National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for advanced nuclear power

  1. Energy Department Announces New Investments in Advanced Nuclear Power

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Reactors | Department of Energy Investments in Advanced Nuclear Power Reactors Energy Department Announces New Investments in Advanced Nuclear Power Reactors October 31, 2014 - 12:20pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT 202-586-4940 WASHINGTON - Today, as part of the President's all-of-the-above energy approach and Climate Action Plan, the Energy Department announced awards for five companies to lead key nuclear energy research and development projects supporting advanced reactor technologies. These

  2. Energy Department Announces New Investments in Advanced Nuclear Power

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Reactors | Department of Energy Reactors Energy Department Announces New Investments in Advanced Nuclear Power Reactors June 27, 2013 - 2:20pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above strategy to accelerate clean energy leadership and to enable a low-carbon economy, the Energy Department today announced $3.5 million for four advanced nuclear reactor projects that go beyond traditional light water designs. These projects --

  3. Cost estimate guidelines for advanced nuclear power technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delene, J.G.; Hudson, C.R. II.

    1990-03-01

    To make comparative assessments of competing technologies, consistent ground rules must be applied when developing cost estimates. This document provides a uniform set of assumptions, ground rules, and requirements that can be used in developing cost estimates for advanced nuclear power technologies. 10 refs., 8 figs., 32 tabs.

  4. Development and Analysis of Advanced High-Temperature Technology for Nuclear Heat Transport and Power Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Per F. Peterson

    2010-03-01

    This project by the Thermal Hydraulics Research Laboratory at U.C. Berkeley Studied advanced high-temperature heat transport and power conversion technology, in support of the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative and Generation IV.

  5. Advanced Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Energy - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  6. Application of PSA to review and define technical specifications for advanced nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, I.S.; Samanta, P.K.; Reinhart, F.M.; Wohl, M.L.

    1995-11-01

    As part of the design certification process, probabilistic safety assessments (PSAS) are performed at the design stage for each advanced nuclear power plant. Among other usages, these PSAs are important inputs in defining the Technical Specifications (TSs) for these plants. Knowledge gained from their use in improving the TSs for operating nuclear power plants is providing methods and insights for using PSAs at this early stage. Evaluating the safety or the risk significance of the TSs to be defined for an advanced plant encompasses diverse aspects: (a) determining the basic limiting condition for operation (LCO); (b) structuring conditions associated with the LCO; (c) defining completion times (equivalent to allowed outage times in the TS for conventional plants); and, (d) prescribing required actions to be taken within the specified completion times. In this paper, we consider the use of PSA in defining the TSs for an advanced nuclear plant, namely General Electric`s Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR). Similar approaches are being taken for ABB-CE`s System 80+ and Westinghouse`s AP-600. We discuss the general features of an advanced reactor`s TS, how PSA is being used in reviewing the TSs, and we give an example where the TS submittal was reviewed using a PSA-based analysis to arrive at the requirements for the plant.

  7. Nuclear Power & Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power & Engineering - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  8. Advanced nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrani, Kurt

    2014-07-14

    Kurt Terrani uses his expertise in materials science to develop safer fuel for nuclear power plants.

  9. Advanced nuclear fuel

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Terrani, Kurt

    2014-07-15

    Kurt Terrani uses his expertise in materials science to develop safer fuel for nuclear power plants.

  10. Advanced Nuclear Reactors | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Nuclear Reactors Advanced Nuclear Reactors Turbulent Flow of Coolant in an Advanced Nuclear Reactor Visualizing Coolant Flow in Sodium Reactor Subassemblies Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) Coolant Flow At the heart of a nuclear power plant is the reactor. The fuel assembly is placed inside a reactor vessel where all the nuclear reactions occur to produce the heat and steam used for power generation. Nonetheless, an entire power plant consists of many other support components and key

  11. Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roald Wigeland; Temitope Taiwo; Michael Todosow; William Halsey; Jess Gehin

    2010-06-01

    A systematic evaluation has been conducted of the potential for advanced nuclear fuel cycle strategies and options to address the issues ascribed to the use of nuclear power. Issues included nuclear waste management, proliferation risk, safety, security, economics and affordability, and sustainability. The two basic strategies, once-through and recycle, and the range of possibilities within each strategy, are considered for all aspects of the fuel cycle including options for nuclear material irradiation, separations if needed, and disposal. Options range from incremental changes to todays implementation to revolutionary concepts that would require the development of advanced nuclear technologies.

  12. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    dioxide power cycles, hybrid systems matching renewables with nuclear or fossil, and energy storage. Advanced capabilities in materials, computing, and manufacturing can...

  13. Nuclear power high technology colloquium: proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-12-10

    Reports presenting information on technology advancements in the nuclear industry and nuclear power plant functions have been abstracted and are available on the energy data base.

  14. Interagency Advanced Power Group, Joint Electrical and Nuclear Working Group, meeting minutes, November 16--17, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    Reports on soldier power R&D review, N-MCT power electronic building blocks, silicon carbide power semiconductor work, and ground based radar were made to the Power Conditioning Panel. An introduction to high temperature electronics needs, research and development was made to the High Temperature Electronics Subcommittee. The Pulse Power Panel received reports on the navy ETC gun, and army pulse power. The Superconductivity Panel received reports on high-tc superconducting wires, superconducting magnetic energy storage, and superconducting applications. The Nuclear Working Group received presentations on the Topaz nuclear power program, and space nuclear work in the Department of Energy.

  15. Safer nuclear power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safer nuclear power 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:October 2015 past issues All Issues » submit Safer nuclear power Experiments at Los Alamos reveal that alternative fuel rod cladding materials can make nuclear power plants dramatically less likely to suffer a Fukushima-type explosion in the event of a nuclear accident March 25, 2013 Safer nuclear power Nuclear generating station Los Alamos scientists, in collaboration with scientists from the Idaho and Oak Ridge

  16. Advanced Nuclear Technology: Advanced Light Water Reactors Utility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Technology: Advanced Light Water Reactors Utility Requirements Document Small Modular Reactors Inclusion Summary Advanced Nuclear Technology: Advanced Light Water Reactors ...

  17. Energy Department Announces New Investments in Advanced Nuclear Power Reactors to Help Meet America’s Carbon Emission Reduction Goal

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In support of the Administration’s goal to produce more carbon-free energy, today the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced the selection of two companies, X-energy and Southern Company, to further develop advanced nuclear reactor designs. These awards, with a multi-year cost share of up to $80 million for both companies, will support work to address key technical challenges to the design, construction, and operation of next generation nuclear reactors.

  18. Advancing Global Nuclear Security

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Today world leaders gathered at The Hague for the Nuclear Security Summit, a meeting to measure progress and take action to secure sensitive nuclear materials.

  19. Virtual Advanced Power Training Environments | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Virtual Advanced Power Training Environments

  20. Advanced nuclear plant control complex

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth; Jamison, David S.; Manazir, Richard M.; Rescorl, Robert L.; Harmon, Daryl L.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  1. Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Projects Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects ADVANCED NUCLEAR ENERGY 1 PROJECT in 1 LOCATION 2,200 MW GENERATION CAPACITY 17,200,000 MWh PROJECTED ANNUAL GENERATION * 10,000,000 METRIC TONS OF CO2 EMISSIONS PREVENTED ANNUALLY ALL FIGURES AS OF MARCH 2015 * Calculated using the project's and NREL Technology specific capacity factors. For cases in which NREL's capacity

  2. Nuclear Power in Space

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    1994-01-01

    In the early years of the United States space program, lightweight batteries, fuel cells, and solar modules provided electric power for space missions. As missions became more ambitious and complex, power needs increased and scientists investigated various options to meet these challenging power requirements. One of the options was nuclear energy. By the mid-1950s, research had begun in earnest on ways to use nuclear power in space. These efforts resulted in the first radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs), which are nuclear power generators build specifically for space and special terrestrial uses. These RTGs convert the heat generated from the natural decay of their radioactive fuel into electricity. RTGs have powered many spacecraft used for exploring the outer planets of the solar system and orbiting the sun and Earth. They have also landed on Mars and the moon. They provide the power that enables us to see and learn about even the farthermost objects in our solar system.

  3. Commercial nuclear power 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  4. Evaluation of the applicability of existing nuclear power plant regulatory requirements in the U.S. to advanced small modular reactors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wheeler, Timothy A.; Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Middleton, Bobby D.; Jordan, Sabina Erteza; Duran, Felicia Angelica; Baum, Gregory A.

    2013-05-01

    The current wave of small modular reactor (SMR) designs all have the goal of reducing the cost of management and operations. By optimizing the system, the goal is to make these power plants safer, cheaper to operate and maintain, and more secure. In particular, the reduction in plant staffing can result in significant cost savings. The introduction of advanced reactor designs and increased use of advanced automation technologies in existing nuclear power plants will likely change the roles, responsibilities, composition, and size of the crews required to control plant operations. Similarly, certain security staffing requirements for traditional operational nuclear power plants may not be appropriate or necessary for SMRs due to the simpler, safer and more automated design characteristics of SMRs. As a first step in a process to identify where regulatory requirements may be met with reduced staffing and therefore lower cost, this report identifies the regulatory requirements and associated guidance utilized in the licensing of existing reactors. The potential applicability of these regulations to advanced SMR designs is identified taking into account the unique features of these types of reactors.

  5. Georgia Power- Advanced Solar Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: According to Georgia Power's website, the Advanced Solar Initiative's final program guidelines are due to be published on June 25th and the bidding period for is expected to open on July 10,...

  6. Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Solicitation Public Meeting Presentation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nuclear Energy Solicitation Public Meeting Presentation Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Solicitation Public Meeting Presentation PDF icon Draft Advanced Nuclear Solicitation...

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Advanced Power Electronics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress ...

  8. Global warming and nuclear power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, L., LLNL

    1998-07-10

    Nuclear fission power reactors represent a potential solution to many aspects of global change possibly induced by inputting of either particulate or carbon or sulfur oxides into the Earth`s atmosphere. Of proven technological feasibility, they presently produce high-grade heat for large-scale electricity generation, space heating and industrial process-energizing around the world, without emitting greenhouse gases or atmospheric particulates; importantly, electricity production costs from the best nuclear plants presently are closely comparable with those of the best fossil-fired plants. However, a substantial number of issues currently stand between nuclear power and widespread substitution for large stationary fossil fuel-fired systems. These include perceptual ones regarding both long-term and acute operational safety, plant decommissioning, fuel reprocessing, radwaste disposal, fissile materials diversion to military purposes and - perhaps most seriously- readily quantifiable concerns regarding long-term fuel supply and total unit electrical energy cost. We sketch a road-map for proceeding from the present situation toward a nuclear power-intensive world, addressing along the way each of the concerns which presently impede widespread nuclear substitution for fossil fuels, particularly for coal in the most populous and rapidly developing portions of the world, e.g., China and India. This `design to societal specifications` approach to large-scale nuclear fission power systems may lead to energy sources meeting essentially all stationary demands for high-temperature heat. Such advanced options offer a human population of ten billion the electricity supply levels currently enjoyed by Americans for 10,000 years. Nuclear power systems tailored to local needs-and-interests and having a common advanced technology base could reduce present-day world-wide C0{sub 2} emissions by two-fold, if universally employed. By application to small mobile demands, a second two-fold reduction might be attained. Even the first such halving of carbon intensivity of stationary-source energy production world-wide might permit continued slow power-demand growth in the highly developed countries and rapid development of the other 80% of the world, both without active governmental suppression of fossil fuel usage - while also stabilizing carbon input-rates into the Earth`s atmosphere. The second two-fold reduction might obviate most global warming concerns.

  9. Labor and nuclear power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logan, R.; Nelkin, D.

    1980-03-01

    The AFL-CIO is officially pro-nuclear, but tensions within unions are taking issue over ideological differences. The Labor movement, having looked to nuclear power development as an economic necessity to avoid unemployment, has opposed efforts to delay construction or close plants. As many as 42% of union members or relatives of members, however, were found to oppose new power plants, some actively working against specific construction projects. The United Mine Workers and Teamsters actively challenged the nuclear industry while the auto workers have been ambivalent. The differences between union orientation reflects the history of unionism in the US and explains the emergence of social unionism with its emphasis on safety and working conditions as well as economic benefits. Business union orientation trends to prevail during periods of prosperity; social unions during recessions. The labor unions and the environmentalists are examined in this conext and found to be hopeful. 35 references. (DCK)

  10. Solar and wind power advancing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Solar and wind power advancing U.S. electricity generation from wind and solar energy show no signs of slowing down. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration expects wind-powered generation to grow by 19 percent this year and rise another 8 percent in 2014. Congress's extension in January of a tax credit for electricity producers that use renewables is behind the wind power boost. Solar generation in the electric power sector is expected to grow even more, rising

  11. Advanced Nuclear Supplement_November 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Nuclear Supplement_November 2015 SECOND SUPPLEMENT TO LOAN GUARANTEE SOLICITATION ANNOUNCEMENT FEDERAL LOAN GUARANTEES FOR ADVANCED NUCLEAR ENERGY PROJECTS Solicitation Number: DE-SOL- DE-SOL-0007791

  12. University Program in Advanced Technology | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration Program in Advanced Technology | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for

  13. MIT - Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems Jump to: navigation, search Logo: MIT - Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems Name: MIT - Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy...

  14. Energy Department Announces New Investments in Advanced Nuclear...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reactors Energy Department Announces New Investments in Advanced Nuclear Power Reactors June 27, 2013 - 2:20pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of the ...

  15. Overview paper on nuclear power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spiewak, I.; Cope, D.F.

    1980-09-01

    This paper was prepared as an input to ORNL's Strategic Planning Activity, ORNL National Energy Perspective (ONEP). It is intended to provide historical background on nuclear power, an analysis of the mission of nuclear power, a discussion of the issues, the technology choices, and the suggestion of a strategy for encouraging further growth of nuclear power.

  16. Advanced nuclear reactor public opinion project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, B.

    1991-07-25

    This Interim Report summarizes the findings of our first twenty in-depth interviews in the Advanced Nuclear Reactor Public Opinion Project. We interviewed 6 industry trade association officials, 3 industry attorneys, 6 environmentalists/nuclear critics, 3 state officials, and 3 independent analysts. In addition, we have had numerous shorter discussions with various individuals concerned about nuclear power. The report is organized into the four categories proposed at our April, 1991, Advisory Group meeting: safety, cost-benefit analysis, science education, and communications. Within each category, some change of focus from that of the Advisory Group has been required, to reflect the findings of our interviews. This report limits itself to describing our findings. An accompanying memo draws some tentative conclusions.

  17. Nuclear Security for Floating Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skiba, James M.; Scherer, Carolynn P.

    2015-10-13

    Recently there has been a lot of interest in small modular reactors. A specific type of these small modular reactors (SMR,) are marine based power plants called floating nuclear power plants (FNPP). These FNPPs are typically built by countries with extensive knowledge of nuclear energy, such as Russia, France, China and the US. These FNPPs are built in one country and then sent to countries in need of power and/or seawater desalination. Fifteen countries have expressed interest in acquiring such power stations. Some designs for such power stations are briefly summarized. Several different avenues for cooperation in FNPP technology are proposed, including IAEA nuclear security (i.e. safeguards), multilateral or bilateral agreements, and working with Russian design that incorporates nuclear safeguards for IAEA inspections in non-nuclear weapons states

  18. Experiments ? Simulations = Better Nuclear Power Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiments + Simulations Better Nuclear Power Research Experiments Simulations Better Nuclear Power Research Atomic Level Simulations Enhance Characterization of Radiation...

  19. Advanced Solar Power ASP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power (ASP) Place: Israel Sector: Solar Product: Involved in the development and manufacturing of innovative solar energy solutions. References: Advanced Solar Power (ASP)1...

  20. Advance Power Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Advance Power Co Place: Calpella, California Zip: 95418 Sector: Hydro, Solar, Wind energy Product: Distributor of stand alone and backup power systems based on solar,...

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Power Electronics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Electronics and Electric Machinery R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machinery R&D Annual Progress Report ...

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2011 Advanced Power Electronics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2011 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress Report The ...

  3. Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Machines Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and ... More Documents & Publications Advnaced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) R&D ...

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Advanced Power Electronics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress Report The ...

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Advanced Power Electronics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Electronics R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Advanced Power Electronics R&D Annual Progress Report Annual report focusing on understanding and ...

  6. NUCLEAR POWER REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; 05 NUCLEAR FUELS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title list of documents made publicly available, January 1-31, 1998 NONE 21 NUCLEAR POWER REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; 05 NUCLEAR FUELS; BIBLIOGRAPHIES; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS;...

  7. Kalex Advanced Low Temp Geothemal Power Cycle

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kalex Advanced Low Temp Geothemal Power Cycle presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  8. Topics in nuclear power (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    NUCLEAR POWER STATION; GAIN; JAPAN; NATURAL DISASTERS; NUCLEAR INDUSTRY; NUCLEAR POWER; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; PROBABILISTIC ESTIMATION; REACTOR ACCIDENTS; REACTOR MAINTENANCE;...

  9. Funding Opportunity Announcement: Concentrating Solar Power: Advanced

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Projects Offering Low LCOE Opportunities | Department of Energy Funding Opportunity Announcement: Concentrating Solar Power: Advanced Projects Offering Low LCOE Opportunities Funding Opportunity Announcement: Concentrating Solar Power: Advanced Projects Offering Low LCOE Opportunities Funding Number: DE-FOA-0001186 Funding Amount: $25,000,000 Description The Concentrating Solar Power: Advanced Projects Offering Low LCOE Opportunities (CSP: APOLLO) funding opportunity announcement (FOA) seeks

  10. Report of the ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SUBCOMMITTEE...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SUBCOMMITTEE of the NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE Report of the ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION TECHNOLOGY...

  11. Workshop on nuclear power growth and nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilat, Joseph F

    2010-01-01

    It is widely viewed that an expansion of nuclear power would have positive energy, economic and environmental benefits for the world. However, there are concerns about the economic competitiveness, safety and proliferation and terrorism risks of nuclear power. The prospects for a dramatic growth in nuclear power will depend on the ability of governments and industry to address these concerns, including the effectiveness of, and the resources devoted to, plans to develop and implement technologies and approaches that strengthen nonproliferation, nuclear materials accountability and nuclear security. In his Prague speech, President Obama stated: 'we should build a new framework for civil nuclear cooperation, including an international fuel bank, so that countries can access peaceful power without increasing the risks of proliferation. That must be the right of every nation that renounces nuclear weapons, especially developing countries embarking on peaceful programs. And no approach will succeed if it's based on the denial of rights to nations that play by the rules. We must harness the power of nuclear energy on behalf of our efforts to combat climate change, and to advance peace opportunity for all people.' How can the President's vision, which will rekindle a vigorous public debate over the future of nuclear power and its relation to proliferation, be realized? What critical issues will frame the reemerging debate? What policies must be put into place to address these issues? Will US policy be marked more by continuity or change? To address these and other questions, the Los Alamos National Laboratory in cooperation with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars will host a workshop on the future of nuclear power and nonproliferation.

  12. Competitive economics of nuclear power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hellman, R.

    1981-03-02

    Some 12 components of a valid study of the competitive economics of a newly ordered nuclear power plant are identified and explicated. These are then used to adjust the original cost projections of four authoritative studies of nuclear and coal power economics.

  13. United States and Italy Sign Agreements to Advance Developments in Nuclear

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy | Department of Energy Italy Sign Agreements to Advance Developments in Nuclear Energy United States and Italy Sign Agreements to Advance Developments in Nuclear Energy September 30, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu and Italian Minister for Economic Development Claudio Scajola today signed two important nuclear energy agreements that may lead to construction of new nuclear power plants and improved cooperation on advanced nuclear energy

  14. Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear Waste Technology R&D Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear Waste Technology R&D "Even ...

  15. Advancing Concentrating Solar Power Research (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-02-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provide scientific, engineering, and analytical expertise to help advance innovation in concentrating solar power (CSP). This fact sheet summarizes how NREL is advancing CSP research.

  16. Siemens Nuclear Power GmbH AREVA Nuclear Power | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nuclear Power GmbH AREVA Nuclear Power Jump to: navigation, search Name: Siemens Nuclear Power GmbH (AREVA Nuclear Power) Place: Erlangen, Germany Zip: 91058 Sector: Services...

  17. Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1, Unit 2","1,705","13,994",100.0,"Calvert Cliffs Nuclear PP Inc" "1 Plant 2 Reactors","1,705","13,994",100.0 "Note: Totals

  18. Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station Unit 1",685,"5,918",100.0,"Entergy Nuclear Generation Co" "1 Plant 1 Reactor",685,"5,918",100.0 "Note: Totals may not equal sum of components due to

  19. Advanced Accessory Power Supply Topologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marlino, L.D.

    2010-06-15

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) began December 8, 2000 and ended September 30, 2009. The total funding provided by the Participant (General Motors Advanced Technology Vehicles [GM]) during the course of the CRADA totaled $1.2M enabling the Contractor (UT-Battelle, LLC [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a.k.a. ORNL]) to contribute significantly to the joint project. The initial task was to work with GM on the feasibility of developing their conceptual approach of modifying major components of the existing traction inverter/drive to develop low cost, robust, accessory power. Two alternate methods for implementation were suggested by ORNL and both were proven successful through simulations and then extensive testing of prototypes designed and fabricated during the project. This validated the GM overall concept. Moreover, three joint U.S. patents were issued and subsequently licensed by GM. After successfully fulfilling the initial objective, the direction and duration of the CRADA was modified and GM provided funding for two additional tasks. The first new task was to provide the basic development for implementing a cascaded inverter technology into hybrid vehicles (including plug-in hybrid, fuel cell, and electric). The second new task was to continue the basic development for implementing inverter and converter topologies and new technology assessments for hybrid vehicle applications. Additionally, this task was to address the use of high temperature components in drive systems. Under this CRADA, ORNL conducted further research based on GM’s idea of using the motor magnetic core and windings to produce bidirectional accessory power supply that is nongalvanically coupled to the terminals of the high voltage dc-link battery of hybrid vehicles. In order not to interfere with the motor’s torque, ORNL suggested to use the zero-sequence, highfrequency harmonics carried by the main fundamental motor current for producing the accessory power. Two studies were conducted at ORNL. One was to put an additional winding in the motor slots to magnetically link with the high frequency of the controllable zero-sequence stator currents that do not produce any zero-sequence harmonic torques. The second approach was to utilize the corners of the square stator punching for the high-frequency transformers of the dc/dc inverter. Both approaches were successful. This CRADA validated the feasibility of GM’s desire to use the motor’s magnetic core and windings to produce bidirectional accessory power supply. Three joint U.S. patents with GM were issued to ORNL and GM by the U.S. Patent Office for the research results produced by this CRADA.

  20. Advanced nuclear plant control room complex

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth; Jamison, David S.; Manazir, Richard M.; Rescorl, Robert L.; Harmon, Daryl L.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  1. Pyroelectric Energy Scavenging Techniques for Self-Powered Nuclear Reactor

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Wireless Sensor Networks (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Pyroelectric Energy Scavenging Techniques for Self-Powered Nuclear Reactor Wireless Sensor Networks Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Pyroelectric Energy Scavenging Techniques for Self-Powered Nuclear Reactor Wireless Sensor Networks Recent advances in technologies for harvesting waste thermal energy from ambient environments present an opportunity to implement truly wireless sensor nodes in nuclear power plants. These

  2. Higher energy fast range nuclear data evaluation advances (u...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Higher energy fast range nuclear data evaluation advances (u) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Higher energy fast range nuclear data evaluation advances (u)...

  3. Advanced Elastic/Inelastic Nuclear Data Development Project ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Advanced ElasticInelastic Nuclear Data Development Project Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Advanced ElasticInelastic Nuclear Data Development Project The optical model ...

  4. Nuclear Advances | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advances Nuclear Advances Posted: February 11, 2013 - 2:52pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 9, Issue 2 | 2013 The scope of research and development at the Y-12 National Security Complex has widened from a single-focus World War II defense mission to a panoply of explorations and achievements. Seventy years of projects with members of the Nuclear Security Enterprise, other government agencies, universities and private industry have supercharged Y-12 into an invaluable scientific and technological

  5. Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Edwin I Hatch Unit 1, Unit 2","1,759","13,902",41.5,"Georgia Power Co" "Vogtle Unit 1, Unit 2","2,302","19,610",58.5,"Georgia Power Co" "2 Plants 4

  6. Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Monticello Unit 1",554,"4,695",34.8,"Northern States Power Co - Minnesota" "Prairie Island Unit 1, Unit 2","1,040","8,783",65.2,"Northern States Power Co -

  7. Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Cooper Unit 1",767,"6,793",61.4,"Nebraska Public Power District" "Fort Calhoun Unit 1",478,"4,261",38.6,"Omaha Public Power District" "2 Plants 2

  8. Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "North Anna Unit 1, Unit 2","1,863","13,399",50.4,"Virginia Electric & Power Co" "Surry Unit 1, Unit 2","1,638","13,172",49.6,"Virginia Electric & Power

  9. Topics in nuclear power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budnitz, Robert J.

    2015-03-30

    The 101 nuclear plants operating in the US today are far safer than they were 20-30 years ago. For example, there's been about a 100-fold reduction in the occurrence of 'significant events' since the late 1970s. Although the youngest of currently operating US plants was designed in the 1970s, all have been significantly modified over the years. Key contributors to the safety gains are a vigilant culture, much improved equipment reliability, greatly improved training of operators and maintenance workers, worldwide sharing of experience, and the effective use of probabilistic risk assessment. Several manufacturers have submitted high quality new designs for large reactors to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for design approval, and several companies are vigorously working on designs for smaller, modular reactors. Although the Fukushima reactor accident in March 2011 in Japan has been an almost unmitigated disaster for the local population due to their being displaced from their homes and workplaces and also due to the land contamination, its 'lessons learned' have been important for the broader nuclear industry, and will surely result in safer nuclear plants worldwide - indeed, have already done so, with more safety improvements to come.

  10. Dynamic Simulation Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-03-03

    DSNP (Dynamic Simulator for Nuclear Power-Plants) is a system of programs and data files by which a nuclear power plant, or part thereof, can be simulated. The acronym DSNP is used interchangeably for the DSNP language, the DSNP libraries, the DSNP precompiler, and the DSNP document generator. The DSNP language is a special-purpose, block-oriented, digital-simulation language developed to facilitate the preparation of dynamic simulations of a large variety of nuclear power plants. It is amore » user-oriented language that permits the user to prepare simulation programs directly from power plant block diagrams and flow charts by recognizing the symbolic DSNP statements for the appropriate physical components and listing these statements in a logical sequence according to the flow of physical properties in the simulated power plant. Physical components of nuclear power plants are represented by functional blocks, or modules. Many of the more complex components are represented by several modules. The nuclear reactor, for example, has a kinetic module, a power distribution module, a feedback module, a thermodynamic module, a hydraulic module, and a radioactive heat decay module. These modules are stored in DSNP libraries in the form of a DSNP subroutine or function, a block of statements, a macro, or a combination of the above. Basic functional blocks such as integrators, pipes, function generators, connectors, and many auxiliary functions representing properties of materials used in nuclear power plants are also available. The DSNP precompiler analyzes the DSNP simulation program, performs the appropriate translations, inserts the requested modules from the library, links these modules together, searches necessary data files, and produces a simulation program in FORTRAN.« less

  11. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Advanced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Develop Advanced Burner Reactors Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Advanced Burner Reactors GNEP will develop and demonstrate Advanced Burner Reactors (ABRs) ...

  12. Advanced Nuclear Technology: Advanced Light Water Reactors Utility Requirements Document Small Modular Reactors Inclusion Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Nuclear Technology: Advanced Light Water Reactors Utility Requirements Document Small Modular Reactors Inclusion Summary November 2014

  13. Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LWRS Overview and Select Research Highlights J. Busby and K. Leonard Oak Ridge National Laboratory with a host of contributors Overview Presentation for the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies September 15, 2015 Video Conference FY16 - Consolidated Innovative Nuclear Research * Light water reactor sustainability (LWRS) is one of the four technical areas in the Reactor Concepts Research, Development and Demonstration Program sections in the FOA. * Activities in LWRS also overlap with NEET

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - Advances_Singley

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 1 Global Threat Reduction Initiative 1 Implementing Advances in Transport Security Technologies Paul Singley ORNL Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 2 Transport Security Technologies Update * GTRI Domestic mission * Previous technology evaluation results * Current proposed configuration for technology deployment * Where we are going 2 Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 3 3 3 GTRI's Domestic

  15. Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer cpacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,685,"5,918",98.7,"BWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel" ,685,"5,918",98.7

  16. Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Browns Ferry Unit 1, Unit 2, Unit 3","3,309","24,771",65.3,"Tennessee Valley Authority" "Joseph M Farley Unit 1, Unit 2","1,734","13,170",34.7,"Alabama Power

  17. Florida Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Crystal River Unit 3",860,0,"--","Progress Energy Florida Inc" "St Lucie Unit 1, Unit 2","1,678","12,630",52.8,"Florida Power & Light Co" "Turkey Point

  18. Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Donald C Cook Unit 1, Unit 2","2,069","15,646",52.8,"Indiana Michigan Power Co" "Fermi Unit 2","1,085","7,738",26.1,"Detroit Edison Co" "Palisades Unit

  19. Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Arkansas Nuclear One Unit 1, Unit 2","1,835","15,023",100.0,"Entergy Arkansas Inc" "1 Plant 2 Reactors","1,835","15,023",100.0

  20. California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Diablo Canyon Unit 1, Unit 2","2,240","18,430",57.2,"Pacific Gas & Electric Co" "San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station Unit 2, Unit

  1. Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Millstone Unit 2, Unit 3","2,103","16,750",100.0,"Dominion Nuclear Conn Inc" "1 Plant 2 Reactors","2,103","16,750",100.0

  2. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Braidwood Generation Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,330","19,200",20.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Byron Generating Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,300","19,856",20.6,"Exelon

  3. Kansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Wolf Creek Generating Station Unit 1","1,160","9,556",100.0,"Wolf Creek Nuclear Optg Corp" "1 Plant 1 Reactor","1,160","9,556",100.0

  4. Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Sequoyah Unit 1, Unit 2","2,278","18,001",64.9,"Tennessee Valley Authority" "Watts Bar Nuclear Plant Unit 1","1,123","9,738",35.1,"Tennessee Valley

  5. Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Comanche Peak Unit 1, Unit 2","2,406","20,208",48.9,"Luminant Generation Company LLC" "South Texas Project Unit 1, Unit 2","2,560","21,127",51.1,"STP Nuclear

  6. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Beaver Valley Unit 1, Unit 2","1,777","14,994",19.3,"FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company" "Limerick Unit 1, Unit 2","2,264","18,926",24.3,"Exelon

  7. Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Vermont Yankee Unit 1",620,"4,782",100.0,"Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee" "1 Plant 1 Reactor",620,"4,782",100.0

  8. Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Kewaunee Unit 1",566,"4,990",37.6,"Dominion Energy Kewaunee Inc." "Point Beach Nuclear Plant Unit 1, Unit 2","1,018","8,291",62.4,"NextEra Energy Point Beach

  9. Autonomous Control of Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basher, H.

    2003-10-20

    A nuclear reactor is a complex system that requires highly sophisticated controllers to ensure that desired performance and safety can be achieved and maintained during its operations. Higher-demanding operational requirements such as reliability, lower environmental impacts, and improved performance under adverse conditions in nuclear power plants, coupled with the complexity and uncertainty of the models, necessitate the use of an increased level of autonomy in the control methods. In the opinion of many researchers, the tasks involved during nuclear reactor design and operation (e.g., design optimization, transient diagnosis, and core reload optimization) involve important human cognition and decisions that may be more easily achieved with intelligent methods such as expert systems, fuzzy logic, neural networks, and genetic algorithms. Many experts in the field of control systems share the idea that a higher degree of autonomy in control of complex systems such as nuclear plants is more easily achievable through the integration of conventional control systems and the intelligent components. Researchers have investigated the feasibility of the integration of fuzzy logic, neural networks, genetic algorithms, and expert systems with the conventional control methods to achieve higher degrees of autonomy in different aspects of reactor operations such as reactor startup, shutdown in emergency situations, fault detection and diagnosis, nuclear reactor alarm processing and diagnosis, and reactor load-following operations, to name a few. With the advancement of new technologies and computing power, it is feasible to automate most of the nuclear reactor control and operation, which will result in increased safety and economical benefits. This study surveys current status, practices, and recent advances made towards developing autonomous control systems for nuclear reactors.

  10. Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies Overview Bruce P. Hallbert DOE-NE Webinar September 16, 2014 Light Water Sustainability Program Goals and Scope * Develop the fundamental scientific basis to understand, predict, and measure changes in materials and structures, systems, and components (SSCs) as they age in environments * Apply this knowledge to develop and demonstrate methods and technologies that support safe and economical long-term operation of existing

  11. advanced radiographic capability | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    radiographic capability | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at

  12. advanced simulation and computing | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration simulation and computing | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs

  13. Nuclear Power Facilities (2008) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Nuclear Power Facilities (2008) More Documents & Publications Front-end Nuclear Facilities (2008) Financial Institution Partnership Program - Commercial Technology Renewable Energy...

  14. Advanced Lithium Power Inc ALP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lithium Power Inc ALP Jump to: navigation, search Name: Advanced Lithium Power Inc (ALP) Place: Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada Product: They develop lithium ion and advanced...

  15. Air Cooling Technology for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines Air Cooling Technology for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies ...

