National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for advanced materials partners

  1. Advanced Materials Partners Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Materials Partners Inc Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Advanced Materials Partners Inc Name: Advanced Materials Partners Inc Address: 45 Pine Street Place: New Canaan,...

  2. Partnering with Industry to Develop Advanced Biofuels

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Partnering with Industry to Develop Advanced Biofuels > David C. Carroll GTI President and CEO Biomass 2014 July 29, 2014 2 Advanced Biofuels Tenets > Converting indigenous resources is good for the economy > Abundant non-food biomass is available > Drop-in, infrastructure-compatible fuels have vast markets > Seek commercial competitiveness without subsidy > Scale of supply requires innovation for process efficiency > Policy needs to ensure access to markets > Funds are

  3. Advanced Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Manufacturing Office 13 Selectees Announced for High Performance Computing for Manufacturing Program 13 Selectees Announced for High Performance Computing for Manufacturing Program EERE, in partnership with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), announced the second round of selections for the High Performance Computing for Manufacturing ("HPC4Mfg") Program. Thirteen projects were selected to receive nearly $3.8 million for manufacturers to use high-performance

  4. Partnering with Industry to Develop Advanced Biofuels | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Partnering with Industry to Develop Advanced Biofuels Partnering with Industry to Develop Advanced Biofuels Breakout Session IA-Conversion Technologies I: Industrial Perspectives on Pathways to Advanced Biofuels Partnering with Industry to Develop Advanced Biofuels David C. Carroll, President and Chief Executive Officer, Gas Technology Institute carroll_biomass_2014.pdf (1.38 MB) More Documents & Publications Commercialization of IH2® Biomass Direct-to-Hydrocarbon Fuel Technology

  5. Energy Department Recognizes San Antonio Area Partners for Advancing Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency | Department of Energy San Antonio Area Partners for Advancing Energy Efficiency Energy Department Recognizes San Antonio Area Partners for Advancing Energy Efficiency April 15, 2015 - 10:36am Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 As part of the Administration's effort to cut energy waste in the nation's buildings, the Energy Department will recognize San Antonio area partners today for their leadership in advancing energy efficiency. Through the Better Buildings Challenge,

  6. Argonne National Laboratory Partners with Advanced Magnet Lab to Develop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    First Fully Superconducting Direct-Drive Generator | Department of Energy Partners with Advanced Magnet Lab to Develop First Fully Superconducting Direct-Drive Generator Argonne National Laboratory Partners with Advanced Magnet Lab to Develop First Fully Superconducting Direct-Drive Generator December 19, 2011 - 9:24am Addthis This is an excerpt from the Fourth Quarter 2011 edition of the Wind Program R&D Newsletter. The Department of Energy (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is

  7. Department of Energy, Duke Energy and EPRI Partner to Test Advanced...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy, Duke Energy and EPRI Partner to Test Advanced Energy Technologies for Utilities Department of Energy, Duke Energy and EPRI Partner to Test Advanced Energy Technologies for ...

  8. NREL Partners with California to Accelerate Advanced Energy Communities |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Buildings | NREL Partners with California to Accelerate Advanced Energy Communities June 1, 2016 The California Energy Commission has selected NREL to be part of a team that will complete a major applied research project to accelerate the deployment of Advanced Energy Communities (AEC). Team members also include the Advanced Power and Energy Program at the University of California, Irvine (UCI), the City of Huntington Beach, and Altura Associates, Inc. NREL will use advanced analytics

  9. Advanced Materials Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Much Cheaper, More Abundant Catalyst May Lower Hydrogen-Powered Car Costs Advanced Materials Laboratory, Analysis, Capabilities, Energy, Facilities, Highlights - Energy Research, ...

  10. Advanced Materials Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Sandia Researchers Win CSP:ELEMENTS Funding Award Advanced Materials Laboratory, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test ...

  11. NREL Partners with California to Accelerate Advanced Energy Communities |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Systems Integration | NREL NREL Partners with California to Accelerate Advanced Energy Communities June 1, 2016 The California Energy Commission has selected NREL to be part of a team that will complete a major applied research project to accelerate the deployment of Advanced Energy Communities (AEC). Team members also include the Advanced Power and Energy Program at the University of California, Irvine (UCI), the City of Huntington Beach, and Altura Associates, Inc. NREL will use

  12. Advanced Materials Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Marketing Summaries Site Map Printable Version Share this resource About Search Categories (15) Advanced Materials Marketing Summaries (349) Success Stories (3) Biomass and Biofuels Building Energy Efficiency Electricity Transmission Energy Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America Vehicles and Fuels Wind Energy Partners (27) Visual Patent Search Success Stories Browse

  13. News about CMI Partners | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Partners 2016 energy.gov: Dr. Sanjiv Malhotra to lead Energy Department's Clean Energy Investment Center, Jan. 5, 2016 BloombergBusiness: Molycorp bids said to top miner's own price amid sales feud, Jan. 5, 2016 New elements on periodic table: Oak Ridge National Laboratory: ORNL on team officially recognized for elements 115, 117 discovery, Jan. 5, 2016 National Public Radio: The periodic table gets update with 4 new elements, Jan. 4, 2016 Washington Post: Periodic table gains four new

  14. CMI Education Partner: Iowa State University | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Partner: Iowa State University Iowa State University offers courses in several areas: Materials Engineering Materials Science and Engineering Recycling/Industrial Engineering Geology Chemistry http://catalog.iastate.edu/collegescurricula/ Course could be changed semester by semester. The list below is based on general information of Iowa State University. Materials Engineering Courses primarily for undergraduates: MAT E 214. Structural Characterization of Materials. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: MAT

  15. Advanced Materials Success Stories - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Success Stories Site Map Printable Version Share this resource About Search Categories (15) Advanced Materials Marketing Summaries (349) Success Stories (3) Biomass and Biofuels Building Energy Efficiency Electricity Transmission Energy Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America Vehicles and Fuels Wind Energy Partners (27) Visual Patent Search Success Stories Graphic of a full-grown

  16. Partnering with Industry to Advance Biofuels and Bioproducts (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-12-01

    Fact sheet describing NREL's Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility, a biochemical pilot plant and partnership facility containing equipment and lab space for pretreatement, enzymatic hydrolysis, fermentation, compositional analysis, and downstream processing. For more than 30 years, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been at the leading edge of research and technology advancements to develop renewable fuels and bioproducts. NREL works to develop cost-competitive alternatives to conventional transportation fuels and value-added biobased chemicals that can be used to manufacture clothing, plastics, lubricants, and other products. NREL is developing technologies and processes to produce a range of sustainable, energy-dense advanced biofuels that are compatible with our existing transportation fuel infrastructure. As part of that effort, NREL's National Bioenergy Center has entered into more than 90 collaborations in the past five years with companies ranging in size from start-ups to those that appear on Fortune magazine's Fortune 100 list. The new Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF) showcases NREL's commitment to collaboration and to meeting the nation's biofuels and bioproducts development and deployment goals. Designed to speed the growth of the biofuels and bioproducts industries, the IBRF is a unique $33.5 million pilot facility capable of supporting a variety of projects. The IBRF is available to industry partners who work with NREL through cooperative research and development, technical, and analytical service agreements. With 27,000 ft2 of high bay space, the IBRF provides industry partners with the opportunity to operate, test, and develop their own biorefining technology and equipment.

  17. Magnetic Materials | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Internal Magnetic Materials The Magnetic Material Group (MMG) is part of the X-ray Science Division (XSD) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Our research focuses on the...

  18. CMI Education Partners Offer Courses | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Partners Offer Courses The CMI Team includes six education members. The CMI Education and Outreach staff reviewed the courses these colleges and universities offer, and created an inventory of those related to critical materials and rare earth elements. The list of courses taught by CMI Team members is available by university and grouped by topic: Geology Engineering/ Geochemistry Mining Engineering Metallurgical Engineering/ Material Science Chemistry Engineering Mineral Economics and Business

  19. CMI Education Partner: Colorado School of Mines | Critical Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute Education Partner: Colorado School of Mines Colorado School of Mines offers courses in several areas: Geology Engineering/Geochemistry Mining Engineering Metallurgical Engineering/Materials Science Chemistry Engineering Mineral Economics and Business Geology Engineering/Geochemistry GEGN101. EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS. 4.0 Hours. (I, II, S) Fundamental concepts concerning the nature, composition and evolution of the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere of the

  20. Partners

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Partners Technology Development and Commercialization A primary objective of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories is to promote the economic interests of the United States by facilitating development, transfer, and use of federally owned or originated technology to industry for public benefit and to leverage DOE resources through partnering with industry. Argonne's Technology Development and Commercialization Office works proactively with Argonne divisions and selected industry

  1. Advanced neutron absorber materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branagan, Daniel J.; Smolik, Galen R.

    2000-01-01

    A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

  2. U.S. Department of Energy and India Partner to Advance Accelerator and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Particle Detector Research and Development | Department of Energy India Partner to Advance Accelerator and Particle Detector Research and Development U.S. Department of Energy and India Partner to Advance Accelerator and Particle Detector Research and Development July 25, 2011 - 3:22pm Addthis WASHINGTON DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that it has signed an agreement with the Indian Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) to help advance scientific discovery in the field

  3. Accelerating Advanced Material Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    this tool into a more permanent, flexible and scalable data service built on top of rich modern web interfaces and state-of-the-art NoSQL database technology." The Materials...

  4. San Antonio Better Buildings Partners Recognized for Advancing Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In April, the Energy Department recognized Better Buildings Challenge San Antonio, Texas area partners. Dr. Kathleen Hogan, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency met with Macys and the...

  5. Advanced Pressure Boundary Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santella, Michael L; Shingledecker, John P

    2007-01-01

    Increasing the operating temperatures of fossil power plants is fundamental to improving thermal efficiencies and reducing undesirable emissions such as CO{sub 2}. One group of alloys with the potential to satisfy the conditions required of higher operating temperatures is the advanced ferritic steels such as ASTM Grade 91, 9Cr-2W, and 12Cr-2W. These are Cr-Mo steels containing 9-12 wt% Cr that have martensitic microstructures. Research aimed at increasing the operating temperature limits of the 9-12 wt% Cr steels and optimizing them for specific power plant applications has been actively pursued since the 1970's. As with all of the high strength martensitic steels, specifying upper temperature limits for tempering the alloys and heat treating weldments is a critical issue. To support this aspect of development, thermodynamic analysis was used to estimate how this critical temperature, the A{sub 1} in steel terminology, varies with alloy composition. The results from the thermodynamic analysis were presented to the Strength of Weldments subgroup of the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code and are being considered in establishing maximum postweld heat treatment temperatures. Experiments are also being planned to verify predictions. This is part of a CRADA project being done with Alstom Power, Inc.

  6. Partnering with Utilities Part 2 - Advanced Topics for Local Governments in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Creating Successful Partnerships with Utilities to Deliver Energy Efficiency Programs | Department of Energy Partnering with Utilities Part 2 - Advanced Topics for Local Governments in Creating Successful Partnerships with Utilities to Deliver Energy Efficiency Programs Partnering with Utilities Part 2 - Advanced Topics for Local Governments in Creating Successful Partnerships with Utilities to Deliver Energy Efficiency Programs This presentation given through the DOE's Technical Assistance

  7. ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance Print Thursday, 27 September 2012 00:00 ritchie ceramics...

  8. Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Materials Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Materials Workshop Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Materials Workshop WHEN: Jul 20, 2015 8:30 AM - Jul 21, 2015...

  9. Advances in understanding solar energy collection materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Understanding solar energy collection materials Advances in understanding solar energy collection materials A LANL team and collaborators have made advances in the understanding of...

  10. Advanced Water Splitting Materials EMN Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advanced Water Splitting Materials EMN Workshop Stanford, CA April 14 th , 2016 Dr. Eric ... Laying a Foundation.. ...for an Advanced Water Splitting Materials EMN for renewable H 2 ...

  11. Current Partners > Partnerships > The Energy Materials Center at Cornell

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In This Section Why Partnerships? Current Partners Project Updates News & Events Resources Join PARTNERSHIPS Why Partnerships? ›Project Updates ›News + Events › Current Partners Some of our partner companies appear below. More information about each of these, and other partners coming soon. General Motors Honeoye Falls, NY Primet Precision Materials Ithaca, NY Ford Motor Corporation Dearborn, MI

  12. Advanced Light Extraction Material for OLED Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light Extraction Material for OLED Lighting Advanced Light Extraction Material for OLED Lighting Lead Performer: Pixelligent Technologies LLC - Baltimore, MD Partners: OLEDWorks LLC DOE Total Funding: $1,000,000 Project Term: April 6, 2015 - April 5, 2017 Funding Opportunity: FY2015 Phase II Release 1 SBIR Awards PROJECT OBJECTIVE The primary goal of this Phase II project is to develop a viable commercial process to manufacture an internal light extraction (ILE) layer to be supplied to OLED

  13. Advanced Materials by Design: Programable Transient Electronics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Materials by Design: Programable Transient Electronics Transient materials is an emerging area of materials design with the key attribute being the ability to physically...

  14. Advanced materials in marine environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sedriks, A.J. )

    1994-02-01

    This article outlines engineering applications of advanced materials, such as polymer-matrix composites; superferritic, superaustenitic, and superduplex stainless steels (SS); and titanium alloys in hulls, condensers/heat exchangers, and centrifugal pumps operating in marine environments. Although many traditional seawater corrosion problems have been eliminated by the use of these materials, other environment-induced effects have been identified, notable among them strength degradation, blister formation, and cavitation in polymer-matrix composites; hydrogen embrittlement and crevice corrosion in superferritic SS; and hydride precipitation in titanium. Measures for avoiding these effects are discussed.

  15. EERE Success Story-Dow Partners with ORNL to Commercialize Advanced

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy-Saving Sealant for Buildings | Department of Energy Dow Partners with ORNL to Commercialize Advanced Energy-Saving Sealant for Buildings EERE Success Story-Dow Partners with ORNL to Commercialize Advanced Energy-Saving Sealant for Buildings June 1, 2016 - 11:29am Addthis A liquid flashing product invented by Dow and evaluated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory can be brushed or sprayed on surfaces to seal gaps, cracks, and seams and improve a building’s energy efficiency. Photo

  16. Porvair Advanced Materials | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Advanced Materials Place: North Carolina Zip: 28792 Sector: Carbon Product: Materials science company focused on the development and application of microporous carbon, metals and...

  17. CMI Education Partner: Brown University | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Education Partner: Brown University Brown University offers courses in several areas: Engineering School Institute of Environment and Study Brown University: Engineering School http://www.brown.edu/academics/engineering/undergraduate-study/courses ENGN 0030 - Introduction to Engineering: An introduction to various engineering disciplines, thought processes, and issues. Topics include computing in engineering, engineering design, optimization, and estimation. Case studies in engineering are used

  18. Advanced Nickel Oxide Based Materials for Electrochromic Applications...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Building Energy Efficiency Building Energy Efficiency Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Advanced Nickel Oxide Based Materials for...

  19. Hydrogen Materials Advanced Research Consortium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An overview of the organization and scientific activities of the Hydrogen Materials—Advanced Research Consortium (HyMARC).

  20. Ames Laboratory a partner in DOE Center for Computational Materials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    materials, as well as a companion database to predict targeted properties with energy-related application to thermoelectric materials. READ MORE at Brookhaven National Laboratory....

  1. Advanced Materials Manufacturing (AMM) Session

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... and complementary experimentalcomputational materials data - Provide an accessible brain trust of professionals highly skilled in computational materials techniques, such as ...

  2. Recent Device Developments with Advanced Bulk Thermoelectric Materials at RTI

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reviews work in engineered thin-film nanoscale thermoelectric materials and nano-bulk materials with high ZT undertaken by RTI in collaboration with its research partners

  3. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program: Annual progress report FY 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-01

    In many ways, the Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program underwent a major transformation in Fiscal Year 1995 and these changes have continued to the present. When the Program was established in 1990 as the Advanced Industrial Concepts (AIC) Materials Program, the mission was to conduct applied research and development to bring materials and processing technologies from the knowledge derived from basic research to the maturity required for the end use sectors for commercialization. In 1995, the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) made radical changes in structure and procedures. All technology development was directed toward the seven ``Vision Industries`` that use about 80% of industrial energy and generated about 90% of industrial wastes. The mission of AIM has, therefore, changed to ``Support development and commercialization of new or improved materials to improve productivity, product quality, and energy efficiency in the major process industries.`` Though AIM remains essentially a National Laboratory Program, it is essential that each project have industrial partners, including suppliers to, and customers of, the seven industries. Now, well into FY 1996, the transition is nearly complete and the AIM Program remains reasonably healthy and productive, thanks to the superb investigators and Laboratory Program Managers. This Annual Report for FY 1995 contains the technical details of some very remarkable work by the best materials scientists and engineers in the world. Areas covered here are: advanced metals and composites; advanced ceramics and composites; polymers and biobased materials; and new materials and processes.

