantages through improvements to the utilization of transmission lines and the capability to firm up variable wind generation for delivery to load centers to compete effectively with other supply-side alternatives in terms of project economics and emissions footprint. The study was conducted by an Analysis Team that consists of staff from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Western Interstate Energy Board (WIEB). We conducted a screening level analysis of the economic competitiveness and technical feasibility of ACWH generation options located in Wyoming that would supply electricity to load centers in California, Arizona or Nevada. Figure ES-1 is a simple stylized representation of the configuration of the ACWH options. The ACWH consists of a 3,000 MW coal gasification combined cycle power plant equipped with carbon capture and sequestration (G+CC+CCS plant), a fuel production or syngas storage facility, and a 1,500 MW wind plant. The ACWH project is connected to load centers by a 3,000 MW transmission line. In the G+CC+CCS plant, coal is gasified into syngas and CO{sub 2} (which is captured). The syngas is burned in the combined cycle plant to produce electricity. The ACWH facility is operated in such a way that the transmission line is always utilized at its full capacity by backing down the combined cycle (CC) power generation units to accommodate wind generation. Operating the ACWH facility in this manner results in a constant power delivery of 3,000 MW to the load centers, in effect firming-up the wind generation at the project site.

Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles; Larson, Doug; Carr, Tom; Rath, Larry; Balash, Peter; Yih-Huei, Wan

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

110

Moon Dust and Coal Ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... struck by the similarity between the preliminary descriptions of moon dust and that of the ash residue collected from pulverized ... residue collected from pulverized coal-fired boilers (that is, pulverized fuel ...

A. B. HART; E. RAASK

1969-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

111

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 Syngas (H2 + CO + CO2) Coal Gasifier coal Fuel Production/2 Syngas (H2 + CO + CO2) Coal Gasifier coal Fuel Production/this operational mode, the gasifiers and other parts of the

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

application of new clean coal technologies with near zeroapplication of new clean coal technologies with near zero

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

DOE's Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Program to  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE's Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration DOE's Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Program to Develop Low-carbon Emission Coal Technologies DOE's Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Program to Develop Low-carbon Emission Coal Technologies March 11, 2009 - 3:18pm Addthis Statement of Victor K. Der, Acting Assistant Secretary, Office of Fossil Energy before the Subcommittee on Energy and Environment, Committee on Science and Technology, U.S. House of Representatives. Thank you, Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee. I appreciate this opportunity to provide testimony on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced coal research, development, and demonstration program to develop low-carbon emission coal technologies. Introduction Fossil fuel resources represent a tremendous national asset. An abundance

114

DOE's Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Program to  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Program to Develop Low-carbon Emission Coal Technologies DOE's Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Program to Develop Low-carbon Emission Coal Technologies March 11, 2009 - 3:18pm Addthis Statement of Victor K. Der, Acting Assistant Secretary, Office of Fossil Energy before the Subcommittee on Energy and Environment, Committee on Science and Technology, U.S. House of Representatives. Thank you, Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee. I appreciate this opportunity to provide testimony on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced coal research, development, and demonstration program to develop low-carbon emission coal technologies. Introduction Fossil fuel resources represent a tremendous national asset. An abundance

115

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced multi-product coal Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced... Hydrogen from Coal Edward Schmetz Office of Sequestration, Hydrogen and Clean Coal Fuels U... 12;Presentation Outline Hydrogen Initiatives Hydrogen from Coal ......

116

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced coal utilization Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced... Hydrogen from Coal Edward Schmetz Office of Sequestration, Hydrogen and Clean Coal Fuels U... 12;Presentation Outline Hydrogen Initiatives Hydrogen from Coal ......

117

Suppression of fine ash formation in pulverized coal flames. Final technical report, September 30, 1992--January 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal ash, and particularly fine fly ash, remain one of the principal practical and environmental problems in coal-based power generation. In particular, submicron aerosols are identified with direct inhalation risk. Submicron ash is thought to arise from mineral vaporization during char combustion, followed by nucleation, condensation and coagulation to yield an aerosol. While aerosols are predominantly made out of volatile alkali minerals, they also can include refractory oxides that are chemically reduced to more volatile forms within the char particle and vaporized. Most of the ash of size greater than 1 {mu}m is generated by agglomeration of mineral as the char particle bums out. These two principal mechanisms are thought to account for most of the ash generated in coal combustion. Previous research has shown that various forms of coal treatment can influence the yields of fine ash from combustion. The research reported here investigates various forms of treatment, including physical coal cleaning, aerodynamic sizing, degree of grinding, and combinations of these on both aerosol yields and on yields of fine residual ash (1-4 {mu}m). The work also includes results from the combustion of artificial chars that include individual mineral elements. This research shows that these various forms of coal treatment can significantly change ash characteristics. While none of the treatments affected the bulk of the residual ash size distribution significantly, the yield of the ash aerosol mode (d<0.5 {mu}m) and fine residual ash mode (1-4 {mu}m) are changed by the treatments.

Kramlich, J.C.; Chenevert, B.; Park, Jungsung; Hoffman, D.A.; Butcher, E.K.

1996-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

118

NETL: News Release -Eight Advanced Coal Projects Chosen for Further  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5, 2011 5, 2011 Eight Advanced Coal Projects Chosen for Further Development by DOE's University Coal Research Program Washington, D.C. - The Department of Energy has selected eight new projects to further advanced coal research under the University Coal Research Program. The selected projects will improve coal conversion and use and will help propel technologies for future advanced coal power systems. The selections will conduct investigations in three topic areas - computational energy sciences, material science, and sensors and controls - and will be funded at a maximum of $300,000 for 36 months. The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) will manage the projects, which include ultra-clean energy plants that could co-produce electric power, fuels, chemicals and other high-value products from coal with near-zero emissions and substantial increases in efficiency.

119

NETL: News Release -Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7, 2007 7, 2007 Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Credit Applications for 2007-2008 WASHINGTON, DC - The Treasury Department and the Department of Energy (DOE) released today new instructions for applying for the tax credits for advanced coal projects and gasification projects. The new instructions provide additional time to submit applications for the credits. For the 2007-2008 allocation round, applications for DOE certification are not due to the Energy Department until October 31, 2007. "To further advance our nation's energy security, this Administration had made sustained investments in research, development, and wider use of advanced coal technologies a priority," Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell said. "Through new and innovative programs such as the Clean Coal Power Initiative and FutureGen demonstration, private sector partnerships, and use of tax credits and loan guarantees, the Department of Energy is advancing research to further develop and deploy advanced coal technologies to meet growing energy demand."

120

Pulverizer performance upgrades lower fuel costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Between 2002 and 2005, combustion equipment modifications were carried out at St. Johns River Power Plant in Jacksonville, FL. The effort succeeded in obtaining the desired emission reductions and to increase petroleum coke consumption. Since 2005 the boilers typically fired a blend of 70% Colombia coal and 30% delayed petroleum coke. To realize significant fuel savings, the pulverizer capacity was increased by 14% to allow a lower grade coal to be used. The article describes the changes made to the pulverizer to allow 11,800 Btu/pound coal to be burnt, with annual savings of $6.3 m beginning in 2006. 4 figs., 1 tab.

Hansen, T.

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low Rank Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 Capture Technology for Low Rank Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems Background Gasification of coal or other solid feedstocks (wood waste, petroleum coke, etc.) is a clean way to produce electricity and produce or co-produce a variety of commercial products. The major challenge is cost reduction; current integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology is estimated to produce power at a cost higher than that of pulverized coal combustion. However, the Gasification

122

NETL: News Release - Seven Projects Aimed at Advancing Coal Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

May 13, 2010 May 13, 2010 Seven Projects Aimed at Advancing Coal Research Selected for DOE's University Coal Research Program Department's Longest Running Student-Teacher Initiative Provides Research Exposure for Future Scientists and Engineers Washington, D.C. - Seven projects aimed at advancing coal research and development while providing research exposure to a new generation of scientists and engineers have been selected to participate in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) University Coal Research (UCR) program. The projects aim to improve the basic understanding of the chemical and physical processes that govern coal conversion and utilization, by-product utilization, and technological development for advanced energy systems. These advanced systems - efficient, ultra-clean energy plants - are envisioned to co-produce electric power, fuels, chemicals and other high-value products from coal with near-zero emissions, including greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide.

123

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced coal conversion Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Edward Schmetz Summary: ;Summary of Hydrogen from Coal Cases Case 1 Case 2 Case 3 Gasifier* Conventional Advanced Advanced... Hydrogen from Coal Edward Schmetz Office of...

124

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced direct coal Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Edward Schmetz Summary: ;Summary of Hydrogen from Coal Cases Case 1 Case 2 Case 3 Gasifier* Conventional Advanced Advanced... Hydrogen from Coal Edward Schmetz Office of...

125

Construction Begins on First-of-its-Kind Advanced Clean Coal...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Construction Begins on First-of-its-Kind Advanced Clean Coal Electric Generating Facility Construction Begins on First-of-its-Kind Advanced Clean Coal Electric Generating Facility...

126

Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the original Request for Proposal was to establish the technological bases necessary for the subsequent commercial development and deployment of advanced coal-fueled gas turbine power systems by the private sector. The offeror was to identify the specific application or applications, toward which his development efforts would be directed; define and substantiate the technical, economic, and environmental criteria for the selected application; and conduct such component design, development, integration, and tests as deemed necessary to fulfill this objective. Specifically, the offeror was to choose a system through which ingenious methods of grouping subcomponents into integrated systems accomplishes the following: (1) Preserve the inherent power density and performance advantages of gas turbine systems. (2) System must be capable of meeting or exceeding existing and expected environmental regulations for the proposed application. (3) System must offer a considerable improvement over coal-fueled systems which are commercial, have been demonstrated, or are being demonstrated. (4) System proposed must be an integrated gas turbine concept, i.e., all fuel conditioning, all expansion gas conditioning, or post-expansion gas cleaning, must be integrated into the gas turbine system.

Horner, M.W.; Ekstedt, E.E.; Gal, E.; Jackson, M.R.; Kimura, S.G.; Lavigne, R.G.; Lucas, C.; Rairden, J.R.; Sabla, P.E.; Savelli, J.F.; Slaughter, D.M.; Spiro, C.L.; Staub, F.W.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Clean coal technologies in electric power generation: a brief overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper talks about the future clean coal technologies in electric power generation, including pulverized coal (e.g., advanced supercritical and ultra-supercritical cycles and fluidized-bed combustion), integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), and CO{sub 2} capture technologies. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

Janos Beer; Karen Obenshain [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), MA (United States)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

Moon Dust and Coal Ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... SIR,-The similarity of the description of moon dust particles and that of pulverized coal ...coalash ...

D. J. THORNE; J. D. WATT

1969-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

129

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at http://web.mit.edu/coal/ NETL, 2007a. “The Cost andbaseline_studies.html NETL, 2007b. “Increasing Security andRole for Coal with Biomass. DOE/NETL- 1298, National Energy

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Alstom's Chemical Looping Combustion Prototype for CO{sub 2} Capture from Existing Pulverized Coal-Fired Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alstom’s Limestone Chemical Looping (LCL™) process has the potential to capture CO{sub 2} from new and existing coal-fired power plants while maintaining high plant power generation efficiency. This new power plant concept is based on a hybrid combustion- gasification process utilizing high temperature chemical and thermal looping technology. This process could also be potentially configured as a hybrid combustion-gasification process producing a syngas or hydrogen for various applications while also producing a separate stream of CO{sub 2} for use or sequestration. The targets set for this technology is to capture over 90% of the total carbon in the coal at cost of electricity which is less than 20% greater than Conventional PC or CFB units. Previous work with bench scale test and a 65 kWt Process Development Unit Development (PDU) has validated the chemistry required for the chemical looping process and provided for the investigation of the solids transport mechanisms and design requirements. The objective of this project is to continue development of the combustion option of chemical looping (LCL-C™) by designing, building and testing a 3 MWt prototype facility. The prototype includes all of the equipment that is required to operate the chemical looping plant in a fully integrated manner with all major systems in service. Data from the design, construction, and testing will be used to characterize environmental performance, identify and address technical risks, reassess commercial plant economics, and develop design information for a demonstration plant planned to follow the proposed Prototype. A cold flow model of the prototype will be used to predict operating conditions for the prototype and help in operator training. Operation of the prototype will provide operator experience with this new technology and performance data of the LCL-C™ process, which will be applied to the commercial design and economics and plan for a future demonstration plant.

Andrus, Herbert; Chiu, John; Edberg, Carl; Thibeault, Paul; Turek, David

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

131

Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Credit  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Credit Applications for 2007-2008 Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Credit Applications for 2007-2008 June 7, 2007 - 1:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Treasury Department and the Department of Energy (DOE) released today new instructions for applying for the tax credits for advanced coal projects and gasification projects. The new instructions provide additional time to submit applications for the credits. For the 2007-2008 allocation round, applications for DOE certification are not due to the Energy Department until October 31, 2007. "To further advance our nation's energy security, this Administration had made sustained investments in research, development, and wider use of

132

Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Credit  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Credit Applications for 2007-2008 Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Credit Applications for 2007-2008 June 7, 2007 - 1:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Treasury Department and the Department of Energy (DOE) released today new instructions for applying for the tax credits for advanced coal projects and gasification projects. The new instructions provide additional time to submit applications for the credits. For the 2007-2008 allocation round, applications for DOE certification are not due to the Energy Department until October 31, 2007. "To further advance our nation's energy security, this Administration had made sustained investments in research, development, and wider use of

133

Coal pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for pressurizing pulverized coal and circulating a carrier gas is disclosed. This device has utility in a coal gasification process and eliminates the need for a separate collection hopper and eliminates the separate compressor.

Bonin, John H. (Sunnyvale, CA); Meyer, John W. (Palo Alto, CA); Daniel, Jr., Arnold D. (Alameda County, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Technology status and project development risks of advanced coal power generation technologies in APEC developing economies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report reviews the current status of IGCC and supercritical/ultrasupercritical pulverized-coal power plants and summarizes risks associated with project development, construction and operation. The report includes an economic analysis using three case studies of Chinese projects; a supercritical PC, an ultrasupercritical PC, and an IGCC plant. The analysis discusses barriers to clean coal technologies and ways to encourage their adoption for new power plants. 25 figs., 25 tabs.

Lusica, N.; Xie, T.; Lu, T.

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

Portfolio evaluation of advanced coal technology : research, development, and demonstration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper evaluates the advanced coal technology research, development and demonstration programs at the U.S. Department of Energy since the 1970s. The evaluation is conducted from a portfolio point of view and derives ...

Naga-Jones, Ayaka

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Clean coal technologies market potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Looking at the growing popularity of these technologies and of this industry, the report presents an in-depth analysis of all the various technologies involved in cleaning coal and protecting the environment. It analyzes upcoming and present day technologies such as gasification, combustion, and others. It looks at the various technological aspects, economic aspects, and the various programs involved in promoting these emerging green technologies. Contents: Industry background; What is coal?; Historical background of coal; Composition of coal; Types of coal; Environmental effects of coal; Managing wastes from coal; Introduction to clean coal; What is clean coal?; Byproducts of clean coal; Uses of clean coal; Support and opposition; Price of clean coal; Examining clean coal technologies; Coal washing; Advanced pollution control systems; Advanced power generating systems; Pulverized coal combustion (PCC); Carbon capture and storage; Capture and separation of carbon dioxide; Storage and sequestration of carbon dioxide; Economics and research and development; Industry initiatives; Clean Coal Power Initiative; Clean Coal Technology Program; Coal21; Outlook; Case Studies.

Drazga, B. (ed.)

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

137

Advanced coal technologies in Czech heat and power systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal is the only domestic source of fossil fuel in the Czech Republic. The coal reserves are substantial and their share in total energy use is about 60%. Presently necessary steps in making coal utilisation more friendly towards the environment have been taken and fairly well established, and an interest to develop and build advanced coal units has been observed. One IGCC system has been put into operation, and circa 10 AFBC units are in operation or under construction. Preparatory steps have been taken in building an advanced combustion unit fuelled by pulverised coal and retrofit action is taking place in many heating plants. An actual experience has shown two basic problems: (1) Different characteristic of domestic lignite, especially high content of ash, cause problems applying well-tried foreign technologies and apparently a more focused attention shall have to be paid to the quality of coal combusted. (2) Low prices of lignite (regarding energy, lignite is four times cheaper then coal) do not oblige to increase efficiency of the standing equipment applying advanced technologies. It will be of high interest to observe the effect of the effort of the European Union to establish a kind of carbon tax. It could dramatically change the existing scene in clean coal power generation by the logical pressure to increase the efficiency of energy transformation. In like manner the gradual liberalisation of energy prices might have similar consequences and it is a warranted expectation that, up to now not the best, energy balance will improve in near future.

Noskievic, P.; Ochodek, T. [VSB-Technical Univ., Ostrava (Czechoslovakia)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Method for firing a rotary kiln with pulverized solid fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method for firing a kiln as well as a method for producing cement clinker in which pulverized coal is initially entrained in an airflow of about 2% of the theoretical amount of air needed to combust the coal and transport it to a burner. Supplemental primary air heated sufficiently to vaporize volatiles in the coal is mixed with the coal flow in a burner, discharged into the kiln and hence ignited. Secondary combustion air heated to between 800 F to 1650 F and more is added in the kiln to effect the substantially complete combustion of the pulverized coal in the kiln.

Binasik, C.S.; Siegert, L.D.

1982-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

139

Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation. Final report, October 1, 1988--March 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The initial goal of the research project was to develop methods of coal surface control in advanced froth flotation to achieve 90% pyritic sulfur rejection, while operating at Btu recoveries above 90% based on run-of-mine quality coal. Moreover, the technology is to concomitantly reduce the ash content significantly (to six percent or less) to provide a high-quality fuel to the boiler (ash removal also increases Btu content, which in turn decreases a coal`s emission potential in terms of lbs SO{sub 2}/million Btu). (VC)

Fuerstenau, D.W.; Hanson, J.S.; Diao, J.; Harris, G.H.; De, A.; Sotillo, F. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Somasundaran, P.; Harris, C.C.; Vasudevan, T.; Liu, D.; Li, C. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Hu, W.; Zou, Y.; Chen, W. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Choudhry, V.; Shea, S.; Ghosh, A.; Sehgal, R. [Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

NETL: News Release - Tax Credit Program Promotes Advanced Coal Power  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

December 5, 2007 December 5, 2007 Tax Credit Program Promotes Advanced Coal Power Generation and Gasification Technologies DOE Will Assist Internal Revenue Service in Project Selection WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is partnering with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to evaluate five projects that have recently applied for tax credits under the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005). Accepted projects will help bring about rapid deployment of advanced coal-based power generation and gasification technologies and enable the clean and efficient use of coal, America's most abundant energy resource. In June 2007, the Treasury Department and DOE released revised guidance on the procedures for awarding the tax credits authorized under EPAct 2005 for qualifying advanced coal projects and qualifying gasification projects. Under the revised guidance, applications for DOE certification received before October 31, 2007, will be acted on in 2008.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

DOE-Supported Project Advances Clean Coal, Carbon Capture Technology |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE-Supported Project Advances Clean Coal, Carbon Capture DOE-Supported Project Advances Clean Coal, Carbon Capture Technology DOE-Supported Project Advances Clean Coal, Carbon Capture Technology January 29, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Researchers at The Ohio State University (OSU) have successfully completed more than 200 hours of continuous operation of their patented Coal-Direct Chemical Looping (CDCL) technology - a one-step process to produce both electric power and high-purity carbon dioxide (CO2). The test, led by OSU Professor Liang-Shih Fan, represents the longest integrated operation of chemical looping technology anywhere in the world to date. The test was conducted at OSU's 25 kilowatt thermal (kWt) CDCL combustion sub-pilot unit under the auspices of DOE's Carbon Capture Program, which is developing innovative environmental control technologies to foster the

142

DOE-Supported Project Advances Clean Coal, Carbon Capture Technology |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE-Supported Project Advances Clean Coal, Carbon Capture DOE-Supported Project Advances Clean Coal, Carbon Capture Technology DOE-Supported Project Advances Clean Coal, Carbon Capture Technology January 29, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Researchers at The Ohio State University (OSU) have successfully completed more than 200 hours of continuous operation of their patented Coal-Direct Chemical Looping (CDCL) technology - a one-step process to produce both electric power and high-purity carbon dioxide (CO2). The test, led by OSU Professor Liang-Shih Fan, represents the longest integrated operation of chemical looping technology anywhere in the world to date. The test was conducted at OSU's 25 kilowatt thermal (kWt) CDCL combustion sub-pilot unit under the auspices of DOE's Carbon Capture Program, which is developing innovative environmental control technologies to foster the

143

Strategic evaluation of investments in coal-dust fuel for blast furnaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper discusses the evaluation of venture investment projects in pulverized coal injection into blast furnaces.

S.V. Bogdanov; S.M. Kornilaev [State University of Management, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the United States from LNG and Coal. ” DOE/NETL-2006/1227,per MJ and those for imported LNG are about 11 grams of CO2gas, which in the US is imported LNG that has substantially

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

NETL: News Release - Clean Coal Technology Report Showcases Advanced Iron  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

April 6, 2000 April 6, 2000 Clean Coal Technology Report Showcases Advanced Iron Making Process, Benefits for the Environment Topical Report Profiles Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection System; Now Available on DOE's Fossil Energy Web Site An advanced iron making technology demonstrated in the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program stands out for its potential to provide major environmental and financial benefits to the United States steel industry. Bethlehem Steel Topical Report The Energy Department has profiled the project in a topical report entitled Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection System Demonstration Project. The report describes the federal government's partnership demonstration project with Bethlehem Steel Corporation, which tested a new method for reducing

146

Interlaboratory comparison of advanced fine-coal beneficiation processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) recently completed three interlaboratory test programs involving 21 developers of advanced fine-coal-cleaning processes. The processes consisted of specific gravity separation (aqueous or heavy-liquid), electrostatic separation (dry), advanced froth flotation, selective agglomeration, and surface modification (gas). The participating organizations received representative samples of Illinois No. 6, Pittsburgh, and Upper Freeport bed coals. They ground them to a size appropriate for their particular process and then treated each coal. Their goal was to produce a clean coal with 2--3{percent} ash while recovering maximum energy. The products were returned to the PETC for analysis and performance evaluation. This paper will discuss the processes involved in the three test programs and present the results of the beneficiation tests. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Jacobsen, P.S. (Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA)); Killmeyer, R.P.; Hucko, R.E. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (USA))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Development of an Advanced Fine Coal Suspension Dewatering Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the advancement in fine coal cleaning technology, recovery of fine coal (minus 28 mesh) has become an attractive route for the U.S. coal industry. The clean coal recovered using the advanced flotation technology i.e. column flotation, contains on average 20% solids and 80% water, with an average particle size of 35 microns. Fine coal slurry is usually dewatered using a vacuum dewatering technique, providing a material with about 25 to 30 percent moisture. The process developed in this project will improve dewatering of fine (0.6mm) coal slurry to less than 20 percent moisture. Thus, thermal drying of dewatered wet coal will be eliminated. This will provide significant energy savings for the coal industry along with some environmental benefits. A 1% increase in recovery of coal and producing a filter cake material of less than 20 % moisture will amount to energy savings of 1900 trillion Btu/yr/unit. In terms of the amount of coal it will be about 0.8% of the total coal being used in the USA for electric power generation. It is difficult to dewater the fine clean coal slurry to about 20% moisture level using the conventional dewatering techniques. The finer the particle, the larger the surface area and thus, it retains large amounts of moisture on the surface. The coal industry has shown some reluctance in using the advanced coal recovery techniques, because of unavailability of an economical dewatering technique which can provide a product containing less than 20% moisture. The U.S.DOE and Industry has identified the dewatering of coal fines as a high priority problem. The goal of the proposed program is to develop and evaluate a novel two stage dewatering process developed at the University of Kentucky, which involves utilization of two forces, namely, vacuum and pressure for dewatering of fine coal slurries. It has been observed that a fine coal filter cake formed under vacuum has a porous structure with water trapped in the capillaries. When this porous cake is subjected to pressure for a short time, the free water present is released from the filter cake. Laboratory studies have shown that depending on the coal type a filter cake containing about 15% moisture could be obtained using the two-stage filtration technique. It was also noted that applying intermittent breaks in vacuum force during cake formation, which disturbed the cake structure, helped in removing moisture from the filter cakes. In this project a novel approach of cleaning coal using column flotation was also developed. With this approach the feed capacity of the column is increased significantly, and the column was also able to recover coarser size coal which usually gets lost in the process. The outcome of the research benefits the coal industry, utility industry, and indirectly the general public. The benefits can be counted in terms of clean energy, cleaner environment, and lower cost power.

B. K. Parekh; D. P. Patil

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

148

Staged Combustion of Pulverized Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The emissions of nitrogen oxides are much higher with the combustion of fossil fuels containing organic bound nitrogen compounds than with clean fuels like natural gas and light distillate oil. During combusti...

H. Kremer; R. Mechenbier; W. Schulz

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Chemical-looping combustion of Victorian brown coal.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Victoria has over 500 years of brown coal resources at present consumption rate. Current utilization of brown coal through conventional pulverized coal-fired power generation results… (more)

Saha, Chiranjib

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced clean coal Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

clean coal Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced clean coal Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ACTION TEAM PROGRESS REPORT Integrated...

151

Chapter 3 - Coal-fired Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal provides around 40% of the world’s electricity, more than any other source. Most modern coal-fired power stations burn pulverized coal in a boiler to raise steam for a steam turbine. High efficiency is achieved by using supercritical boilers made of advanced alloys that produce high steam temperatures, and large, high-efficiency steam turbines. Alternative types of coal-fired power plants include fluidized bed boilers that can burn a variety of poor fuels, as well as coal gasifiers that allow coal to be turned into a combustible gas that can be burned in a gas turbine. Emissions from coal plants include sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide, and trace metals, all of which must be controlled. Capturing carbon dioxide from a coal plant is also under consideration. This can be achieved using post-combustion capture, a pre-combustion gasification process, or by burning coal in oxygen instead of air.

Paul Breeze

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Advanced coal technology by-products: Long-term results from landfill test cells and their implications for reuse or disposal applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New air pollution regulations under the 1991 Clean Air Act and other legislation are motivating continued development and implementation, of cleaner, more efficient processes for converting coal to electrical power. These clean coal processes produce solid by-products which differ in important respects from conventional pulverized coal combustion ash. Clean coal by-products` contain both residual sorbent and captured SO{sub 2} control products, as well as the mineral component of the coal. The Department of Energy/Morgantown Energy Technology Center has contracted Radian Corporation to construct and monitor landfill test cells with a several different advanced coal combustion by-products at three locations around the US; data from these sites provide a unique picture of the long-term field behavior of clean coal combustion by-products. The field testing sites were located in western Colorado, northern Ohio, and central Illinois. Fluidized bed combustion and lime injection residues are characterized by high lime and calcium sulfate contents` contributed by reacted and unreacted sorbent materials, and produce an leachate, when wetted. Compared with conventional coal fly ash, the clean coal technology ashes have been noted for potential difficulties when wetted, including corrosivity, heat generation, cementation, and swelling on hydration. On the other hand, the high lime content and chemical reactivity of clean coal residues offer potential benefits in reuse as a cementitious material.The results of three years of data collection suggest a fairly consistent pattern of behavior for the calcium-based dry sorbent systems involved in the project, despite differences in the initial of the by-products, differences in the methods of placement, and differences in climate at the test sites.

Weinberg, A. [Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States); Harness, J.L. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

NETL: News Release - DOE Advances Production of Hydrogen from Coal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 , 2006 6 , 2006 DOE Advances Production of Hydrogen from Coal Projects Selected to Address Technological Challenges of Hydrogen Production in Large-Scale Facilities WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy today announced the selection of six research and development projects that will promote the production of hydrogen from coal at large-scale facilities. This central approach will combat climate change by allowing for the capture - and subsequent sequestration - of carbon dioxide generated during hydrogen production. The selections support President Bush's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative, which provides funding for research and technology development to realize a future hydrogen economy that minimizes America's dependence on foreign oil and reduces greenhouse gas emissions.

154

Kinetic extruder - a dry pulverized solid material pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and apparatus are shown for the continuous feeding of pulverized material to a high pressure container. A rotor is located within the high pressure container. The pulverized material is fed from a feed hopper through a stationary feed pipe to a vented spin-up chamber to a plurality of two-stage sprues mounted in the rotor. Control nozzles downstream from the sprues meter the flow of coal through the sprues.

Meyer, John W. (Palo Alto, CA); Bonin, John H. (Sunnyvale, CA); Daniel, Jr., Arnold D. (Pleasanton, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Integration of carbonate fuel cells with advanced coal gasification systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbonate fuel cells have attributes which make them ideally suited to operate on coal-derived fuel gas; they can convert the methane, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide present in coal derived fuel gas directly to electricity, are not subject to thermodynamic cycle limits as are heat engines, and operate at temperatures compatible with coal gasifiers. Some new opportunities for improved efficiency have been identified in integrated coal gasification/carbonate fuel cells which take advantage of low temperature catalytic coal gasification producing a methane-rich fuel gas, and the internal methane reforming capabilities of Energy Research Corporation`s carbonate fuel cells. By selecting the appropriate operating conditions and catalyst in the gasifier, methane formation is maximized to improve gasification efficiency and to take advantage of the heat management aspects of the internal reforming carbonate fuel cell. These advanced integrated gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems are projected to have better efficiencies than gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems employing conventional gasification, and also competing non-fuel cell systems. These improved efficiencies would be accompanied by a corresponding reduction in impact on the environment as well.

Steinfeld, G. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States); Meyers, S.J. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States); Hauserman, W.B. [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Integration of carbonate fuel cells with advanced coal gasification systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbonate fuel cells have attributes which make them ideally suited to operate on coal-derived fuel gas; they can convert the methane, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide present in coal derived fuel gas directly to electricity, are not subject to thermodynamic cycle limits as are heat engines, and operate at temperatures compatible with coal gasifiers. Some new opportunities for improved efficiency have been identified in integrated coal gasification/carbonate fuel cells which take advantage of low temperature catalytic coal gasification producing a methane-rich fuel gas, and the internal methane reforming capabilities of Energy Research Corporation's carbonate fuel cells. By selecting the appropriate operating conditions and catalyst in the gasifier, methane formation is maximized to improve gasification efficiency and to take advantage of the heat management aspects of the internal reforming carbonate fuel cell. These advanced integrated gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems are projected to have better efficiencies than gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems employing conventional gasification, and also competing non-fuel cell systems. These improved efficiencies would be accompanied by a corresponding reduction in impact on the environment as well.