  16. 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 5. Advanced Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5. Advanced Power Electronics 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 5. Advanced Power Electronics DOE Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review PDF icon 2008meritreview5.pdf ...

  17. Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Palo Verde Unit 1, Unit 2, Unit 3","3,937","31,200",100.0,"Arizona Public Service Co" "1 Plant 3 Reactors","3,937","31,200",100.0 "Note: Totals may not equal sum of

  18. Iowa Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Duane Arnold Energy Center Unit 1",601,"4,451",100.0,"NextEra Energy Duane Arnold LLC" "1 Plant 1 Reactor",601,"4,451",100.0

  19. Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant Name/Total Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (Pprcent)","Owner" "River Bend Unit 1",974,"8,363",44.9,"Entergy Gulf States - LA LLC" "Waterford 3 Unit 3","1,168","10,276",55.1,"Entergy Louisiana Inc" "2 Plants 2

  20. Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Grand Gulf Unit 1","1,251","9,643",100.0,"System Energy Resources, Inc" "1 Plant 1 Reactor","1,251","9,643",100.0

  1. Missouri Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Callaway Unit 1","1,190","8,996",100.0,"Union Electric Co" "1 Plant 1 Reactor","1,190","8,996",100.0 "Note: Totals may not equal sum of components due to

  2. Washington Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Columbia Generating Station Unit 2","1,097","9,241",100.0,"Energy Northwest" "1 Plant 1 Reactor","1,097","9,241",100.0

  3. Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery

  4. Owners of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-11-01

    The list indicates percentage ownership of commercial nuclear power plants by utility companies as of September 1, 1982. The list includes all plants licensed to operate, under construction, docketed for NRC safety and environmental reviews, or under NRC antitrust review. Part I lists plants alphabetically with their associated applicants and percentage ownership. Part II lists applicants alphabetically with their associated plants and percentage ownership. Part I also indicates which plants have received operating licenses.

  5. Sabotage at Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purvis, James W.

    1999-07-21

    Recently there has been a noted worldwide increase in violent actions including attempted sabotage at nuclear power plants. Several organizations, such as the International Atomic Energy Agency and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, have guidelines, recommendations, and formal threat- and risk-assessment processes for the protection of nuclear assets. Other examples are the former Defense Special Weapons Agency, which used a risk-assessment model to evaluate force-protection security requirements for terrorist incidents at DOD military bases. The US DOE uses a graded approach to protect its assets based on risk and vulnerability assessments. The Federal Aviation Administration and Federal Bureau of Investigation conduct joint threat and vulnerability assessments on high-risk US airports. Several private companies under contract to government agencies use formal risk-assessment models and methods to identify security requirements. The purpose of this paper is to survey these methods and present an overview of all potential types of sabotage at nuclear power plants. The paper discusses emerging threats and current methods of choice for sabotage--especially vehicle bombs and chemical attacks. Potential consequences of sabotage acts, including economic and political; not just those that may result in unacceptable radiological exposure to the public, are also discussed. Applicability of risk-assessment methods and mitigation techniques are also presented.

  6. Role of nuclear power in the Philippine power development program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleta, C.R.

    1994-12-31

    The reintroduction of nuclear power in the Philippines is favored by several factors such as: the inclusion of nuclear energy in the energy sector of the science and technology agenda for national development (STAND); the Large gap between electricity demand and available local supply for the medium-term power development plan; the relatively lower health risks in nuclear power fuel cycle systems compared to the already acceptable power systems; the lower environmental impacts of nuclear power systems compared to fossil fuelled systems and the availability of a regulatory framework and trained personnel who could form a core for implementing a nuclear power program. The electricity supply gap of 9600 MW for the period 1993-2005 could be partly supplied by nuclear power. The findings of a recent study are described, as well as the issues that have to be addressed in the reintroduction of nuclear power.

  7. ADVANCED CERAMIC MATERIALS FOR NEXT-GENERATION NUCLEAR APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marra, J.

    2010-09-29

    Rising global energy demands coupled with increased environmental concerns point to one solution; they must reduce their dependence on fossil fuels that emit greenhouse gases. As the global community faces the challenge of maintaining sovereign nation security, reducing greenhouse gases, and addressing climate change nuclear power will play a significant and likely growing role. In the US, nuclear energy already provides approximately one-fifth of the electricity used to power factories, offices, homes, and schools with 104 operating nuclear power plants, located at 65 sites in 31 states. Additionally, 19 utilities have applied to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for construction and operating licenses for 26 new reactors at 17 sites. This planned growth of nuclear power is occurring worldwide and has been termed the 'nuclear renaissance.' As major industrial nations craft their energy future, there are several important factors that must be considered about nuclear energy: (1) it has been proven over the last 40 years to be safe, reliable and affordable (good for Economic Security); (2) its technology and fuel can be domestically produced or obtained from allied nations (good for Energy Security); and (3) it is nearly free of greenhouse gas emissions (good for Environmental Security). Already an important part of worldwide energy security via electricity generation, nuclear energy can also potentially play an important role in industrial processes and supporting the nation's transportation sector. Coal-to-liquid processes, the generation of hydrogen and supporting the growing potential for a greatly increased electric transportation system (i.e. cars and trains) mean that nuclear energy could see dramatic growth in the near future as we seek to meet our growing demand for energy in cleaner, more secure ways. In order to address some of the prominent issues associated with nuclear power generation (i.e., high capital costs, waste management, and proliferation), the worldwide community is working to develop and deploy new nuclear energy systems and advanced fuel cycles. These new nuclear systems address the key challenges and include: (1) extracting the full energy value of the nuclear fuel; (2) creating waste solutions with improved long term safety; (3) minimizing the potential for the misuse of the technology and materials for weapons; (4) continually improving the safety of nuclear energy systems; and (5) keeping the cost of energy affordable.

  8. Saving Energy Through Advanced Power Strips (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, D.

    2013-10-01

    Advanced Power Strips (APS) look just like ordinary power strips, except that they have built-in features that are designed to reduce the amount of energy used by many consumer electronics. There are several different types of APSs on the market, but they all operate on the same basic principle of shutting off the supply power to devices that are not in use. By replacing your standard power strip with an APS, you can signifcantly cut the amount of electricity used by your home office and entertainment center devices, and save money on your electric bill. This illustration summarizes the different options.

  9. Computational Design of Advanced Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savrasov, Sergey; Kotliar, Gabriel; Haule, Kristjan

    2014-06-03

    The objective of the project was to develop a method for theoretical understanding of nuclear fuel materials whose physical and thermophysical properties can be predicted from first principles using a novel dynamical mean field method for electronic structure calculations. We concentrated our study on uranium, plutonium, their oxides, nitrides, carbides, as well as some rare earth materials whose 4f eletrons provide a simplified framework for understanding complex behavior of the f electrons. We addressed the issues connected to the electronic structure, lattice instabilities, phonon and magnon dynamics as well as thermal conductivity. This allowed us to evaluate characteristics of advanced nuclear fuel systems using computer based simulations and avoid costly experiments.

  10. Powering the Nuclear Navy | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Our Mission / Powering the Nuclear Navy Powering the Nuclear Navy The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program provides militarily effective nuclear propulsion plants and ensures their safe, reliable and long-lived operation. NNSA's Naval Reactors Program provides the design, development and operational support required to provide militarily effective nuclear propulsion plants and ensure their safe, reliable and long-lived operation. Learn More USS George H.W. Bush conducts flight operations Concern for

  11. New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reactors | Department of Energy Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors May 3, 2011 - 3:41pm Addthis Oak Ridge, Tenn. - Today the Department of Energy dedicated the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), an advanced research facility that will accelerate the advancement of nuclear reactor technology. CASL researchers are using supercomputers to

  12. Owners of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, R.S.

    1991-07-01

    This report indicates percentage ownership of commercial nuclear power plants by utility companies. The report includes all plants operating, under construction, docketed for NRC safety and environmental reviews, or under NRC antitrust review, but does not include those plants announced but not yet under review or those plants formally cancelled. Part 1 of the report lists plants alphabetically with their associated applicants or licensees and percentage ownership. Part 2 lists applicants or licensees alphabetically with their associated plants and percentage ownership. Part 1 also indicates which plants have received operating licenses (OLS).

  13. Economic Conditions and Factors Affecting New Nuclear Power Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Thomas J.

    2014-10-01

    This report documents work performed in support of the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Advanced Small Modular Reactor (AdvSMR) program. The report presents information and results from economic analyses to describe current electricity market conditions and those key factors that may impact the deployment of AdvSMRs or any other new nuclear power plants. Thus, this report serves as a reference document for DOE as it moves forward with its plans to develop advanced reactors, including AdvSMRs. For the purpose of this analysis, information on electricity markets and nuclear power plant operating costs will be combined to examine the current state of the nuclear industry and the process required to successfully move forward with new nuclear power in general and AdvSMRs in particular. The current electricity market is generally unfavorable to new nuclear construction, especially in deregulated markets with heavy competition from natural gas and subsidized renewables. The successful and profitable operation of a nuclear power plant (or any power plant) requires the rate at which the electricity is sold to be sufficiently greater than the cost to operate. The wholesale rates in most US markets have settled into values that provide profits for most operating nuclear power plants but are too low to support the added cost of capital recovery for new nuclear construction. There is a strong geographic dependence on the wholesale rate, with some markets currently able to support new nuclear construction. However, there is also a strong geographic dependence on pronuclear public opinion; the areas where power prices are high tend to have unfavorable views on the construction of new nuclear power plants. The use of government-backed incentives, such as subsidies, can help provide a margin to help justify construction projects that otherwise may not seem viable. Similarly, low interest rates for the project will also add a positive margin to the economic analysis. In both cases, the profitable price point is decreased, making more markets open to profitable entry. Overall, the economic attractiveness of a nuclear power construction project is not only a function of its own costs, but a function of the market into which it is deployed. Many of the market characteristics are out of the control of the potential nuclear power plant operators. The decision-making process for the power industry in general is complicated by the short-term market volatility in both the wholesale electricity market and the commodity (natural gas) market. Decisions based on market conditions today may be rendered null and void in six months. With a multiple-year lead time, nuclear power plants are acutely vulnerable to market corrections.

  14. Advanced Power Plant Development and Analyses Methodologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.S. Samuelsen; A.D. Rao

    2006-02-06

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory, a multi-disciplinary team led by the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California at Irvine is defining the system engineering issues associated with the integration of key components and subsystems into advanced power plant systems with goals of achieving high efficiency and minimized environmental impact while using fossil fuels. These power plant concepts include ''Zero Emission'' power plants and the ''FutureGen'' H{sub 2} co-production facilities. The study is broken down into three phases. Phase 1 of this study consisted of utilizing advanced technologies that are expected to be available in the ''Vision 21'' time frame such as mega scale fuel cell based hybrids. Phase 2 includes current state-of-the-art technologies and those expected to be deployed in the nearer term such as advanced gas turbines and high temperature membranes for separating gas species and advanced gasifier concepts. Phase 3 includes identification of gas turbine based cycles and engine configurations suitable to coal-based gasification applications and the conceptualization of the balance of plant technology, heat integration, and the bottoming cycle for analysis in a future study. Also included in Phase 3 is the task of acquiring/providing turbo-machinery in order to gather turbo-charger performance data that may be used to verify simulation models as well as establishing system design constraints. The results of these various investigations will serve as a guide for the U. S. Department of Energy in identifying the research areas and technologies that warrant further support.

  15. Advanced Power Plant Development and Analysis Methodologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.D. Rao; G.S. Samuelsen; F.L. Robson; B. Washom; S.G. Berenyi

    2006-06-30

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory, a multi-disciplinary team led by the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California at Irvine is defining the system engineering issues associated with the integration of key components and subsystems into advanced power plant systems with goals of achieving high efficiency and minimized environmental impact while using fossil fuels. These power plant concepts include 'Zero Emission' power plants and the 'FutureGen' H2 co-production facilities. The study is broken down into three phases. Phase 1 of this study consisted of utilizing advanced technologies that are expected to be available in the 'Vision 21' time frame such as mega scale fuel cell based hybrids. Phase 2 includes current state-of-the-art technologies and those expected to be deployed in the nearer term such as advanced gas turbines and high temperature membranes for separating gas species and advanced gasifier concepts. Phase 3 includes identification of gas turbine based cycles and engine configurations suitable to coal-based gasification applications and the conceptualization of the balance of plant technology, heat integration, and the bottoming cycle for analysis in a future study. Also included in Phase 3 is the task of acquiring/providing turbo-machinery in order to gather turbo-charger performance data that may be used to verify simulation models as well as establishing system design constraints. The results of these various investigations will serve as a guide for the U. S. Department of Energy in identifying the research areas and technologies that warrant further support.

  16. Powering the Nuclear Navy | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    About Us / Our Programs / Powering the Nuclear Navy Powering the Nuclear Navy The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program provides militarily effective nuclear propulsion plants and ensures their safe, reliable and long-lived operation. This mission requires the combination of fully trained U.S. Navy men and women with ships that excel in endurance, stealth, speed, and independence from supply chains. NNSA's Navy Reactors Program provides the design, development and operational support required to

  17. Advanced nuclear reactor public opinion project. Interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, B.

    1991-07-25

    This Interim Report summarizes the findings of our first twenty in-depth interviews in the Advanced Nuclear Reactor Public Opinion Project. We interviewed 6 industry trade association officials, 3 industry attorneys, 6 environmentalists/nuclear critics, 3 state officials, and 3 independent analysts. In addition, we have had numerous shorter discussions with various individuals concerned about nuclear power. The report is organized into the four categories proposed at our April, 1991, Advisory Group meeting: safety, cost-benefit analysis, science education, and communications. Within each category, some change of focus from that of the Advisory Group has been required, to reflect the findings of our interviews. This report limits itself to describing our findings. An accompanying memo draws some tentative conclusions.

  18. Proliferation resistance of advanced nuclear energy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierpoint, Lara; Kazimi, Mujid; Hejzlar, Pavel

    2007-07-01

    A methodology for evaluating the proliferation resistance of advanced nuclear fuel cycles is presented. The methodology, based on multi-attribute utility theory (MAUT) is intended as a computerized assessment for fuel cycles at their earliest stages of development (i.e. when detailed facility design information is not available). Preliminary results suggest that the methodology may be useful in identifying sources of proliferation vulnerability within different fuel cycles. Of the fuel cycles and segments studied, the fabrication step of the Once- Through fuel cycle and the reprocessing step of the MOX fuel cycle present the greatest vulnerability. The Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) fuel cycle with conversion ratio 0.0 appears to be the overall safest fuel cycle from a proliferation protection standpoint. (authors)

  19. Advances in High Power Compact Accelerators | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    (SC) High Power Compact Accelerators Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: Email Us More Information » 04.01.14 Advances in High Power Compact Accelerators Argonne superconducting

  20. Anhui Wuhu Nuclear Power Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wuhu Nuclear Power Co Jump to: navigation, search Name: Anhui Wuhu Nuclear Power Co. Place: Shenzhen, Guangdong Province, China Zip: 518031 Product: JV between Guangdong Nuclear...

  1. Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors Annual Report -- 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narumanchi, S.; Bennion, K.; DeVoto, D.; Moreno, G.; Rugh, J.; Waye, S.

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the research into advanced liquid cooling, integrated power module cooling, high temperature air cooled power electronics, two-phase cooling for power electronics, and electric motor thermal management by NREL's Power Electronics group in FY13.

  2. Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Solicitation Public Meeting Presentation |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Solicitation Public Meeting Presentation Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Solicitation Public Meeting Presentation PDF icon Draft Advanced Nuclear Solicitation presentation.pdf More Documents & Publications REEE Solicitation Public Meeting Presentation Renewable Energy & Energy Efficiency Projects: Loan Guarantee Solicitation

  3. Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    R&D Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells ... More Documents & Publications Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) R&D ...

  4. Advancing State-of-the-Art Concentrating Solar Power Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advancing State-of-the-Art Concentrating Solar Power Systems Advancing State-of-the-Art Concentrating Solar Power Systems April 15, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Brayton Energy's...

  5. Center for Advanced Power Systems CAPS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Focused on advanced power system technologies with emphasis on the needs of the future naval ship power systems and electricity supply grid of the US. References: Center for...

  6. Concentrating Solar Power: Advanced Projects Offering Low LCOE...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Concentrating Solar Power: Advanced Projects Offering Low LCOE Opportunities (CSP: APOLLO) Building upon the successful outcomes of the 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) ...

  7. Integrated Combined Heat and Power/Advanced Reciprocating Internal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combined Heat and PowerAdvanced Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engine System for Landfill Gas to Power Applications Development of an Improved Modular Landfill Gas Cleanup and...

  8. Advanced Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power Losses Advanced Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power Losses 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle...

  9. Advanced Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power Losses Advanced Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power Losses 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen...

  10. Thermal Stress and Reliability for Advanced Power Electronics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Thermal Stress and Reliability for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration ...

  11. Advanced Thermal Interface Materials (TIMs) for Power Electronics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermal Interface Materials (TIMs) for Power Electronics Advanced Thermal Interface Materials (TIMs) for Power Electronics 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies ...

  12. KiloPower Project - KRUSTY Experiment Nuclear Design (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    KiloPower Project - KRUSTY Experiment Nuclear Design Citation Details In-Document Search Title: KiloPower Project - KRUSTY Experiment Nuclear Design This PowerPoint presentation...

  13. Lab Tests Demonstrate Effectiveness of Advanced Power Strips (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-09-01

    NREL engineers evaluate the functionalities of advanced power strips and help consumers choose the right one for their plug loads.

  14. ADVANCED POWER SYSTEMS ASH BEHAVIOR IN POWER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHRISTOPHER J. ZYGARLICKE; DONALD P. MCCOLLOR; JOHN P. KAY; MICHAEL L. SWANSON

    1998-09-01

    The overall goal of this initiative is to develop fundamental knowledge of ash behavior in power systems for the purpose of increasing power production efficiency, reducing operation and maintenance costs, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. The specific objectives of this initiative focus primarily on ash behavior related to advanced power systems and include the following: ? Determine the current status of the fundamental ash interactions and deposition formation mechanisms as already reported through previous or ongoing projects at the EERC or in the literature. ? Determine sintering mechanisms for temperatures and particle compositions that are less well known and remain for the most part undetermined. ? Identify the relationship between the temperature of critical viscosity (Tcv ) as measured in a viscometer and the crystallization occurring in the melt. ? Perform a literature search on the use of heated-stage microscopy (HSM) for examining in situ ash-sintering phenomena and then validate the use of HSM in the determination of viscosity in spherical ash particles. ? Ascertain the formation and stability of specific mineral or amorphous phases in deposits typical of advanced power systems. ? Evaluate corrosion for alloys being used in supercritical combustion systems.

  15. Advanced Nuclear Final Solicitation Fact Sheet_Dec-2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FACT S HEET FACT S HEET FACT S HEET December 2014 ADVANCED N UCLEAR E NERGY P ROJECTS LOAN G UARANTEE S OLICITATION The Loan Programs Office (LPO) has issued an Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects Loan Guarantee Solicitation to support advanced nuclear energy technologies that will foster the deployment of future projects that replicate or extend a technological innovation. This solicitation makes as much as $12.5 billion in loan guarantees available to support innovative nuclear energy projects in

  16. U.S. Forward Operating Base Applications of Nuclear Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, George W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a high level overview of current nuclear power technology and the potential use of nuclear power at military bases. The size, power ranges, and applicability of nuclear power units for military base power are reviewed. Previous and current reactor projects are described to further define the potential for nuclear power for military power.

  17. solar power | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    power | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home /

  18. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Software...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Software Verification and Validation (V&V) Plan Requirements Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Software Verification and Validation (V&V) Plan Requirements ...

  19. Energy Department Announces New Awards for Advanced Nuclear Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Awards for Advanced Nuclear Energy Development Energy Department Announces New Awards for ... energy strategy and efforts to expand clean energy innovation, the Department of ...

  20. Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Davis Besse Unit 1",894,"5,185",32.8,"FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company" "Perry Unit 1","1,240","10,620",67.2,"FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company" "2 Plants 2 ...

  1. Public opinion factors regarding nuclear power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, B.

    1991-12-31

    This paper is an effort to identify, as comprehensively as possible, public concerns about nuclear power, and to assess, where possible, the relative importance of these concerns as they relate to government regulation of and policy towards nuclear power. It is based on some two dozen in-depth interviews with key communicators representing the nuclear power industry, the environmental community, and government, as well as on the parallel efforts in our research project: (1) review of federal court case law, (2) a selective examination of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) administrative process, and (3) the preceding George Mason University research project in this series. The paper synthesizes our findings about public attitudes towards nuclear power as expressed through federal court case law, NRC administrative law, public opinion surveys, and direct personal interviews. In so doing, we describe the public opinion environment in which the nuclear regulatory process must operate. Our premise is that public opinion ultimately underlies the approaches government agencies take towards regulating nuclear power, and that, to the degree that the nuclear power industry`s practices are aligned with public opinion, a more favorable regulatory climate is possible.

  2. Public opinion factors regarding nuclear power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper is an effort to identify, as comprehensively as possible, public concerns about nuclear power, and to assess, where possible, the relative importance of these concerns as they relate to government regulation of and policy towards nuclear power. It is based on some two dozen in-depth interviews with key communicators representing the nuclear power industry, the environmental community, and government, as well as on the parallel efforts in our research project: (1) review of federal court case law, (2) a selective examination of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) administrative process, and (3) the preceding George Mason University research project in this series. The paper synthesizes our findings about public attitudes towards nuclear power as expressed through federal court case law, NRC administrative law, public opinion surveys, and direct personal interviews. In so doing, we describe the public opinion environment in which the nuclear regulatory process must operate. Our premise is that public opinion ultimately underlies the approaches government agencies take towards regulating nuclear power, and that, to the degree that the nuclear power industry's practices are aligned with public opinion, a more favorable regulatory climate is possible.

  3. Air Cooling Technology for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines Air Cooling Technology for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon ape_12_bharathan.pdf More Documents & Publications Air Cooling Technology for Power Electronic Thermal Control Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric

  4. Chapter 4 - Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy 4 - Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies Chapter 4 - Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies Chapter 4 - Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies Clean electric power is paramount to today's mission to meet our interdependent security, economic, and environmental goals. While supporting aggressive emission reductions, the traditional market drivers such as reliability, safety, and affordability must be maintained and enhanced. The current portfolio of electric production

  5. Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects Solicitation | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Projects Solicitation Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects Solicitation INFORMATIONAL MATERIALS ADVANCED NUCLEAR ENERGY PROJECTS SOLICITATION Solicitation and Supplements I, II, and III (January 19, 2016). Applicants should review the final solicitation and all supplements before submitting an application. The full download above contains the following documents listed below: Solicitation (December 10, 2014) Supplement I regarding Scope of Projects Eligible for the Solicitation (June 23, 2015)

  6. Relative Movements for Design of Commodities in Nuclear Power Plants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Relative Movements for Design of Commodities in Nuclear Power Plants Javad Moslemian, Vice President, Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent & Lundy LLC Nezar Abraham, Senior Associate II, Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent & Lundy LLC

  7. Advanced power electronics and electric machinery program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2007-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as "FreedomCAR" (derived from "Freedom" and "Cooperative Automotive Research"), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public/private partnerships to fund high-risk, high-payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieving the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001.

  8. Lesson 7- Waste from Nuclear Power Plants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This lesson takes a look at the waste from electricity production at nuclear power plants. It considers the different types of waste generated, as well as how we deal with each type of waste.

  9. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Advanced Burner

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Reactors | Department of Energy Develop Advanced Burner Reactors Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Advanced Burner Reactors GNEP will develop and demonstrate Advanced Burner Reactors (ABRs) that consume transuranic elements (plutonium and other long-lived radioactive material) while extracting their energy. The development of ABRs will allow us to build an improved nuclear fuel cycle that recycles used fuel. Accordingly, the U.S. will work with participating

  10. Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Advance Nuclear Technology |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy 0 Million to Advance Nuclear Technology Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Advance Nuclear Technology June 5, 2015 - 11:18am Addthis News Media Contact 202-586-4940 WASHINGTON - Today, the Energy Department announced more than $60 million in nuclear energy research and infrastructure enhancement awards. Sixty-eight projects from across the country were selected based on their potential to create scientific breakthroughs that both help strengthen the nation's energy

  11. Energy Department Invests $67 Million to Advanced Nuclear Technology |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy 7 Million to Advanced Nuclear Technology Energy Department Invests $67 Million to Advanced Nuclear Technology August 20, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis News Media Contact 202-586-4940 WASHINGTON - Building on President Obama's Climate Action Plan and the Administration's efforts to expand clean energy innovation, the Energy Department announced today nearly $67 million in nuclear energy research and infrastructure enhancement awards. 83 projects were selected from across the

  12. Experiments ✚ Simulations = Better Nuclear Power Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiments + Simulations = Better Nuclear Power Research Experiments ✚ Simulations = Better Nuclear Power Research Atomic Level Simulations Enhance Characterization of Radiation Damage July 31, 2015 Contact: Kathy Kincade, +1 510 495 2124, kkincade@lbl.gov Radiation Damage PNNL In a study featured on the cover of a Journal of Materials Research focus issue, an international research collaboration used molecular dynamics simulations run at NERSC to identify atomic-level details of early-stage

  13. KiloPower Project - KRUSTY Experiment Nuclear Design (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    KiloPower Project - KRUSTY Experiment Nuclear Design Citation Details In-Document Search Title: KiloPower Project - KRUSTY Experiment Nuclear Design You are accessing a document...

  14. Renewing America's Nuclear Power Partnership for Energy Security...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Renewing America's Nuclear Power Partnership for Energy Security and Economic Growth Renewing America's Nuclear Power Partnership for Energy Security and Economic Growth October 8,...

  15. China Guangdong Nuclear Power Holding Co Ltd CGNPC | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nuclear Power Holding Co Ltd CGNPC Jump to: navigation, search Name: China Guangdong Nuclear Power Holding Co Ltd (CGNPC) Place: Shenzhen, Guangdong Province, China Zip: 518031...

  16. Sandia Nuclear Power Safety Expert Elected to National Academy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Power Safety Expert Elected to National Academy of Engineering - Sandia Energy ... Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & ...

  17. Renewing America's Nuclear Power Partnership for Energy Security...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewing America's Nuclear Power Partnership for Energy Security and Economic Growth Renewing America's Nuclear Power Partnership for Energy Security and Economic Growth October 8, ...

  18. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Advanced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The advanced plant technologies are combined with carbon capture and storage (CCS) ... the cost of capturing carbon with CCS technologies compared to conventional systems. ...

  19. Fresh nuclear fuel measurements at Ukrainian nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuzminski, Jozef; Ewing, Tom; Dickman, Debbie; Gavrilyuk, Victor; Drapey, Sergey; Kirischuk, Vladimir; Strilchuk, Nikolay

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, the Provisions on Nuclear Material Measurement System was enacted in Ukraine as an important regulatory driver to support international obligations in nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation. It defines key provisions and requirements for material measurement and measurement control programs to ensure the quality and reliability of measurement data within the framework of the State MC&A System. Implementing the Provisions requires establishing a number of measurement techniques for both fresh and spent nuclear fuel for various types of Ukrainian reactors. Our first efforts focused on measurements of fresh nuclear fuel from a WWR-1000 power reactor.

  20. Technology Roadmap Instrumentation, Control, and Human-Machine Interface to Support DOE Advanced Nuclear Energy Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald D Dudenhoeffer; Burce P Hallbert

    2007-03-01

    Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) technologies are essential to ensuring delivery and effective operation of optimized advanced Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. In 1996, the Watts Bar I nuclear power plant in Tennessee was the last U.S. nuclear power plant to go on line. It was, in fact, built based on pre-1990 technology. Since this last U.S. nuclear power plant was designed, there have been major advances in the field of ICHMI systems. Computer technology employed in other industries has advanced dramatically, and computing systems are now replaced every few years as they become functionally obsolete. Functional obsolescence occurs when newer, more functional technology replaces or supersedes an existing technology, even though an existing technology may well be in working order.Although ICHMI architectures are comprised of much of the same technology, they have not been updated nearly as often in the nuclear power industry. For example, some newer Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) or handheld computers may, in fact, have more functionality than the 1996 computer control system at the Watts Bar I plant. This illustrates the need to transition and upgrade current nuclear power plant ICHMI technologies.

  1. Advanced Power Electronics for LED Drivers: Advanced Technologies for integrated Power Electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-09-01

    ADEPT Project: MIT is teaming with Georgia Institute of Technology, Dartmouth College, and the University of Pennsylvania (UPenn) to create more efficient power circuits for energy-efficient light-emitting diodes (LEDs) through advances in 3 related areas. First, the team is using semiconductors made of high-performing gallium nitride grown on a low-cost silicon base (GaN-on-Si). These GaN-on-Si semiconductors conduct electricity more efficiently than traditional silicon semiconductors. Second, the team is developing new magnetic materials and structures to reduce the size and increase the efficiency of an important LED power component, the inductor. This advancement is important because magnetics are the largest and most expensive part of a circuit. Finally, the team is creating an entirely new circuit design to optimize the performance of the new semiconductors and magnetic devices it is using.

  2. The American nuclear power industry. A handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearman, W.A.; Starr, P.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents an overview of the history and current organization of the American nuclear power industry. Part I focuses on development of the industry, including the number, capacity, and type of plants in commercial operation as well as those under construction. Part II examines the safety, environmental, antitrust, and licensing issues involved in the use of nuclear power. Part III presents case studies of selected plants, such as Three Mile Island and Seabrook, to illustrate some of the issues discussed. The book also contains a listing of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission libraries and a subject index.

  3. Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells These slides were presented at the 2010 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting on September 28, 2010. PDF icon 9_lanl_zelenay.pdf More Documents & Publications Introduction to DMFCs - Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts New MEA Materials for Improved DMFC Performance, Durability and C

  4. FY 2009 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Power Electronics

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROGRESS REPORT FOR ADVANCED POWER ELECTRONICS annual progress report 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies, EE-2G 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585-0121 FY 2009 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Power Electronics Prepared by: Susan A. Rogers, Technology Development Manager Submitted to: Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Vehicle Technologies Program January 2010 Advanced Power Electronics FY 2009

  5. Projects To Develop Novel Monitoring Networks for Advanced Power Systems

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Selected | Department of Energy To Develop Novel Monitoring Networks for Advanced Power Systems Selected Projects To Develop Novel Monitoring Networks for Advanced Power Systems Selected September 1, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Five projects that will develop technologically sophisticated monitoring networks for advanced fossil energy power systems have been selected for continued research by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The projects will support efforts by the Office of

  6. Advanced Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Cycle Configurations for Use in Concentrating Solar Power Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Z.; Turchi, C. S.

    2011-03-01

    The research will characterize and evaluate advanced S-CO2 Brayton cycle power generation with a modular power tower CSP system.

  7. The ARIES Advanced and Conservative Tokamak Power Plant Study...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ARIES Advanced and Conservative Tokamak Power Plant Study Kessel, C. E Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Tillak, M. S Univ. of California, San...

  8. Thermal Stress and Reliability for Advanced Power Electronics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermal Performance and Reliability of Bonded Interfaces Physics of Failure of Electrical Interconnects Thermal Stress and Reliability for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric ...

  9. $60 Million to Fund Projects Advancing Concentrating Solar Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The SunShot initiative announces a $60 million funding opportunity (FOA) to advance concentrating solar power in the United States.

  10. University Program in Advanced Technology | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Facility Operations and User Support Computational Systems & Software Environment Verification & Validation Physics and Engineering Models Integrated Codes Advanced Technology ...

  11. New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Oyster Creek Unit 1",615,"4,601",14.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "PSEG Hope Creek Generating Station Unit 1","1,161","9,439",28.8,"PSEG Nuclear LLC" "PSEG Salem Generating

  12. Indicator system for advanced nuclear plant control complex

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth; Jamison, David S.; Manazir, Richard M.; Rescorl, Robert L.; Harmon, Daryl L.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  13. Development of an Advanced Combined Heat and Power (CHP) System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heat and Power (CHP) System Utilizing Off-Gas from Coke Calcination - Fact Sheet, 2014 Development of an Advanced Combined Heat and Power (CHP) System Utilizing Off-Gas ...

  14. An advanced power distribution automation model system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niwa, Shigeharu; Kanoi, Minoru; Nishijima, Kazuo; Hayami, Mitsuo

    1995-12-31

    An advanced power distribution automation (APDA) model system has been developed on the present basis of the automated distribution systems in Japan, which have been used for remote switching operations and for urgent supply restorations during faults. The increased use of electronic apparatuses sensitive to supply interruption requires very high supply reliability, and the final developed system is expected to be useful for this purpose. The developed model system adopts pole circuit breakers and remote termination units connected through 64kbps optical fibers to the computer of the automated system in the control center. Immediate switching operations for supply restorations during faults are possible through the restoration procedures, prepared beforehand, by the computer and by fast telecommunications using optical fibers. So, protection by the feeder circuit breaker in the substation can be avoided, which would otherwise cause the blackout of the whole distribution line. The test results show the effectiveness of model the system: successful fault locations and reconfiguration for supply restoration including separation of the fault sections (without blackout for the ground faults and with a short period (within 1 s) of blackout for the short-circuit faults).

  15. System and method for advanced power management

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Atcitty, Stanley (Albuquerque, NM); Symons, Philip C. (Surprise, AZ); Butler, Paul C. (Albuquerque, NM); Corey, Garth P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-07-28

    A power management system is provided that includes a power supply means comprising a plurality of power supply strings, a testing means operably connected to said plurality of power supply strings for evaluating performance characteristics of said plurality of power supply strings, and a control means for monitoring power requirements and comprising a switching means for controlling switching of said plurality of power supply strings to said testing means.