  4. Cladding and Structural Materials for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Was, G S; Allen, T R; Ila, D; C,; Levi,; Morgan, D; Motta, A; Wang, L; Wirth, B

    2011-06-30

    The goal of this consortium is to address key materials issues in the most promising advanced reactor concepts that have yet to be resolved or that are beyond the existing experience base of dose or burnup. The research program consists of three major thrusts: 1) high-dose radiation stability of advanced fast reactor fuel cladding alloys, 2) irradiation creep at high temperature, and 3) innovative cladding concepts embodying functionally-graded barrier materials. This NERI-Consortium final report represents the collective efforts of a large number of individuals over a period of three and a half years and included 9 PIs, 4 scientists, 3 post-docs and 12 students from the seven participating institutions and 8 partners from 5 national laboratories and 3 industrial institutions (see table). University participants met semi-annually and participants and partners met annually for meetings lasting 2-3 days and designed to disseminate and discuss results, update partners, address outstanding issues and maintain focus and direction toward achieving the objectives of the program. The participants felt that this was a highly successful program to address broader issues that can only be done by the assembly of a range of talent and capabilities at a more substantial funding level than the traditional NERI or NEUP grant. As evidence of the success, this group, collectively, has published 20 articles in archival journals and made 57 presentations at international conferences on the results of this consortium.

  5. CMI Education Partner: University of California, Davis | Critical Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute University of California, Davis The University of California, Davis offers courses in several areas: Chemical and Materials Science Engineering Chemistry Geology http://catalog.ucdavis.edu/programs.html course list Chemical and Materials Science Engineering , Chemistry, Chemical Physics(website cannot be opened) Courses in Engineering: Chemical and Materials Science (ECM) Lower Division 51. Material Balances (4) Lecture-4 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 21D with C- or better, and

  6. Advanced Photon Source Upgrade Project - Materials

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gibbson, Murray;

    2013-04-19

    An upgrade to Advanced Photon Source announced by DOE - http://go.usa.gov/ivZ -- will help scientists break through bottlenecks in materials design in order to develop materials with desirable functions.

  7. Advances in understanding solar energy collection materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Understanding solar energy collection materials Advances in understanding solar energy collection materials A LANL team and collaborators have made advances in the understanding of how carbon nanotubes move charges created by light. November 9, 2012 Efficient energy transport in photovoltaic carbon nanomaterials Efficient energy transport in photovoltaic carbon nanomaterials. A LANL team and collaborators have made advances in the understanding of how carbon nanotubes move charges created by

  8. Hydrogen Materials Advanced Research Consortium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... materials to store hydrogen onboard vehicles, leading to more reliable, economic hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles. "Hydrogen, as a transportation fuel, has great potential to ...

  9. Advanced Battery Materials Synthesis and Manufacturing R&D Program...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Battery Materials Synthesis and Manufacturing R&D Program Argonne's Materials Engineering Research Facility (MERF) supports the laboratory's Advanced Battery Materials...

  10. SiXtron Advanced Materials | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Materials Jump to: navigation, search Name: SiXtron Advanced Materials Place: Quebec, Canada Website: www.sixtronadvancedmaterials.c References: SiXtron Advanced Materials1...

  11. Advanced Water Splitting Materials Workshop Agenda

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Water Splitting Materials Workshop Agenda Thursday, April 14, 2016 Room 8:00 am Check-in Outside Clubhouse Ballroom Renewable H 2 Production and the Advanced Water Splitting EMN ...

  12. Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Materials Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July » Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Materials Workshop Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Materials Workshop WHEN: Jul 20, 2015 8:30 AM - Jul 21, 2015 7:30 PM WHERE: La Fonda on the Plaza Santa Fe, New Mexico SPEAKER: Multiple speakers CONTACT: Caryll Blount (505) 665-3950 CATEGORY: Science TYPE: Workshop INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description Invited speakers from universities and research centers, both US-based and Europe-based, will provide updates on

  13. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

    2013-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and industry research efforts to ensure the properties of materials in light water reactors are well understood. The ATR NSUF is providing this support through three main efforts: establishing unique infrastructure necessary to conduct research on highly radioactive materials, conducting research in conjunction with industry partners on life extension relevant topics, and providing training courses to encourage more U.S. researchers to understand and address LWR materials issues. In 2010 and 2011, several advanced instruments with capability focused on resolving nuclear material performance issues through analysis on the micro (10-6 m) to atomic (10-10 m) scales were installed primarily at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. These instruments included a local electrode atom probe (LEAP), a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) system, a Raman spectrometer, and an nanoindentor/atomic force microscope. Ongoing capability enhancements intended to support industry efforts include completion of two shielded, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test loops, the first of which will come online in early calendar year 2013, a pressurized and controlled chemistry water loop for the ATR center flux trap, and a dedicated facility intended to house post irradiation examination equipment. In addition to capability enhancements at the main site in Idaho, the ATR NSUF also welcomed two new partner facilities in 2011 and two new partner facilities in 2012; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and associated hot cells and the University California Berkeley capabilities in irradiated materials analysis were added in 2011. In 2012, Purdue University’s Interaction of Materials

  14. Ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, N.W.; Marwick, A.D.; Roberto, J.B. (eds.) (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA); International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY (USA). Thomas J. Watson Research Center; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-01-01

    This report contains research programs discussed at the materials research society symposia on ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials. Major topics include: shallow implantation and solid-phase epitaxy; damage effects; focused ion beams; MeV implantation; high-dose implantation; implantation in III-V materials and multilayers; and implantation in electronic materials. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  15. Joining of advanced materials by superplastic deformation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goretta, Kenneth C.; Routbort, Jules L.; Gutierrez-Mora, Felipe

    2005-12-13

    A method for utilizing superplastic deformation with or without a novel joint compound that leads to the joining of advanced ceramic materials, intermetallics, and cermets. A joint formed by this approach is as strong as or stronger than the materials joined. The method does not require elaborate surface preparation or application techniques.

  16. Joining of advanced materials by superplastic deformation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goretta, Kenneth C.; Routbort, Jules L.; Gutierrez-Mora, Felipe

    2008-08-19

    A method for utilizing superplastic deformation with or without a novel joint compound that leads to the joining of advanced ceramic materials, intermetallics, and cermets. A joint formed by this approach is as strong as or stronger than the materials joined. The method does not require elaborate surface preparation or application techniques.

  17. Process Development and Scale up of Advanced Electrolyte Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scale up of Advanced Electrolyte Materials Process Development and Scale up of Advanced ... More Documents & Publications Process Development and Scale up of Advanced Electrolyte ...

  18. Materials performance in advanced fossil technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natesan, K. )

    1991-11-01

    A number of advanced technologies are being developed to convert coal into clean fuels for use as a feedstock in chemical plants and for power generation. From the standpoint of component materials, the environments created by coal conversion and combustion in these technologies and their interactions with materials are of interest. This article identifies several modes of materials degradation and possible mechanisms for metal wastage. Available data on the performance of materials in several of the environments are highlighted, and examples of promising research activities to improve the corrosion resistance of materials are presented.

  19. Integration of Advanced Materials and Interfaces for Durable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Materials and Interfaces for Durable Thermoelectric Automobile Exhaust Waste Heat Harvesting Devices Integration of Advanced Materials and Interfaces for Durable ...

  20. Exploring nanoscale magnetism in advanced materials with polarized...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Exploring nanoscale magnetism in advanced materials with polarized X-rays Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Exploring nanoscale magnetism in advanced materials with ...

  1. Introduction to DMFCs - Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DMFCs - Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells Introduction to DMFCs - Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells Download the ...

  2. Sodiff Advanced Materials Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sodiff Advanced Materials Co Ltd Place: Yeongju, North Gyeongsang, Korea (Republic) Product: Korean manufacturer of advanced materials for...

  3. Case Western Reserve University's Institute for Advanced Materials...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reserve University's Institute for Advanced Materials Jump to: navigation, search Name: The Institute for Advanced Materials at Case Western Reserve University Address: 2061...

  4. A molecular basis for advanced materials in water treatment....

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A molecular basis for advanced materials in water treatment. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A molecular basis for advanced materials in water treatment. Authors: Rempe, ...

  5. Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Applications Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume Applications ... More Documents & Publications Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High ...

  6. Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Applications (ACC932) Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume ... More Documents & Publications Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High ...

  7. Materials performance in advanced combustion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natesan, K.

    1992-12-01

    A number of advanced technologies are being developed to convert coal into clean fuels for use as feedstock in chemical plants and for power generation. From the standpoint of component materials, the environments created by coal conversion and combustion in these technologies and their interactions with materials are of interest. The trend in the new or advanced systems is to improve thermal efficiency and reduce the environmental impact of the process effluents. This paper discusses several systems that are under development and identifies requirements for materials application in those systems. Available data on the performance of materials in several of the environments are used to examine the performance envelopes for materials for several of the systems and to identify needs for additional work in different areas.

  8. Materials challenges in advanced coal conversion technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powem, C.A.; Morreale, B.D.

    2008-04-15

    Coal is a critical component in the international energy portfolio, used extensively for electricity generation. Coal is also readily converted to liquid fuels and/or hydrogen for the transportation industry. However, energy extracted from coal comes at a large environmental price: coal combustion can produce large quantities of ash and CO{sub 2}, as well as other pollutants. Advanced technologies can increase the efficiencies and decrease the emissions associated with burning coal and provide an opportunity for CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration. However, these advanced technologies increase the severity of plant operating conditions and thus require improved materials that can stand up to the harsh operating environments. The materials challenges offered by advanced coal conversion technologies must be solved in order to make burning coal an economically and environmentally sound choice for producing energy.

  9. NNSA Partners With Russia to Recover Material That Could Be Used in Dirty

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Bombs | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Partners With Russia to Recover Material That Could Be Used in Dirty Bombs November 07, 2013 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), in partnership with the Russian Federation, has successfully completed the removal of 14 Russian radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) from the Northern Sea Route. These devices, which contain high-activity radioactive sources, powered

  10. Advanced materials by design: bioelectronics | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced materials by design: bioelectronics Transient materials is an emerging area of materials design with the key attribute being the ability to physically dissolve into the...

  11. Partnering with Industry to Advance Biofuels, NREL's Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-10-01

    Fact sheet describing NREL's Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility and its availability to biofuels' industry partners who want to operate, test, and develop biorefining technology and equipment.

  12. ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance Print ritchie ceramics This 3D image of a ceramic composite specimen imaged under load at 1750C shows the detailed fracture patterns that researchers are able to view using ALS Beamline 8.3.2. The vertical white lines are the individual silicon carbide fibers in this sample about 500 microns in diameter. LBNL senior materials scientist and U.C. Berkeley professor Rob Ritchie has been researching the fracture behavior of a wide array of

  13. Experience with the Development of Advanced Materials for Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugama, T.; Butcher, T.; Ecker, L.

    2011-01-01

    This chapter contains the following sections: Introduction, Advanced Cements, Materials Research and Development in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), Advanced Coatings, and Conclusions.

  14. Advanced Water Splitting Materials Workshop | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Stanford University held the Advanced Water Splitting Materials Workshop on April ... and deployment of advanced water splitting technologies for renewable hydrogen production. ...

  15. Advanced research workshop: nuclear materials safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jardine, L J; Moshkov, M M

    1999-01-28

    The Advanced Research Workshop (ARW) on Nuclear Materials Safety held June 8-10, 1998, in St. Petersburg, Russia, was attended by 27 Russian experts from 14 different Russian organizations, seven European experts from six different organizations, and 14 U.S. experts from seven different organizations. The ARW was conducted at the State Education Center (SEC), a former Minatom nuclear training center in St. Petersburg. Thirty-three technical presentations were made using simultaneous translations. These presentations are reprinted in this volume as a formal ARW Proceedings in the NATO Science Series. The representative technical papers contained here cover nuclear material safety topics on the storage and disposition of excess plutonium and high enriched uranium (HEU) fissile materials, including vitrification, mixed oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication, plutonium ceramics, reprocessing, geologic disposal, transportation, and Russian regulatory processes. This ARW completed discussions by experts of the nuclear materials safety topics that were not covered in the previous, companion ARW on Nuclear Materials Safety held in Amarillo, Texas, in March 1997. These two workshops, when viewed together as a set, have addressed most nuclear material aspects of the storage and disposition operations required for excess HEU and plutonium. As a result, specific experts in nuclear materials safety have been identified, know each other from their participation in t he two ARW interactions, and have developed a partial consensus and dialogue on the most urgent nuclear materials safety topics to be addressed in a formal bilateral program on t he subject. A strong basis now exists for maintaining and developing a continuing dialogue between Russian, European, and U.S. experts in nuclear materials safety that will improve the safety of future nuclear materials operations in all the countries involved because of t he positive synergistic effects of focusing these diverse backgrounds of

  16. ASME Material Challenges for Advanced Reactor Concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Ali Siahpush

    2013-07-01

    This study presents the material Challenges associated with Advanced Reactor Concept (ARC) such as the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR). ACR are the next generation concepts focusing on power production and providing thermal energy for industrial applications. The efficient transfer of energy for industrial applications depends on the ability to incorporate cost-effective heat exchangers between the nuclear heat transport system and industrial process heat transport system. The heat exchanger required for AHTR is subjected to a unique set of conditions that bring with them several design challenges not encountered in standard heat exchangers. The corrosive molten salts, especially at higher temperatures, require materials throughout the system to avoid corrosion, and adverse high-temperature effects such as creep. Given the very high steam generator pressure of the supercritical steam cycle, it is anticipated that water tube and molten salt shell steam generators heat exchanger will be used. In this paper, the ASME Section III and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section VIII requirements (acceptance criteria) are discussed. Also, the ASME material acceptance criteria (ASME Section II, Part D) for high temperature environment are presented. Finally, lack of ASME acceptance criteria for thermal design and analysis are discussed.

  17. Advanced Composite Materials for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Composite Materials for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Applications in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Workshop Advanced Composite Materials for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen ...

  18. Ames Lab 101: Improving Materials with Advanced Computing

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Johnson, Duane

    2014-06-04

    Ames Laboratory's Chief Research Officer Duane Johnson talks about using advanced computing to develop new materials and predict what types of properties those materials will have.

  19. Advanced Materials and Devices for Stationary Electrical Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials and Devices for Stationary Electrical Energy Storage Applications Advanced Materials ... the U.S. economy, and electrical energy storage is an integral element in this system. ...

  20. Advanced Ceramic Materials and Packaging Technologies for Realizing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ceramic Materials and Packaging Technologies for Realizing Sensors for Concentrating Solar Power Systems Advanced Ceramic Materials and Packaging Technologies for Realizing Sensors ...

  1. Advanced Cathode Material Development for PHEV Lithium Ion Batteries...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Advanced Cathode Material Development for PHEV Lithium Ion Batteries High Energy Novel Cathode Alloy Automotive Cell Develop & evaluate materials & ...

  2. Partnering with Utilities Part 2: Advanced Topics for Local Governments in Creating Successful Partnerships with Utilities to Deliver Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation; given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP); is part 2 in the series; Partnering with Utilities:Advanced Topics for Local Governments in Creating Successful Partnerships with Utilities to Deliver Energy Efficiency Programs.