Steinfeld, G. (Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States)); Meyers, S.J. (Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)); Hauserman, W.B. (North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

GEOTECHNICAL/GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ADVANCED COAL PROCESS WASTE STREAMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thirteen solid wastes, six coals and one unreacted sorbent produced from seven advanced coal utilization processes were characterized for task three of this project. The advanced processes from which samples were obtained included a gas-reburning sorbent injection process, a pressurized fluidized-bed coal combustion process, a coal-reburning process, a SO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, RO{sub x}, BOX process, an advanced flue desulfurization process, and an advanced coal cleaning process. The waste samples ranged from coarse materials, such as bottom ashes and spent bed materials, to fine materials such as fly ashes and cyclone ashes. Based on the results of the waste characterizations, an analysis of appropriate waste management practices for the advanced process wastes was done. The analysis indicated that using conventional waste management technology should be possible for disposal of all the advanced process wastes studied for task three. However, some wastes did possess properties that could present special problems for conventional waste management systems. Several task three wastes were self-hardening materials and one was self-heating. Self-hardening is caused by cementitious and pozzolanic reactions that occur when water is added to the waste. All of the self-hardening wastes setup slowly (in a matter of hours or days rather than minutes). Thus these wastes can still be handled with conventional management systems if care is taken not to allow them to setup in storage bins or transport vehicles. Waste self-heating is caused by the exothermic hydration of lime when the waste is mixed with conditioning water. If enough lime is present, the temperature of the waste will rise until steam is produced. It is recommended that self-heating wastes be conditioned in a controlled manner so that the heat will be safely dissipated before the material is transported to an ultimate disposal site. Waste utilization is important because an advanced process waste will not require ultimate disposal when it is put to use. Each task three waste was evaluated for utilization potential based on its physical properties, bulk chemical composition, and mineral composition. Only one of the thirteen materials studied might be suitable for use as a pozzolanic concrete additive. However, many wastes appeared to be suitable for other high-volume uses such as blasting grit, fine aggregate for asphalt concrete, road deicer, structural fill material, soil stabilization additives, waste stabilization additives, landfill cover material, and pavement base course construction.

Edwin S. Olson; Charles J. Moretti

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Advanced Development Of The Coal Fired Oxyfuel Process With CO2...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Of The Coal Fired Oxyfuel Process With CO2 Separation ADECOS Jump to: navigation, search Name: Advanced Development Of The Coal-Fired Oxyfuel Process With CO2...

159

Cast Alloys for Advanced Ultra Supercritical Steam Turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Develop advanced coal-based power systems capable of 45–50 % efficiency at <$1,000/kW (in 2002 dollars). Develop technologies for capture and sequestration of CO2 that result in: • <10% increase in the cost of electricity in an IGCC-based plant • <35% increase in the cost of electricity for pulverized coal boilers Demonstrate coal-based energy plants that offer near-zero emissions (including CO2) with multiproduct production

G. R. Holcomb, P. D. Jablonski, and P. Wang

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Advanced Development Of The Coal Fired Oxyfuel Process With CO2 Separation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal Fired Oxyfuel Process With CO2 Separation Coal Fired Oxyfuel Process With CO2 Separation ADECOS Jump to: navigation, search Name Advanced Development Of The Coal-Fired Oxyfuel Process With CO2 Separation (ADECOS) Place Germany Product Dresden based initiative that has been formed to assess oxyfuel CCS technology. References Advanced Development Of The Coal-Fired Oxyfuel Process With CO2 Separation (ADECOS)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Advanced Development Of The Coal-Fired Oxyfuel Process With CO2 Separation (ADECOS) is a company located in Germany . References ↑ "Advanced Development Of The Coal-Fired Oxyfuel Process With CO2 Separation (ADECOS)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Advanced_Development_Of_The_Coal_Fired_Oxyfuel_Process_With_CO2_Separation_ADECOS&oldid=341776

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Moderate or Intense Low-Oxygen Dilution Oxy-combustion Characteristics of Light Oil and Pulverized Coal in a Pilot-Scale Furnace  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The primary and secondary oxidizer streams are preheated to 450 and 400 K with electrical heaters, respectively. ... on the heat transfer, the comparison of flameless oxyfuel and flameless air fuel combustion results of lab. ... processes that coal particles experience during combustion, the characteristics of oxy-fuel combustion are reviewed in the context of heat and mass transfer, fuel delivery and injection, coal particle heating and moisture evapn., devolatilization and ignition, char oxidn. ...

P. Li; F. Wang; Y. Tu; Z. Mei; J. Zhang; Y. Zheng; H. Liu; Z. Liu; J. Mi; C. Zheng

2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

162

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 Industrial Applications Advanced Cyclone Combustor with Internal Sulfur, Nitrogen, and Ash Control - Project Brief [PDF-302KB] Coal Tech Corp., Williamsport, PA PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Demonstration of an Advanced Cyclone Coal Combustor with Internal Sulfur Nitrogen, and Ash Control for the Conversion of a 23-MMBtu/Hour Oil Fired Boiler to Pulverized Coal (Aug 1991) Volume 1: Final Technical Report [PDF-5.9MB] Appendixes I through VI [PDF-8.9MB] CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports The Coal Tech Advanced Cyclone Combustor Demonstration Project -- A DOE Assessment [PDF-234KB] (May 1993) Environmental Reports Annual Environmental Report for The Demonstration of an Advanced Cyclone Coal Combustor, with Internal Sulfur, Nitrogen, and Ash Control for the Conversion of a 23 MMBtu/Hour Boiler to Coal [PDF-812KB] (Sept 1987)

163

Coal surface control for advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies. Final report, September 19, 1988--August 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report presents the research work carried out on the Coal Surface Control for Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning Technologies project, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE/PETC). The project was to support the engineering development of the selective agglomeration technology in order to reduce the sulfur content of US coals for controlling SO{sub 2} emissions (i.e., acid rain precursors). The overall effort was a part of the DOE/PETCs Acid Rain Control Initiative (ARCI). The overall objective of the project is to develop techniques for coal surface control prior to the advanced physical fine coal cleaning process of selective agglomeration in order to achieve 85% pyrite sulfur rejection at an energy recovery greater than 85% based on run-of-mine coal. The surface control is meant to encompass surface modification during grinding and laboratory beneficiation testing. The project includes the following tasks: Project planning; methods for analysis of samples; development of standard beneficiation test; grinding studies; modification of particle surface; and exploratory R&D and support. The coal samples used in this project include three base coals, Upper Freeport - Indiana County, PA, Pittsburgh NO. 8 - Belmont County, OH, and Illinois No. 6 - Randolph County, IL, and three additional coals, Upper Freeport - Grant County- WV, Kentucky No. 9 Hopkins County, KY, and Wyodak - Campbell County, WY. A total of 149 drums of coal were received.

Morsi, B.I.; Chiang, S.H.; Sharkey, A.; Blachere, J.; Klinzing, G.; Araujo, G.; Cheng, Y.S.; Gray, R.; Streeter, R.; Bi, H.; Campbell, P.; Chiarlli, P.; Ciocco, M.; Hittle, L.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.; Perez, L.; Venkatadri, R.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

In-plant testing of a novel coal cleaning circuit using advanced technologies. Final technical report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A circuit comprised of advanced fine coal cleaning technologies was evaluated in an operating preparation plant to determine circuit performance and to compare the performance with current technologies used to treat -16 mesh fine coal. The circuit integrated a Floatex hydrosizer, a Falcon enhanced gravity concentrator and a Jameson flotation cell. A Packed-Column was used to provide additional reductions in the pyritic sulfur and ash contents by treatment of the Floatex-Falcon-Jameson circuit product. For a low sulfur Illinois No. 5 coal, the pyritic sulfur content was reduced from 0.67% to 0.34% at a combustible recovery of 93.2%. The ash content was decreased from 27.6% to 5.84%, which equates to an organic efficiency of 95% according to gravity-based washability data. The separation performance achieved on a high sulfur Illinois No. 5 coal resulted in the rejection of 72.7% of the pyritic sulfur and 82.3% of the ash-forming material at a recovery of 8 1 %. Subsequent pulverization of the cleaned product and retreatment in a Falcon concentrator and Packed-Column resulted in overall circuit ash and pyritic sulfur rejections of 89% and 93%, respectively, which yielded a pyritic sulfur content reduction from 2.43% to 0.30%. This separation reduced the sulfur dioxide emission rating of an Illinois No. 5 coal from 6.21 to 1.75 lbs SO{sub 2}/MBTU, which is Phase I compliance coal. A comparison of the results obtained from the Floatex-Falcon-Jameson circuit with those of the existing circuit revealed that the novel fine coal circuit provides 10% to 20% improvement in mass yield to the concentrate while rejecting greater amounts of ash and pyritic sulfur.

Honaker, R.Q. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Mining Engineering; Reed, S.; Mohanty, M.K.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced coal preparation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Utilization Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik... investigation. Two additional ash samples were prepared by...

166

Economic feasibility study: CFR advanced direct coal liquefaction process. Volume 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary technical and economic data are presented on the CFR Advanced Coal Liquefaction Process. Operating cost estimates and material balances are given.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Practical Use of Coal Combustion Research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Laboratory measurements of coal rapid pyrolysis char yield and char reactivity, together with a simple model of pulverized coal combustion, have been used to predict coal combustion efficiency in utility boile...

P. T. Roberts; C. Morley

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope included laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by the design, construction and operation of 2 t/hr process development unit (PDU). This report represents the findings of the PDU Advanced Column Flotation Testing and Evaluation phase of the program and includes a discussion of the design and construction of the PDU. Three compliance steam coals, Taggart, Indiana VII and Hiawatha, were processed in the PDU to determine performance and design parameters for commercial production of premium fuel by advanced flotation. Consistent, reliable performance of the PDU was demonstrated by 72-hr production runs on each of the test coals. Its capacity generally was limited by the dewatering capacity of the clean coal filters during the production runs rather than by the flotation capacity of the Microcel column. The residual concentrations of As, Pb, and Cl were reduced by at least 25% on a heating value basis from their concentrations in the test coals. The reduction in the concentrations of Be, Cd, Cr, Co, Mn, Hg, Ni and Se varied from coal to coal but the concentrations of most were greatly reduced from the concentrations in the ROM parent coals. The ash fusion temperatures of the Taggart and Indiana VII coals, and to a much lesser extent the Hiawatha coal, were decreased by the cleaning.

Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

1997-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

169

NETL: Gasification - Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Coal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Syngas Processing Systems Syngas Processing Systems Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Coal Gasification Praxair Inc. Project Number: FE0004908 Project Description Praxair is conducting research to develop hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) technology to separate carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen (H2) in coal-derived syngas for IGCC applications. The project team has fabricated palladium based membranes and measured hydrogen fluxes as a function of pressure, temperature, and membrane preparation conditions. Membranes are a commercially-available technology in the chemical industry for CO2 removal and H2 purification. There is, however, no commercial application of membrane processes that aims at CO2 capture for IGCC syngas. Due to the modular nature of the membrane process, the design does not exhibit economy of scale-the cost of the system will increase linearly as the plant system scale increases making the use of commercially available membranes, for an IGCC power plant, cost prohibitive. For a membrane process to be a viable CO2 capture technology for IGCC applications, a better overall performance is required, including higher permeability, higher selectivity, and lower membrane cost.

170

Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Program. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the original Request for Proposal was to establish the technological bases necessary for the subsequent commercial development and deployment of advanced coal-fueled gas turbine power systems by the private sector. The offeror was to identify the specific application or applications, toward which his development efforts would be directed; define and substantiate the technical, economic, and environmental criteria for the selected application; and conduct such component design, development, integration, and tests as deemed necessary to fulfill this objective. Specifically, the offeror was to choose a system through which ingenious methods of grouping subcomponents into integrated systems accomplishes the following: (1) Preserve the inherent power density and performance advantages of gas turbine systems. (2) System must be capable of meeting or exceeding existing and expected environmental regulations for the proposed application. (3) System must offer a considerable improvement over coal-fueled systems which are commercial, have been demonstrated, or are being demonstrated. (4) System proposed must be an integrated gas turbine concept, i.e., all fuel conditioning, all expansion gas conditioning, or post-expansion gas cleaning, must be integrated into the gas turbine system.

Horner, M.W.; Ekstedt, E.E.; Gal, E.; Jackson, M.R.; Kimura, S.G.; Lavigne, R.G.; Lucas, C.; Rairden, J.R.; Sabla, P.E.; Savelli, J.F.; Slaughter, D.M.; Spiro, C.L.; Staub, F.W.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Field study of disposed solid wastes from advanced coal processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radian Corporation and the North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) are funded to develop information to be used by private industry and government agencies for managing solid waste produced by advanced coal processes. This information will be developed by conducting several field studies on disposed wastes from these processes. Data will be collected to characterize these wastes and their interactions with the environments in which they are disposed. Three sites have been selected for the field studies: Colorado Ute's fluidized bed combustion (FBC) unit in Nucla, Colorado; Ohio Edison's limestone injection multistage burner (LIMB) retrofit in Lorain, Ohio; and Freeman United's site using waste from Midwest Grain's FBC unit in central Illinois. A fourth site is under consideration at the Dakota Gasification Company in North Dakota. The first two tasks of this project involved the development of test plans and obtaining site access.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Coal Gasification  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE's Office of Fossil Energy supports activities to advance coal-to-hydrogen technologies, specifically via the process of coal gasification with sequestration. DOE anticipates that coal...

173

Engineering and organizational solutions for improvement of engineering and economic characteristics of the TPE-216 boilers equipped with MV-3300/800/490 pulverizing fans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Efficiency of coal-fired boilers is determined in many respects by optimal operation of the coal-pulverizing plants that are increasingly frequently equipped ... effects of different factors on the performance an...

M. V. Kirillov; P. G. Safronov

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

New Projects Set to Target Efficiency, Environmental Gains at Advanced Coal  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Projects Set to Target Efficiency, Environmental Gains at Projects Set to Target Efficiency, Environmental Gains at Advanced Coal Gasification Facilities New Projects Set to Target Efficiency, Environmental Gains at Advanced Coal Gasification Facilities July 27, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- Four projects that will demonstrate an innovative technology that could eventually enhance hydrogen fuel production, lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, improve efficiencies and lower consumer electricity costs from advanced coal gasification power systems have been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The projects will test membrane technology to separate hydrogen and carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal or coal/biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas), such as from Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power systems.

175

Advanced Coal-Extraction-Systems Project: report of activities for fiscal year 1980-1981. [By coal field and basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Coal Extraction Systems Project completed several major accomplishments in the definition of target resources, definition of conceptual design requirements for Central Appalachia coals, and initiation of the conceptual design effort. Geologically and economically significant resources were characterized, resulting in recommendations for additional target resources; conceptual design requirements for Central Appalachia coals in the areas of production cost, safety, health, environmental impact, and coal conservation were formulated; and strategies for internal and external design efforts were defined. In addition, an in-depth health and safety evaluation of a modified tunnel borer design for coal mining was completed. At the end of fiscal year 1980-1981, the project was prepared to begin evolution and evaluation of conceptual designs for advanced coal mining systems. The selection of Central Appalachia as the target region automatically imposes certain restrictions and constraints, pertinent to the geology, geography, and other aspects of the operating environment. Requirements imposed by the target resource are summarized. Figure 2-1 presents an overview of the relationship between the conceptual design requirements and the constraints imposed by the Central Appalachian target resource.

Dutzi, E.J.

1982-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

POC-scale testing of an advanced fine coal dewatering equipment/technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine (minus 74 {mu}m) clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultra-fine clean coal product to a 20 percent level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. This project is a step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal could be effectively dewatered to 20 percent or lower moisture using either conventional or advanced dewatering techniques. As the contract title suggests, the main focus of the program is on proof-of-concept testing of a dewatering technique for a fine clean coal product. The coal industry is reluctant to use the advanced fine coal recovery technology due to the non-availability of an economical dewatering process. in fact, in a recent survey conducted by U.S. DOE and Battelle, dewatering of fine clean coal was identified as the number one priority for the coal industry. This project will attempt to demonstrate an efficient and economic fine clean coal slurry dewatering process.

Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Rawls, P. [Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Advanced spectroscopic analysis of coal surfaces during beneficiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary FTIR spectra are reported on coals undergoing flotation where enhanced recovery was achieved by ultrasonic or chemical treatments. The spectra of sonicated coals indicate that ultrasonic treatment (10 kHz Swen Sonic) reduces the surface oxidation of heavily oxidized coal. Spectra of chemically treated coal indicate that a higher mineral concentration is present on or near the surface of float coal suggesting that a slime might be present. Spectra are reported for coal-, mineral-, and crystal-derived pyrite which show a strong absorbance band at 420 cm{sup {minus}1}. Spectra of eight Argonne Premium Coal Library specimens have been examined in the 420 cm{sup {minus}1} spectral region and are found to have numerous overlapping bands. 4 figs.

McClelland, J.F.; Oh, J.S.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Low-rank coal research: Volume 2, Advanced research and technology development: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume II contains articles on advanced combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation; coal/char reactivity; liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, and fine particulate emissions. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

Mann, M.D.; Swanson, M.L.; Benson, S.A.; Radonovich, L.; Steadman, E.N.; Sweeny, P.G.; McCollor, D.P.; Kleesattel, D.; Grow, D.; Falcone, S.K.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Construction Begins on First-of-its-Kind Advanced Clean Coal Electric  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Construction Begins on First-of-its-Kind Advanced Clean Coal Construction Begins on First-of-its-Kind Advanced Clean Coal Electric Generating Facility Construction Begins on First-of-its-Kind Advanced Clean Coal Electric Generating Facility September 10, 2007 - 3:16pm Addthis ORLANDO, Fla. - Officials representing the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Southern Company, KBR Inc. and the Orlando Utilities Commission (OUC) today broke ground to begin construction of an advanced 285-megawatt integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) facility near Orlando, Fla. The new generating station will be among the cleanest, most efficient coal-fueled power plants in the world. Southern Company will operate the facility through its Southern Power subsidiary, which builds, owns, and manages the company's competitive generation assets. It will be located at OUC's Stanton Energy Center in

180

Geotechnical/geochemical characterization of advanced coal process waste streams: Task 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Successful disposal practices for solid wastes produced from advanced coal combustion and coal conversion processes must provide for efficient management of relatively large volumes of wastes in a cost-effective and environmentally safe manner. At present, most coal-utilization solid wastes are disposed of using various types of land-based systems, and it is probable that this disposal mode will continue to be widely used in the future for advanced process wastes. Proper design and operation of land-based disposal systems for coal combustion wastes normally require appropriate waste transfer, storage, and conditioning subsystems at the plant to prepare the waste for transport to an ultimate disposal site. Further, the overall waste management plan should include a by-product marketing program to minimize the amount of waste that will require disposal. In order to properly design and operate waste management systems for advanced coal-utilization processes, a fundamental understanding of the physical properties, chemical and mineral compositions, and leaching behaviors of the wastes is required. In order to gain information about the wastes produced by advanced coal-utilization processes, 55 waste samples from 16 different coal gasification, fluidized-bed coal combustion (FBC), and advanced flue gas scrubbing processes were collected. Thirty-four of these wastes were analyzed for their bulk chemical and mineral compositions and tested for a detailed set of disposal-related physical properties. The results of these waste characterizations are presented in this report. In addition to the waste characterization data, this report contains a discussion of potentially useful waste management practices for advanced coal utilization processes.

Moretti, C.J.; Olson, E.S.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Coal combustion science. Quarterly progress report, April 1993--June 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a quarterly status report of the Coal Combustion Science Project that is being conducted at the Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories. The information reported is for Apr-Jun 1993. The objective of this work is to support the Office of Fossil Energy in executing research on coal combustion science. This project consists of basic research on coal combustion that supports both the PETC Direct Utilization Advanced Research and Technology Development Program, and the International Energy Agency Coal Combustion Science Project. The objective of the kinetics and mechanisms of pulverized coal char combustion task is to characterize the combustion behavior of selected US coals under conditions relevant to industrial pulverized coal-fired furnaces. Work is being done in four areas: kinetics of heterogeneous fuel particle populations; char combustion kinetics at high carbon conversion; the role of particle structure and the char formation process in combustion and; unification of the Sandia char combustion data base. This data base on the high temperature reactivities of chars from strategic US coals will permit identification of important fuel-specific trends and development of predictive capabilities for advanced coal combustion systems. The objective of the fate of inorganic material during coal combustion task is the establish a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms and rates of transformation, fragmentation, and deposition of inorganic material during coal combustion as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, the initial forms and distribution of inorganic species in the unreacted coal, and the local gas temperature and composition. In addition, optical diagnostic capabilities are being developed for in situ, real-time detection of inorganic vapor species and surface species during ash deposition. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Hardesty, D.R. [ed.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research in this project centers upon developing a new approach to the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrates all aspects of the coal liquefaction process including coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, coal liquefaction experimentation, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. The project is being carried out under contract to the United States Department of Energy. On May 28, 1992, the Department of Energy authorized starting the experimental aspects of this projects; therefore, experimentation at Amoco started late in this quarterly report period. Research contracts with Auburn University, Pennsylvania State University, and Foster Wheeler Development Corporation were signed during June, 1992, so their work was just getting underway. Their work will be summarized in future quarterly reports. A set of coal samples were sent to Hazen Research for beneficiation. The samples were received and have been analyzed. The literature search covering coal swelling has been up-dated, and preliminary coal swelling experiments were carried out. Further swelling experimentation is underway. An up-date of the literature on the liquefaction of coal using dispersed catalysts is nearing completion; it will be included in the next quarterly report.

Curtis, C.W. (Auburn Univ., AL (United States)); Gutterman, C. (Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)); Chander, S. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States))

1992-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

183

POC-Scale Testing of an Advanced Fine Coal Dewatering Equipment/Technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine (minus 74 mm) clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultra-fine clean coal product to a 20% level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. This project is a step in the Department of Energy's program to show that ultra-clean coal could be effectively dewatered to 20% or lower moisture using either conventional or advanced dewatering techniques. The cost-sharing contract effort is for 45 months beginning September 30, 1994. This report discusses technical progress made during the quarter from January 1 ? March 31, 1998.

B. K. Karekh; D. Tao; J. G. Groppo

1998-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

184

Ash Deposition Behavior of Upgraded Brown Coal and Bituminous Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ash Deposition Behavior of Upgraded Brown Coal and Bituminous Coal ... Ash with a low melting point causes slagging and fouling problems in pulverized coal combustion boilers. ... The ash composition in coal and operational conditions in boilers such as heat load greatly affect the ash deposition behavior. ...

Katsuya Akiyama; Haeyang Pak; Toshiya Tada; Yasuaki Ueki; Ryo Yoshiie; Ichiro Naruse

2010-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

185

Field study of disposed solid wastes from advanced coal processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radian Corporation and the North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) are funded to develop information to be used by private industry and government agencies for managing solid wastes produced by advanced coal combustion processes. This information will be developed by conducting several field studies on disposed wastes from these processes. Data will be collected to characterize these wastes and their interactions with the environments in which they are disposed. Three sites were selected for the field studies: Colorado Ute's fluidized bed combustion (FBC) unit in Nucla, Colorado; Ohio Edison's limestone injection multistage burner (LIMB) retrofit in Lorain, Ohio; and Freeman United's mine site in central Illinois with wastes supplied by the nearby Midwest Grain FBC unit. During the past year, field monitoring and sampling of the four landfill test cases constructed in 1989 and 1991 has continued. Option 1 of the contract was approved last year to add financing for the fifth test case at the Freeman United site. The construction of the Test Case 5 cells is scheduled to begin in November, 1992. Work during this past year has focused on obtaining data on the physical and chemical properties of the landfilled wastes, and on developing a conceptual framework for interpreting this information. Results to date indicate that hydration reactions within the landfilled wastes have had a major impact on the physical and chemical properties of the materials but these reactions largely ceased after the first year, and physical properties have changed little since then. Conditions in Colorado remained dry and no porewater samples were collected. In Ohio, hydration reactions and increases in the moisture content of the waste tied up much of the water initially infiltrating the test cells.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Chapter 5 - Technologies for Coal Utilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter deals with the technologies for coal utilization. Coal use in the United States had been primarily for iron and steel production, locomotives for transportation, and household heat. In addition, many chemicals, including medicines, dyes, flavorings, ammonia, and explosives were produced from coal. Coal is used in the industrial sector for producing steam and to a lesser extent electricity, and some chemicals are produced from coal. The chapter explores the technologies used for generating power, heat, coke, and chemicals and includes combustion, carbonization, gasification, and liquefaction, which have been referred to as the four “grand processes” of coal utilization. Advances in materials of construction, system designs, and fuel firing have led to increasing capacity and higher steam operating temperatures and pressures. In the United States, utilities typically choose between two basic pulverized coal-fired watertube steam generators: subcritical drum-type boilers with nominal operating pressures of either 1900 or 2600 psig or once-through supercritical units operating at 3800 psig advances. The chapter concludes by emphasizing on coal combustion, as this technology is the single largest user of coal.

Bruce G. Miller

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Ash & Pulverized Coal Deposition in Combustors & Gasifiers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Further progress in achieving the objectives of the project was made in the period of January I to March 31, 1998. The direct numerical simulation of particle removal process in turbulent gas flows was completed. Variations of particle trajectories are studied. It is shown that the near wall vortices profoundly affect the particle removal process in turbulent boundary layer flows. Experimental data for transport and deposition of fibrous particles in the aerosol wind tunnel was obtained. The measured deposition velocity for irregular fibrous particles is compared with the empirical correlation and the available data for glass fibers and discussed. Additional progress on the sublayer model for evaluating the particle deposition and resuspension in turbulent flows was made.

Goodarz Ahmadi

1998-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

188

THE SCALE-UP OF LARGE PRESSURIZED FLUIDIZED BEDS FOR ADVANCED COAL-FIRED POWER PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor an agency thereof, nor any of the their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, A combined-cycle High Performance Power System (HIPPS) capable of overall cycle efficiencies approaching 50% has been proposed and designed by Foster Wheeler Development Corporation (FWDC). A pyrolyzer in the first stage of the HIPPS process converts a coal feedstock into fuel gas and char at an elevated pressure of 1.4 Map. (206 psia) and elevated temperature of 930 C (1700 F). The generated char serves as the feedstock for a Pulverized Coal (PC) boiler operating at atmospheric pressure, and the fuel gas is directly fired in a gas turbine. The hydrodynamic behavior of the pyrolyzer strongly influences the quality of both the fuel gas and the generated char, the energy split between the gas turbine and the steam turbine, and hence the overall efficiency of the system. By utilizing a simplified set of scaling parameters (Glicksman et al.,1993), a 4/7th labscale cold model of the pyrolyzer operating at ambient temperature and pressure was constructed and tested. The scaling parameters matched include solid to gas density ratio, Froude number, length to diameter ratio; dimensionless superficial gas velocity and solid recycle rate, particle sphericity and particle size distribution (PSD).

Leon R. Glicksman; Michael Louge; Hesham F. Younis; Richard Tan; Mathew Hyre; Mark Torpey

2003-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

189

Upgrading of low-rank coals for conventional and advanced combustion systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low-rank coals, subbituminous, lignitic, and brown coals, have a ubiquitous presence in the world, being found in all continents. Close to half of the world`s estimated coal resources are low- rank coals. Many countries have no alternative economic source of energy. In the lower 48 states of the United States, there are 220 billion tons of economically recoverable reserves of lignite and subbituminous coal. Add to this quantity 5 trillion tons of predominantly subbituminous coal in Alaska, and the combined amount represents the largest supply of the lowest-cost fuels available for generating electric power in the United States. However, to use these coals cost-effectively and in an environmentally acceptable way, it is imperative that their properties and combustion/gasification behavior be well understood. The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) takes a cradle-to-grave approach (i.e., mining, precleaning, combustion/gasification, postcleaning, and reuse and disposal of residues) for all aspects of coal processing and utilization. The environmental impact of these activities must be matched with the appropriate technologies. Experience over many years has shown that variations in coal and ash properties have a critical impact on design, reliability and efficiency of operation, and environmental compliance when low-rank coals are burned in conventional systems. This chapter reviews the significant technical issues of beneficiation, which includes reduction in moisture as well as ash (including sulfur), in relation to low-rank coal properties and their impact on conventional and advanced power systems. Finally, the development and utilization of low-rank coal resources are briefly discussed in view of policy, economic, and strategic issues.

Young, B.C.; Musich, M.A.; Jones, M.L.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

Fine Particle and Mercury Formation and Control during Coal Combustion.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Pulverized coal combustion is widely used worldwide for the production of electricity. However, it is one of the primary emission sources of air pollutants, including… (more)

Wang, Xiaofei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Advanced forecast of coal seam thickness variation by integrated geophysical method in the laneway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal seam thickness variation has a direct relationship with coal mine design and mining, and the mutation locations of the thickness are generally the gas accumulation area. In order to justify the feasibility and validity of advanced forecast about the thickness change, we carried out geophysical numerical simulation. Utilizing generalized Radon transform migration, coal-rock interface can be identified with an error of less than 2%. By the calculation of 2.5D finite difference method, transient electric magnetic response characteristics of the thickness variation is conspicuous. In a coal mine the case study indicated that: the reflected wave energy anomaly offer interface information of the thickness change point; the apparent resistivity provide the physical index of the thick or thin coal seam area; synthesizing two kinds of information can predict the thickness variation tendency ahead of the driving face, which can ensure the safety of driving efficiency.

Wang Bo; Liu Sheng-dong; Jiang Zhi-hai; Huang Lan-ying

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Technical analysis of advanced wastewater-treatment systems for coal-gasification plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis of advanced wastewater treatment systems for coal gasification plants highlights the three coal gasification demonstration plants proposed by the US Department of Energy: The Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant, the Illinois Coal Gasification Group Pipeline Gas Demonstration Plant, and the CONOCO Pipeline Gas Demonstration Plant. Technical risks exist for coal gasification wastewater treatment systems, in general, and for the three DOE demonstration plants (as designed), in particular, because of key data gaps. The quantities and compositions of coal gasification wastewaters are not well known; the treatability of coal gasification wastewaters by various technologies has not been adequately studied; the dynamic interactions of sequential wastewater treatment processes and upstream wastewater sources has not been tested at demonstration scale. This report identifies key data gaps and recommends that demonstration-size and commercial-size plants be used for coal gasification wastewater treatment data base development. While certain advanced treatment technologies can benefit from additional bench-scale studies, bench-scale and pilot plant scale operations are not representative of commercial-size facility operation. It is recommended that coal gasification demonstration plants, and other commercial-size facilities that generate similar wastewaters, be used to test advanced wastewater treatment technologies during operation by using sidestreams or collected wastewater samples in addition to the plant's own primary treatment system. Advanced wastewater treatment processes are needed to degrade refractory organics and to concentrate and remove dissolved solids to allow for wastewater reuse. Further study of reverse osmosis, evaporation, electrodialysis, ozonation, activated carbon, and ultrafiltration should take place at bench-scale.

Not Available

1981-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

A review of ash in conventional and advanced coal-based power systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Process conditions are briefly described for conventional and advanced power systems. The advanced systems include both combustion and gasification processes. We discuss problems in coal-based power generation systems, including deposition, agglomeration and sintering of bed materials, and ash attack are discussed. We also discuss methods of mitigating ash problems and anticipated changes anticipated in ash use by converting from conventional to advanced systems.