  16. Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear Proliferation: Magnitude Matters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Goldston

    2010-03-03

    Integrated energy, environment and economics modeling suggests electrical energy use will increase from 2.4 TWe today to 12 TWe in 2100. It will be challenging to provide 40% of this electrical power from combustion with carbon sequestration, as it will be challenging to provide 30% from renewable energy sources. Thus nuclear power may be needed to provide ~30% by 2100. Calculations of the associated stocks and flows of uranium, plutonium and minor actinides indicate that the proliferation risks at mid-century, using current light-water reactor technology, are daunting. There are institutional arrangements that may be able to provide an acceptable level of risk mitigation, but they will be difficult to implement. If a transition is begun to fast-spectrum reactors at mid-century, without a dramatic change in the proliferation risks of such systems, at the end of the century proliferation risks are much greater, and more resistant to mitigation. The risks of nuclear power should be compared with the risks of the estimated 0.64oC long-term global surface-average temperature rise predicted if nuclear power were replaced with coal-fired power plants without carbon sequestration. Fusion energy, if developed, would provide a source of nuclear power with much lower proliferation risks than fission.

  17. The Fukushima Nuclear Event and its Implications for Nuclear Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golay, Michael

    2011-07-06

    The combined strong earthquake and super tsunami of 12 March 2011 at the Fukushima nuclear power plant imposed the most severe challenges ever experienced at such a facility. Information regarding the plant response and status remains uncertain, but it is clear that severe damage has been sustained, that the plant staff have responded creatively and that the offsite implications are unlikely to be seriously threatening to the health, if not the prosperity, of the surrounding population. Re-examination of the regulatory constraints of nuclear power will occur worldwide, and some changes are likely, particularly concerning reliance upon active systems for achieving critical safety functions and concerning treatments of used reactor fuel. Whether worldwide expansion of the nuclear power economy will be slowed in the long run is perhaps unlikely and worth discussion.

  18. Advanced Technology Development and Mitigation | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home About Us Our Programs Defense Programs Future Science & Technology Programs Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D...

  19. Recent advances in nuclear fission theory: pre- and post-scission...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Recent advances in nuclear fission theory: pre- and post-scission physics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Recent advances in nuclear fission theory: pre- and ...

  20. Recent advances in nuclear fission theory: pre- and post-scission...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Recent advances in nuclear fission theory: pre- and post-scission physics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Recent advances in nuclear fission theory: pre- and ...

  1. Power America - Advanced Manufacturing Office Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    bandgap semiconductor-based power electronics, which allow electronic systems to be smaller, faster and more efficient than power electronics made from silicon. - US ...

  2. Advanced Elastic/Inelastic Nuclear Data Development Project (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect Advanced Elastic/Inelastic Nuclear Data Development Project Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Advanced Elastic/Inelastic Nuclear Data Development Project The optical model is used to analyze the elastic and inelastic scattering of nucleons, deuterons, hellions, tritons, and alpha particles by the nuclei. Since this paper covers primarily neutron-nucleus scattering, the focus will be limited to only that interaction. For the sake of this model, the nucleus

  3. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program Plan |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Program Plan Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program Plan The NEAMS program plan includes information on the program vision, objective, scope, schedule and cost, management, development team and collaborations. PDF icon NEAMS Executive Program Plan.pdf More Documents & Publications NEAMS Quarterly Report April-June 2013 Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Software Verification and Validation (V&V) Plan Requirements

  4. Advanced Technology Development and Mitigation | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration Technology Development and Mitigation | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply

  5. Science based integrated approach to advanced nuclear fuel development - vision, approach, and overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pasamehmetoglu, Kemal [IDAHO NATIONAL LAB; Carmack, Jon [IDAHO NATIONAL LAB

    2010-01-01

    Advancing the performance of Light Water Reactors, Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles, and Advanced Rcactors, such as the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants, requires enhancing our fundamental understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The capability to accurately model the nuclear fuel systems is critical. In order to understand specific aspects of the nuclear fuel, fully coupled fuel simulation codes are required to achieve licensing of specific nuclear fuel designs for operation. The backbone of these codes, models, and simulations is a fundamental understanding and predictive capability for simulating the phase and microstructural behavior of the nuclear fuel system materials and matrices. The purpose of this paper is to identify the modeling and simulation approach in order to deliver predictive tools for advanced fuels development. The coordination between experimental nuclear fuel design, development technical experts, and computational fuel modeling and simulation technical experts is a critical aspect of the approach and naturally leads to an integrated, goal-oriented science-based R & D approach and strengthens both the experimental and computational efforts. The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) and Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Fuels Integrated Performance and Safety Code (IPSC) are working together to determine experimental data and modeling needs. The primary objective of the NEAMS fuels IPSC project is to deliver a coupled, three-dimensional, predictive computational platform for modeling the fabrication and both normal and abnormal operation of nuclear fuel pins and assemblies, applicable to both existing and future reactor fuel designs. The science based program is pursuing the development of an integrated multi-scale and multi-physics modeling and simulation platform for nuclear fuels. This overview paper discusses the vision, goals and approaches how to develop and implement the new approach.

  6. 1. Hallam Nuclear Power Facility, NE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hallam Nuclear Power Facility, NE 1969 1998 2. Piqua Nuclear Power Facility, OH 1969 1998 3. Bayo Canyon, NM 1982 1998 4. Kellex/Pierpont, NJ 1982 1998 5. University of California, CA 1982 1998 6. Acid/Pueblo Canyons, NM 1984 1999 7. Chupadera Mesa, NM 1984 1999 8. Canonsburg, PA 1986 1999 9.Shiprock, NM 1987 2000 10. Middlesex Municipal Landfill, NJ 1987 2000 11. Niagara Falls Storage Site Vicinity Properties, NY 1987 2001 12. Salt Lake City, UT 1989 2001 13. Spook, WY 1989 2001 14. National

  7. Table 2. Nuclear power plant data

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Revised: February 3, 2016 (revision) Next release date: Late 2018 Table 2. Nuclear power plant data as of June 30, 2013 Reactor name State Reactor type Reactor vendora Core size (number of assemblies) Startup date (year) b License expiration (year) Actual retirement (year) Arkansas Nuclear 1 AR PWR B&W 177 1974 2034 Arkansas Nuclear 2 AR PWR CE 177 1978 2038 Beaver Valley 1 PA PWR WE 157 1976 2036 Beaver Valley 2 PA PWR WE 157 1987 2047 Big Rock Point MI BWR GE 84 1964 2057 1997 Braidwood 1

  8. New York Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Indian Point Unit 2, Unit 3","2,063","16,321",39.0,"Entergy Nuclear Indian Point" "James A Fitzpatrick Unit 1",855,"6,361",15.2,"Entergy Nuc Fitzpatrick LLC" "Nine

  9. Advancing our Nuclear Collaboration with the Czech Republic | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy our Nuclear Collaboration with the Czech Republic Advancing our Nuclear Collaboration with the Czech Republic September 28, 2011 - 5:36pm Addthis President Obama addresses a crowd in Hradcany Square on April 5, 2009, touching on issues from green energy to nuclear treaties. Daniel B. Poneman Daniel B. Poneman Former Deputy Secretary of Energy This week, I joined with the Řež Nuclear Research Institute, the U.S. Embassy in Prague, Texas A&M and the Czech Nuclear Education Network

  10. QUARTERLY NUCLEAR POWER DEPLOYMENT SUMMARY APRIL 2014

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4 Updates available at: www.energy.gov/ne NEXT UPDATE - July 2014 Page 1 News Updates  On February 20, Secretary Moniz announced the issuance of loan guarantees totalling approximately $6.5 billion to Georgia Power Company and Oglethorpe Power Company for the construction of two new nuclear reactors at the Alvin W. Vogtle Electric Generating Plant. The Department continues to work on the remaining conditional commitment for a $1.8 billion loan guarantee to Municipal Electric Authority of

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2011 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Motors R&D Annual Progress Report | Department of Energy Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2011 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress Report The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) program within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing

  12. Advanced Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power Losses |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power Losses Advanced Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power Losses 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon ape_06_lai.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power Losses Electro-thermal-mechanical Simulation and Reliability for

  13. Concentrating Solar Power: Advanced Projects Offering Low LCOE

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Opportunities (CSP: APOLLO) | Department of Energy Power: Advanced Projects Offering Low LCOE Opportunities (CSP: APOLLO) Concentrating Solar Power: Advanced Projects Offering Low LCOE Opportunities (CSP: APOLLO) Building upon the successful outcomes of the 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Research & Development funding program, the CSP: APOLLO funding program furthers CSP system technologies through transformative projects that target all of the components of a CSP plant.

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Motors R&D Annual Progress Report | Department of Energy Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress Report The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) technology area within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on

  15. Interagency Advanced Power Group meeting minutes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This document contains the minutes and viewgraphs from a meeting of military personnel on the subject of power generation and distribution systems for military applications. Topics include heating and cooling systems for standard shelters, SDIO power programs, solar dynamic space power systems, hybrid solar dynamic/ photovoltaic systems, pulsed power technology, high-{Tc} superconductors, and actuators and other electronic equipment for aerospace vehicles. Attendees represented the US Air Force, Army, Navy, and NASA. (GHH)

  16. Interagency Advanced Power Group meeting minutes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This document contains the minutes and viewgraphs from a meeting of military personnel on the subject of power generation and distribution systems for military applications. Topics include heating and cooling systems for standard shelters, SDIO power programs, solar dynamic space power systems, hybrid solar dynamic/ photovoltaic systems, pulsed power technology, high-{Tc} superconductors, and actuators and other electronic equipment for aerospace vehicles. Attendees represented the US Air Force, Army, Navy, and NASA. (GHH)

  17. Advancing Civil Nuclear Cooperation with Japan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In June, Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman traveled to Japan for the third meeting of the Bilateral Commission on Civil Nuclear Cooperation, an initiative launched by President Obama in 2012.

  18. Technology Readiness Levels for Advanced Nuclear Fuels and Materials Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon Carmack

    2014-01-01

    The Technology Readiness Level (TRL) process is used to quantitatively assess the maturity of a given technology. The TRL process has been developed and successfully used by the Department of Defense (DOD) for development and deployment of new technology and systems for defense applications. In addition, NASA has also successfully used the TRL process to develop and deploy new systems for space applications. Advanced nuclear fuels and materials development is a critical technology needed for closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Because the deployment of a new nuclear fuel forms requires a lengthy and expensive research, development, and demonstration program, applying the TRL concept to the advanced fuel development program is very useful as a management and tracking tool. This report provides definition of the technology readiness level assessment process as defined for use in assessing nuclear fuel technology development for the Advanced Fuel Campaign (AFC).

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - Advances_Singley

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    SmartONE SX1 GT 1000 GT 600 Global Trak GlobalStar Orbcomm Qualcomm Hi-G-Tek TrakLok Spot Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 5 Concept...

  20. Deputy Secretary Poneman Delivers Remarks on Nuclear Power at...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    "For decades, we have worked in close partnership with Japan on nuclear issues, ranging from preventing the proliferation of nuclear weapons and confronting North Korea, to power ...

  1. Development and Demonstration of Advanced Forecasting, Power...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ...mizationprojectanlgasper.ppt More Documents & Publications Day-ahead Scheding and Real-time Operations Tool 2014 Water Power Program Peer Review Compiled Presentations: ...

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Advanced Power Electronics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE) and electric ... Temperature, High Voltage Fully Integrated Gate Driver Circuit High Temperature, High ...

  3. Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-Off Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristine Barrett; Shannon Bragg-Sitton

    2012-09-01

    The Advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) Nuclear Fuel Development Research and Development (R&D) Pathway encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. To achieve significant operating improvements while remaining within safety boundaries, significant steps beyond incremental improvements in the current generation of nuclear fuel are required. Fundamental improvements are required in the areas of nuclear fuel composition, cladding integrity, and the fuel/cladding interaction to allow power uprates and increased fuel burn-up allowance while potentially improving safety margin through the adoption of an accident tolerant fuel system that would offer improved coping time under accident scenarios. With a development time of about 20 25 years, advanced fuel designs must be started today and proven in current reactors if future reactor designs are to be able to use them with confidence.

  4. Transactions of the fifth symposium on space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Hoover, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    This paper contains the presented papers at the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems. Topics of these paper include: space nuclear missions and applications, reactors and shielding, nuclear electric and nuclear propulsion, high-temperature materials, instrumentation and control, energy conversion and storage, space nuclear fuels, thermal management, nuclear safety, simulation and modeling, and multimegawatt system concepts. (LSP)

  5. Transactions of the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Hoover, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    This paper contains the presented papers at the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems. Topics of these papers include: space nuclear missions and applications, reactors and shielding, nuclear electric and nuclear propulsion, refractory alloys and high-temperature materials, instrumentation and control, energy conversion and storage, space nuclear fuels, thermal management, nuclear safety, simulation and modeling, and multimegawatt system concepts. (LSP)

  6. Coal and nuclear power: Illinois' energy future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    This conference was sponsored by the Energy Resources Center, University of Illinois at Chicago; the US Department of Energy; the Illinois Energy Resources Commission; and the Illinois Department of Energy and Natural Resources. The theme for the conference, Coal and Nuclear Power: Illinois' Energy Future, was based on two major observations: (1) Illinois has the largest reserves of bituminous coal of any state and is surpassed in total reserves only by North Dakota, and Montana; and (2) Illinois has made a heavy commitment to the use of nuclear power as a source of electrical power generation. Currently, nuclear power represents 30% of the electrical energy produced in the State. The primary objective of the 1982 conference was to review these two energy sources in view of the current energy policy of the Reagan Administration, and to examine the impact these policies have on the Midwest energy scene. The conference dealt with issues unique to Illinois as well as those facing the entire nation. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 30 individual presentations.

  7. QUARTERLY NUCLEAR POWER DEPLOYMENT SUMMARY JULY 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Updates available at: www.energy.gov/ne NEXT UPDATE - October 2015 Page 1 News Updates  DTE Energy has received a license to build and operate an ESBWR light water reactor at its Fermi site in Newport, Michigan; the company has not committed to building a new plant, but is retaining the option for long-term planning purposes.  The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has voted to grant the Director of Nuclear Reactor Regulation authority to issue a full power operating license to Tennessee

  8. New Hampshire Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (nw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Seabrook Unit 1","1,247","10,910",100.0,"NextEra Energy Seabrook LLC" "1 Plant 1 Reactor","1,247","10,910",100.0 "Note: Totals may not equal sum of components due

  9. North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Brunswick Unit 1, Unit 2","1,858","14,808",36.3,"Progress Energy Carolinas Inc" "Harris Unit 1",900,"7,081",17.4,"Progress Energy Carolinas Inc" "McGuire

  10. South Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Catawba Unit 1, Unit 2","2,258","18,964",36.5,"Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC" "H B Robinson Unit 2",724,"3,594",6.9,"Progress Energy Carolinas Inc"

  11. NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research - Advanced Optical Materials for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Concentrating Solar Power Advanced Optical Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Photo of a 1400W solar simulator. NREL researchers use a variety of equipment, including the 1400W solar simulator shown, to test optical materials. NREL works to develop durable, low-cost optical materials for concentrating solar power systems. These optical materials-which reflect, absorb, and transmit solar energy-play a fundamental role in the overall cost and efficiency of all concentrating solar power

  12. THE ARIES ADVANCED AND CONSERVATIVE TOKAMAK POWER PLANT STUDY

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    THE ARIES ADVANCED AND CONSERVATIVE TOKAMAK POWER PLANT STUDY C. E. KESSEL, a * M. S. TILLACK, b F. NAJMABADI, b F. M. POLI, a K. GHANTOUS, a N. GORELENKOV, a X. R. WANG, b D....

  13. Advanced Power Sources Ltd APS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sources Ltd APS Jump to: navigation, search Name: Advanced Power Sources Ltd (APS) Place: United Kingdom Product: UK R&D company based at Loughborough University focusing on fuel...

  14. Johnson Controls Saft Advanced Power Solutions | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    venture between SAFT and Johnson Controls to produce and sell nickel-metal-hydride and lithium-ion batteries for HEVs and EVs. References: Johnson Controls-Saft Advanced Power...

  15. Results of Laboratory Testing of Advanced Power Strips: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Earle, L.; Sparn, B.

    2012-08-01

    This paper describes the results of a laboratory investigation to evaluate the technical performance of advanced power strip (APS) devices when subjected to a range of home entertainment center and home office usage scenarios.

  16. Carbon pricing, nuclear power and electricity markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron, R.; Keppler, J. H. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, 12, boulevard des Iles, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    2012-07-01

    In 2010, the NEA in conjunction with the International Energy Agency produced an analysis of the Projected Costs of Electricity for almost 200 power plants, covering nuclear, fossil fuel and renewable electricity generation. That analysis used lifetime costs to consider the merits of each technology. However, the lifetime cost analysis is less applicable in liberalised markets and does not look specifically at the viewpoint of the private investor. A follow-up NEA assessment of the competitiveness of nuclear energy against coal- and gas-fired generation under carbon pricing has considered just this question. The economic competition in electricity markets is today between nuclear energy and gas-fired power generation, with coal-fired power generation not being competitive as soon as even modest carbon pricing is introduced. Whether nuclear energy or natural gas comes out ahead in their competition depends on a number of assumptions, which, while all entirely reasonable, yield very different outcomes. The analysis in this study has been developed on the basis of daily data from European power markets over the last five-year period. Three different methodologies, a Profit Analysis looking at historic returns over the past five years, an Investment Analysis projecting the conditions of the past five years over the lifetime of plants and a Carbon Tax Analysis (differentiating the Investment Analysis for different carbon prices) look at the issue of competitiveness from different angles. They show that the competitiveness of nuclear energy depends on a number of variables which in different configurations determine whether electricity produced from nuclear power or from CCGTs generates higher profits for its investors. These are overnight costs, financing costs, gas prices, carbon prices, profit margins (or mark-ups), the amount of coal with carbon capture and electricity prices. This paper will present the outcomes of the analysis in the context of a liberalised electricity market, looking at the impact of the seven key variables and provide conclusions on the portfolio that a utility would be advised to maintain, given the need to limit risks but also to move to low carbon power generation. Such portfolio diversification would not only limit financial investor risk, but also a number of non-financial risks (climate change, security of supply, accidents). (authors)

  17. DOE Issues Landmark Rule for Risk Insurance for Advanced Nuclear...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The rule establishes the requirements for risk insurance to cover costs associated with certain regulatory or litigation-related delays in the start-up of new nuclear power plants. ...

  18. Maryland Nuclear Profile - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,855,"6,755",90.2,"PWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

  19. New York Nuclear Profile - R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License Expiration Date" 1,581,"4,948",97.2,"PWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel" ,581,"4,948",97.2

  20. Management of National Nuclear Power Programs for assured safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    Topics discussed in this report include: nuclear utility organization; before the Florida Public Service Commission in re: St. Lucie Unit No. 2 cost recovery; nuclear reliability improvement and safety operations; nuclear utility management; training of nuclear facility personnel; US experience in key areas of nuclear safety; the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission - function and process; regulatory considerations of the risk of nuclear power plants; overview of the processes of reliability and risk management; management significance of risk analysis; international and domestic institutional issues for peaceful nuclear uses; the role of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO); and nuclear safety activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

  1. Analysis of nuclear power plant component failures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Items are shown that have caused 90% of the nuclear unit outages and/or deratings between 1971 and 1980 and the magnitude of the problem indicated by an estimate of power replacement cost when the units are out of service or derated. The funding EPRI has provided on these specific items for R and D and technology transfer in the past and the funding planned in the future (1982 to 1986) are shown. EPRI's R and D may help the utilities on only a small part of their nuclear unit outage problems. For example, refueling is the major cause for nuclear unit outages or deratings and the steam turbine is the second major cause for nuclear unit outages; however, these two items have been ranked fairly low on the EPRI priority list for R and D funding. Other items such as nuclear safety (NRC requirements), reactor general, reactor and safety valves and piping, and reactor fuel appear to be receiving more priority than is necessary as determined by analysis of nuclear unit outage causes.

  2. 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 5. Advanced Power Electronics |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 5. Advanced Power Electronics 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 5. Advanced Power Electronics DOE Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review PDF icon 2008_merit_review_5.pdf More Documents & Publications 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 14. Vehicle Systems and Simulation 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 13. Health Impacts 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 10. Fuels Technologies

  3. PROJECT PROFILE: Advanced Thermal Management for Higher Module Power Output

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Advanced Thermal Management for Higher Module Power Output PROJECT PROFILE: Advanced Thermal Management for Higher Module Power Output Funding Opportunity: SuNLaMP SunShot Subprogram: Photovoltaics Location: Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM Amount Awarded: $2,816,911 Higher temperatures of photovoltaic (PV) modules are causing lower than projected module performance. For example, a free-standing Si PV module has 0.4% decrease in efficiency per degree

  4. Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Vehicle Technologies Program Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Susan Rogers eere.energy.gov 2 | Vehicle Technologies Program CHARTER: Develop APEEM technologies to enable large market penetration of electric drive vehicles. Advanced Power Electronics and Electrical Motors (APEEM) HV Battery (200 - 450 V) DC Torque to Drive Wheels 120 V AC Bi-directional Converter Battery Charger Electric Motor Inverter Accessory Loads DC-DC Converter Technical Targets Traction Drive System

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Machinery R&D Annual Progress Report | Department of Energy Power Electronics and Electric Machinery R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machinery R&D Annual Progress Report PDF icon 2008_apeem_report.pdf More Documents & Publications Characterization and Development of Advanced Heat Transfer Technologies An integrated approach towards efficient, scalable, and low cost thermoelectric waste heat recovery devices

  6. Calling All Coders: Help Advance America's Wave Power Industry | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Calling All Coders: Help Advance America's Wave Power Industry Calling All Coders: Help Advance America's Wave Power Industry August 4, 2014 - 5:47pm Addthis The Energy Department has launched the second round of a coding competition to help industry develop new models and tools that improve the design, development, and optimization of marine and hydrokinetic devices. The Energy Department has launched the second round of a coding competition to help industry develop new models and

  7. Advancement Of Tritium Powered Betavoltaic Battery Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staack, G.; Gaillard, J.; Hitchcock, D.; Peters, B.; Colon-Mercado, H.; Teprovich, J.; Coughlin, J.; Neikirk, K.; Fisher, C.

    2015-10-14

    Due to their decades-long service life and reliable power output under extreme conditions, betavoltaic batteries offer distinct advantages over traditional chemical batteries, especially in applications where frequent battery replacement is hazardous, or cost prohibitive. Although many beta emitting isotopes exist, tritium is considered ideal in betavoltaic applications for several reasons: 1) it is a pure beta emitter, 2) the beta is not energetic enough to damage the semiconductor, 3) it has a moderately long half-life, and 4) it is readily available. Unfortunately, the widespread application of tritium powered betavoltaics is limited, in part, by their low power output. This research targets improving the power output of betavoltaics by increasing the flux of beta particles to the energy conversion device (the p-n junction) through the use of low Z nanostructured tritium trapping materials.

  8. Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear Proliferation: Magnitude Matters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Goldston

    2011-04-28

    Integrated energy, environment and economics modeling suggests that worldwide electrical energy use will increase from 2.4 TWe today to ~12 TWe in 2100. It will be challenging to provide 40% of this electrical power from combustion with carbon sequestration, as it will be challenging to provide 30% from renewable energy sources derived from natural energy flows. Thus nuclear power may be needed to provide ~30%, 3600 GWe, by 2100. Calculations of the associated stocks and flows of uranium, plutonium and minor actinides indicate that the proliferation risks at mid-century, using current light-water reactor technology, are daunting. There are institutional arrangements that may be able to provide an acceptable level of risk mitigation, but they will be difficult to implement. If a transition is begun to fast-spectrum reactors at mid-century, without a dramatic change in the proliferation risks of such systems, at the end of the century global nuclear proliferation risks are much greater, and more resistant to mitigation. Fusion energy, if successfully demonstrated to be economically competitive, would provide a source of nuclear power with much lower proliferation risks than fission.

  9. Conference on Advances in Materials Science | National Nuclear Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA

  10. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Nuclear Power Plant Siting Database

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1994-01-28

    This database is a repository of comprehensive licensing and technical reviews of siting regulatory processes and acceptance criteria for advanced light water reactor (ALWR) nuclear power plants. The program is designed to be used by applicants for an early site permit or combined construction permit/operating license (10CFRR522, Subparts A and C) as input for the development of the application. The database is a complete, menu-driven, self-contained package that can search and sort the supplied datamore » by topic, keyword, or other input. The software is designed for operation on IBM compatible computers with DOS.« less

  11. China Guangdong Nuclear Power Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Company Jump to: navigation, search Name: China Guangdong Nuclear Power Company Place: Guangzhou, China Coordinates: 23.129075, 113.264423 Show Map Loading map......

  12. Nuclear Power Corp L T JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Corp L T JV Jump to: navigation, search Name: Nuclear Power Corp-L&T JV Place: Mumbai, Maharashtra, India Zip: 400094 Product: JV between Nuclear Power Corp. and L&T. Coordinates:...

  13. Howard Baker Center for Public Policy Nuclear Power Conference...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Howard Baker Center for Public Policy Nuclear Power Conference Howard Baker Center for Public Policy Nuclear Power Conference October 4, 2007 - 3:14pm Addthis Remarks as Prepared...

  14. Nuclear energy is an important source of power, supplying 20

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    More than 100 nuclear power plants are operating in the U.S., and countries around the world are implementing nuclear power as a carbon-free alternative to fossil fuels. We can ...

  15. Higher energy fast range nuclear data evaluation advances (u) (Conference)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect Conference: Higher energy fast range nuclear data evaluation advances (u) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Higher energy fast range nuclear data evaluation advances (u) Authors: Chadwick, Mark B [1] ; Kawano, Toshihiko [1] ; Talou, Patrick [1] ; Kahler, Albert C., III [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2011-10-21 OSTI Identifier: 1172847 Report Number(s): LA-UR-11-06066; LA-UR-11-6066 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396

  16. Nuclear energy is an important source of power, supplying 20

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy is an important source of power, supplying 20 percent of the nation's electricity. More than 100 nuclear power plants are operating in the U.S., and countries around the world are implementing nuclear power as a carbon-free alternative to fossil fuels. We can maximize the climate and energy security benefits provided by responsible global nuclear energy expansion by developing options to increase the energy extracted from nuclear fuel, improve waste management, and strengthen nuclear

  17. Summary of space nuclear reactor power systems, 1983--1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buden, D.

    1993-08-11

    This report summarizes major developments in the last ten years which have greatly expanded the space nuclear reactor power systems technology base. In the SP-100 program, after a competition between liquid-metal, gas-cooled, thermionic, and heat pipe reactors integrated with various combinations of thermoelectric thermionic, Brayton, Rankine, and Stirling energy conversion systems, three concepts:were selected for further evaluation. In 1985, the high-temperature (1,350 K), lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectric conversion was selected for full scale development. Since then, significant progress has been achieved including the demonstration of a 7-y-life uranium nitride fuel pin. Progress on the lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectrics has progressed from a concept, through a generic flight system design, to the design, development, and testing of specific components. Meanwhile, the USSR in 1987--88 orbited a new generation of nuclear power systems beyond the, thermoelectric plants on the RORSAT satellites. The US has continued to advance its own thermionic fuel element development, concentrating on a multicell fuel element configuration. Experimental work has demonstrated a single cell operating time of about 1 1/2-y. Technology advances have also been made in the Stirling engine; an advanced engine that operates at 1,050 K is ready for testing. Additional concepts have been studied and experiments have been performed on a variety of systems to meet changing needs; such as powers of tens-to-hundreds of megawatts and highly survivable systems of tens-of-kilowatts power.

  18. Linking Humans and Systems in Nuclear Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacques Hugo

    2013-02-01

    Traditional engineering methods do not make provision for the integration of human considerations, while traditional human factors methods do not scale well to the complexity of large-scale nuclear power plant projects. Although the need for up-to-date human factors engineering processes and tools is recognised widely in industry, so far no formal guidance has been developed. This article proposes such a framework.

  19. Radiological Assessment of effects from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    NNSA presentation on Radiological Assessment of effects from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant from May 13, 2011

  20. Microsoft PowerPoint - Advances_Tuttle

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy WebTRAGIS Mark Tuttle Geographic Information Sciences and Technology Group 14May2014 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Advances in Transportation Info Systems Acknowledgment Prepared by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6285, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U. S. Department of Energy under contract no. DEAC05-00OR22725. Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy TRAGIS Background 

  1. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Value-Added Options Carbon Dioxide Capture for Natural Gas and Industrial Applications Carbon Dioxide Capture Technologies Carbon Dioxide Storage Technologies Crosscutting Technologies in Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Fast-spectrum Reactors Geothermal Power High Temperature Reactors Hybrid Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems Hydropower Light Water Reactors Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Nuclear Fuel Cycles Solar Power Stationary Fuel Cells Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Wind Power

  2. Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    Nuclear power is an important source of electric energy and the amount of nuclear-generated electricity continued to grow as the performance of nuclear power plants improved. In 1996, nuclear power plants supplied 23 percent of the electricity production for countries with nuclear units, and 17 percent of the total electricity generated worldwide. However, the likelihood of nuclear power assuming a much larger role or even retaining its current share of electricity generation production is uncertain. The industry faces a complex set of issues including economic competitiveness, social acceptance, and the handling of nuclear waste, all of which contribute to the uncertain future of nuclear power. Nevertheless, for some countries the installed nuclear generating capacity is projected to continue to grow. Insufficient indigenous energy resources and concerns over energy independence make nuclear electric generation a viable option, especially for the countries of the Far East.

  3. Model-free adaptive control of advanced power plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheng, George Shu-Xing; Mulkey, Steven L.; Wang, Qiang

    2015-08-18

    A novel 3-Input-3-Output (3.times.3) Model-Free Adaptive (MFA) controller with a set of artificial neural networks as part of the controller is introduced. A 3.times.3 MFA control system using the inventive 3.times.3 MFA controller is described to control key process variables including Power, Steam Throttle Pressure, and Steam Temperature of boiler-turbine-generator (BTG) units in conventional and advanced power plants. Those advanced power plants may comprise Once-Through Supercritical (OTSC) Boilers, Circulating Fluidized-Bed (CFB) Boilers, and Once-Through Supercritical Circulating Fluidized-Bed (OTSC CFB) Boilers.

  4. Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) R&D Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Advanced Power Electronics & Electric Motors R&D Plenary Session Susan Rogers Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) R&D Vehicle ...

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Motors R&D Annual Progress Report | Department of Energy Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress Report The APEEM subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE) and

  6. Seismic requirements for design of nuclear power plants and nuclear test facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-02-01

    This standard establishes engineering requirements for the design of nuclear power plants and nuclear test facilities to accommodate vibratory effects of earthquakes.

  7. Advanced radioisotope power source options for Pluto Express

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Underwood, M.L.

    1995-12-31

    In the drive to reduce mass and cost, Pluto Express is investigating using an advanced power conversion technology in a small Radioisotope Power Source (RPS) to deliver the required mission power of 74 W(electric) at end of mission. Until this year the baseline power source under consideration has been a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG). This RTG would be a scaled down GPHS RTG with an inventory of 6 General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) and a mass of 17.8 kg. High efficiency, advanced technology conversion options are being examined to lower the power source mass and to reduce the amount of radioisotope needed. Three technologies are being considered as the advanced converter technology: the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC), Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) converters, and Stirling Engines. Conceptual designs for each of these options have been prepared. Each converter would require only 2 GPHSs to provide the mission power and would have a mass of 6.1, 7.2, and 12.4 kg for AMTEC, TPV, and Stirling Engines respectively. This paper reviews the status of each technology and the projected performance of an advanced RPS based on each technology. Based on the projected performance and spacecraft integration issues, Pluto Express would prefer to use the AMTEC based RPS. However, in addition to technical performance, selection of a power technology will be based on many other factors.

  8. Secretary Chu Visits Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant Secretary Chu Visits Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant February 15, 2012 - 3:54pm Addthis Secretary Chu traveled to Waynesboro, Georgia, to visit the Vogtle nuclear power plant, the site of what will be the first new nuclear reactors to be built in the United States in three decades. | Image credit: Southern Company. Secretary Chu traveled to Waynesboro, Georgia, to visit the Vogtle nuclear power plant, the site of what will be the first new nuclear reactors to be built in

  9. Software Framework for Advanced Power Plant Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Widmann; Sorin Munteanu; Aseem Jain; Pankaj Gupta; Mark Moales; Erik Ferguson; Lewis Collins; David Sloan; Woodrow Fiveland; Yi-dong Lang; Larry Biegler; Michael Locke; Simon Lingard; Jay Yun

    2010-08-01

    This report summarizes the work accomplished during the Phase II development effort of the Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS). The objective of the project is to develop the tools to efficiently combine high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models with process modeling software. During the course of the project, a robust integration controller was developed that can be used in any CAPE-OPEN compliant process modeling environment. The controller mediates the exchange of information between the process modeling software and the CFD software. Several approaches to reducing the time disparity between CFD simulations and process modeling have been investigated and implemented. These include enabling the CFD models to be run on a remote cluster and enabling multiple CFD models to be run simultaneously. Furthermore, computationally fast reduced-order models (ROMs) have been developed that can be 'trained' using the results from CFD simulations and then used directly within flowsheets. Unit operation models (both CFD and ROMs) can be uploaded to a model database and shared between multiple users.