  3. Materials for advanced ultrasupercritical steam turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purgert, Robert; Shingledecker, John; Saha, Deepak; Thangirala, Mani; Booras, George; Powers, John; Riley, Colin; Hendrix, Howard

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have sponsored a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired power plants capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than the current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of advanced ultrasupercritical (A-USC) steam conditions. A limiting factor in this can be the materials of construction for boilers and for steam turbines. The overall project goal is to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760°C (1400°F)/35MPa (5000 psi). This final technical report covers the research completed by the General Electric Company (GE) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), with support from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) – Albany Research Center, to develop the A-USC steam turbine materials technology to meet the overall project goals. Specifically, this report summarizes the industrial scale-up and materials property database development for non-welded rotors (disc forgings), buckets (blades), bolting, castings (needed for casing and valve bodies), casting weld repair, and casting to pipe welding. Additionally, the report provides an engineering and economic assessment of an A-USC power plant without and with partial carbon capture and storage. This research project successfully demonstrated the materials technology at a sufficient scale and with corresponding materials property data to enable the design of an A-USC steam turbine. The key accomplishments included the development of a triple-melt and forged Haynes 282 disc for bolted rotor construction, long-term property development for Nimonic 105 for blading and bolting, successful scale-up of Haynes 282 and Nimonic 263 castings using

  4. Herty Advanced Materials Development Center | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Herty Advanced Materials Development Center Herty Advanced Materials Development Center Session 1-B: Advancing Alternative Fuels for the Military and Aviation Sector Breakout Session 1: New Developments and Hot Topics Jill Stuckey, Acting Director, Herty Advanced Materials Development Center b13_stuckey_2-b.pdf (2.33 MB) More Documents & Publications Center of Innovation - Energy Sustainable Solutions to Global Energy Challenges Biomass 2013: Breakout Speaker Biographies

  5. Advanced Pattern Material for Investment Casting Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Douglas Neece Neil Chaudhry

    2006-02-08

    Cleveland Tool and Machine (CTM) of Cleveland, Ohio in conjunction with Harrington Product Development Center (HPDC) of Cincinnati, Ohio have developed an advanced, dimensionally accurate, temperature-stable, energy-efficient and cost-effective material and process to manufacture patterns for the investment casting industry. In the proposed technology, FOPAT (aFOam PATtern material) has been developed which is especially compatible with the investment casting process and offers the following advantages: increased dimensional accuracy; increased temperature stability; lower cost per pattern; less energy consumption per pattern; decreased cost of pattern making equipment; decreased tooling cost; increased casting yield. The present method for investment casting is "the lost wax" process, which is exactly that, the use of wax as a pattern material, which is then melted out or "lost" from the ceramic shell. The molten metal is then poured into the ceramic shell to produce a metal casting. This process goes back thousands of years and while there have been improvements in the wax and processing technology, the material is basically the same, wax. The proposed technology is based upon an established industrial process of "Reaction Injection Molding" (RIM) where two components react when mixed and then "molded" to form a part. The proposed technology has been modified and improved with the needs of investment casting in mind. A proprietary mix of components has been formulated which react and expand to form a foam-like product. The result is an investment casting pattern with smooth surface finish and excellent dimensional predictability along with the other key benefits listed above.

  6. Advanced Materials in Support of EERE Needs to Advance Clean Energy Technologies Program Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liby, Alan L; Rogers, Hiram

    2013-10-01

    The goal of this activity was to carry out program implementation and technical projects in support of the ARRA-funded Advanced Materials in Support of EERE Needs to Advance Clean Energy Technologies Program of the DOE Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) (formerly the Industrial Technologies Program (ITP)). The work was organized into eight projects in four materials areas: strategic materials, structural materials, energy storage and production materials, and advanced/field/transient processing. Strategic materials included work on titanium, magnesium and carbon fiber. Structural materials included work on alumina forming austentic (AFA) and CF8C-Plus steels. The advanced batteries and production materials projects included work on advanced batteries and photovoltaic devices. Advanced/field/transient processing included work on magnetic field processing. Details of the work in the eight projects are available in the project final reports which have been previously submitted.

  7. Advanced Materials for Proton Exchange Membranes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials for Proton Exchange Membranes Advanced Materials for Proton Exchange Membranes A presentation to the High Temperature Membranes Working Group meeting, May 19, 2006. mcgrath.pdf (404.59 KB) More Documents & Publications Higher Temperature PEM Composite Systems for Fuel Cells Introduction to DMFCs - Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells Integration of Non-Traditional Membranes into MEAs

  8. Department of Energy, Duke Energy and EPRI Partner to Test Advanced Energy Technologies for Utilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Partnership with the Department's Advanced Research Agency Aims to Commercialize Technologies that can Lower Customers' Energy Costs and Strengthen the Electric Grid

  9. Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing and Design Optimization | Department of Energy in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing and Design Optimization Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing and Design Optimization Part of a $100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE Secretary Bodman on Oct. 25, 2006. 2_cfd.pdf (21.58 KB) More Documents & Publications Fuel Cell Kickoff Meeting Agenda Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material

  10. Introduction to DMFCs - Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cells | Department of Energy DMFCs - Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells Introduction to DMFCs - Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells Download the presentation slides from Piotr Zelenay, Los Alamos National Laboratory, at the July 17, 2012, Fuel Cell Technologies Program webinar "Fuel Cells for Portable Power." Introduction to DMFCs - Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells Webinar Slides (3.03 MB) More

  11. Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells These slides were presented at the 2010 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting on September 28, 2010. 9_lanl_zelenay.pdf (2.69 MB) More Documents & Publications Introduction to DMFCs - Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts New MEA Materials for Improved DMFC Performance, Durability and

  12. NETL Earns Carnegie Science Awards for Advanced Materials, Corporate

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovation | Department of Energy Earns Carnegie Science Awards for Advanced Materials, Corporate Innovation NETL Earns Carnegie Science Awards for Advanced Materials, Corporate Innovation March 5, 2013 - 9:16am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - For its leadership and innovation in science and technology, the National Energy Technology Laboratory has earned two Carnegie Science Awards from the Carnegie Science Center. NETL representatives will pick up the Advanced Materials Award and the Corporate

  13. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program: Compilation of project summaries and significant accomplishments, FY 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-01

    In many ways, the Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program underwent a major transformation in Fiscal Year 1995 and these changes have continued to the present. When the Program was established in 1990 as the Advanced Industrial Concepts (AIC) Materials Program, the mission was to conduct applied research and development to bring materials and processing technologies from the knowledge derived from basic research to the maturity required for the end use sectors for commercialization. In 1995, the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) made radical changes in structure and procedures. All technology development was directed toward the seven ``Vision Industries`` that use about 80% of industrial energy and generated about 90% of industrial wastes. The mission of AIM has, therefore, changed to ``Support development and commercialization of new or improved materials to improve productivity, product quality, and energy efficiency in the major process industries.`` Though AIM remains essentially a National Laboratory Program, it is essential that each project have industrial partners, including suppliers to, and customers of, the seven industries. Now, well into FY 1996, the transition is nearly complete and the AIM Program remains reasonably healthy and productive, thanks to the superb investigators and Laboratory Program Managers. This report contains the technical details of some very remarkable work by the best materials scientists and engineers in the world. Subject areas covered are: advanced metals and composites; advanced ceramics and composites; polymers and biobased materials; and new materials and processes.

  14. Advanced Materials for Reversible Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (RSOFC...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell (RSOFC), Dual Mode Operation with Low Degradation Advanced Materials for Reversible Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (RSOFC), Dual Mode Operation with Low Degradation Presented ...

  15. Advanced Cathode Material Development for PHEV Lithium Ion Batteries...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Advanced Cathode Material Development for PHEV Lithium Ion Batteries Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Energy Storage R&D Annual Progress...

  16. Advanced Materials and Devices for Stationary Electrical Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (e.g., the distributed grid and electric vehicles), and the projected increase in renewable energy sources. Advanced Materials and Devices for Stationary Electrical Energy...

  17. Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing and Design Optimization ... Optimization Part of a 100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE Secretary Bodman on ...

  18. Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Predictive Technology Development and Crash Energy Management Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume Applications FY 2009 ...

  19. Materials for Advanced Turbocharger Designs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Materials for Advanced Turbocharger Designs (Agreement ID:17257) Project ID:18518 CF8C PLus: A New Cast Stainless Steel for ...

  20. Advanced Industrial Materials Program. Annual progress report, FY 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stooksbury, F.

    1994-06-01

    Mission of the AIM program is to commercialize new/improved materials and materials processing methods that will improve energy efficiency, productivity, and competitiveness. Program investigators in the DOE national laboratories are working with about 100 companies, including 15 partners in CRDAs. Work is being done on intermetallic alloys, ceramic composites, metal composites, polymers, engineered porous materials, and surface modification. The program supports other efforts in the Office of Industrial Technologies to assist the energy-consuming process industries. The aim of the AIM program is to bring materials from basic research to industrial application to strengthen the competitive position of US industry and save energy.

  1. New Advances in SuperConducting Materials

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-08-12

    Superconducting materials will transform the world's electrical infrastructure, saving billions of dollars once the technical details and installation are in place. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, new materials science concepts are bringing this essential technology closer to widespread industrial use.

  2. Solar synthesis of advanced materials: A solar industrial program initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewandowski, A.

    1992-06-01

    This is an initiative for accelerating the use of solar energy in the advanced materials manufacturing industry in the United States. The initiative will be based on government-industry collaborations that will develop the technology and help US industry compete in the rapidly expanding global advanced materials marketplace. Breakthroughs in solar technology over the last 5 years have created exceptional new tools for developing advanced materials. Concentrated sunlight from solar furnaces can produce intensities that approach those on the surface of the sun and can generate temperatures well over 2000{degrees}C. Very thin layers of illuminated surfaces can be driven to remarkably high temperatures in a fraction of a second. Concentrated solar energy can be delivered over large areas, allowing for rapid processing and high production rates. By using this technology, researchers are transforming low-cost raw materials into high-performance products. Solar synthesis of advanced materials uses bulk materials and energy more efficiently, lowers processing costs, and reduces the need for strategic materials -- all with a technology that does not harm the environment. The Solar Industrial Program has built a unique, world class solar furnace at NREL to help meet the growing need for applied research in advanced materials. Many new advanced materials processes have been successfully demonstrated in this facility, including the following: Metalorganic deposition, ceramic powders, diamond-like carbon materials, rapid heat treating, and cladding (hard coating).

  3. Advanced materials for solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, T.; Stevenson, J.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this research is to improve the properties of the current state-of-the-art materials used for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The objectives are to: (1) develop materials based on modifications of the state-of-the-art materials; (2) minimize or eliminate stability problems in the cathode, anode, and interconnect; (3) Electrochemically evaluate (in reproducible and controlled laboratory tests) the current state-of-the-art air electrode materials and cathode/electrolyte interfacial properties; (4) Develop accelerated electrochemical test methods to evaluate the performance of SOFCs under controlled and reproducible conditions; and (5) Develop and test materials for use in low-temperature SOFCs.

  4. Advanced Materials Technologies Available for Licensing - Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial ... cell batteries films solar properties cost berkeley material electrode gas process ...

  5. New Advance in SuperConducting Materials

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08

    Superconducting materials will transform the world's electrical infrastructure, saving billions of dollars once the technical details and installation are in place. At Los Alamos National Laborator...  

  6. Advanced Materials and Manufacturing | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials and Manufacturing Argonne researchers prepare silicon wafers for full-scale deposition testing of dielectric coatings for large area detectors. Argonne researchers...

  7. Advanced Materials Development through Computational Design ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER ... Office Merit Review 2015: High Temperature Materials for High Efficiency Engines ...

  8. ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    One of Ritchie's latest materials research projects is contributing to the evolution of jet engine performance, and hence has industry players heavily interested and invested. ...

  9. Advanced materials for solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, T.R.; Stevenson, J.; Paulik, S.

    1996-12-31

    Purpose of the research is to improve the properties of current state- of-the-art materials used for SOFCs. The project includes interconnect development, high-performance cathode, electrochemical testing, and accelerated testing. This document reports results of mechanical tests (bend strength, elastic modulus, fracture strength) of acceptor-substituted lanthanum chromite (interconnect material).

  10. Chapter 6: Innovating Clean Energy Technologies in Advanced Manufacturing | Advanced Materials Manufacturing Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Materials Manufacturing Chapter 6: Technology Assessments NOTE: This technology assessment is available as an appendix to the 2015 Quadrennial Technology Review (QTR). Advanced Materials Manufacuturing is one of fourteen manufacturing-focused technology assessments prepared in support of Chapter 6: Innovating Clean Energy Technologies in Advanced Manufacturing. For context within the 2015 QTR, key connections between this technology assessment, other QTR technology chapters, and other

  11. Advanced lubrication systems and materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, S.

    1998-05-07

    This report described the work conducted at the National Institute of Standards and Technology under an interagency agreement signed in September 1992 between DOE and NIST for 5 years. The interagency agreement envisions continual funding from DOE to support the development of fuel efficient, low emission engine technologies in terms of lubrication, friction, and wear control encountered in the development of advanced transportation technologies. However, in 1994, the DOE office of transportation technologies was reorganized and the tribology program was dissolved. The work at NIST therefore continued at a low level without further funding from DOE. The work continued to support transportation technologies in the development of fuel efficient, low emission engine development. Under this program, significant progress has been made in advancing the state of the art of lubrication technology for advanced engine research and development. Some of the highlights are: (1) developed an advanced high temperature liquid lubricant capable of sustaining high temperatures in a prototype heat engine; (2) developed a novel liquid lubricant which potentially could lower the emission of heavy duty diesel engines; (3) developed lubricant chemistries for ceramics used in the heat engines; (4) developed application maps for ceramic lubricant chemistry combinations for design purpose; and (5) developed novel test methods to screen lubricant chemistries for automotive air-conditioning compressors lubricated by R-134a (Freon substitute). Most of these findings have been reported to the DOE program office through Argonne National Laboratory who manages the overall program. A list of those reports and a copy of the report submitted to the Argonne National Laboratory is attached in Appendix A. Additional reports have also been submitted separately to DOE program managers. These are attached in Appendix B.

  12. Lignin-Derived Advanced Carbon Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-11-16

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. By applying specific pretreatments and manufacturing methods, it has been found that lignin can be converted into a variety of value-added carbon materials. However, the physical and chemical heterogeneities of lignin complicate its use as a feedstock. Herein, we discuss the lignin manufacturing process, the effects of pretreatments and manufacturing methods on the properties of product lignin, and structure–property relationships in various applications of lignin-derived carbon materials, such as carbon fibers, carbon mats, activated carbons, carbon films, and templated carbon.

  13. Advanced Composite Materials | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The fan blade is a work of art, with each stripe of composite material laid by hand to ... GE Innovation and Manufacturing in Europe 3-1-9-v-industrial-inspec...

  14. Development of Advanced Materials Get Boost

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Project of Berkeley LabMIT will work with Intermolecular Inc. to accelerate innovation. June 24, 2013 Julie Chao (510) 486-6491 JHChao@lbl.gov XBD201110-01310.jpg...

  15. Methane storage in advanced porous materials | Center for Gas...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Methane storage in advanced porous materials Previous Next List Trevor A. Makal, Jian-Rong Li, Weigang Lu and Hong-Cai Zhou, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2012,41, 7761-7779 DOI: 10.1039...

  16. Materials for Advanced Turbocharger Design | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting pm038_maziasz_2012_o.pdf (1.74 MB) More Documents & Publications Materials for Advanced Turbocharger Designs

  17. SiXtron Advanced Materials Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: SiXtron Advanced Materials Inc Place: Dorval, Quebec, Canada Zip: H9P 1J1 Product: Canadian manufacturer of anti-reflective coating capital...

  18. Lignin-Derived Advanced Carbon Materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-11-16

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. By applying specific pretreatments and manufacturing methods, it has been found that lignin can be converted into a variety of value-added carbon materials. However, the physical and chemical heterogeneities of lignin complicate its use as a feedstock. Herein, we discuss the lignin manufacturing process, the effects of pretreatments and manufacturing methods on the properties of product lignin, and structure–property relationships in various applications of lignin-derived carbon materials, such as carbon fibers, carbon mats, activated carbons, carbon films, and templatedmore » carbon.« less

  19. Economical Remediation of Plastic Waste into Advanced Materials with

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coatings | Argonne National Laboratory Economical Remediation of Plastic Waste into Advanced Materials with Coatings Technology available for licensing: An autogenic pyrolysis process to convert plastic waste into high-value carbon nanotubes (50- to 100-nm outside diameter) and perfectly round carbon spheres (2- to 12-μm outside diameter). The tubes can be used as anode material in advanced batteries such as lithium-ion and eventually, lithium-air batteries. An environmentally-friendly,

  20. Advanced Composite Materials for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Applications in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Workshop | Department of Energy Composite Materials for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Applications in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Workshop Advanced Composite Materials for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Applications in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory hosted the "Advanced

  1. Materials and process engineering projects for the Sandia National Laboratories/Newly Independent States Industrial Partnering Program. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zanner, F.J.; Moffatt, W.C.

    1995-07-01

    In July, 1994, a team of materials specialists from Sandia and U S Industry traveled to Russia and the Ukraine to select and fund projects in materials and process technology in support of the Newly Independent States/Industrial Partnering Program (NIS/IPP). All of the projects are collaborations with scientists and Engineers at NIS Institutes. Each project is scheduled to last one year, and the deliverables are formatted to supply US Industry with information which will enable rational decisions to be made regarding the commercial value of these technologies. This work is an unedited interim compilation of the deliverables received to date.

  2. Materials and process engineering projects for the Sandia National Laboratories/Newly Independent States Industrial Partnering Program. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zanner, F.J.; Moffatt, W.C.