Holcombe, N.T.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

Clean Coal Power Initiative Round 1 Demonstration Projects Applying Advanced Technologies to Lower Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 JUNE 2012 7 JUNE 2012 Clean Coal Power Initiative Round 1 Demonstration Projects Applying Advanced Technologies to Lower Emissions and Improve Efficiency 2 Cover Photos: * Top left: Great River Energy's Coal Creek Station * Top right: We Energy's Presque Isle Power Plant * Bottom: Dynegy's Baldwin Energy Complex A report on three projects conducted under separate cooperative agreements between the U.S. Department of Energy and: * Great River Energy * NeuCo. , Inc. * WeEnergies 3 Executive Summary 4 Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program 5 CCPI Program 6 Demonstration of Integrated Optimization Software at

195

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced combustion systems Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of these include pulverized coal combustion... combustion in gas turbines and coal gasification-fuel cell systems hold out ... Source: Kammen, Daniel M. - Renewable and...

196

Engineering Development of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaing for Premium Fuel Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ash in six common bituminous coals, Taggart, Winifrede, Elkhorn No. 3, Indiana VII, Sunnyside and Hiawatha, could be liberated by fine grinding to allow preparation of clean coal meeting premium fuel specifications (< 1- 2 lb/ MBtu ash and <0.6 lb/ MBtu sulfur) by laboratory and bench- scale column flotation or selective agglomeration. Over 2,100 tons of coal were cleaned in the PDU at feed rates between 2,500 and 6,000 lb/ h by Microcel? column flotation and by selective agglomeration using recycled heptane as the bridging liquid. Parametric testing of each process and 72- hr productions runs were completed on each of the three test coals. The following results were achieved after optimization of the operating parameters: The primary objective was to develop the design base for commercial fine coal cleaning facilities for producing ultra- clean coals which can be converted into coal-water slurry premium fuel. The coal cleaning technologies to be developed were advanced column flotation and selective agglomeration, and the goal was to produce fuel meeting the following specifications -- Less than 2 pounds of ash per million Btu (860 grams per gigajoule) and

Frank J. Smit; Gene L. Schields; Mehesh C. Jha; Nick Moro

1997-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

197

Engineering design and analysis of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major goal is to provide the simulation tools for modeling both conventional and advanced coal cleaning technologies. This project is part of a major research initiative by the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) aimed at advancing three advanced coal cleaning technologies-heavy-liquid cycloning, selective agglomeration, and advanced froth flotation through the proof-of-concept (POC) level. The ASPEN PLUS process simulation package will be extended to handle coal cleaning applications. Algorithms for predicting the process performance, equipment size, and flowsheet economics of commercial coal cleaning devices and related ancillary equipment will be incorporated into the coal cleaning simulator. The work plan for the froth quarter called for completion of the washability interpolation routine, gravity separation models, and dewatering models. As these items were completed, work in the areas of size reduction, classification and froth flotation were scheduled to begin. As each model was completed, testing and validation procedures were scheduled to begin. Costing models were also planned to be implemented and tested as each of the gravity separation models were completed. 1 tab.

Gallier, P.W.

1990-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

198

Overall requirements for an advanced underground coal extraction system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents overall requirements on underground mining systems suitable for coal seams exploitable in the year 2000, with particular relevance to the resources of Central Appalachia. These requirements may be summarized as follows: (1) Production Cost: demonstrate a return on incremental investment of 1.5 to 2.5 times the value required by a low-risk capital project. (2) Miner Safety: achieve at least a 50% reduction in deaths and disabling injuries per million man-hours. (3) Miner Health: meet the intent of all applicable regulations, with particular attention to coal dust, carcinogens, and mutagens; and with continued emphasis on acceptable levels of noise and vibration, lighting, humidity and temperature, and adequate work space. (4) Environmental Impact: maintain the value of mined and adjacent lands at the pre-mining value following reclamation; mitigation of off-site impacts should not cost more than the procedures used in contemporary mining. (5) Coal Conservation: the recovery of coal from the seam being mined should be at least as good as the best available contemporary technology operating in comparable conditions. No significant trade-offs between production cost and other performance indices were found.

Goldsmith, M.; Lavin, M.L.

1980-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

NETL: Coal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

use of our domestic energy resources and infrastructure. Gasification Systems | Advanced Combustion | Coal & Coal-Biomass to Liquids | Solid Oxide Fuel Cells | Turbines CO2...

200

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the activity during the period from 2 June 1991 to 1 June 1992. The major areas of work include: the combustor sub-scale and full size testing, cleanup, coal fuel specification and processing, the Hot End Simulation rig and design of the engine parts required for use with the coal-fueled combustor island. To date Solar has demonstrated: Stable and efficient combustion burning coal-water mixtures using the Two Stage Slagging Combustor; Molten slag removal of over 97% using the slagging primary and the particulate removal impact separator; and on-site preparation of CWM is feasible. During the past year the following tasks were completed: The feasibility of on-site CWM preparation was demonstrated on the subscale TSSC. A water-cooled impactor was evaluated on the subscale TSSC; three tests were completed on the full size TSSC, the last one incorporating the PRIS; a total of 27 hours of operation on CWM at design temperature were accumulated using candle filters supplied by Refraction through Industrial Pump Filter; a target fuel specification was established and a fuel cost model developed which can identify sensitivities of specification parameters; analyses of the effects of slag on refractory materials were conducted; and modifications continued on the Hot End Simulation Rig to allow extended test times.

LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; When, C.S.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Projects Aimed at Advancing State-of-the-Art Carbon Capture from Coal Power  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Projects Aimed at Advancing State-of-the-Art Carbon Capture from Projects Aimed at Advancing State-of-the-Art Carbon Capture from Coal Power Plants Selected for Further Development Projects Aimed at Advancing State-of-the-Art Carbon Capture from Coal Power Plants Selected for Further Development August 15, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Four projects aimed at reducing the energy and cost penalties of advanced carbon capture systems applied to power plants have been selected for further development by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (FE). Valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million in non-federal cost sharing) over four years, the overall goal of the research is to develop carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and separation technologies that can achieve at least 90 percent CO2 removal at no more than a 35 percent

202

Assessment of Metal Media Filters for Advanced Coal-Based Power Generation Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced coal and biomass-based gas turbine power generation technologies (IGCC, PFBC, PCFBC, and Hipps) are currently under development and demonstration. Efforts at Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) have been focused on the development and demonstration of hot gas filter systems as an enabling technology for power generation. This paper reviews SWPC's material and component assessment efforts, identifying the performance, stability, and life of porous metal, advanced alloy, and intermetallic filters under simulated, pressurized fluidized-bed combustion conditions.

Alvin, M.A.

2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

203

Sixth clean coal technology conference: Proceedings. Volume 1: Policy papers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sixth Clean Coal Technology Conference focused on the ability of clean coal technologies (CCTs) to meet increasingly demanding environmental requirements while simultaneously remaining competitive in both international and domestic markets. Conference speakers assessed environmental, economic, and technical issues and identified approaches that will help enable CCTs to be deployed in an era of competing, interrelated demands for energy, economic growth, and environmental protection. Recognition was given to the dynamic changes that will result from increasing competition in electricity and fuel markets and industry restructuring, both domestically and internationally. Volume 1 contains 38 papers arranged under the following topical sections: International business forum branch; Keynote session; Identification of the issues; CCTs--Providing for unprecedented environmental concerns; Domestic competitive pressures for CCTs; Financing challenges for CCTs; New markets for CCTs; Clean coal for the 21st century: What will it take? Conclusions and recommendations. The clean coal technologies discussed include advanced pulverized coal-fired boilers, atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion (FBC), pressurized FBC, integrated gasification combined-cycle systems, pressurized pulverized coal combustion, integrated gasification fuel cell systems, and magnetohydrodynamic power generation.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Testing of advanced liquefaction concepts in HTI Run ALC-1: Coal cleaning and recycle solvent treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1991, the Department of Energy initiated the Advanced Liquefaction Concepts Program to promote the development of new and emerging technology that has potential to reduce the cost of producing liquid fuels by direct coal liquefaction. Laboratory research performed by researchers at CAER, CONSOL, Sandia, and LDP Associates in Phase I is being developed further and tested at the bench scale at HTI. HTI Run ALC-1, conducted in the spring of 1996, was the first of four planned tests. In Run ALC-1, feed coal ash reduction (coal cleaning) by oil agglomeration, and recycle solvent quality improvement through dewaxing and hydrotreatment of the recycle distillate were evaluated. HTI`s bench liquefaction Run ALC-1 consisted of 25 days of operation. Major accomplishments were: 1) oil agglomeration reduced the ash content of Black Thunder Mine coal by 40%, from 5.5% to 3.3%; 2) excellent coal conversion of 98% was obtained with oil agglomerated coal, about 3% higher than the raw Black Thunder Mine coal, increasing the potential product yield by 2-3% on an MAF coal basis; 3) agglomerates were liquefied with no handling problems; 4) fresh catalyst make-up rate was decreased by 30%, with no apparent detrimental operating characteristics, both when agglomerates were fed and when raw coal was fed (with solvent dewaxing and hydrotreating); 5) recycle solvent treatment by dewaxing and hydrotreating was demonstrated, but steady-state operation was not achieved; and 6) there was some success in achieving extinction recycle of the heaviest liquid products. Performance data have not been finalized; they will be available for full evaluation in the new future.

Robbins, G.A.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P. [CONSOL, Inc., Library, PA (United States). Research and Development Dept.] [CONSOL, Inc., Library, PA (United States). Research and Development Dept.; Derbyshire, F.L.; Givens, E.N. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research] [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Hu, J.; Lee, T.L.K. [Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., Lawrenceville, NJ (United States)] [Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., Lawrenceville, NJ (United States); Miller, J.E.; Stephens, H.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Peluso, M. [LDP Associates, Hamilton Square, NJ (United States)] [LDP Associates, Hamilton Square, NJ (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

THE COMBUSTION OF SOLVENT REPINED COAL IN AN OPPOSED FLOW DIFFUSION FLAME  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

refining, the sulfur and ash levels of coal may be reduced.pressed pulverized coal with significant ash production inin both sulfur and ash in comparison with the parent coal.

Chin, W.K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced coal cleaning Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: Hydrogen from Coal Edward Schmetz Office of Sequestration, Hydrogen and Clean Coal Fuels U... Hydrogen From Coal? Huge U.S. coal reserves Hydrogen can be produced...

207

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress made in five research programs is described. The subtasks in oil shale study include oil shale process studies and unconventional applications and markets for western oil shale.The tar sand study is on recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction (ROPE) process. Four tasks are described in coal research: underground coal gasification; coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and sold waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research covers: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; NMR analysis of sample from the ocean drilling program; and menu driven access to the WDEQ hydrologic data management system.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Design manual for management of solid by-products from advanced coal technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Developing coal conversion technologies face major obstacles in byproduct management. This project has developed several management strategies based on field trials of small-scale landfills in an earlier phase of the project, as well as on published/unpublished sources detailing regulatory issues, current industry practice, and reuse opportunities. Field testing, which forms the basis for several of the disposal alternatives presented in this design manual, was limited to byproducts from Ca-based dry SO{sub 2} control technologies, circulating fluidized bed combustion ash, and bubbling bed fluidized bed combustion ash. Data on byproducts from other advanced coal technologies and on reuse opportunities are drawn from other sources (citations following Chapter 3). Field results from the 5 test cases examined under this project, together with results from other ongoing research, provide a basis for predictive modeling of long-term performance of some advanced coal byproducts on exposure to ambient environment. This manual is intended to provide a reference database and development plan for designing, permitting, and operating facilities where advanced coal technology byproducts are managed.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

An analysis of cost effective incentives for initial commercial deployment of advanced clean coal technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis evaluates the incentives necessary to introduce commercial scale Advanced Clean Coal Technologies, specifically Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (ICGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) powerplants. The incentives required to support the initial introduction of these systems are based on competitive busbar electricity costs with natural gas fired combined cycle powerplants, in baseload service. A federal government price guarantee program for up to 10 Advanced Clean Coal Technology powerplants, 5 each ICGCC and PFBC systems is recommended in order to establish the commercial viability of these systems by 2010. By utilizing a decreasing incentives approach as the technologies mature (plants 1--5 of each type), and considering the additional federal government benefits of these plants versus natural gas fired combined cycle powerplants, federal government net financial exposure is minimized. Annual net incentive outlays of approximately 150 million annually over a 20 year period could be necessary. Based on increased demand for Advanced Clean Coal Technologies beyond 2010, the federal government would be revenue neutral within 10 years of the incentives program completion.

Spencer, D.F. [SIMTECHE, Half Moon Bay, CA (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

210

Fuel supply system and method for coal-fired prime mover  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A coal-fired gas turbine engine is provided with an on-site coal preparation and engine feeding arrangement. With this arrangement, relatively large dry particles of coal from an on-site coal supply are micro-pulverized and the resulting dry, micron-sized, coal particulates are conveyed by steam or air into the combustion chamber of the engine. Thermal energy introduced into the coal particulates during the micro-pulverizing step is substantially recovered since the so-heated coal particulates are fed directly from the micro-pulverizer into the combustion chamber.

Smith, William C. (Morgantown, WV); Paulson, Leland E. (Morgantown, WV)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Advanced coal gasifier designs using large-scale simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Porting of the legacy code MFIX to a high performance computer (HPC) and the use of high resolution simulations for the design of a coal gasifier are described here. MFIX is based on a continuum multiphase flow model that considers gas and solids to form interpenetrating continua. Low resolution simulations of a commercial scale gasifier with a validated MFIX model revealed interesting physical phenomena with implications on the gasifier design, which prompted the study reported here. To be predictive, the simulations need to model the spatiotemporal variations in gas and solids volume fractions, velocities, temperatures with any associated phase change and chemical reactions. These processes occur at various time- and length-scales requiring very high spatial resolution and large number of iterations with small time-steps. We were able to perform perhaps the largest known simulations of gas-solids reacting flows, providing detailed information about the gas-solids flow structure and the pressure, temperature and species distribution in the gasifier. One key finding is the new features of the coal jet trajectory revealed with the high spatial resolution, which provides information on the accuracy of the lower resolution simulations. Methodologies for effectively combining high and low resolution simulations for design studies must be developed. From a computational science perspective, we found that global communication has to be reduced to achieve scalability to 1000s of cores, hybrid parallelization is required to effectively utilize the multicore chips, and the wait time in the batch queue significantly increases the actual time-to-solution. From our experience, development is required in the following areas: efficient solvers for heterogeneous, massively parallel systems; data analysis tools to extract information from large data sets; and programming environments for easily porting legacy codes to HPC.

Syamlal, M [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL); Guenther, Chris [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL); Gel, Aytekin [Aeolus Research Inc.; Pannala, Sreekanth [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Development of an Integrated Multicontaminant Removal Process Applied to Warm Syngas Cleanup for Coal-Based Advanced Gasification Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

an Integrated an Integrated Multicontaminant Removal Process Applied to Warm Syngas Cleanup for Coal-Based Advanced Gasification Systems Background The U.S. has more coal than any other country, and it can be converted through gasification into electricity, liquid fuels, chemicals, or hydrogen. However, for coal gasification to become sufficiently competitive to benefit the U.S. economy and help reduce our dependence on foreign fuels, gasification costs must be reduced

213

Studies of Coal Nitrogen Release Chemistry for Oxyfuel Combustion and Chemical Additives.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Pollution is one of the greatest concerns with pulverized coal combustion. With tightening standards on pollution emissions, more information is needed to create better design… (more)

Sowa, John M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Wilsonville Advanced Coal-Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama: Run 240 with Illinois 6 coal. Technical progress report. [Run 240; non-integrated two stage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the operating results for Run 240 at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R and D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. This run was made in a non-integrated two stage iquefaction (NTSL) mode using Illinois 6 coal from the Burning Star mine. Run 240 began on 31 May and continued through 20 July 1982. During this period, coal was fed continuously for 1203 hours. Three overall special product workup periods were selected and are analyzed herein. Six additional material balances around the hydrotreater unit are also reported. This run was made in support of the demonstration plant design effort by the International Coal Refining Company to define a yield structure and the exothermic heat of reaction for the SRC reactor when liquefying Illinois 6 coal.

Not Available

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Advanced turbine design for coal-fueled engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The investigators conclude that: (1) Turbine erosion resistance was shown to be improved by a factor of 5 by varying the turbine design. Increasing the number of stages and increasing the mean radius reduces the peak predicted erosion rates for 2-D flows on the blade airfoil from values which are 6 times those of the vane to values of erosion which are comparable to those of the vane airfoils. (2) Turbine erosion was a strong function of airfoil shape depending on particle diameter. Different airfoil shapes for the same turbine operating condition resulted in a factor of 7 change in airfoil erosion for the smallest particles studied (5 micron). (3) Predicted erosion for the various turbines analyzed was a strong function of particle diameter and weaker function of particle density. (4) Three dimensional secondary flows were shown to cause increases in peak and average erosion on the vane and blade airfoils. Additionally, the interblade secondary flows and stationary outer case caused unique erosion patterns which were not obtainable with 2-D analyses. (5) Analysis of the results indicate that hot gas cleanup systems are necessary to achieve acceptable turbine life in direct-fired, coal-fueled systems. In addition, serious consequences arise when hot gas filter systems fail for even short time periods. For a complete failure of the filter system, a 0.030 in. thick corrosion-resistant protective coating on a turbine blade would be eroded at some locations within eight minutes.

Wagner, J.H.; Johnson, B.V.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems: Subscale combustion testing. Topical report, Task 3.1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report on the Subscale Combustor Testing performed at Textron Defense Systems` (TDS) Haverhill Combustion Laboratories for the Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine System Program of the Westinghouse Electric Corp. This program was initiated by the Department of Energy in 1986 as an R&D effort to establish the technology base for the commercial application of direct coal-fired gas turbines. The combustion system under consideration incorporates a modular staged, rich-lean-quench, Toroidal Vortex Slogging Combustor (TVC) concept. Fuel-rich conditions in the first stage inhibit NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen; molten coal ash and sulfated sorbent are removed, tapped and quenched from the combustion gases by inertial separation in the second stage. Final oxidation of the fuel-rich gases, and dilution to achieve the desired turbine inlet conditions are accomplished in the third stage, which is maintained sufficiently lean so that here, too, NO{sub x} formation is inhibited. The primary objective of this work was to verify the feasibility of a direct coal-fueled combustion system for combustion turbine applications. This has been accomplished by the design, fabrication, testing and operation of a subscale development-type coal-fired combustor. Because this was a complete departure from present-day turbine combustors and fuels, it was considered necessary to make a thorough evaluation of this design, and its operation in subscale, before applying it in commercial combustion turbine power systems.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Regional price targets appropriate for advanced coal extraction. [Forecasting to 1985 and 2000; USA; Regional analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The object of the study is to provide a methodology for predicting coal prices in regional markets for the target time frames 1985 and 2000 that could subsequently be used to guide the development of an advanced coal extraction system. The model constructed for the study is a supply and demand model that focuses on underground mining, since the advanced technology is expected to be developed for these reserves by the target years. The supply side of the model is based on coal reserve data generated by Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. (EEA). Given this data and the cost of operating a mine (data from US Department of Energy and Bureau of Mines), the Minimum Acceptable Selling Price (MASP) is obtained. The MASP is defined as the smallest price that would induce the producer to bring the mine into production, and is sensitive to the current technology and to assumptions concerning miner productivity. Based on this information, market supply curves can then be generated. On the demand side of the model, demand by region is calculated based on an EEA methodology that emphasizes demand by electric utilities and demand by industry. The demand and supply curves are then used to obtain the price targets. This last step is accomplished by allocating the demands among the suppliers so that the combined cost of producing and transporting coal is minimized.

Terasawa, K.L.; Whipple, D.W.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Carbon formation and metal dusting in advanced coal gasification processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The product gases generated by coal gasification systems contain high concentrations of CO and, characteristically, have relatively high carbon activities. Accordingly, carbon deposition and metal dusting can potentially degrade the operation of such gasifier systems. Therefore, the product gas compositions of eight representative gasifier systems were examined with respect to the carbon activity of the gases at temperatures ranging from 480 to 1,090 C. Phase stability calculations indicated that Fe{sub 3}C is stable only under very limited thermodynamic conditions and with certain kinetic assumptions and that FeO and Fe{sub 0.877}S tend to form instead of the carbide. As formation of Fe{sub 3}C is a necessary step in the metal dusting of steels, there are numerous gasifier environments where this type of carbon-related degradation will not occur, particularly under conditions associated with higher oxygen and sulfur activities. These calculations also indicated that the removal of H{sub 2}S by a hot-gas cleanup system may have less effect on the formation of Fe{sub 3}C in air-blown gasifier environments, where the iron oxide phase can exist and is unaffected by the removal of sulfur, than in oxygen-blown systems, where iron sulfide provides the only potential barrier to Fe{sub 3}C formation. Use of carbon- and/or low-alloy steels dictates that the process gas composition be such that Fe{sub 3}C cannot form if the potential for metal dusting is to be eliminated. Alternatively, process modifications could include the reintroduction of hydrogen sulfide, cooling the gas to perhaps as low as 400 C and/or steam injection. If higher-alloy steels are used, a hydrogen sulfide-free gas may be processed without concern about carbon deposition and metal dusting.

DeVan, J.H.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Judkins, R.R.; Wright, I.G.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

The effect of coal particle size on the heat of combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relations between integral heat and differential heat of combustion for pulverized coal, respectively, and the size of coal particle were derived in this paper. The results show that coal particle size has some effect on its heats of combustion; the smaller coal particle size, the greater the specific surface area and the specific surface energy, and the greater the heat value, also; and that the differential heat of combustion for pulverized coal differs from the integral one.

Xue Yongqiang; Yan Ruiping; Gao Yang [Dept. of Coal Processing and Utilization, Shanxi (China)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

220

(Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center): Quarterly technical progress report for the period ending June 30, 1987. [Advanced Coal Research and Technology Development Programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research programs on coal and coal liquefaction are presented. Topics discussed are: coal science, combustion, kinetics, surface science; advanced technology projects in liquefaction; two stage liquefaction and direct liquefaction; catalysts of liquefaction; Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and thermodynamics; alternative fuels utilization; coal preparation; biodegradation; advanced combustion technology; flue gas cleanup; environmental coordination, and technology transfer. Individual projects are processed separately for the data base. (CBS)

None

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Requirements for the conceptual design of advanced underground coal-extraction systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents conceptual design requirements for underground coal mining systems having substantially improved performance in the areas of production cost and miner safety. Mandatory performance levels are also set for miner health, environmental impact, and coal recovery. In addition to mandatory design goals and constraints, the document identifies a number of desirable system characteristics which must be assessed in terms of their impact on production cost and their compatibility with other system elements. Although developed for the flat-lying, moderately thick seams of Central Appalachia, these requirements are designed to be easily adaptable to other coals. This document results from the initial phase of a program to define, develop, and demonstrate advanced equipment suitable for the resources remaining beyond the year 2000. The requirements developed are meant to implement the broad systems performance goals formulated by Goldsmith and Lavin (1980) by providing a rational point of departure for the design of underground mining systems with emphasis on Central Appalachian coals. Because no one has yet attempted to design to these requirements, they may contain some inconsistencies and need clarification in some areas. Accordingly, the authors would very much appreciate commments and suggestions from those who have used or critically reviewed these requirements.

Gangal, M.D.; Lavin, M.L.

1981-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Coal-oil slurry preparation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pumpable slurry of pulverized coal in a coal-derived hydrocarbon oil carrier which slurry is useful as a low-ash, low-sulfur clean fuel, is produced from a high sulfur-containing coal. The initial pulverized coal is separated by gravity differentiation into (1) a high density refuse fraction containing the major portion of non-coal mineral products and sulfur, (2) a lowest density fraction of low sulfur content and (3) a middlings fraction of intermediate sulfur and ash content. The refuse fraction (1) is gasified by partial combustion producing a crude gas product from which a hydrogen stream is separated for use in hydrogenative liquefaction of the middlings fraction (3). The lowest density fraction (2) is mixed with the liquefied coal product to provide the desired fuel slurry. Preferably there is also separately recovered from the coal liquefaction LPG and pipeline gas.

Tao, John C. (Perkiomenville, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Coal combustion science: Task 1, Coal char combustion: Task 2, Fate of mineral matter. Quarterly progress report, July--September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: (1) kinetics and mechanisms of pulverized coal char combustion and (2) fate of inorganic material during coal combustion. The objective of Task 1 is to characterize the combustion behavior of selected US coals under conditions relevant to industrial pulverized coal-fired furnaces. In Sandia`s Coal Combustion Laboratory (CCL), optical techniques are used to obtain high-resolution images of individual burning coal char particles and to measure, in situ, their temperatures, sizes, and velocities. Detailed models of combustion transport processes are then used to determine kinetic parameters describing the combustion behavior as a function of coal type and combustion environment. Partially reacted char particles are also sampled and characterized with advanced materials diagnostics to understand the critical physical and chemical transformations that influence reaction rates and burnout times. The ultimate goal of the task is the establishment of a data base of the high temperature reactivities of chars from strategic US coals, from which important trends may be identified and predictive capabilities developed. The overall objectives for task 2 are: (1) to complete experimental and theoretical investigation of ash release mechanisms; (2) to complete experimental work on char fragmentation; (3) to establish the extent of coal (as opposed to char) fragmentation as a function of coal type and particle size; (4) to develop diagnostic capabilities for in situ, real-time, qualitative indications of surface species composition during ash deposition, with work continuing into FY94; (5) to develop diagnostic capabilities for in situ, real-time qualitative detection of inorganic vapor concentrations; and (6) to conduct a literature survey on the current state of understanding of ash deposition, with work continuing into FY94.

Hardesty, D.R. [ed.; Hurt, R.H.; Davis, K.A.; Baxter, L.L.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Proceedings of the coal-fired power systems 94: Advances in IGCC and PFBC review meeting. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Coal-Fired Power Systems 94 -- Advances in IGCC and PFBC Review Meeting was held June 21--23, 1994, at the Morgantown Energy Center (METC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. This Meeting was sponsored and hosted by METC, the Office of Fossil Energy, and the US Department of Energy (DOE). METC annually sponsors this conference for energy executives, engineers, scientists, and other interested parties to review the results of research and development projects; to discuss the status of advanced coal-fired power systems and future plans with the industrial contractors; and to discuss cooperative industrial-government research opportunities with METC`s in-house engineers and scientists. Presentations included industrial contractor and METC in-house technology developments related to the production of power via coal-fired Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) systems, the summary status of clean coal technologies, and developments and advancements in advanced technology subsystems, such as hot gas cleanup. A keynote speaker and other representatives from the electric power industry also gave their assessment of advanced power systems. This meeting contained 11 formal sessions and one poster session, and included 52 presentations and 24 poster presentations. Volume I contains papers presented at the following sessions: opening commentaries; changes in the market and technology drivers; advanced IGCC systems; advanced PFBC systems; advanced filter systems; desulfurization system; turbine systems; and poster session. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

McDaniel, H.M.; Staubly, R.K.; Venkataraman, V.K. [eds.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Evaluation of sorbents for the cleanup of coal-derived synthesis gas at elevated temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) with carbon dioxide capture is a promising technology to produce electricity from coal at a higher efficiency than with traditional subcritical pulverized coal (PC) power plants. ...

Couling, David Joseph

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Coal and Coal-Biomass to Liquids  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Coal-Biomass to Liquids News Gasifipedia Coal-Biomass Feed Advanced Fuels Synthesis Systems Analyses International Activity Project Information Project Portfolio Publications...

227

Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume I, Part 1. Final report, September 1986--September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program was the development of a predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. The foundation to describe coal specific conversion behavior was AFR`s Functional Group and Devolatilization, Vaporization and Crosslinking (DVC) models, which had been previously developed. The combined FG-DVC model was integrated with BYU`s comprehensive two-dimensional reactor model for combustion and coal gasification, PCGC-2, and a one-dimensional model for fixed-bed gasifiers, FBED-1. Progress utilizing these models is described.

Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Scoping Studies to Evaluate the Benefits of an Advanced Dry Feed System on the Use of Low-Rank Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to evaluate the ability of advanced low rank coal gasification technology to cause a significant reduction in the COE for IGCC power plants with 90% carbon capture and sequestration compared with the COE for similarly configured IGCC plants using conventional low rank coal gasification technology. GE’s advanced low rank coal gasification technology uses the Posimetric Feed System, a new dry coal feed system based on GE’s proprietary Posimetric Feeder. In order to demonstrate the performance and economic benefits of the Posimetric Feeder in lowering the cost of low rank coal-fired IGCC power with carbon capture, two case studies were completed. In the Base Case, the gasifier was fed a dilute slurry of Montana Rosebud PRB coal using GE’s conventional slurry feed system. In the Advanced Technology Case, the slurry feed system was replaced with the Posimetric Feed system. The process configurations of both cases were kept the same, to the extent possible, in order to highlight the benefit of substituting the Posimetric Feed System for the slurry feed system.

Rader, Jeff; Aguilar, Kelly; Aldred, Derek; Chadwick, Ronald; Conchieri, John; Dara, Satyadileep; Henson, Victor; Leininger, Tom; Liber, Pawel; Liber, Pawel; Lopez-Nakazono, Benito; Pan, Edward; Ramirez, Jennifer; Stevenson, John; Venkatraman, Vignesh

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

229

DOE/EA-1498: Advanced Coal Utilization Byproduct Beneficiation Processing Plant Ghent Power Station, Carroll County, Kentucky (01/05)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EA-1498 EA-1498 Advanced Coal Utilization Byproduct Beneficiation Processing Plant Ghent Power Station, Carroll County, Kentucky Final Environmental Assessment January 2005 Note: No comments were received during the public comment period from September 25 to October 25, 2004. Therefore, no changes to the Draft Environmental Assessment were necessary. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Cover Sheet Proposed Action: The proposed Federal action is to provide funding, through a cooperative agreement with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation (UKRF), Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), for the design, construction, and operation of an advanced coal ash beneficiation processing plant at Kentucky Utilities (KU) Ghent Power Station in Carroll County, Kentucky.

230

Decaking of coal or oil shale during pyrolysis in the presence of iron oxides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing a fuel from the pyrolysis of coal or oil shale in the presence of iron oxide in an inert gas atmosphere is described. The method includes the steps of pulverizing feed coal or oil shale, pulverizing iron oxide, mixing the pulverized feed and iron oxide, and heating the mixture in a gas atmosphere which is substantially inert to the mixture so as to form a product fuel, which may be gaseous, liquid and/or solid. The method of the invention reduces the swelling of coals, such as bituminous coal and the like, which are otherwise known to swell during pyrolysis. 4 figs., 8 tabs.

Rashid Khan, M.

1988-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

231

Decaking of coal or oil shale during pyrolysis in the presence of iron oxides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing a fuel from the pyrolysis of coal or oil shale in the presence of iron oxide in an inert gas atmosphere. The method includes the steps of pulverizing feed coal or oil shale, pulverizing iron oxide, mixing the pulverized feed and iron oxide, and heating the mixture in a gas atmosphere which is substantially inert to the mixture so as to form a product fuel, which may be gaseous, liquid and/or solid. The method of the invention reduces the swelling of coals, such as bituminous coal and the like, which are otherwise known to swell during pyrolysis.