  10. Department of Energy Releases Conditional Agreement for New Nuclear Power

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Plants | Department of Energy Conditional Agreement for New Nuclear Power Plants Department of Energy Releases Conditional Agreement for New Nuclear Power Plants September 25, 2007 - 2:49pm Addthis Marks initial step for sponsors of new nuclear plants to qualify for up to $2 billion in federal risk insurance WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today released a Conditional Agreement for companies building new nuclear power plants in the United

  11. Expanding Options for Nuclear Power | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Expanding Options for Nuclear Power Expanding Options for Nuclear Power April 15, 2013 - 10:12am Addthis The development of clean, affordable nuclear power options is a key element of the Energy Department's Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap. As a part of this strategy, a high priority of the Department has been to help accelerate the timelines for the commercialization and deployment of small modular reactor (SMR) technologies through the SMR Licensing Technical Support program. |

  12. Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    This report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the worldwide nuclear fuel market. Long term projections of U.S. nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed. A discussion on decommissioning of nuclear power plants is included.

  13. UNDERSTANDING SEISMIC DESIGN CRITERIA FOR JAPANESE NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    UNDERSTANDING SEISMIC DESIGN CRITERIA FOR JAPANESE NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Y.J. Park and C.H. Hofmayer Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, Long Island, New York 11973 J.F. Costello U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Washington, D.C. 20555 ABSTRACT This paper summarizes the results of recent survey studies on the seismic design practice for nuclear power plants in Japan. The seismic design codes and standards for both nuclear as well as non- nuclear structures have been reviewed and summarized.

  14. International Working Group Meeting Focuses on Nuclear Power Infrastructure

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Development and Financing of New Nuclear Projects | Department of Energy Financing of New Nuclear Projects International Working Group Meeting Focuses on Nuclear Power Infrastructure Development and Financing of New Nuclear Projects December 15, 2009 - 1:09pm Addthis VIENNA, AUSTRIA - The multi-nation Infrastructure Development Working Group (IDWG) held its fifth meeting and also a workshop on the financing of international nuclear power projects in Vienna, Austria, on December 9-10, 2009.

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - Advances_Fuller [Compatibility Mode]

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    9/2014 1 Advances in Transportation Technologies Safety is our Priority  CAST Specialty and Visionary Solutions sought to improve our safety through technology advances  These systems were not contract required  We continue to seek ways to improve ZONAR  Pre-Trip and Post-Trip Vehicle Inspections  EVIR simplifies the entire pre- and post-trip truck inspection process improving safety, efficiency and CSA compliance scores. It is easy to use, captures powerful new fleet performance

  16. Nuclear Energy | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Energy Argonne has contributed to the development of civilian nuclear power for over 50 years. Our scientists and engineers conduct research in advanced nuclear energy ...

  17. DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Construction | Department of Energy Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction October 2, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced it has received 19 Part I applications from 17 electric power companies for federal loan guarantees to support the construction of 14 nuclear power plants in response to its June 30, 2008 solicitation. The

  18. Human Factors Considerations in New Nuclear Power Plants: Detailed Analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHara,J.; Higgins, J.; Brown, W.; Fink, R.

    2008-02-14

    This Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored study has identified human-performance issues in new and advanced nuclear power plants. To identify the issues, current industry developments and trends were evaluated in the areas of reactor technology, instrumentation and control technology, human-system integration technology, and human factors engineering (HFE) methods and tools. The issues were organized into seven high-level HFE topic areas: Role of Personnel and Automation, Staffing and Training, Normal Operations Management, Disturbance and Emergency Management, Maintenance and Change Management, Plant Design and Construction, and HFE Methods and Tools. The issues where then prioritized into four categories using a 'Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table' methodology based on evaluations provided by 14 independent subject matter experts. The subject matter experts were knowledgeable in a variety of disciplines. Vendors, utilities, research organizations and regulators all participated. Twenty issues were categorized into the top priority category. This Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) technical report provides the detailed methodology, issue analysis, and results. A summary of the results of this study can be found in NUREG/CR-6947. The research performed for this project has identified a large number of human-performance issues for new control stations and new nuclear power plant designs. The information gathered in this project can serve as input to the development of a long-term strategy and plan for addressing human performance in these areas through regulatory research. Addressing human-performance issues will provide the technical basis from which regulatory review guidance can be developed to meet these challenges. The availability of this review guidance will help set clear expectations for how the NRC staff will evaluate new designs, reduce regulatory uncertainty, and provide a well-defined path to new nuclear power plant licensing.

  19. Development of a propulsion system and component test facility for advanced radioisotope powered Mars Hopper platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert C. O'Brien; Nathan D. Jerred; Steven D. Howe

    2011-02-01

    Verification and validation of design and modeling activities for radioisotope powered Mars Hopper platforms undertaken at the Center for Space Nuclear Research is essential for proof of concept. Previous research at the center has driven the selection of advanced material combinations; some of which require specialized handling capabilities. The development of a closed and contained test facility to forward this research is discussed within this paper.

  20. Energy Department Nuclear Systems Are Powering Mars Rover | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Nuclear Systems Are Powering Mars Rover Energy Department Nuclear Systems Are Powering Mars Rover November 28, 2011 - 2:00pm Addthis The Mars Science Laboratory rover, which launched from Cape Canaveral this weekend, is powered by nuclear systems developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), marking the 28th space mission supported by nuclear energy. This year also marks the 50th anniversary of nuclear-powered space exploration. To commemorate the launch, DOE released a new video

  1. Energy Department Nuclear Systems Are Powering Mars Rover | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Nuclear Systems Are Powering Mars Rover Energy Department Nuclear Systems Are Powering Mars Rover November 28, 2011 - 12:14pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The Mars Science Laboratory rover, which launched from Cape Canaveral this weekend, is powered by nuclear systems developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), marking the 28th space mission supported by nuclear energy. This year also marks the 50th anniversary of nuclear-powered space exploration. To commemorate the launch, DOE

  2. HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH,RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

    2003-06-01

    OAK B202 HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER. Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from fossil fuels has trace contaminants (primarily carbon monoxide) that are detrimental to precious metal catalyzed fuel cells, as is now recognized by many of the world's largest automobile companies. Thermochemical hydrogen will not contain carbon monoxide as an impurity at any level. Electrolysis, the alternative process for producing hydrogen using nuclear energy, suffers from thermodynamic inefficiencies in both the production of electricity and in electrolytic parts of the process. The efficiency of electrolysis (electricity to hydrogen) is currently about 80%. Electric power generation efficiency would have to exceed 65% (thermal to electrical) for the combined efficiency to exceed the 52% (thermal to hydrogen) calculated for one thermochemical cycle. Thermochemical water-splitting cycles have been studied, at various levels of effort, for the past 35 years. They were extensively studied in the late 70s and early 80s but have received little attention in the past 10 years, particularly in the U.S. While there is no question about the technical feasibility and the potential for high efficiency, cycles with proven low cost and high efficiency have yet to be developed commercially. Over 100 cycles have been proposed, but substantial research has been executed on only a few. This report describes work accomplished during a three-year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.'' The emphasis of the first phase was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen from water in which the primary energy input is high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear reactor and to select one (or, at most three) for further detailed consideration. During Phase 1, an exhaustive literature search was performed to locate all cycles previously proposed. The cycles located were screened using objective criteria to determine which could benefit, in terms of efficiency and cost, from the high-temperature capabilities of advanced nuclear reactors. The more promising cycles were then analyzed in depth as to their adaptability to advanced high-temperature nuclear reactors. As a result, the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) cycle was selected for integration into the advanced nuclear reactor system. In Phases 2 and 3, alternative flowsheets were developed and compared. This effort entailed a considerable effort into developing the solution thermodynamics pertinent to the S-I cycle.

  3. Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Systems. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, July 31-August 3, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberto, J.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Gibala, R.; Zinkle, S.; Miller, J.R.; Pimblott, S.; Burns, C.; Raymond, K.; Grimes, R.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.; Clark, S.; Ewing, R.; Wagner, A.; Yip, S.; Buchanan, M.; Crabtree, G.; Hemminger, J.; Poate, J.; Miller, J.C.; Edelstein, N.; Fitzsimmons, T.; Gruzalski, G.; Michaels, G.; Morss, L.; Peters, M.; Talamini, K.

    2006-10-01

    The global utilization of nuclear energy has come a long way from its humble beginnings in the first sustained nuclear reaction at the University of Chicago in 1942. Today, there are over 440 nuclear reactors in 31 countries producing approximately 16% of the electrical energy used worldwide. In the United States, 104 nuclear reactors currently provide 19% of electrical energy used nationally. The International Atomic Energy Agency projects significant growth in the utilization of nuclear power over the next several decades due to increasing demand for energy and environmental concerns related to emissions from fossil plants. There are 28 new nuclear plants currently under construction including 10 in China, 8 in India, and 4 in Russia. In the United States, there have been notifications to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission of intentions to apply for combined construction and operating licenses for 27 new units over the next decade. The projected growth in nuclear power has focused increasing attention on issues related to the permanent disposal of nuclear waste, the proliferation of nuclear weapons technologies and materials, and the sustainability of a once-through nuclear fuel cycle. In addition, the effective utilization of nuclear power will require continued improvements in nuclear technology, particularly related to safety and efficiency. In all of these areas, the performance of materials and chemical processes under extreme conditions is a limiting factor. The related basic research challenges represent some of the most demanding tests of our fundamental understanding of materials science and chemistry, and they provide significant opportunities for advancing basic science with broad impacts for nuclear reactor materials, fuels, waste forms, and separations techniques. Of particular importance is the role that new nanoscale characterization and computational tools can play in addressing these challenges. These tools, which include DOE synchrotron X-ray sources, neutron sources, nanoscale science research centers, and supercomputers, offer the opportunity to transform and accelerate the fundamental materials and chemical sciences that underpin technology development for advanced nuclear energy systems. The fundamental challenge is to understand and control chemical and physical phenomena in multi-component systems from femto-seconds to millennia, at temperatures to 1000?C, and for radiation doses to hundreds of displacements per atom (dpa). This is a scientific challenge of enormous proportions, with broad implications in the materials science and chemistry of complex systems. New understanding is required for microstructural evolution and phase stability under relevant chemical and physical conditions, chemistry and structural evolution at interfaces, chemical behavior of actinide and fission-product solutions, and nuclear and thermomechanical phenomena in fuels and waste forms. First-principles approaches are needed to describe f-electron systems, design molecules for separations, and explain materials failure mechanisms. Nanoscale synthesis and characterization methods are needed to understand and design materials and interfaces with radiation, temperature, and corrosion resistance. Dynamical measurements are required to understand fundamental physical and chemical phenomena. New multiscale approaches are needed to integrate this knowledge into accurate models of relevant phenomena and complex systems across multiple length and time scales.

  4. Klotz visits Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration Klotz visits Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs

  5. Bettis and Knolls Atomic Power Laboratories | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration and Knolls Atomic Power Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply

  6. Solar power purchase for DOE laboratories | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration Solar power purchase for DOE laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs

  7. Development and Demonstration of Advanced Forecasting, Power and Environmental Planning and Management Tools and Best Practices

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development and Demonstration of Advanced Forecasting, Power and Environmental Planning and Management Tools and Best Practices

  8. Reducing Office Plug Loads through Simple and Inexpensive Advanced Power Strips: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metzger, I.; Sheppy, M.; Cutler, D.

    2013-07-01

    This paper documents the process (and results) of applying Advanced Power Strips with various control approaches.

  9. Advanced Thermal Interface Materials (TIMs) for Power Electronics |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Thermal Interface Materials (TIMs) for Power Electronics Advanced Thermal Interface Materials (TIMs) for Power Electronics 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon ape_10_narumanchi.pdf More Documents & Publications Thermal Performance and Reliability of Bonded Interfaces Thermal Performance and Reliability of Bonded Interfaces Vehicle Technologies Office:

  10. Project Profile: Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant Project Profile: Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant Abengoa logo Abengoa, under the Baseload CSP FOA, will demonstrate a 100-megawatt electrical (MWe) central receiver plant using nitrate salt as the receiver coolant, thermal storage medium, and heat transport fluid in the steam generator. Approach Photo of two lit towers surrounded by much smaller blue flat plates that are mounted on the ground. The plan is to

  11. Thermal Stress and Reliability for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Machines | Department of Energy 09 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon ape_14_okeefe.pdf More Documents & Publications Thermal Stress and Reliability for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration Thermal Performance and Reliability of Bonded Interfaces

  12. Apparatus for advancing a wellbore using high power laser energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zediker, Mark S.; Land, Mark S.; Rinzler, Charles C.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F.

    2014-09-02

    Delivering high power laser energy to form a borehole deep into the earth using laser energy. Down hole laser tools, laser systems and laser delivery techniques for advancement, workover and completion activities. A laser bottom hole assembly (LBHA) for the delivery of high power laser energy to the surfaces of a borehole, which assembly may have laser optics, a fluid path for debris removal and a mechanical means to remove earth.

  13. BIOMASS GASIFICATION AND POWER GENERATION USING ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Liscinsky

    2002-10-20

    A multidisciplined team led by the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) and consisting of Pratt & Whitney Power Systems (PWPS), the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), KraftWork Systems, Inc. (kWS), and the Connecticut Resource Recovery Authority (CRRA) has evaluated a variety of gasified biomass fuels, integrated into advanced gas turbine-based power systems. The team has concluded that a biomass integrated gasification combined-cycle (BIGCC) plant with an overall integrated system efficiency of 45% (HHV) at emission levels of less than half of New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) is technically and economically feasible. The higher process efficiency in itself reduces consumption of premium fuels currently used for power generation including those from foreign sources. In addition, the advanced gasification process can be used to generate fuels and chemicals, such as low-cost hydrogen and syngas for chemical synthesis, as well as baseload power. The conceptual design of the plant consists of an air-blown circulating fluidized-bed Advanced Transport Gasifier and a PWPS FT8 TwinPac{trademark} aeroderivative gas turbine operated in combined cycle to produce {approx}80 MWe. This system uses advanced technology commercial products in combination with components in advanced development or demonstration stages, thereby maximizing the opportunity for early implementation. The biofueled power system was found to have a levelized cost of electricity competitive with other new power system alternatives including larger scale natural gas combined cycles. The key elements are: (1) An Advanced Transport Gasifier (ATG) circulating fluid-bed gasifier having wide fuel flexibility and high gasification efficiency; (2) An FT8 TwinPac{trademark}-based combined cycle of approximately 80 MWe; (3) Sustainable biomass primary fuel source at low cost and potentially widespread availability-refuse-derived fuel (RDF); (4) An overall integrated system that exceeds the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal of 40% (HHV) efficiency at emission levels well below the DOE suggested limits; and (5) An advanced biofueled power system whose levelized cost of electricity can be competitive with other new power system alternatives.

  14. Advanced Biofuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  15. Advanced Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  16. Department of Energy Issues Final $12.5 Billion Advanced Nuclear Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Loan Guarantee Solicitation | Department of Energy Issues Final $12.5 Billion Advanced Nuclear Energy Loan Guarantee Solicitation Department of Energy Issues Final $12.5 Billion Advanced Nuclear Energy Loan Guarantee Solicitation December 10, 2014 - 9:01am Addthis News Media Contact 202-586-4940 Department of Energy Issues Final $12.5 Billion Advanced Nuclear Energy Loan Guarantee Solicitation WASHINGTON D.C. - Today, the Department of Energy issued the Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects loan

  17. At Vogtle, Big Results with Nuclear Power | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    At Vogtle, Big Results with Nuclear Power At Vogtle, Big Results with Nuclear Power February 20, 2014 - 1:29pm Addthis Construction work inside the Vogtle 3 and 4 module assembly building. | Photo courtesy of Georgia Power Company. Construction work inside the Vogtle 3 and 4 module assembly building. | Photo courtesy of Georgia Power Company. A look inside the Vogtle Unite 3 containment vessel bottom head. | Photo courtesy of Georgia Power Company. A look inside the Vogtle Unite 3 containment

  18. Results of Laboratory Testing of Advanced Power Strips

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Sparn, L. Earle

    2012-08-01

    Presented at the ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings on August 12-17, 2012, this presentation reports on laboratory tests of 20 currently available advanced power strip products, which reduce wasteful electricity use of miscellaneous electric loads in buildings.

  19. Advanced Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power Losses

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power Losses Jason Lai Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University June 10, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Project ID: APE011 2 Outline * Overview * Objectives * Milestones * Approaches * Accomplishments * Future Work * Summary 3 Overview * Start - Sep 2007 * Finish - Sep 2010 * 75% Complete * Barriers addressed - Inverter Cost - Inverter Weight and

  20. FY2009 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Power Electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, Susan A.

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) subprogram within the Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on understanding and improving the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency.

  1. Foundational development of an advanced nuclear reactor integrated safety code.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarno, Kevin; Lorber, Alfred Abraham; Pryor, Richard J.; Spotz, William F.; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Belcourt, Kenneth; Hooper, Russell Warren; Humphries, Larry LaRon

    2010-02-01

    This report describes the activities and results of a Sandia LDRD project whose objective was to develop and demonstrate foundational aspects of a next-generation nuclear reactor safety code that leverages advanced computational technology. The project scope was directed towards the systems-level modeling and simulation of an advanced, sodium cooled fast reactor, but the approach developed has a more general applicability. The major accomplishments of the LDRD are centered around the following two activities. (1) The development and testing of LIME, a Lightweight Integrating Multi-physics Environment for coupling codes that is designed to enable both 'legacy' and 'new' physics codes to be combined and strongly coupled using advanced nonlinear solution methods. (2) The development and initial demonstration of BRISC, a prototype next-generation nuclear reactor integrated safety code. BRISC leverages LIME to tightly couple the physics models in several different codes (written in a variety of languages) into one integrated package for simulating accident scenarios in a liquid sodium cooled 'burner' nuclear reactor. Other activities and accomplishments of the LDRD include (a) further development, application and demonstration of the 'non-linear elimination' strategy to enable physics codes that do not provide residuals to be incorporated into LIME, (b) significant extensions of the RIO CFD code capabilities, (c) complex 3D solid modeling and meshing of major fast reactor components and regions, and (d) an approach for multi-physics coupling across non-conformal mesh interfaces.

  2. President Obama Announces Loan Guarantees to Construct New Nuclear Power

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reactors in Georgia | Department of Energy Loan Guarantees to Construct New Nuclear Power Reactors in Georgia President Obama Announces Loan Guarantees to Construct New Nuclear Power Reactors in Georgia February 16, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington D.C. --- Underscoring his Administration's commitment to jumpstarting the nation's nuclear power industry, President Obama today announced that the Department of Energy has offered conditional commitments for a total of $8.33 billion in loan

  3. Nuclear Systems Powering a Mission to Mars | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems Powering a Mission to Mars Nuclear Systems Powering a Mission to Mars November 28, 2011 - 11:23am Addthis Radioisotope Power Systems, a strong partnership between the Energy Department's Office of Nuclear Energy and NASA, has been providing the energy for deep space exploration. Assistant Secretary Lyons Assistant Secretary Lyons Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Curiosity Mission: investigate whether the Gale Crater on Mars has ever offered environmental conditions that support the

  4. Guidance for Deployment of Mobile Technologies for Nuclear Power Plant

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Field Workers | Department of Energy Guidance for Deployment of Mobile Technologies for Nuclear Power Plant Field Workers Guidance for Deployment of Mobile Technologies for Nuclear Power Plant Field Workers This report is a guidance document prepared for the benefit of commercial nuclear power plants' (NPPs) supporting organizations and personnel who are considering or undertaking deployment of mobile technology for the purpose of improving human performance and plant status control (PSC)

  5. Deputy Secretary Poneman Delivers Remarks on Nuclear Power at Tokyo

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    American Center in Japan | Department of Energy Deputy Secretary Poneman Delivers Remarks on Nuclear Power at Tokyo American Center in Japan Deputy Secretary Poneman Delivers Remarks on Nuclear Power at Tokyo American Center in Japan December 15, 2011 - 1:57pm Addthis Energy Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman spoke at the Tokyo American Center today about nuclear power after Fukushima. Excerpts and full text of remarks, as prepared for delivery, are below: "As two of the nations

  6. SUPERCRITICAL STEAM CYCLE FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsiklauri, Georgi V.; Talbert, Robert J.; Schmitt, Bruce E.; Filippov, Gennady A.; Bogojavlensky, Roald G.; Grishanin, Evgeny I.

    2005-07-01

    Revolutionary improvement of the nuclear plant safety and economy with light water reactors can be reached with the application of micro-fuel elements (MFE) directly cooled by a supercritical pressure light-water coolant-moderator. There are considerable advantages of the MFE as compared with the traditional fuel rods, such as: Using supercritical and superheated steam considerably increases the thermal efficiency of the Rankine cycle up to 44-45%. Strong negative coolant and void reactivity coefficients with a very short thermal delay time allow the reactor to shutdown quickly in the event of a reactivity or power excursion. Core melting and the creation of corium during severe accidents are impossible. The heat transfer surface area is larger by several orders of magnitude due to the small spherical dimensions of the MFE. The larger heat exchange surface significantly simplifies residual heat removal by natural convection and radiation from the core to a subsequent passive system of heat removal.

  7. UNDERSTANDING SEISMIC DESIGN CRITERIA FOR JAPANESE NUCLEAR POWER...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MITI Orders and Notifications: e MITI Order No. 62, "Technical Standards for Nuclear Power Plant Facilities", 1989 (Ref lo). MITI Notification No. 501, "Technical Standards for...

  8. Microsoft Word - Department of Energy Nuclear Power Solicitation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    70 3 Full Announcement Loan Guarantee Solicitation for Applications for Nuclear Power Facilities I. Solicitation Description A. Purpose of Solicitation This...

  9. Guangdong Nuclear Power and New Energy Industrial Investment...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Investment Fund Management Company Jump to: navigation, search Name: Guangdong Nuclear Power and New Energy Industrial Investment Fund Management Company Place: Shenzhen,...

  10. State Nuclear Power Technology Corporation SNPTC | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Corporation SNPTC Jump to: navigation, search Name: State Nuclear Power Technology Corporation (SNPTC) Place: Beijing, Beijing Municipality, China Zip: 100032 Product:...

  11. Guidance for Deployment of Mobile Technologies for Nuclear Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guidance for Deployment of Mobile Technologies for Nuclear PowerPlant Field Workers ... for the purpose of improving human performance and plant status control (PSC) for ...

  12. Hans Bethe, Powering the Stars, and Nuclear Physics

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    During his long life, he uncovered the secrets powering the stars, published the standard work on nuclear physics, built atomic weapons, and called for a halt to their ...

  13. DC power transmission from the Leningradskaya Nuclear Power Plant to Vyborg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koshcheev, L. A.; Shul'ginov, N. G.

    2011-05-15

    DC power transmission from the Leningradskaya Nuclear Power Plant (LAES) to city of Vyborg is proposed. This will provide a comprehensive solution to several important problems in the development and control of the unified power system (EES) of Russia.

  14. Prognostics and Life Beyond 60 for Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard J. Bond; Pradeep Ramuhalli; Magdy S. Tawfik; Nancy J. Lybeck

    2011-06-01

    Safe, secure, reliable and sustainable energy supply is vital for advanced and industrialized life styles. To meet growing energy demand there is interest in longer term operation (LTO) for the existing nuclear power plant fleet and enhancing capabilities in new build. There is increasing use of condition based maintenance (CBM) for active components and periodic in service inspection (ISI) for passive systems: there is growing interest in deploying on-line monitoring. Opportunities exist to move beyond monitoring and diagnosis based on pattern recognition and anomaly detection to and prognostics with the ability to provide an estimate of remaining useful life (RUL). The adoption of digital I&C systems provides a framework within which added functionality including on-line monitoring can be deployed, and used to maintain and even potentially enhance safety, while at the same time improving planning and reducing both operations and maintenance costs.

  15. Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mekhiche, Mike; Dufera, Hiz; Montagna, Deb

    2012-10-29

    The project conducted under DOE contract DE?EE0002649 is defined as the Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Converter. The overall project is split into a seven?stage, gated development program. The work conducted under the DOE contract is OPT Stage Gate III work and a portion of Stage Gate IV work of the seven stage product development process. The project effort includes Full Concept Design & Prototype Assembly Testing building on our existing PowerBuoy? technology to deliver a device with much increased power delivery. Scaling?up from 150kW to 500kW power generating capacity required changes in the PowerBuoy design that addressed cost reduction and mass manufacturing by implementing a Design for Manufacturing (DFM) approach. The design changes also focused on reducing PowerBuoy Installation, Operation and Maintenance (IO&M) costs which are essential to reducing the overall cost of energy. In this design, changes to the core PowerBuoy technology were implemented to increase capability and reduce both CAPEX and OPEX costs. OPT conceptually envisaged moving from a floating structure to a seabed structure. The design change from a floating structure to seabed structure would provide the implementation of stroke? unlimited Power Take?Off (PTO) which has a potential to provide significant power delivery improvement and transform the wave energy industry if proven feasible.

  16. Sandia Nuclear Power Safety Expert Elected to National Academy of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering Nuclear Power Safety Expert Elected to National Academy of Engineering - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing

  17. United States and Italy Sign Agreements to Advance Developments...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    today signed two important nuclear energy agreements that may lead to construction of new nuclear power plants and improved cooperation on advanced nuclear energy systems and fuel...

  18. Steam turbine development for advanced combined cycle power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oeynhausen, H.; Bergmann, D.; Balling, L.; Termuehlen, H.

    1996-12-31

    For advanced combined cycle power plants, the proper selection of steam turbine models is required to achieve optimal performance. The advancements in gas turbine technology must be followed by advances in the combined cycle steam turbine design. On the other hand, building low-cost gas turbines and steam turbines is desired which, however, can only be justified if no compromise is made in regard to their performance. The standard design concept of two-casing single-flow turbines seems to be the right choice for most of the present and future applications worldwide. Only for very specific applications it might be justified to select another design concept as a more suitable option.

  19. Advanced Wireless Power Transfer Vehicle and Infrastructure Analysis (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonder, J.; Brooker, A.; Burton, E.; Wang, J.; Konan, A.

    2014-06-01

    This presentation discusses current research at NREL on advanced wireless power transfer vehicle and infrastructure analysis. The potential benefits of E-roadway include more electrified driving miles from battery electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, or even properly equipped hybrid electric vehicles (i.e., more electrified miles could be obtained from a given battery size, or electrified driving miles could be maintained while using smaller and less expensive batteries, thereby increasing cost competitiveness and potential market penetration). The system optimization aspect is key given the potential impact of this technology on the vehicles, the power grid and the road infrastructure.

  20. Thermal Stress and Reliability for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Machines | Department of Energy 10 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon ape017_okeefe_2010_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Thermal Performance and Reliability of Bonded Interfaces Physics of Failure of Electrical Interconnects Thermal Stress and Reliability for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines

  1. Energy Department Nuclear Systems Are Powering Mars Rover

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    doe logo U.S. Department of Energy Office of Public Affairs Media Contact: 202-586-4940 For Immediate Release: Monday, November 28, 2011 Energy Department Nuclear Systems Are Powering Mars Rover 2011 Marks 50th Anniversary of Nuclear-Powered Space Missions Washington, D.C. � The Mars Science Laboratory rover, which launched from Cape Canaveral this weekend, is powered by nuclear systems developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), marking the 28th space mission supported by nuclear

  2. Advanced austenitic alloys for fossil power systems. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swindeman, R.W.; Cole, N.C.; Canonico, D.A.; Henry, J.F.

    1998-08-01

    In 1993, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and ABB Combustion Engineering t examine advanced alloys for fossil power systems. Specifically, the use of advanced austenitic stainless steels for superheater/reheater construction in supercritical boilers was examined. The strength of cold-worked austenitic stainless steels was reviewed and compared to the strength and ductility of advanced austenitic stainless steels. The advanced stainless steels were found to retain their strength to very long times at temperatures where cold-worked standard grades of austenitic stainless steels became weak. Further, the steels exhibited better long-time stability than the stabilized 300 series stainless steels in either the annealed or cold worked conditions. Type 304H mill-annealed tubing was provided to ORNL for testing of base metal and butt welds. The tubing was found to fall within range of expected strength for 304H stainless steel. The composite 304/308 stainless steel was found to be stronger than typical for the weldment. Boiler tubing was removed from a commercial boiler for replacement by newer steels, but restraints imposed by the boiler owners did not permit the installation of the advanced steels, so a standard 32 stainless steel was used as a replacement. The T91 removed from the boiler was characterized.

  3. Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company, Ltd Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd. (KHNP), a large electric company based in the Republic of Korea, operates 20 nuclear power plants and has 8 more planned or under construction. The Korean government has given KHNP responsibility for permanent disposal of nuclear waste. The company has turned to Sandia' s Defense Waste Management Programs in Carlsbad, NM to lead an educational project for its staff on repository sciences based on Sandia's well- known expertise in the field. Sandia has

  4. High Level Requirements for the Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rich Johnson; Hyung Lee; Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

    2011-09-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), has been tasked with the important mission of ensuring that nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy source in the U.S. The motivations behind this mission include cost-effectively meeting the expected increases in the power needs of the country, reducing carbon emissions and reducing dependence on foreign energy sources. In the near term, to ensure that nuclear power remains a key element of U.S. energy strategy and portfolio, the DOE-NE will be working with the nuclear industry to support safe and efficient operations of existing nuclear power plants. In the long term, to meet the increasing energy needs of the U.S., the DOE-NE will be investing in research and development (R&D) and working in concert with the nuclear industry to build and deploy new, safer and more efficient nuclear power plants. The safe and efficient operations of existing nuclear power plants and designing, licensing and deploying new reactor designs, however, will require focused R&D programs as well as the extensive use and leveraging of advanced modeling and simulation (M&S). M&S will play a key role in ensuring safe and efficient operations of existing and new nuclear reactors. The DOE-NE has been actively developing and promoting the use of advanced M&S in reactor design and analysis through its R&D programs, e.g., the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) and Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) programs. Also, nuclear reactor vendors are already using CFD and CSM, for design, analysis, and licensing. However, these M&S tools cannot be used with confidence for nuclear reactor applications unless accompanied and supported by verification and validation (V&V) and uncertainty quantification (UQ) processes and procedures which provide quantitative measures of uncertainty for specific applications. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Utah State University and others with the objective of establishing a comprehensive and web-accessible knowledge base that will provide technical services and resources for V&V and UQ of M&S in nuclear energy sciences and engineering. The knowledge base will serve as an important resource for technical exchange and collaboration that will enable credible and reliable computational models and simulations for application to nuclear reactor design, analysis and licensing. NE-KAMS will serve as a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, academia, the national laboratories, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the public and will help ensure the safe, economical and reliable operation of existing and future nuclear reactors. From its inception, NE-KAMS will directly support nuclear energy research, development and demonstration programs within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the CASL, NEAMS, Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS), Small Modular Reactors (SMR), and Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP) programs. These programs all involve M&S of nuclear reactor systems, components and processes, and it is envisioned that NE-KAMS will help to coordinate and facilitate collaboration and sharing of resources and expertise for V&V and UQ across these programs.

  5. Advanced Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imaging - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  6. Secretary Bodman Announces Federal Risk Insurance for Nuclear Power Plants

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Touts Robust Economy | Department of Energy Federal Risk Insurance for Nuclear Power Plants & Touts Robust Economy Secretary Bodman Announces Federal Risk Insurance for Nuclear Power Plants & Touts Robust Economy August 4, 2006 - 8:42am Addthis ATLANTA, GA - After touring Georgia Power and speaking to its employees, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced completion of the final rule that establishes the process for utility companies building

  7. Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) R&D Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) R&D Program Overview Advnaced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) R&D Program ...

  8. Advanced Power Strips (APS): How to Use in an Office Setting (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-03-01

    This poster describes the difference between the three outlet types in an advanced power strip and discusses their uses.

  9. Choose the Right Advanced Power Strip for You | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Choose the Right Advanced Power Strip for You Choose the Right Advanced Power Strip for You October 28, 2013 - 11:33am Addthis Choose the right advanced power strip based on your habits to reduce the electricity wasted when your electronic devices are idle. Choose the right advanced power strip based on your habits to reduce the electricity wasted when your electronic devices are idle. Lieko Earle, Ph.D. Senior Engineer, Residential Buildings, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Bethany Sparn,

  10. A Public-Private-Academic Partnership to Advance Solar Power Forecasting |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy A Public-Private-Academic Partnership to Advance Solar Power Forecasting A Public-Private-Academic Partnership to Advance Solar Power Forecasting UCAR logo2.jpg The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) will develop a solar power forecasting system that advances the state of the science through cutting-edge research. APPROACH UCAR value chain.png The team will develop a solar power forecasting system that advances the state of the science through

  11. Owners of nuclear power plants: Percentage ownership of commercial nuclear power plants by utility companies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, R.S.

    1987-08-01

    The following list indicates percentage ownership of commercial nuclear power plants by utility companies as of June 1, 1987. The list includes all plants licensed to operate, under construction, docked for NRC safety and environmental reviews, or under NRC antitrust review. It does not include those plants announced but not yet under review or those plants formally canceled. In many cases, ownership may be in the process of changing as a result of altered financial conditions, changed power needs, and other reasons. However, this list reflects only those ownership percentages of which the NRC has been formally notified. Part I lists plants alphabetically with their associated applicants/licensees and percentage ownership. Part II lists applicants/licensees alphabetically with their associated plants and percentage ownership. Part I also indicates which plants have received operating licenses (OL's). Footnotes for both parts appear at the end of this document.