    1995-07-01

    In July, 1994, a team of materials specialists from Sandia and US. Industry traveled to Russia and the Ukraine to select and fund projects in materials and process technology in support of the Newly Independent States/Industrial Partnering Program (NIS/IPP). All of the projects are collaborations with scientists and Engineers at NIS Institutes. Each project is scheduled to last one year, and the deliverables are formatted to supply US. Industry with information which will enable rational decisions to be made regarding the commercial value of these technologies. This work is an unedited interim compilation of the deliverables received to date.

  3. Argonne partners with Strem Chemicals to deliver next-gen battery materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to industry | Argonne National Laboratory You may also like Argonne theorists solve a long-standing fundamental problem August 30, 2016 Energy Department awards five new Argonne-business collaborations under Small Business Vouchers pilot August 23, 2016 New silicon structures could make better biointerfaces August 1, 2016 A new leaf: Scientists turn carbon dioxide back into fuel July 29, 2016 Physicists show trilayer metal oxide's true stripes July 26, 2016 Argonne partners with Strem

  4. Bayer Material Science (TRL 1 2 3 System)- River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials(River DREAM)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bayer Material Science (TRL 1 2 3 System) - River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials(River DREAM)

  5. Characterization of advanced preprocessed materials (Hydrothermal)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachel Emerson; Garold Gresham

    2012-09-01

    The initial hydrothermal treatment parameters did not achieve the proposed objective of this effort; the reduction of intrinsic ash in the corn stover. However, liquid fractions from the 170°C treatments was indicative that some of the elements routinely found in the ash that negatively impact the biochemical conversion processes had been removed. After reviewing other options for facilitating ash removal, sodium-citrate (chelating agent) was included in the hydrothermal treatment process, resulting in a 69% reduction in the physiological ash. These results indicated that chelation –hydrothermal treatment is one possible approach that can be utilized to reduce the overall ash content of feedstock materials and having a positive impact on conversion performance.

  6. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ADVANCED MAGNETIC MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monica Sorescu

    2004-09-22

    The work described in this grant report was focused mainly on the properties of novel magnetic intermetallics. In the first project, we synthesized several 2:17 intermetallic compounds, namely Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}Si{sub 2}, Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}Al{sub 2}, Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}SiAl and Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}SiMn, as well as several 1:12 intermetallic compounds, such as NdFe{sub 10}Si{sub 2}, NdFe{sub 10}Al{sub 2}, NdFe{sub 10}SiAl and NdFe{sub 10}MnAl. In the second project, seven compositions of Nd{sub x}Fe{sub 100-x-y}B{sub y} ribbons were prepared by a melt spinning method with Nd and B content increasing from 7.3 and 3.6 to 11 and 6, respectively. The alloys were annealed under optimized conditions to obtain a composite material consisting of the hard magnetic Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B and soft magnetic {alpha}-Fe phases, typical of a spring magnet structure. In the third project, intermetallic compounds of the type Zr{sub 1}Cr{sub 1}Fe{sub 1}T{sub 0.8} with T = Al, Co and Fe were subjected to hydrogenation. In the fourth project, we performed three crucial experiments. In the first experiment, we subjected a mixture of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Fe (80-20 wt %) to mechanochemical activation by high-energy ball milling, for time periods ranging from 0.5 to 14 hours. In the second experiment, we ball-milled Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}:Co{sup 2+} (x = 0.1) for time intervals between 2.5 and 17.5 hours. Finally, we exposed a mixture of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Co (80-20 wt %) to mechanochemical activation for time periods ranging from 0.5 to 10 hours. In all cases, the structural and magnetic properties of the systems involved were elucidated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Moessbauer spectroscopy and hysteresis loop measurements. The four projects resulted in four papers, which were published in Intermetallics, IEEE Transactions on Magnetics, Journal of Materials Science Letters and Materials Chemistry and Physics. The contributions reveal for the first time in literature the effect of

  7. MATERIALS AND COMPONENT DEVELOPMENT FOR ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS ? PROJECT SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. A. Alvin

    2010-06-18

    Future hydrogen-fired or oxy-fuel turbines will likely experience an enormous level of thermal and mechanical loading, as turbine inlet temperatures (TIT) approach ?1425-1760?C (?2600-3200?F) with pressures of ?300-625 psig, respectively. Maintaining the structural integrity of future turbine components under these extreme conditions will require (1) durable thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), (2) high temperature creep resistant metal substrates, and (3) effective cooling techniques. While advances in substrate materials have been limited for the past decades, thermal protection of turbine airfoils in future hydrogen-fired and oxy-fuel turbines will rely primarily on collective advances in the TBCs and aerothermal cooling. To support the advanced turbine technology development, the Office of Research and Development (ORD) at National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has continued its collaborative research efforts with the University of Pittsburgh and West Virginia University, while working in conjunction with commercial material and coating suppliers. This paper presents the technical accomplishments that were made during FY09 in the initial areas of advanced materials, aerothermal heat transfer and non-destructive evaluation techniques for use in advanced land-based turbine applications in the Materials and Component Development for Advanced Turbine Systems project, and introduces three new technology areas ? high temperature overlayer coating development, diffusion barrier coating development, and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy development that are being conducted in this effort.

  8. Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, N.C.; Judkins, R.R.

    1992-12-01

    Objective of this materials program is to conduct R and D on materials for fossil energy applications with focus on longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The projects are organized according to materials research areas: (1) ceramics, (2) new alloys: iron aluminides, advanced austenitics and chromium niobium alloys, and (3) technology development and transfer. Separate abstracts have been prepared.

  9. Simulation Toolkit for Renewable Energy Advanced Materials Modeling

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-11-13

    STREAMM is a collection of python classes and scripts that enables and eases the setup of input files and configuration files for simulations of advanced energy materials. The core STREAMM python classes provide a general framework for storing, manipulating and analyzing atomic/molecular coordinates to be used in quantum chemistry and classical molecular dynamics simulations of soft materials systems. The design focuses on enabling the interoperability of materials simulation codes such as GROMACS, LAMMPS and Gaussian.

  10. New classes of magnetoelectric materials promise advances in computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technology | Argonne National Laboratory New classes of magnetoelectric materials promise advances in computing technology By Jared Sagoff * February 7, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - Although scientists have been aware that magnetism and electricity are two sides of the same proverbial coin for almost 150 years, researchers are still trying to find new ways to use a material's electric behavior to influence its magnetic behavior, or vice versa. Thanks to new research by an

  11. NERSC, LBL Researchers Share Materials Science Advances at APS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC, LBL Researchers Highlight Materials Science at APS NERSC, LBL Researchers Share Materials Science Advances at APS March 3, 2014 APSlogo NERSC and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL) are well represented this week at the American Physical Society (APS) March meeting. Some 10,000 physicists, scientists, and students are expected to attend this year's meeting, which takes place March 3-7 in Denver, CO. Physicists and students will report on groundbreaking research from industry,

  12. Advanced Thermoelectric Materials and Generator Technology for Automotive

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Waste Heat at GM | Department of Energy Overview of design, fabrication, integration, and test of working prototype TEG for engine waste heat recovery on Suburban test vehicle, and continuing investigation of skutterudite materials systems meisner.pdf (1.94 MB) More Documents & Publications Advanced Thermoelectric Materials and Generator Technology for Automotive Waste Heat at GM Electrical and Thermal Transport Optimization of High Efficient n-type Skutterudites Electrical and Thermal

  13. Advanced Materials and Devices for Stationary Electrical Energy Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Applications | Department of Energy Materials and Devices for Stationary Electrical Energy Storage Applications Advanced Materials and Devices for Stationary Electrical Energy Storage Applications Reliable access to cost-effective electricity is the backbone of the U.S. economy, and electrical energy storage is an integral element in this system. Without significant investments in stationary electrical energy storage, the current electric grid infrastructure will increasingly struggle to

  14. MATERIALS AND COMPONENT DEVELOPMENT FOR ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. A. Alvin

    2009-06-12

    Future hydrogen-fired or oxy-fuel turbines will likely experience an enormous level of thermal and mechanical loading, as turbine inlet temperatures (TIT) approach 1425-1760C with pressures of 300-625 psig, respectively. Maintaining the structural integrity of future turbine components under these extreme conditions will require durable thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), high temperature creep resistant metal substrates, and effective cooling techniques. While advances in substrate materials have been limited for the past decades, thermal protection of turbine airfoils in future hydrogen-fired and oxy-fuel turbines will rely primarily on collective advances in TBCs and aerothermal cooling. To support the advanced turbine technology development, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) at the Office of Research and Development (ORD) has initiated a research project effort in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh (UPitt), and West Virginia University (WVU), working in conjunction with commercial material and coating suppliers, to develop advanced materials, aerothermal configurations, as well as non-destructive evaluation techniques for use in advanced land-based gas turbine applications. This paper reviews technical accomplishments recently achieved in each of these areas.

  15. GNEP Partners and Observers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GNEP Partners and Observers GNEP Partners and Observers A list of GNEP partners and observers. GNEP Partners and Observers (45.67 KB) More Documents & Publications Microsoft PowerPoint - GNEP PARTNERS CANDIDATE PARTNERS AND OBSERVERS.PPT Senior Delegation Officials From All GNEP Participants Meeting Materials: April 21, 2008

  16. ADVANCED HOT SECTION MATERIALS AND COATINGS TEST RIG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Reome; Dan Davies

    2004-04-30

    The Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig program provides design and implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal-gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. The principal activity during this reporting period were the evaluation of syngas combustor concepts, the evaluation of test section concepts and the selection of the preferred rig configuration.

  17. Advanced Hot Section Materials and Coatings Test Rig

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Davies

    2004-10-30

    The Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig program provides design and implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal-gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. The principal activities during this reporting period were the continuation of test section detail design and developing specifications for auxiliary systems and facilities.

  18. Institute for Advanced Materials at University of Louisville

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sunkara, Mahendra; Sumaneskara, Gamini; Starr, Thomas L; Willing, G A; Robert W, Cohn

    2009-10-29

    In this project, a university-wide, academic center has been established entitled ?Institute for Advanced Materials and Renewable Energy?. In this institute, a comprehensive materials characterization facility has been established by co-locating several existing characterization equipment and acquiring several state of the art instrumentation such as field emission transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscope, high resolution X-ray diffractometer, Particle Size Distribution/Zeta Potential measurement system, and Ultra-microtome for TEM specimen. In addition, a renewable energy conversion and storage research facility was also established by acquiring instrumentation such as UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, Atomic Layer Deposition reactor, Solar light simulator, oxygen-free glove box, potentiostat/galvanostats and other miscellaneous items. The institute is staffed with three full-time staff members (one senior research technologist, a senior PhD level research scientist and a junior research scientist) to enable proper use of the techniques. About thirty faculty, fifty graduate students and several researchers access the facilities on a routine basis. Several industry R&D organizations (SudChemie, Optical Dynamics and Hexion) utilize the facility. The established ?Institute for Advanced Materials? at UofL has three main objectives: (a) enable a focused research effort leading to the rapid discovery of new materials and processes for advancing alternate energy conversion and storage technologies; (b) enable offering of several laboratory courses on advanced materials science and engineering; and (c) develop university-industry partnerships based on the advanced materials research. The Institute?s efforts were guided by an advisory board comprising eminent researchers from outside KY. Initial research efforts were focused on the discovery of new materials and processes for solar cells and Li ion battery electrodes. Initial sets of results helped PIs

  19. Recent Advances in Two-Dimensional Materials Beyond Graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meunier, Vincent; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Terrones Maldonado, Mauricio; Terrones Maldonado, Humberto; Liang, Liangbo; Cooper, Valentino R.; Bhimanapati, Ganesh; Lin, Zhong; Jung, Yeongwoong; Cha, Judy; Das, Saptarshi; Xiao, Di; Son, Youngwoo; Strano, Michael; Louie, Steven G.; Ringe, Emilie; Xia, Fengnian; Wang, Yeliang; Akinwande, Deji; Zhu, Jun; Schuller, John; Schaak, Raymond; Robinson, Joshua A

    2015-11-06

    The isolation of graphene in 2004 by peeling apart the atomically-thin sheets that comprise graphite was a defining moment for the birth of a field: Two-dimensional (2D) materials. In recent years, there has been a rapidly increasing number of papers focusing on non-graphene layered materials, including transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), because of the new properties and applications that emerge upon 2D confinement. Here we review significant recent advances and important new developments in 2D materials beyond graphene . We provide insight into the theoretical modeling and understanding of the van der Waals forces that hold together the 2D layers in bulk solids, as well as their excitonic properties and growth morphologies. Additionally, we highlight recent breakthroughs in TMD synthesis and characterization and discuss the newest families of 2D materials, including monoelement 2D materials (i.e., silicene, phosphorene, etc.) and transition metal carbide- and carbon nitride-based MXenes. We then discuss the doping and functionalization of 2D materials beyond graphene, which enable device applications, followed by advances in electronic, optoelectronic, and magnetic devices and theory. Finally, we provide perspectives on the future of 2D materials beyond graphene.

  20. Recent Advances in Two-Dimensional Materials Beyond Graphene

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meunier, Vincent; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Terrones Maldonado, Mauricio; Terrones Maldonado, Humberto; Liang, Liangbo; Cooper, Valentino R.; Bhimanapati, Ganesh; Lin, Zhong; Jung, Yeongwoong; Cha, Judy; et al

    2015-11-06

    The isolation of graphene in 2004 by peeling apart the atomically-thin sheets that comprise graphite was a defining moment for the birth of a field: Two-dimensional (2D) materials. In recent years, there has been a rapidly increasing number of papers focusing on non-graphene layered materials, including transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), because of the new properties and applications that emerge upon 2D confinement. Here we review significant recent advances and important new developments in 2D materials beyond graphene . We provide insight into the theoretical modeling and understanding of the van der Waals forces that hold together the 2D layers in bulkmore » solids, as well as their excitonic properties and growth morphologies. Additionally, we highlight recent breakthroughs in TMD synthesis and characterization and discuss the newest families of 2D materials, including monoelement 2D materials (i.e., silicene, phosphorene, etc.) and transition metal carbide- and carbon nitride-based MXenes. We then discuss the doping and functionalization of 2D materials beyond graphene, which enable device applications, followed by advances in electronic, optoelectronic, and magnetic devices and theory. Finally, we provide perspectives on the future of 2D materials beyond graphene.« less

  1. Materials and Component Development for Advanced Turbine Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvin, M.A.; Pettit, F.; Meier, G.; Yanar, N.; Chyu, M.; Mazzotta, D.; Slaughter, W.; Karaivanov, V.; Kang, B.; Feng, C.; Chen, R.; Fu, T-C.

    2008-10-01

    In order to meet the 2010-2020 DOE Fossil Energy goals for Advanced Power Systems, future oxy-fuel and hydrogen-fired turbines will need to be operated at higher temperatures for extended periods of time, in environments that contain substantially higher moisture concentrations in comparison to current commercial natural gas-fired turbines. Development of modified or advanced material systems, combined with aerothermal concepts are currently being addressed in order to achieve successful operation of these land-based engines. To support the advanced turbine technology development, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has initiated a research program effort in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh (UPitt), and West Virginia University (WVU), working in conjunction with commercial material and coating suppliers as Howmet International and Coatings for Industry (CFI), and test facilities as Westinghouse Plasma Corporation (WPC) and Praxair, to develop advanced material and aerothermal technologies for use in future oxy-fuel and hydrogen-fired turbine applications. Our program efforts and recent results are presented.

  2. Report on sodium compatibility of advanced structural materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, M.; Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Rink, D.L.; Soppet, W.K.; Listwan, J.T.