Khan, M. Rashid (Morgantown, WV)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Forecast of Advanced Technology for Coal Power Generation Towards the Year of 2050 in CO2 Reduction Model of Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the fossil fuel, coal is enough to get easily because it has supply and price stability brought about its ubiquitously. Coal is used for power generation as the major fuel in the world. However it is true that control of global warming should be applied to coal power generations. Therefore, many people expect CO2 reduction by technical innovation such as efficiency improvement, Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS). In case of coal power plant are considered for improving efficiency. Some of them have already put into commercial operation but others are still under R&D stage. Especially, the technical development prospect of the power plant is very important for planning the energy strategy in the resource-importing country. Japan Coal Energy Center (JCOAL) constructed a program to forecast the share of advanced coal fired plants/natural gas power plants towards the year of 2050. Then, we simulated the future prediction about 2 cases (the Japanese scenario and the world scenario). The fuel price and the existence of CCS were considered in the forecast of the technical development of the thermal power generation. Especially in the Japanese scenario, we considered the CO2 reduction target which is 80% reduction in 1990. In the world scenario, coal price had almost no influence on the share of coal fired plant. However, when the gas price increased 1.5% or more, the share of coal fired plant increased. In that case, CO2 emissions increased because coal-fired plant increased. Compared with both cases, the amount of CO2 in 2050 without CCS case was 50% higher than that of with CCS case. In Japanese scenario, achievement of 80% CO2 reduction target is impossible without CCS. If CCS is introduced into all the new establishment coal fired plant, CO2 reduction target can be attained. In the Japanese scenario, the gas price more expensive than a coal price so that the amount of the coal fired plant does not decline. Since the reduction of the amount of CO2 will be needed in all over the world, introductory promotion and technical development of CCS are very important not only Japan but also all over the world.

Takashi Nakamura; Keiji Makino; Kunihiko Shibata; Michiaki Harada

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Coal - prices tumble as the glut continues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The oil price collapse was the major event affecting coal markets around the world in 1986. The 8% expansion in international coal trade in 1985 was halted, and prices fell considerably. World coking coal trade declined and import and export prices fell due to a decrease in steel production and the use of oil, rather than pulverized coal, in blast furnaces. However steam coal trade increased by about 5 million mt because of various institutional constraints to utilities switching from coal burning to oil burning. The article covers coal trade and production in the following countries: Australia; Canada; China; Colombia; Western Europe; Japan; Poland; South Africa; and the USSR.

Lee, H.M.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Integration of Advanced Emissions Controls to Produce Next-Generation Circulating Fluid Bed Coal Generating Unit (withdrawn prior to award)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

contacts contacts Brad tomer Director Office of Major Demonstrations National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4692 brad.tomer@netl.doe.gov PaRtIcIPant Colorado Springs Utilities Colorado Springs, CO aDDItIonaL tEaM MEMBERs Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. Clinton, NJ IntegratIon of advanced emIssIons controls to Produce next-generatIon cIrculatIng fluId Bed coal generatIng unIt (wIthdrawn PrIor to award) Project Description Colorado Springs Utilities (Springs Utilities) and Foster Wheeler are planning a joint demonstration of an advanced coal-fired electric power plant using advanced, low-cost emission control systems to produce exceedingly low emissions. Multi- layered emission controls will be

235

NITROGEN EVOLUTION AND SOOT FORMATION DURING SECONDARY COAL PYROLYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NITROGEN EVOLUTION AND SOOT FORMATION DURING SECONDARY COAL PYROLYSIS by Haifeng Zhang DURING SECONDARY COAL PYROLYSIS Haifeng Zhang Department of Chemical Engineering Doctor of Philosophy Economical NOx control techniques used in pulverized coal furnaces, such as air/fuel staging, promote

Fletcher, Thomas H.

236

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a three-year project on Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.'' The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are being run at the cleaning facility in Homer City, Pennsylvania, to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE's laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CVVT) or a dry microfine pulverized coal (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. Subcontractors to CE to perform parts of the test work are the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Physical Science, Inc. Technology Company (PSIT) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC). Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFS, and two conventionally cleaned coals for full-scale tests. Approximately, nine BCFs will be in dry microfine coal (DMPC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Research investigations in oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, and advanced fuels research: Volume 1 -- Base program. Final report, October 1986--September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerous studies have been conducted in five principal areas: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuels research. In subsequent years, underground coal gasification was broadened to be coal research, under which several research activities were conducted that related to coal processing. The most significant change occurred in 1989 when the agreement was redefined as a Base Program and a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP). Investigations were conducted under the Base Program to determine the physical and chemical properties of materials suitable for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels, to test and evaluate processes and innovative concepts for such conversions, to monitor and determine environmental impacts related to development of commercial-sized operations, and to evaluate methods for mitigation of potential environmental impacts. This report is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 consists of 28 summaries that describe the principal research efforts conducted under the Base Program in five topic areas. Volume 2 describes tasks performed within the JSRP. Research conducted under this agreement has resulted in technology transfer of a variety of energy-related research information. A listing of related publications and presentations is given at the end of each research topic summary. More specific and detailed information is provided in the topical reports referenced in the related publications listings.

Smith, V.E.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

POC-SCALE TESTING OF AN ADVANCED FINE COAL DEWATERING EQUIPMENT/TECHNIQUE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objective of the proposed program is to evaluate a novel surface modification technique, which utilizes the synergistic effect of metal ions-surfactant combination, for dewatering of ultra-fine clean coal on a proof-of-concept scale of 1 to 2 tph. The novel surface modification technique developed at the UKCAER will be evaluated using vacuum, centrifuge, and hyperbaric filtration equipment. Dewatering tests will be conducted using the fine clean-coal froth produced by the column flotation units at the Powell Mountain Coal Company, Mayflower Preparation Plant in St. Charles, Virginia. The POC-scale studies will be conducted on two different types of clean coal, namely, high-sulfur and low-sulfur clean coal. The Mayflower Plant processes coals from five different seams, thus the dewatering studies results could be generalized for most of the bituminous coals.

B.K. PAREKH; D. TAO; J.G. GROPPO

1998-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

239

Advanced direct coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report No. 2, December 1983-February 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five Bench-Scale coal liquefaction runs were completed with Wyoming subbituminous coal in a two-stage process scheme. In this process scheme, LDAR, the lighter fraction of ash-free resid, was fed to the catalytic stage prior to its recycle to the thermal stage, whereas DAR, the heavy fraction of the deashed resid, was directly recycled to the thermal stage without any intermediate processing step. The results indicate that increasing coal space rate in the dissolver resulted in lower coal conversion and reduced distillate yield in this process configuration. The coal conversions decreased from 92 wt% to 89 wt% (MAF coal) and the distillate yield was reduced from 50 wt% to less than 40 wt% (MAF coal), as the coal space velocity increased. Attempts to duplicate the yields of Run 32, at comparable process conditions in Runs 37 and 38, were unsuccessful. Several process parameters were investigated but failed to show why the yields of Run 32 could not be duplicated. Valuable process related information was gained as a result of process parameter studies completed during these runs. At comparable process conditions, coal conversions were lower by about 3 to 4 relative percent and were only in the 87 wt% (MAF coal) range. Similarly, the distillate yield was about 40 wt% (MAF coal) which is about 10 wt% lower than observed in Run 32. Although no exact cause for these results could be determined, it appeared that the H/C atomic ratio of the solvent and possibly the flow pattern (plug-flow versus back-mixed) could have affected the coal conversion and quantity of distillate product produced. A significant decrease in coal conversion of 4 to 5 wt% was observed when the disposable catalyst (iron oxide) was removed from the reaction mixture and therefore substantiates the need for a disposable catalyst in the liquefaction of Wyoming subbituminous coal.

Paranjape, A.S.

1984-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

240

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of deploying advanced coal power in the Chinese context,”12 2.6. International coal prices and12 III. Chinese Coal

Aden, Nathaniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to have indicated economic coal reserves of at least 15tonnes of indicated economic coal reserves. Map 1: Chinaand economic assessment of deploying advanced coal power in

Aden, Nathaniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Quarterly progress report, July--September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to develop a new approach for the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrates coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, liquefaction, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and carrying out a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. The primary coal of this program, Black Thunder subbituminous coal, can be effectively beneficiated to about 3.5 wt % ash using aqueous sulfurous acid pretreatment. This treated coal can be further beneficiated to about 2 wt % ash using commercially available procedures. All three coals used in this study (Black Thunder, Burning Star bituminous, and Martin Lake lignite) are effectively swelled by a number of solvents. The most effective solvents are those having hetero-functionality. laboratory- and bench-scale liquefaction experimentation is underway using swelled and catalyst impregnated coal samples. Higher coal conversions were observed for the SO{sub 2}-treated subbituminous coal than the raw coal, regardless of catalyst type. Conversions of swelled coal were highest when Molyvan L, molybdenum naphthenate, and nickel octoate, respectively, were added to the liquefaction solvent. The study of bottoms processing consists of combining the ASCOT process which consists of coupling solvent deasphalting with delayed coking to maximize the production of coal-derived liquids while rejecting solids within the coke drum. The asphalt production phase has been completed; representative product has been evaluated. The solvent system for the deasphalting process has been established. Two ASCOT tests produced overall liquid yields (63.3 wt % and 61.5 wt %) that exceeded the combined liquid yields from the vacuum tower and ROSE process.

Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., (United States); Gutterman, C. [FWDC (United States); Chander, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal-laden wastes can be stabilized and solidified using advanced clean coal technology by-products (CCTBs)--fluid bed combustor ash and spray drier solids. These utility-generated treatment chemicals are available for purchase through brokers, and commercial applications of this process are being practiced by treaters of metal-laden hazardous waste. A complex of regulations governs this industry, and sensitivities to this complex has discouraged public documentation of treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with CCTBs. This report provides a comprehensive public documentation of laboratory studies that show the efficacy of the stabilization and solidification of metal-laden hazardous wastes--such as lead-contaminated soils and sandblast residues--through treatment with CCTBs. It then describes the extensive efforts that were made to obtain the permits allowing a commercial hazardous waste treater to utilize CCTBs as treatment chemicals and to install the equipment required to do so. It concludes with the effect of this lengthy process on the ability of the treatment company to realize the practical, physical outcome of this effort, leading to premature termination of the project.

James T. Cobb, Jr.

2003-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

244

Hydrogeologic investigation of the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the geology and hydrogeology at the former Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development (ACLR&D) facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The work was conducted by personnel from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Grand Junction office (ORNL/GJ) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). Characterization information was requested by PETC to provide baseline environmental information for use in evaluating needs and in subsequent decision-making for further actions associated with the closeout of facility operations. The hydrogeologic conceptual model presented in this report provides significant insight regarding the potential for contaminant migration from the ACLR&D facility and may be useful during other characterization work in the region. The ACLR&D facility is no longer operational and has been dismantled. The site was characterized in three phases: the first two phases were an environmental assessment study and a sod sampling study (APCO 1991) and the third phase the hydraulic assessment. Currently, a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remedial investigation (RI) to address the presence of contaminants on the site is underway and will be documented in an RI report. This technical memorandum addresses the hydrogeologic model only.

Gardner, F.G.; Kearl, P.M.; Mumby, M.E.; Rogers, S.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report No. 6, January--March 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is a major step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal-water slurry fuel (CWF) can be produced from selected coals and that this premium fuel will be a cost-effectve replacement for oil and natural gas now fueling some of the industrial and utility boilers in the United States as well as for advanced combustars currently under development. The replacement of oil and gas with CWF can only be realized if retrofit costs are kept to a minimum and retrofit boiler emissions meet national goals fbr clean air. These concerns establish the specifications for maximum ash and sulfur levels and combustion properties of the CWF. This cost-share contract is a 51-month program which started on September 30, 1992. This report discusses the technical progress, made during the 6th quarter of the project from January 1 to March 31, 1994. The project has three major objectives: (1) The primary objective is to develop the design base for prototype commercial advanced fine coal cleaning facilities capable of producing ultra-clean coals suitable for conversion to coal-water slurry fuel for premium fuel applications. The fine coal cleaning technologies are advanced column flotation and selective agglomeration. (2) A secondary objective is to develop the design base for near-term application of these advanced fine coal cleaning technologies in new or existing coal preparation plants for efficiently processing minus 28-mesh coal fines and converting this to marketable products in current market economics. (3) A third objective is to determine the removal of toxic trace elements from coal by advance column flotation and selective agglomeration technologies.

Smit, F.J.; Rowe, R.M.; Anast, K.R.; Jha, M.C.

1994-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

246

Field study of disposed wastes from advanced coal processes. Quarterly technical progress report, May--July 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy/Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) has initiated research on the disposal of solid wastes from advanced coal processes. The objective of this research is to develop information to be used by private industry and government agencies for planning waste disposal practices associated with advanced coal processes. To accomplish this objective, DOE has contracted Radian Corporation and the North Dakota Energy & Mineral Research Center (EMRC) to design, construct and monitor a limited number of field disposal tests with advanced coal process wastes. These field tests will be monitored over a three year period with the emphasis on collecting data on the field disposal of these wastes. The specific objectives for the reporting period were as follows: review fourth site candidates; obtain site access for the Freeman United site; select an ash supplier for the Illinois site and initiate subcontracts for on-site work; commence construction of the Freeman United test cell; and obtain waste for the Colorado Ute test site. Accomplishments under each task are discussed.

NONE

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

247

Scoping Studies to Evaluate the Benefits of an Advanced Dry Feed System on the Use of Low-Rank Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the development of the design of an advanced dry feed system that was carried out under Task 4.0 of Cooperative Agreement DE-FE0007902 with the US DOE, “Scoping Studies to Evaluate the Benefits of an Advanced Dry Feed System on the use of Low- Rank Coal.” The resulting design will be used for the advanced technology IGCC case with 90% carbon capture for sequestration to be developed under Task 5.0 of the same agreement. The scope of work covered coal preparation and feeding up through the gasifier injector. Subcomponents have been broken down into feed preparation (including grinding and drying), low pressure conveyance, pressurization, high pressure conveyance, and injection. Pressurization of the coal feed is done using Posimetric1 Feeders sized for the application. In addition, a secondary feed system is described for preparing and feeding slag additive and recycle fines to the gasifier injector. This report includes information on the basis for the design, requirements for down selection of the key technologies used, the down selection methodology and the final, down selected design for the Posimetric Feed System, or PFS.

Rader, Jeff; Aguilar, Kelly; Aldred, Derek; Chadwick, Ronald; Conchieri,; Dara, Satyadileep; Henson, Victor; Leininger, Tom; Liber, Pawel; Nakazono, Benito; Pan, Edward; Ramirez, Jennifer; Stevenson, John; Venkatraman, Vignesh

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

248

Market and equipment performance analysis for the application of coal-based fuels/advanced combustion systems: Commercial and small industrial applications: Volume B, Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In March 1985, Burns and Roe Services Corporation (BRSC) under Contract No. AC22-84PC72571 with the US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE/PETC) initiated a task entitled ''Market and Equipment Performance Analysis for the Application of Coal-Based Fuels/Advanced Combustion Systems.'' This volume contains the following Appendices: Commercial sector applications of coal based fuels and advanced technologies, EOS Technologies, Inc.; Estimation of fuel use and population for industrial boilers <50 mm Btu/hr and direct fired combustors <100 mm Btu/hr firing oil and gas, PEI Associates; Characteristics of oil and gas fired boilers; Characteristics of oil and gas fired process heaters; Environmental permitting considerations; States air emission rules and regulations applying to commercial/industrial boilers and process heaters <100 mm Btu/hr heat input; Advanced coal combustion systems; Application of advanced coal combustion systems to watertube boilers; Application of advanced coal combustion systems to firetube boilers; and Application of advanced coal combustion systems to process heaters.

Not Available

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced coal-gasification technical Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasification to Produce SNG (Beulah, North Dakota, USA) (Source:DakotaGasification Petcoke... Source: NETL, 2009 12;12 Dakota Coal Gasification ... Source: Center for...

250

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced pressurized coal Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

will also add to the increasing pressure for consolidation in the coal industry. Medium... International, National, and Virginia Trends Virginia Center for ... Source:...

251

Sulfidation-oxidation of advanced metallic materials in simulated low-Btu coal-gasifier environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The corrosion behavior of structural alloys in complex multicomponent gas environments is of considerable interest for their effective utilization in coal conversion schemes. Little understanding...

T. C. Tiearney Jr.; K. Natesan

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Development of an advanced process for drying fine coal in an inclined fluidized bed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research project was to demonstrate a technically feasible and economically viable process for drying and stabilizing high-moisture subbituminous coal. Controlled thermal drying of coal fines was achieved using the inclined fluidized-bed drying and stabilization process developed by the Western Research Institute. The project scope of work required completion of five tasks: (1) project planning, (2) characterization of two feed coals, (3) bench-scale inclined fluidized-bed drying studies, (4) product characterization and testing, and (5) technical and economic evaluation of the process. High moisture subbituminous coals from AMAX Eagle Butte mine located in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and from Usibelli Coal Mine, Inc. in Healy, Alaska were tested in a 10-lb/hr bench-scale inclined fluidized-bed. Experimental results show that the dried coal contains less than 1.5% moisture and has a heating value over 11,500 Btu/lb. The coal fines entrainment can be kept below 15 wt % of the feed. The equilibrium moisture of dried coal was less than 50% of feed coal equilibrium moisture. 7 refs., 60 figs., 47 tabs.

Boysen, J.E.; Cha, C.Y.; Barbour, F.A.; Turner, T.F.; Kang, T.W.; Berggren, M.H.; Hogsett, R.F.; Jha, M.C.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced coal-fired systems Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Collection: Fossil Fuels 13 Nuclear Engineering Graduate Program Summary: pollutants, a coal-fired power plant, in contrast, annually releases 10 billion kg of carbon...

254

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced coal-fired low-emission Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plasma Physics and Fusion 27 Nuclear Engineering Graduate Program Summary: pollutants, a coal-fired power plant, in contrast, annually releases 10 billion kg of carbon...

255

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced coal-fired gas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CHLORINE LINK IN COMMERCIAL SCALE SYSTEM FLUE GASES? Summary: that Battelle measured dioxins in coal fired utility boiler stack emissions in the United States and by ETSU... in...

256

Design and fabrication of advanced materials from Illinois coal wastes. Quarterly report, 1 March 1995--31 May 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main goal of this project is to develop a bench-scale procedure to design and fabricate advanced brake and structural composite materials from Illinois coal combustion residues. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), differential thermal analysis (DTA), and transmission-Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) were conducted on PCC fly ash (Baldwin), FBC fly ash (ADM unit1-6), FBC fly ash (S.I. coal), FBC spent bed ash (ADM unit1-6), bottom ash, and scrubber sludge (CWLP) residues to characterize their geometrical shapes, mineral phases, and thermal stability. Our spectroscopic results indicate that the scrubber sludge is mainly composed of a gypsum-like phase whose lattice structure is different from the lattice structure of conventional gypsum, and sludge does not contain hannebachite (CaSO{sub 3}0.5H{sub 2}O) phase. In the second and third quarters the focus of research has been on developing protocols for the formation of advanced brake composites and structural composites. Our attempts to fabricate brake frictional shoes, in the form of 1.25 inch disks, from PCC fly ash, FBC spent bed ash, scrubber sludge, coal char, iron particles, and coal tar were successful. Based on the experience gained and microscopic analyses, we have now upscaled our procedures to fabricate 2.5 inch diameter disks from coal combustion residues. The SEM and Young`s modulus analyses of brake composites fabricated at 400 psi < Pressure < 2200 psi suggest pressure has a strong influence on the particle packing and the filling of interstices in our composites.

Malhotra, V.M.; Wright, M.A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

257

Design and fabrication of advanced materials from Illinois coal wastes. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main goal of this project is to develop a bench-scale procedure to design and fabricate advanced brake and structural composite materials from Illinois coal combustion residues. During the first two quarters of the project, the thrust of the work directed towards characterizing the various coal combustion residues and FGD residue, i.e., scrubber sludge. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), differential thermal analysis (DTA), and transmission-Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) were conducted on PCC fly ash (Baldwin), FBC fly ash (ADK unit l-6), FBC fly ash (S.I. coal), FBC spent bed ash (ADM, unit l-6), bottom ash, and scrubber sludge (CWLP) residues to characterize their geometrical shapes, mineral phases, and thermal stability. Our spectroscopic results indicate that the scrubber sludge is mainly composed of a gypsum-like phase whose lattice structure is different from the lattice structure of conventional gypsum, and sludge does not contain hannebachite (CaSO{sub 3}.0.5H{sub 2}O) phase. Our attempts to fabricate brake frictional shoes, in the form of 1.25 inch disks, from PCC fly ash, FBC spent bed ash, scrubber sludge, coal char, iron particles, and coal tar were successful. Based on the experience gained and microscopic analyses, we have now upscaled our procedures to fabricate 2.5 inch diameter disk,- from coal combustion residues. This has been achieved. The SEM and Young`s modulus analyses of brake composites fabricated at 400 psi < Pressure < 2200 psi suggest pressure has a strong influence on the particle packing and the filling of interstices in our composites. Also, these results along with mechanical behavior of the fabricated disks lead us to believe that the combination of surface altered PCC fly ash and scrubber sludge particles, together ed ash particles are ideal for our composite materials.

Malhotra, V.M.; Wright, M.A. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

Large-Eddy Simulation of Swirling Pulverized-Coal Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Eulerian-Lagrangian large-eddy simulation (LES) with a Smagorinsky-Lilly sub-grid scale stress model, presumed-PDF fast chemistry and EBU gas combustion models, particle devolatilization and particle combustion

L. Y. Hu; L. X. Zhou; Y. H. Luo; C. S. Xu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Iron Transformation and Ash Fusibility during Coal Combustion in Air and O2/CO2 Medium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(1) The successful design and operation of oxy-fired pulverized coal boilers require comprehensive knowledge of ash deposition characteristics, which have a major impact on the safety and economic performance of the boilers. ... Two bituminous coals (Utah coal and Illinois coal) and one sub-bituminous coal (PRB coal) were burned on a down-fired combustor under both oxy- and air-firing. ...

Dunxi Yu; Liang Zhao; Zuoyong Zhang; Chang Wen; Minghou Xu; Hong Yao

2011-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

260

Process for coal liquefaction employing selective coal feed  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved coal liquefaction process is provided whereby coal conversion is improved and yields of pentane soluble liquefaction products are increased. In this process, selected feed coal is pulverized and slurried with a process derived solvent, passed through a preheater and one or more dissolvers in the presence of hydrogen-rich gases at elevated temperatures and pressures, following which solids, including mineral ash and unconverted coal macerals, are separated from the condensed reactor effluent. The selected feed coals comprise washed coals having a substantial amount of mineral matter, preferably from about 25-75%, by weight, based upon run-of-mine coal, removed with at least 1.0% by weight of pyritic sulfur remaining and exhibiting vitrinite reflectance of less than about 0.70%.

Hoover, David S. (New Tripoli, PA); Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

DOE`s high performance power systems program: Development of advanced coal-fired combined-cycle systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal currently provides more than one third of the world`s electricity and more than one half of the US`s electricity. However, for coal to be the fuel of choice in the future, highly efficient, environmentally acceptable, and economically competitive, coal-fired power plants are needed. The US Department of Energy, Federal Energy Technology Center, under its High Performance Power Systems (HIPPS) Program, has two contracts in place, one with Foster Wheeler Development Corporation and one with United Technologies Research Center, to develop advanced power generation systems. Based on an indirectly fired cycle, HIPPS uses a combined cycle for power generation at efficiencies of 47--50% (HHV) with superior environmental performance (1/10 of New Source Performance Standards) and a lower cost-of-electricity (10% reduction relative to current coal-fired plants). HIPPS, scheduled to be ready for commercialization by the year 2005, could provide a solution to the anticipated worldwide demand for clean, efficient electricity generation. In this paper, the two HIPPS designs are reviewed and on-going research is discussed.

Ruth, L.; Plasynski, S.; Shaffer, F. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Federal Energy Technology Center; Ramezan, M. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

An environment friendly and efficient lignite-fired power generation process based on a boiler with an open pulverizing system and the recovery of water from mill-exhaust  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper advances a novel lignite-fired power generation process based on a OPSB (boiler with an open pulverizing system) and the recovery of water from mill-exhaust after the comprehensive analysis of the open pulverizing system used for high-moisture coals and heat/water recovery from boiler exhaust. Then, the thermal calculation method that applies to OPSB is presented based on heat and mass balance analyses of the boiler. Finally, an efficient unit applying the OPSB process is compared with a conventional 600 MW lignite-fired power unit, and the performance of the efficient unit is calculated and discussed in detail. The results show that the efficient unit not only yields a notable increase in the boiler's (2.6%) and the power plant's (1.3%) thermal efficiency but also provides a remarkable advantage in water recovery due to the mass of water vapor concentrated in mill-exhaust. In the efficient unit, the volume fraction of water vapor in mill-exhaust reaches 34%, the water reclaimed from mill-exhaust is so much that a lignite-fired power plant with zero water consumption can be expected, while the pollutant emissions can be reduced in proportion to the increase in boiler thermal efficiency.

Youfu Ma; Yichao Yuan; Jing Jin; Hua Zhang; Xiaohong Hu; Dengyu Shi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Method for reducing NOx during combustion of coal in a burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An organically complexed nanocatalyst composition is applied to or mixed with coal prior to or upon introducing the coal into a coal burner in order to catalyze the removal of coal nitrogen from the coal and its conversion into nitrogen gas prior to combustion of the coal. This process leads to reduced NOx production during coal combustion. The nanocatalyst compositions include a nanoparticle catalyst that is made using a dispersing agent that can bond with the catalyst atoms. The dispersing agent forms stable, dispersed, nano-sized catalyst particles. The catalyst composition can be formed as a stable suspension to facilitate storage, transportation and application of the catalyst nanoparticles to a coal material. The catalyst composition can be applied before or after pulverizing the coal material or it may be injected directly into the coal burner together with pulverized coal.

Zhou, Bing (Cranbury, NJ); Parasher, Sukesh (Lawrenceville, NJ); Hare, Jeffrey J. (Provo, UT); Harding, N. Stanley (North Salt Lake, UT); Black, Stephanie E. (Sandy, UT); Johnson, Kenneth R. (Highland, UT)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

Illinois Coal Development Program (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Illinois Coal Development Program seeks to advance promising clean coal technologies beyond research and towards commercialization. The program provides a 50/50 match with private industry...

265

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study of co-firing of coal and pretreated biomass.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This master thesis describes the co-firing concept, benefits and opportunities of pretreated biomass in pulverized coal boilers for industrial use. Burning fossil fuels, i.e.… (more)

Hye, A S M Abdul

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Status of coal ash corrosion resistant materials test program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In November of 1998, Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) began development of a system to permit testing of several advanced tube materials at metal temperatures typical of advanced supercritical steam conditions of 1100 F and higher in a boiler exhibiting coal ash corrosive conditions. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO), B and W, and First Energy's Ohio Edison jointly fund the project. CONSOL Energy Company is also participating as an advisor. Several materials producers including Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contributed advanced materials to the project. The coal-ash corrosion resistant materials test program will provide full scale, in-situ testing of recently developed boiler superheater and reheater tube materials. These newer materials may be capable of operating at higher steam temperatures while resisting external/fire-side corrosion. For high sulfur coal applications, this is a key issue for advanced cycle pulverized coal-fired plants. Fireside corrosion is also a critical issue for many existing plants. Previous testing of high temperature materials in the United States has been based primarily on using laboratory test coupons. The test coupons did not operate at conditions representative of a high sulfur coal-fired boiler. Testing outside of the United States has been with low sulfur coal or natural gas firing and has not addressed corrosion issues. This test program takes place in an actual operating boiler and is expected to confirm the performance of these materials with high sulfur coal. The system consists of three identical sections, each containing multiple pieces of twelve different materials. They are cooled by reheater steam, and are located just above the furnace exit in Ohio Edison's Niles Unit No.1, a 110 MWe unit firing high sulfur Ohio coal. After one year of operation, the first section will be removed for thorough metallurgical evaluation. The second and third sections will operate for three and five years respectively prior to removal and evaluation. The objective is to determine how well each material resists corrosion at different operating temperatures and over different time periods and provide characteristic data. Selection of the test materials, system engineering, fabrication, installation and startup of this system is now completed and data acquisition is in progress. This paper gives an overview of the program and its objectives, explains the system, describes section fabrication, identifies the materials selected, and describes ORNL's experience in fabricating four of the advanced materials.

McDonald, D.K.; Meisenhelter, D.K.; Sikka, V.K.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Methodology for technology evaluation under uncertainty and its application in advanced coal gasification processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology has attracted interest as a cleaner alternative to conventional coal-fired power generation processes. While a number of pilot projects have been launched to ...

Gong, Bo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Forecast of Advanced Technology Adoption for Coal Fired Power Generation Towards the Year of 2050  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The considered systems of coal fired power generation are Supercritical Unit, Ultra Supercritical Unit, ... . In order to compare with the natural gas case, Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) is included. Evaluati...

Keiji Makino

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced coal combustion Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TRACE ELEMENTS, ALKALI METALS 19.6.2001 8-1 Chapter 8 Trace elements, Summary: ,gasification, incineration etc. is illustrated by Figure 8.2 for a coal combustion process with...

270

Advanced direct coal liquefaction concepts. Quarterly report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five barrels of a Wilsonville process derived solvent (V-1074) from Black Thunder coal were obtained. This material boils within the preferred gas oil range, is more aromatic than previous solvents, and will therefore be used for the bench unit studies. Several repeat runs were performed in the autoclave to confirm the results of the matrix study. In addition, runs were carried out with different catalysts, with agglomerates and with the V-1074 solvent. The results of the autoclave runs were analyzed with respect to coal conversion, CO conversion, oil yield, hydrogen consumption and oxygen removal. It was concluded that the best operating conditions for the first stage operation was a temperature of at least 390{degrees}C, residence time of at least 30 minutes, cold CO pressure of at least 600 psig and potassium carbonate catalyst (2% wt on total feed). The data also indicated however, that the coal conversion goes through a maximum, and too high a severity leads to retrograde reaction and lower coal solubilization. The scope for increasing temperature and time is therefore limited. Petrographic examination of the THF insoluble resids from the autoclave program indicated a maximum coal conversion of about 90% for Black Thunder coal. The bench unit construction was also essentially completed and the bench unit program to be carded out in the next twelve months was defined.

Berger, D.J.; Parker, R.J.; Simpson, P.L. [Canadian Energy Development, Inc., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Hardened, environmentally disposable composite granules of coal cleaning refuse, coal combustion waste, and other wastes, and method preparing the same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hardened, environmentally inert and disposable composite granule of coal cleaning refuse and coal combustion waste, and method for producing the same, wherein the coal combustion waste is first granulated. The coal cleaning refuse is pulverized into fine particles and is then bound, as an outer layer, to the granulated coal combustion waste granules. This combination is then combusted and sintered. After cooling, the combination results in hardened, environmentally inert and disposable composite granules having cores of coal combustion waste, and outer shells of coal cleaning refuse. The composite particles are durable and extremely resistant to environmental and chemical forces.

Burnet, George (Ames, IA); Gokhale, Ashok J. (College Station, TX)

1990-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

272

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced fine coal Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CHILE ESCUELA DE INGENIERIA Summary: of more advanced technologies on the future coalpetcoke-fired power plants, and the system's operation... were compared with more advanced...

273

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced coal fired Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CHILE ESCUELA DE INGENIERIA Summary: of more advanced technologies on the future coalpetcoke-fired power plants, and the system's operation... were compared with more advanced...