  12. Recent advances in nuclear fission theory: pre- and post-scission physics

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Recent advances in nuclear fission theory: pre- and post-scission physics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Recent advances in nuclear fission theory: pre- and post-scission physics Recent advances in the modeling of the nuclear fission process for data evaluation purposes are reviewed. In particular, it is stressed that a more comprehensive approach to fission data is needed if predictive capability is to be achieved. The link between pre-

  13. Impact of Nuclear Energy Futures on Advanced Fuel Cycle Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent W. Dixon; Steven J. Piet

    2004-10-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act requires the Secretary of Energy to inform Congress before 2010 on the need for a second geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel. By that time, the spent fuel discharged from current commercial reactors will exceed the statutory limit of the first repository (63,000 MTiHM commercial, 7,000 MT non-commercial). There are several approaches to eliminate the need for another repository in this century. This paper presents a high-level analysis of these spent fuel management options in the context of a full range of possible nuclear energy futures. The analysis indicates the best option to implement varies depending on the nuclear energy future selected. The first step in understanding the need for different spent fuel management approaches is to understand the size of potential spent fuel inventories. A full range of potential futures for domestic commercial nuclear energy is considered. These energy futures are as follows: 1. Existing License Completion - Based on existing spent fuel inventories plus extrapolation of future plant-by-plant discharges until the end of each operating license, including known license extensions. 2. Extended License Completion - Based on existing spent fuel inventories plus a plant-by-plant extrapolation of future discharges assuming on all operating plants having one 20-year extension. 3. Continuing Level Energy Generation - Based on extension of the current ~100 GWe installed commercial base and average spent fuel discharge of 2100 MT/yr through the year 2100. 4. Continuing Market Share Generation Based on a 1.8% compounded growth of the electricity market through the year 2100, matched by growing nuclear capacity and associated spent fuel discharge. 5. Growing Market Share Generation - Extension of current nuclear capacity and associated spent fuel discharge through 2100 with 3.2% growth representing 1.5% market growth (all energy, not just electricity) and 1.7% share growth. Share growth results in tripling market share by 2100 from the current 8.4% to 25%, equivalent to continuing the average market growth of last 50 years for an additional 100 years. Five primary spent fuel management strategies are assessed against each of the energy futures to determine the number of geological repositories needed and how the first repository would be used. The geological repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has the physical potential to accommodate all the spent fuel that will be generated by the current fleet of domestic commercial nuclear reactors, even with license extensions. If new nuclear plants are built in the future as replacements or additions, the United States will need to adopt spent fuel treatment to extend the life of the repository. Should a significant number of new nuclear plants be built, advanced fuel recycling will be needed to fully manage the spent fuel within a single repository. The analysis also considers the timeframe for most efficient implementation of new spent fuel management strategies. The mix of unprocessed spent fuel and processed high level waste in Yucca Mountain varies with each future and strategy. Either recycling must start before there is too much unprocessed waste emplaced or unprocessed waste will have to be retrieved later with corresponding costs. For each case, the latest date to implement reprocessing without subsequent retrieval is determined.

  14. Recent advances in phosphate laser glasses for high power applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J.H.

    1996-05-14

    Recent advances in Nd-doped phosphate laser glasses for high-peak-power and high-average-power applications are reviewed. Compositional studies have progressed to the point that glasses can be tailored to have specific properties for specific applications. Non-radiative relaxation effects can be accurately modeled and empirical expressions have been developed to evaluate both intrinsic (structural) and extrinsic (contamination induced) relaxation effects. Losses due to surface scattering and bulk glass absorption have been carefully measured and can be accurately predicted. Improvements in processing have lead to high damage threshold (e.g. Pt inclusion free) and high thermal shock resistant glasses with improved edge claddings. High optical quality pieces up to 79 x 45 x 4cm{sup 3} have been made and methods for continuous melting laser glass are under development.

  15. Advanced Power Batteries for Renewable Energy Applications 3.09

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shane, Rodney

    2011-12-01

    This report describes the research that was completed under project title Advanced Power Batteries for Renewable Energy Applications 3.09, Award Number DE-EE0001112. The report details all tasks described in the Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO). The SOPO includes purchasing of test equipment, designing tooling, building cells and batteries, testing all variables and final evaluation of results. The SOPO is included. There were various types of tests performed during the project, such as; gas collection, float current monitoring, initial capacity, high rate partial state of charge (HRPSoC), hybrid pulse power characterization (HPPC), high rate capacity, corrosion, software modeling and solar life cycle tests. The grant covered a period of two years starting October 1, 2009 and ending September 30, 2011.

  16. Recent advances in nuclear fission theory: pre- and post-scission...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    nuclear fission theory: pre- and post-scission physics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Recent advances in nuclear fission theory: pre- and post-scission physics You ...

  17. NEAC Nuclear Reactor Technology (NRT) Subcommittee Advanced Test and/or Demonstration Reactor Planning Study

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nuclear Reactor Technology (NRT) Subcommittee Advanced Test and/or Demonstration Reactor Planning Study October 6 th , 2015 Meeting Summary and Comments Given direction from Congress, the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE- NE) is conducting a planning study for an advanced test and/or demonstration reactor (AT/DR study) in the United States. The Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee (NEAC) and specifically its Nuclear Reactor Technology (NRT) subcommittee has been asked to provide

  18. Business risks to utilities as new nuclear power costs escalate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Severance, Craig A.

    2009-05-15

    A nuclear power megaproject carries with it severe business risks. Despite attempts to shift these risks to taxpayers and ratepayers, ultimately there are no guarantees for utility shareholders. Utility management needs to keep some core principles in mind. (author)

  19. Annex: Attributes of Proliferation Resistance for Civilian Nuclear Power Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The NERAC1 Task Force on Technology Opportunities for Increasing the Proliferation Resistance of Global Civilian Nuclear Power Systems (TOPS) determined at its first meeting in November 1999 that a...

  20. Secretary Chu's Remarks at Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant -- As Prepared...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    60 years ago, scientists in Arco, Idaho successfully used nuclear energy to power four light bulbs. They laid the groundwork for decades of clean electricity and put the U.S. at...

  1. Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. Risk Informed Assessment of Regulatory and Design Requirements for Future Nuclear Power Plants. Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritterbusch, S.E.

    2000-08-01

    The overall goal of this research project is to support innovation in new nuclear power plant designs. This project is examining the implications, for future reactors and future safety regulation, of utilizing a new risk-informed regulatory system as a replacement for the current system. This innovation will be made possible through development of a scientific, highly risk-informed approach for the design and regulation of nuclear power plants. This approach will include the development and.lor confirmation of corresponding regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major impediment to long term competitiveness of new nuclear plants in the U.S. is the capital cost component--which may need to be reduced on the order of 35% to 40% for Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs) such as System 80+ and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR). The required cost reduction for an ALWR such as AP600 or AP1000 would be expected to be less. Such reductions in capital cost will require a fundamental reevaluation of the industry standards and regulatory bases under which nuclear plants are designed and licensed. Fortunately, there is now an increasing awareness that many of the existing regulatory requirements and industry standards are not significantly contributing to safety and reliability and, therefore, are unnecessarily adding to nuclear plant costs. Not only does this degrade the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy, it results in unnecessary costs to the American electricity consumer. While addressing these concerns, this research project will be coordinated with current efforts of industry and NRC to develop risk-informed, performance-based regulations that affect the operation of the existing nuclear plants; however, this project will go farther by focusing on the design of new plants.

  2. Remote power systems with advanced storage technologies for Alaskan villages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isherwood, W.; Smith, R.; Aceves, S.; Berry, G.; Clark, W.; Johnson, R.; Das, D.; Goering, D.; Seifert, R.

    1997-12-01

    Remote Alaskan communities pay economic and environmental penalties for electricity, because they must import diesel as their primary fuel for electric power production, paying heavy transportation costs and potentially causing environmental damage with empty drums, leakage, and spills. For these reasons, remote villages offer a viable niche market where sustainable energy systems based on renewable resources and advanced energy storage technologies can compete favorably on purely economic grounds, while providing environmental benefits. These villages can also serve as a robust proving ground for systematic analysis, study, improvement, and optimization of sustainable energy systems with advanced technologies. This paper presents an analytical optimization of a remote power system for a hypothetical Alaskan village. The analysis considers the potential of generating renewable energy (e.g., wind and solar), along with the possibility of using energy storage to take full advantage of the intermittent renewable sources available to these villages. Storage in the form of either compressed hydrogen or zinc pellets can then provide electricity from hydrogen or zinc-air fuel cells when renewable sources are unavailable.The analytical results show a great potential to reduce fossil fuel consumption and costs basing renewable energy combined with advanced energy storage devices. The best solution for our hypothetical village appears to be a hybrid energy system, which can reduce consumption of diesel fuel by over 50% with annualized cost savings by over 30% by adding wind turbines to the existing diesel generators. When energy storage devices are added, diesel fuel consumption and costs can be reduced substantially more. With optimized energy storage, use of the diesel generatorss can be reduced to almost zero, with the existing equipment only maintained for added reliability. However about one quarter of the original diesel consumption is still used for heating purposes. (We use the term diesel to encompass the fuel, often called heating or fuel oil, of similar or identical properties.)

  3. Renewing America's Nuclear Power Partnership for Energy Security and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Economic Growth | Department of Energy Renewing America's Nuclear Power Partnership for Energy Security and Economic Growth Renewing America's Nuclear Power Partnership for Energy Security and Economic Growth October 8, 2008 - 4:14pm Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Delivery by Secretary Bodman Thank you, Jamie, for that kind introduction. And many thanks as well to Secretary Gutierrez, Deputy Secretary Sullivan and the entire Commerce team for convening this important event. As always, it's

  4. Source term estimation during incident response to severe nuclear power

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    plant accidents (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Source term estimation during incident response to severe nuclear power plant accidents Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Source term estimation during incident response to severe nuclear power plant accidents × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to

  5. Nuclear stopping power in warm and hot dense matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faussurier, Gerald; Blancard, Christophe; Gauthier, Maxence

    2013-01-15

    We present a method to estimate the nuclear component of the stopping power of ions propagating in dense matter. Three kinds of effective pair potentials are proposed. Results from the warm dense matter regime and the domain of high energy density physics are presented and discussed for proton and helium. The role of ionic temperature is examined. The nuclear stopping power can play a noticeable role in hot dense matter.

  6. "Is There a Future for Nuclear Power After Fukushima?", Dr. Alexander...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "Is There a Future for Nuclear Power After Fukushima?", Dr. Alexander Glaser, Woodrow ... Is There a Future for Nuclear Power After Fukushima? PPPL Entrance Procedures Visitor ...

  7. International Working Group Meeting Focuses on Nuclear Power Infrastructure

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Development and Needs | Department of Energy Needs International Working Group Meeting Focuses on Nuclear Power Infrastructure Development and Needs June 2, 2010 - 12:02pm Addthis VIENNA, Austria - The multi-nation Infrastructure Development Working Group (IDWG) of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) held its sixth meeting on May 26-27, 2010, in Vienna, Austria. The two-day event included workshops on nuclear energy regulatory agency engagement and the infrastructure needs for

  8. Converting Maturing Nuclear Sites to Integrated Power Production Islands

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Solbrig, Charles W.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear islands, which are integrated power production sites, could effectively sequester and safeguard the US stockpile of plutonium. A nuclear island, an evolution of the integral fast reactor, utilizes all the Transuranics (Pu plus minor actinides) produced in power production, and it eliminates all spent fuel shipments to and from the site. This latter attribute requires that fuel reprocessing occur on each site and that fast reactors be built on-site to utilize the TRU. All commercial spent fuel shipments could be eliminated by converting all LWR nuclear power sites to nuclear islands. Existing LWR sites have the added advantage ofmore » already possessing a license to produce nuclear power. Each could contribute to an increase in the nuclear power production by adding one or more fast reactors. Both the TRU and the depleted uranium obtained in reprocessing would be used on-site for fast fuel manufacture. Only fission products would be shipped to a repository for storage. The nuclear island concept could be used to alleviate the strain of LWR plant sites currently approaching or exceeding their spent fuel pool storage capacity. Fast reactor breeding ratio could be designed to convert existing sites to all fast reactors, or keep the majority thermal.« less

  9. QUARTERLY NUCLEAR POWER DEPLOYMENT SUMMARY JULY 2014

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4 Updates available at: www.energy.gov/ne NEXT UPDATE - October 2014 Page 1 News Updates  The NRC Atomic Safety and Licensing Board (ASLB) has ruled that Toshiba's participation in Nuclear Innovation North America's South Texas Project does not violate federal rules on foreign ownership, control or domination of nuclear reactors. NRC staff had previously stated that despite having only a 10% ownership stake in the project, Toshiba's level of financial support constituted an impermissible

  10. Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Structures - Overview of Methods and Related Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, Dan J

    2009-05-01

    The objectives of this limited study were to provide an overview of the methods that are available for inspection of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete and metallic structures, and to provide an assessment of the status of methods that address inspection of thick, heavily-reinforced concrete and inaccessible areas of the containment metallic pressure boundary. In meeting these objectives a general description of nuclear power plant safety-related structures was provided as well as identification of potential degradation factors, testing and inspection requirements, and operating experience; methods for inspection of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures and containment metallic pressure boundaries were identified and described; and applications of nondestructive evaluation methods specifically related to inspection of thick-section reinforced concrete structures and inaccessible portions of containment metallic pressure boundaries were summarized. Recommendations are provided on utilization of test article(s) to further advance nondestructive evaluation methods related to thick-section, heavily-reinforced concrete and inaccessible portions of the metallic pressure boundary representative of nuclear power plant containments. Conduct of a workshop to provide an update on applications and needed developments for nondestructive evaluation of nuclear power plant structures would also be of benefit.

  11. Application of advanced austenitic alloys to fossil power system components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swindeman, R.W.

    1996-06-01

    Most power and recovery boilers operating in the US produce steam at temperatures below 565{degrees}C (1050{degrees}F) and pressures below 24 MPa (3500 psi). For these operating conditions, carbon steels and low alloy steels may be used for the construction of most of the boiler components. Austenitic stainless steels often are used for superheater/reheater tubing when these components are expected to experience temperatures above 565{degrees}C (1050{degrees}F) or when the environment is too corrosive for low alloys steels. The austenitic stainless steels typically used are the 304H, 321H, and 347H grades. New ferritic steels such as T91 and T92 are now being introduced to replace austenitic: stainless steels in aging fossil power plants. Generally, these high-strength ferritic steels are more expensive to fabricate than austenitic stainless steels because the ferritic steels have more stringent heat treating requirements. Now, annealing requirements are being considered for the stabilized grades of austenitic stainless steels when they receive more than 5% cold work, and these requirements would increase significantly the cost of fabrication of boiler components where bending strains often exceed 15%. It has been shown, however, that advanced stainless steels developed at ORNL greatly benefit from cold work, and these steels could provide an alternative to either conventional stainless steels or high-strength ferritic steels. The purpose of the activities reported here is to examine the potential of advanced stainless steels for construction of tubular components in power boilers. The work is being carried out with collaboration of a commercial boiler manufacturer.

  12. Uncertainty Quantification Techniques for Sensor Calibration Monitoring in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Lin, Guang; Crawford, Susan L.; Konomi, Bledar A.; Braatz, Brett G.; Coble, Jamie B.; Shumaker, Brent; Hashemian, Hash

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the status of ongoing research towards the development of advanced algorithms for online calibration monitoring. The objective of this research is to develop the next generation of online monitoring technologies for sensor calibration interval extension and signal validation in operating and new reactors. These advances are expected to improve the safety and reliability of current and planned nuclear power systems as a result of higher accuracies and increased reliability of sensors used to monitor key parameters. The focus of this report is on documenting the outcomes of the first phase of R&D under this project, which addressed approaches to uncertainty quantification (UQ) in online monitoring that are data-driven, and can therefore adjust estimates of uncertainty as measurement conditions change. Such data-driven approaches to UQ are necessary to address changing plant conditions, for example, as nuclear power plants experience transients, or as next-generation small modular reactors (SMR) operate in load-following conditions.

  13. Uncertainty Quantification Techniques for Sensor Calibration Monitoring in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Lin, Guang; Crawford, Susan L.; Konomi, Bledar A.; Coble, Jamie B.; Shumaker, Brent; Hashemian, Hash

    2014-04-30

    This report describes research towards the development of advanced algorithms for online calibration monitoring. The objective of this research is to develop the next generation of online monitoring technologies for sensor calibration interval extension and signal validation in operating and new reactors. These advances are expected to improve the safety and reliability of current and planned nuclear power systems as a result of higher accuracies and increased reliability of sensors used to monitor key parameters. The focus of this report is on documenting the outcomes of the first phase of R&D under this project, which addressed approaches to uncertainty quantification (UQ) in online monitoring that are data-driven, and can therefore adjust estimates of uncertainty as measurement conditions change. Such data-driven approaches to UQ are necessary to address changing plant conditions, for example, as nuclear power plants experience transients, or as next-generation small modular reactors (SMR) operate in load-following conditions.

  14. Risk-informed assessment of regulatory and design requirements for future nuclear power plants. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-08-01

    OAK B188 Risk-informed assessment of regulatory and design requirements for future nuclear power plants. Annual report. The overall goal of this research project is to support innovation in new nuclear power plant designs. This project is examining the implications, for future reactors and future safety regulation, of utilizing a new risk-informed regulatory system as a replacement for the current system. This innovation will be made possible through development of a scientific, highly risk-formed approach for the design and regulation of nuclear power plants. This approach will include the development and/or confirmation of corresponding regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major impediment to long term competitiveness of new nuclear plants in the U.S. is the capital cost component--which may need to be reduced on the order of 35% to 40% for Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRS) such as System 80+ and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR). The required cost reduction for an ALWR such as AP600 or AP1000 would be expected to be less. Such reductions in capital cost will require a fundamental reevaluation of the industry standards and regulatory bases under which nuclear plants are designed and licensed. Fortunately, there is now an increasing awareness that many of the existing regulatory requirements and industry standards are not significantly contributing to safety and reliability and, therefore, are unnecessarily adding to nuclear plant costs. Not only does this degrade the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy, it results in unnecessary costs to the American electricity consumer. While addressing these concerns, this research project will be coordinated with current efforts of industry and NRC to develop risk-informed, performance-based regulations that affect the operation of the existing nuclear plants; however, this project will go further by focusing on the design of new plants.

  15. The ARIES Advanced and Conservative Tokamak Power Plant Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kessel, C. E; Tillak, M. S; Najmabadi, F.; Poli, F. M.; Ghantous, K.; Gorelenkov, N.; Wang, X. R.; Navaei, D.; Toudeshki, H. H.; Koehly, C.; EL-Guebaly, L.; Blanchard, J. P.; Martin, C. J.; Mynsburge, L.; Humrickhouse, P.; Rensink, M. E.; Rognlien, T. D.; Yoda, M.; Abdel-Khalik, S. I.; Hageman, M. D.; Mills, B. H.; Rader, J. D.; Sadowski, D. L.; Snyder, P. B.; St. John, H.; Turnbull, A. D.; Waganer, L. M.; Malang, S.; Rowcliffe, A. F.

    2015-12-22

    Tokamak power plants are studied with advanced and conservative design philosophies to identify the impacts on the resulting designs and to provide guidance to critical research needs. Incorporating updated physics understanding and using more sophisticated engineering and physics analysis, the tokamak configurations have developed a more credible basis compared with older studies. The advanced configuration assumes a self-cooled lead lithium blanket concept with SiC composite structural material with 58% thermal conversion efficiency. This plasma has a major radius of 6.25 m, a toroidal field of 6.0 T, a q?? of 4.5, a?total N of 5.75, an H98 of 1.65, an n/nGr of 1.0, and a peak divertor heat flux of 13.7 MW/m . The conservative configuration assumes a dual-coolant lead lithium blanket concept with reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel structural material and helium coolant, achieving a thermal conversion efficiency of 45%. The plasma has a major radius of 9.75 m, a toroidal field of 8.75 T, a q?? of 8.0, a?totalN of 2.5, an H?? of 1.25, an n/nGr of 1.3, and a peak divertor heat flux of 10 MW/m . The divertor heat flux treatment with a narrow power scrape off width has driven the plasmas to larger major radius. Edge and divertor plasma simulations are targeting a basis for high radiated power fraction in the divertor, which is necessary for solutions to keep the peak heat flux in the range 10 to 15 MW/m . Combinations of the advanced and conservative approaches show intermediate sizes. A new systems code using a database approach has been used and shows that the operating point is really an operating zone with some range of plasma and engineering parameters and very similar costs of electricity. Other papers in this issue provide more detailed discussion of the work summarized here.

  16. The ARIES Advanced And Conservative Tokamak (ACT) Power Plant Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kessel, C. E.; Poli, F. M.; Ghantous, K.; Gorelenkov, N.; Tillack, M. S.; Najmabadi, F.; Wang, X. R.; Navaei, D.; Toudeshki, H. H.; Koehly, C.; El-Guebaly, L.; Blanchard, J. P.; Martin, C. J.; Mynsburge, L.; Humrickhouse, P.; Rensink, M. E.; Rognlien, T. D.; Yoda, M.; Abdel-Khalik, S. I.; Hageman, M. D.; Mills, B. H.; Radar, J. D.; Sadowski, D. L.; Snyder, P. B.; St. John, H.; Turnbull, A. D.; Waganer, L. M.; Malang, S.; Rowcliffe, A. F.

    2014-03-05

    Tokamak power plants are studied with advanced and conservative design philosophies in order to identify the impacts on the resulting designs and to provide guidance to critical research needs. Incorporating updated physics understanding, and using more sophisticated engineering and physics analysis, the tokamak configurations have developed a more credible basis compared to older studies. The advanced configuration assumes a self-cooled lead lithium (SCLL) blanket concept with SiC composite structural material with 58% thermal conversion efficiency. This plasma has a major radius of 6.25 m, a toroidal field of 6.0 T, a q95 of 4.5, a {beta}N{sup total} of 5.75, H{sub 98} of 1.65, n/nGr of 1.0, and peak divertor heat flux of 13.7 MW/m{sup 2}. The conservative configuration assumes a dual coolant lead lithium (DCLL) blanket concept with ferritic steel structural material and helium coolant, achieving a thermal conversion efficiency of 45%. The plasma major radius is 9.75 m, a toroidal field of 8.75 T, a q95 of 8.0, a {beta}N{sup total} of 2.5, H{sub 98} of 1.25, n/n{sub Gr} of 1.3, and peak divertor heat flux of 10 MW/m{sup 2}. The divertor heat flux treatment with a narrow power scrape-off width has driven the plasmas to larger major radius. Edge and divertor plasma simulations are targeting a basis for high radiated power fraction in the divertor, which is necessary for solutions to keep the peak heat flux in the range of 10-15 MW/m{sup 2}. Combinations of the advanced and conservative approaches show intermediate sizes. A new systems code using a database approach has been used and shows that the operating point is really an operating zone with some range of plasma and engineering parameters and very similar costs of electricity. Papers in this issue provide more detailed discussion of the work summarized here.

  17. The ARIES Advanced and Conservative Tokamak Power Plant Study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kessel, C. E; Tillak, M. S; Najmabadi, F.; Poli, F. M.; Ghantous, K.; Gorelenkov, N.; Wang, X. R.; Navaei, D.; Toudeshki, H. H.; Koehly, C.; et al

    2015-12-22

    Tokamak power plants are studied with advanced and conservative design philosophies to identify the impacts on the resulting designs and to provide guidance to critical research needs. Incorporating updated physics understanding and using more sophisticated engineering and physics analysis, the tokamak configurations have developed a more credible basis compared with older studies. The advanced configuration assumes a self-cooled lead lithium blanket concept with SiC composite structural material with 58% thermal conversion efficiency. This plasma has a major radius of 6.25 m, a toroidal field of 6.0 T, a q₉₅ of 4.5, aᵦtotal N of 5.75, an H98 of 1.65, anmore » n/nGr of 1.0, and a peak divertor heat flux of 13.7 MW/m² . The conservative configuration assumes a dual-coolant lead lithium blanket concept with reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel structural material and helium coolant, achieving a thermal conversion efficiency of 45%. The plasma has a major radius of 9.75 m, a toroidal field of 8.75 T, a q₉₅ of 8.0, aᵦtotalN of 2.5, an H₉₈ of 1.25, an n/nGr of 1.3, and a peak divertor heat flux of 10 MW/m² . The divertor heat flux treatment with a narrow power scrape off width has driven the plasmas to larger major radius. Edge and divertor plasma simulations are targeting a basis for high radiated power fraction in the divertor, which is necessary for solutions to keep the peak heat flux in the range 10 to 15 MW/m² . Combinations of the advanced and conservative approaches show intermediate sizes. A new systems code using a database approach has been used and shows that the operating point is really an operating zone with some range of plasma and engineering parameters and very similar costs of electricity. Other papers in this issue provide more detailed discussion of the work summarized here.« less

  18. Overview of the DOE Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motor R&D Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Electronics and Electric Motor R&D Program Susan Rogers Steven Boyd Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors Vehicle Technologies Office June 17, 2014 VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE 2 APEEM R&D Program Vehicle Technologies Office Hybrid Electric Systems R&D Vehicle Systems Advanced Power Electronics & Electric Motors (APEEM) R&D Industry Federal Agencies Academia National Labs Energy Storage 3 APEEM R&D Mission and Budget Develop advanced power electronics,

  19. The role of actinide burning and the Integral Fast Reactor in the future of nuclear power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollaway, W.R.; Lidsky, L.M.; Miller, M.M.

    1990-12-01

    A preliminary assessment is made of the potential role of actinide burning and the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) in the future of nuclear power. The development of a usable actinide burning strategy could be an important factor in the acceptance and implementation of a next generation of nuclear power. First, the need for nuclear generating capacity is established through the analysis of energy and electricity demand forecasting models which cover the spectrum of bias from anti-nuclear to pro-nuclear. The analyses take into account the issues of global warming and the potential for technological advances in energy efficiency. We conclude, as do many others, that there will almost certainly be a need for substantial nuclear power capacity in the 2000--2030 time frame. We point out also that any reprocessing scheme will open up proliferation-related questions which can only be assessed in very specific contexts. The focus of this report is on the fuel cycle impacts of actinide burning. Scenarios are developed for the deployment of future nuclear generating capacity which exploit the advantages of actinide partitioning and actinide burning. Three alternative reactor designs are utilized in these future scenarios: The Light Water Reactor (LWR); the Modular Gas-Cooled Reactor (MGR); and the Integral Fast Reactor (FR). Each of these alternative reactor designs is described in some detail, with specific emphasis on their spent fuel streams and the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Four separation and partitioning processes are utilized in building the future nuclear power scenarios: Thermal reactor spent fuel preprocessing to reduce the ceramic oxide spent fuel to metallic form, the conventional PUREX process, the TRUEX process, and pyrometallurgical reprocessing.

  20. Institute of Nuclear Power Operations annual report, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-12-31

    This annual report highlights the activities of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations. The topics of the report include the president and chairmen`s joint message, overview of programs serving as the foundation for most of its activities, performance indicators for the US nuclear utility industry, and INPO`s 1993 financial reports and rosters. INPO has four technical cornerstone programs that serve as the foundation for most of its activities. (1) Evaluations of nuclear power plants operated by member utilities are conducted on a regularly scheduled basis. (2) INPO supports its member utilities in their work to achieve and maintain accreditation of training programs. (3) Events analysis programs identify and communicate lessons learned from plant events so utilities can take action to prevent similar events at their plants. (4) INPO helps members improve in nuclear operations areas through assistance programs and other activities that continually evolve to meet the changing needs of the nuclear industry.

  1. FRAMEWORK AND APPLICATION FOR MODELING CONTROL ROOM CREW PERFORMANCE AT NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald L Boring; David I Gertman; Tuan Q Tran; Brian F Gore

    2008-09-01

    This paper summarizes an emerging project regarding the utilization of high-fidelity MIDAS simulations for visualizing and modeling control room crew performance at nuclear power plants. The key envisioned uses for MIDAS-based control room simulations are: (i) the estimation of human error associated with advanced control room equipment and configurations, (ii) the investigative determination of contributory cognitive factors for risk significant scenarios involving control room operating crews, and (iii) the certification of reduced staffing levels in advanced control rooms. It is proposed that MIDAS serves as a key component for the effective modeling of cognition, elements of situation awareness, and risk associated with human performance in next generation control rooms.

  2. Design of radiation resistant metallic multilayers for advanced nuclear systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhernenkov, Mikhail E-mail: gills@bnl.gov; Gill, Simerjeet E-mail: gills@bnl.gov; Stanic, Vesna; DiMasi, Elaine; Kisslinger, Kim; Ecker, Lynne; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Misra, Amit; Demkowicz, M. J.

    2014-06-16

    Helium implantation from transmutation reactions is a major cause of embrittlement and dimensional instability of structural components in nuclear energy systems. Development of novel materials with improved radiation resistance, which is of the utmost importance for progress in nuclear energy, requires guidelines to arrive at favorable parameters more efficiently. Here, we present a methodology that can be used for the design of radiation tolerant materials. We used synchrotron X-ray reflectivity to nondestructively study radiation effects at buried interfaces and measure swelling induced by He implantation in Cu/Nb multilayers. The results, supported by transmission electron microscopy, show a direct correlation between reduced swelling in nanoscale multilayers and increased interface area per unit volume, consistent with helium storage in Cu/Nb interfaces in forms that minimize dimensional changes. In addition, for Cu/Nb layers, a linear relationship is demonstrated between the measured depth-dependent swelling and implanted He density from simulations, making the reflectivity technique a powerful tool for heuristic material design.

  3. QUARTERLY NUCLEAR POWER DEPLOYMENT SUMMARY JANUARY 2016

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    South Texas Project TX ABWR 2 2 92007 112907 - Completed Completed Duke Energy William States Lee SC AP1000 2 121307 22508 - Ph. B Completed Florida Power and Light Turkey ...

  4. QUARTERLY NUCLEAR POWER DEPLOYMENT SUMMARY JANUARY 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... B Completed Florida Power and Light Turkey Point FL AP1000 2 63009 9409 - Ph. A Ph. 2 PPL (UniStar) Bell Bend PA US-EPR 1 101008 121908 - Ph. A Ph. 2 Dominion Energy North ...

  5. QUARTERLY NUCLEAR POWER DEPLOYMENT SUMMARY JULY 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    South Texas Project TX ABWR 2 2 92007 112907 - Ph. 6 Completed Duke Energy William States Lee SC AP1000 2 121307 22508 - Ph. B Completed Florida Power and Light Turkey ...

  6. QUARTERLY NUCLEAR POWER DEPLOYMENT SUMMARY APRIL 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... B Completed Florida Power and Light Turkey Point FL AP1000 2 63009 9409 - Ph. A Ph. 3 PPL (UniStar) Bell Bend PA US-EPR 1 101008 121908 - Ph. A Ph. 2 Dominion Energy North ...

  7. QUARTERLY NUCLEAR POWER DEPLOYMENT SUMMARY JULY 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    B Completed Florida Power and Light Turkey Point FL AP1000 2 63009 9409 - Ph. A Ph. 2 PPL (UniStar) Bell Bend PA US-EPR 1 101008 121908 - Ph. A Ph. 2 Dominion Energy North ...

  8. Strategic Plan for Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rich Johnson; Kimberlyn C. Mousseau; Hyung Lee

    2011-09-01

    NE-KAMS knowledge base will assist computational analysts, physics model developers, experimentalists, nuclear reactor designers, and federal regulators by: (1) Establishing accepted standards, requirements and best practices for V&V and UQ of computational models and simulations, (2) Establishing accepted standards and procedures for qualifying and classifying experimental and numerical benchmark data, (3) Providing readily accessible databases for nuclear energy related experimental and numerical benchmark data that can be used in V&V assessments and computational methods development, (4) Providing a searchable knowledge base of information, documents and data on V&V and UQ, and (5) Providing web-enabled applications, tools and utilities for V&V and UQ activities, data assessment and processing, and information and data searches. From its inception, NE-KAMS will directly support nuclear energy research, development and demonstration programs within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS), the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS), the Small Modular Reactors (SMR), and the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP) programs. These programs all involve computational modeling and simulation (M&S) of nuclear reactor systems, components and processes, and it is envisioned that NE-KAMS will help to coordinate and facilitate collaboration and sharing of resources and expertise for V&V and UQ across these programs. In addition, from the outset, NE-KAMS will support the use of computational M&S in the nuclear industry by developing guidelines and recommended practices aimed at quantifying the uncertainty and assessing the applicability of existing analysis models and methods. The NE-KAMS effort will initially focus on supporting the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and thermal hydraulics (T/H) analysis for M&S of nuclear reactor systems, components and processes, and will later expand to include materials, fuel system performance and other areas of M&S as time and funding allow.

  9. Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear Waste

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology R&D | Department of Energy Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear Waste Technology R&D Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear Waste Technology R&D "Even though one cannot anticipate the answers in basic research, the return on the public's investment can be maximized through long-range planning of the most promising avenues to explore and the resources needed to explore them." (p. v) "Pursuit of this

  10. Method for assigning sites to projected generic nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holter, G.M.; Purcell, W.L.; Shutz, M.E.; Young, J.R.