    2012-07-09

    This report provides an update on the evaluation of sodium compatibility of advanced structural materials. The report is a deliverable (level 3) in FY11 (M3A11AN04030403), under the Work Package A-11AN040304, 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Structural Materials' performed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for the Advanced Reactor Concepts. This work package supports the advanced structural materials development by providing corrosion and tensile data from the standpoint of sodium compatibility of advanced structural alloys. The scope of work involves exposure of advanced structural alloys such as G92, mod.9Cr-1Mo (G91) ferritic-martensitic steels and HT-UPS austenitic stainless steels to a flowing sodium environment with controlled impurity concentrations. The exposed specimens are analyzed for their corrosion performance, microstructural changes, and tensile behavior. Previous reports examined the thermodynamic and kinetic factors involved in the purity of liquid sodium coolant for sodium reactor applications as well as the design, fabrication, and construction of a forced convection sodium loop for sodium compatibility studies of advanced materials. This report presents the results on corrosion performance, microstructure, and tensile properties of advanced ferritic-martensitic and austenitic alloys exposed to liquid sodium at 550 C for up to 2700 h and at 650 C for up to 5064 h in the forced convection sodium loop. The oxygen content of sodium was controlled by the cold-trapping method to achieve {approx}1 wppm oxygen level. Four alloys were examined, G92 in the normalized and tempered condition (H1 G92), G92 in the cold-rolled condition (H2 G92), G91 in the normalized and tempered condition, and hot-rolled HT-UPS. G91 was included as a reference to compare with advanced alloy, G92. It was found that all four alloys showed weight loss after sodium exposures at 550 and 650 C. The weight loss of the four

  3. Technology Readiness Levels for Advanced Nuclear Fuels and Materials Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon Carmack

    2014-01-01

    The Technology Readiness Level (TRL) process is used to quantitatively assess the maturity of a given technology. The TRL process has been developed and successfully used by the Department of Defense (DOD) for development and deployment of new technology and systems for defense applications. In addition, NASA has also successfully used the TRL process to develop and deploy new systems for space applications. Advanced nuclear fuels and materials development is a critical technology needed for closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Because the deployment of a new nuclear fuel forms requires a lengthy and expensive research, development, and demonstration program, applying the TRL concept to the advanced fuel development program is very useful as a management and tracking tool. This report provides definition of the technology readiness level assessment process as defined for use in assessing nuclear fuel technology development for the Advanced Fuel Campaign (AFC).

  4. Polymers as advanced materials for desiccant applications, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czanderna, A.W.; Neidlinger, H.H.

    1990-09-01

    This report documents work to identify a next-generation, low-cost material with which solar energy or heat from another low-cost energy source can be used for regenerating the water vapor sorption activity of the desiccant. The objective of the work is to determine how the desired sorption performance of advanced desiccant materials can be predicted by understanding the role of the material modifications and material surfaces. The work concentrates on solid materials to be used for desiccant cooling systems and which process water vapor in an atmosphere to produce cooling. The work involved preparing modifications of polystyrene sulfonic acid sodium salt, synthesizing a hydrogel, and evaluating the sorption performances of these and similar commercially available polymeric materials; all materials were studied for their potential application in solid commercial desiccant cooling systems. Background information is also provided on desiccant cooling systems and the role of a desiccant material within such a system, and it includes the use of polymers as desiccant materials. 31 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Code qualification of structural materials for AFCI advanced recycling reactors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natesan, K.; Li, M.; Majumdar, S.; Nanstad, R.K.; Sham, T.-L.

    2012-05-31

    This report summarizes the further findings from the assessments of current status and future needs in code qualification and licensing of reference structural materials and new advanced alloys for advanced recycling reactors (ARRs) in support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The work is a combined effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with ANL as the technical lead, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for AFCI Reactor Campaign. The report is the second deliverable in FY08 (M505011401) under the work package 'Advanced Materials Code Qualification'. The overall objective of the Advanced Materials Code Qualification project is to evaluate key requirements for the ASME Code qualification and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval of structural materials in support of the design and licensing of the ARR. Advanced materials are a critical element in the development of sodium reactor technologies. Enhanced materials performance not only improves safety margins and provides design flexibility, but also is essential for the economics of future advanced sodium reactors. Code qualification and licensing of advanced materials are prominent needs for developing and implementing advanced sodium reactor technologies. Nuclear structural component design in the U.S. must comply with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III (Rules for Construction of Nuclear Facility Components) and the NRC grants the operational license. As the ARR will operate at higher temperatures than the current light water reactors (LWRs), the design of elevated-temperature components must comply with ASME Subsection NH (Class 1 Components in Elevated Temperature Service). However, the NRC has not approved the use of Subsection NH for reactor components, and this puts additional burdens on materials qualification of the ARR. In the past licensing review for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project (CRBRP) and the

  6. Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 DOE Kick-off Meeting, Washington, DC September 28, 2010 Fuel Cell Projects Kick-off Meeting Washington, DC - September 28, 2010 Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells for Portable Power Fuel Cells Piotr Zelenay Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information - t t Overview Timeline * Start date: September 2010 * End date:

  7. ADVANCED HOT SECTION MATERIALS AND COATINGS TEST RIG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Reome; Dan Davies

    2004-01-01

    The Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig program initiated this quarter, provides design and implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal-gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. The principle activity during this first reporting period were preparing for and conducting a project kick-off meeting, working through plans for the project implementation, and beginning the conceptual design of the test section.

  8. Materials/manufacturing element of the Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karnitz, M.A.; Holcomb, R.S.; Wright, I.G.; Ferber, M.K.; Hoffman, E.E.

    1995-12-31

    The technology based portion of the Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) contains several subelements which address generic technology issues for land-based gas-turbine systems. One subelement is the Materials/ Manufacturing Technology Program which is coordinated by DOE Oak Ridge Operations and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The work in this subelement is being performed predominantly by industry with assistance from universities and the national laboratories. Projects in this sub-element are aimed toward hastening the incorporation of new materials and components in gas turbines.

  9. Advanced Materials for Mercury 50 Gas Turbine Combustion System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Jeffrey

    2008-09-30

    Solar Turbines Incorporated (Solar), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-0CH11049, has conducted development activities to improve the durability of the Mercury 50 combustion system to 30,000 hours life and reduced life cycle costs. This project is part of Advanced Materials in the Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines program in DOE's Office of Distributed Energy. The targeted development engine was the Mercury{trademark} 50 gas turbine, which was developed by Solar under the DOE Advanced Turbine Systems program (DOE contract number DE-FC21-95MC31173). As a generator set, the Mercury 50 is used for distributed power and combined heat and power generation and is designed to achieve 38.5% electrical efficiency, reduced cost of electricity, and single digit emissions. The original program goal was 20,000 hours life, however, this goal was increased to be consistent with Solar's standard 30,000 hour time before overhaul for production engines. Through changes to the combustor design to incorporate effusion cooling in the Generation 3 Mercury 50 engine, which resulted in a drop in the combustor wall temperature, the current standard thermal barrier coated liner was predicted to have 18,000 hours life. With the addition of the advanced materials technology being evaluated under this program, the combustor life is predicted to be over 30,000 hours. The ultimate goal of the program was to demonstrate a fully integrated Mercury 50 combustion system, modified with advanced materials technologies, at a host site for a minimum of 4,000 hours. Solar was the Prime Contractor on the program team, which includes participation of other gas turbine manufacturers, various advanced material and coating suppliers, nationally recognized test laboratories, and multiple industrial end-user field demonstration sites. The program focused on a dual path development route to define an optimum mix of technologies for the Mercury 50 and future gas turbine products. For liner and injector

  10. Corrosion performance of advanced structural materials in sodium.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Li, M.; Rink, D.L.

    2012-05-16

    This report gives a description of the activities in design, fabrication, construction, and assembling of a pumped sodium loop for the sodium compatibility studies on advanced structural materials. The work is the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) portion of the effort on the work project entitled, 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Fast Reactor Materials,' and is a part of Advanced Materials Development within the Reactor Campaign. The objective of this project is to develop information on sodium corrosion compatibility of advanced materials being considered for sodium reactor applications. This report gives the status of the sodium pumped loop at Argonne National Laboratory, the specimen details, and the technical approach to evaluate the sodium compatibility of advanced structural alloys. This report is a deliverable from ANL in FY2010 (M2GAN10SF050302) under the work package G-AN10SF0503 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Fast Reactor Materials.' Two reports were issued in 2009 (Natesan and Meimei Li 2009, Natesan et al. 2009) which examined the thermodynamic and kinetic factors involved in the purity of liquid sodium coolant for sodium reactor applications as well as the design specifications for the ANL pumped loop for testing advanced structural materials. Available information was presented on solubility of several metallic and nonmetallic elements along with a discussion of the possible mechanisms for the accumulation of impurities in sodium. That report concluded that the solubility of many metals in sodium is low (<1 part per million) in the temperature range of interest in sodium reactors and such trace amounts would not impact the mechanical integrity of structural materials and components. The earlier report also analyzed the solubility and transport mechanisms of nonmetallic elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen in laboratory sodium loops and in reactor systems such as Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, Fast Flux Test Facility, and

  11. Crashworthiness analysis using advanced material models in DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logan, R.W.; Burger, M.J.; McMichael, L.D.; Parkinson, R.D.

    1993-10-22

    As part of an electric vehicle consortium, LLNL and Kaiser Aluminum are conducting experimental and numerical studies on crashworthy aluminum spaceframe designs. They have jointly explored the effect of heat treat on crush behavior and duplicated the experimental behavior with finite-element simulations. The major technical contributions to the state of the art in numerical simulation arise from the development and use of advanced material model descriptions for LLNL`s DYNA3D code. Constitutive model enhancements in both flow and failure have been employed for conventional materials such as low-carbon steels, and also for lighter weight materials such as aluminum and fiber composites being considered for future vehicles. The constitutive model enhancements are developed as extensions from LLNL`s work in anisotropic flow and multiaxial failure modeling. Analysis quality as a function of level of simplification of material behavior and mesh is explored, as well as the penalty in computation cost that must be paid for using more complex models and meshes. The lightweight material modeling technology is being used at the vehicle component level to explore the safety implications of small neighborhood electric vehicles manufactured almost exclusively from these materials.

  12. Materials and Component Development for Advanced Turbine Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvin, M A; Pettit, F; Meier, G H; Yanar, M; Helminiak, M; Chyu, M; Siw, S; Slaughter, W S; Karaivanov, V; Kang, B S; Feng, C; Tannebaum, J M; Chen, R; Zhang, B; Fu, T; Richards, G A; Sidwell, T G; Straub, D; Casleton, K H; Dogan, O M

    2008-07-01

    Hydrogen-fired and oxy-fueled land-based gas turbines currently target inlet operating temperatures of ~1425-1760°C (~2600-3200°F). In view of natural gas or syngas-fired engines, advancements in both materials, as well as aerothermal cooling configurations are anticipated prior to commercial operation. This paper reviews recent technical accomplishments resulting from NETL’s collaborative research efforts with the University of Pittsburgh and West Virginia University for future land-based gas turbine applications.

  13. Task 2 Materials for Advanced Boiler and Oxy-combustion Systems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Task 2 Materials for Advanced Boiler and Oxy-combustion Systems (NETL-US) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Task 2 Materials for Advanced Boiler and Oxy-combustion Systems ...

  14. Advanced Hot Section Materials and Coatings Test Rig

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Davis

    2006-09-30

    Phase I of the Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig Program has been successfully completed. Florida Turbine Technologies has designed and planned the implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. Potential uses of this rig include investigations into environmental attack of turbine materials and coatings exposed to syngas, erosion, and thermal-mechanical fatigue. The principle activities during Phase 1 of this project included providing several conceptual designs for the test section, evaluating various syngas-fueled rig combustor concepts, comparing the various test section concepts and then selecting a configuration for detail design. Conceptual definition and requirements of auxiliary systems and facilities were also prepared. Implementation planning also progressed, with schedules prepared and future project milestones defined. The results of these tasks continue to show rig feasibility, both technically and economically.

  15. HyMARC: Hydrogen Materials-Advanced Research Consortium | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy HyMARC: Hydrogen Materials-Advanced Research Consortium HyMARC: Hydrogen Materials-Advanced Research Consortium The Hydrogen Materials-Advanced Research Consortium (HyMARC), composed of Sandia National Laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, has been formed with the objective of addressing the scientific gaps blocking the advancement of solid-state storage materials. Illustration of the research consortia model showing a

  16. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program annual progress report, FY 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-05-01

    The Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program is a part of the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, US Department of Energy (DOE). The mission of AIM is to support development and commercialization of new or improved materials to improve energy efficiency, productivity, product quality, and reduced waste in the major process industries. OIT has embarked on a fundamentally new way of working with industries--the Industries of the Future (IOF) strategy--concentrating on the major process industries that consume about 90% of the energy and generate about 90% of the waste in the industrial sector. These are the aluminum, chemical, forest products, glass, metalcasting, and steel industries. OIT has encouraged and assisted these industries in developing visions of what they will be like 20 or 30 years into the future, defining the drivers, technology needs, and barriers to realization of their visions. These visions provide a framework for development of technology roadmaps and implementation plans, some of which have been completed. The AIM Program supports IOF by conducting research and development on materials to solve problems identified in the roadmaps. This is done by National Laboratory/industry/university teams with the facilities and expertise needed to develop new and improved materials. Each project in the AIM Program has active industrial participation and support.

  17. Damping capacity measurements for characterization of degradation in advanced materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mantena, R.; Gibson, R.F.; Place, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the application of damping capacity measurements for characterization of degradation in advanced materials. A recently developed impulse-frequency response technique was used to obtain damping capacity measurements on crossplied E-glass/epoxy laminates which had been subjected to four-point bending and cantilever bending to produce matrix cracking in the transverse plies. The size and location of the damage zone were correlated with changes in damping. With the expected introduction of Rapidly Solidified Alloys (RSA) as effective alternatives to conventional materials, the applicability of damping capacity measurements as a nondestructive means of evaluating degradation in these materials was also studied. A conventional A710 structural steel having three different microstructures was used for developing the methodology to be used later on RSA specimens. It is shown that damping is more sensitive to matrix cracking than stiffness is in E-glass/epoxy composite specimens. In the case of A710 steel, the damping changes at low strain, though significant, do not correlate with the mechanical property data. Damping data at high strains does correlate with the mechanical property data, however.

  18. Collaborative Utility Task Force Partners with DOE to Develop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Collaborative Utility Task Force Partners with DOE to Develop Cyber Security Requirements for Advanced Metering Infrastructure Collaborative Utility Task Force Partners with DOE to ...

  19. Improved Thermoelectric Devices: Advanced Semiconductor Materials for Thermoelectric Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-12-11

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Phononic Devices is working to recapture waste heat and convert it into usable electric power. To do this, the company is using thermoelectric devices, which are made from advanced semiconductor materials that convert heat into electricity or actively remove heat for refrigeration and cooling purposes. Thermoelectric devices resemble computer chips, and they manage heat by manipulating the direction of electrons at the nanoscale. These devices aren’t new, but they are currently too inefficient and expensive for widespread use. Phononic Devices is using a high-performance, cost-effective thermoelectric design that will improve the device’s efficiency and enable electronics manufacturers to more easily integrate them into their products.

  20. Summary of the Output from the VTP Advanced Materials Workshop

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Materials 12,576K Materials for Internal Combustion Engines Solicitations SuperTruck (NETL) Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive Components Goal: Develop high ...

  1. Technology Partnering

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transfer and Related Technology Partnering Activities at the National Laboratories and Other Facilities Fiscal Years 2009-2013 Report to Congress May 2015 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Message from the Secretary The Report on Technology Transfer and Related Partnering Activities at the National Laboratories and Other Facilities for Fiscal Year 2009-2013 is prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Technology Transfer and Commercialization Act of 2000: It is

  2. Summary of the Output from the VTP Advanced Materials Workshop | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy the Output from the VTP Advanced Materials Workshop Summary of the Output from the VTP Advanced Materials Workshop 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting vtpn04_lm_schutte_2012_o.pdf (461.49 KB) More Documents & Publications Materials Lightweight Materials Overview Overview of Lightweight Materials

  3. Recent advances in the molten salt destruction of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruneda, C. O., LLNL

    1996-09-01

    We have demonstrated the use of the Molten Salt Destruction (MSD) Process for destroying explosives, liquid gun propellant, and explosives-contaminated materials on a 1.5 kg of explosive/hr bench- scale unit (1, 2, 3, 4, 5). In our recently constructed 5 kg/hr pilot- scale unit we have also demonstrated the destruction of a liquid gun propellant and simulated wastes containing HMX (octogen). MSD converts the organic constituents of the waste into non-hazardous substances such as carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and water. Any inorganic constituents of the waste, such as metallic particles, are retained in the molten salt. The destruction of energetic materials waste is accomplished by introducing it, together with air, into a vessel containing molten salt (a eutectic mixture of sodium, potassium, and lithium carbonates). The following pure explosives have been destroyed in our bench-scale experimental unit located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL) High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF): ammonium picrate, HMX, K- 6 (keto-RDX), NQ, NTO, PETN, RDX, TATB, and TNT. In addition, the following compositions were also destroyed: Comp B, LX- IO, LX- 1 6, LX- 17, PBX-9404, and XM46 (liquid gun propellant). In this 1.5 kg/hr bench-scale unit, the fractions of carbon converted to CO and of chemically bound nitrogen converted to NO{sub x} were found to be well below 1%. In addition to destroying explosive powders and compositions we have also destroyed materials that are typical of residues which result from explosives operations. These include shavings from machined pressed parts of plastic-bonded explosives and sump waste containing both explosives and non-explosive debris. Based on the process data obtained on the bench-scale unit we designed and constructed a next-generation 5 kg/hr pilot-scale unit, incorporating LLNL`s advanced chimney design. The pilot unit has completed process implementation operations and explosives safety reviews. To date, in this

  4. MaRIE: Probing Dynamic Processes in Soft Materials Using Advanced...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: MaRIE: Probing Dynamic Processes in Soft Materials Using Advanced Light Sources Los ... Authors: Sykora, Milan 1 ; Kober, Edward Martin 1 + Show Author Affiliations Los ...