274

Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 15, April--June 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Goal is engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. Scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on 6 coals to optimize these processes, followed by design/construction/operation of a 2-t/hr PDU. During this quarter, parametric testing of the 30-in. Microcel{trademark} flotation column at the Lady Dunn plant was completed and clean coal samples submitted for briquetting. A study of a novel hydrophobic dewatering process continued at Virginia Tech. Benefits of slurry PSD (particle size distribution) modification and pH adjustment were evaluated for the Taggart and Hiawatha coals; they were found to be small. Agglomeration bench-scale test results were positive, meeting product ash specifications. PDU Flotation Module operations continued; work was performed with Taggart coal to determine scaleup similitude between the 12-in. and 6-ft Microcel{trademark} columns. Construction of the PDU selective agglomeration module continued.

Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

1996-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

275

Bench-scale Development of an Advanced Solid sorbent-based CO2 Capture Process for Coal-fired Power Plalnts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

scale Development of an scale Development of an Advanced Solid Sorbent-based CO 2 Capture Process for Coal-fired Power Plants Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions, & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current

276

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 6, July 1990--September 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a three-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are being run at the cleaning facility in Homer City, Pennsylvania, to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CVVT) or a dry microfine pulverized coal (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. Subcontractors to CE to perform parts of the test work are the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Physical Science, Inc. Technology Company (PSIT) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC). Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFS, and two conventionally cleaned coals for full-scale tests. Approximately, nine BCFs will be in dry microfine coal (DMPC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

THE SCALE-UP OF LARGE PRESSURIZED FLUIDIZED BEDS FOR ADVANCED COAL FIRED PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pressurized fluidization is a promising new technology for the clean and efficient combustion of coal. Its principle is to operate a coal combustor at high inlet gas velocity to increase the flow of reactants, at an elevated pressure to raise the overall efficiency of the process. Unfortunately, commercialization of large pressurized fluidized beds is inhibited by uncertainties in scaling up units from the current pilot plant levels. In this context, our objective is to conduct a study of the fluid dynamics and solid capture of a large pressurized coal-fired unit. The idea is to employ dimensional similitude to simulate in a cold laboratory model the flow in a Pressurized Circulating Fluid Bed ''Pyrolyzer,'' which is part of a High Performance Power System (HIPPS) developed by Foster Wheeler Development Corporation (FWDC) under the DOE's Combustion 2000 program.

Leon Glicksman; Hesham Younis; Richard Hing-Fung Tan; Michel Louge; Elizabeth Griffith; Vincent Bricout

1998-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

278

Advanced direct coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report No. 1, September-November 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wyoming subbituminous coal was liquefied using three different two-stage process configurations in bench-scale tests. These process configurations differed in the type of fractionated deashing resid being recycled to the individual stages. The objective of these runs was to determine whether, by recycle of specific resid streams to the thermal stage, the second stage catalyst life could be improved without detrimentally affecting distillate yield or hydrogen consumption. The results indicate that the two-stage process configuration consisting of hydrotreating the Light Deashed Resid and direct recycle of heavy Deashed Resid to the thermal stage produced the best results. This process configuration resulted in a distillate yield of 54 wt % (MAF coal basis) and overall coal conversion in the 93 to 95% range, as measured by pyridine-soluble analytical test while operating in a total distillate mode. These results are very encouraging from the lower rank Wyoming subbituminous coal. Among the three two-stage process configurations tested, the particular process configuration of hydrotreating Light Deashed Resid resulted in the least amount of catalyst deactivation. As a part of this research effort, a test procedure for quick evaluation of various resids and catalysts in terms of coke precursors was also developed. This procedure utilizing as-produced oxide-form extrudates of catalyst is able to simulate closely in a batch reactor test the performance of a presulfided and extrudate form of catalyst in a continuous reactor. The CSD unit, being able to not only deash but also fractionate the resid, greatly increased the flexibility of options for coal liquefaction. New process concepts evolved incorporating reside fractionation and selective resid recycle in coal liquefaction. 17 figures, 28 tables.

Paranjape, A.S.

1984-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

279

Field study of disposed wastes from advanced coal processes. Quarterly technical progress report, November 1991--January 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to develop information to be used by private industry and government agencies for planning waste disposal practices associated with advanced coal processes. To accomplish this objective, DOE has contracted Radian Corporation and the North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) to design, construct, and monitor a limited number of field disposal tests with advanced coal process wastes. These field tests will be monitored over a three year period with the emphasis on collecting data on the field disposal of these wastes. Accomplishments for this past quarter are as follows: The 9th quarterly measurements at the Colorado site took place in December, 1991. Permeability and neutron absorption moisture content measurements were made and on site data was collected from the data logger; The 9th quarterly sampling at the Ohio site took place in November 1991. Permeability and moisture content measurements were made, and water samples were collected from the wells and lysimeters; The second quarterly core and water samples from the first Illinois test case were collected in mid November, and field data were collected from the data logger; Chemical analysis of all core and water samples continued; all chemical analyses except for some tests on Illinois second quarter cores are now complete.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

ADVANCED COAL & ENERGY RESEARCH FACILITY (ACERF) Washington University in St. Louis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technologies for clean utilization of fuels. This 1 MW (thermal) facility is located on the campus. Goals · Develop and test clean technologies for pollution control and carbon Algae production using Kumfer, ACERF Manager Consortium for Clean Coal Utilization Fly ash utilization· Be a resource

Subramanian, Venkat

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Advanced direct coal liquefaction concepts. Quarterly report, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the first quarter of FY 1993, the Project proceeded close to the Project Plan. The analysis of the feed material has been completed as far as possible. Some unplanned distillation was needed to correct the boiling range of the Black Thunder solvent used during the autoclave tests. Additional distillation will be required if the same solvent is to be used for the bench unit tests. A decision on this is still outstanding. The solvent to be used with Illinois No. 6 coal has not yet been defined. As a result, the procurement of the feed and the feed analysis is somewhat behind schedule. Agglomeration tests with Black Thunder coal indicates that small agglomerates can be formed. However, the ash removal is quite low (about 10%), which is not surprising in view of the low ash content of the coal. The first series of autoclave tests with Black Thunder coal was completed as planned. Also, additional runs are in progress as repeats of previous runs or at different operating conditions based on the data obtained so far. The results are promising indicating that almost complete solubilization (close to 90%) of Black Thunder coal can be achieved in a CO/H{sub 2}O environment at our anticipated process conditions. The design of the bench unit has been completed. In contrast to the originally planned modifications, the bench unit is now designed based on a computerized control and data acquisition system. All major items of equipment have been received, and prefabrication of assemblies and control panels is proceeding on schedule. Despite a slight delay in the erection of the structural steel, it is anticipated that the bench unit will be operational at the beginning of April 1993.

Berger, D.J.; Parker, R.J.; Simpson, P.L. [Canadian Energy Development, Inc., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

282

The Phase Inversion-based Coal-CO? Slurry (PHICCOS) feeding system : design, coupled multiscale analysis, and technoeconomic assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The continuous conveying of a solid feedstock like pulverized coal into a pressurized environment is a challenging task required in multiple industrial processes. Plants based on pressurized, entrained-flow gasifiers (EFG) ...

Botero, Cristina, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Development of advanced, dry, SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} emission control technologies for high-sulfur coal. Final report, April 1, 1993--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dry Scrubbing is a common commercial process that has been limited to low- and medium-sulfur coal applications because high-sulfur coal requires more reagent than can be efficiently injected into the process. Babcock & Wilcox has made several advances that extend dry scrubbing technologies to higher sulfur coals by allowing deposit-free operation at low scrubber exit temperatures. This not only increases the amount of reagent that can be injected into the scrubber, but also increases SO{sub 2} removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The objectives of this project were to demonstrate, at pilot scale, that advanced, dry-scrubbing-based technologies can attain the performance levels specified by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions while burning high-sulfur coal, and that these technologies are economically competitive with wet scrubber systems. The use of these technologies by utilities in and around Ohio, on new or retrofit applications, will ensure the future of markets for high-sulfur coal by creating cost effective options to coal switching.

Amrhein, G.T.

1994-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

284

POC-scale testing of an advanced fine coal dewatering equipment/technique. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, October--December, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine (minus 74{mu}m) clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultrafine clean coal product to a 20% level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. The main objective of the proposed program is to evaluate a novel surface modification technique, which utilizes the synergistic effect of metal ions-surfactant combination, for dewatering of ultra-fine clean coal on a proof-of-concept scale of 1 to 2 tph. The novel surface modification technique developed at the the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research will be evaluated using vacuum, centrifuge, and hyperbaric filtration equipment. Dewatering tests will be conducted using the fine clean coal froth produced by the column flotation units at the Powell Mountain Coal Company, Mayflower Preparation Plant in St. Charles, Virginia. The POC-scale studies will be conducted on two different types of clean coal, namely, high sulfur and low sulfur clean coal. Accomplishments for the past quarter are described.

Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Resource targets for advanced underground coal-extraction systems. [Identification of location and geology of deposit for which greatest savings can be realized by advanced mining systems in 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report identifies resource targets appropriate for federal sponsorship of research and development of advanced underground coal mining systems. In contrast to previous research, which focused on a particular resource type, this study made a comprehensive examination of both conventional and unconventional coals, with particular attention to exceptionally thin and thick seams, steeply dipping beds, and multiple seam geometry. The major thrust of the targeting analysis was forecasting which coals would be of clear commercial significance at the beginning of the 21st century under three widely different scenarios for coal demand. The primary measure of commercial importance was an estimate of the aggregate dollar savings realized by consumers if advanced technology were available to mine coal at prices at or below the price projected for conventional technology in the year 2000. Both deterministic and probabilistic savings estimates were prepared for each demand scenario. The results indicate that the resource of primary importance is flat-lying bituminous coal of moderate thickness, under moderate cover, and located within the lower 48 states. Resources of secondary importance are the flat-lying multiple seams and thin seams (especially those in Appalachia). The rather substantial deposits of bituminous coal in North Alaska and the deeply buried lignites of the Gulf Coast present transportation and ground control problems which appear to postpone their commercial importance well beyond 2000. Steeply dipping coals, abandoned pillars, and exceptionally thick western coals may be important in some regions or sub-regions, but the limited tonnage available places them in a position of tertiary importance.

Hoag, J.H.; Whipple, D.W.; Habib-Agahi, H.; Lavin, M.L.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for the Utilization of Low Rank Coals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air Products has developed a potentially ground-breaking technology – Sour Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) – to replace the solvent-based acid gas removal (AGR) systems currently employed to separate sulfur containing species, along with CO{sub 2} and other impurities, from gasifier syngas streams. The Sour PSA technology is based on adsorption processes that utilize pressure swing or temperature swing regeneration methods. Sour PSA technology has already been shown with higher rank coals to provide a significant reduction in the cost of CO{sub 2} capture for power generation, which should translate to a reduction in cost of electricity (COE), compared to baseline CO{sub 2} capture plant design. The objective of this project is to test the performance and capability of the adsorbents in handling tar and other impurities using a gaseous mixture generated from the gasification of lower rank, lignite coal. The results of this testing are used to generate a high-level pilot process design, and to prepare a techno-economic assessment evaluating the applicability of the technology to plants utilizing these coals.

Kloosterman, Jeff

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

287

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system. Annual report, June 1991--June 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the activity during the period from 2 June 1991 to 1 June 1992. The major areas of work include: the combustor sub-scale and full size testing, cleanup, coal fuel specification and processing, the Hot End Simulation rig and design of the engine parts required for use with the coal-fueled combustor island. To date Solar has demonstrated: Stable and efficient combustion burning coal-water mixtures using the Two Stage Slagging Combustor; Molten slag removal of over 97% using the slagging primary and the particulate removal impact separator; and on-site preparation of CWM is feasible. During the past year the following tasks were completed: The feasibility of on-site CWM preparation was demonstrated on the subscale TSSC. A water-cooled impactor was evaluated on the subscale TSSC; three tests were completed on the full size TSSC, the last one incorporating the PRIS; a total of 27 hours of operation on CWM at design temperature were accumulated using candle filters supplied by Refraction through Industrial Pump & Filter; a target fuel specification was established and a fuel cost model developed which can identify sensitivities of specification parameters; analyses of the effects of slag on refractory materials were conducted; and modifications continued on the Hot End Simulation Rig to allow extended test times.

LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; When, C.S.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

An Integrated Model of Coal/Coke Combustion in a Blast Furnace  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A three?dimensional integrated mathematical model of the combustion of pulverized coal and coke is developed. The model is applied to the region of lance?blowpipe?tuyere?raceway?coke bed to simulate the operation of pulverized coal injection in an ironmaking blast furnace. The model integrates two parts: pulverized coal combustion model in the blowpipe?tuyere?raceway?coke bed and the coke combustion model in the coke bed. The model is validated against the measurements in terms of coal burnout and gas composition respectively. The comprehensive in?furnace phenomena are simulated in the raceway and coke bed in terms of flow temperature gas composition and coal burning characteristics. In addition underlying mechanisms for the in?furnace phenomena are analyzed. The model provides a cost?effective tool for understanding and optimizing the in?furnace flow?thermo?chemical characteristics of the PCI process in full?scale blast furnaces.

Y. S. Shen; B. Y. Guo; A. B. Yu; P. Austin; P. Zulli

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Combustion of high-sulfur coal and anthracite wastes in a rotary kiln combustor with an advanced internal air distributor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluid bed combustors have received extensive testing with both high-sulfur coal and anthracite wastes. Rotary kilns are effective and popular devices for waste combustion. The Angelo Rotary Furnace{trademark} has been developed to improve the operation of rotary pyrolyzer/combustor systems through enhanced air distribution, which in this process is defined as staged, swirled combustion air injection. Fourteen of these new furnaces have been installed worldwide. Two units in Thailand, designed for rice hull feed with occasional lignite feed, have been recently started up. An older unit in Pennsylvania is being upgraded with a new, more advanced air distribution system for a series of tests this fall in which inexpensive high-sulfur coal and anthracite wastes will be fired with limestone. The purposes of these tests are to determine the burning characteristics of these two fuels in this system, to discover the Ca/S ratios necessary for operation of a rotary kiln combusting these fuels, and to observe the gas-borne emissions from the furnace. An extensive preliminary design study will be performed on a commercial installation for combustion of anthracite wastes. 14 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Cobb, J.T. Jr. (Pittsburgh Univ., PA (USA)); Ahn, Y.K. (Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (USA)); Angelo, J.F. (Universal Energy International, Inc., Little Rock, AR (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Field study of disposed solid wastes from advanced coal processes. Annual report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radian Corporation and the North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) are funded to develop information to be used by private industry and government agencies for managing solid wastes produced by advanced coal combustion processes. This information will be developed by conducting several field studies on disposed wastes from these processes. Data will be collected to characterize these wastes and their interactions with the environments in which they are disposed. Three sites were selected for the field studies: Colorado Ute`s fluidized bed combustion (FBC) unit in Nucla, Colorado; Ohio Edison`s limestone injection multistage burner (LIMB) retrofit in Lorain, Ohio; and Freeman United`s mine site in central Illinois with wastes supplied by the nearby Midwest Grain FBC unit. During the past year, field monitoring and sampling of the three landfill test cases constructed in 1989 were completed. Monitoring continued at Test Case Four. Two cells for Test Case Five were constructed in Illinois.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Field study of disposed solid wastes from advanced coal processes. Annual technical progress report, October 1987--August 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radian Corporation and the North Dakota Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute (MMRRI) are funded to develop information to be used by private industry and government agencies for managing solid waste produced by advanced coal processes. This information will be developed by conducting several field studies on disposed wastes from these processes. Data will be collected to characterize these wastes and their interactions with the environments in which they are disposed. The first two tasks of this project involve the development of test plans. Through July of 1988 we have developed a generic test design manual, detailed test procedures manual, and test plans for three sites. Task three, field studies, will be initiated as soon as final site access is obtained and the facilities producing the waste are fully operational.

NONE

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

CoalFleet RD&D augmentation plan for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To help accelerate the development, demonstration, and market introduction of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and other clean coal technologies, EPRI formed the CoalFleet for Tomorrow initiative, which facilitates collaborative research by more than 50 organizations from around the world representing power generators, equipment suppliers and engineering design and construction firms, the U.S. Department of Energy, and others. This group advised EPRI as it evaluated more than 120 coal-gasification-related research projects worldwide to identify gaps or critical-path activities where additional resources and expertise could hasten the market introduction of IGCC advances. The resulting 'IGCC RD&D Augmentation Plan' describes such opportunities and how they could be addressed, for both IGCC plants to be built in the near term (by 2012-15) and over the longer term (2015-25), when demand for new electric generating capacity is expected to soar. For the near term, EPRI recommends 19 projects that could reduce the levelized cost-of-electricity for IGCC to the level of today's conventional pulverized-coal power plants with supercritical steam conditions and state-of-the-art environmental controls. For the long term, EPRI's recommended projects could reduce the levelized cost of an IGCC plant capturing 90% of the CO{sub 2} produced from the carbon in coal (for safe storage away from the atmosphere) to the level of today's IGCC plants without CO{sub 2} capture. EPRI's CoalFleet for Tomorrow program is also preparing a companion RD&D augmentation plan for advanced-combustion-based (i.e., non-gasification) clean coal technologies (Report 1013221). 7 refs., 30 figs., 29 tabs., 4 apps.

NONE

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

NETL: News Release - DOE Announces Further Field Testing of Advanced  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOE Announces Further Field Testing of Advanced Mercury Control Technologies DOE Announces Further Field Testing of Advanced Mercury Control Technologies Six Projects Selected in Round 2 to Address Future Power Plant Mercury Reduction Initiatives PITTSBURGH, PA - With an eye on future federal regulations aimed at reducing mercury emissions, the U.S. Department of Energy has selected six additional projects as part of a DOE research program to advance the technical readiness of mercury control options for the Nation's fleet of coal-fired power plants. The six projects in this second round of awards build on last year's selection of eight projects, and will verify technology performance, evaluate costs, and assess balance-of-plant impacts. The projects will field test advanced, post-combustion technologies involving all coal types at utilities using pulverized coal or cyclone-boiler configurations, and focus on technologies capable of removing mercury from flue gas containing higher concentrations of elemental mercury. The technologies include sorbent injection, wet flue gas desulfurization systems enhancement, and combustion optimization.

294

Recent Advances in Steels for Coal Fired Power Plant: A Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The current status of the development of materials for advanced ultra supercritical power generation technology is considered in the light of changes in the priorities and opportunities worldwide for high effi...

Thomas B. Gibbons

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

NETL: Advanced Research - Computation Energy Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MFIX MFIX Advanced Research Computational Energy Sciences MFIX MFIX (Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchanges) is a general-purpose computer code developed at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for describing the hydrodynamics, heat transfer and chemical reactions in fluid-solids systems. It has been used for describing bubbling and circulating fluidized beds and spouted beds. MFIX calculations give transient data on the three-dimensional distribution of pressure, velocity, temperature, and species mass fractions. MFIX code is based on a generally accepted set of multiphase flow equations. The code is used as a "test-stand" for testing and developing multiphase flow constitutive equations. MFIX Virtual Plant Consider a fluidized bed coal gasification reactor, in which pulverized

296

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress made in five research programs is described. The subtasks in oil shale study include oil shale process studies and unconventional applications and markets for western oil shale.The tar sand study is on recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction (ROPE) process. Four tasks are described in coal research: underground coal gasification; coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and sold waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research covers: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; NMR analysis of sample from the ocean drilling program; and menu driven access to the WDEQ hydrologic data management system.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

Modeling Creep-Fatigue-Environment Interactions in Steam Turbine Rotor Materials for Advanced Ultra-supercritical Coal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to model creep-fatigue-environment interactions in steam turbine rotor materials for advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) coal power Alloy 282 plants, to develop and demonstrate computational algorithms for alloy property predictions, and to determine and model key mechanisms that contribute to the damages caused by creep-fatigue-environment interactions. The nickel based Alloy 282 is selected for this project because it is one of the leading candidate materials for the high temperature/pressure section of an A-USC steam turbine. The methods developed in the project are expected to be applicable to other metal alloys in similar steam/oxidation environments. The major developments are: ? failure mechanism and microstructural characterization ? atomistic and first principles modeling of crack tip oxygen embrittlement ? modeling of gamma prime microstructures and mesoscale microstructure-defect interactions ? microstructure and damage-based creep prediction ? multi-scale crack growth modeling considering oxidation, viscoplasticity and fatigue The technology developed in this project is expected to enable more accurate prediction of long service life of advanced alloys for A-USC power plants, and provide faster and more effective materials design, development, and implementation than current state-of-the-art computational and experimental methods. This document is a final technical report for the project, covering efforts conducted from January 2011 to January 2014.

Shen, Chen

2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

298

Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell technology advancement for coal-based power generation. Final report, September 1989--March 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project has successfully advanced the technology for MSOFCs for coal-based power generation. Major advances include: tape-calendering processing technology, leading to 3X improved performance at 1000 C; stack materials formulations and designs with sufficiently close thermal expansion match for no stack damage after repeated thermal cycling in air; electrically conducting bonding with excellent structural robustness; and sealants that form good mechanical seals for forming manifold structures. A stack testing facility was built for high-spower MSOFC stacks. Comprehensive models were developed for fuel cell performance and for analyzing structural stresses in multicell stacks and electrical resistance of various stack configurations. Mechanical and chemical compatibility properties of fuel cell components were measured; they show that the baseline Ca-, Co-doped interconnect expands and weakens in hydrogen fuel. This and the failure to develop adequate sealants were the reason for performance shortfalls in large stacks. Small (1-in. footprint) two-cell stacks were fabricated which achieved good performance (average area-specific-resistance 1.0 ohm-cm{sup 2} per cell); however, larger stacks had stress-induced structural defects causing poor performance.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

NETL: Advanced Research - Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High Performance Materials > Chrome Oxide Refractory High Performance Materials > Chrome Oxide Refractory Advanced Research High Performance Materials Chrome Oxide Refractory One notable NETL success is the development of a chrome oxide refractory material capable of working in slagging gasifier conditions. In this project, researchers first determined that one of the major failure mechanisms for chrome oxide refractories exposed to the intense heat and corrosive environment was spalling, or the chipping or flaking of refractory material from an exposed face. They used this information to formulate a high-chrome oxide refractory composition that resists spalling, resulting in a refractory with a longer service life in the gasifier. Inside an ultrasupercritical (USC) pulverized coal power plant, materials are exposed to temperatures up to 760°C and pressures up to 5,000 psi. Operating a USC system can improve power plant efficiency up to 47% and reduce emissions. However, finding boiler and turbine materials that can hold up under extreme conditions requires new high-temperature metal alloys and ceramic coatings, as well as computational modeling research to optimize the processing of these materials. Advanced Research Materials Development program successes in this area include the following:

300

Process to improve boiler operation by supplemental firing with thermally beneficiated low rank coal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention described is a process for improving the performance of a commercial coal or lignite fired boiler system by supplementing its normal coal supply with a controlled quantity of thermally beneficiated low rank coal, (TBLRC). This supplemental TBLRC can be delivered either to the solid fuel mill (pulverizer) or directly to the coal burner feed pipe. Specific benefits are supplied based on knowledge of equipment types that may be employed on a commercial scale to complete the process. The thermally beneficiated low rank coal can be delivered along with regular coal or intermittently with regular coal as the needs require.

Sheldon, Ray W. (Huntley, MT)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Upgraded Coal Interest Group  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Upgraded Coal Interest Group (UCIG) is an EPRI 'users group' that focuses on clean, low-cost options for coal-based power generation. The UCIG covers topics that involve (1) pre-combustion processes, (2) co-firing systems and fuels, and (3) reburn using coal-derived or biomass-derived fuels. The UCIG mission is to preserve and expand the economic use of coal for energy. By reducing the fuel costs and environmental impacts of coal-fired power generation, existing units become more cost effective and thus new units utilizing advanced combustion technologies are more likely to be coal-fired.

Evan Hughes

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

302

ADVANCED MULTI-PRODUCT COAL UTILIZATION BY-PRODUCT PROCESSING PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utilities 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. This part of the study includes the examination of the feedstocks for the beneficiation plant. The ash, as produced by the plant, and that stored in the lower pond were examined. The ash produced by the plant was found to be highly variable as the plant consumes high and low sulfur bituminous coal, in Units 1 and 2 and a mixture of subbituminous and bituminous coal in Units 3 and 4. The ash produced reflected this consisting of an iron-rich ({approx}24%, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), aluminum rich ({approx}29% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and high calcium (6%-7%, CaO) ash, respectively. The LOI of the ash typically was in the range of 5.5% to 6.5%, but individual samples ranged from 1% to almost 9%. The lower pond at Ghent is a substantial body, covering more than 100 acres, with a volume that exceeds 200 million cubic feet. The sedimentation, stratigraphy and resource assessment of the in place ash was investigated with vibracoring and three-dimensional, computer-modeling techniques. Thirteen cores to depths reaching nearly 40 feet, were retrieved, logged in the field and transported to the lab for a series of analyses for particle size, loss on ignition, petrography, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray fluorescence. Collected data were processed using ArcViewGIS, Rockware, and Microsoft Excel to create three-dimensional, layered iso-grade maps, as well as stratigraphic columns and profiles, and reserve estimations. The ash in the pond was projected to exceed 7 million tons and contain over 1.5 million tons of coarse carbon, and 1.8 million tons of fine (<10 {micro}m) glassy pozzolanic material. The size, quality and consistency of the ponded material suggests that it is the better feedstock for the beneficiation plant.

Robert Jewell; Thomas Robl; John Groppo

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Spectroscopy of infrared emission characteristics of thermal power plant boiler coal ash deposits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal radiation characteristics of ash deposits on a coal combustion boiler of an electric power plant are investigated. Normal emittance spectra in 2.5-25 µm wavelength region and total normal emittance are measured on four kinds of ash at 600-1100K ... Keywords: ash deposit, emittance, pulverized coal combustion boiler furnace, spectroscopic measurement, thermal radiation

Aleksandar Saljnikov; Darko Goricanec; Danijela Dobersek; Dorde Kozic

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Volume 1, Final technical report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to develop a new approach for the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrated coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, liquefaction, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. Heterofunctional solvents were the most effective in swelling coals. Also solvent blends such as isopropanol/water were more effective than pure solvents alone. Impregnating slurry catalysts simultaneously during coal swelling showed that better uptake was achieved with nonswelling solvent and higher impregnation temperature. Some enhancement in initial coal conversion was seen liquefying SO{sub 2}-treated Black Thunder coal with slurry catalysts, and also when hydrogen donor liquefaction solvents were used. Noncatalytic reactions showed no benefit from SO{sub 2} treatment. Coupling coal swelling and SO{sub 2} treatment with slurry catalysts was also not beneficial, although high conversion was seen with continuous operation and long residence time, however, similar high conversion was observed with untreated coal. SO{sub 2} treatment is not economically attractive unless it provides about 17% increase in coal reactivity. In most cases, the best results were obtained when the coal was untreated and the slurry catalyst was added directly into the reactor. Foster Wheeler`s ASCOT process had better average liquid yields than either Wilsonville`s vacuum tower/ROSE combination or delayed coking process. This liquid product also had good quality.

Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., (United States); Gutterman, C. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Chander, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

305

NETL: News Release - Ten Projects Selected by DOE to Advance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7, 2010 7, 2010 Ten Projects Selected by DOE to Advance State-of-the-Art Carbon Capture from Coal Power Plants Washington, D.C. -Ten projects aimed at developing advanced technologies for capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal combustion have been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under its Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Program. Valued at approximately $67 million ($15 million in non-federal cost sharing) over three years, the projects are focused on reducing the "energy and efficiency penalties" associated with applying currently available carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies to existing and new power plants. CO2 power plant capture systems currently require large amounts of energy for their operation, resulting in decreased efficiency and reduced net power output when compared to plants without CCS technology. These "penalties" can add as much as 80 percent to the cost of electricity for a new pulverized coal plant and about 35 percent to the cost of electricity for a new advanced gasification plant. The overall goal of research conducted by DOE's Office of Fossil Energy (FE) and managed by FE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is to improve efficiencies and reduce these costs to less than 30 percent and 10 percent, respectively.

306

Low NOx nozzle tip for a pulverized solid fuel furnace  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nozzle tip [100] for a pulverized solid fuel pipe nozzle [200] of a pulverized solid fuel-fired furnace includes: a primary air shroud [120] having an inlet [102] and an outlet [104], wherein the inlet [102] receives a fuel flow [230]; and a flow splitter [180] disposed within the primary air shroud [120], wherein the flow splitter disperses particles in the fuel flow [230] to the outlet [104] to provide a fuel flow jet which reduces NOx in the pulverized solid fuel-fired furnace. In alternative embodiments, the flow splitter [180] may be wedge shaped and extend partially or entirely across the outlet [104]. In another alternative embodiment, flow splitter [180] may be moved forward toward the inlet [102] to create a recessed design.

Donais, Richard E; Hellewell, Todd D; Lewis, Robert D; Richards, Galen H; Towle, David P

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

307

Wilsonville Advanced Coal-Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama. Topical report No. 5. 6000 TPD SRC-I demonstration plant support  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Initially, the Wilsonville facility consisted of a single stage (thermal) process, also known as the SRC-I process. The original plant has been expanded to become an advanced two-stage coal liquefaction facility. A Critical Solvent Deashing (CDS) unit was installed in 1978 and a second stage catalytic hydrogenation (HTR) unit was installed in 1981. The principal product of the first stage is a low sulfur solid fuel. The reaction product is deashed by the CSD unit using a proprietary process developed by the Kerr-McGee Corporation. The hydrotreater, or the second stage, was installed primarily for further enhancement of product properties, process flexibility, and overall hydrogen utilization efficiency. In the decoupled mode of operation, the HTR unit has no direct effect on the SRC unit. This operating mode is called the non-integrated two-stage liquefaction (NTSL) process. From 17 October 1981 to 14 October 1982, the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R and D Facility at Wilsonville, Alabama, was operated partly in support of the 6000 TPD-I demonstration plant design effort undertaken by ICRC. The ICRC support tests and operations performed were: Run 235 with Kentucky 9 (Fies) coal; Run 240 with Illinois 6 (Burning Star) coal; CSD unit second stage variability study; CSD unit continuous ash removal system study; SRC solidification test; wastewater sampling operation; and residual fuel oil blending operation.

Not Available

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Coal combustion system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a coal combustion system suitable for a gas turbine engine, pulverized coal is transported to a rich zone combustor and burned at an equivalence ratio exceeding 1 at a temperature above the slagging temperature of the coal so that combustible hot gas and molten slag issue from the rich zone combustor. A coolant screen of water stretches across a throat of a quench stage and cools the combustible gas and molten slag to below the slagging temperature of the coal so that the slag freezes and shatters into small pellets. The pelletized slag is separated from the combustible gas in a first inertia separator. Residual ash is separated from the combustible gas in a second inertia separator. The combustible gas is mixed with secondary air in a lean zone combustor and burned at an equivalence ratio of less than 1 to produce hot gas motive at temperature above the coal slagging temperature. The motive fluid is cooled in a dilution stage to an acceptable turbine inlet temperature before being transported to the turbine.