    1986-07-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed a method for forecasting potential locations and startup sequences of nuclear power plants that will be required in the future but have not yet been specifically identified by electric utilities. Use of the method results in numerical ratings for potential nuclear power plant sites located in each of the 10 federal energy regions. The rating for each potential site is obtained from numerical factors assigned to each of 5 primary siting characteristics: (1) cooling water availability, (2) site land area, (3) power transmission land area, (4) proximity to metropolitan areas, and (5) utility plans for the site. The sequence of plant startups in each federal energy region is obtained by use of the numerical ratings and the forecasts of generic nuclear power plant startups obtained from the EIA Middle Case electricity forecast. Sites are assigned to generic plants in chronological order according to startup date.

  11. Understanding the Challenges in the Transition from Film Radiography in the Nuclear Power Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Moran, Traci L.; Nove, Carol A.; Pardini, Allan F.

    2012-09-01

    Nondestructive examination (NDE) applications in the nuclear power industry using film radiography are shrinking due to the advent of modern digital imaging technologies and advances in alternative inspection methods that do not present an ionizing radiation hazard. Technologies that are used routinely in the medical industry for patient diagnosis are being adapted to industrial NDE applications including the detection and characterization of defects in welds. From the user perspective, non-film inspection techniques provide several advantages over film techniques. It is anticipated that the shift away from the application of film radiography in the nuclear power industry represents an irreversible trend. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has noted this trend in the U.S. nuclear power industry and will be working to ensure that the effectiveness and reliability of component inspections is not compromised by this transition. Currently, specific concerns are associated with 1) obtaining a fundamental understanding of how inspection effectiveness and reliability may be impacted by this transition and 2) ensuring training standards and qualifications remain compatible with modern industrial radiographic practice. This paper discusses recent trends in industrial radiography and assesses their advantages and disadvantages from the perspective of nuclear power plant component inspections.

  12. Advanced Nuclear Fuel | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    refueling. Global Security Cooley joins Y-12's Global Security and Strategic Partnerships Manufacturing and Technical Services Nuclear Material Recovery Nuclear Detection and...

  13. QUARTERLY NUCLEAR POWER DEPLOYMENT SUMMARY JANUARY 2014

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4 Updates available at: www.energy.gov/ne NEXT UPDATE - April 2014 Page 1 News Updates  Luminant has requested a suspension of the NRC's review of its Comanche Peak Combined Construction and Operating License (COL) application. The company cited impacts to the review schedule of the Mitsubishi Heavy Industries US Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (US- APWR) due to the vendor's desire to refocus its resources to reactor restarts in Japan as well as low electricity prices driven by low natural

  14. Advanced Soldier Thermoelectric Power System for Power Generation from Battlefield Heat Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendricks, Terry J.; Hogan, Tim; Case, Eldon D.; Cauchy, Charles J.

    2010-09-01

    The U.S. military uses large amounts of fuel during deployments and battlefield operations. This project sought to develop a lightweight, small form-factor, soldier-portable advanced thermoelectric (TE) system prototype to recover and convert waste heat from various deployed military equipment (i.e., diesel generators/engines, incinerators, vehicles, and potentially mobile kitchens), with the ultimate purpose of producing power for soldier battery charging, advanced capacitor charging, and other battlefield power applications. The technical approach employed microchannel technology, a unique power panel approach to heat exchange/TE system integration, and newly-characterized LAST (lead-antimony-silver-telluride) and LASTT (lead-antimony-silver-tin-telluride) TE materials segmented with bismuth telluride TE materials in designing a segmented-element TE power module and system. This project researched never-before-addressed system integration challenges (thermal expansion, thermal diffusion, electrical interconnection, thermal and electrical interfaces) of designing thin power panels consisting of alternating layers of thin, microchannel heat exchangers (hot and cold) sandwiching thin, segmented-element TE power generators. The TE properties, structurally properties, and thermal fatigue behavior of LAST and LASTT materials were developed and characterized such that the first segmented-element TE modules using LAST / LASTT materials were fabricated and tested at hot-side temperatures = 400 C and cold-side temperatures = 40 C. LAST / LASTT materials were successfully segmented with bismuth telluride and electrically interconnected with diffusion barrier materials and copper strapping within the module electrical circuit. A TE system design was developed to produce 1.5-1.6 kW of electrical energy using these new TE modules from the exhaust waste heat of 60-kW Tactical Quiet Generators as demonstration vehicles.

  15. HIGH TEMPERATURE, HIGH POWER HETEROGENEOUS NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammond, R.P.; Wykoff, W.R.; Busey, H.M.

    1960-06-14

    A heterogeneous nuclear reactor is designed comprising a stationary housing and a rotatable annular core being supported for rotation about a vertical axis in the housing, the core containing a plurality of radial fuel- element supporting channels, the cylindrical empty space along the axis of the core providing a central plenum for the disposal of spent fuel elements, the core cross section outer periphery being vertically gradated in radius one end from the other to provide a coolant duct between the core and the housing, and means for inserting fresh fuel elements in the supporting channels under pressure and while the reactor is in operation.

  16. What future for nuclear power? Workshop report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-31

    A Workshop on this highly controversial subject, organized by the Energy and Environment Programme of the RIIA, was held on 10th November 1997 at Green College, Oxford. The meeting was attended by some forty people from eight countries, coming from the nuclear and electricity generating industry, governments, research organizations, academic institutions, environmental pressure groups and inter-governmental organizations. In addition, subsequent to this Workshop, there have been a number of smaller, more informal discussions on various aspects of the subject. This paper summarizes the main conclusions arising from the Workshop and from these later discussions.

  17. QUARTERLY NUCLEAR POWER DEPLOYMENT SUMMARY OCTOBER 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Updates available at: www.energy.gov/ne NEXT UPDATE - January 2016 Page 1 News Updates  The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued an operating license for Tennessee Valley Authority's Watts Bar 2 reactor. This marks the end of unit 2 construction; TVA plans to begin commercial operation of the 1,150 MW reactor in early 2016.  The Calvert Cliffs and Callaway COLAs have been withdrawn following the suspension of the Areva US-EPR Design Certification application. The Bell Bend COL

  18. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Carbon Dioxide Storage Technologies Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies Crosscutting Technologies in Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Fast-spectrum Reactors Geothermal Power High Temperature Reactors Hybrid Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems Hydropower Light Water Reactors Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Nuclear Fuel Cycles Solar Power Stationary Fuel Cells Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Wind Power ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Clean Power Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 1 Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 Carbon Dioxide Storage Technologies

  19. Advanced fusion MHD power conversion using the CFAR (compact fusion advanced Rankine) cycle concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, M.A.; Campbell, R.; Logan, B.G.; Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1988-10-01

    The CFAR (compact fusion advanced Rankine) cycle concept for a tokamak reactor involves the use of a high-temperature Rankine cycle in combination with microwave superheaters and nonequilibrium MHD disk generators to obtain a compact, low-capital-cost power conversion system which fits almost entirely within the reactor vault. The significant savings in the balance-of-plant costs are expected to result in much lower costs of electricity than previous concepts. This paper describes the unique features of the CFAR cycle and a high- temperature blanket designed to take advantage of it as well as the predicted performance of the MHD disk generators using mercury seeded with cesium. 40 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Projects Aimed at Advancing State-of-the-Art Carbon Capture from Coal Power

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plants Selected for Further Development | Department of Energy Aimed at Advancing State-of-the-Art Carbon Capture from Coal Power Plants Selected for Further Development Projects Aimed at Advancing State-of-the-Art Carbon Capture from Coal Power Plants Selected for Further Development August 15, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Four projects aimed at reducing the energy and cost penalties of advanced carbon capture systems applied to power plants have been selected for further

  1. Integrated approach to economical, reliable, safe nuclear power production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    An Integrated Approach to Economical, Reliable, Safe Nuclear Power Production is the latest evolution of a concept which originated with the Defense-in-Depth philosophy of the nuclear industry. As Defense-in-Depth provided a framework for viewing physical barriers and equipment redundancy, the Integrated Approach gives a framework for viewing nuclear power production in terms of functions and institutions. In the Integrated Approach, four plant Goals are defined (Normal Operation, Core and Plant Protection, Containment Integrity and Emergency Preparedness) with the attendant Functional and Institutional Classifications that support them. The Integrated Approach provides a systematic perspective that combines the economic objective of reliable power production with the safety objective of consistent, controlled plant operation.

  2. Identifying and bounding uncertainties in nuclear reactor thermal power calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, J.; Hauser, E.; Estrada, H.

    2012-07-01

    Determination of the thermal power generated in the reactor core of a nuclear power plant is a critical element in the safe and economic operation of the plant. Direct measurement of the reactor core thermal power is made using neutron flux instrumentation; however, this instrumentation requires frequent calibration due to changes in the measured flux caused by fuel burn-up, flux pattern changes, and instrumentation drift. To calibrate the nuclear instruments, steam plant calorimetry, a process of performing a heat balance around the nuclear steam supply system, is used. There are four basic elements involved in the calculation of thermal power based on steam plant calorimetry: The mass flow of the feedwater from the power conversion system, the specific enthalpy of that feedwater, the specific enthalpy of the steam delivered to the power conversion system, and other cycle gains and losses. Of these elements, the accuracy of the feedwater mass flow and the feedwater enthalpy, as determined from its temperature and pressure, are typically the largest contributors to the calorimetric calculation uncertainty. Historically, plants have been required to include a margin of 2% in the calculation of the reactor thermal power for the licensed maximum plant output to account for instrumentation uncertainty. The margin is intended to ensure a cushion between operating power and the power for which safety analyses are performed. Use of approved chordal ultrasonic transit-time technology to make the feedwater flow and temperature measurements (in place of traditional differential-pressure- based instruments and resistance temperature detectors [RTDs]) allows for nuclear plant thermal power calculations accurate to 0.3%-0.4% of plant rated power. This improvement in measurement accuracy has allowed many plant operators in the U.S. and around the world to increase plant power output through Measurement Uncertainty Recapture (MUR) up-rates of up to 1.7% of rated power, while also decreasing the probability of significant over-power events. This paper will examine the basic elements involved in calculation of thermal power using ultrasonic transit-time technology and will discuss the criteria for bounding uncertainties associated with each element in order to achieve reactor thermal power calculations to within 0.3% to 0.4%. (authors)

  3. Solid state laser media driven by remote nuclear powered fluorescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prelas, Mark A.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for driving a solid state laser by a nuclear powered fluorescence source which is located remote from the fluorescence source. A nuclear reaction produced in a reaction chamber generates fluorescence or photons. The photons are collected from the chamber into a waveguide, such as a fiber optic waveguide. The waveguide transports the photons to the remote laser for exciting the laser.

  4. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Clinton Power Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Clinton Power Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,"1,065","8,612",92.3,"BWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-

  5. Enhancement of NRC station blackout requirements for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, M. W.

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established a Near-Term Task Force (NTTF) in response to Commission direction to conduct a systematic and methodical review of NRC processes and regulations to determine whether the agency should make additional improvements to its regulatory system and to make recommendations to the Commission for its policy direction, in light of the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. The NTTF's review resulted in a set of recommendations that took a balanced approach to defense-in-depth as applied to low-likelihood, high-consequence events such as prolonged station blackout (SBO) resulting from severe natural phenomena. Part 50, Section 63, of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), 'Loss of All Alternating Current Power,' currently requires that each nuclear power plant must be able to cool the reactor core and maintain containment integrity for a specified duration of an SBO. The SBO duration and mitigation strategy for each nuclear power plant is site specific and is based on the robustness of the local transmission system and the transmission system operator's capability to restore offsite power to the nuclear power plant. With regard to SBO, the NTTF recommended that the NRC strengthen SBO mitigation capability at all operating and new reactors for design-basis and beyond-design-basis external events. The NTTF also recommended strengthening emergency preparedness for prolonged SBO and multi-unit events. These recommendations, taken together, are intended to clarify and strengthen US nuclear reactor safety regarding protection against and mitigation of the consequences of natural disasters and emergency preparedness during SBO. The focus of this paper is on the existing SBO requirements and NRC initiatives to strengthen SBO capability at all operating and new reactors to address prolonged SBO stemming from design-basis and beyond-design-basis external events. The NRC initiatives are intended to enhance core and spent fuel pool cooling, reactor coolant system integrity, and containment integrity. (authors)

  6. Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) R&D Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon ape00arogers2013o.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) R&D Program Overview Electric Drive Status and ...

  7. Energy Department Announces Projects to Advance Cost-Effective Concentrating Solar Power Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department today announced $10 million for six new research and development projects that will advance innovative concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies.

  8. Space nuclear power, propulsion, and related technologies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, Marshall

    1992-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) is one of the nation's largest research and development (R&D) facilities, with headquarters at Albuquerque, New Mexico; a laboratory at Livermore, California; and a test range near Tonopah, Nevada. Smaller testing facilities are also operated at other locations. Established in 1945, Sandia was operated by the University of California until 1949, when, at the request of President Truman, Sandia Corporation was formed as a subsidiary of Bell Lab's Western Electric Company to operate Sandia as a service to the U.S. Government without profit or fee. Sandia is currently operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by AT&T Technologies, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of AT&T. Sandia's responsibility is national security programs in defense and energy with primary emphasis on nuclear weapon research and development (R&D). However, Sandia also supports a wide variety of projects ranging from basic materials research to the design of specialized parachutes. Assets, owned by DOE and valued at more than $1.2 billion, include about 600 major buildings containing about 372,000 square meters (m2) (4 million square feet [ft2]) of floor space, located on land totalling approximately 1460 square kilometers (km2) (562 square miles [mi]). Sandia employs about 8500 people, the majority in Albuquerque, with about 1000 in Livermore. Approximately 60% of Sandia's employees are in technical and scientific positions, and the remainder are in crafts, skilled labor, and administrative positions. As a multiprogram national laboratory, Sandia has much to offer both industrial and government customers in pursuing space nuclear technologies. The purpose of this brochure is to provide the reader with a brief summary of Sandia's technical capabilities, test facilities, and example programs that relate to military and civilian objectives in space. Sandia is interested in forming partnerships with industry and government organizations, and has already formed several cooperative alliances and agreements. Because of the synergism of multiple governmental and industrial sponsors of many programs, Sandia is frequently able to provide complex technical solutions in a relatively short time, and often at lower cost to a particular customer. They have listed a few ongoing programs at Sandia related to space nuclear technology as examples of the possible synergisms that could result from forming teams and partnerships with related technologies and objectives.

  9. Report on aging of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.R.

    1996-03-01

    The Structural Aging Program provides the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service assessments of nuclear power plant safety-related concrete structures. The program was organized under four task areas: Program Management, Materials Property Data Base, Structural Component Assessment/Repair Technology, and Quantitative Methodology for Continued Service Determinations. Under these tasks, over 90 papers and reports were prepared addressing pertinent aspects associated with aging management of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures. Contained in this report is a summary of program results in the form of information related to longevity of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, a Structural Materials Information Center presenting data and information on the time variation of concrete materials under the influence of environmental stressors and aging factors, in-service inspection and condition assessments techniques, repair materials and methods, evaluation of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, and a reliability-based methodology for current and future condition assessments. Recommendations for future activities are also provided. 308 refs., 61 figs., 50 tabs.

  10. Nuclear Power: High Hopes, Unfulfilled Promise (Conference) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Nuclear Power: High Hopes, Unfulfilled Promise Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Power: High Hopes, Unfulfilled Promise Authors: Gupta, Rajan [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2012-03-26 OSTI Identifier: 1053857 Report Number(s): LA-UR-12-20205 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: EES Colloquium, LANL ; 2012-03-19 - 2012-03-19 ; Los Alamos, New Mexico, United States

  11. Howard Baker Center for Public Policy Nuclear Power Conference | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy Howard Baker Center for Public Policy Nuclear Power Conference Howard Baker Center for Public Policy Nuclear Power Conference October 4, 2007 - 3:14pm Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Secretary Bodman Thank you, Ambassador Baker for that warm introduction and for all the good work you and the University of Tennessee are sponsoring through the Baker Center for Public Policy. I also want to thank Representative Hamilton and the Wilson Center for hosting this event on such an important

  12. The History of Nuclear Power in Space | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Power in Space The History of Nuclear Power in Space June 9, 2015 - 11:42am Addthis Marissa Newhall Marissa Newhall Director of Digital Strategy & Communications How can I participate? It's Space Week on Energy.gov -- and we're highlighting the contributions of the Energy Department and our National Labs to the U.S. space program. Join us for "The Energy of Star Wars: A Google+ Hangout" on Friday June 12 at 2 p.m. EDT. Ask questions now and during the Hangout on social

  13. QUARTERLY NUCLEAR POWER DEPLOYMENT SUMMARY JANUARY 2016

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    6 Updates available at: www.energy.gov/ne NEXT UPDATE - April 2016 Page 1 News Updates  The Tennessee Valley Authority has completed fuel loading of the Watts Bar Unit 2 reactor. TVA plans to begin commercial operation of the 1,150 MW reactor in early 2016 following completion of power ascension testing.  The final environmental impact statement for the PSEG Early Site Permit (ESP) has been completed; an ESP could be issued as early as mid- 2016. If approved, the permit will be valid for

  14. Inelastic X-ray and Nuclear Resonant Scattering | Advanced Photon...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    XSD-IXN XSD-IXN Home Staff Inelastic X-ray and Nuclear Resonant Scattering The Inelastic X-ray and Nuclear Resonant Scattering group operates beamlines at APS Sectors 3, 9 and 30....

  15. Advanced Power Electronic Interfaces for Distributed Energy Systems Part 1: Systems and Topologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, W.; Chakraborty, S.; Kroposki, B.; Thomas, H.

    2008-03-01

    This report summarizes power electronic interfaces for DE applications and the topologies needed for advanced power electronic interfaces. It focuses on photovoltaic, wind, microturbine, fuel cell, internal combustion engine, battery storage, and flywheel storage systems.

  16. MHD Advanced Power Train Phase I, Final Report, Volume 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. R. Jones

    1985-08-01

    Under contract to the Department of Energy, Westinghouse has prepared the definition of a program plan for the development of an MHD Advanced Power Train (APT). The scope of work of this contract includes conceptual designs of early commercial MHD/steam electric plants (topping/bottoming) ranging from 200 to 1000 Mw(e). These plant designs were prepared during 1982 and made use of a system analysis model that provides performance and design information and economic estimates. In early April 1984, DOE requested westinghouse to perform special studies under the existing APT contract to aid the Department in evaluating MHD program options. Two tasks were defined by DOE: the first task was to evaluate an 80 MW(t) integrated test system (with steam electric bottoming cycle) for installation at the CDIF in Butte, Montana; the second task was to investigate placing a 50 MW(e) MHD topping stage onto an existing steam electric plant (as a retrofit). This volume of the final report documents the results of these special studies. Highlights of the studies were presented orally to DOE on May 15, 1984.

  17. Advanced Condenser Boosts Geothermal Power Plant Output (Fact Sheet), The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-12-01

    When power production at The Geysers geothermal power complex began to falter, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) stepped in, developing advanced condensing technology that dramatically boosted production efficiency - and making a major contribution to the effective use of geothermal power. NREL developed advanced direct-contact condenser (ADCC) technology to condense spent steam more effectively, improving power production efficiency in Unit 11 by 5%.

  18. Underground collocation of nuclear power plant reactors and repository to facilitate the post-renaissance expansion of nuclear power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, Carl W; Elkins, Ned Z

    2008-01-01

    Underground collocation of nuclear power reactors and the nuclear waste management facilities supporting those reactors, termed an underground nuclear park (UNP), appears to have several advantages compared to the conventional approach to siting reactors and waste management facilities. These advantages include the potential to lower reactor capital and operating cost, lower nuclear waste management cost, and increase margins of physical security and safety. Envirorunental impacts related to worker health, facility accidents, waste transportation, and sabotage and terrorism appear to be lower for UNPs compared to the current approach. In-place decommissioning ofUNP reactors appears to have cost, safety, envirorunental and waste disposal advantages. The UNP approach has the potential to lead to greater public acceptance for the deployment of new power reactors. Use of the UNP during the post-nuclear renaissance time frame has the potential to enable a greater expansion of U.S. nuclear power generation than might otherwise result. Technical and economic aspects of the UNP concept need more study to determine the viability of the concept.

  19. Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Schey

    2009-07-01

    Cooperative Agreement DE-FC07-06ID14788 was executed between the U.S. Department of Energy, Electric Transportation Applications, and Idaho National Laboratory to investigate the economics of producing hydrogen by electrolysis using electricity generated by nuclear power. The work under this agreement is divided into the following four tasks: Task 1 – Produce Data and Analyses Task 2 – Economic Analysis of Large-Scale Alkaline Electrolysis Task 3 – Commercial-Scale Hydrogen Production Task 4 – Disseminate Data and Analyses. Reports exist on the prospect that utility companies may benefit from having the option to produce electricity or produce hydrogen, depending on market conditions for both. This study advances that discussion in the affirmative by providing data and suggesting further areas of study. While some reports have identified issues related to licensing hydrogen plants with nuclear plants, this study provides more specifics and could be a resource guide for further study and clarifications. At the same time, this report identifies other area of risks and uncertainties associated with hydrogen production on this scale. Suggestions for further study in some of these topics, including water availability, are included in the report. The goals and objectives of the original project description have been met. Lack of industry design for proton exchange membrane electrolysis hydrogen production facilities of this magnitude was a roadblock for a significant period. However, recent design breakthroughs have made costing this facility much more accurate. In fact, the new design information on proton exchange membrane electrolyzers scaled to the 1 kg of hydrogen per second electrolyzer reduced the model costs from $500 to $100 million. Task 1 was delayed when the original electrolyzer failed at the end of its economic life. However, additional valuable information was obtained when the new electrolyzer was installed. Products developed during this study include a process model and a N2H2 economic assessment model (both developed by the Idaho National Laboratory). Both models are described in this report. The N2H2 model closely tracked and provided similar results as the H2A model and was instrumental in assessing the effects of plant availability on price when operated in the shoulder mode for electrical pricing. Differences between the H2A and N2H2 model are included in this report.

  20. US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

    1998-02-01

    NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov).

  1. SunLab: Advancing Concentrating Solar Power Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-11-24

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies, including parabolic troughs, power towers, and dish/engines, have the potential to provide the world with tens of thousands of megawatts of clean, renewable, cost-competitive power.

  2. Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants Annual Report 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation

    2010-12-10

    This report describes radioactive effluents from commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. This information was reported by the licensees for radioactive discharges that occurred in 2008. The report provides information relevant to the potential impact of NPPs on the environment and on public health.

  3. Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants Annual Report 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation

    2010-12-10

    This report describes radioactive effluents from commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. This information was reported by the licensees for radioactive discharges that occurred in 2007. The report provides information relevant to the potential impact of NPPs on the environment and on public health.

  4. A Virtual Engineering Framework for Simulating Advanced Power System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Stanislav Borodai

    2008-06-18

    In this report is described the work effort performed to provide NETL with VE-Suite based Virtual Engineering software and enhanced equipment models to support NETL's Advanced Process Engineering Co-simulation (APECS) framework for advanced power generation systems. Enhancements to the software framework facilitated an important link between APECS and the virtual engineering capabilities provided by VE-Suite (e.g., equipment and process visualization, information assimilation). Model enhancements focused on improving predictions for the performance of entrained flow coal gasifiers and important auxiliary equipment (e.g., Air Separation Units) used in coal gasification systems. In addition, a Reduced Order Model generation tool and software to provide a coupling between APECS/AspenPlus and the GE GateCycle simulation system were developed. CAPE-Open model interfaces were employed where needed. The improved simulation capability is demonstrated on selected test problems. As part of the project an Advisory Panel was formed to provide guidance on the issues on which to focus the work effort. The Advisory Panel included experts from industry and academics in gasification, CO2 capture issues, process simulation and representatives from technology developers and the electric utility industry. To optimize the benefit to NETL, REI coordinated its efforts with NETL and NETL funded projects at Iowa State University, Carnegie Mellon University and ANSYS/Fluent, Inc. The improved simulation capabilities incorporated into APECS will enable researchers and engineers to better understand the interactions of different equipment components, identify weaknesses and processes needing improvement and thereby allow more efficient, less expensive plants to be developed and brought on-line faster and in a more cost-effective manner. These enhancements to APECS represent an important step toward having a fully integrated environment for performing plant simulation and engineering. Furthermore, with little effort the modeling capabilities described in this report can be extended to support other DOE programs, such as ultra super critical boiler development, oxy-combustion boiler development or modifications to existing plants to include CO2 capture and sequestration.

  5. Mid America Advanced Power Solutions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MAAPS specializes in solar electric (PV), solar thermal, solar water heating, wind power, hydrogen power, efficiency lighting, and induction lighting products. These products are...

  6. An Approach to Autonomous Control for Space Nuclear Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Richard Thomas; Upadhyaya, Belle R.

    2011-01-01

    Under Project Prometheus, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) investigated deep space missions that would utilize space nuclear power systems (SNPSs) to provide energy for propulsion and spacecraft power. The initial study involved the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO), which was proposed to conduct in-depth studies of three Jovian moons. Current radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) and solar power systems cannot meet expected mission power demands, which include propulsion, scientific instrument packages, and communications. Historically, RTGs have provided long-lived, highly reliable, low-power-level systems. Solar power systems can provide much greater levels of power, but power density levels decrease dramatically at {approx} 1.5 astronomical units (AU) and beyond. Alternatively, an SNPS can supply high-sustained power for space applications that is both reliable and mass efficient. Terrestrial nuclear reactors employ varying degrees of human control and decision-making for operations and benefit from periodic human interaction for maintenance. In contrast, the control system of an SNPS must be able to provide continuous operatio for the mission duration with limited immediate human interaction and no opportunity for hardware maintenance or sensor calibration. In effect, the SNPS control system must be able to independently operate the power plant while maintaining power production even when subject to off-normal events and component failure. This capability is critical because it will not be possible to rely upon continuous, immediate human interaction for control due to communications delays and periods of planetary occlusion. In addition, uncertainties, rare events, and component degradation combine with the aforementioned inaccessibility and unattended operation to pose unique challenges that an SNPS control system must accommodate. Autonomous control is needed to address these challenges and optimize the reactor control design.

  7. Science based integrated approach to advanced nuclear fuel development - integrated multi-scale multi-physics hierarchical modeling and simulation framework Part III: cladding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tome, Carlos N; Caro, J A; Lebensohn, R A; Unal, Cetin; Arsenlis, A; Marian, J; Pasamehmetoglu, K

    2010-01-01

    Advancing the performance of Light Water Reactors, Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles, and Advanced Reactors, such as the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants, requires enhancing our fundamental understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The capability to accurately model the nuclear fuel systems to develop predictive tools is critical. Not only are fabrication and performance models needed to understand specific aspects of the nuclear fuel, fully coupled fuel simulation codes are required to achieve licensing of specific nuclear fuel designs for operation. The backbone of these codes, models, and simulations is a fundamental understanding and predictive capability for simulating the phase and microstructural behavior of the nuclear fuel system materials and matrices. In this paper we review the current status of the advanced modeling and simulation of nuclear reactor cladding, with emphasis on what is available and what is to be developed in each scale of the project, how we propose to pass information from one scale to the next, and what experimental information is required for benchmarking and advancing the modeling at each scale level.

  8. Multimegawatt space nuclear power supply, Phase 1 Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-02-17

    This Specification establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Boeing Multimegawatt Space Nuclear Power System (MSNPS). The Boeing Multimegawatt Space Power System is part of the DOE/SDIO Multimegawatt Space Nuclear Power Program. The purpose of this program is to provide a space-based nuclear power system to meet the needs of SDIO missions. The Boeing MSNPS is a category 1 concept which is capable of delivering 10's of MW(e) for 100's of seconds with effluent permitted. A design goal is for the system to have growth or downscale capability for other power system concepts. The growth objective is to meet the category 3 capability of 100's of MW(e) for 100's of seconds, also with effluent permitted. The purpose of this preliminary document is to guide the conceptual design effort throughout the Phase 1 study effort. This document will be updated through out the study. It will thus result in a record of the development of the design effort.

  9. Energy Department Announces New Awards for Advanced Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Development | Department of Energy DOENews@hq.doe.gov WASHINGTON-Building on the President's all-of-the-above energy strategy and efforts to expand clean energy innovation, the Department of Energy today awarded more than $5 million to undergraduate and graduate students pursuing nuclear engineering degrees and other nuclear science and engineering programs relevant to nuclear energy. The awards include 59 undergraduate scholarships and 32 graduate-level fellowships for students at American

  10. Impact of Nuclear Energy Futures on Advanced Fuel Cycle Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, B.W.; Piet, S.J.

    2004-10-03

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act requires the Secretary of Energy to inform Congress before 2010 on the need for a second geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel. By that time, the spent fuel discharged from current commercial reactors will exceed the statutory limit of the first repository. There are several approaches to eliminate the need for another repository in this century. This paper presents a high-level analysis of these spent fuel management options in the context of a full range of possible nuclear energy futures. The analysis indicates the best option to implement varies depending on the nuclear energy future selected.

  11. Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-off Study |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-off Study Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-off Study The LWR Sustainability (LWRS) Program activities must support the timeline dictated by utility life extension decisions to demonstrate a lead test rod in a commercial reactor within 10 years. In order to maintain the demanding development schedule that must accompany this aggressive timeline, the LWRS Program focuses on advanced fuel cladding

  12. FEDERAL LOAN GUARANTEE SOLICITATION & SUPPLEMENTS FOR: ADVANCED NUCLEAR ENERGY PROJECTS

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ADVANCED NUCLEAR ENERGY PROJECTS U.S. Department of Energy Loan Programs Office Solicitation Number: DE-SOL-0007791 INCLUDED DOCUMENTS (UPDATED: January 19, 2016) Document Issue Date Subject Solicitation Section Affected SOLICITATION December 10, 2014 Solicitation for Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects SUPPLEMENT I June 23, 2015 Scope of Projects Eligible II.C. inserted after II.B (p. 3) SUPPLEMENT II November 6, 2015 Early Upstream and Engineering Project Costs II.D inserted after II.C (p. 3)

  13. Top 6 Things You Didn't Know About Nuclear Power | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Nuclear Power December 12, 2014 - 10:39am Addthis These are the first lightbulbs lit by nuclear fission at Argonne's EBR or Experimental Breeder Reactor.| Energy Department...

  14. California: Advanced 'Drop-In' Biofuels Power the Navy's Green...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to Pennsylvania Fueling the Navy's Great Green Fleet with Advanced Biofuels Cellana, ... Five Energy Department Accomplishments in Algal Biofuels Project Overview Positive Impact ...

  15. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Nuclear...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... A number of coolant types have been assessed for Fast Reactors, leading to technologies such as the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), the lead or lead-bismuth cooled fast reactor ...

  16. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | High...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    also supply process heat for a variety of industrial applications. Under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) ... prismatic and pebble bed design, and encompass both ...

  17. A method to select human-system interfaces for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hugo, Jacques Victor; Gertman, David Ira

    2015-10-19

    The new generation of nuclear power plants (NPPs) will likely make use of state-of-the-art technologies in many areas of the plant. The analysis, design, and selection of advanced humansystem interfaces (HSIs) constitute an important part of power plant engineering. Designers need to consider the new capabilities afforded by these technologies in the context of current regulations and new operational concepts, which is why they need a more rigorous method by which to plan the introduction of advanced HSIs in NPP work areas. Much of current human factors research stops at the user interface and fails to provide a definitive process for integration of end user devices with instrumentation and control (I&C) and operational concepts. The current lack of a clear definition of HSI technology, including the process for integration, makes characterization and implementation of new and advanced HSIs difficult. This paper describes how new design concepts in the nuclear industry can be analyzed and how HSI technologies associated with new industrial processes might be considered. Furthermore, it also describes a basis for an understanding of human as well as technology characteristics that could be incorporated into a prioritization scheme for technology selection and deployment plans.

  18. A method to select human-system interfaces for nuclear power plants

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hugo, Jacques Victor; Gertman, David Ira

    2015-10-19

    The new generation of nuclear power plants (NPPs) will likely make use of state-of-the-art technologies in many areas of the plant. The analysis, design, and selection of advanced human–system interfaces (HSIs) constitute an important part of power plant engineering. Designers need to consider the new capabilities afforded by these technologies in the context of current regulations and new operational concepts, which is why they need a more rigorous method by which to plan the introduction of advanced HSIs in NPP work areas. Much of current human factors research stops at the user interface and fails to provide a definitive processmore » for integration of end user devices with instrumentation and control (I&C) and operational concepts. The current lack of a clear definition of HSI technology, including the process for integration, makes characterization and implementation of new and advanced HSIs difficult. This paper describes how new design concepts in the nuclear industry can be analyzed and how HSI technologies associated with new industrial processes might be considered. Furthermore, it also describes a basis for an understanding of human as well as technology characteristics that could be incorporated into a prioritization scheme for technology selection and deployment plans.« less

  19. Understanding the nature of nuclear power plant risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denning, R. S.