  5. EERE National Lab Initiatives and Capabilities for Advanced Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovation Institute Mission: Develop and demonstrate innovative technologies that will, within 10 years, make advanced fiber-reinforced polymer composites at 50% Lower Cost 75% ...

  6. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: TECO Energy | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Watch a video by Workplace Charging Partner TECO Energy. View more videos on the Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center. Kenneth Hernandez showing the electric ...

  7. Cooperative Research and Development for Advanced Materials in Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramesh Subramanian

    2006-04-19

    Evaluation of the performance of innovative thermal barrier coating systems for applications at high temperatures in advanced industrical gas turbines.

  8. Advanced Technology and Materials Co Ltd AT M | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Materials Co Ltd AT M Jump to: navigation, search Name: Advanced Technology and Materials Co Ltd (AT&M) Place: Beijing, Beijing Municipality, China Zip: 100081 Sector: Solar...

  9. Advanced Thermal Interface Materials (TIMs) for Power Electronics (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narumanchi, S.

    2009-05-01

    This presentation describes our progress in the area of thermal interface materials for power electronics applications.

  10. Transformer Resilience and Advanced Components (TRAC) Program Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    OE’s Transformer Resilience and Advanced Components (TRAC) program supports modernization and resiliency of the grid by addressing the challenges facing large power transformers (LPTs) and other...

  11. ADVANCED CERAMIC MATERIALS FOR NEXT-GENERATION NUCLEAR APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marra, J.

    2010-09-29

    proliferation), the worldwide community is working to develop and deploy new nuclear energy systems and advanced fuel cycles. These new nuclear systems address the key challenges and include: (1) extracting the full energy value of the nuclear fuel; (2) creating waste solutions with improved long term safety; (3) minimizing the potential for the misuse of the technology and materials for weapons; (4) continually improving the safety of nuclear energy systems; and (5) keeping the cost of energy affordable.

  12. Overview and Progress of the Advanced Battery Materials Research (BMR) Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Overview and Progress of the Advanced Battery Materials Research (BMR) Program Tien Q. Duong BMR Program Manager Energy Storage R&D Hybrid and Electric Systems Subprogram Department of Energy This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Project ID: ES 108 Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Advanced Battery Materials Research (BMR) Program  Previously known as: - Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BATT) -

  13. Prediction of Corrosion of Advanced Materials and Fabricated Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Anderko; G. Engelhardt; M.M. Lencka; M.A. Jakab; G. Tormoen; N. Sridhar

    2007-09-29

    The goal of this project is to provide materials engineers, chemical engineers and plant operators with a software tool that will enable them to predict localized corrosion of process equipment including fabricated components as well as base alloys. For design and revamp purposes, the software predicts the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environment chemistry and assists the user in selecting the optimum alloy for a given environment. For the operation of existing plants, the software enables the users to predict the remaining life of equipment and help in scheduling maintenance activities. This project combined fundamental understanding of mechanisms of corrosion with focused experimental results to predict the corrosion of advanced, base or fabricated, alloys in real-world environments encountered in the chemical industry. At the heart of this approach is the development of models that predict the fundamental parameters that control the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environmental conditions and alloy composition. The fundamental parameters that dictate the occurrence of localized corrosion are the corrosion and repassivation potentials. The program team, OLI Systems and Southwest Research Institute, has developed theoretical models for these parameters. These theoretical models have been applied to predict the occurrence of localized corrosion of base materials and heat-treated components in a variety of environments containing aggressive and non-aggressive species. As a result of this project, a comprehensive model has been established and extensively verified for predicting the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environment chemistry and temperature by calculating the corrosion and repassivation potentials.To support and calibrate the model, an experimental database has been developed to elucidate (1) the effects of various inhibiting species as well as aggressive species on localized corrosion of nickel

  14. Hydrogen Materials Advanced Research Consortium (HyMARC)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen M aterials A dvanced Research C onsor6um Sponsor: D OE-EERE/Fuel C ell T echnologies O ffice Consor6um D irector: D r. M ark D . A llendorf Partner L aboratories: Sandia N a2onal L aboratories Mail S top 9 161, L ivermore, C A 9 4551---0969. P hone: ( 925) 2 94---2895. E mail:mdallen@sandia.gov Lawrence L ivermore N a2onal L aboratory POC: D r. B randon W ood P hone: ( 925) 4 22---8391. E mail: b randonwood@llnl.gov Lawrence B erkeley N a2onal L aboratory POC: D r. J eff U rban; p hone:

  15. Advanced process research and development to enhance metals and materials recycling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, E. J.

    1997-12-05

    Innovative, cost-effective technologies that have a positive life-cycle environmental impact and yield marketable products are needed to meet the challenges of the recycling industry. Four materials-recovery technologies that are being developed at Argonne National Laboratory in cooperation with industrial partners are described in this paper: (1) dezincing of galvanized steel scrap; (2) material recovery from auto-shredder residue; (3) high-value-plastics recovery from obsolete appliances; and (4) aluminum salt cake recycling. These technologies are expected to be applicable to the production of low-cost, high-quality raw materials from a wide range of waste streams.

  16. Part A - Advanced turbine systems. Part B - Materials/manufacturing element of the Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karnitz, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    The DOE Offices of Fossil Energy and Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy have initiated a program to develop advanced turbine systems for power generation. The objective of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, and cost competitive gas turbine systems for utility and industrial applications. One of the supporting elements of the ATS Program is the Materials/Manufacturing Technologies Task. The objective of this element is to address the critical materials and manufacturing issues for both industrial and utility gas turbines.

  17. Polymers as Advanced Materials for Desiccant Applications: 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czanderna, A. W.

    1988-12-01

    This research is concerned with solid materials used as desiccants for desiccant cooling systems that process water vapor in an atmosphere to produce net cooling.

  18. Nanostructured materials for advanced catalyst design | The Ames...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The students will be trained in the synthesis and characterization of hybrid mesoporous materials. They will use a series of analytical methods including powder x-ray...

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED DRILL COMPONENTS FOR BHA USING MICROWAVE TECHNOLOGY INCORPORATING CARBIDE, DIAMOND COMPOSITES AND FUNCTIONALLY GRADED MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinesh Agrawal; Rustum Roy

    2003-01-01

    The microwave processing of materials is a new emerging technology with many attractive advantages over the conventional methods. The advantages of microwave technology for various ceramic systems has already been demonstrated and proven. The recent developments at Penn State have succeeded in applying the microwave technology for the commercialization of WC/Co and diamond based cutting and drilling tools, effectively sintering of metallic materials, and fabrication of transparent ceramics for advanced applications. In recent years, the Microwave Processing and Engineering Center at Penn State University in collaboration with our industrial partner, Dennis Tool Co. has succeeded in commercializing the developed microwave technology partially funded by DOE for WC/Co and diamond based cutting and drilling tools for gas and oil exploration operations. In this program we have further developed this technology to make diamond-carbide composites and metal-carbide-diamond functionally graded materials. Several actual product of diamond-carbide composites have been processed in microwave with better performance than the conventional product. The functionally graded composites with diamond as one of the components has been for the first time successfully developed. These are the highlights of the project.

  20. Advancing the Materials Science of Concrete with Supercomputers | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a min [Type the abstract of the document here. The abstract is typically a short summary of the contents of the document.] Advancing Simulation Science: The Legacy of the ASC Academic Strategic Alliance Program ii ON THE COVER: Hot gas flow field and propellant stress in propellant of Titan IV rocket motor. Fully coupled "fluid-structure interaction" simulation performed using CSAR Rocstar Simulation Suite." University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign: Center for Simulation of

  1. Partners | JCESR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    services and software to enable the manufacture of advanced semiconductor, flat panel display and solar photovoltaic products. Our technologies help make innovations like...

  2. Advanced techniques for characterization of ion beam modified materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Yanwen; Debelle, Aurélien; Boulle, Alexandre; Kluth, Patrick; Tuomisto, Filip

    2014-10-30

    Understanding the mechanisms of damage formation in materials irradiated with energetic ions is essential for the field of ion-beam materials modification and engineering. Utilizing incident ions, electrons, photons, and positrons, various analysis techniques, including Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), electron RBS, Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering, and positron annihilation spectroscopy, are routinely used or gaining increasing attention in characterizing ion beam modified materials. The distinctive information, recent developments, and some perspectives in these techniques are reviewed in this paper. Applications of these techniques are discussed to demonstrate their unique ability for studying ion-solid interactions and the corresponding radiationmore » effects in modified depths ranging from a few nm to a few tens of μm, and to provide information on electronic and atomic structure of the materials, defect configuration and concentration, as well as phase stability, amorphization and recrystallization processes. Finally, such knowledge contributes to our fundamental understanding over a wide range of extreme conditions essential for enhancing material performance and also for design and synthesis of new materials to address a broad variety of future energy applications.« less

  3. Advanced Cathode Material Development for PHEV Lithium Ion Batteries |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy catalysts and supports for PEM fuel cells, was given by Mark Debe of 3M at a February 2007 meeting on new fuel cell projects. new_fc_debe_3m.pdf (145.42 KB) More Documents & Publications Advanced Cathode Catalysts Light Weight, Low Cost PEM Fuel Cell Stacks Durable Catalysts for Fuel Cell Protection during Transient Conditions

    catalysts, was given by Piotr Zelenay of Los Alamos National laboratory at a February 2007 meeting on new fuel cell projects. new_fc_zelenay_lanl.pdf

  4. Advancing Materials Science using Neutrons at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Carpenter, John

    2014-06-03

    Jack Carpenter, pioneer of accelerator-based pulsed spallation neutron sources, talks about neutron science at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and a need for a second target station at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). ORNL is the Department of Energy's largest multiprogram science and energy laboratory, and is home to two scientific user facilities serving the neutron science research community: the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and SNS. HFIR and SNS provide researchers with unmatched capabilities for understanding the structure and properties of materials, macromolecular and biological systems, and the fundamental physics of the neutron. Neutrons provide a window through which to view materials at a microscopic level that allow researchers to develop better materials and better products. Neutrons enable us to understand materials we use in everyday life. Carpenter explains the need for another station to produce long wavelength neutrons, or cold neutrons, to answer questions that are addressed only with cold neutrons. The second target station is optimized for that purpose. Modern technology depends more and more upon intimate atomic knowledge of materials, and neutrons are an ideal probe.

  5. Partners | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Professional Development Partners Illinois Biotechnology Industry Organization Undergraduate Partners Chicago State University Fermilab Indiana University Purdue University ...

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Advanced Bus and Truck Radial Materials for Fuel Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by PPG at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced bus and truck radial materials...

  7. Projects Selected to Advance Innovative Materials for Fossil Energy Power Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Four projects that will develop capabilities for designing sophisticated materials that can withstand the harsh environments of advanced fossil energy power systems have been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  8. Advanced Process Technology: Combi Materials Science and Atmospheric Processing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Process Technology and Advanced Concepts -- High-Throughput Combi Material Science and Atmospheric Processing that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information.

  9. Applied Materials Develops an Advanced Epitaxial Growth System to Bring Down LED Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the help of DOE funding, Applied Materials has developed an advanced epitaxial growth system for gallium nitride (GaN) LED devices that decreases operating costs, increases internal quantum efficiency, and improves binning yields.

  10. Advanced Manufacturing Office Update January 2016 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Partner Spotlight AMO Technology Advances Wind Turbine Research Hilton Joins Superior ... Partner Spotlight AMO Technology Advances Wind Turbine Research BAAM machine.jpg ...

  11. Advanced materials development for multi-junction monolithic photovoltaic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawson, L.R.; Reno, J.L.

    1996-07-01

    We report results in three areas of research relevant to the fabrication of monolithic multi-junction photovoltaic devices. (1) The use of compliant intervening layers grown between highly mismatched materials, GaAs and GaP (same lattice constant as Si), is shown to increase the structural quality of the GaAs overgrowth. (2) The use of digital alloys applied to the MBE growth of GaAs{sub x}Sb{sub l-x} (a candidate material for a two junction solar cell) provides increased control of the alloy composition without degrading the optical properties. (3) A nitrogen plasma discharge is shown to be an excellent p-type doping source for CdTe and ZnTe, both of which are candidate materials for a two junction solar cell.

  12. Advanced Manufacturing Office Update, March 2015 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    March 2015 Advanced Manufacturing Office Update, March 2015 March 30, 2015 - 3:13pm Addthis In This Issue Featured Articles Better Plants Welcomes New Partners from Diverse Sectors Better Plants Challenge Partners Share Energy-Saving Solutions Harbec Receives 2014 Environmental Excellence Award from New York State AMO and Industry News Heat Exchange Materials Research Advances Accomplishments Highlighted at Critical Materials Institute Annual Peer Review Benefits of Combined Heat and Power

  13. Overview and Progress of the Advanced Battery Materials Research (BMR) Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Overview and Progress of the Advanced Battery Materials Research (BMR) Program Tien Q. Duong BMR Program Manager Energy Storage R&D Hybrid and Electric Systems Subprogram Department of Energy This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Project ID: ES 108 June 9, 2016 2 Outline  Advanced Battery Materials Research (BMR) - Role - Program update  Current research emphasis - Lithium metal anode and solid electrolytes - Sulfur

  14. Task 2: Materials for Advanced Boiler and Oxy-combustion Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcolm, Gordon R.; McGhee, Barry

    2009-05-01

    The PowerPoint presentation provides an overview of the tasks for the project: Characterize advanced boiler (oxy-fuel combustion, biomass co-fired) gas compositions and ash deposits; Generate critical data on the effects of environmental conditions; develop a unified test method with a view to future standardization; Generate critical data for coating systems for use in advanced boiler systems; Generate critical data for flue gas recycle piping materials for oxy-fuel systems; and, Compile materials performance data from laboratory and pilot plant exposures of candidate alloys for use in advanced boiler systems.

  15. Statistical Methods Handbook for Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. J. Einerson

    2005-05-01

    Fuel materials such as kernels, coated particles, and compacts are being manufactured for experiments simulating service in the next generation of high temperature gas reactors. These must meet predefined acceptance specifications. Many tests are performed for quality assurance, and many of these correspond to criteria that must be met with specified confidence, based on random samples. This report describes the statistical methods to be used. The properties of the tests are discussed, including the risk of false acceptance, the risk of false rejection, and the assumption of normality. Methods for calculating sample sizes are also described.

  16. Nanostructured material for advanced energy storage : magnesium battery cathode development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sigmund, Wolfgang M.; Woan, Karran V.; Bell, Nelson Simmons

    2010-11-01

    Magnesium batteries are alternatives to the use of lithium ion and nickel metal hydride secondary batteries due to magnesium's abundance, safety of operation, and lower toxicity of disposal. The divalency of the magnesium ion and its chemistry poses some difficulties for its general and industrial use. This work developed a continuous and fibrous nanoscale network of the cathode material through the use of electrospinning with the goal of enhancing performance and reactivity of the battery. The system was characterized and preliminary tests were performed on the constructed battery cells. We were successful in building and testing a series of electrochemical systems that demonstrated good cyclability maintaining 60-70% of discharge capacity after more than 50 charge-discharge cycles.

  17. Advances in optical materials for large aperture lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stokowski, S.E.; Lowdermilk, W.H.; Marchi, F.T.; Swain, J.E.; Wallerstein, E.P.; Wirtenson, G.R.

    1981-12-15

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is using large aperture Nd: glass lasers to investigate the feasibility of inertial confinement fusion. In our experiments high power laser light is focussed onto a small (100 to 500 micron) target containing a deuterium-tritium fuel mixture. During the short (1 to 5 ns) laser pulse the fuel is compressed and heated, resulting in fusion reactions. The generation and control of the powerful laser pulses for these experiments is a challenging scientific and engineering task, which requires the development of new optical materials, fabrication techniques, and coatings. LLNL with the considerable cooperation and support from the optical industry, where most of the research and development and almost all the manufacturing is done, has successfully applied several new developments in these areas.