Wilkes, Colin (Lebanon, IN); Mongia, Hukam C. (Carmel, IN); Tramm, Peter C. (Indianapolis, IN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The experimental study of coal swelling ratios have been determined with a wide variety of solvents. Only marginal levels of coal swelling were observed for the hydrocarbon solvents, but high levels were found with solvents having heteroatom functionality. Blends were superior to pure solvents. The activity of various catalyst precursors for pyrene hydrogenation and coal conversion was measured. Higher coal conversions were observed for the S0{sub 2}-treated coal than the raw coal, regardless of catalyst type. Coal conversions were highest for Molyvan-L, molybdenum naphthenate, and nickel octoate, respectively. Bottoms processing consists of a combination of the ASCOT process coupling solvent deasphalting with delayed coking. Initial results indicate that a blend of butane and pentane used near the critical temperature of butane is the best solvent blend for producing a yield/temperature relationship of proper sensitivity and yet retaining an asphalt phase of reasonable viscosity. The literature concerning coal swelling, both alone and in combination with coal liquefaction, and the use of dispersed or unsupported catalysts in coal liquefaction has been updated.

Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Gutterman, C. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Chander, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

INTERACTION OF ORGANIC SOLVENTS WITH A SUBBITUMINOUS COAL BELOW PYROLYSIS TEMPERATURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and P. Fugassi, Phenanthrene Extraction of Bituminous Coal,Coal Science, Advances in Chemistry Series No. 55, 448 C.Mechanism of High Volatile Coal, Coal Science, Advances in

Dorighi, G.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

NETL: Clean Coal Demonstrations - Coal 101  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A "Bed" for Burning Coal A "Bed" for Burning Coal Clean Coal 101 Lesson 4: A "Bed" for Burning Coal? It was a wet, chilly day in Washington DC in 1979 when a few scientists and engineers joined with government and college officials on the campus of Georgetown University to celebrate the completion of one of the world's most advanced coal combustors. It was a small coal burner by today's standards, but large enough to provide heat and steam for much of the university campus. But the new boiler built beside the campus tennis courts was unlike most other boilers in the world. A Fluidized Bed Boiler A Fluidized Bed Boiler In a fluidized bed boiler, upward blowing jets of air suspend burning coal, allowing it to mix with limestone that absorbs sulfur pollutants.

312

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, third quarter 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO{sub x} combustion technologies on NO{sub x} emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project.

Not Available

1992-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

313

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company's Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO{sub x} combustion technologies on NO{sub x} emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project.

Not Available

1992-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

314

Coke quality for blast furnaces with coal-dust fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, plans have been developed for the introduction of pulverized coal injection (PCI) at various Russian metallurgical enterprises. The main incentive for switching to PCI is the recent price rises for Russian natural gas. The paper discusses the quality of coke for PCI into blast furnaces.

Y.A. Zolotukhin; N.S. Andreichikov [Eastern Coal-Chemistry Institute, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Modeling of integrated environmental control systems for coal-fired power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM) was designed to permit the systematic evaluation of environmental control options for pulverized coal-fired (PC) power plants. Of special interest was the ability to compare the performance and cost of advanced pollution control systems to conventional'' technologies for the control of particulate, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Of importance also was the ability to consider pre-combustion, combustion and post-combustion control methods employed alone or in combination to meet tough air pollution emission standards. Finally, the ability to conduct probabilistic analyses is a unique capability of the IECM. Key results are characterized as distribution functions rather than as single deterministic values. (VC)

Rubin, E.S.; Salmento, J.S.; Frey, H.C.; Abu-Baker, A.; Berkenpas, M.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Modeling of integrated environmental control systems for coal-fired power plants. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM) was designed to permit the systematic evaluation of environmental control options for pulverized coal-fired (PC) power plants. Of special interest was the ability to compare the performance and cost of advanced pollution control systems to ``conventional`` technologies for the control of particulate, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Of importance also was the ability to consider pre-combustion, combustion and post-combustion control methods employed alone or in combination to meet tough air pollution emission standards. Finally, the ability to conduct probabilistic analyses is a unique capability of the IECM. Key results are characterized as distribution functions rather than as single deterministic values. (VC)

Rubin, E.S.; Salmento, J.S.; Frey, H.C.; Abu-Baker, A.; Berkenpas, M.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research in this project centers upon developing a new approach to the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrates all aspects of the coal liquefaction process including coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, coal liquefaction experimentation, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. The project is being carried out under contract to the United States Department of Energy. On May 28, 1992, the Department of Energy authorized starting the experimental aspects of this projects; therefore, experimentation at Amoco started late in this quarterly report period. Research contracts with Auburn University, Pennsylvania State University, and Foster Wheeler Development Corporation were signed during June, 1992, so their work was just getting underway. Their work will be summarized in future quarterly reports. A set of coal samples were sent to Hazen Research for beneficiation. The samples were received and have been analyzed. The literature search covering coal swelling has been up-dated, and preliminary coal swelling experiments were carried out. Further swelling experimentation is underway. An up-date of the literature on the liquefaction of coal using dispersed catalysts is nearing completion; it will be included in the next quarterly report.

Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Gutterman, C. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Chander, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

1992-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

318

RESIDUES FROM COAL CONVERSION AND UTILIZATION: ADVANCED MINERALOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND DISPOSED BYPRODUCT DIAGENESIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior to the initiation of this study, understanding of the long-term behavior of environmentally-exposed Coal Combustion By-Products (CCBs) was lacking in (among others) two primary areas addressed in this work. First, no method had been successfully applied to achieve full quantitative analysis of the partitioning of chemical constituents into reactive or passive crystalline or noncrystalline compounds. Rather, only semi-quantitative methods were available, with large associated errors. Second, our understanding of the long-term behavior of various CCBs in contact with the natural environment was based on a relatively limited set of study materials. This study addressed these areas with two objectives, producing (1) a set of protocols for fully quantitative phase analysis using the Rietveld Quantitative X-ray Diffraction (RQXRD) method and (2) greater understanding of the hydrologic and geochemical nature of the long-term behavior of disposed and utilized CCBs. The RQXRD technique was initially tested using (1) mixtures of National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) crystalline standards, and (2) mixtures of synthetic reagents simulating various CCBs, to determine accuracy and precision of the method, and to determine the most favorable protocols to follow in order to efficiently quantify multi-phase mixtures. Four sets of borehole samples of disposed or utilized CCBs were retrieved and analyzed by RQXRD according to the protocols developed under the first objective. The first set of samples, from a Class F ash settling pond in Kentucky disposed for up to 20 years, showed little mineralogical alteration, as expected. The second set of samples, from an embankment in Indiana containing a mixture of chain-grate (stoker) furnace ash and fluidized bed combustion (FBC) residues, showed formation of the mineral thaumasite, as observed in previously studied exposed FBC materials. Two high-calcium CCBs studied, including a dry-process flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-product disposed in the Midwest, and a mixture of Class C fly ash and wet process FGD by-product codisposed in North Dakota, appeared relatively unchanged mineralogically over the up to 5 and 17 years of emplacement, respectively. Each of these two materials contained mineralogies consistent with short-term hydration products of their respective starting (dry) materials. The hydration product ettringite persisted throughout the duration of emplacement at each site, and the diagenetic ash alteration product thaumasite did not form at either site. Explanations for the absence of thaumasite in these two sites include a lack of significant carbonate, sulfate, and alkalinity sources in the case of the North Dakota site, and a lack of sulfate, alkalinity, and sufficient moisture in the Midwest site. Potential for future thaumasite formation in these materials may exist if placed in contact with cold, wet materials containing the missing components listed above. In the presence of the sulfite scrubber mineral hannebachite, the ettringites formed had crystallographic unit cell dimensions smaller than those of pure sulfate ettringite, suggesting either incorporation of sulfite ions into the ettringite structure, or incorporation of silicon and carbonate ions, forming a solid solution towards thaumasite.

Gregory J. McCarthy; Dean G. Grier

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to design, construct, and operate an ash beneficiation facility that will generate several products from coal combustion ash stored in a utility ash pond. The site selected is LG&E's Ghent Station located in Carroll County, Kentucky. The specific site under consideration is the lower ash pond at Ghent, a closed landfill encompassing over 100 acres. Coring activities revealed that the pond contains over 7 million tons of ash, including over 1.5 million tons of coarse carbon and 1.8 million tons of fine (<10 {micro}m) glassy pozzolanic material. These potential products are primarily concentrated in the lower end of the pond adjacent to the outlet. A representative bulk sample was excavated for conducting laboratory-scale process testing while a composite 150 ton sample was also excavated for demonstration-scale testing at the Ghent site. A mobile demonstration plant with a design feed rate of 2.5 tph was constructed and hauled to the Ghent site to evaluate unit processes (i.e. primary classification, froth flotation, spiral concentration, secondary classification, etc.) on a continuous basis to determine appropriate scale-up data. Unit processes were configured into four different flowsheets and operated at a feed rate of 2.5 tph to verify continuous operating performance and generate bulk (1 to 2 tons) products for product testing. Cementitious products were evaluated for performance in mortar and concrete as well as cement manufacture process addition. All relevant data from the four flowsheets was compiled to compare product yields and quality while preliminary flowsheet designs were generated to determine throughputs, equipment size specifications and capital cost summaries. A detailed market study was completed to evaluate the potential markets for cementitious products. Results of the study revealed that the Ghent local fly ash market is currently oversupplied by more than 500,000 tpy and distant markets (i.e. Florida) are oversupplied as well. While the total US demand for ultrafine pozzolan is currently equal to demand, there is no reason to expect a significant increase in demand. Despite the technical merits identified in the pilot plant work with regard to beneficiating the entire pond ash stream, market developments in the Ohio River Valley area during 2006-2007 were not conducive to demonstrating the project at the scale proposed in the Cooperative Agreement. As a result, Cemex withdrew from the project in 2006 citing unfavorable local market conditions in the foreseeable future at the demonstration site. During the Budget Period 1 extensions provided by the DOE, CAER has contacted several other companies, including cement producers and ash marketing concerns for private cost share. Based on the prevailing demand-supply situation, these companies had expressed interest only in limited product lines, rather than the entire ash beneficiation product stream. Although CAER had generated interest in the technology, a financial commitment to proceed to Budget Period 2 could not be obtained from private companies. Furthermore, the prospects of any decisions being reached within a reasonable time frame were dim. Thus, CAER concurred with the DOE to conclude the project at the end of Budget Period 1, March 31, 2007. The activities presented in this report were carried out during the Cooperative Agreement period 08 November 2004 through 31 March 2007.

Thomas Robl; John Groppo

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

320

Coal science for the clean use of coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal will need to be retained as a major source of energy in the next century. It will need to be used more effectively and more cleanly. In order to achieve this, it is necessary to introduce new technology supported by a local community of science and technology. Only in this way can the full benefits of international advances in coal utilization be fully achieved. It is important that full advantage be taken of the advances that have been achieved in laboratory techniques and in the better understanding of fundamental coal science. This paper reviews available technologies in power generation, industrial process heat, coal combustion, coal gasification, and coal analytical procedures.

Harrison, J.S. [Univ. of Leeds (United Kingdom)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

application (coal gasification, coal combustion followed byversions of advanced gasification processes show promise ofFixed-Bed Low-Btu Coal Gasification Systems for Retrofitting

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

HYDROGENOLYSIS OF A SUB-BITUMINOUS COAL WITH MOLTEN ZINC CHLORIDE SOLUTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Liquefaction and Gasification of Western Coals", in5272 (1976). COal Processing - Gasification, Liguefaction,or gaseous fuels, coal gasification has advanced furthest

Holten, R.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electric Generation Technology Conventional Coal-Fired PowerPlants Advanced Coal-Electric Plants OperatingCharacteristics for Conventional Coal- Fired Power

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Coal Direct Chemical  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Coal Direct Chemical Looping Retrofit for Pulverized Coal-Fired Power Plants with In-Situ CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-NT0005289 Ohio State chemical looping metal carrier. Ohio State chemical looping metal carrier. The Ohio State University Research Foundation will further develop coal direct chemical looping (CDCL) technology. CDCL uses a patented iron oxide-based composite oxygen carrier and can be retrofit to existing coal-fired power plants. The development of the CDCL system will be conducted through experimental testing under bench- and sub-pilot scales. Related Papers and Publications: Coal Direct Chemical Looping Retrofit to Pulverized Coal Power Plants for In-Situ CO2 Capture [PDF-2.43MB] (July 2013) Presented by Samuel Bayham of the Ohio State University Research Foundation at the 2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting.

325

Advanced Systems for Preprocessing and Characterizing Coal-Biomass Mixtures as Next-Generation Fuels and Feedstocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research activities presented in this report are intended to address the most critical technical challenges pertaining to coal-biomass briquette feedstocks. Several detailed investigations were conducted using a variety of coal and biomass feedstocks on the topics of (1) coal-biomass briquette production and characterization, (2) gasification of coal-biomass mixtures and briquettes, (3) combustion of coal-biomass mixtures and briquettes, and (4) conceptual engineering design and economic feasibility of briquette production. The briquette production studies indicate that strong and durable co-firing feedstocks can be produced by co-briquetting coal and biomass resources commonly available in the United States. It is demonstrated that binderless coal-biomass briquettes produced at optimized conditions exhibit very high strength and durability, which indicates that such briquettes would remain competent in the presence of forces encountered in handling, storage and transportation. The gasification studies conducted demonstrate that coal-biomass mixtures and briquettes are exceptional gasification feedstocks, particularly with regard to the synergistic effects realized during devolatilization of the blended materials. The mixture combustion studies indicate that coal-biomass mixtures are exceptional combustion feedstocks, while the briquette combustion study indicates that the use of blended briquettes reduces NOx, CO2, and CO emissions, and requires the least amount of changes in the operating conditions of an existing coal-fired power plant. Similar results were obtained for the physical durability of the pilot-scale briquettes compared to the bench-scale tests. Finally, the conceptual engineering and feasibility analysis study for a commercial-scale briquetting production facility provides preliminary flowsheet and cost simulations to evaluate the various feedstocks, equipment selection and operating parameters.

Karmis, Michael; Luttrell, Gerald; Ripepi, Nino; Bratton, Robert; Dohm, Erich

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

326

Coal Combustion Science  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this activity is to support the Office of Fossil Energy in executing research on coal combustion science. This activity consists of basic research on coal combustion that supports both the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center Direct Utilization Advanced Research and Technology Development Program, and the International Energy Agency Coal Combustion Science Project. Specific tasks for this activity include: (1) coal devolatilization - the objective of this risk is to characterize the physical and chemical processes that constitute the early devolatilization phase of coal combustion as a function of coal type, heating rate, particle size and temperature, and gas phase temperature and oxidizer concentration; (2) coal char combustion -the objective of this task is to characterize the physical and chemical processes involved during coal char combustion as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, and gas phase temperature and oxygen concentration; (3) fate of mineral matter during coal combustion - the objective of this task is to establish a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms and rates of transformation, fragmentation, and deposition of mineral matter in coal combustion environments as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, the initial forms and distribution of mineral species in the unreacted coal, and the local gas temperature and composition.

Hardesty, D.R. (ed.); Fletcher, T.H.; Hurt, R.H.; Baxter, L.L. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Field study of disposed solid wastes from advanced coal processes. Annual technical progress report, October 1991--September 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radian Corporation and the North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) are funded to develop information to be used by private industry and government agencies for managing solid wastes produced by advanced coal combustion processes. This information will be developed by conducting several field studies on disposed wastes from these processes. Data will be collected to characterize these wastes and their interactions with the environments in which they are disposed. Three sites were selected for the field studies: Colorado Ute`s fluidized bed combustion (FBC) unit in Nucla, Colorado; Ohio Edison`s limestone injection multistage burner (LIMB) retrofit in Lorain, Ohio; and Freeman United`s mine site in central Illinois with wastes supplied by the nearby Midwest Grain FBC unit. During the past year, field monitoring and sampling of the four landfill test cases constructed in 1989 and 1991 has continued. Option 1 of the contract was approved last year to add financing for the fifth test case at the Freeman United site. The construction of the Test Case 5 cells is scheduled to begin in November, 1992. Work during this past year has focused on obtaining data on the physical and chemical properties of the landfilled wastes, and on developing a conceptual framework for interpreting this information. Results to date indicate that hydration reactions within the landfilled wastes have had a major impact on the physical and chemical properties of the materials but these reactions largely ceased after the first year, and physical properties have changed little since then. Conditions in Colorado remained dry and no porewater samples were collected. In Ohio, hydration reactions and increases in the moisture content of the waste tied up much of the water initially infiltrating the test cells.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

Oxy-coal Combustion Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to move toward the development of a predictive capability with quantified uncertainty bounds for pilot-scale, single-burner, oxy-coal operation. This validation research brings together multi-scale experimental measurements and computer simulations. The combination of simulation development and validation experiments is designed to lead to predictive tools for the performance of existing air fired pulverized coal boilers that have been retrofitted to various oxy-firing configurations. In addition, this report also describes novel research results related to oxy-combustion in circulating fluidized beds. For pulverized coal combustion configurations, particular attention is focused on the effect of oxy-firing on ignition and coal-flame stability, and on the subsequent partitioning mechanisms of the ash aerosol. To these ends, the project has focused on the following: â?¢ The development of reliable Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of oxy-coal flames using the Direct Quadrature Method of Moments (DQMOM) (Subtask 3.1). The simulations were validated for both non-reacting particle-laden jets and oxy-coal flames. â?¢ The modifications of an existing oxy-coal combustor to allow operation with high levels of input oxygen to enable in-situ laser diagnostic measurements as well as the development of strategies for directed oxygen injection (Subtask 3.2). Flame stability was quantified for various burner configurations. One configuration that was explored was to inject all the oxygen as a pure gas within an annular oxygen lance, with burner aerodynamics controlling the subsequent mixing. â?¢ The development of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) for identification of velocity fields in turbulent oxy-coal flames in order to provide high-fidelity data for the validation of oxy-coal simulation models (Subtask 3.3). Initial efforts utilized a laboratory diffusion flame, first using gas-fuel and later a pulverized-coal flame to ensure the methodology was properly implemented and that all necessary data and image-processing techniques were fully developed. Success at this stage of development led to application of the diagnostics in a large-scale oxy-fuel combustor (OFC). â?¢ The impact of oxy-coal-fired vs. air-fired environments on SO{sub x} (SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}) emissions during coal combustion in a pilot-scale circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) (Subtask 3.4). Profiles of species concentration and temperature were obtained for both conditions, and profiles of temperature over a wide range of O{sub 2} concentration were studied for oxy-firing conditions. The effect of limestone addition on SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} emissions were also examined for both air- and oxy- firing conditions. â?¢ The investigation of O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} environments on SO{sub 2 emissions during coal combustion in a bench-scale single-particle fluidized-bed reactor (Subtask 3.5). Moreover, the sulfation mechanisms of limestone in O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} environments were studied, and a generalized gassolid and diffusion-reaction single-particle model was developed to study the effect of major operating variables. â?¢ The investigation of the effect of oxy-coal combustion on ash formation, particle size distributions (PSD), and size-segregated elemental composition in a drop-tube furnace and the 100 kW OFC (Subtask 3.6). In particular, the effect of coal type and flue gas recycle (FGR, OFC only) was investigated.

J. Wendt; E. Eddings; J. Lighty; T. Ring; P. Smith; J. Thornock; Y. Jia, W. Morris; J. Pedel; D. Rezeai; L. Wang; J. Zhang; K. Kelly

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, fourth quarter 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO{sub x} burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

Not Available

1992-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

330

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, Second quarter 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (No{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO{sub x} burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

Not Available

1992-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

331

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, First quarter 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO{sub x} burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (No[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company's Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO[sub x] combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO[sub x] reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO[sub x] burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO[sub x] reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

Not Available

1992-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

333

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company's Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO{sub x} burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

Not Available

1992-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

334

3-10-09_Final_Testimony_(Bauer)_(NETL).pdf  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

plants consume approximately 60 percent less water than equivalent contemporary subcritical Pulverized Coal (PC) technology. Moreover, advanced technology coal plants offer...

335

Advances of flue gas desulfurization technology for coal-fired boilers and strategies for sulfur dioxide pollution prevention in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal is one of the most important kinds of energy resources at the present time and in the immediate future in China. Sulfur dioxide resulting from combustion of coal is one of the principle pollutants in the air. Control of SO{sub 2} discharge is still a major challenge for environmental protection in developing China. In this paper, research, development and application of technology of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) for coal-fired boilers in China will be reviewed with emphasis on cost-effective technology, and the development trends of FGD technology, as well as the strategy for SO{sub 2} discharge control in China, will be analyzed. A practical technology for middle-small-sized boilers developed by the primary author and the field investigation results will also be presented. At present, there are four major kinds of FGD technologies that are practical to be applied in China for their cost-effectiveness and efficiency to middle-small-sized boilers. An important development trend of the FGD technology for middle-small-sized boilers for the next decade is improvement of the existing cost-effective wet-type FGD technology, and in the future it will be the development of dry-type FGD technology. For middle-sized generating boilers, the development direction of the FGD technology is the spraying and drying process. For large-sized generating boilers, the wet-type limestone-plaster process will still be applied in the immediate future, and dry-type FGD technologies, such as ammonia with electron beam irradiation, will be developed in the future. State strategies for the control of SO{sub 2} discharge will involve the development and popularization of efficient coal-fired devices, extension of gas coal and liquefied coal, spreading coal washing, and centralized heating systems.

Yang, C.; Zeng, G.; Li, G.; Qiu, J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Report of activities of the advanced coal extraction systems definition project for the period 1979-1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary focus of the Project during 1979-1980 was formulation of system level performance goals and the translation of these goals into conceptual design requirements. The overall performance goals, although presented as specific to the Central Appalachian resource, are general in all areas except mine size and regional geology. Five system performance areas were covered: production cost, miner safety and health, environmental impact, and coal conservation. During the latter portion of 1980, project attention turned to transformation into conceptual design requirements the previously identified opportunities to meet the systems requirements. The Central Appalachian coals were chosen as the focus of the early system definition work on the basis of a brief analysis. Preliminary estimates indicated substantial deposits of coal in the Gulf Coast and the Brooks Range region of Alaska. At the close of 1980, this resource study was in the midst of an in-depth analysis of substantial coal deposits within the five major coal provinces - Appalachia, the Interior, the Rocky Mountains, the Gulf Coast, and Alaska. Finally, the project launched a brief conceptual design activity in early 1979, and performed a broad survey of current R and D in underground mining technology. Subsequent work in the area of technology assessment focused on underground slurry transport.

Lavin, M.L.; Isenberg, L.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Clean Coal Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE's clean coal R&D is focused on developing and demonstrating advanced power generation and carbon capture, utilization and storage technologies for existing facilities and new fossil-fueled...

338

Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 9, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by design, and construction of a 2-t/hr process development unit (PDU). The PDU will then be operated to generate 200 ton lots of each of three project coals, by each process. The project began in October, 1992 and is scheduled for completion by March, 1997. During Quarter 9 (October--December, 1995), parametric and optimization testing was completed for the Taggart, Sunnyside, and Indiana VII coal using a 12-inch Microcel{trademark} flotation column. The detailed design of the 2-t/hr PDU grinding, flotation, and dewatering circuits neared completion with the specification of the major pieces of capital equipment to be purchased for these areas. Selective agglomeration test work investigated the properties of various industrial grades of heptane for use during bench- and PDU-scale testing. It was decided to use a hydrotreated grade of commercial heptane due to its low cost and low concentration of aromatic compounds. The final Subtask 6.4 CWF Formulation Studies Test Plan was issued. A draft version of the Subtask 6.5 Preliminary Design and Test Plan Report was also issued, discussing the progress made in the design of the bench-scale selective agglomeration unit. PDU construction work moved forward through the issuing of 26 request for quotations and 21 award packages for capital equipment.

Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C. [AMAX Research and Development Center, Golden, CO (United States)

1995-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

339

Low-rank coal research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work is a compilation of reports on ongoing research at the University of North Dakota. Topics include: Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research (SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control, waste management), Advanced Research and Technology Development (turbine combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation, coal/char reactivity, liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, fine particulate emissions), Combustion Research (fluidized bed combustion, beneficiation of low-rank coals, combustion characterization of low-rank coal fuels, diesel utilization of low-rank coals), Liquefaction Research (low-rank coal direct liquefaction), and Gasification Research (hydrogen production from low-rank coals, advanced wastewater treatment, mild gasification, color and residual COD removal from Synfuel wastewaters, Great Plains Gasification Plant, gasifier optimization).

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, [October--December, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NOx combustion technologies on NOx emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NOx reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NOx control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NOx concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NOx reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. During this quarter, tests of the LNCFS Level III system were conducted to determine the effect that fuel fineness has on NOx emissions and unburned carbon levels. Results showed that changing the fineness of the fuel has almost no effect on NOx emissions; however, unburned carbon levels can be reduced significantly by increasing fuel fineness.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company's Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO[sub x] combustion technologies on NO[sub x] emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO[sub x] reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NO[sub x] control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NO[sub x] concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NO[sub x] reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. This technical progress report presents the LNCFS Level I short-term data collected during this quarter. In addition, a comparison of all the long-term emissions data that have been collected to date is included.

Not Available

1992-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

342

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, fourth quarter 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO{sub x} combustion technologies on NO{sub x} emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NO{sub x} control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NO{sub x} concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

Not Available

1992-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

343

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company's Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO{sub x} combustion technologies on NO{sub x} emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NO{sub x} control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NO{sub x} concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

Not Available

1992-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

344

coking coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

coking coal [A caking coal suitable for the production of coke for metallurgical use] ? Kokskohle f, verkokbare Kohle

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume I, Part 2. Final report, September 1986--September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work pertaining to the development of models for coal gasification and combustion processes. This volume, volume 1, part 2, contains research progress in the areas of large particle oxidation at high temperatures, large particle, thick-bed submodels, sulfur oxide/nitrogen oxides submodels, and comprehensive model development and evaluation.

Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Advanced Fuels Synthesis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Fuels Synthesis Advanced Fuels Synthesis Coal and Coal/Biomass to Liquids Advanced Fuels Synthesis The Advanced Fuels Synthesis Key Technology is focused on catalyst and reactor optimization for producing liquid hydrocarbon fuels from coal/biomass mixtures, supports the development and demonstration of advanced separation technologies, and sponsors research on novel technologies to convert coal/biomass to liquid fuels. Active projects within the program portfolio include the following: Fischer-Tropsch fuels synthesis Small Scale Coal Biomass Liquids Production Using Highly Selective Fischer Tropsch Catalyst Small Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal/Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels Via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Coal Fuels Alliance: Design and Construction of Early Lead Mini Fischer-Tropsch Refinery

347

Development of high temperature air combustion technology in pulverized fossil fuel fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High temperature air combustion (HTAC) is a promising technology for energy saving, flame stability enhancement and NOx emission reduction. In a conventional HTAC system, the combustion air is highly preheated by using the recuperative or regenerative heat exchangers. However, such a preheating process is difficult to implement for pulverized fossil fuel fired boilers. In this paper, an alternative approach is proposed. In the proposed HTAC system, a special burner, named PRP burner is introduced to fulfill the preheating process. The PRP burner has a preheating chamber with one end connected with the primary air and the other end opened to the furnace. Inside the chamber, gas recirculation is effectively established such that hot flue gases in the furnace can be introduced. Combustible mixture instead of combustion air is highly preheated by the PRP burner. A series of experiments have been conducted in an industrial scale test facility, burning low volatile petroleum coke and an anthracite coal. Stable combustion was established for burning pure petroleum coke and anthracite coal, respectively. Inside the preheating chamber, the combustible mixture was rapidly heated up to a high temperature level close to that of the hot secondary air used in the conventional HTAC system. The rapid heating of the combustible mixture in the chamber facilitates pyrolysis, volatile matter release processes for the fuel particles, suppressing ignition delay and enhancing combustion stability. Moreover, compared with the results measured in the same facility but with a conventional low NOx burner, NOx concentration at the furnace exit was at the same level when petroleum coke was burnt and 50% less when anthracite was burnt. Practicability of the HTAC technology using the proposed approach was confirmed for efficiently and cleanly burning fossil fuels. 16 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Hai Zhang; Guangxi Yue; Junfu Lu; Zhen Jia; Jiangxiong Mao; Toshiro Fujimori; Toshiyuki Suko; Takashi Kiga [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Department of Thermal Engineering

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Development of an Advanced Deshaling Technology to Improve the Energy Efficiency of Coal Handling, Processing, and Utilization Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of using a dry, density-based separator to achieve efficient, near-face rock removal, commonly referred to as deshaling, was evaluated in several applications across the U.S.. Varying amounts of high-density rock exist in most run-of-mine feed. In the central Appalachian coalfields, a rock content exceeding 50% in the feed to a preparation plant is commonplace due to high amounts of out-of-seam dilution made necessary by extracting coal from thin seams. In the western U.S, an increase in out-of-seam dilution and environmental regulations associated with combustion emissions have resulted in a need to clean low rank coals and dry cleaning may be the only option. A 5 ton/hr mobile deshaling unit incorporating a density-based, air-table technology commercially known as the FGX Separator has been evaluated at mine sites located within the states of Utah, Wyoming, Texas, West Virginia, Virginia, Pennsylvania and Kentucky. The FGX technology utilizes table riffling principles with air as the medium. Air enters through the table and creates a fluidized bed of particles comprised of mostly fine, high density particles. The high density particle bed lifts the low-density coal particles to the top of the bed. The low-density coal moves toward the front of the table due to mass action and the downward slope of the table. The high-density particles settle through the fluidized particle bed and, upon making contact with the table, moves toward the back of the table with the assistance of table vibration. As a result, the low-density coal particles exit the front of the table closest to the feed whereas the high-density, high-ash content particles leave on the side and front of the table located at the farthest from the feed entry. At each test site, the run-of-mine feed was either directly fed to the FGX unit or pre-screened to remove the majority of the -6mm material. The surface moisture of the feed must be maintained below 9%. Pre-screening is required when the surface moisture of the feed coal exceeds the maximum limit. However, the content of -6mm in the feed to the FGX separator should be maintained between 10% and 20% to ensure an adequate fluidized bed. A parametric evaluation was conducted using a 3-level experimental design at each test site to identify the optimum separation performance and parameter values. The test data was used to develop empirical expressions that describe the response variables (i.e., mass yield and product ash content) as a function of the operating parameter values. From this process, it was established that table frequency and longitudinal slope are the most critical factors in controlling both mass yield and clean coal ash while the cross table slope was the least significant. Fan blower frequency is a critical parameter that controls mass yield. Although the splitter positions between product and middling streams and the middling and tailing streams were held constant during the tests, a separate evaluation indicated that performance is sensitive to splitter position within certain lengths of the table and insensitive in others. For a Utah bituminous coal, the FGX separator provided clean coal ash contents that ranged from a low of 8.57% to a high of 12.48% from a feed coal containing around 17% ash. From the 29 tests involved in the statistically designed test program, the average clean coal ash content was 10.76% while the tailings ash content averaged around 72%. One of the best separation performances achieved an ash reduction from 17.36% to 10.67% while recovering 85.9% of the total feed mass, which equated to an ash rejection value of around 47%. The total sulfur content was typically decreased from 1.61% to 1.49%. These performances were quantified by blending the middlings stream with the clean coal product. At a second Utah site, coal sources from three different bituminous coal seams were treated by the FGX deshaling unit. Three parameter values were varied based on the results obtained from Site No. 1 to obtain the optimum results shown in Table E-1. Approximately 9 tests w

Rick Honaker; Gerald Luttrell

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

349

NETL: Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coal/Biomass Feed & Gasification Coal/Biomass Feed & Gasification Coal and Coal/Biomass to Liquids Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification The Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification Key Technology is advancing scientific knowledge of the production of liquid hydrocarbon fuels from coal and/or coal-biomass mixtures. Activities support research for handling and processing of coal/biomass mixtures, ensuring those mixtures are compatible with feed delivery systems, identifying potential impacts on downstream components, catalyst and reactor optimization, and characterizing the range of products and product quality. Active projects within the program portfolio include the following: Coal-biomass fuel preparation Development of Biomass-Infused Coal Briquettes for Co-Gasification Coal-biomass gasification modeling

350

Low-Rank Coal Grinding Performance Versus Power Plant Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The intent of this project was to demonstrate that Alaskan low-rank coal, which is high in volatile content, need not be ground as fine as bituminous coal (typically low in volatile content) for optimum combustion in power plants. The grind or particle size distribution (PSD), which is quantified by percentage of pulverized coal passing 74 microns (200 mesh), affects the pulverizer throughput in power plants. The finer the grind, the lower the throughput. For a power plant to maintain combustion levels, throughput needs to be high. The problem of particle size is compounded for Alaskan coal since it has a low Hardgrove grindability index (HGI); that is, it is difficult to grind. If the thesis of this project is demonstrated, then Alaskan coal need not be ground to the industry standard, thereby alleviating somewhat the low HGI issue (and, hopefully, furthering the salability of Alaskan coal). This project studied the relationship between PSD and power plant efficiency, emissions, and mill power consumption for low-rank high-volatile-content Alaskan coal. The emissions studied were CO, CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, and Hg (only two tests). The tested PSD range was 42 to 81 percent passing 76 microns. Within the tested range, there was very little correlation between PSD and power plant efficiency, CO, NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2}. Hg emissions were very low and, therefore, did not allow comparison between grind sizes. Mill power consumption was lower for coarser grinds.

Rajive Ganguli; Sukumar Bandopadhyay

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

NETL: Coal and Coal/Biomass to Liquids  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

C&CBTL C&CBTL Coal and Power Systems Coal and Coal/Biomass to Liquids The Coal and Coal/Biomass to Liquids program effort is focused on technologies to foster the commercial adoption of coal and coal/biomass gasification and the production of affordable liquid fuels and hydrogen with excellent environmental performance. U.S. Economic Competitiveness U.S. Economic Competitiveness U.S. Economic Competitiveness U.S. Economic Competitiveness Advanced Fuels Synthesis U.S. Economic Competitiveness U.S. Economic Competitiveness U.S. Economic Competitiveness U.S. Economic Competitiveness Advanced Fuels Synthesis Systems Analyses Global Environmental Benefits Global Environmental Benefits Global Environmental Benefits Global Environmental Benefits Global Environmental Benefits Global Environmental Benefits

352

ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions are engaged in a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the fly ash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO{sub 3} and ammonia. During this reporting quarter, installation of a liquid flue gas conditioning system was completed at the American Electric Power Conesville Plant, Unit 3. This plant fires a bituminous coal and has opacity and particulate emissions performance issues related to fly ash re-entrainment. Two cohesivity-specific additive formulations, ADA-44C and ADA-51, will be evaluated. In addition, ammonia conditioning will also be compared.

Kenneth E. Baldrey

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is a major step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal-water slurry fuel (CWF) can be produced from selected coals and that this premium fuel will be a cost-effective replacement for oil and natural gas now fueling some of the industrial and utility boilers in the United States. The replacement of oil and gas with CWF can only be realized if retrofit costs are kept to a minimum and retrofit boiler emissions meet national goals for clean air. These concerns establish the specifications for maximum ash and sulfur levels and combustion properties of the CWF. This cost-share contract is a 48-month program which started on September 30, 1992. This report discusses the technical progress made during the 4th quarter of the project from July 1 to September 30, 1993.

Smit, F.J.; Hogsett, R.F.; Jha, M.C.

1993-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

354

Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Volume 2, appendices. Final technical report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquefaction experiments were undertaken using subbituminous Black Thunder mine coal to observe the effects of aqueous SO{sub 2} coal beneficiation and the introduction of various coal swelling solvents and catalyst precursors. Aqueous SO{sub 2} beneficiation of Black Thunder coal removed alkali metals and alkaline earth metals, increased the sulfur content and increased the catalytic liquefaction conversion to THF solubles compared to untreated Black Thunder coal. The liquefaction solvent had varying effects on coal conversion, depending upon the type of solvent added. The hydrogen donor solvent, dihydroanthracene, was most effective, while a coal-derived Wilsonville solvent promoted more coal conversion than did relatively inert 1-methylnaphthalene. Swelling of coal with hydrogen bonding solvents tetrahydrofuran (THF), isopropanol, and methanol, prior to reaction resulted in increased noncatalytic conversion of both untreated and SO{sub 2} treated Black Thunder coals, while dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), which was absorbed more into the coal than any other swelling solvent, was detrimental to coal conversion. Swelling of SO{sub 2} treated coal before liquefaction resulted in the highest coal conversions; however, the untreated coal showed the most improvements in catalytic reactions when swelled in either THF, isopropanol, or methanol prior to liquefaction. The aprotic solvent DMSO was detrimental to coal conversion.

Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Chander, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., College Park, PA (United States); Gutterman, C.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

FE Clean Coal News | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5, 2011 5, 2011 Eight Advanced Coal Projects Chosen for Further Development by DOE's University Coal Research Program DOE has selected eight new projects to further advanced coal research under the University Coal Research Program. The selected projects will improve coal conversion and use and will help propel technologies for future advanced coal power systems. January 4, 2011 DOE-Supported Coal Cleaning Technology Succeeds in Commercial Demonstration A novel technology that could help release some of the currently unusable energy in an estimated 2 billion tons of U.S. coal waste has been successfully demonstrated by a Department of Energy supported project. December 16, 2010 Prestigious Coal-Fired Project of the Year Award Goes to Plant Demonstrating Innovative DOE-Funded Technology

356

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY FOSTER WHEELER, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9 9 STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY FOSTER WHEELER, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC26- 03NT41865; W(A)-03-052, CH1169 The Petitioner, Foster Wheeler (FW), was awarded this cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled, "Ammonia-Free NO, Control System." The purpose of the cooperative agreement is to achieve very low levels of NO, emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and flue gas NOx reduction. Catalyst formulations successful in the automotive applications will be evaluated both analytically and empirically for their use in PC power plants. This knowledge, combined with prior catalyst research for power plant applications conducted at Lehigh University,

357

An SAIC Report Prepared for The Indiana Center for Coal Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

....................................................................................................................... 15 1.6.2 Implement advanced clean coal technologies for production of energy products ........ 15

Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

358

The Advanced Tangentially Fired Combustion Techniques for the Reduction of Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) Emissions From Coal-Fired Boilers Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 2 The Advanced Tangentially Fired Combustion Techniques for the Reduction of Nitrogen Oxides (NO ) Emissions From Coal-Fired Boilers X Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment March 2000 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 and P.O. Box 10940, 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or

359

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, first quarter 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO{sub x} combustion technologies on NO{sub x} emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NO{sub x} control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NO{sub x} concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. This technical progess report presents the LNCFS Level III long-term data collected during this quarter. NO{sub x} emissions for each day of long-term testing are presented. The average NO{sub x} emission during long-term testing was 0.39 lb/MBtu at an average load of 155 MW. The effect of the low NO{sub x} combustion system on other combustion parameters such as carbon monoxide, excess oxygen level, and carbon carryover are also included.

Not Available

1992-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

360

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company's Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO[sub x] combustion technologies on NO[sub x] emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO[sub x] reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NO[sub x] control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NO[sub x] concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NO[sub x] reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. This technical progess report presents the LNCFS Level III long-term data collected during this quarter. NO[sub x] emissions for each day of long-term testing are presented. The average NO[sub x] emission during long-term testing was 0.39 lb/MBtu at an average load of 155 MW. The effect of the low NO[sub x] combustion system on other combustion parameters such as carbon monoxide, excess oxygen level, and carbon carryover are also included.

Not Available

1992-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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361

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, second quarter 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO{sub x} combustion technologies on NO{sub x} emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NO{sub x} control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NO{sub x} concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. This technical progress report presents the LNCFS Level I short-term data collected during this quarter. In addition, a comparison of all the long-term emissions data that have been collected to date is included.

Not Available

1992-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

362

Coal Direct Chemical Looping (CDCL) Process Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Direct Chemical Looping (CDCL) Retrofit to Direct Chemical Looping (CDCL) Retrofit to Pulverized Coal Power Plants for In-Situ CO 2 Capture William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering The Ohio State University Columbus, OH 43210 Award #: DE-NT0005289 PI: Liang-Shih Fan Presenter: Samuel Bayham Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering The Ohio State University 2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting July 11, 2013 Pittsburgh, PA Clean Coal Research Laboratory at The Ohio State University Sub-Pilot Scale Unit 250kW th Pilot Unit (Wilsonville, Alabama) Syngas Chemical Looping Coal-Direct Chemical Looping Cold Flow Model Sub-Pilot Scale Unit HPHT Slurry Bubble Column 120kW th Demonstration Unit Calcium Looping Process CCR Process Sub-Pilot Unit F-T Process

363

New Clean Coal Cycle Optimized Using Pinch Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

particularly fossil fuels. ' One of the technologies under development to address these concerns is a hybrid cycle pressurized circulating fluid ~ed combustion (PCFBC) system. The cycle 1ncorporates both gasification and combustion of pulverized coal...-06-19 Proceedings from the 12th National Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, June 19-20, 1990 have been described previously (reference 1) ? Gasification is a relatively slow process compared to combustion. consequently, a gasifier designed...

Rossiter, A. P.; O'Donnell, J. J.

364

ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions are engaged in a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the fly ash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO{sub 3} and ammonia. During this reporting quarter, performance testing of flue gas conditioning was underway at the PacifiCorp Jim Bridger Power Plant. The product tested, ADA-43, was a combination resistivity modifier with cohesivity polymers. This represents the first long-term full-scale testing of this class of products. Modifications to the flue gas conditioning system at Jim Bridger, including development of alternate injection lances, was also undertaken to improve chemical spray distribution and to avoid spray deposition to duct interior surfaces. Also in this quarter, a firm commitment was received for another long-term test of the cohesivity additives. This plant fires a bituminous coal and has opacity and particulate emissions performance issues related to fly ash re-entrainment. Ammonia conditioning is employed here on one unit, but there is interest in liquid cohesivity additives as a safer alternative.

Kenneth E. Baldrey

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions are engaged in a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the fly ash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO{sub 3} and ammonia. During this reporting quarter, installation of a flue gas conditioning system was completed at PacifiCorp Jim Bridger Power Plant. Performance testing was underway. Results will be detailed in the next quarterly and subsequent technical summary reports. Also in this quarter, discussions were initiated with a prospective long-term candidate plant. This plant fires a bituminous coal and has opacity performance issues related to fly ash re-entrainment. Ammonia conditioning has been proposed here, but there is interest in liquid additives as a safer alternative.

Kenneth E. Baldrey

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Development of a Low NOx Burner System for Coal Fired Power Plants Using Coal and Biomass Blends  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.................................................................................... 36 Figure 19 Result of Combustion Performance Tests after Retrofits of Thermal Power Plant IN in Finland Consisting of Four 265 MW Pulverized Coal-Fired Boilers... on to include the International Energy Agency Bioenergy Task 32 group?s draft position paper that indicates cofiring represents among the lowest risk, least expensive, most efficient, and shortest term options for renewable-based electrical power generation...

Gomez, Patsky O.

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

367

Detailed investigation of a pulverized fuel swirl flame in CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel approach to oxycoal flame stabilization has been developed at the Institute of Heat and Mass Transfer at RWTH Aachen University [D. Toporov, M. Foerster, R. Kneer, in: Third Int. Conf. on Clean Coal Technologies for Our Future, Cagliari, Sardinia, Italy, 15-17 May 2007]. The swirl burner design and its operating conditions have been adjusted in order to enforce CO formation thus stabilizing the flame and obtaining a full burnout at levels of O{sub 2} content in the O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixture similar to those in air. The paper presents results of detailed numerical and experimental investigations of a stable oxy-fired pulverized coal swirl flame (type-2) obtained with a 21 vol% O{sub 2} concentration. The combustion tests were performed in a vertical pilot-scale furnace (100 kW{sub th}) in the framework of the OXYCOAL-AC research project aiming to develop a membrane-based oxyfuel process. The experimental results concerning gas velocities, gas and particle temperatures, and gas compositions are presented and discussed, focusing on the underlying mechanisms as well as on the aerodynamics of the oxycoal flame. A comparison between measurements and simulations has shown the validity of the numerical method used. The reported data set can be used for validation of numerical models developed for prediction of oxyfuel combustion. (author)

Toporov, D.; Bocian, P.; Heil, P.; Kellermann, A.; Stadler, H.; Tschunko, S.; Foerster, M.; Kneer, R. [Institute of Heat and Mass Transfer, RWTH Aachen University, Eilfschornsteinstrasse 18, D-52056 Aachen (Germany)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

Ash vaporization in circulating fluidized bed coal combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, the vaporization of the ash-forming constituents in circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) in a full-scale 80 MW{sub th} unit was studied. Ash vaporization in CFBC was studied by measuring the fly ash aerosols in a full-scale boiler upstream of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) at the flue gas temperature of 125{degree}C. The fly ash number size distributions showed two distinct modes in the submicrometer size range, at particle diameters 0.02 and 0.3 {mu}m. The concentration of the ultrafine 0.02-{mu}m mode showed a large variation with time and it decreased as the measurements advanced. The concentration of the 0.02-{mu}m mode was two orders of magnitude lower than in the submicrometer mode observed earlier in the bubbling FBC and up to three orders of magnitude lower than in the pulverized coal combustion. Scanning electron micrographs showed few ultrafine particles. The intermediate mode at 0.3 {mu}m consisted of particles irregular in shape, and hence in this mode the particles had not been formed via a gas to particle route. We propose that the 0.3-{mu}m mode had been formed from the partial melting of the very fine mineral particles in the coal. The mass size distribution in the size range 0.01-70 {mu}m was unimodal with maximum at 20 {mu}m. Less than 1% of the fly ash particles was found in the submicrometer size range. 35 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Lind, T.; Kauppinen, E.I.; Maenhaut, W. [Univ. of Gent (Belgium); Shah, A.; Huggins, F. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions are engaged in a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the fly ash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO{sub 3} and ammonia. During this reporting quarter, performance testing of flue gas conditioning was completed at the PacifiCorp Jim Bridger Power Plant. The product tested, ADA-43, was a combination resistivity modifier with cohesivity polymers. The product was effective as a flue gas conditioner. However, ongoing problems with in-duct deposition resulting from the flue gas conditioning were not entirely resolved. Primarily these problems were the result of difficulties encountered with retrofit of an existing spray humidification system. Eventually it proved necessary to replace all of the original injection lances and to manually bypass the PLC-based air/liquid feed control. This yielded substantial improvement in spray atomization and system reliability. However, the plant opted not to install a permanent system. Also in this quarter, preparations continued for a test of the cohesivity additives at the American Electric Power Conesville Plant, Unit 3. This plant fires a bituminous coal and has opacity and particulate emissions performance issues related to fly ash re-entrainment. Ammonia conditioning is employed here on one unit, but there is interest in liquid cohesivity additives as a safer alternative.

Kenneth E. Baldrey

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Cofiring waste biofuels and coal for emissions reduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combustion tests have been performed in two pilot-scale combustion facilities to evaluate the emissions reduction possible while firing coal blended with several different biofuels. Two different boiler simulations, pulverized coal fired boilers and stoker coal fired boilers, were simulated. The pc-fired studies investigated the use of waste hardwood and softwood with pulverized coal, or using the biofuels as potential reburning fuels. The use of these wood waste is attractive because: wood contains little nitrogen and virtually no sulfur; wood is a regenerable biofuel; and wood utilization results in a net reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions. The wood reburning results indicate a reduction of 50-60% NO with approximately 10% wood heat input. Reburn stoichiometry was the most important variable. The NO reduction was strongly dependent upon initial NO and only slightly dependent upon temperature and wood moisture content. Cofiring of wood with pulverized coal; however, did not lead to significant NO reductions with the current NO{sub x} burner configuration. The stoker program investigated barriers for the successful blending of coal with waste railroad ties. Parameters evaluated included blending firing rate, chip size, optimum feed location, overfire/underfire air ratio, and natural gas addition. The results of this study demonstrate that NO emissions can be reduced by more than 50% without any significant increase in CO or THC emissions by the proper use of zoned reburning. Both programs demonstrated several benefits of biofuel cofiring, including: (1) lower operating costs due to reduced fuel prices; (2) reduced waste disposal; (3) reduced maintenance costs; (4) reduced environmental costs; and (5) extension of the useful life of existing equipment.

Brouwer, J.; Owens, W.D.; Harding, N.S. [Reaction Engineering International, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)] [and others

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Uncovering Coal's Secrets Through the University Coal Research Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8, 2013 8, 2013 Uncovering Coal's Secrets Through the University Coal Research Program Uncovering Coal's Secrets Through the University Coal Research Program The challenges confronting the environmentally sound use of our country's fossil energy resources are best addressed through collaborative research and development. That's why this approach, which stretches federal dollars, is at the heart of the Office of Fossil Energy's University Coal Research (UCR) Program. Managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the UCR program funds university research to improve understanding of the chemical and physical properties of coal, one of our nation's most abundant resources. The program has forged partnerships between academia and the private sector that have led to advances not only in how we use coal, but

372

NETL: Coal and Power Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Systems Systems Technologies Coal and Power Systems Advancing our Nation's Portfolio of Coal RD&D Technologies - Rotating Images Advancing our Nation's Portfolio of Coal RD&D Technologies - Read More! Focus of NETL RD&D RD&D efforts in coal and power systems fall into three categories: Technologies that enable existing coal power plants to cost-effectively meet environmental requirements. NETL and its research partners are developing environmental control technologies for retrofitting existing power plants, with application to new plants as well. Key areas of research include cost-effective control of mercury, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and fine particulate emissions; beneficial uses for coal utilization byproducts; and innovations to minimize the impact of

373

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF COAL-FIRED HIGH-PERFORMANCE POWER SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A High Performance Power System (HIPPS) is being developed. This system is a coal-fired, combined cycle plant with indirect heating of gas turbine air. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation and a team consisting of Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation, Bechtel Corporation, University of Tennessee Space Institute and Westinghouse Electric Corporation are developing this system. In Phase 1 of the project, a conceptual design of a commercial plant was developed. Technical and economic analyses indicated that the plant would meet the goals of the project which include a 47 percent efficiency (HHV) and a 10 percent lower cost of electricity than an equivalent size PC plant. The concept uses a pyrolysis process to convert coal into fuel gas and char. The char is fired in a High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF). The HITAF is a pulverized fuel-fired boiler/air heater where steam is generated and gas turbine air is indirectly heated. The fuel gas generated in the pyrolyzer is then used to heat the gas turbine air further before it enters the gas turbine. The project is currently in Phase 2 which includes engineering analysis, laboratory testing and pilot plant testing. Research and development is being done on the HIPPS systems that are not commercial or being developed on other projects. Pilot plant testing of the pyrolyzer subsystem and the char combustion subsystem are being done separately, and after each experimental program has been completed, a larger scale pyrolyzer will be tested at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, AL. The facility is equipped with a gas turbine and a topping combustor, and as such, will provide an opportunity to evaluate integrated pyrolyzer and turbine operation. This report addresses the areas of technical progress for this quarter. A general arrangement drawing of the char transfer system was forwarded to SCS for their review. Structural steel drawings were used to generate a three-dimensional model of the char transfer system including all pressure vessels and major piping components. Experimental testing at the Combustion and Environmental Test Facility continued during this quarter. Performance of the char burner, as benchmarked by flame stability and low NOx, has been exceptional. The burner was operated successfully both without natural gas and supplemental pulverized coal.

Unknown

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Coal: the cornerstone of America's energy future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In April 2005, US Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman asked the National Coal Council to develop a 'report identifying the challenges and opportunities of more fully exploring our domestic coal resources to meet the nation's future energy needs'. The Council has responded with eight specific recommendations for developing and implementing advanced coal processing and combustion technologies to satisfy our unquenchable thirst for energy. These are: Use coal-to-liquids technologies to produce 2.6 million barrels/day; Use coal-to-natural gas technologies to produce 4 trillion ft{sup 3}/yr; Build 100 GW of clean coal plants by 2025; Produce ethanol from coal; Develop coal-to-hydrogen technologies; Use CO{sub 2} to enhance recovery of oil and coal-bed methane; Increase the capacity of US coal mines and railroads; and Invest in technology development and implementation. 1 ref.; 4 figs.; 1 tab.

Beck, R.A. [National Coal Council (United Kingdom)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Zero Emissions Coal Syngas Oxygen Turbo Machinery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Siemens Energy, Inc. (formerly Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation) worked with Clean Energy Systems and Florida Turbine Technologies to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of advanced turbines for oxy-fuel based power systems that discharge negligible CO{sub 2} into the atmosphere. The approach builds upon ultra supercritical steam turbine and advanced gas turbine technology with the goal of attaining plant efficiencies above 50% in the 2015 timeframe. Conceptual designs were developed for baseline, near term, and long term oxy-fuel turbine cycles, representing commercial introductions of increasingly advanced thermal conditions and increasing exposure to steam-CO{sub 2} mixtures. An economic analysis and market demand study was performed by Science Applications International Corp. (SAIC), and indicated that long-term oxy-fuel turbine cycles start to look attractive in 2025 when the CO{sub 2} tax is assumed to reach $40/ ton, and by 2030 it has a clear advantage over both IGCC with sequestration and pulverized coal with sequestration. A separate risk analysis of the oxy-fuel combustor, HP turbine, re-heater, and IP turbine of the long-term cycle identified and categorized risks and proposed mitigation measures. In 2007 the program began to focus on a potential oxy-fuel turbine power generation demonstration project in the 2012 -13 time period while still maintaining a link to the requirements of the long-term oxy-syngas cycle. The SGT-900 turbine was identified as the best fit for modification into an intermediate pressure turbine (IPT) for this application. The base metals, bond coats, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), and rotor materials used in the SGT-900 were tested for their ability to operate in the steam- CO{sub 2} environment of the oxy-fuel OFT-900. Test results indicated that these same materials would operate satisfactorily, and the plan, is to use SGT-900materials for the OFT-900. Follow-on programs for corrosion testing and evaluation of crack growth rates in oxy-fuel environments have been proposed to build on these results and provide quantifiable assessments of the effects of oxy-fuel environments on the service lives of turbine components.

Dennis Horazak

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

An advanced control system for fine coal flotation. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model-based flotation control scheme is being implemented to achieve optimal performance in the handling and treatment of fine coal. The control scheme monitors flotation performance through on-line analysis of ash content. Then, based on the economic and metallurgical performance of the circuit, variables such as reagent dosage, pulp density and pulp level are adjusted using model-based control algorithms to compensate for feed variations and other process disturbances. Recent developments in sensor technology are being applied for on-line determination of slurry ash content. During the fourth quarter of this project, a final attempt was made to calibrate a video-based ash analyzer for use in this application. It was concluded that the low ash content and the coarse particle size of the flotation tailings slurry at the Maple Meadow plant site made the video-based system unsuitable for this application. Plans are now underway to lease a nuclear-based analyzer as the primary sensor for this project.

Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.

1997-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

377

Advanced turbine design for coal-fueled engines. Phase 1, Erosion of turbine hot gas path blading: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The investigators conclude that: (1) Turbine erosion resistance was shown to be improved by a factor of 5 by varying the turbine design. Increasing the number of stages and increasing the mean radius reduces the peak predicted erosion rates for 2-D flows on the blade airfoil from values which are 6 times those of the vane to values of erosion which are comparable to those of the vane airfoils. (2) Turbine erosion was a strong function of airfoil shape depending on particle diameter. Different airfoil shapes for the same turbine operating condition resulted in a factor of 7 change in airfoil erosion for the smallest particles studied (5 micron). (3) Predicted erosion for the various turbines analyzed was a strong function of particle diameter and weaker function of particle density. (4) Three dimensional secondary flows were shown to cause increases in peak and average erosion on the vane and blade airfoils. Additionally, the interblade secondary flows and stationary outer case caused unique erosion patterns which were not obtainable with 2-D analyses. (5) Analysis of the results indicate that hot gas cleanup systems are necessary to achieve acceptable turbine life in direct-fired, coal-fueled systems. In addition, serious consequences arise when hot gas filter systems fail for even short time periods. For a complete failure of the filter system, a 0.030 in. thick corrosion-resistant protective coating on a turbine blade would be eroded at some locations within eight minutes.

Wagner, J.H.; Johnson, B.V.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions are engaged in a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the fly ash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO{sub 3} and ammonia. During this reporting quarter, further laboratory-screening tests of additive formulations were completed. For these tests, the electrostatic tensiometer method was used for determination of fly ash cohesivity. Resistivity was measured for each screening test with a multi-cell laboratory fly ash resistivity furnace constructed for this project. Also during this quarter chemical formulation testing was undertaken to identify stable and compatible resistivity/cohesivity liquid products.

Kenneth E. Baldrey

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions are engaged in a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the fly ash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO{sub 3} and ammonia. During this reporting quarter, two cohesivity-specific additive formulations, ADA-44C and ADA-51, were evaluated in a full-scale trial at the American Electric Power Conesville plant. Ammonia conditioning was also evaluated for comparison. ADA-51 and ammonia conditioning significantly reduced rapping and non-rapped particulate re-entrainment based on stack opacity monitor data. Based on the successful tests to date, ADA-51 will be evaluated in a long-term test.

Kenneth E. Baldrey

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions are engaged in a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the fly ash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO{sub 3} and ammonia. This quarterly report summarizes project activity for the period April-June, 2003. In this period there was limited activity and no active field trials. Results of ash analysis from the AEP Conesville demonstration were received. In addition, a site visit was made to We Energies Presque Isle Power Plant and a proposal extended for a flue gas conditioning trial with the ADA-51 cohesivity additive. It is expected that this will be the final full-scale evaluation on the project.

Kenneth E. Baldrey

2003-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Modelling fly ash generation for UK power station coals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An in-depth characterization has been made of three UK bituminous coals and the combustion products from these coals when burned at a power station and on a range of experimental combustion facilities. The coals were chosen to represent the range of ash compositions and slagging propensities found at UK power stations. CCSEM analysis of the pulverized coals has been performed to provide quantitative data on the size and chemical composition of individual mineral occurrences, and to determine the nature of the mineral-mineral and mineral-organic associations in the pulverized fuel. In a similar way the size and chemical composition of individual fly ash particle has been determined. The mineral-mineral association information has been used to predict the effects of mineral coalescence, the dominant mineral transformation process for UK power station coals. The CCSEM information correctly identifies the types of mineral-mineral association and hence the predicted effects of coalescence. The limitations of the information are inherent in the analysis of a cross-section, but useful information for the modelling of ash generation may still be obtained.

Wigley, F.; Williamson, J. [Imperial Coll., London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

Pulverized coal firing of aluminum melting furnaces. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1-December 31, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heaviest acitivity this quarter has been in the area of system design and specification and purchase of system components. Mechanical design is now complete. The design of electrical power, process control and data acquisition systems has begun. Combustor design meetings with General Electric Space Science Labs have resulted in an increasing awareness that analytical flow field modeling of the cyclonic combustor could not only enhance current understanding of the process but also broaden the future scope of implementation. A proposal to add specific additional modeling tasks was presented to the Department of Energy, and is included herein in Appendix B. Equipment procurement will continue and system construction will begin during the next quarter.

West, C E

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Ignition behaviour of individual pulverized coal particles in air and oxy-fuel environments.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Research Doctorate - Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) In recent years, increasing concern over global warming and climate change and its connection to CO2 emissions have… (more)

Abdul Gani, Zeenathul Farida

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Techno-economic assessment of pulverized coal boilers and IGCC power plants with CO2 capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The current studies on power plant technologies suggest that Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems are an effective and economic CO2 capture technology pathway. In addition, the system in conventi...

Y. Huang; S. Rezvani; D. McIlveen-Wright…

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Direct tuyere injection of oxygen for enhanced coal combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Injecting oxygen directly into the tuyere blowpipe can enhance the ignition and combustion of injected pulverized coal, allowing the efficient use of higher coal rates at high furnace production levels. The effects of direct oxygen injection have been estimated from an analysis of the factors controlling the dispersion, heating, ignition, and combustion of injected coal. Injecting ambient temperature oxygen offers mechanical improvements in the dispersion of coal but provides little thermochemical benefit over increased blast enrichment. Injecting hot oxygen through a novel, patented thermal nozzle lance offers both mechanical and thermochemical benefits over increased enrichment or ambient oxygen injection. Plans for pilot-scale and commercial-scale testing of this new lance are described.

Riley, M.F. [Praxair, Inc., Tarrytown, NY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

Coal Utilization Science Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coal Utilization SCienCe Program Coal Utilization SCienCe Program Description The Coal Utilization Science (CUS) Program sponsors research and development (R&D) in fundamental science and technology areas that have the potential to result in major improvements in the efficiency, reliability, and environmental performance of advanced power generation systems using coal, the Nation's most abundant fossil fuel resource. The challenge for these systems is to produce power in an efficient and environmentally benign manner while remaining cost effective for power providers as well as consumers. The CUS Program is carried out by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The program supports DOE's Strategic Plan to:

387

Coal-fired furnace for testing of thermionic converters. Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of thermionic converter technology has progressed to make near-term applications interesting. One of these applications is the thermionic topping of a pulverized coal-fired central station powerplant. Up to now, thermionic converters have been flame tested using natural gas as fuel. A new test furnace is required for evaluation of thermionic converters in a coal-fired environment. The design and costs of a facility which adapts a coal-fired furnace built by Foster Wheeler Development Corporation (FWDC) for thermionic converter testing are discussed. Such a facility would be exempt from air pollution regulations because of its low firing rate.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Theoretical principles of use of coal fractions with different densities for combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is reasonable to complement the conventional preparation of steam coal involving the removal of ash components and pyritic sulfur by the isolation of the lightest organic fractions, which possess enhanced performance characteristics. These fractions are smoothly saleable both on the domestic and world markets for effective pulverized-coal combustion via new combustion technologies. Heavier (inertinite) fractions of the coal preparation concentrate marketed at lower prices can be considered appropriate fuel for burning in circulating fluidized-bed combustion systems. 13 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

S.G. Gagarin; A.M. Gyul'maliev [Institute for Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Investigation of mechanisms of ash deposit formation from low-rank coal combustion: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to determine the chemical behavior of alkali metal and other species implicated in the ash fouling which can occur during the combustion of low rank coals. The coal combustion was studied in unaugmented premixed pulverized coal flames. Vapor species were measured by molecular beam mass spectrometry. Temperatures were also measured, and time-resolved coal/ash particulate samples were collected and analyzed. A major part of the research on this project was devoted to: (1) the development and refinement of techniques for the MBMS analysis of trace quantities of unstable and reactive high temperature vapor species from the pulverized coal flames; and (2) the time-resolved sampling and collection of particulates. The equipment is now operating very satisfactorily. Inorganic species, some of which were present at parts-per-million levels, were quantitatively sampled and measured in the pulverized coal flames. Time-resolved particulate samples which were free of vapor deposited contaminants were collected without the use of an interfering substrate. Profiles of the alkali metal species in Beulah lignite and Decker subbituminous coal flames were obtained. It was found in both flames that sodium is volatilized as the atomic species early (milliseconds) in the combustion process. The gaseous Na reacts, also in milliseconds, to form an unknown species which is probably an oxide fume, but which is not NaOH or Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. This is probably the mechanism for the formation of the alkali ''fumes'' observed in other systems. Measurements were also made of a number of other gaseous species, and time-resolved coal/ash samples were obtained and analyzed. 27 refs., 23 figs., 8 tabs.

Greene, F.T.; O'Donnell, J.E.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Milliken Clean Coal Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) program is to furnish the energy marketplace with a number of advanced, more efficient, and environmentally responsible coal-utilization technologies through demonstration projects. These projects seek to establish the commercial feasibility of the most promising advanced coal technologies that have developed beyond the proof-of-concept stage.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2001-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - Ultra Low-NOx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ultra Low NOx Integrated System Ultra Low NOx Integrated System TFS 2000(tm) Low NOx Firing System Project Summary: ALSTOM Power Inc.'s Power Plant Laboratories, working in concert with ALSTOM Power's Performance Projects Group, has teamed with the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) to conduct a comprehensive study to develop/evaluate low-cost, efficient NOx control technologies for retrofit to pulverized coal fired utility boilers. The objective of this project was to develop retrofit NOx control technology to achieve less than 0.15 lb/MMBtu NOx (for bituminous coals) and 0.10 lb/MMBtu NOx (for subbituminous coals) from existing pulverized coal fired utility boilers at a cost which is at least 25% less than SCR technology. Efficient control of NOx is seen as an important,

392

Coal and Biomass to Liquids | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Coal to Liquids » Coal and Coal to Liquids » Coal and Biomass to Liquids Coal and Biomass to Liquids Over the last several decades, the Office of Fossil Energy performed RD&D activities that made significant advancements in the areas of coal conversion to liquid fuels and chemicals. Technology improvements and cost reductions that were achieved led to the construction of demonstration-scale facilities. The program is now supporting work to reduce the carbon footprint of coal derived liquids by incorporating the co-feeding of biomass and carbon capture. In the area of direct coal liquefaction, which is the process of breaking down coal to maximize the correct size of molecules for liquid products, the U.S. DOE made significant investments and advancements in technology in the 1970s and 1980s. Research enabled direct coal liquefaction to produce

393

A Synergistic Combination of Advanced Separation and Chemical Scale Inhibitor Technologies for Efficient Use of Imparied Water As Cooling Water in Coal-based Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nalco Company is partnering with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in this project to jointly develop advanced scale control technologies that will provide cost-effective solutions for coal-based power plants to operate recirculating cooling water systems at high cycles using impaired waters. The overall approach is to use combinations of novel membrane separations and scale inhibitor technologies that will work synergistically, with membrane separations reducing the scaling potential of the cooling water and scale inhibitors extending the safe operating range of the cooling water system. The project started on March 31, 2006 and ended in August 30, 2010. The project was a multiyear, multi-phase project with laboratory research and development as well as a small pilot-scale field demonstration. In Phase 1 (Technical Targets and Proof of Concept), the objectives were to establish quantitative technical targets and develop calcite and silica scale inhibitor chemistries for high stress conditions. Additional Phase I work included bench-scale testing to determine the feasibility of two membrane separation technologies (electrodialysis ED and electrode-ionization EDI) for scale minimization. In Phase 2 (Technology Development and Integration), the objectives were to develop additional novel scale inhibitor chemistries, develop selected separation processes, and optimize the integration of the technology components at the laboratory scale. Phase 3 (Technology Validation) validated the integrated system's performance with a pilot-scale demonstration. During Phase 1, Initial evaluations of impaired water characteristics focused on produced waters and reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents. Literature and new data were collected and evaluated. Characteristics of produced waters vary significantly from one site to another, whereas reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents have relatively more uniform characteristics. Assessment to date confirmed that calcite and silica/silicate are two common potential cycle-limiting minerals for using impaired waters. For produced waters, barium sulfate and calcium sulfate are two additional potential cycle-limiting minerals. For reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents, calcium phosphate scaling can be an issue, especially in the co-presence of high silica. Computational assessment, using a vast amount of Nalco's field data from coal fired power plants, showed that the limited use and reuse of impaired waters is due to the formation of deposit caused by the presence of iron, high hardness, high silica and high alkalinity in the water. Appropriate and cost-effective inhibitors were identified and developed - LL99B0 for calcite and gypsum inhibition and TX-15060 for silica inhibition. Nalco's existing dispersants HSP-1 and HSP-2 has excellent efficacy for dispersing Fe and Mn. ED and EDI were bench-scale tested by the CRADA partner Argonne National Laboratory for hardness, alkalinity and silica removal from synthetic make-up water and then cycled cooling water. Both systems showed low power consumption and 98-99% salt removal, however, the EDI system required 25-30% less power for silica removal. For Phase 2, the EDI system's performance was optimized and the length of time between clean-in-place (CIP) increased by varying the wafer composition and membrane configuration. The enhanced EDI system could remove 88% of the hardness and 99% of the alkalinity with a processing flux of 19.2 gal/hr/m{sup 2} and a power consumption of 0.54 kWh/100 gal water. Bench tests to screen alternative silica/silicate scale inhibitor chemistries have begun. The silica/silicate control approaches using chemical inhibitors include inhibition of silicic acid polymerization and dispersion of silica/silicate crystals. Tests were conducted with an initial silica concentration of 290-300 mg/L as SiO{sub 2} at pH 7 and room temperature. A proprietary new chemistry was found to be promising, compared with a current commercial product commonly used for silica/silicate control. Additional pilot cooling tower testing confirmed

Jasbir Gill

2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

394

COAL & POWER SYSTEMS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

COAL & POWER SYSTEMS COAL & POWER SYSTEMS STRATEGIC & MULTI-YEAR PROGRAM PLANS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY GREENER, SOONER... THROUGH TECHNOLOGY INTRODUCTION .......... i-1 STRATEGIC PLAN ........ 1-1 PROGRAM PLANS Vision 21 .......................... 2-1 Central Power Systems ...... 3-1 Distributed Generation ..... 4-1 Fuels ................................ 5-1 Carbon Sequestration ....... 6-1 Advanced Research ........... 7-1 TABLE OF CONTENTS STRATEGIC & MULTI-YEAR PROGRAM PLANS STRENGTH THROUGH SCIENCE... A "GREENER, SOONER" PHILOSOPHY Coal, natural gas, and oil fuel about 70 percent of the electricity generated in the United States. As promising as renewable and other alternative fuels are, it will be several decades before they can make significant energy contributions to the Nation's

395

Methods for Characterization of Composition of Fly Ashes from Coal-Fired Power Stations:? A Critical Overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

HTA and LTA are laboratory-produced coal ashes that are originated at (i) regulated temperatures, commonly at 500?815 °C in air (after the spontaneous coal combustion), and (ii) oxygen plasma ashing (normally at 150?200 °C), respectively. ... The wet disposal of ash, from the coal-fired thermal power plants, involves its mixing with water and its impoundment in the ash ponds or lagoons. ... The fabric, mineralogy, and chem. of high-calcium ash deposits from the Agios Dimitrios pulverized-lignite power plant in northern Greece were investigated as a key to the ability to improve the performance of the power plant. ...

Stanislav V. Vassilev; Christina G. Vassileva

2005-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

396

Express quality analysis of coal concentrates by diffuse reflection IR spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ongoing quality monitoring of coal concentrates is important today on account of instability in the raw materials for coking at OAO Magnitogorskii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat (MMK) and the variable composition of the coal batch for enrichment plants. Currently, numerous standardized methods permit the determination of the classificational and quality characteristics of coal and batch. These methods are slow, laborious, and relatively ineffective in industrial conditions. In May 2005, an automated Spektrotest express-analysis system developed by ECCI was installed in the coke laboratory at ZAO RMK in order to determine the quality of the coal concentrate and batch. The basic equipment is an IR spectrometer with a unit for Fourier transformation and a special optical module yielding the reflect on spectra of the pulverized coal. A control station based on a high-speed computer runs an algorithm for information analysis and storage and for printing out the test protocol. The Spektrotest system includes complex algorithms and software specially developed at ECCI.

V.N. Egorov; I.I. Mel'nikov; N.A. Tarasov; V.I. Butakova; Y.M. Posokhov [ZAO RMK (Russian Federation)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Coal based electric generation comparative technologies report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ohio Clean Fuels, Inc., (OCF) has licensed technology that involves Co-Processing (Co-Pro) poor grade (high sulfur) coal and residual oil feedstocks to produce clean liquid fuels on a commercial scale. Stone Webster is requested to perform a comparative technologies report for grassroot plants utilizing coal as a base fuel. In the case of Co-Processing technology the plant considered is the nth plant in a series of applications. This report presents the results of an economic comparison of this technology with other power generation technologies that use coal. Technologies evaluated were:Co-Processing integrated with simple cycle combustion turbine generators, (CSC); Co-Processing integrated with combined cycle combustion turbine generators, (CCC); pulverized coal-fired boiler with flue gas desulfurization and steam turbine generator, (PC) and Circulating fluidized bed boiler and steam turbine generator, (CFB). Conceptual designs were developed. Designs were based on approximately equivalent net electrical output for each technology. A base case of 310 MWe net for each technology was established. Sensitivity analyses at other net electrical output sizes varying from 220 MWe's to 1770 MWe's were also performed. 4 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1989-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

398

Integrated coal preparation and CWF processing plant: Conceptual design and costing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, a study was conducted to provide DOE with a reliable, documented estimate of the cost of producing coal-water fuel (CWF). The approach to the project was to specify a plant capacity and location, identify and analyze a suitable coal, and develop a conceptual design for an integrated coal preparation and CWF processing plant. Using this information, a definitive costing study was then conducted, on the basis of which an economic and sensitivity analysis was performed utilizing a financial evaluation model to determine a price for CWF in 1992. The design output of the integrated plant is 200 tons of coal (dry basis) per hour. Operating at a capacity factor of 83 percent, the baseline design yields approximately 1.5 million tons per year of coal on a dry basis. This is approximately equivalent to the fuel required to continuously generate 500 MW of electric power. The CWF produced by the plant is intended as a replacement for heavy oil or gas in electric utility and large industrial boilers. The particle size distribution, particularly the top size, and the ash content of the coal in the CWF are specified at significantly lower levels than is commonly found in typical pulverized coal grinds. The particle top size is 125 microns (vs typically 300m[mu] for pulverized coal) and the coal ash content is 3.8 percent. The lower top size is intended to promote complete carbon burnout at less derating in boilers that are not designed for coal firing. The reduced mineral matter content will produce ash of very fine particle size during combustion, which leads to less impaction and reduced fouling of tubes in convective passages.

McHale, E.T.; Paul, A.D.; Bartis, J.T. (Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (United States)); Korkmaz, M. (Roberts and Schaefer Co., Salt Lake City, UT (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Integrated coal preparation and CWF processing plant: Conceptual design and costing. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, a study was conducted to provide DOE with a reliable, documented estimate of the cost of producing coal-water fuel (CWF). The approach to the project was to specify a plant capacity and location, identify and analyze a suitable coal, and develop a conceptual design for an integrated coal preparation and CWF processing plant. Using this information, a definitive costing study was then conducted, on the basis of which an economic and sensitivity analysis was performed utilizing a financial evaluation model to determine a price for CWF in 1992. The design output of the integrated plant is 200 tons of coal (dry basis) per hour. Operating at a capacity factor of 83 percent, the baseline design yields approximately 1.5 million tons per year of coal on a dry basis. This is approximately equivalent to the fuel required to continuously generate 500 MW of electric power. The CWF produced by the plant is intended as a replacement for heavy oil or gas in electric utility and large industrial boilers. The particle size distribution, particularly the top size, and the ash content of the coal in the CWF are specified at significantly lower levels than is commonly found in typical pulverized coal grinds. The particle top size is 125 microns (vs typically 300m{mu} for pulverized coal) and the coal ash content is 3.8 percent. The lower top size is intended to promote complete carbon burnout at less derating in boilers that are not designed for coal firing. The reduced mineral matter content will produce ash of very fine particle size during combustion, which leads to less impaction and reduced fouling of tubes in convective passages.

McHale, E.T.; Paul, A.D.; Bartis, J.T. [Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (United States); Korkmaz, M. [Roberts and Schaefer Co., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Engineering development of coal-fired high-performance power systems. Technical report, July - September 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A High Performance Power System (HIPPS) is being developed. This system is a coal-fired, combined cycle plant with indirect heating of gas turbine air. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation and a team consisting of Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation, AlliedSignal Aerospace Equipment Systems, Bechtel Corporation, University of Tennessee Space Institute and Westinghouse Electric Corporation are developing this system. In Phase I of the project, a conceptual design of a commercial plant was developed. Technical and economic analyses indicated that the plant would meet the goals of the project which include a 47 percent efficiency (HHV) and a 10 percent lower cost of electricity than an equivalent size PC plant. The concept uses a pyrolyzation process to convert coal into fuel gas and char. The char is fired in a High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF). It is a pulverized fuel-fired boiler/airheater where steam and gas turbine air are indirectly heated. The fuel gas generated in the pyrolyzer is then used to heat the gas turbine air further before it enters the gas turbine. The project is currently in Phase 2 which includes engineering analysis, laboratory testing and pilot plant testing. Research and development is being done on the HIPPS systems that are not commercial or being developed on other projects. Pilot plant testing of the pyrolyzer subsystem and the char combustion subsystem are being done separately, and then a pilot plant with integrated pyrolyzer and char combustion systems will be tested. In this report, progress in the pyrolyzer pilot plant preparation is reported. The results of extensive laboratory and bench scale testing of representative char are also reported. Preliminary results of combustion modeling of the char combustion system are included. There are also discussions of the auxiliary systems that are planned for the char combustion system pilot plant and the status of the integrated system pilot plant.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced pulverized coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High-Performance Power Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A High Performance Power System (HIPPS) is being developed. This system is a coal-fired, combined cycle plant with indirect heating of gas turbine air. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation and a team consisting of Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation, Bechtel Corporation, University of Tennessee Space Institute and Westinghouse Electric Corporation are developing this system. In Phase 1 of the project, a conceptual design of a commercial plant was developed. Technical and economic analyses indicated that the plant would meet the goals of the project which include a 47 percent efficiency (HHV) and a 10 percent lower cost of electricity than an equivalent size PC plant. The concept uses a pyrolysis process to convert coal into fuel gas and char. The char is fired in a High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF). The HITAF is a pulverized fuel-fired boiler/air heater where steam is generated and gas turbine air is indirectly heated. The fuel gas generated in the pyrolyzer is then used to heat the gas turbine air further before it enters the gas turbine. The project is currently in Phase 2 which includes engineering analysis, laboratory testing and pilot plant testing. Research and development is being done on the HIPPS systems that are not commercial or being developed on other projects. Pilot plant testing of the pyrolyzer subsystem and the char combustion subsystem are being done separately. This report addresses the areas of technical progress for this quarter. The detail of syngas cooler design is given in this report. The final construction work of the CFB pyrolyzer pilot plant has started during this quarter. No experimental testing was performed during this quarter. The proposed test matrix for the future CFB pyrolyzer tests is given in this report. Besides testing various fuels, bed temperature will be the primary test parameter.

York Tsuo

2000-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

402

Modeling the resolution of inexpensive, novel non-seismic geophysical monitoring tools to monitor CO2 injection into coal beds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plasynski, S. , 2008, Advancing Coal-Based Power Generationto monitor CO 2 injection into Coal Beds as a part of theanalysis for CO 2 movement in coal beds was based on the

Gasperikova, E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Coal for the future. Proceedings of the 33rd international technical conference on coal utilization and fuel systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Topics covered include oxy-fuel technology, modelling and simulations, low NOx technology, gasification technology, pre-utilization beneficiation of coal, advanced energy conversion systems, mercury emissions control, improving power plant efficiency and reducing emissions, biomass and wastes, coal to liquids, post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture, multi emission controls, advanced materials, advanced controls, and international highlights.

Sakkestad, B.A. (ed.)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Recovery of iron oxide from coal fly ash  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high quality iron oxide concentrate, suitable as a feed for blast and electric reduction furnaces is recovered from pulverized coal fly ash. The magnetic portion of the fly ash is separated and treated with a hot strong alkali solution which dissolves most of the silica and alumina in the fly ash, leaving a solid residue and forming a precipitate which is an acid soluble salt of aluminosilicate hydrate. The residue and precipitate are then treated with a strong mineral acid to dissolve the precipitate leaving a solid residue containing at least 90 weight percent iron oxide.

Dobbins, Michael S. (Ames, IA); Murtha, Marlyn J. (Ames, IA)

1983-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

405

Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results from an experimental investigation of the mechanisms governing the ash aerosol size segregated composition resulting from the combustion of pulverized coal in a laboratory scale down-flow combustor are described. The results of modeling activities used to interpret the results of the experiments conducted under his subtask are also described in this section. Although results from the entire program are included, Phase II studies which emphasized: (1) alkali behavior, including a study of the interrelationship between potassium vaporization and sodium vaporization; and (2) iron behavior, including an examination of the extent of iron-aluminosilicate interactions, are highlighted. Idealized combustion determination of ash particle formation and surface stickiness are also described.

Helble, J.J. (ed.); Srinivasachar, S.; Wilemski, G.; Boni, A.A. (PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States)); Kang, Shin-Gyoo; Sarofim, A.F.; Graham, K.A.; Beer, J.M. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Gallagher, N.B.; Bool, L. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States)); Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Shah, A. (Kentucky Univ., Lexingt

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Coal extraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal is extracted using a mixed solvent which includes a substantially aromatic component and a substantially naphthenic component, at a temperature of 400/sup 0/ to 500/sup 0/C. Although neither component is an especially good solvent for coal by itself, the use of mixed solvent gives greater flexibility to the process and offers efficiency gains.

Clarke, J.W.; Kimber, G.M.; Rantell, T.D.; Snape, C.E.

1985-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

407

Section 5 - Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal has the longest history of use among the fossil fuels, with use as a fuel dating to 3000 BC in China and Wales. Marco Polo’s “Description of the World” (1298) comments on many novel customs and practices of China, including the use of “stones that burn like logs” (coal). By the thirteenth century the mining of coal was widespread in England in regions such as Durham, Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, Staffordshire, and North and South Wales. By the early seventeenth century nearly half of England’s maritime trade consisted of coal exports. Coal was the fuel that launched the Industrial Revolution in Europe and then the United States. By the late 1890s, the U.S. assumed the lead in world coal production. Britain now ranked second, after having been the world leader since the beginnings of the formal industry in the 1500s. Germany was third, an indication of its growing industrial power relative to continental rival France. Coal’s leading role in energy use peaked in the early twentieth century, after which it was supplanted by oil and natural gas. By the late twentieth century China’s rapid economic expansion, surging demand for electricity, and prodigious coal resources combined to propel it to become the world leader in production. Continuous improvements in coal mining technology have produced lower costs, improved safety, and greater labor productivity. John Buddle introduced the first air pump to ventilate coal mines (1803), followed shortly by the miner’s safety lamps that were developed independently by Sir Humphry Davy, William Clanny, and George Stephenson (1813-1816). Coal mining underwent a rapid transition in the 1880s to mechanical coal cutting in mines in the United Kingdom, the United States, and Russia. The St. Joseph Lead Company of Missouri (1900) invented the first underground mine roof bolts that became a key safety feature in underground coal mines. The first commercially successful bucket wheel excavator was used at the Luise Mine in Braunkohlemwerke, Germany (1925), followed by the first successful continuous miners in U.S. underground coal mining (1948). The first mechanized U.S. longwall mining system appeared in 1951, and was followed by the self-advancing hydraulic longwall support system that provided greater support for the roof of the mine. LeTourneau Technologies, Inc. of Texas manufactured the largest rubber tired front-end wheel loader in the world, the L-2350, which would play an important role in loading coal in Wyoming’s large surface mines (2005). Coal mining has always been a very hazardous occupation, and has produced some of history’s worst industrial disasters. The Courrières mine disaster, Europe's worst mining accident, caused the death of 1,099 miners in Northern France (1906). An explosion in a coal mine in Liaoning province in northeastern China killed more than 1,500 Chinese miners (1942), as did other major accidents in Ky?sh?, Japan (1914), Wankie, Rhodesia (1972), Wales (1913), Bihar, India (1965), and West Virginia, U.S. (1907), to name just a few. Legislation such as the Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act in the U.S. (1969) improved working conditions in many nations. The Great Smog of London (1952) occurred after an exceptionally cold winter forced homes and factories to burn large quantities of coal. A temperature inversion formed, trapping pollutants above the ground. More than 4,000 people died from respiratory ailments within the following week. The use of coal has been impacted by legislation to control the environmental impacts associated with its mining and combustion. The first known environmental regulation of coal dates to 1306 when King Edward II of England prohibited burning sea coal while Parliament was in session because of its offensive smoke. Sulfur dioxide from coal combustion was tied to acid rain in the 1960s, and carbon dioxide emissions became a concern beginning in the 1980s when climate change emerged as a critical environmental issue.

Cutler J. Cleveland; Christopher Morris

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Clean Coal Research | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Clean Coal Research Clean Coal Research Clean Coal Research Clean Coal Projects This interactive map shows the extent of FE's clean coal projects across the United States and Canada. Read more AVESTAR Training FE and local colleges signed an agreement recently to train power plant field operators. Read more FutureGen 2.0 DOE recently announced the beginning of Phase II development for this innovative carbon capture and storage project in Illinois. Read more DOE's clean coal R&D is focused on developing and demonstrating advanced power generation and carbon capture, utilization and storage technologies for existing facilities and new fossil-fueled power plants by increasing overall system efficiencies and reducing capital costs. In the near-term, advanced technologies that increase the power generation

409

Application of a Heat Integrated Post-combustion CO2 Capture System with Hitachi Advanced Solvent into Existing Coal-Fired Power Plant Award Number: DE-FE0007395 DOE Project Manager: José D. Figueroa  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a Heat Integrated Post- a Heat Integrated Post- combustion CO 2 Capture System with Hitachi Advanced Solvent into Existing Coal-Fired Power Plant University of Kentucky Research Foundation Partnered with U.S. Department of Energy NETL Louisville Gas & Electric and Kentucky Utilities Electric Power Research Institute (with WorleyParsons) Hitachi Power Systems America Smith Management Group July 9, 2013 Goals and Objectives * Objectives 1) To demonstrate a heat-integrated post-combustion CO 2 capture system with an advanced solvent; 2) To collect information/data on material corrosion and identify appropriate materials of construction for a 550 MWe commercial-scale carbon capture plant.  To gather data on solvent degradation kinetics, water management, system dynamic control as well as other information during the long-term

410

Characterization of Oxy-combustion Impacts in Existing Coal-fired Boilers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Characterization of Oxy-combustion Characterization of Oxy-combustion Impacts in Existing Coal-fired Boilers Background Technology and policy options are being investigated for mitigating CO 2 emissions. Electric power generation represents one of the largest CO 2 contributors in the United States and is expected to grow with fossil fuels continuing to be the dominant fuel source. Oxy-combustion is a developing technology that could become part of a national carbon capture effort to mitigate climate change. At a pulverized coal

411

Textures and conditions of formation of Middle Pennsylvanian coal balls, central United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

containing petrified plant fossils and sometimes marine bioclastic mud occur within some coal seams of Middle Pennsylvanian age from the central U.S.A., New Brunswick, Canada, various parts of Europe, and the Donets Basin, U.S.S.R. (see Andrews, 1951; Baxter... in the Iron Post Coal near Vinita, Okla- homa. Type 4 (Fig. 4,D). Nodules of Type 4 con- sist of crushed and highly fragmented plant organs in a matrix of pulverized and thoroughly macerated plant debris. Most of the fragmented plant remains are identifiable...

Perkins, T. W.

1976-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

412

Abrasive wear by coal-fueled diesel engine and related particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of commercially viable diesel engines that operate directly on pulverized coal-fuels will require solution to the problem of severe abrasive wear. The purpose of the work described in this report was to investigate the nature of the abrasive wear problem. Analytical studies were carried out to determine the characteristics of the coal-fuel and associated combustion particles responsible for abrasion. Laboratory pinon-disk wear tests were conducted on oil-particle mixtures to determine the relationship between wear rate and a number of different particle characteristics, contact parameters, specimen materials properties, and other relevant variables.

Ives, L.K. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration - Project Brief [PDF-192KB] Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration - Project Brief [PDF-192KB] Rosebud SynCoal Partnership, Colstrip, MT PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration Final Technical Report [PDF-362KB] (Sept 2004) Annual/Quarterly Technical Reports Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration Annual Technical Progress Reports January - December 1991 [PDF-920KB] January - December 1992 [PDF-2.9MB] January - December 1993 [PDF-3.3MB] January - December 1995 [PDF-2.9MB] January - December 1996 [PDF-250KB] January - December 1997 [PDF-264KB] January - December 1998 [PDF-188KB] January - December 1999 [PDF-212KB] January - December 2000 [PDF-231KB] Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration Quarterly Technical Progress Reports

414

advanced-fuels-synthesis-index | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

International Activity Project Information Project Portfolio Publications Coal Gasification Magazine Solicitations The Advanced Fuels Synthesis Key Technology is focused on...

415

Circulating fluidized bed tehnology in biomass combustion-performance, advances and experiences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of fluidized bed combustion (FBC) was started both in North America and in Europe in the 1960`s. In Europe and especially in Scandinavia the major driving force behind the development was the need to find new more efficient technologies for utilization of low-grade fuels like different biomasses and wastes. Both bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) and circulating fluidized bed (CFB) technologies were under intensive R&D,D efforts and have now advanced to dominating role in industrial and district heating power plant markets in Europe. New advanced CFB designs are now entering the markets. In North America and especially in the US the driving force behind the FBC development was initially the need to utilize different types of coals in a more efficient and environmentally acceptable way. The present and future markets seem to be mainly in biomass and multifuel applications where there is benefit from high combustion efficiency, high fuel flexibility and low emissions such as in the pulp and paper industry. The choice between CFB technology and BFB technology is based on selected fuels, emission requirements, plant size and on technical and economic feasibility. Based on Scandinavian experience there is vast potential in the North American industry to retrofit existing oil fired, pulverized coal fired, chemical recovery or grate fired boilers with FBC systems or to build a new FBC based boiler plant. This paper will present the status of CFB technologies and will compare technical and economic feasibility of CFB technology to CFB technology to BFB and also to other combustion methods. Power plant projects that are using advanced CFB technology e.g. Ahlstrom Pyroflow Compact technology for biomass firing and co-firing of biomass with other fuels will also be introduced.

Mutanen, K.I. [A. Ahlstrom Corporation, Varkaus (Finland)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from combustion and gasification of coal – an equilibriumHolysh, M. 2005. Coke Gasification: Advanced technology forfrom a Coal-Fired Gasification Plant. Final Report, December

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF COAL-FIRED HIGH-PERFORMANCE POWER SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A High Performance Power System (HIPPS) is being developed. This system is a coal-fired, combined cycle plant with indirect heating of gas turbine air. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation and a team consisting of Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation, Bechtel Corporation, University of Tennessee Space Institute and Westinghouse Electric Corporation are developing this system. In Phase 1 of the project, a conceptual design of a commercial plant was developed. Technical and economic analyses indicated that the plant would meet the goals of the project which include a 47 percent efficiency (HHV) and a 10 percent lower cost of electricity than an equivalent size PC plant. The concept uses a pyrolyzation process to convert coal into fuel gas and char. The char is fired in a High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF). The HITAF is a pulverized fuel-fired boiler/air heater where steam is generated and gas turbine air is indirectly heated. The fuel gas generated in the pyrolyzer is then used to heat the gas turbine air further before it enters the gas turbine. The project is currently in Phase 2, which includes engineering analysis, laboratory testing and pilot plant testing. Research and development is being done on the HIPPS systems that are not commercial or being developed on other projects. Pilot plant testing of the pyrolyzer subsystem and the char combustion subsystem are being done separately, and after each experimental program has been completed, a larger scale pyrolyzer will be tested at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, Al. The facility is equipped with a gas turbine and a topping combustor, and as such, will provide an opportunity to evaluate integrated pyrolyzer and turbine operation. The design of the char burner was completed during this quarter. The burner is designed for arch-firing and has a maximum capacity of 30 MMBtu/hr. This size represents a half scale version of a typical commercial burner. The burner is outfitted with nozzles for separate injection of char, coal, and limestone. Burner performance will be rated according to three criteria, carbon conversion efficiency, NOx generation, and flame stability. If initial testing in the arch configuration proves successful, further tests will be performed in the wall-fired arrangement. A complete set of process and instrumentation drawings (P/ID's) were completed for the Combustion and Environmental Test Facility (CETF) this quarter. These drawings established an ISA approved instrument tagging structure, and provided a coherent database for the development of a data acquisition system. The data acquisition system polls tag information (value, range, engineering units, etc.) from the distributed control system (DCS) highway, and provides a platform for data reduction. The quadrupole mass spectrometer, used during the pyrolyzer tests performed at the pilot plant in Livingston, N.J., has been redesigned for use at the CETF. The mass spectrometer is designed to provide on-line gas analysis by identifying all of the chemical components within the secondary air line, the flue gas recycle line, and the furnace exit ducting. The construction effort at the CETF continued this quarter with the completion of the char storage system, reheat burner, flue gas recycle piping, and the pulverized coal feed system.

NONE

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Technical progress report for the magnetohydrodynamics Coal-Fired Flow Facility for the period April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this quarterly technical progress report, UTSI reports on progress on a multitask contract to develop the necessary technology for the steam bottoming plant of the MHD Steam Combined Cycle power plant. A Proof-Of-Concept (POC) test was conducted during the quarter and the results are reported. This POC test was terminated after 88 hours of operation due to the failure of the coal pulverizer main shaft. Preparations for the test and post-test activities are summarized. Modifications made to the dry electrostatic precipitator (ESP) are described and measurements of its performance are reported. The baghouse performance is summarized, together with actions being taken to improve bag cleaning using reverse air. Data on the wet ESP performance is included at two operating conditions, including verification that it met State of Tennessee permit conditions for opacity with all the flow through it. The results of experiments to determine the effect of potassium seed on NO{sub x} emissions and secondary combustion are reported. The status of efforts to quantify the detailed mass balance for all POC testing is summarized. The work to develop a predictive ash deposition model is discussed and results compared with deposition actually encountered during the test. Plans to