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the evolution of understanding of severe accident consequences from the non-mechanistic assumptions of WASH-740 to WASH-1400, NUREG-1150, SOARCA and today in the interpretation of the consequences of the accident at Fukushima. As opposed to the general perception, the radiological human health consequences to members of the Japanese public from the Fukushima accident will be small despite meltdowns at three reactors and loss of containment integrity. In contrast, the radiation-related societal impacts present a substantial additional economic burden on top of the monumental task of economic recovery from the nonnuclear aspects of the earthquake and tsunami damage. The Fukushima accident provides additional evidence that we have mis-characterized the risk of nuclear power plant accidents to ourselves and to the public. The human health risks are extremely small even to people living next door to a nuclear power plant. The principal risk associated with a nuclear power plant accident involves societal impacts: relocation of people, loss of land use, loss of contaminated products, decontamination costs and the need for replacement power. Although two of the three probabilistic safety goals of the NRC address societal risk, the associated quantitative health objectives in reality only address individual human health risk. This paper describes the types of analysis that would address compliance with the societal goals. (authors)

  20. Review of maintenance personnel practices at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chockie, A.D.; Badalamente, R.V.; Hostick, C.J.; Vickroy, S.C.; Bryant, J.L.; Imhoff, C.H.

    1984-05-01

    As part of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored Maintenance Qualifications and Staffing Project, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has conducted a preliminary assessment of nuclear power plant (NPP) maintenance practices. As requested by the NRC, the following areas within the maintenance function were examined: personnel qualifications, maintenance training, overtime, shiftwork and staffing levels. The purpose of the assessment was to identify the primary safety-related problems that required further analysis before specific recommendations can be made on the regulations affecting NPP maintenance operations.

  1. Development of an Advanced Combined Heat and Power (CHP) System Utilizing

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Off-Gas from Coke Calcination - Fact Sheet, 2014 | Department of Energy an Advanced Combined Heat and Power (CHP) System Utilizing Off-Gas from Coke Calcination - Fact Sheet, 2014 Development of an Advanced Combined Heat and Power (CHP) System Utilizing Off-Gas from Coke Calcination - Fact Sheet, 2014 The Gas Technology Institute-in collaboration with Superior Graphite Company and SCHMIDTSCHE SCHACK, a division of ARVOS Group, Wexford business unit (formerly Alstom Power Energy

  2. Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.

    2011-09-27

    This presentation from the Water Peer Review highlights one of the program's marine and hyrokinetics device design projects to scale up the current Ocean Power Technology PowerBuoy from 150kW to 500kW.

  3. Nuclear Systems Enhanced Performance Program, Maintenance Cycle Extension in Advanced Light Water Reactor Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Professor Neill Todreas

    2001-10-01

    A renewed interest in new nuclear power generation in the US has spurred interest in developing advanced reactors with features which will address the public's concerns regarding nuclear generation. However, it is economic performance which will dictate whether any new orders for these plants will materialize. Economic performance is, to a great extent, improved by maximizing the time that the plant is on-line generating electricity relative to the time spent off-line conducting maintenance and refueling. Indeed, the strategy for the advanced light water reactor plant IRIS (International Reactor, Innovative and Secure) is to utilize an eight year operating cycle. This report describes a formalized strategy to address, during the design phase, the maintenance-related barriers to an extended operating cycle. The top-level objective of this investigation was to develop a methodology for injecting component and system maintainability issues into the reactor plant design process to overcome these barriers. A primary goal was to demonstrate the applicability and utility of the methodology in the context of the IRIS design. The first step in meeting the top-level objective was to determine the types of operating cycle length barriers that the IRIS design team is likely to face. Evaluation of previously identified regulatory and investment protection surveillance program barriers preventing a candidate operating PWR from achieving an extended (48 month) cycle was conducted in the context of the IRIS design. From this analysis, 54 known IRIS operating cycle length barriers were identified. The resolution methodology was applied to each of these barriers to generate design solution alternatives for consideration in the IRIS design. The methodology developed has been demonstrated to narrow the design space to feasible design solutions which enable a desired operating cycle length, yet is general enough to have broad applicability. Feedback from the IRIS design team indicates that the proposed solutions to the investigated operating cycle length barriers are both feasible and consistent with sound design practice.

  4. The potential role of nuclear power in controlling CO sub 2 emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fulkerson, W.; Jones, J.E.; Delene, J.G.; Perry, A.M.; Cantor, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear power currently reduces CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuel burning worldwide by about 8% (0.4 Gt(C)/yr). It can continue to play an important role only if it can grow substantially in the next 50 years. For such growth to occur public confidence will need to improve throughout the world. That might happen if (a) other non-fossil alternatives are inadequate to meet electricity demand growth, (b) the risks to society from global warming are perceived to be very high, (c) nuclear technology improves substantially, and (d) an international institutional setting is devised to manage the nuclear enterprise so that the technology is available to all nations while catastrophic accidents and proliferation of nuclear weapon capabilities are avoided. It seems feasible that the necessary technological and institutional advances can be devised and tested over the next 20 years. It is also plausible that the direct costs of electricity produced by the system would be in the range of 50-100 mills/kWhr (1990 dollars) delivered to the grid. In other words, the direct costs of nuclear power should not be greater than they are today. Achieving such an outcome will require aggressive technical and institutional RD D performed in a cooperative international setting. If rapid growth of nuclear power can begin again in 15-20 years it could supply 30-50% of world electricity in 50 years and cut CO{sub 2} emission rates by up to 2.5 Gt(C)/yr. This would be a substantial contribution to controlling greenhouse gases, but it is not sufficient. Improved efficiency and various renewable energy sources must also grow rapidly if CO{sub 2} emission rates from electricity generation are to be reduced from the current value of about 2 Gt(C)/yr. 41 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August, 2000 - July 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, L.C.

    2002-11-01

    OAK B188 High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August 2000 - July 2001. Currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process is available for commercialization nor has such a process been identified. Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation sector of our economy. Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion are thought to be responsible for global warming. The purpose of this work is to determine the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear power station. The benefits of this work will include the generation of a low-polluting transportable energy feedstock in an efficient method that has little or no implication for greenhouse gas emissions from a primary energy source whose availability and sources are domestically controlled. This will help to ensure energy for a future transportation/energy infrastructure that is not influenced/controlled by foreign governments. This report describes work accomplished during the second year (Phase 2) of a three year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.'' The emphasis of the first year (Phase 1) was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen from water, in which the primary energy input is high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear reactor and to select one (or, at most, three) for further detailed consideration. Phase 1 met its goals and did select one process, the sulfur-iodine process, for investigation in Phases 2 and 3. The combined goals of Phases 2 and 3 were to select the advanced nuclear reactor best suited to driving the selected thermochemical process and to define the selected reactor and process to the point that capital costs, operating costs and the resultant cost of hydrogen can be estimated. During original contract negotiation, it was necessary to reduce work scope to meet funding limits. As a result, the reactor interface and process will not be iterated to the point that only hydrogen is produced. Rather, hydrogen and electricity will be co-generated and the hydrogen cost will be stated as a function of the electricity sales price.

  6. Advanced Power Electronics Interfaces for Distributed Energy Workshop Summary: August 24, 2006, Sacramento, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Treanton, B.; Palomo, J.; Kroposki, B.; Thomas, H.

    2006-10-01

    The Advanced Power Electronics Interfaces for Distributed Energy Workshop, sponsored by the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research program and organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, was held Aug. 24, 2006, in Sacramento, Calif. The workshop provided a forum for industry stakeholders to share their knowledge and experience about technologies, manufacturing approaches, markets, and issues in power electronics for a range of distributed energy resources. It focused on the development of advanced power electronic interfaces for distributed energy applications and included discussions of modular power electronics, component manufacturing, and power electronic applications.

  7. New Technologies for Repairing Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Kevin L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fifield, Leonard S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westman, Matthew P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-09-11

    The goal of this project is to demonstrate a proof-of-concept for a technique to repair aging cables that have been subjected to degradation associated with long-term thermal and radiation exposure in nuclear power plants. The physical degradation of the aging cables manifests itself primarily as cracking and increased brittleness of the polymeric electrical insulation. Therefore, the proposed cable-repair concept comprises development of techniques to impart a softening agent within the deteriorated polymer insulation jacket so as to regain the ability of the insulation to stretch without failing and possibly to heal existing cracks in the insulation. Our approach is to use commercially available ethylene-propylene rubber (EPR) as the relevant test material, demonstrate the adsorption of chemical treatments in the EPR and quantify changes in resulting physical and mechanical properties. EPR cable samples have been thermally treated in air to produce specimens corresponding to the full range of cable age-performance points from new (>350% elongation at break) to end-of-life (<50% elongation at break). The current focus is on two chemical treatments selected as candidates for restoring age-related cable elasticity loss: a rubber plasticizer and a reactive silane molecule. EPR specimens of 200, 150, 100, and 50% elongation at break have been soaked in the candidate chemical treatments and the kinetics of chemical uptake, measured by change in mass of the samples, has been determined. Mechanical properties as a function of aging and chemical treatment have been measured including ultimate tensile strength, tensile modulus at 50% strain, elongation at break, and storage modulus. Dimensional changes with treatment and changes in glass transition temperature were also investigated. These ongoing experiments are expected to provide insight into the physical-chemical nature of the effect of thermal degradation on EPR rejuvenation limits and to advance novel methods for restoring the ability of degraded EPR to be compliant and resist fracture. The results of this research reveal that absorption of chemical treatments can lower the glass transition temperature and modulus of EPR. Chemical treatments pursued thus far have proven ineffective at restoring EPR strength and elongation at break. Future work will combine the plasticizer modalities found to successfully increase the volume of the EPR, reduce EPR glass transition temperature and reduce EPR modulus with promising chemistries that will repair the damage of the polymer, potentially using the plasticizer as a host for the new chemistry.

  8. Axeon Power Limited formerly Advanced Batteries Ltd ABL | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Advanced Batteries Ltd (ABL)) Place: Dundee, United Kingdom Zip: DD2 4UH Product: Lithium ion battery pack developer. Coordinates: 45.27939, -123.009669 Show Map Loading...

  9. N.R. 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; 14 SOLAR ENERGY; 15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL POWER PLANTS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; HEAT...

  10. QUARTERLY NUCLEAR POWER DEPLOYMENT SUMMARY JULY 2013 News Updates

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3 News Updates  Dominion Resources, Inc. has informed the NRC that Dominion Virginia Power will amend its COL application to reflect the ESBWR technology by the end of 2013. In 2009 Dominion dropped the ESBWR from its COLA after failing to reach a commercial agreement with General Electric-Hitachi (GEH). A COL is expected no earlier than late 2015. Dominion Virginia Power has not yet committed to building a new nuclear unit at North Anna.  NRC has determined that the latest revision to the

  11. Study of Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station Unit 4 Spent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Study of Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station Unit 4 Spent Fuel Pool Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Study of Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power...

  12. Los Alamos turns its nuclear weapons power to war on cancer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos turns its nuclear weapons power to war on cancer Los Alamos turns its nuclear weapons power to war on cancer Los Alamos Physicist Eva Birnbaum shows how the laboratory ...

  13. Incidents at nuclear power plants caused by the human factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mashin, V. A.

    2012-09-15

    Psychological analysis of the causes of incorrect actions by personnel is discussed as presented in the report 'Methodological guidelines for analyzing the causes of incidents in the operation of nuclear power plants.' The types of incorrect actions and classification of the root causes of errors by personnel are analyzed. Recommendations are made for improvements in the psychological analysis of causes of incorrect actions by personnel.

  14. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Assessments Introduction Geothermal power taps into earth's internal heat as an energy source. While geothermal currently constitutes less than 1% of total U.S....

  15. High‐Penetration PV with Advanced Power Conditioning Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (VT) is evaluating the impacts of high photovoltaic (PV) penetration and methods to manage any impacts with improved power conditioning equipment.

  16. Audit of Funding for Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems, IG...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for these systems is NASA. The systems have provided proven, reliable, maintenance free power for many NASA projects including the Apollo, Pioneer, Viking, Voyager, Galileo, and...

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Piqua Nuclear Power Facility - OH 08

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Piqua Nuclear Power Facility - OH 08 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Piqua Nuclear Power Facility (OH.08 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Piqua, Ohio, Decommissioned Reactor Site Documents Related to Piqua Nuclear Power Facility

  18. AdvAnced

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AdvAnced test reActor At the InL advanced Unlike large, commercial power reactors, ATR is a low- temperature, low-pressure reactor. A nuclear reactor is basically an elaborate tool to produce power. reactors work by splitting atoms, the basic building blocks of matter, to release large amounts of energy. In commercial power reactors, that energy heats water, which creates steam. the steam turns turbines, generating electricity. What makes the Advanced test reactor, located at the Idaho national

  19. Advanced Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Light Source - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  20. Advanced Bit Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bit Development - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  1. Advanced Materials Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page 2 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  2. Projects Selected to Advance Innovative Materials for Fossil Energy Power Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Four projects that will develop capabilities for designing sophisticated materials that can withstand the harsh environments of advanced fossil energy power systems have been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  3. DOE Announces Effort to Advance U.S. Wind Power Manufacturing Capacity |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Effort to Advance U.S. Wind Power Manufacturing Capacity DOE Announces Effort to Advance U.S. Wind Power Manufacturing Capacity June 2, 2008 - 12:51pm Addthis MOU Launches Government-Industry Effort to Define and Develop Technologies and Siting Strategies Necessary to Achieve 20% Wind Energy by 2030 HOUSTON, TEXAS -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Assistant Secretary of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Andy Karsner today announced a Memorandum of Understanding

  4. Advances in High Power Compact Accelerators | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    (SC) 4 » Advances in High Power Compact Accelerators High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees Community Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: Email Us More Information » 04.01.14 Advances in High Power Compact Accelerators Argonne superconducting

  5. Subtask 5.10 - Testing of an Advanced Dry Cooling Technology for Power

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plants (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Subtask 5.10 - Testing of an Advanced Dry Cooling Technology for Power Plants Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Subtask 5.10 - Testing of an Advanced Dry Cooling Technology for Power Plants The University of North Dakota's Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is developing a market-focused dry cooling technology that is intended to address the key shortcomings of conventional dry cooling technologies: high

  6. Method and system for advancement of a borehole using a high power laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moxley, Joel F.; Land, Mark S.; Rinzler, Charles C.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

    2014-09-09

    There is provided a system, apparatus and methods for the laser drilling of a borehole in the earth. There is further provided with in the systems a means for delivering high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to advance such boreholes deep into the earth and at highly efficient advancement rates, a laser bottom hole assembly, and fluid directing techniques and assemblies for removing the displaced material from the borehole.

  7. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Stationary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... are from Table 1.3 of the EPA "Catalog of CHP Technologies" (see endnote 4). 57 Elgowainy, A., Wang, M. "Fuel Cycle Comparison of Distributed Power Generation Technologies." ...

  8. Advanced nuclear fuel cycles - Main challenges and strategic choices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Biez, V.; Machiels, A.; Sowder, A.

    2013-07-01

    A graphical conceptual model of the uranium fuel cycles has been developed to capture the present, anticipated, and potential (future) nuclear fuel cycle elements. The once-through cycle and plutonium recycle in fast reactors represent two basic approaches that bound classical options for nuclear fuel cycles. Chief among these other options are mono-recycling of plutonium in thermal reactors and recycling of minor actinides in fast reactors. Mono-recycling of plutonium in thermal reactors offers modest savings in natural uranium, provides an alternative approach for present-day interim management of used fuel, and offers a potential bridging technology to development and deployment of future fuel cycles. In addition to breeder reactors' obvious fuel sustainability advantages, recycling of minor actinides in fast reactors offers an attractive concept for long-term management of the wastes, but its ultimate value is uncertain in view of the added complexity in doing so,. Ultimately, there are no simple choices for nuclear fuel cycle options, as the selection of a fuel cycle option must reflect strategic criteria and priorities that vary with national policy and market perspectives. For example, fuel cycle decision-making driven primarily by national strategic interests will likely favor energy security or proliferation resistance issues, whereas decisions driven primarily by commercial or market influences will focus on economic competitiveness.

  9. A Nuclear Renaissance: The Role of Nuclear Power in Mitigating Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winslow, Anne

    2011-06-28

    The U. N. Framework Convention on Climate Change calls for the stabilization of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at double the preindustrial atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration to avoid dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. To achieve this goal, carbon emissions in 2050 must not exceed their current level, despite predictions of a dramatic increase in global electricity demand. The need to reduce GHG emissions and simultaneously provide for additional electricity demand has led to a renewed interest in the expansion of alternatives to fossil fuels--particularly renewable energy and nuclear power. As renewable energy sources are often constrained by the intermittency of natural energy forms, scale-ability concerns, cost and environmental barriers, many governments and even prominent environmentalist turn to nuclear energy as a source of clean, reliable base-load electricity. Described by some as a ''nuclear renaissance'', this trend of embracing nuclear power as a tool to mitigate climate change will dramatically influence the feasibility of emerging nuclear programs around the world.

  10. Systems Analysis of an Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Based on a Modified UREX+3c Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. R. Johnson; R. E. Best

    2009-12-28

    The research described in this report was performed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to describe and compare the merits of two advanced alternative nuclear fuel cycles -- named by this study as the UREX+3c fuel cycle and the Alternative Fuel Cycle (AFC). Both fuel cycles were assumed to support 100 1,000 MWe light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plants operating over the period 2020 through 2100, and the fast reactors (FRs) necessary to burn the plutonium and minor actinides generated by the LWRs. Reprocessing in both fuel cycles is assumed to be based on the UREX+3c process reported in earlier work by the DOE. Conceptually, the UREX+3c process provides nearly complete separation of the various components of spent nuclear fuel in order to enable recycle of reusable nuclear materials, and the storage, conversion, transmutation and/or disposal of other recovered components. Output of the process contains substantially all of the plutonium, which is recovered as a 5:1 uranium/plutonium mixture, in order to discourage plutonium diversion. Mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for recycle in LWRs is made using this 5:1 U/Pu mixture plus appropriate makeup uranium. A second process output contains all of the recovered uranium except the uranium in the 5:1 U/Pu mixture. The several other process outputs are various waste streams, including a stream of minor actinides that are stored until they are consumed in future FRs. For this study, the UREX+3c fuel cycle is assumed to recycle only the 5:1 U/Pu mixture to be used in LWR MOX fuel and to use depleted uranium (tails) for the makeup uranium. This fuel cycle is assumed not to use the recovered uranium output stream but to discard it instead. On the other hand, the AFC is assumed to recycle both the 5:1 U/Pu mixture and all of the recovered uranium. In this case, the recovered uranium is reenriched with the level of enrichment being determined by the amount of recovered plutonium and the combined amount of the resulting MOX. The study considered two sub-cases within each of the two fuel cycles in which the uranium and plutonium from the first generation of MOX spent fuel (i) would not be recycled to produce a second generation of MOX for use in LWRs or (ii) would be recycled to produce a second generation of MOX fuel for use in LWRs. The study also investigated the effects of recycling MOX spent fuel multiple times in LWRs. The study assumed that both fuel cycles would store and then reprocess spent MOX fuel that is not recycled to produce a next generation of LWR MOX fuel and would use the recovered products to produce FR fuel. The study further assumed that FRs would begin to be brought on-line in 2043, eleven years after recycle begins in LWRs, when products from 5-year cooled spent MOX fuel would be available. Fuel for the FRs would be made using the uranium, plutonium, and minor actinides recovered from MOX. For the cases where LWR fuel was assumed to be recycled one time, the 1st generation of MOX spent fuel was used to provide nuclear materials for production of FR fuel. For the cases where the LWR fuel was assumed to be recycled two times, the 2nd generation of MOX spent fuel was used to provide nuclear materials for production of FR fuel. The number of FRs in operation was assumed to increase in successive years until the rate that actinides were recovered from permanently discharged spent MOX fuel equaled the rate the actinides were consumed by the operating fleet of FRs. To compare the two fuel cycles, the study analyzed recycle of nuclear fuel in LWRs and FRs and determined the radiological characteristics of irradiated nuclear fuel, nuclear waste products, and recycle nuclear fuels. It also developed a model to simulate the flows of nuclear materials that could occur in the two advanced nuclear fuel cycles over 81 years beginning in 2020 and ending in 2100. Simulations projected the flows of uranium, plutonium, and minor actinides as these nuclear fuel materials were produced and consumed in a fleet of 100 1,000 MWe LWRs and in FRs. The model als

  11. Nuclear power fleets and uranium resources recovered from phosphates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabriel, S.; Baschwitz, A.; Mathonniere, G.

    2013-07-01

    Current light water reactors (LWR) burn fissile uranium, whereas some future reactors, as Sodium fast reactors (SFR) will be capable of recycling their own plutonium and already-extracted depleted uranium. This makes them a feasible solution for the sustainable development of nuclear energy. Nonetheless, a sufficient quantity of plutonium is needed to start up an SFR, with the plutonium already being produced in light water reactors. The availability of natural uranium therefore has a direct impact on the capacity of the reactors (both LWR and SFR) that we can build. It is therefore important to have an accurate estimate of the available uranium resources in order to plan for the world's future nuclear reactor fleet. This paper discusses the correspondence between the resources (uranium and plutonium) and the nuclear power demand. Sodium fast reactors will be built in line with the availability of plutonium, including fast breeders when necessary. Different assumptions on the global uranium resources are taken into consideration. The largely quoted estimate of 22 Mt of uranium recovered for phosphate rocks can be seriously downscaled. Based on our current knowledge of phosphate resources, 4 Mt of recoverable uranium already seems to be an upper bound value. The impact of the downscaled estimate on the deployment of a nuclear fleet is assessed accordingly. (authors)

  12. Restructuring the DOE Laboratory Complex to Advance Clean Energy, Environmental Sustainability, and a Global Future without Nuclear Weapons

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Restructuring the DOE Laboratory Complex to Advance Clean Energy, Environmental Sustainability, and a Global Future without Nuclear Weapons - December Commission meeting

  13. Advanced underground Vehicle Power and Control: The locomotive Research Platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vehicle Projects LLC

    2003-01-28

    Develop a fuelcell mine locomotive with metal-hydride hydrogen storage. Test the locomotive for fundamental limitations preventing successful commercialization of hydride fuelcells in underground mining. During Phase 1 of the DOE-EERE sponsored project, FPI and its partner SNL, completed work on the development of a 14.4 kW fuelcell power plant and metal-hydride energy storage. An existing battery-electric locomotive with similar power requirements, minus the battery module, was used as the base vehicle. In March 2001, Atlas Copco Wagner of Portland, OR, installed the fuelcell power plant into the base vehicle and initiated integration of the system into the vehicle. The entire vehicle returned to Sandia in May 2001 for further development and integration. Initial system power-up took place in December 2001. A revision to the original contract, Phase 2, at the request of DOE Golden Field Office, established Vehicle Projects LLC as the new prime contractor,. Phase 2 allowed industry partners to conduct surface tests, incorporate enhancements to the original design by SNL, perform an extensive risk and safety analysis, and test the fuelcell locomotive underground under representative production mine conditions. During the surface tests one of the fuelcell stacks exhibited reduced power output resulting in having to replace both fuelcell stacks. The new stacks were manufactured with new and improved technology resulting in an increase of the gross power output from 14.4 kW to 17 kW. Further work by CANMET and Hatch Associates, an engineering consulting firm specializing in safety analysis for the mining industry, both under subcontract to Vehicle Projects LLC, established minimum requirements for underground testing. CANMET upgraded the Programmable Logic Control (PLC) software used to monitor and control the fuelcell power plant, taking into account locomotive operator's needs. Battery Electric, a South Africa manufacturer, designed and manufactured (at no cost to the project) a new motor controller capable of operating the higher rpm motor and different power characteristics of the fuelcells. In early August 2002, CANMET, with the technical assistance of Nuvera Fuel Cells and Battery Electric, installed the new PLC software, installed the new motor controller, and installed the new fuelcell stacks. After minor adjustments, the fuelcell locomotive pulled its first fully loaded ore cars on a surface track. The fuelcell-powered locomotive easily matched the battery powered equivalent in its ability to pull tonnage and equaled the battery-powered locomotive in acceleration. The final task of Phase 2, testing the locomotive underground in a production environment, occurred in early October 2002 in a gold mine. All regulatory requirements to allow the locomotive underground were completed and signed off by Hatch Associates prior to going underground. During the production tests, the locomotive performed flawlessly with no failures or downtime. The actual tests occurred during a 2-week period and involved moving both gold ore and waste rock over a 1,000 meter track. Refueling, or recharging, of the metal-hydride storage took place on the surface. After each shift, the metal-hydride storage module was removed from the locomotive, transported to surface, and filled with hydrogen from high-pressure tanks. The beginning of each shift started with taking the fully recharged metal-hydride storage module down into the mine and re-installing it onto the locomotive. Each 8 hour shift consumed approximately one half to two thirds of the onboard hydrogen. This indicates that the fuelcell-powered locomotive can work longer than a similar battery-powered locomotive, which operates about 6 hours, before needing a recharge.

  14. Electric power transmission for a Hanford Nuclear Energy Center (HNEC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harty, H.; Dowis, W.J.

    1983-06-01

    The original study of transmission for a Hanford Nuclear Energy Center (HNEC), which was completed in September 1975, was updated in June 1978. The present 1983 revision takes cognizance of recent changes in the electric power situation of the PNW with respect to: (1) forecasts of load growth, (2) the feasibility of early use of 1100 kV transmission, and (3) the narrowing opportunities for siting nuclear plants in the region. The purpose of this update is to explore and describe additions to the existing transmission system that would be necessary to accommodate three levels of generation at HNEC. Comparisons with a PNW system having new thermal generating capacity distributed throughout the marketing region are not made as was done in earlier versions.

  15. Refractory alloy technology for space nuclear power applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, R.H. Jr.; Hoffman, E.E.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose of this symposium is twofold: (1) to review and document the status of refractory alloy technology for structural and fuel-cladding applications in space nuclear power systems, and (2) to identify and document the refractory alloy research and development needs for the SP-100 Program in both the short and the long term. In this symposium, an effort was made to recapture the space reactor refractory alloy technology that was cut off in midstream around 1973 when the national space nuclear reactor program began in the early 1960s, was terminated. The six technical areas covered in the program are compatibility, processing and production, welding and component fabrication, mechanical and physical properties, effects of irradiation, and machinability. The refractory alloys considered are niobium, molybdenum, tantalum, and tungsten. Thirteen of the 14 pages have been abstracted separately. The remaining paper summarizes key needs for further R and D on refractory alloys. (DLC)

  16. Advances in the ab initio description of nuclear three-cluster systems

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Advances in the ab initio description of nuclear three-cluster systems Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Advances in the ab initio description of nuclear three-cluster systems Authors: Redondo, C R ; Quaglioni, S ; Navratil, P ; Hupin, G Publication Date: 2015-08-25 OSTI Identifier: 1234622 Report Number(s): LLNL-PROC-676587 DOE Contract Number: AC52-07NA27344 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Presented at: 21st International

  17. Advances in the ab initio description of nuclear three-cluster systems

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Advances in the ab initio description of nuclear three-cluster systems Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Advances in the ab initio description of nuclear three-cluster systems × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy

  18. FEDERAL LOAN GUARANTEE SOLICITATION & SUPPLEMENTS FOR: ADVANCED NUCLEAR ENERGY PROJECTS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NUCLEAR ENERGY PROJECTS U.S. Department of Energy Loan Programs Office Solicitation Number: DE-SOL-0007791 INCLUDED DOCUMENTS (UPDATED: December 4, 2015) Document Issue Date Subject Solicitation Section Affected SOLICITATION December 10, 2014 Solicitation for Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects SUPPLEMENT I June 23, 2015 Scope of Projects Eligible II.C. inserted after II.B (p. 3) SUPPLEMENT II November 6, 2015 Early Upstream and Engineering Project Costs II.D inserted after II.C (p. 3) The Loan

  19. California: Advanced 'Drop-In' Biofuels Power the Navy's Green Strike Group

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Advanced 'Drop-In' Biofuels Power the Navy's Green Strike Group California: Advanced 'Drop-In' Biofuels Power the Navy's Green Strike Group April 18, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Partnering with Solazyme of San Francisco, EERE enabled the company to increase its production of algal oil by a factor of 10. In December 2011, the U.S. Navy's Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) announced that it would purchase 450,000 gallons of Solazyme's advanced "drop-in" jet fuel made

  20. Advanced thermometrics for fossil power plant process improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shepard, R.L.; Weiss, J.M.; Holcomb, D.E.

    1996-04-30

    Improved temperature measurements in fossil power plants can reduce heat rate and uncertainties in power production efficiencies, extend the life of plant components, reduce maintenance costs, and lessen emissions. Conventional instruments for measurement of combustion temperatures, steam temperatures, and structural component temperatures can be improved by better specification, in situ calibration, signal processing, and performance monitoring. Innovative instruments can enhance, augment, or replace conventional instruments. Several critical temperatures can be accessed using new methods that were impossible with conventional instruments. Such instruments include high temperature resistance temperature detectors (RTDs), thermometric phosphors, inductive thermometry, and ultrasonic thermometry.

  1. Cladding and Structural Materials for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Was, G S; Allen, T R; Ila, D; C,; Levi,; Morgan, D; Motta, A; Wang, L; Wirth, B

    2011-06-30

    The goal of this consortium is to address key materials issues in the most promising advanced reactor concepts that have yet to be resolved or that are beyond the existing experience base of dose or burnup. The research program consists of three major thrusts: 1) high-dose radiation stability of advanced fast reactor fuel cladding alloys, 2) irradiation creep at high temperature, and 3) innovative cladding concepts embodying functionally-graded barrier materials. This NERI-Consortium final report represents the collective efforts of a large number of individuals over a period of three and a half years and included 9 PIs, 4 scientists, 3 post-docs and 12 students from the seven participating institutions and 8 partners from 5 national laboratories and 3 industrial institutions (see table). University participants met semi-annually and participants and partners met annually for meetings lasting 2-3 days and designed to disseminate and discuss results, update partners, address outstanding issues and maintain focus and direction toward achieving the objectives of the program. The participants felt that this was a highly successful program to address broader issues that can only be done by the assembly of a range of talent and capabilities at a more substantial funding level than the traditional NERI or NEUP grant. As evidence of the success, this group, collectively, has published 20 articles in archival journals and made 57 presentations at international conferences on the results of this consortium.

  2. Machinery monitoring system installed at nuclear power station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piety, K.; Hamrick, L.; McCurdy, A.

    1981-10-01

    The Grand Gulf Nuclear Station under construction in Mississippi will have a computer-based system to monitor 300 process variables and 200 vibration signals in each of the two units. The system's functions include monitoring support, startup/shutdown, surveillance, and diagnostics. The tasks associated with machinery monitoring are broken down into the initial plant design, construction and startup testing, and power-operation phases. The value of this monitoring is discussed and summarized in a table showing the impact of component failure on plant availability. 4 figures, 3 tables. (DCK)

  3. Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants - heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booker, S.; Lehnert, D.; Daavettila, N.; Palop, E.

    1994-06-01

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in commercial nuclear power plant heat exchangers important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

  4. Float level switch for a nuclear power plant containment vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, J.G.

    1993-11-16

    This invention is a float level switch used to sense rise or drop in water level in a containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during a loss of coolant accident. The essential components of the device are a guide tube, a reed switch inside the guide tube, a float containing a magnetic portion that activates a reed switch, and metal-sheathed, ceramic-insulated conductors connecting the reed switch to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. Special materials and special sealing techniques prevent failure of components and allow the float level switch to be connected to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. 1 figures.

  5. Float level switch for a nuclear power plant containment vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, James G. (Clifton Park, NY)

    1993-01-01

    This invention is a float level switch used to sense rise or drop in water level in a containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during a loss of coolant accident. The essential components of the device are a guide tube, a reed switch inside the guide tube, a float containing a magnetic portion that activates a reed switch, and metal-sheathed, ceramic-insulated conductors connecting the reed switch to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. Special materials and special sealing techniques prevent failure of components and allow the float level switch to be connected to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel.

  6. Surveys of organizational culture and safety culture in nuclear power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Walter S.

    2000-07-30

    The results of a survey of organizational culture at a nuclear power plant are summarized and compared with those of a similar survey which has been described in the literature on ''high-reliability organizations''. A general-purpose cultural inventory showed a profile of organizational style similar to that reported in the literature; the factor structure for the styles was also similar to that of the plant previously described. A specialized scale designed to measure ''safety culture'' did not distinguished among groups within the organization that would be expected to differ.

  7. Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) R&D Program Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon vtpn08_ape_rogers_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) R&D Program Overview Advnaced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) R&D Program Overview

  8. Nuclear Safety Risk Management in Refueling Outage of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meijing Wu; Guozhang Shen [Qinshan Nuclear power company (China)

    2006-07-01

    The NPP is used to planning maintenance, in-service inspection, surveillance test, fuel handling and design modification in the refueling outage; the operator response capability will be reduced plus some of the plant systems out of service or loss of power at this time. Based on 8 times refueling outage experiences of the Qinshan NPP, this article provide some good practice and lesson learned for the nuclear safety risk management focus at four safety function areas of Residual Heat Removal Capability, Inventory Control, Power availability and Reactivity control. (authors)

  9. U.S. Nuclear Power Plants: Continued Life or Replacement After 60? (released in AEO2010)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear power plants generate approximately 20% of U.S. electricity, and the plants in operation today are often seen as attractive assets in the current environment of uncertainty about future fossil fuel prices, high construction costs for new power plants (particularly nuclear plants), and the potential enactment of greenhouse gas regulations. Existing nuclear power plants have low fuel costs and relatively high power output. However, there is uncertainty about how long they will be allowed to continue operating.

  10. MHD Advanced Power Train Phase I, Final Report, Volume 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. R. Jones

    1985-08-01

    This appendix provides additional data in support of the MHD/Steam Power Plant Analyses reported in report Volume 5. The data is in the form of 3PA/SUMARY computer code printouts. The order of presentation in all four cases is as follows: (1) Overall Performance; (2) Component/Subsystem Information; (3) Plant Cost Accounts Summary; and (4) Plant Costing Details and Cost of Electricity.