  18. Advanced Materials for RSOFC Dual Operation with Low Degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric, Tang; Tony, Wood; Sofiane, Benhaddad; Casey, Brown; Hongpeng, He; Jeff, Nelson; Oliver, Grande; Ben, Nuttall; Mark, Richards; Randy, Petri

    2012-12-27

    Reversible solid oxide fuel cells (RSOFCs) are energy conversion devices. They are capable of operating in both power generation mode (SOFC) and electrolysis modes (SOEC). RSOFC can integrate renewable production of electricity and hydrogen when power generation and steam electrolysis are coupled in a system, which can turn intermittent solar and wind energy into "firm power." In this DOE EERE project, VPS continuously advanced RSOFC cell stack technology in the areas of endurance and performance. Over 20 types of RSOFC cells were developed in the project. Many of those exceeded performance (area specific resistance less than 300 mohmcm2) and endurance (degradation rate less than 4% per 1000 hours) targets in both fuel cell and electrolysis modes at 750C. One of those cells, RSOFC-7, further demonstrated the following: Steady-state electrolysis with a degradation rate of 1.5% per 1000 hours. Ultra high current electrolysis over 3 A/cm2 at 75% water electrolysis efficiency voltage of 1.67 V. Daily SOFC/SOEC cyclic test of over 600 days with a degradation rate of 1.5% per 1000 hours. Over 6000 SOFC/SOEC cycles in an accelerated 20-minute cycling with degradation less than 3% per 1000 cycles. In RSOFC stack development, a number of kW-class RSOFC stacks were developed and demonstrated the following: Steady-state electrolysis operation of over 5000 hours. Daily SOFC/SOEC cyclic test of 100 cycles. Scale up capability of using large area cells with 550 cm2 active area showing the potential for large-scale RSOFC stack development in the future. Although this project is an open-ended development project, this effort, leveraging Versa Power Systems' years of development experience, has the potential to bring renewable energy RSOFC storage systems significantly closer to commercial viability through improvements in RSOFC durability, performance, and cost. When unitized and deployed in renewable solar and wind installations, an RSOFC system can enable higher availability for

  19. High-resolution electron microscopy of advanced materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, T.E.; Kung, H.H.; Sickafus, K.E.; Gray, G.T. III; Field, R.D.; Smith, J.F.

    1997-11-01

    This final report chronicles a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The High-Resolution Electron Microscopy Facility has doubled in size and tripled in quality since the beginning of the three-year period. The facility now includes a field-emission scanning electron microscope, a 100 kV field-emission scanning transmission electron microscope (FE-STEM), a 300 kV field-emission high-resolution transmission electron microscope (FE-HRTEM), and a 300 kV analytical transmission electron microscope. A new orientation imaging microscope is being installed. X-ray energy dispersive spectrometers for chemical analysis are available on all four microscopes; parallel electron energy loss spectrometers are operational on the FE-STEM and FE-HRTEM. These systems enable evaluation of local atomic bonding, as well as chemical composition in nanometer-scale regions. The FE-HRTEM has a point-to-point resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}, but the resolution can be pushed to its information limit of 1 {angstrom} by computer reconstruction of a focal series of images. HRTEM has been used to image the atomic structure of defects such as dislocations, grain boundaries, and interfaces in a variety of materials from superconductors and ferroelectrics to structural ceramics and intermetallics.

  20. Advanced Materials for PEM-Based Fuel Cell Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. McGrath

    2005-10-26

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are quickly becoming attractive alternative energy sources for transportation, stationary power, and small electronics due to the increasing cost and environmental hazards of traditional fossil fuels. Two main classes of PEMFCs include hydrogen/air or hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). The current benchmark membrane for both types of PEMFCs is Nafion, a perfluorinated sulfonated copolymer made by DuPont. Nafion copolymers exhibit good thermal and chemical stability, as well as very high proton conductivity under hydrated conditions at temperatures below 80 °C. However, application of these membranes is limited due to their high methanol permeability and loss of conductivity at high temperatures and low relative humidities. These deficiencies have led to the search for improved materials for proton exchange membranes. Potential PEMs should have good thermal, hydrolytic, and oxidative stability, high proton conductivity, selective permeability, and mechanical durability over long periods of time. Poly(arylene ether)s, polyimides, polybenzimidazoles, and polyphenylenes are among the most widely investigated candidates for PEMs. Poly(arylene ether)s are a promising class of proton exchange membranes due to their excellent thermal and chemical stability and high glass transition temperatures. High proton conductivity can be achieved through post-sulfonation of poly(arylene ether) materials, but this most often results in very high water sorption or even water solubility. Our research has shown that directly polymerized poly(arylene ether) copolymers show important advantages over traditional post-sulfonated systems and also address the concerns with Nafion membranes. These properties were evaluated and correlated with morphology, structure-property relationships, and

  1. Advanced Materials for PEM-Based Fuel Cell Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. McGrath; Donald G. Baird; Michael von Spakovsky

    2005-10-26

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are quickly becoming attractive alternative energy sources for transportation, stationary power, and small electronics due to the increasing cost and environmental hazards of traditional fossil fuels. Two main classes of PEMFCs include hydrogen/air or hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). The current benchmark membrane for both types of PEMFCs is Nafion, a perfluorinated sulfonated copolymer made by DuPont. Nafion copolymers exhibit good thermal and chemical stability, as well as very high proton conductivity under hydrated conditions at temperatures below 80 degrees C. However, application of these membranes is limited due to their high methanol permeability and loss of conductivity at high temperatures and low relative humidities. These deficiencies have led to the search for improved materials for proton exchange membranes. Potential PEMs should have good thermal, hydrolytic, and oxidative stability, high proton conductivity, selective permeability, and mechanical durability over long periods of time. Poly(arylene ether)s, polyimides, polybenzimidazoles, and polyphenylenes are among the most widely investigated candidates for PEMs. Poly(arylene ether)s are a promising class of proton exchange membranes due to their excellent thermal and chemical stability and high glass transition temperatures. High proton conductivity can be achieved through post-sulfonation of poly(arylene ether) materials, but this most often results in very high water sorption or even water solubility. Our research has shown that directly polymerized poly(arylene ether) copolymers show important advantages over traditional post-sulfonated systems and also address the concerns with Nafion membranes. These properties were evaluated and correlated with morphology, structure-property relationships, and states of water in the membranes. Further improvements in properties were achieved through incorporation of inorganic

  2. Partnering with Utilities and Other Program Administrators | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Partnering with Utilities and Other Program Administrators Partnering with Utilities and Other Program Administrators U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Assistance Program (TAP) State and Local Solution Center document addressing how DOE partners in state, local, and tribal governments can partner with utilities and other program administrators to advance their energy efficiency and renewable energy programs. Partnering with Utilities and Other Ratepayer-Funded Energy

  3. Roll-to-Roll Electrode Processing and Materials NDE for Advanced Lithium

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Secondary Batteries | Department of Energy 3 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting es165_wood_2013_p.pdf (4.5 MB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Roll-to-Roll Electrode Processing NDE for Advanced Lithium Secondary Batteries Lithium Ion Electrode Production NDE and QC Considerations Roll-to-Roll Electrode Processing and Materials NDE for Advanced Lithium Secondary

  4. Roll-to-Roll Electrode Processing and Materials NDE for Advanced Lithium

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Secondary Batteries | Department of Energy 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting es165_wood_2012_o.pdf (3.53 MB) More Documents & Publications Roll-to-Roll Electrode Processing and Materials NDE for Advanced Lithium Secondary Batteries Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Roll-to-Roll Electrode Processing NDE for Advanced Lithium Secondary Batteries In-situ characterization and diagnostics of

  5. Partnering Institution Name Partnering Institution Name Place...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Boise Idaho Test Evaluation Partner Electricity Resources Building Systems Integration Solar Systems Solar Systems Abbotsford Australia Electricity Resources Building Systems...

  6. Regional Education Partners

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Education Partners Regional Education Partners One of the Laboratory's STEM education objectives is centered on strengthening the future workforce of Northern New Mexico...

  7. Advanced Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering ...

  8. Advanced Thermoelectric Materials for Efficient Waste Heat Recovery in Process Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam Polcyn; Moe Khaleel

    2009-01-06

    The overall objective of the project was to integrate advanced thermoelectric materials into a power generation device that could convert waste heat from an industrial process to electricity with an efficiency approaching 20%. Advanced thermoelectric materials were developed with figure-of-merit ZT of 1.5 at 275 degrees C. These materials were not successfully integrated into a power generation device. However, waste heat recovery was demonstrated from an industrial process (the combustion exhaust gas stream of an oxyfuel-fired flat glass melting furnace) using a commercially available (5% efficiency) thermoelectric generator coupled to a heat pipe. It was concluded that significant improvements both in thermoelectric material figure-of-merit and in cost-effective methods for capturing heat would be required to make thermoelectric waste heat recovery viable for widespread industrial application.

  9. Chapter 6: Innovating Clean Energy Technologies in Advanced Manufacturing | Composite Materials Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Composite Materials Chapter 6: Technology Assessments This technology assessment is available as an appendix to the 2015 Quadrennial Technology Review (QTR). Composite Materials is one of fourteen manufacturing-focused technology assessments prepared in support of Chapter 6: Innovating Clean Energy Technologies in Advanced Manufacturing. For context within the 2015 QTR, key connections between this technology assessment, other QTR technology chapters, and other Chapter 6 technology assessments

  10. Chapter 6: Innovating Clean Energy Technologies in Advanced Manufacturing | Critical Materials Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Critical Materials Chapter 6: Technology Assessments NOTE: This technology assessment is available as an appendix to the 2015 Quadrennial Technology Review (QTR). Critical Materials is one of fourteen manufacturing-focused technology assessments prepared in support of Chapter 6: Innovating Clean Energy Technologies in Advanced Manufacturing. For context within the 2015 QTR, key connections between this technology assessment, other QTR technology chapters, and other Chapter 6 technology

  11. Industry Partners Panel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Industry Panel presenters include: Michael G. Andrew, Director - Academic and Technical Programs, Advanced Products and Materials, Johnson Controls Power Solutions Michael A. Fetcenko, Vice President and Managing Director, BASF Battery Materials – Ovonic, BASF Corporation Adam Kahn, Founder and CEO, AKHAN Technologies, Inc. Stephen E. Zimmer, Executive Director, United States Council for Automotive Research (USCAR)

  12. High temperature solid lubricant materials for heavy duty and advanced heat engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DellaCorte, C.; Wood, J.C.

    1994-10-01

    Advanced engine designs incorporate higher mechanical and thermal loading to achieve efficiency improvements. This approach often leads to higher operating temperatures of critical sliding elements (e.g. piston ring/cylinder wall contacts and valve guides) which compromise the use of conventional and even advanced synthetic liquid lubricants. For these applications solid lubricants must be considered. Several novel solid lubricant composites and coatings designated PS/PM200 have been employed to dry and marginally oil lubricated contacts in advanced heat engines. These applications include cylinder kits of heavy duty diesels, and high temperature sterling engines, sidewall seals of rotary engines and various exhaust valve and exhaust component applications. The following paper describes the tribological and thermophysical properties of these tribomaterials and reviews the results of applying them to engine applications. Other potential tribological materials and applications are also discussed with particular emphasis to heavy duty and advanced heat engines.

  13. STEP Partner Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    STEP Partner Presentation, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  14. Partner Letter of Engagement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Partner Letter of Engagement, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  15. Damping capacity measurements of degradation in advanced materials. [Rapidly solidified alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mantena, R.; Gibson, R.F.; Place, T.A.

    1986-04-01

    This paper describes the application of damping capacity measurements for characterization of degradation in advanced materials. A recently developed impulse-frequency response technique was used to obtain damping capacity measurements on crossplied E-glass/epoxy laminates that had been subjected to four-point bending and cantilever bending to produce matrix cracking in the transverse plies. The size and location of the damage zone were correlated with changes to damping. With the expected introduction of Rapidly Solidified Alloys (RSA) as effective alternatives to conventional materials, the applicability of damping capacity measurements as a non destructive means of evaluating degradation in these materials was also studied. 17 references, 15 figures.

  16. Modeling the Behaviour of an Advanced Material Based Smart Landing Gear System for Aerospace Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varughese, Byji; Dayananda, G. N.; Rao, M. Subba

    2008-07-29

    The last two decades have seen a substantial rise in the use of advanced materials such as polymer composites for aerospace structural applications. In more recent years there has been a concerted effort to integrate materials, which mimic biological functions (referred to as smart materials) with polymeric composites. Prominent among smart materials are shape memory alloys, which possess both actuating and sensory functions that can be realized simultaneously. The proper characterization and modeling of advanced and smart materials holds the key to the design and development of efficient smart devices/systems. This paper focuses on the material characterization; modeling and validation of the model in relation to the development of a Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) based smart landing gear (with high energy dissipation features) for a semi rigid radio controlled airship (RC-blimp). The Super Elastic (SE) SMA element is configured in such a way that it is forced into a tensile mode of high elastic deformation. The smart landing gear comprises of a landing beam, an arch and a super elastic Nickel-Titanium (Ni-Ti) SMA element. The landing gear is primarily made of polymer carbon composites, which possess high specific stiffness and high specific strength compared to conventional materials, and are therefore ideally suited for the design and development of an efficient skid landing gear system with good energy dissipation characteristics. The development of the smart landing gear in relation to a conventional metal landing gear design is also dealt with.

  17. Final LDRD report : advanced materials for next generation high-efficiency thermochemistry.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ambrosini, Andrea; Miller, James Edward; Allendorf, Mark D.; Coker, Eric Nicholas; Ermanoski, Ivan; Hogan, Roy E.,; McDaniel, Anthony H.

    2014-01-01

    Despite rapid progress, solar thermochemistry remains high risk; improvements in both active materials and reactor systems are needed. This claim is supported by studies conducted both prior to and as part of this project. Materials offer a particular large opportunity space as, until recently, very little effort apart from basic thermodynamic analysis was extended towards understanding this most fundamental component of a metal oxide thermochemical cycle. Without this knowledge, system design was hampered, but more importantly, advances in these crucial materials were rare and resulted more from intuition rather than detailed insight. As a result, only two basic families of potentially viable solid materials have been widely considered, each of which has significant challenges. Recent efforts towards applying an increased level of scientific rigor to the study of thermochemical materials have provided a much needed framework and insights toward developing the next generation of highly improved thermochemically active materials. The primary goal of this project was to apply this hard-won knowledge to rapidly advance the field of thermochemistry to produce a material within 2 years that is capable of yielding CO from CO2 at a 12.5 % reactor efficiency. Three principal approaches spanning a range of risk and potential rewards were pursued: modification of known materials, structuring known materials, and identifying/developing new materials for the application. A newly developed best-of-class material produces more fuel (9x more H2, 6x more CO) under milder conditions than the previous state of the art. Analyses of thermochemical reactor and system efficiencies and economics were performed and a new hybrid concept was reported. The larger case for solar fuels was also further refined and documented.

  18. Advanced Materials for Reversible Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (RSOFC), Dual Mode

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Operation with Low Degradation | Department of Energy for Reversible Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (RSOFC), Dual Mode Operation with Low Degradation Advanced Materials for Reversible Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (RSOFC), Dual Mode Operation with Low Degradation Presented at the Department of Energy Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting, September 1 - October 1, 2009 petri_versa%20_power_kickoff.pdf (3.53 MB) More Documents & Publications Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop Summary Report Progress on the

  19. Materials for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Steam Turbines Task 3: Materials for Non-Welded Rotors, Buckets, and BoltingMaterials for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Steam Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saha, Deepak

    2015-09-15

    The primary objective of the task was to characterize the materials suitable for mechanically coupled rotor, buckets and bolting operating with an inlet temperature of 760°C (1400°F). A previous study DOE-FC26-05NT42442, identified alloys such as Haynes®282®, Nimonic 105, Inconel 740, Waspaloy, Nimonic 263, and Inconel 617 as potential alloys that met the requirements for the necessary operating conditions. Of all the identified materials, Waspaloy has been widely utilized in the aviation industry in the form of disk and other smaller forgings, and sufficient material properties and vendor experience exist, for the design and manufacture of large components. The European program characterizing materials for A-USC conditions are evaluating Nimonic 263 and Inconel 617 for large components. Inconel 740 has been studied extensively as a part of the boiler consortium and is code approved. Therefore, the consortium focused efforts in the development of material properties for Haynes®282® and Nimonic 105 to avoid replicative efforts and provide material choices/trade off during the detailed design of large components. Commercially available Nimonic 105 and Haynes®282® were evaluated for microstructural stability by long term thermal exposure studies. Material properties requisite for design such as tensile, creep / rupture, low cycle fatigue, high cycle fatigue, fatigue crack growth rate, hold-time fatigue, fracture toughness, and stress relaxation are documented in this report. A key requisite for the success of the program was a need demonstrate the successful scale up of the down-selected alloys, to large components. All property evaluations in the past were performed on commercially available bar/billet forms. Components in power plant equipment such as rotors and castings are several orders in magnitude larger and there is a real need to resolve the scalability issue. Nimonic 105 contains high volume fraction y’ [>50%], and hence the alloy is best suited

  20. CMI Factsheet | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CMI Factsheet 3D printer uses laser and metals to build new combinations of materials What is the Energy Innovation Hub for Critical Materials? Created by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Energy Innovation Hub is operated under the name the Critical Materials Institute. CMI is led by the DOE's Ames Laboratory, and managed by DOE's Advanced Manufacturing Office. It brings together the expertise of DOE national laboratories, universities, and industry partners to eliminate materials criticality

  1. Partnering with NREL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-08-01

    An overview for industry and organizations about NREL's partnering opportunities including information about technology partnership agreements and technical area contacts.

  2. Grid Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Grid Partners Jump to: navigation, search Name: Grid Partners Place: Los Angeles, California Zip: 90025 Product: String representation "GRID Partners i ... duct selection." is too...

  3. Technology Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Partners Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Technology Partners Name: Technology Partners Address: 550 University Avenue Place: Palo Alto, California Zip: 94301 Region: Bay Area...

  4. Collaborative Utility Task Force Partners with DOE to Develop Cyber

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Security Requirements for Advanced Metering Infrastructure | Department of Energy Collaborative Utility Task Force Partners with DOE to Develop Cyber Security Requirements for Advanced Metering Infrastructure Collaborative Utility Task Force Partners with DOE to Develop Cyber Security Requirements for Advanced Metering Infrastructure The Advanced Metering Infrastructure Security (AMI-SEC) Task Force announces the release of the AMI System Security Requirements, a first-of-its-kind for the

  5. Human Resources at Critical Materials Institute | Critical Materials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human Resources at Critical Materials Institute Each partner within the Critical Materials Institute manages its own hiring. Use these links to find key contacts for CMI partners ...

  6. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Company Partners in Photovoltaic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manufacturing R&D Company Partners in Photovoltaic Manufacturing R&D More than 40 private-sector companies partnered with NREL on successful efforts within the PV Manufacturing R&D Project. They included manufacturers of crystalline silicon, thin-film, and concentrator solar technologies. The companies are listed below. Advanced Energy Systems Alpha Solarco ASE Americas AstroPower/GE Energy Boeing Aerospace BP Solar Cronar Crystal Systems Dow Corning Energy Conversion Devices

  7. Status of the irradiation test vehicle for testing fusion materials in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, H.; Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L.; Palmer, A.J.; Ingram, F.W.; Wiffen, F.W.

    1998-09-01

    The design of the irradiation test vehicle (ITV) for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has been completed. The main application for the ITV is irradiation testing of candidate fusion structural materials, including vanadium-base alloys, silicon carbide composites, and low-activation steels. Construction of the vehicle is underway at the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Company (LMITCO). Dummy test trains are being built for system checkout and fine-tuning. Reactor insertion of the ITV with the dummy test trains is scheduled for fall 1998. Barring unexpected difficulties, the ITV will be available for experiments in early 1999.

  8. Introduction to DMFCs - Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Webinar July 17, 2012 1 Introduction to DMFCs Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells Piotr Zelenay Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, U.S.A. Fuel Cell Technologies Program Webinar - July 17, 2012 - The Fuel Choice P. Piela and P. Zelenay, Fuel Cell Review, 1, 17, 2004 Fuel Cell Technologies Program Webinar - July 17, 2012 2 Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode: Pt-Ru Cathode: Pt Membrane: e.g. Nafion ® 115 e - CH 3 OH H + H 2 O CH 3 OH

  9. Soft x-ray spectromicroscopy development for materials science at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warwick, T.; Padmore, H.; Ade, H.; Hitchcock, A.P.; Rightor, E.G.; Tonner, B.P.

    1996-08-01

    Several third generation synchrotron radiation facilities are now operational and the high brightness of these photon sources offers new opportunities for x-ray microscopy. Well developed synchrotron radiation spectroscopy techniques are being applied in new instruments capable of imaging the surface of a material with a spatial resolution smaller than one micron. There are two aspects to this. One is to further the field of surface science by exploring the effects of spatial variations across a surface on a scale not previously accessible to x-ray measurements. The other is to open up new analytical techniques in materials science using x-rays, on a spatial scale comparable to that of the processes or devices to be studied. The development of the spectromicroscopy program at the Advanced Light Source will employ a variety of instruments, some are already operational. Their development and use will be discussed, and recent results will be presented to illustrate their capabilities.

  10. ENERGY EFFICIENCY CHALLENGES ADDRESSED THROUGH THE USE OF ADVANCED REFRACTORY CERAMIC MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemrick, James Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Refractory ceramics can play a critical role in improving the energy efficiency of traditional industrial processes through increased furnace efficiency brought about by the employment of novel refractory systems and techniques. Examples of advances in refractory materials related to aluminum, gasification, glass, and lime are highlighted. Energy savings are realized based on reduction of chemical reactions, elimination of mechanical degradation caused by the service environment, reduction of temperature limitations of materials, and elimination of costly installation and repair needs. Key results of projects resulting from US Department of Energy (DOE) funded research programs are discussed with emphasis on applicability of these results to high temperature furnace applications and needed research directions for the future.

  11. WaterTransport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing and Design Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Vernon Cole; Abhra Roy; Ashok Damle; Hari Dahr; Sanjiv Kumar; Kunal Jain; Ned Djilai

    2012-10-02

    Water management in Proton Exchange Membrane, PEM, Fuel Cells is challenging because of the inherent conflicts between the requirements for efficient low and high power operation. Particularly at low powers, adequate water must be supplied to sufficiently humidify the membrane or protons will not move through it adequately and resistance losses will decrease the cell efficiency. At high power density operation, more water is produced at the cathode than is necessary for membrane hydration. This excess water must be removed effectively or it will accumulate in the Gas Diffusion Layers, GDLs, between the gas channels and catalysts, blocking diffusion paths for reactants to reach the catalysts and potentially flooding the electrode. As power density of the cells is increased, the challenges arising from water management are expected to become more difficult to overcome simply due to the increased rate of liquid water generation relative to fuel cell volume. Thus, effectively addressing water management based issues is a key challenge in successful application of PEMFC systems. In this project, CFDRC and our partners used a combination of experimental characterization, controlled experimental studies of important processes governing how water moves through the fuel cell materials, and detailed models and simulations to improve understanding of water management in operating hydrogen PEM fuel cells. The characterization studies provided key data that is used as inputs to all state-of-the-art models for commercially important GDL materials. Experimental studies and microscopic scale models of how water moves through the GDLs showed that the water follows preferential paths, not branching like a river, as it moves toward the surface of the material. Experimental studies and detailed models of water and airflow in fuel cells channels demonstrated that such models can be used as an effective design tool to reduce operating pressure drop in the channels and the associated

  12. Advanced Composite Materials for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Applications in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles: Workshop Summary Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Applications in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles October 29, 2015 Sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (This page intentionally left blank) Section title Unt utaerest in pos eum quo con et iii ADVANCED COMPOSITE MATERIALS FOR COLD AND CRYOGENIC HYDROGEN STORAGE APPLICATIONS IN FUEL CELL ELECTRIC VEHICLES Advanced Composite Materials for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage

  13. Insights into the physical chemistry of materials from advances in HAADF-STEM

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sohlberg, Karl; Pennycook, Timothy J.; Zhou, Wu; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2014-11-13

    The observation that, ‘‘New tools lead to new science’’[P. S. Weiss, ACS Nano., 2012, 6(3), 1877–1879], is perhaps nowhere more evident than in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Advances in STEM have endowed this technique with several powerful and complimentary capabilities. For example, the application of high-angle annular dark-field imaging has made possible real-space imaging at subangstrom resolution with Z-contrast (Z = atomic number). Further advances have wrought: simultaneous real-space imaging and elemental identification by using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS); 3-dimensional (3D) mapping by depth sectioning; monitoring of surface diffusion by time-sequencing of images; reduced electron energy imaging formore » probing graphenes; etc. In this paper we review how these advances, often coupled with first-principles theory, have led to interesting and important new insights into the physical chemistry of materials. We then review in detail a few specific applications that highlight some of these STEM capabilities.« less

  14. Advanced grazing-incidence techniques for modern soft-matter materials analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hexemer, Alexander; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The complex nano-morphology of modern soft-matter materials is successfully probed with advanced grazing-incidence techniques. Based on grazing-incidence small- and wide-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (GISAXS, GIWAXS, GISANS and GIWANS), new possibilities arise which are discussed with selected examples. Due to instrumental progress, highly interesting possibilities for local structure analysis in this material class arise from the use of micro- and nanometer-sized X-ray beams in micro- or nanofocused GISAXS and GIWAXS experiments. The feasibility of very short data acquisition times down to milliseconds creates exciting possibilities forin situandin operandoGISAXS and GIWAXS studies. Tuning the energy of GISAXS and GIWAXS in the soft X-ray regime and in time-of flight GISANS allows the tailoring of contrast conditions and thereby the probing of more complex morphologies. In addition, recent progress in software packages, useful for data analysis for advanced grazing-incidence techniques, is discussed.

  15. Advanced grazing-incidence techniques for modern soft-matter materials analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hexemer, Alexander; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The complex nano-morphology of modern soft-matter materials is successfully probed with advanced grazing-incidence techniques. Based on grazing-incidence small- and wide-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (GISAXS, GIWAXS, GISANS and GIWANS), new possibilities arise which are discussed with selected examples. Due to instrumental progress, highly interesting possibilities for local structure analysis in this material class arise from the use of micro- and nanometer-sized X-ray beams in micro- or nanofocused GISAXS and GIWAXS experiments. The feasibility of very short data acquisition times down to milliseconds creates exciting possibilities forin situandin operandoGISAXS and GIWAXS studies. Tuning the energy of GISAXS and GIWAXS in themore » soft X-ray regime and in time-of flight GISANS allows the tailoring of contrast conditions and thereby the probing of more complex morphologies. In addition, recent progress in software packages, useful for data analysis for advanced grazing-incidence techniques, is discussed.« less

  16. Regional Education Partners

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Education Partners Regional Education Partners One of the Laboratory's STEM education objectives is centered on strengthening the future workforce of Northern New Mexico and the Laboratory through effective partnerships with regional secondary and higher education organizations, businesses and industry. Contact Executive Office Director Kathy Keith Community Partnerships Office (505) 665-4400 Email Regional Partners Charlie McMillan talking with Rick Ulibarri and Dr. Fries, President of

  17. Who Partners with NIF?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    partners Who Partners with NIF? Enduring NIF partnerships include representatives from throughout government, industry, and the academic sector. Longstanding Lawrence Livermore/NIF partners include researchers from Los Alamos and Sandia national laboratories, General Atomics, and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics at the University of Rochester (LLE/UR). Other key contributors include the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the Atomic Weapons

  18. Better Plants Program Partners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE recognizes the following companies for their commitment to reducing the energy intensity of their U.S. manufacturing operations by 25% or more within 10 years. These Better Plants Program Partners set ambitious goals, establish energy management plans, and report progress annually to DOE. Click on the arrows below to view Better Plants Program Partner profiles and learn more about their commitment.

  19. Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program. Semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, N.C.; Judkins, R.R.

    1992-12-01

    Objective of this materials program is to conduct R and D on materials for fossil energy applications with focus on longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The projects are organized according to materials research areas: (1) ceramics, (2) new alloys: iron aluminides, advanced austenitics and chromium niobium alloys, and (3) technology development and transfer. Separate abstracts have been prepared.

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Battery Research Partner Requests Proposals for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermal Management Systems | Department of Energy Battery Research Partner Requests Proposals for Thermal Management Systems Vehicle Technologies Office Battery Research Partner Requests Proposals for Thermal Management Systems January 12, 2016 - 3:06pm Addthis The U.S. Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC), which partners with the Vehicle Technologies Office to support battery research and development projects, recently issued a request for proposal information. The request focuses on

  1. Advanced international training course on state systems of accounting for and control of nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    This report incorporates all lectures and presentations at the Advanced International Training Course on State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material held April 27 through May 12, 1981 at Santa Fe and Los Alamos, New Mexico, and Richland, Washington, USA. Authorized by the US Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, the course was developed to provide practical training in the design, implementation, and operation of a state system of nuclear materials accountability and control that satisfies both national and international safeguards. Major emphasis for the 1981 course was placed on safeguards methods used at bulk-handling facilities, particularly low-enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication plants. The course was conducted by the University of California's Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and Exxon Nuclear Company, Inc. Tours and demonstrations were arranged at both the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, and the Exxon Nuclear fuel fabrication plant, Richland, Washington.

  2. Advanced materials for sodium-beta alumina batteries: Status, challenges and perspectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, XC; Xia, GG; Lemmon, JP; Yang, ZG

    2010-05-01

    The increasing penetration of renewable energy and the trend toward clean, efficient transportation have spurred growing interests in sodium-beta alumina batteries that store electrical energy via sodium ion transport across a beta ''-Al(2)O(3) solid electrolyte at elevated temperatures (typically 300-350 degrees C ). Currently, the negative electrode or anode is metallic sodium in molten state during battery operation; the positive electrode or cathode can be molten sulfur (Na-S battery) or solid transition metal halides plus a liquid phase secondary electrolyte (e.g., ZEBRA battery). Since the groundbreaking works in the sodium-beta alumina batteries a few decades ago, encouraging progress has been achieved in improving battery performance, along with cost reduction. However, there remain issues that hinder broad applications and market penetration of the technologies. To better the Na-beta alumina technologies require further advancement in materials along with component and system design and engineering. This paper offers a comprehensive review on materials of electrodes and electrolytes for the Na-beta alumina batteries and discusses the challenges ahead for further technology improvement. (C) 2009 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Development of Advanced Wear and Corrosion Resistant Systems Through Laser Surface Alloying and Materials Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. P. Martukanitz and S. Babu

    2007-05-03

    Laser surfacing in the form of cladding, alloying, and modifications are gaining widespread use because of its ability to provide high deposition rates, low thermal distortion, and refined microstructure due to high solidification rates. Because of these advantages, laser surface alloying is considered a prime candidate for producing ultra-hard coatings through the establishment or in situ formation of composite structures. Therefore, a program was conducted by the Applied Research Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop the scientific and engineering basis for performing laser-based surface modifications involving the addition of hard particles, such as carbides, borides, and nitrides, within a metallic matrix for improved wear, fatigue, creep, and corrosion resistance. This has involved the development of advanced laser processing and simulation techniques, along with the refinement and application of these techniques for predicting and selecting materials and processing parameters for the creation of new surfaces having improved properties over current coating technologies. This program has also resulted in the formulation of process and material simulation tools capable of examining the potential for the formation and retention of composite coatings and deposits produced using laser processing techniques, as well as positive laboratory demonstrations in producing these coatings. In conjunction with the process simulation techniques, the application of computational thermodynamic and kinetic models to design laser surface alloying materials was demonstrated and resulted in a vast improvement in the formulation of materials used for producing composite coatings. The methodology was used to identify materials and to selectively modify microstructures for increasing hardness of deposits produced by the laser surface alloying process. Computational thermodynamic calculations indicated that it was possible to induce the

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Potential Partners

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Potential Partners Potential Partners Sandia and one or more partners outside the federal government collaborate and share the results of a jointly conducted research and development project. Partners can be domestic or foreign and generally come from industry, nonprofit organizations or academia. Becoming a Partner SAM Registration The System for Award Management (SAM) is a government portal that enables secure registration as a potential CRADA Partner with Sandia National Laboratories.

  5. Engaging Financial Institution Partners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar, held on April 25, 2011, gives an overview of energy efficiency residential financing, how to engage potential partners, the importance of sustainable partnerships, and best practices and lessons learned from the field in Wisconsin.

  6. Major Partner Test Sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Major Test Partners Once a technology is ready to be tested at pilot or commercial scale, the cost of building a test facility becomes significant -- often beyond the funding ...

  7. Ridge Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Product: Ridge Partners has developed a diversified portfolio of Caribbean and Latin American energy and transportation infrastructure projects. References: Ridge Partners1 This...

  8. EZKlein Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    energy and biomass, and provide capital and deal services for partners prepared to invest in renewable energy. References: EZKlein Partners1 This article is a stub. You can...

  9. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- Partners

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Partners NNSANFO Language Options U.S. DOENNSA - Nevada Field Office Partners NNSA Nevada Field Office is comprised of the Nevada National Security Site and its related ...

  10. Greylock Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Logo: Greylock Partners (VC) Name: Greylock Partners (VC) Address: 2550 sand hill road Place: Menlo Park, California Zip: 94025 Website: www.greylock.com Coordinates:...