  11. Pyroelectric Energy Scavenging Techniques for Self-Powered Nuclear Reactor Wireless Sensor Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, Scott Robert; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Datskos, Panos G; Clayton, Dwight A

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in technologies for harvesting waste thermal energy from ambient environments present an opportunity to implement truly wireless sensor nodes in nuclear power plants. These sensors could continue to operate during extended station blackouts and during periods when operation of the plant s internal power distribution system has been disrupted. The energy required to power the wireless sensors must be generated using energy harvesting techniques from locally available energy sources, and the energy consumption within the sensor circuitry must therefore be low to minimize power and hence the size requirements of the energy harvester. Harvesting electrical energy from thermal energy sources can be achieved using pyroelectric or thermoelectric conversion techniques. Recent modeling and experimental studies have shown that pyroelectric techniques can be cost competitive with thermoelectrics in self powered wireless sensor applications and, using new temperature cycling techniques, has the potential to be several times as efficient as thermoelectrics under comparable operating conditions. The development of a new thermal energy harvester concept, based on temperature cycled pyroelectric thermal-to-electrical energy conversion, is outlined. This paper outlines the modeling of cantilever and pyroelectric structures and single element devices that demonstrate the potential of this technology for the development of high efficiency thermal-to-electrical energy conversion devices.

  12. Advanced Fusion Power Plant Studies. Annual Report for 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, V.S.; Chu, M.S.; Greenfield, C.M.; Kinsey, J.E.; et al.

    2000-01-01

    Significant progress in physics understanding of the reversed shear advanced tokamak regime has been made since the last ARIES-RS study was completed in 1996. The 1999 study aimed at updating the physics design of ARIES-RS, which has been renamed ARIES-AT, using the improved understanding achieved in the last few years. The new study focused on: Improvement of beta-limit stability calculations to include important non-ideal effects such as resistive wall modes and neo-classical tearing modes; Use of physics based transport model for internal transport barrier (ITB) formation and sustainment; Comparison of current drive and rotational flow drive using fast wave, electron cyclotron wave and neutral particle beam; Improvement in heat and particle control; Integrated modeling of the optimized scenario with self-consistent current and transport profiles to study the robustness of the bootstrap alignment, ITB sustainment, and stable path to high beta and high bootstrap fraction operation.

  13. Regulatory process for decommissioning nuclear power reactors. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-03-01

    This report provides regulatory guidance for utilities consistent with the changes in the decommissioning rule, 10 CFR50.82 as revised in July 1996. The purpose of this report is to explain the new rule in the context of related industry experience and to provide practical guidance to licensees contemplating or implementing a shutdown. Because the regulatory process is still rapidly evolving, this report reflects only a current status of the acceptable methods and practices derived from a review of the current regulations, guidance documents and industry experience for decommissioning a nuclear power reactor. EPRI anticipates periodic updates of this document to incorporate various utility experiences with decommissioning, and also to reflect any regulatory changes. The report provides a summary of ongoing federal agency and industry activities and the regulatory requirements that are currently applicable, or no longer applicable, to nuclear power plants at the time of permanent shutdown through the early decommissioning stage. The report describes the major components of a typical decommissioning action plan, providing industry experience and guidance for licensees considering or implementing permanent shutdown.

  14. NUCLEAR POWERED CO2 CAPTURE FROM THE ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, S

    2008-09-22

    A process for capturing CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere was recently proposed. This process uses a closed cycle of sodium and calcium hydroxide, carbonate, and oxide transformations to capture dilute CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere and to generate a concentrated stream of CO{sub 2} that is amenable to sequestration or subsequent chemical transformations. In one of the process steps, a fossil-fueled lime kiln is needed, which reduces the net CO{sub 2} capture of the process. It is proposed to replace the fossil-fueled lime kiln with a modified kiln heated by a high-temperature nuclear reactor. This will have the effect of eliminating the use of fossil fuels for the process and increasing the net CO{sub 2} capture. Although the process is suitable to support sequestration, the use of a nuclear power source for the process provides additional capabilities, and the captured CO{sub 2} may be combined with nuclear-produced hydrogen to produce liquid fuels via Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or other technologies. Conceivably, such plants would be carbon-neutral, and could be placed virtually anywhere without being tied to fossil fuel sources or geological sequestration sites.

  15. Enterprise SRS: leveraging ongoing operations to advance nuclear fuel cycles research and development programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, A.M.; Marra, J.E.; Wilmarth, W.R.; McGuire, P.W.; Wheeler, V.B.

    2013-07-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is re-purposing its vast array of assets (including H Canyon - a nuclear chemical separation plant) to solve issues regarding advanced nuclear fuel cycle technologies, nuclear materials processing, packaging, storage and disposition. The vehicle for this transformation is Enterprise SRS which presents a new, radical view of SRS as a united endeavor for 'all things nuclear' as opposed to a group of distinct and separate entities with individual missions and organizations. Key among the Enterprise SRS strategic initiatives is the integration of research into SRS facilities but also in other facilities in conjunction with on-going missions to provide researchers from other national laboratories, academic institutions, and commercial entities the opportunity to demonstrate their technologies in a relevant environment and scale prior to deployment. To manage that integration of research demonstrations into site facilities, a center for applied nuclear materials processing and engineering research has been established in SRS.

  16. A Review of Sensor Calibration Monitoring for Calibration Interval Extension in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Bond, Leonard J.; Hashemian, Hash; Shumaker, Brent; Cummins, Dara

    2012-08-31

    Currently in the United States, periodic sensor recalibration is required for all safety-related sensors, typically occurring at every refueling outage, and it has emerged as a critical path item for shortening outage duration in some plants. Online monitoring can be employed to identify those sensors that require calibration, allowing for calibration of only those sensors that need it. International application of calibration monitoring, such as at the Sizewell B plant in United Kingdom, has shown that sensors may operate for eight years, or longer, within calibration tolerances. This issue is expected to also be important as the United States looks to the next generation of reactor designs (such as small modular reactors and advanced concepts), given the anticipated longer refueling cycles, proposed advanced sensors, and digital instrumentation and control systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) accepted the general concept of online monitoring for sensor calibration monitoring in 2000, but no U.S. plants have been granted the necessary license amendment to apply it. This report presents a state-of-the-art assessment of online calibration monitoring in the nuclear power industry, including sensors, calibration practice, and online monitoring algorithms. This assessment identifies key research needs and gaps that prohibit integration of the NRC-approved online calibration monitoring system in the U.S. nuclear industry. Several needs are identified, including the quantification of uncertainty in online calibration assessment; accurate determination of calibration acceptance criteria and quantification of the effect of acceptance criteria variability on system performance; and assessment of the feasibility of using virtual sensor estimates to replace identified faulty sensors in order to extend operation to the next convenient maintenance opportunity. Understanding the degradation of sensors and the impact of this degradation on signals is key to developing technical basis to support acceptance criteria and set point decisions, particularly for advanced sensors which do not yet have a cumulative history of operating performance.

  17. Online Monitoring of Concrete Structures in Nuclear Power Plants: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahadevan, Sankaran; Cai, Guowei; Agarwal, Vivek

    2015-03-01

    The existing fleet of nuclear power plants in the United States have initial operating licenses of 40 years, and many of these plants have applied for and received license extensions. As plant structures, systems, and components age, their useful life—considering both structural integrity and performance—is reduced as a result of deterioration of the materials. Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code-based design margins of safety. Structural health monitoring is required to produce actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. The online monitoring of concrete structures project conducted under the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Technologies Pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program at Idaho National Laboratory is seeking to develop and demonstrate capabilities for concrete structures health monitoring. Through this research project, several national laboratories and Vanderbilt University propose to develop a framework of research activities for the health monitoring of nuclear power plant concrete structures that includes the integration of four elements—damage modeling, monitoring, data analytics, and uncertainty quantification. This report briefly discusses activities in this project during October-December, 2014. The most significant activity during this period was the organizing of a two-day workshop on research needs in online monitoring of concrete structures, hosted by Vanderbilt University in November 2014. Thirty invitees from academia, industry and government participated in the workshop. The presentations and discussions at the workshop surveyed current activities related to concrete structures deterioration modeling and monitoring, and identified the challenges, knowledge gaps, and opportunities for advancing the state of the art; these discussions are summarized in this report

  18. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Software Verification and Validation (V&V) Plan Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Software Verification and Validation (V&V) Plan is to define what the NEAMS program expects in terms of V&V for the computational models that are developed under NEAMS.

  19. The Use of Thorium within the Nuclear Power Industry - 13472

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Keith [The UK's National Nuclear Laboratory, Chadwick House, Birchwood Park, Warrington WA3 6AE (United Kingdom)] [The UK's National Nuclear Laboratory, Chadwick House, Birchwood Park, Warrington WA3 6AE (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    Thorium is 3 to 4 times more abundant than uranium and is widely distributed in nature as an easily exploitable resource in many countries. Unlike natural uranium, which contains ?0.7% fissile {sup 235}U isotope, natural thorium does not contain any fissile material and is made up of the fertile {sup 232}Th isotope only. Therefore thorium and thorium-based fuel as metal, oxide or carbide, has been utilized in combination with fissile {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu in nuclear research and power reactors for conversion to fissile {sup 233}U, thereby enlarging fissile material resources. During the pioneering years of nuclear energy, from the mid 1950's to mid 1970's, there was considerable interest worldwide to develop thorium fuels and fuel cycles in order to supplement uranium reserves. Thorium fuels and fuel cycles are particularly relevant to countries having large thorium deposits but very limited uranium reserves for their long term nuclear power programme. The feasibility of thorium utilization in high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR), light water reactors (LWR), pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs), liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors (LMFBR) and molten salt breeder reactors (MSBR) were demonstrated. The initial enthusiasm for thorium fuels and fuel cycles was not sustained among the developing countries later, due to new discovery of uranium deposits and their improved availability. However, in recent times, the need for proliferation-resistance, longer fuel cycles, higher burnup, and improved waste form characteristics, reduction of plutonium inventories and in situ use of bred-in fissile material has led to renewed interest in thorium-based fuels and fuel cycles. (authors)

  20. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for their advancement of nuclear power; U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for safety reviews and licensing; R&D community for identification,...

  1. Advanced Nuclear Technology: Advanced Light Water Reactors Utility Requirements Document Small Modular Reactors Inclusion Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loflin, Leonard; McRimmon, Beth

    2014-12-18

    This report summarizes a project by EPRI to include requirements for small modular light water reactors (smLWR) into the EPRI Utility Requirements Document (URD) for Advanced Light Water Reactors. The project was jointly funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The report covers the scope and content of the URD, the process used to revise the URD to include smLWR requirements, a summary of the major changes to the URD to include smLWR, and how to use the URD as revised to achieve value on new plant projects.

  2. Draft Advanced Fossil Solicitation | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Draft Advanced Fossil Solicitation Draft Advanced Fossil Solicitation Federal loan guarantee solicitation announcement -- Advanced Fossil Energy Projects. PDF icon Microsoft Word - Draft Advanced Fossil Solicitation Final Draft.1 More Documents & Publications Federal Loan Guarantees for Projects that Manufacture Commercial Technology Renewable Energy Systems and Components: August 10, 2010 Advanced-Fossil-Energy-Projects-Loan-Guarantee-Solicitation_COMPLETE_22-Apr-2015 Nuclear Power

  3. Regression analysis of technical parameters affecting nuclear power plant performances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghazy, R.; Ricotti, M. E.; Trueco, P.

    2012-07-01

    Since the 80's many studies have been conducted in order to explicate good and bad performances of commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs), but yet no defined correlation has been found out to be totally representative of plant operational experience. In early works, data availability and the number of operating power stations were both limited; therefore, results showed that specific technical characteristics of NPPs were supposed to be the main causal factors for successful plant operation. Although these aspects keep on assuming a significant role, later studies and observations showed that other factors concerning management and organization of the plant could instead be predominant comparing utilities operational and economic results. Utility quality, in a word, can be used to summarize all the managerial and operational aspects that seem to be effective in determining plant performance. In this paper operational data of a consistent sample of commercial nuclear power stations, out of the total 433 operating NPPs, are analyzed, mainly focusing on the last decade operational experience. The sample consists of PWR and BWR technology, operated by utilities located in different countries, including U.S. (Japan)) (France)) (Germany)) and Finland. Multivariate regression is performed using Unit Capability Factor (UCF) as the dependent variable; this factor reflects indeed the effectiveness of plant programs and practices in maximizing the available electrical generation and consequently provides an overall indication of how well plants are operated and maintained. Aspects that may not be real causal factors but which can have a consistent impact on the UCF, as technology design, supplier, size and age, are included in the analysis as independent variables. (authors)

  4. Electric power 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-07-01

    Subjects covered include: power industry trends - near term fuel strategies - price/quality/delivery/opportunity; generating fleet optimization and plant optimization; power plant safety and security; coal power plants - upgrades and new capacity; IGCC, advanced combustion and CO{sub 2} capture technologies; gas turbine and combined cycle power plants; nuclear power; renewable power; plant operations and maintenance; power plant components - design and operation; environmental; regulatory issues, strategies and technologies; and advanced energy strategies and technologies. The presentations are in pdf format.

  5. Advanced power conversion based on the Aerocapacitor{trademark}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Josephs, L.C.; Gregory, D.; Roark, D. [and others

    1997-10-01

    The authors report here, for the first time, high frequency testing of a new type of electrochemical double layer capacitor (EDLC), based on carbon aerogels: the Aerocapacitor. Carbon aerogels, are a novel type of carbon foam developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for military applications. The unique properties of carbon aerogels, high surface area (700 m{sup 2}/g), high density (1g/cc), well controlled pore diameter and high material conductivity (25 S/cm) made it an ideal EDLC electrode material. Using carbon aerogel as the electrode material, the authors have developed Aerocapacitors. These new EDLC`s have a frequency response comparable to that of aluminum electrolytic capacitors and are thus ideally suited to power conversion applications.

  6. Aging assessment of surge protective devices in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.F.; Subudhi, M.; Carroll, D.P.

    1996-01-01

    An assessment was performed to determine the effects of aging on the performance and availability of surge protective devices (SPDs), used in electrical power and control systems in nuclear power plants. Although SPDs have not been classified as safety-related, they are risk-important because they can minimize the initiating event frequencies associated with loss of offsite power and reactor trips. Conversely, their failure due to age might cause some of those initiating events, e.g., through short circuit failure modes, or by allowing deterioration of the safety-related component(s) they are protecting from overvoltages, perhaps preventing a reactor trip, from an open circuit failure mode. From the data evaluated during 1980--1994, it was found that failures of surge arresters and suppressers by short circuits were neither a significant risk nor safety concern, and there were no failures of surge suppressers preventing a reactor trip. Simulations, using the ElectroMagnetic Transients Program (EMTP) were performed to determine the adequacy of high voltage surge arresters.

  7. NERI Final Project Report: On-Line Intelligent Self-Diagnostic Monitoring System for Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond, Leonard J.; Jarrell, Donald B.; Koehler, Theresa M.; Meador, Richard J.; Sisk, Daniel R.; Hatley, Darrel D.; Watkins, Kenneth S.; Chai, Jangbom; Kim, Wooshik

    2003-06-20

    This project provides a proof-of-principle technology demonstration for SDMS, where a distributed suite of sensors is integrated with active components and passive structures of types expected to be encountered in next generation nuclear power reactor and plant systems. The project employs state-of-the-art operational sensors, advanced stressor-based instrumentation, distributed computing, RF data network modules and signal processing to improve the monitoring and assessment of the power reactor system and gives data that is used to provide prognostics capabilities.

  8. Use of collaboration software to improve nuclear power plant outage management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Germain, Shawn

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) refueling outages create some of the most challenging activities the utilities face in both tracking and coordinating thousands of activities in a short period of time. Other challenges, including nuclear safety concerns arising from atypical system configurations and resource allocation issues, can create delays and schedule overruns, driving up outage costs. Today the majority of the outage communication is done using processes that do not take advantage of advances in modern technologies that enable enhanced communication, collaboration and information sharing. Some of the common practices include: runners that deliver paper-based requests for approval, radios, telephones, desktop computers, daily schedule printouts, and static whiteboards that are used to display information. Many gains have been made to reduce the challenges facing outage coordinators; however; new opportunities can be realized by utilizing modern technological advancements in communication and information tools that can enhance the collective situational awareness of plant personnel leading to improved decision-making. Ongoing research as part of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRS) has been targeting NPP outage improvement. As part of this research, various applications of collaborative software have been demonstrated through pilot project utility partnerships. Collaboration software can be utilized as part of the larger concept of Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW). Collaborative software can be used for emergent issue resolution, Outage Control Center (OCC) displays, and schedule monitoring. Use of collaboration software enables outage staff and subject matter experts (SMEs) to view and update critical outage information from any location on site or off.

  9. Nuclear power and the allocation of emissions allowances: a new hampshire case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Space, William

    2007-04-15

    The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative's model rule allows states to allocate carbon allowances to nuclear power plants. New Hampshire's 2003 decision to include nuclear uprates in its NO{sub x} allocations represents a relevant precedent. (author)

  10. DOE Science Showcase - Clean Fusion Power | OSTI, US Dept of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clean Fusion Power Search Results from DOE Databases View research documents, ... related to advanced systems for fusion energy and nuclear power, primary scientific challenges ...

  11. Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear Energy Leaders, Pioneer Advanced Nuclear Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Building on President Obama’s Climate Action Plan to continue America’s leadership in clean energy innovation, the Energy Department announced more than $60 million in nuclear energy research awards and improvements to university research reactors and infrastructure.

  12. Establishing a value chain for human factors in nuclear power plantcontrol room modernization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joe, Jeffrey Clark; Thomas, Kenneth David; Boring, Ronald Laurids

    2015-07-01

    Commercial nuclear power plants in the United States (U.S.) have operated reliably and efficiently for decades. With the life extensions of plants now being planned for operation beyond their original operating licenses, there are opportunities to achieve even greater efficiencies, while maintaining high operational reliabilities, with strategic, risk- and economically-informed, upgrades to plant systems and infrastructure. The U.S. Department of Energys Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program supports the commercial nuclear industrys modernization efforts through research and development (R&D) activities across many areas to help establish the technical and economic bases for modernization activities. The Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies pathway is one R&D focus area for the LWRS program, and has researchers at Idaho National Laboratory working with select utility partners to use human factors and instrumentation and controls R&D to help modernize the plants main control room. However, some in the nuclear industry have not been as enthusiastic about using human factors R&D to inform life extension decision making. Part of the reason for this may stem from uncertainty decision-makers have regarding how human factors fits into the value chain for nuclear power plant control room modernization. This paper reviews past work that has attempted to demonstrate the value of human factors, and then describes the value chain concept, how it applies to control room modernization, and then makes a case for how and why human factors is an essential link in the modernization value chain.

  13. Top 6 Things You Didn't Know About Nuclear Power | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Power Top 6 Things You Didn't Know About Nuclear Power December 12, 2014 - 10:39am Addthis These are the first lightbulbs lit by nuclear fission at Argonne's EBR or Experimental Breeder Reactor.| Energy Department photo. These are the first lightbulbs lit by nuclear fission at Argonne's EBR or Experimental Breeder Reactor.| Energy Department photo. Allison Lantero Allison Lantero Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs This article is part of the Energy.gov series

  14. Advanced power conversion based on the Aerocapacitor{trademark}. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roark, D.

    1997-03-05

    This report summarizes work performed under contract No. DE-FC07-94ID13283, {open_quotes}Advanced Power Conversion Based on the Aerocapacitors{trademark}.{close_quotes} Under this contract high power density, high energy density, organic electrolyte Aerocapacitors{trademark} were developed and characterized for power conversion applications. Pilot facilities for manufacturing prototype AA-size Aerocapacitors{trademark} were put in place. The low ESR and good frequency response of these devices show that they are ideal components for high discharge rate and low to moderate frequency (< 10 kHz) applications such as power conversion.

  15. Nuclear power plant simulators: their use in operator training and requalification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, D.W.; Baer, D.K.; Francis, C.C.

    1980-07-01

    This report presents the results of a study performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to evaluate the capabilities and use of nuclear power plant simulators either built or being built by the US nuclear power industry; to determine the adequacy of existing standards for simulator design and for the training of power plant operators on simulators; and to assess the issues about simulator training programs raised by the March 28, 1979, accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2.

  16. Los Alamos turns its nuclear weapons power to war on cancer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos turns its nuclear weapons power to war on cancer Los Alamos turns its nuclear weapons power to war on cancer Los Alamos Physicist Eva Birnbaum shows how the laboratory is manufacturing a radioactive treatment that targets tumors, without killing the surrounding healthy tissue. December 20, 2015 LANL physicist Eva Birnbaum LANL physicist Eva Birnbaum Los Alamos turns its nuclear weapons power to war on cancer NBC News got exclusive access to Los Alamos National Laboratory where

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Hallam Nuclear Power Facility - NE 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Hallam Nuclear Power Facility - NE 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Hallam Nuclear Power Facility (NE.01 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Hallam, Nebraska, Decommissioned Reactor Site Documents Related to Hallam Nuclear Power Facility U.S. Department of Energy 2009 Annual Inspection - Hallam, Nebraska June 2009 Page 1

  18. Department of Energy to Co-Sponsor Workshop on Nuclear Power Plant Life

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Extension R&D | Department of Energy to Co-Sponsor Workshop on Nuclear Power Plant Life Extension R&D Department of Energy to Co-Sponsor Workshop on Nuclear Power Plant Life Extension R&D September 29, 2010 - 11:38am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) will co-sponsor a "Second Workshop on U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Life Extension Research and Development" planned for February 22-24,

  19. Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants-pumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booker, S.; Katz, D.; Daavettila, N.; Lehnert, D.

    1994-03-01

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in BWR and PWR commercial nuclear power plant pumps important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR Part 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

  20. Fitness for duty in the nuclear power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durbin, N.; Moore, C.; Grant, T.; Fleming, T.; Hunt, P.; Martin, R.; Murphy, S.; Hauth, J.; Wilson, R.; Bittner, A.; Bramwell, A.; Macaulay, J.; Olson, J.; Terrill, E.; Toquam, J. )

    1991-09-01

    This report presents an overview of the NRC licensees' implementation of the FFD program during the first full year of the program's operation and provides new information on a variety of FFD technical issues. The purpose of this document is to contribute to appropriate changes to the rule, to the inspection process, and to other NRC activities. It describes the characteristics of licensee programs, discusses the results of NRC inspections, updates technical information covered in previous reports, and identifies lessons learned during the first year. Overall, the experience of the first full year of licensees' FFD program operations indicates that licensees have functioning fitness for duty programs devoted to the NRC rule's performance objectives of achieving drug-free workplaces in which nuclear power plant personnel are not impaired as they perform their duties. 96 refs., 14 tabs.

  1. Vitrification of Polyvinyl Chloride Waste from Korean Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, Jiawei [Kyoto University (Japan); Choi, Kwansik [Nuclear Environment Technology Institute (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Kyung-Hwa [Nuclear Environment Technology Institute (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Myung-Chan [Nuclear Environment Technology Institute (Korea, Republic of); Song, Myung-Jae [Nuclear Environment Technology Institute (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-02-15

    Vitrification is considered as an economical and safe treatment technology for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated from nuclear power plants (NPPs). Korea is in the process of preparing for its first ever vitrification plant to handle LLW from its NPPs. Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) has the largest volume of dry active wastes and is the main waste stream to treat. Glass formulation development for PVC waste is the focus of study. The minimum additive waste stabilization approach has been utilized in vitrification. It was found that glasses can incorporate a high content of PVC ash (up to 50 wt%), which results in a large volume reduction. A glass frit, KEP-A, was developed to vitrify PVC waste after the optimization of waste loading, melt viscosity, melting temperature, and chemical durability. The KEP-A could satisfactorily vitrify PVC with a waste loading of 30 to 50 wt%. The PVC-frit was tolerant of variations in waste composition.

  2. FY2008 Annual Progress Report for the Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AnnuAl Progress rePort for the AdvAnced Power electronics And electric MAchinery technology AreA annual progress report 2008 V e h i c l e T e c h n o l o g i e s P r o g r a m U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies, EE-2G 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585-0121 FY 2008 Annual Progress Report for the Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Technology Area Submitted to: Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Vehicle Technologies Program Susan A.

  3. DOE Selects Projects to Advance Technologies for the Co-Production of Power

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and Hydrogen, Fuels or Chemicals from Coal-Biomass Feedstocks | Department of Energy to Advance Technologies for the Co-Production of Power and Hydrogen, Fuels or Chemicals from Coal-Biomass Feedstocks DOE Selects Projects to Advance Technologies for the Co-Production of Power and Hydrogen, Fuels or Chemicals from Coal-Biomass Feedstocks August 18, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Eight projects that will focus on gasification of coal/biomass to produce synthetic gas (syngas) have been

  4. EERE Success Story-California: Advanced 'Drop-In' Biofuels Power the

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Navy's Green Strike Group | Department of Energy Advanced 'Drop-In' Biofuels Power the Navy's Green Strike Group EERE Success Story-California: Advanced 'Drop-In' Biofuels Power the Navy's Green Strike Group April 18, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Partnering with Solazyme of San Francisco, EERE enabled the company to increase its production of algal oil by a factor of 10. In December 2011, the U.S. Navy's Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) announced that it would purchase 450,000 gallons of Solazyme's

  5. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapters 2-13, project number 669

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume I, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

  6. Deputy Secretary Poneman Delivers Remarks on Nuclear Power at Tokyo American Center in Japan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – Energy Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman spoke at the Tokyo American Center today about nuclear power after Fukushima.

  7. Analysis of Nuclear Power Plant Operating Costs: A 1995 Update, An

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1995-01-01

    This report provides an analysis of nuclear power plant operating costs. The Energy Information Administration published three reports on this subject during the period 1988-1995.

  8. Ukraine Loads U.S. Nuclear Fuel into Power Plant as Part of DOE-Ukraine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Fuel Qualification Program | Department of Energy Ukraine Loads U.S. Nuclear Fuel into Power Plant as Part of DOE-Ukraine Nuclear Fuel Qualification Program Ukraine Loads U.S. Nuclear Fuel into Power Plant as Part of DOE-Ukraine Nuclear Fuel Qualification Program April 9, 2010 - 12:11pm Addthis KYIV, UKRAINE - Officials from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy today (April 8, 2010) participated in a ceremony in Ukraine to mark the insertion of

  9. Method of installing a control room console in a nuclear power plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth; Jamison, David S.; Manazir, Richard M.; Rescorl, Robert L.; Harmon, Daryl L.

    1994-01-01

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  10. Strategic Plan for Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

    2011-10-01

    The Nuclear Energy Computational Fluid Dynamics Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-CAMS) system is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in collaboration with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Utah State University (USU), and other interested parties with the objective of developing and implementing a comprehensive and readily accessible data and information management system for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) verification and validation (V&V) in support of nuclear energy systems design and safety analysis. The two key objectives of the NE-CAMS effort are to identify, collect, assess, store and maintain high resolution and high quality experimental data and related expert knowledge (metadata) for use in CFD V&V assessments specific to the nuclear energy field and to establish a working relationship with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to develop a CFD V&V database, including benchmark cases, that addresses and supports the associated NRC regulations and policies on the use of CFD analysis. In particular, the NE-CAMS system will support the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program, which aims to develop and deploy advanced modeling and simulation methods and computational tools for reliable numerical simulation of nuclear reactor systems for design and safety analysis. Primary NE-CAMS Elements There are four primary elements of the NE-CAMS knowledge base designed to support computer modeling and simulation in the nuclear energy arena as listed below. Element 1. The database will contain experimental data that can be used for CFD validation that is relevant to nuclear reactor and plant processes, particularly those important to the nuclear industry and the NRC. Element 2. Qualification standards for data evaluation and classification will be incorporated and applied such that validation data sets will result in well-defined, well-characterized data. Element 3. Standards will be established for the design and operation of experiments for the generation of new validation data sets that are to be submitted to NE-CAMS that addresses the completeness and characterization of the dataset. Element 4. Standards will be developed for performing verification and validation (V&V) to establish confidence levels in CFD analyses of nuclear reactor processes; such processes will be acceptable and recognized by both CFD experts and the NRC.

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - Nuclear Material Import Export License...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Material ImportExport License - Uses & Reporting processes Gary Langlie - Nuclear Regulatory Commission Karen Antizzo - Link Technologies Overview What is a Nuclear Regulatory ...

  12. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Carbon Dioxide Capture for Natural Gas and Industrial Applications Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gas and Industrial Applications Carbon Dioxide Capture Technologies Carbon Dioxide Storage Technologies Crosscutting Technologies in Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Fast-spectrum Reactors Geothermal Power High Temperature Reactors Hybrid Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems Hydropower Light Water Reactors Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Nuclear Fuel Cycles Solar Power Stationary Fuel Cells Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Wind Power ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Clean Power Quadrennial

  13. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Crosscutting Technologies in Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gas and Industrial Applications Carbon Dioxide Capture Technologies Carbon Dioxide Storage Technologies Crosscutting Technologies in Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Fast-spectrum Reactors Geothermal Power High Temperature Reactors Hybrid Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems Hydropower Light Water Reactors Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Nuclear Fuel Cycles Solar Power Stationary Fuel Cells Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Wind Power ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Clean Power Quadrennial

  14. Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  15. Innovative applications of technology for nuclear power plant productivity improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naser, J. A.

    2012-07-01

    The nuclear power industry in several countries is concerned about the ability to maintain high plant performance levels due to aging and obsolescence, knowledge drain, fewer plant staff, and new requirements and commitments. Current plant operations are labor-intensive due to the vast number of operational and support activities required by commonly used technology in most plants. These concerns increase as plants extend their operating life. In addition, there is the goal to further improve performance while reducing human errors and increasingly focus on reducing operations and maintenance costs. New plants are expected to perform more productively than current plants. In order to achieve and increase high productivity, it is necessary to look at innovative applications of modern technologies and new concepts of operation. The Electric Power Research Inst. is exploring and demonstrating modern technologies that enable cost-effectively maintaining current performance levels and shifts to even higher performance levels, as well as provide tools for high performance in new plants. Several modern technologies being explored can provide multiple benefits for a wide range of applications. Examples of these technologies include simulation, visualization, automation, human cognitive engineering, and information and communications technologies. Some applications using modern technologies are described. (authors)

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Advanced Power Electronics R&D Annual

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Progress Report | Department of Energy Power Electronics R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Advanced Power Electronics R&D Annual Progress Report Annual report focusing on understanding and improving the way various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. PDF icon 2009_apeem_report.pdf More Documents & Publications Thermal Performance and Reliability of Bonded Interfaces Vehicle Technologies

  17. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of advanced reactor concepts: The Gas Core Nuclear Rocket

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banjac, V.; Heger, A.S.

    1995-12-31

    The Gas Core Nuclear Rocket (GCNR), a design first proposed in the 1960s for fast round-trip missions to Mars and the outer planets, is generally considered to be the most advanced, and therefore the most complex, iteration of the fission reactor concept. The GCNR technology involves the extraction of fission energy, by means of thermal radiation, from a high-temperature plasma core to a working fluid. A specific derivative of GCNR technology is the nuclear fight bulb (NLB) rocket engine, first proposed by the then United Aircraft Research Laboratories (UARL) in the early 1960s. The potential operating parameters provided the motivation for a detailed thermal hydraulics analysis.

  18. The Physics Basis For An Advanced Physics And Advanced Technology Tokamak Power Plant Configuration, ARIES-ACT1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Kessel, et al

    2014-03-05

    The advanced physics and advanced technology tokamak power plant ARIES-ACT1 has a major radius of 6.25 m at aspect ratio of 4.0, toroidal field of 6.0 T, strong shaping with elongation of 2.2 and triangularity of 0.63. The broadest pressure cases reached wall stabilized ?N ~ 5.75, limited by n=3 external kink mode requiring a conducting shell at b/a = 0.3, and requiring plasma rotation, feedback, and or kinetic stabilization. The medium pressure peaking case reached ?N = 5.28 with BT = 6.75, while the peaked pressure case reaches ?N < 5.15. Fast particle MHD stability shows that the alpha particles are unstable, but this leads to redistribution to larger minor radius rather than loss from the plasma. Edge and divertor plasma modeling show that about 75% of the power to the divertor can be radiated with an ITER-like divertor geometry, while over 95% can be radiated in a stable detached mode with an orthogonal target and wide slot geometry. The bootstrap current fraction is 91% with a q95 of 4.5, requiring about ~ 1.1 MA of external current drive. This current is supplied with 5 MW of ICRF/FW and 40 MW of LHCD. EC was examined and is most effective for safety factor control over ? ~ 0.2-0.6 with 20 MW. The pedestal density is ~ 0.9x1020 /m3 and the temperature is ~ 4.4 keV. The H98 factor is 1.65, n/nGr = 1.0, and the net power to LH threshold power is 2.8- 3.0 in the flattop.

  19. Aging Management Guideline for commercial nuclear power plants: Power and distribution transformers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toman, G.; Gazdzinski, R.

    1994-05-01

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) provides recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in power and distribution transformers important to license renewal in commercial nuclear power plants. The intent of this AMG to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR Part 54. This AMG is presented in a manner which allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

  20. TTU Advanced Doppler Radar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TTU Advanced Doppler Radar - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs