Sample records for advanced materials partners

  1. Partnering with Industry to Develop Advanced Biofuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session IA—Conversion Technologies I: Industrial Perspectives on Pathways to Advanced Biofuels Partnering with Industry to Develop Advanced Biofuels David C. Carroll, President and Chief Executive Officer, Gas Technology Institute

  2. Energy Department Recognizes San Antonio Area Partners for Advancing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    San Antonio Area Partners for Advancing Energy Efficiency Energy Department Recognizes San Antonio Area Partners for Advancing Energy Efficiency April 15, 2015 - 10:36am Addthis...

  3. Bachelor's, master's and Ph.D. programs in Materials Science and Engineering Partner in the statewide Center for Advanced Energy Studies at the Idaho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    · Bachelor's, master's and Ph.D. programs in Materials Science and Engineering · Partner. #12;Materials science draws on all branches of science and combines them with manufacturing technology and design to solve engineering problems. research prograMs · Materials for Energy Applications · Materials

  4. Advanced Materials | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Materials SHARE Advanced Materials ORNL has the nation's most comprehensive materials research program and is a world leader in research that supports the development of...

  5. Advanced Materials Partners Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEE Jump to:Ohio:Ads-tec GmbH JumpEnergy

  6. Advanced Battery Materials Characterization: Success stories...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advanced Battery Materials Characterization: Success stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Advanced Battery Materials Characterization: Success...

  7. Partnering with Industry to Advance Biofuels and Bioproducts (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describing NREL's Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility, a biochemical pilot plant and partnership facility containing equipment and lab space for pretreatement, enzymatic hydrolysis, fermentation, compositional analysis, and downstream processing. For more than 30 years, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been at the leading edge of research and technology advancements to develop renewable fuels and bioproducts. NREL works to develop cost-competitive alternatives to conventional transportation fuels and value-added biobased chemicals that can be used to manufacture clothing, plastics, lubricants, and other products. NREL is developing technologies and processes to produce a range of sustainable, energy-dense advanced biofuels that are compatible with our existing transportation fuel infrastructure. As part of that effort, NREL's National Bioenergy Center has entered into more than 90 collaborations in the past five years with companies ranging in size from start-ups to those that appear on Fortune magazine's Fortune 100 list. The new Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF) showcases NREL's commitment to collaboration and to meeting the nation's biofuels and bioproducts development and deployment goals. Designed to speed the growth of the biofuels and bioproducts industries, the IBRF is a unique $33.5 million pilot facility capable of supporting a variety of projects. The IBRF is available to industry partners who work with NREL through cooperative research and development, technical, and analytical service agreements. With 27,000 ft2 of high bay space, the IBRF provides industry partners with the opportunity to operate, test, and develop their own biorefining technology and equipment.

  8. Herty Advanced Materials Development Center

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Session 1-B: Advancing Alternative Fuels for the Military and Aviation Sector Breakout Session 1: New Developments and Hot Topics Jill Stuckey, Acting Director, Herty Advanced Materials Development Center

  9. Materials Characterization | Advanced Materials | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  10. Advanced Materials Center of Excellence Jason Boehm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Materials Center of Excellence Webinar Jason Boehm Program Coordination Office National · Materials Genome Initiative · Advanced Materials Center of Excellence · Overview Federal Funding Opportunity one Center focused on Advanced Materials Depending on FY2014 Funding NIST expects to announce

  11. Advanced neutron absorber materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branagan, Daniel J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smolik, Galen R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

  12. Advanced Materials Manufacturing | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1BP-14 Power andAdvancedCMWG

  13. Advanced Materials for Proton Exchange Membranes | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advanced Materials for Proton Exchange Membranes Advanced Materials for Proton Exchange Membranes A presentation to the High Temperature Membranes Working Group meeting, May 19,...

  14. ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance Print Thursday, 27 September 2012 00:00 ritchie ceramics...

  15. Advances in understanding solar energy collection materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Understanding solar energy collection materials Advances in understanding solar energy collection materials A LANL team and collaborators have made advances in the understanding of...

  16. Recent Theoretical Results for Advanced Thermoelectric Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials Recent Theoretical Results for Advanced Thermoelectric Materials Transport theory and first principles calculations applied to oxides, chalcogenides and skutterudite...

  17. Argonne National Laboratory Partners with Advanced Magnet Lab...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    next generation wind turbines and accelerate the deployment of advanced turbines for offshore wind energy in the United States. ANL will work with Magnet Lab, Emerson Electric...

  18. On the fracture toughness of advanced materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Launey, Maximilien E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    toughness of advanced materials ?? By Maximilien E. LauneyAbstract: Few engineering materials are limited by theirare manufactured from materials that are comparatively low

  19. Advanced Binder for Electrode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    calendar life Cost: High manufacture cost (Research in high energy system) Partners LBNL (PI. Vince Battaglia, Venkat Srinivasan, Robert Kostecki, Wangli Yang, Lin-Wang Wang)...

  20. Advanced Binder for Electrode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    calendar life Cost: High manufacture cost (Research in high energy system) Partners LBNL (PI. Vince Battaglia, Venkat Srinivasan, Robert Kostecki, Jordi Carbana-Jimenez, Wanli...

  1. Advanced Thermoelectric Materials and Generator Technology for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermoelectric Materials and Generator Technology for Automotive Waste Heat at GM Advanced Thermoelectric Materials and Generator Technology for Automotive Waste Heat at GM...

  2. Sandia Energy - Advanced Materials Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesIn theTreatmentSRSSafetyAdvanced Materials

  3. Advance disposal fees and recycling: Partners or foes?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods, R.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A political trend of shifting government responsibilities from the federal to the state and local level is beginning to take hold in many municipalities this year. Evidence of this shift recently was codified by the passage of Congress`s unfunded mandates bills, which require a panel review of any federal government mandates that create a cost burden of at least $50 million on state and local government. Expecting to be freed from the yoke of the most costly unfunded federal laws, many states are taking a second look at their expensive recycling laws and considering reassessment of how funding mechanisms are structured. This search for ways to raise revenue has renewed the continuing debate over advance disposal fees (ADFs), which are included in the cost of a product to pay for its ultimate disposal or reuse. These ADFs have been used for several years in a majority of US states to help handle scrap tire disposal. Due to concern over fire hazards posed by the nation`s growing scrap tire piles, several states have implemented a $1--$2 fee on each tire to help pay for disposal, most of which have been reasonably successful.

  4. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program: Annual progress report FY 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In many ways, the Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program underwent a major transformation in Fiscal Year 1995 and these changes have continued to the present. When the Program was established in 1990 as the Advanced Industrial Concepts (AIC) Materials Program, the mission was to conduct applied research and development to bring materials and processing technologies from the knowledge derived from basic research to the maturity required for the end use sectors for commercialization. In 1995, the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) made radical changes in structure and procedures. All technology development was directed toward the seven ``Vision Industries`` that use about 80% of industrial energy and generated about 90% of industrial wastes. The mission of AIM has, therefore, changed to ``Support development and commercialization of new or improved materials to improve productivity, product quality, and energy efficiency in the major process industries.`` Though AIM remains essentially a National Laboratory Program, it is essential that each project have industrial partners, including suppliers to, and customers of, the seven industries. Now, well into FY 1996, the transition is nearly complete and the AIM Program remains reasonably healthy and productive, thanks to the superb investigators and Laboratory Program Managers. This Annual Report for FY 1995 contains the technical details of some very remarkable work by the best materials scientists and engineers in the world. Areas covered here are: advanced metals and composites; advanced ceramics and composites; polymers and biobased materials; and new materials and processes.

  5. Advanced materials: Information and analysis needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curlee, T.R.; Das, S.; Lee, R.; Trumble, D.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the findings of a study to identify the types of information and analysis that are needed for advanced materials. The project was sponsored by the US Bureau of Mines (BOM). It includes a conceptual description of information needs for advanced materials and the development and implementation of a questionnaire on the same subject. This report identifies twelve fundamental differences between advanced and traditional materials and discusses the implications of these differences for data and analysis needs. Advanced and traditional materials differ significantly in terms of physical and chemical properties. Advanced material properties can be customized more easily. The production of advanced materials may differ from traditional materials in terms of inputs, the importance of by-products, the importance of different processing steps (especially fabrication), and scale economies. The potential for change in advanced materials characteristics and markets is greater and is derived from the marriage of radically different materials and processes. In addition to the conceptual study, a questionnaire was developed and implemented to assess the opinions of people who are likely users of BOM information on advanced materials. The results of the questionnaire, which was sent to about 1000 people, generally confirm the propositions set forth in the conceptual part of the study. The results also provide data on the categories of advanced materials and the types of information that are of greatest interest to potential users. 32 refs., 1 fig., 12 tabs.

  6. Cladding and Structural Materials for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Was, G S; Allen, T R; Ila, D; C,; Levi,; Morgan, D; Motta, A; Wang, L; Wirth, B

    2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this consortium is to address key materials issues in the most promising advanced reactor concepts that have yet to be resolved or that are beyond the existing experience base of dose or burnup. The research program consists of three major thrusts: 1) high-dose radiation stability of advanced fast reactor fuel cladding alloys, 2) irradiation creep at high temperature, and 3) innovative cladding concepts embodying functionally-graded barrier materials. This NERI-Consortium final report represents the collective efforts of a large number of individuals over a period of three and a half years and included 9 PIs, 4 scientists, 3 post-docs and 12 students from the seven participating institutions and 8 partners from 5 national laboratories and 3 industrial institutions (see table). University participants met semi-annually and participants and partners met annually for meetings lasting 2-3 days and designed to disseminate and discuss results, update partners, address outstanding issues and maintain focus and direction toward achieving the objectives of the program. The participants felt that this was a highly successful program to address broader issues that can only be done by the assembly of a range of talent and capabilities at a more substantial funding level than the traditional NERI or NEUP grant. As evidence of the success, this group, collectively, has published 20 articles in archival journals and made 57 presentations at international conferences on the results of this consortium.

  7. Functional Materials for Energy | Advanced Materials | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Fuel Cells Thermoelectrics Separations Materials Catalysis Sensor Materials Polymers and Composites Carbon Fiber Related Research Chemistry and Physics at...

  8. Materials for Advanced Engine Valve Train

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    technical gap in Propulsion Materials that supports the following Advanced Combustion Engine goal: 2015 Commercial Engine - Improve Efficiency by 20% over 2009 baseline efficiency...

  9. Advanced Materials Development through Computational Design ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development through Computational Design Advanced Materials Development through Computational Design Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research...

  10. Advanced Reflector and Absorber Materials (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describing NREL CSP Program capabilities in the area of advanced reflector and absorber materials: evaluating performance, determining degradation rates and lifetime, and developing new coatings.

  11. Advanced Photon Source Upgrade Project - Materials

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gibbson, Murray;

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An upgrade to Advanced Photon Source announced by DOE - http://go.usa.gov/ivZ -- will help scientists break through bottlenecks in materials design in order to develop materials with desirable functions.

  12. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and industry research efforts to ensure the properties of materials in light water reactors are well understood. The ATR NSUF is providing this support through three main efforts: establishing unique infrastructure necessary to conduct research on highly radioactive materials, conducting research in conjunction with industry partners on life extension relevant topics, and providing training courses to encourage more U.S. researchers to understand and address LWR materials issues. In 2010 and 2011, several advanced instruments with capability focused on resolving nuclear material performance issues through analysis on the micro (10-6 m) to atomic (10-10 m) scales were installed primarily at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. These instruments included a local electrode atom probe (LEAP), a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) system, a Raman spectrometer, and an nanoindentor/atomic force microscope. Ongoing capability enhancements intended to support industry efforts include completion of two shielded, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test loops, the first of which will come online in early calendar year 2013, a pressurized and controlled chemistry water loop for the ATR center flux trap, and a dedicated facility intended to house post irradiation examination equipment. In addition to capability enhancements at the main site in Idaho, the ATR NSUF also welcomed two new partner facilities in 2011 and two new partner facilities in 2012; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and associated hot cells and the University California Berkeley capabilities in irradiated materials analysis were added in 2011. In 2012, Purdue University’s Interaction of Materials with Particles and Components Testing (IMPACT) facility and the Pacific Northwest Nuclear Laboratory (PNNL) Radiochemistry Processing Laboratory (RPL) and PIE facilities were added. The ATR NSUF annually hosts a weeklong event called User’s Week in which students and faculty from universities as well as other interested parties from regulatory agencies or industry convene in Idaho Falls, Idaho to see presentations from ATR NSUF staff as well as select researchers from the materials research field. User’s week provides an overview of current materials research topics of interest and an opportunity for young researchers to understand the process of performing work through ATR NSUF. Additionally, to increase the number of researchers engaged in LWR materials issues, a series of workshops are in progress to introduce research staff to stress corrosion cracking, zirconium alloy degradation, and uranium dioxide degradation during in-reactor use.

  13. Advanced Materials | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  14. Advanced materials for enhanced condensation heat transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxson, Adam Taylor

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis investigates the use of three classes advanced materials for promoting dropwise condensation: 1. robust hydrophobic functionalizations 2. superhydrophobic textures 3. lubricant-imbibed textures We first define ...

  15. Ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, N.W.; Marwick, A.D.; Roberto, J.B. (eds.) (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA); International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY (USA). Thomas J. Watson Research Center; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains research programs discussed at the materials research society symposia on ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials. Major topics include: shallow implantation and solid-phase epitaxy; damage effects; focused ion beams; MeV implantation; high-dose implantation; implantation in III-V materials and multilayers; and implantation in electronic materials. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  16. Advanced Materials Research Highlights | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  17. Sandia Energy - Advanced Materials Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  18. Advanced Materials | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  19. Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume Applications Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume Applications 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

  20. Integration of Advanced Materials and Interfaces for Durable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Materials and Interfaces for Durable Thermoelectric Automobile Exhaust Waste Heat Harvesting Devices Integration of Advanced Materials and Interfaces for Durable...

  1. Process Development and Scale up of Advanced Electrolyte Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scale up of Advanced Electrolyte Materials Process Development and Scale up of Advanced Electrolyte Materials 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies...

  2. Joining of advanced materials by superplastic deformation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goretta, Kenneth C. (Downers Grove, IL); Routbort, Jules L. (Hinsdale, IL); Gutierrez-Mora, Felipe (Woodridge, IL)

    2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for utilizing superplastic deformation with or without a novel joint compound that leads to the joining of advanced ceramic materials, intermetallics, and cermets. A joint formed by this approach is as strong as or stronger than the materials joined. The method does not require elaborate surface preparation or application techniques.

  3. Advanced materials research areas | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  4. The DOE Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials: Research briefs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication is designed to inform present and potential customers and partners of the DOE Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials about significant advances resulting from Center-coordinated research. The format is an easy-to-read, not highly technical, concise presentation of the accomplishments. Selected accomplishments from each of the Center`s seven initial focused projects are presented. The seven projects are: (1) conventional and superplastic forming; (2) materials joining; (3) nanoscale materials for energy applications; (4) microstructural engineering with polymers; (5) tailored microstructures in hard magnets; (6) processing for surface hardness; and (7) mechanically reliable surface oxides for high-temperature corrosion resistance.

  5. COMBUSTION SYNTHESIS OF ADVANCED MATERIALS: PRINCIPLESAND APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukasyan, Alexander

    COMBUSTION SYNTHESIS OF ADVANCED MATERIALS: PRINCIPLESAND APPLICATIONS Arvind Varma, Alexander S. Gasless Combustion SynthesisFrom Elements B. Combustion Synthesis in Gas-Solid Systems C. Products of Thermite-vpe SHS D. Commercial Aspects IV. Theoretical Considerations A. Combustion Wave Propagation Theory

  6. ADVANCED MATERIALS Membranes for Clean Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ADVANCED MATERIALS Membranes for Clean Water Objective This project provides measurement solutions that probe the surface and internal structure of polymer membranes used in water purification, and correlate that structure to the transport of water and other species through the membrane. Our methods are focused

  7. Chemical Sciences Division | Advanced Materials |ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma of the Rotating 2015AnalysisChemicalChemical

  8. Partnering with Industry to Advance Biofuels, NREL's Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describing NREL's Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility and its availability to biofuels' industry partners who want to operate, test, and develop biorefining technology and equipment.

  9. Task 8.9 - Advanced ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced ceramic materials such as Continuous Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites (CFCCs) have had promising results on the companion program entitled ``Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine`` (CSGT). In particular, CFCCs have outperformed monolithic tiles in structural integrity as a combustor liner. Also, CFCCs have provided the higher temperature operation and improved emissions performance that is required for the ATS combustor. The demonstrated advantages on CSGT justified work to explore the use of advanced ceramic composite materials in other gas turbine components. Sub-tasks include development of a practical, cost effective component fabrication process, development of finite element stress analysis to assure 30,000 hours of component life, and fabrication of a demonstration article.

  10. USAMP AMD 408 ?DIE FACE ENGINEERING FOR ADVANCED SHEET MATERIALS...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    USAMP AMD 408 DIE FACE ENGINEERING FOR ADVANCED SHEET MATERIALS USAMP AMD 408 DIE FACE ENGINEERING FOR ADVANCED SHEET MATERIALS Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle...

  11. Cellulosic Biofuels: Expert Views on Prospects for Advancement: Supplementary Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Cellulosic Biofuels: Expert Views on Prospects for Advancement: Supplementary Material Erin Baker Keywords: Biofuels; Technology R&D; Uncertainty; Environmental policy 2 #12;1 Introduction This paper contains supplementary material for "Cellulosic Biofuels: Expert Views on Prospects for Advancement

  12. ADVANCED MATERIALS Curriculum Biomaterials Materials Science I 5 CP Materials Science II 5 CP Lab Materials Science II 5 CP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    ADVANCED MATERIALS Curriculum Biomaterials Materials Science I 5 CP Materials Science II 5 CP Lab Materials Science II 5 CP Computational Methods in Materials Science 4 CP Lab Materials Science I 5 CP Physical Chemistry 4 CP General Chemistry 2 CP Synthesis of Org. & Inorg. Materials 4 CP Introductory Solid

  13. Ames Lab 101: Improving Materials with Advanced Computing

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Johnson, Duane

    2014-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Ames Laboratory's Chief Research Officer Duane Johnson talks about using advanced computing to develop new materials and predict what types of properties those materials will have.

  14. Use of advanced composite materials for innovative building design solutions/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lau, Tak-bun, Denvid

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced composite materials become popular in construction industry for the innovative building design solutions including strengthening and retrofitting of existing structures. The interface between different materials ...

  15. advanced materials technology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hiring areas are: Novel Sustainable Materials Alpay, S. Pamir 3 ADVANCED COMPOSITE MATERIALS TECHNOLOGY FOR ROTORCRAFT Andrew Makeev*, University of Texas at Arlington,...

  16. advanced composite material: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 ULTRASONIC CHARACTERIZATION OF ADVANCED COMPOSITE MATERIALS CiteSeer Summary: With increased use of composite materials in critical structural...

  17. advanced technological materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hiring areas are: Novel Sustainable Materials Alpay, S. Pamir 3 ADVANCED COMPOSITE MATERIALS TECHNOLOGY FOR ROTORCRAFT Andrew Makeev*, University of Texas at Arlington,...

  18. Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Focal Project 4: Structural Automotive Components from Composite Materials Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume Applications Libby Berger (General...

  19. Advanced Thermal Interface Materials (TIMs) for Power Electronics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interface Materials (TIMs) for Power Electronics Advanced Thermal Interface Materials (TIMs) for Power Electronics 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual...

  20. 98 OCTOBER 2003 / Concrete international The Center for Advanced Cement-Based Materials (ACBM) is a consortium of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    98 OCTOBER 2003 / Concrete international The Center for Advanced Cement-Based Materials (ACBM the hydration of concrete. ACBM's Industrial Partners and Northwestern University's Infra- structure Technology to track the very early age hydration of concrete and provide accurate measurements of maturity

  1. Nondestructive evaluation of advanced ceramic composite materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lott, L.A.; Kunerth, D.C.; Walter, J.B.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nondestructive evaluation techniques were developed to characterize performance degrading conditions in continuous fiber-reinforced silicon carbide/silicon carbide composites. Porosity, fiber-matrix interface bond strength, and physical damage were among the conditions studied. The material studied is formed by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of the matrix material into a preform of woven reinforcing fibers. Acoustic, ultrasonic, and vibration response techniques were studied. Porosity was investigated because of its inherent presence in the CVI process and of the resultant degradation of material strength. Correlations between porosity and ultrasonic attenuation and velocity were clearly demonstrated. The ability of ultrasonic transmission scanning techniques to map variations in porosity in a single sample was also demonstrated. The fiber-matrix interface bond was studied because of its importance in determining the fracture toughness of the material. Correlations between interface bonding and acoustic and ultrasonic properties were observed. These results are presented along with those obtained form acoustic and vibration response measurements on material samples subjected to mechanical impact damage. This is the final report on research sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program. 10 refs., 24 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. ASME Material Challenges for Advanced Reactor Concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Ali Siahpush

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents the material Challenges associated with Advanced Reactor Concept (ARC) such as the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR). ACR are the next generation concepts focusing on power production and providing thermal energy for industrial applications. The efficient transfer of energy for industrial applications depends on the ability to incorporate cost-effective heat exchangers between the nuclear heat transport system and industrial process heat transport system. The heat exchanger required for AHTR is subjected to a unique set of conditions that bring with them several design challenges not encountered in standard heat exchangers. The corrosive molten salts, especially at higher temperatures, require materials throughout the system to avoid corrosion, and adverse high-temperature effects such as creep. Given the very high steam generator pressure of the supercritical steam cycle, it is anticipated that water tube and molten salt shell steam generators heat exchanger will be used. In this paper, the ASME Section III and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section VIII requirements (acceptance criteria) are discussed. Also, the ASME material acceptance criteria (ASME Section II, Part D) for high temperature environment are presented. Finally, lack of ASME acceptance criteria for thermal design and analysis are discussed.

  3. Partnering with Utilities Part 2- Advanced Topics for Local Governments in Creating Successful Partnerships with Utilities to Deliver Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP) is part two in the series Partnering with Utilities:Advanced Topics for Local Governments in Creating Successful Partnerships with Utilities to Deliver Energy Efficiency Programs.

  4. Advanced Components and Materials | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1BP-14 Power andAdvanced Components and Materials SHARE

  5. Advanced Composite Materials | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1BP-14 Power andAdvanced Components and Materials

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: hydrogen-materials research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hydrogen-materials research Sandia-California Partners with Japanese National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) in Hydrogen-Materials Research On July...

  7. ADVANCED MATERIALS Curriculum Nanomaterials Materials Science I 5 CP Materials Science II 5 CP Lab Materials Science II 5 CP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    ADVANCED MATERIALS Curriculum Nanomaterials Materials Science I 5 CP Materials Science II 5 CP Lab Materials Science II 5 CP Computational Methods in Materials Science 4 CP Lab Materials Science I 5 CP Science Chemistry Physics Engineering Nanomaterials Introductory Engineering 5 CP #12;

  8. On the fracture toughness of advanced materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Launey, Maximilien E.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2008-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Few engineering materials are limited by their strength; rather they are limited by their resistance to fracture or fracture toughness. It is not by accident that most critical structures, such as bridges, ships, nuclear pressure vessels and so forth, are manufactured from materials that are comparatively low in strength but high in toughness. Indeed, in many classes of materials, strength and toughness are almost mutually exclusive. In the first instance, such resistance to fracture is a function of bonding and crystal structure (or lack thereof), but can be developed through the design of appropriate nano/microstructures. However, the creation of tough microstructures in structural materials, i.e., metals, polymers, ceramics and their composites, is invariably a compromise between resistance to intrinsic damage mechanisms ahead of the tip of a crack (intrinsic toughening) and the formation of crack-tip shielding mechanisms which principally act behind the tip to reduce the effective 'crack-driving force' (extrinsic toughening). Intrinsic toughening is essentially an inherent property of a specific microstructure; it is the dominant form of toughening in ductile (e.g., metallic) materials. However, for most brittle (e.g., ceramic) solids, and this includes many biological materials, it is largely ineffective and toughening conversely must be developed extrinsically, by such shielding mechanisms as crack bridging. From a fracture mechanics perspective, this results in toughening in the form of rising resistance-curve behavior where the fracture resistance actually increases with crack extension. The implication of this is that in many biological and high-strength advanced materials, toughness is developed primarily during crack growth and not for crack initiation. This is an important realization yet is still rarely reflected in the way that toughness is measured, which is invariably involves the use of single-value (crack-initiation) parameters such as the fracture toughness K{sub Ic}.

  9. Advanced Materials in Support of EERE Needs to Advance Clean Energy Technologies Program Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liby, Alan L [ORNL; Rogers, Hiram [ORNL

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this activity was to carry out program implementation and technical projects in support of the ARRA-funded Advanced Materials in Support of EERE Needs to Advance Clean Energy Technologies Program of the DOE Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) (formerly the Industrial Technologies Program (ITP)). The work was organized into eight projects in four materials areas: strategic materials, structural materials, energy storage and production materials, and advanced/field/transient processing. Strategic materials included work on titanium, magnesium and carbon fiber. Structural materials included work on alumina forming austentic (AFA) and CF8C-Plus steels. The advanced batteries and production materials projects included work on advanced batteries and photovoltaic devices. Advanced/field/transient processing included work on magnetic field processing. Details of the work in the eight projects are available in the project final reports which have been previously submitted.

  10. Polymers as advanced materials for desiccant applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czanderna, A.W.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research is concerned with solid materials used as desiccants for desiccant cooling systems (DCSs) that process water vapor in an atmosphere to produce cooling. Background information includes an introduction to DCSs and the role of the desiccant as a system component. The water vapor sorption performance criteria used for screening the modified polymers prepared include the water sorption capacity from 5% to 80% relative humidity (R.H.), isotherm shape, and rate of adsorption and desorption. Measurements are presented for the sorption performance of modified polymeric advanced desiccant materials with the quartz crystal microbalance. Isotherms of polystyrene sulfonic acid (PSSA) taken over a 5-month period show that the material has a dramatic loss in capacity and that the isotherm shape is time dependent. The adsorption and desorption kinetics for PSSA and all the ionic salts of it studied are easily fast enough for commercial DCS applications with a wheel rotation speed of 6 min per revolution. Future activities for the project are addressed, and a 5-year summary of the project is included as Appendix A. 34 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program: Compilation of project summaries and significant accomplishments, FY 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In many ways, the Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program underwent a major transformation in Fiscal Year 1995 and these changes have continued to the present. When the Program was established in 1990 as the Advanced Industrial Concepts (AIC) Materials Program, the mission was to conduct applied research and development to bring materials and processing technologies from the knowledge derived from basic research to the maturity required for the end use sectors for commercialization. In 1995, the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) made radical changes in structure and procedures. All technology development was directed toward the seven ``Vision Industries`` that use about 80% of industrial energy and generated about 90% of industrial wastes. The mission of AIM has, therefore, changed to ``Support development and commercialization of new or improved materials to improve productivity, product quality, and energy efficiency in the major process industries.`` Though AIM remains essentially a National Laboratory Program, it is essential that each project have industrial partners, including suppliers to, and customers of, the seven industries. Now, well into FY 1996, the transition is nearly complete and the AIM Program remains reasonably healthy and productive, thanks to the superb investigators and Laboratory Program Managers. This report contains the technical details of some very remarkable work by the best materials scientists and engineers in the world. Subject areas covered are: advanced metals and composites; advanced ceramics and composites; polymers and biobased materials; and new materials and processes.

  12. Advanced Pattern Material for Investment Casting Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Douglas Neece Neil Chaudhry

    2006-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Cleveland Tool and Machine (CTM) of Cleveland, Ohio in conjunction with Harrington Product Development Center (HPDC) of Cincinnati, Ohio have developed an advanced, dimensionally accurate, temperature-stable, energy-efficient and cost-effective material and process to manufacture patterns for the investment casting industry. In the proposed technology, FOPAT (aFOam PATtern material) has been developed which is especially compatible with the investment casting process and offers the following advantages: increased dimensional accuracy; increased temperature stability; lower cost per pattern; less energy consumption per pattern; decreased cost of pattern making equipment; decreased tooling cost; increased casting yield. The present method for investment casting is "the lost wax" process, which is exactly that, the use of wax as a pattern material, which is then melted out or "lost" from the ceramic shell. The molten metal is then poured into the ceramic shell to produce a metal casting. This process goes back thousands of years and while there have been improvements in the wax and processing technology, the material is basically the same, wax. The proposed technology is based upon an established industrial process of "Reaction Injection Molding" (RIM) where two components react when mixed and then "molded" to form a part. The proposed technology has been modified and improved with the needs of investment casting in mind. A proprietary mix of components has been formulated which react and expand to form a foam-like product. The result is an investment casting pattern with smooth surface finish and excellent dimensional predictability along with the other key benefits listed above.

  13. advanced engineering materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed 3 Hindawi Publishing Corporation Advances in Materials Science and Engineering Physics Websites Summary: ID 905474, 13 pages doi:10.11552012905474 Review...

  14. Advanced Materials for Reversible Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (RSOFC...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Reversible Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (RSOFC), Dual Mode Operation with Low Degradation Advanced Materials for Reversible Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (RSOFC), Dual Mode Operation with Low...

  15. Chemical and Materials Science (XSD) | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Home Advanced Photon Source About Us Useful Links Chemical and Materials Science (X-ray Science Division) The CMS group has operational responsibility for...

  16. Economical Remediation of Plastic Waste into Advanced Materials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Economical Remediation of Plastic Waste into Advanced Materials with Coatings Technology available for licensing: An autogenic pyrolysis process to convert plastic waste into...

  17. Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2010 Fuel Cell Projects Kick-off Meeting Washington, DC - September 28, 2010 Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells for Portable Power Fuel Cells Piotr...

  18. Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Applications (ACC932) Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume Applications (ACC932) 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies...

  19. Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -- Washington D.C. lm021zaluzec2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume Applications ACC115 High Volume...

  20. Advanced Ceramic Materials and Packaging Technologies for Realizing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Thermal Hydraulic Laboratory Project start date: November 15, 2012 Advanced Ceramic Materials and Packaging Technologies for Realizing Sensors for Concentrating Solar Power...

  1. advanced fusion material: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Sandia National Laboratories Awards for Excellence (1992, 1993, 19942, 1995, 1999) Employee Shelnutt, John A. 24 Advanced Materials Laboratory Sandia National...

  2. Advanced Cathode Material Development for PHEV Lithium Ion Batteries...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Advanced Cathode Material Development for PHEV Lithium Ion Batteries High Energy Novel Cathode Alloy Automotive Cell Develop & evaluate...

  3. Advanced Cathode Material Development for PHEV Lithium Ion Batteries...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Advanced Cathode Material Development for PHEV Lithium Ion Batteries Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy Novel...

  4. Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing and Design Optimization Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing and Design Optimization Part of a 100 million fuel cell award...

  5. Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing, and Design Optimization Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design Optimization This presentation, which focuses on...

  6. On the fracture toughness of advanced materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Launey, Maximilien E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is invariably a critical material parameter for many suchbulk) materials that we currently use in critical structuralsame as the critical crack size (a c ). In materials with a

  7. Advanced Industrial Materials Program. Annual progress report, FY 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stooksbury, F. [comp.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mission of the AIM program is to commercialize new/improved materials and materials processing methods that will improve energy efficiency, productivity, and competitiveness. Program investigators in the DOE national laboratories are working with about 100 companies, including 15 partners in CRDAs. Work is being done on intermetallic alloys, ceramic composites, metal composites, polymers, engineered porous materials, and surface modification. The program supports other efforts in the Office of Industrial Technologies to assist the energy-consuming process industries. The aim of the AIM program is to bring materials from basic research to industrial application to strengthen the competitive position of US industry and save energy.

  8. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program Compilation of Project Summaries and Significant Accomplishments FY 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angelini, P

    2000-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    For the past 10 years the Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) has supported development of new and improved materials to enable U.S. industry to improve energy efficiency, increase productivity, and reduce waste. It has been a National Laboratory based program, with work currently under way at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories, in collaboration with industrial and university partners. With the advent of the Industries of the Future (IOF) strategy within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) and the scheduled completion of the Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) Program in FY 2002, an integrated materials program is being developed in OIT. So this represents the last summary of AIM research and development. The new program, Industrial Materials for the Future (IMF), will be competitive in operation, with solicitations for proposals for development of materials in accordance with the IOF Technology Roadmaps, followed by merit review and funding of the best proposals. Industry will take the lead in ''industry-specific'' research and development, in cooperation with National Laboratories, as needed. National Laboratories and universities will take the lead in maintaining a base technology program, for the purpose of maintaining a continuing flow of new materials technologies. The AIM and CFCC Programs will be replaced by the IMF program over a three year period, so that in FY 2004, all research and development will be in response to industry solicitations and Laboratory/university calls. The Program Manager believes that AIM has been an extremely successful program, thanks to the Laboratory investigators and their partners. For 10 years, the program has increased industrial participation from very little to nearly 100 percent. The CFCC Program, similarly, has been successful in advancing the knowledge of processing and property development in these materials, though much still can be done in advancing their uses in industry. It is hoped that the Industrial Materials for the Future Program will be equally successful, not only in solving industry's short-term, immediate needs, but also in maintaining a materials technology base that will lead to longer-range materials and processing developments. The projects summarized here will be carried to successful conclusions over the next 3 years and the current Laboratories in AIM and CFCC will be joined by other Laboratories, universities, and new industrial partners. The Program Manager expresses his profound appreciation for the very fine work done for OIT during the last 10 years.

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Materials Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    integration of renewable-energy resources, real-time residential and industrial energy management and control, lifetime degradation and science and various forms of advanced...

  10. Advanced Battery Materials Characterization: Success stories...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Battery Materials Characterization: Success stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Dr. E. Andrew Payzant, ORNL Project ID lmp02payzant This...

  11. Advanced Components and Materials | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Materials and power equipment form the basis of our electricity delivery infrastructure. To meet the many demands and expectations of a modern Resilient, Reliable and...

  12. Advanced Materials and Manufacturing | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and characterization of ceramic materials for energy-related applications Process Development and Scale-up Program Argonne's Materials Synthesis and Manufacturing Research and...

  13. Solar synthesis of advanced materials: A solar industrial program initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewandowski, A.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an initiative for accelerating the use of solar energy in the advanced materials manufacturing industry in the United States. The initiative will be based on government-industry collaborations that will develop the technology and help US industry compete in the rapidly expanding global advanced materials marketplace. Breakthroughs in solar technology over the last 5 years have created exceptional new tools for developing advanced materials. Concentrated sunlight from solar furnaces can produce intensities that approach those on the surface of the sun and can generate temperatures well over 2000{degrees}C. Very thin layers of illuminated surfaces can be driven to remarkably high temperatures in a fraction of a second. Concentrated solar energy can be delivered over large areas, allowing for rapid processing and high production rates. By using this technology, researchers are transforming low-cost raw materials into high-performance products. Solar synthesis of advanced materials uses bulk materials and energy more efficiently, lowers processing costs, and reduces the need for strategic materials -- all with a technology that does not harm the environment. The Solar Industrial Program has built a unique, world class solar furnace at NREL to help meet the growing need for applied research in advanced materials. Many new advanced materials processes have been successfully demonstrated in this facility, including the following: Metalorganic deposition, ceramic powders, diamond-like carbon materials, rapid heat treating, and cladding (hard coating).

  14. New Advances in SuperConducting Materials

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting materials will transform the world's electrical infrastructure, saving billions of dollars once the technical details and installation are in place. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, new materials science concepts are bringing this essential technology closer to widespread industrial use.

  15. Materials and process engineering projects for the Sandia National Laboratories/Newly Independent States Industrial Partnering Program. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zanner, F.J.; Moffatt, W.C.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In July, 1994, a team of materials specialists from Sandia and US. Industry traveled to Russia and the Ukraine to select and fund projects in materials and process technology in support of the Newly Independent States/Industrial Partnering Program (NIS/IPP). All of the projects are collaborations with scientists and Engineers at NIS Institutes. Each project is scheduled to last one year, and the deliverables are formatted to supply US. Industry with information which will enable rational decisions to be made regarding the commercial value of these technologies. This work is an unedited interim compilation of the deliverables received to date.

  16. Materials and process engineering projects for the Sandia National Laboratories/Newly Independent States Industrial Partnering Program. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zanner, F.J.; Moffatt, W.C.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In July, 1994, a team of materials specialists from Sandia and U S Industry traveled to Russia and the Ukraine to select and fund projects in materials and process technology in support of the Newly Independent States/Industrial Partnering Program (NIS/IPP). All of the projects are collaborations with scientists and Engineers at NIS Institutes. Each project is scheduled to last one year, and the deliverables are formatted to supply US Industry with information which will enable rational decisions to be made regarding the commercial value of these technologies. This work is an unedited interim compilation of the deliverables received to date.

  17. Advanced Material Development, Processing and Characterization - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1BP-14 Power andAdvancedCMWG BreakoutAdvancedInnovation

  18. advanced materials icam: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    advanced materials icam First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 ?????? ??? ?????? ???...

  19. advanced thermoelectric materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    advanced thermoelectric materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Thermoelectrics :...

  20. USAMP AMD 408 ?DIE FACE ENGINEERING FOR ADVANCED SHEET MATERIALS

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    8 - Die Face Engineering for Advanced Sheet Materials edm2@chrysler.com February 28, 2008 1 Leader: Tom Stoughton Administrator: Manish Mehta, TRCNCMS Presenter: Eric McCarty...

  1. advanced composite materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    advanced composite materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 ULTRASONIC...

  2. Advances in Geosynthetics Materials and Applications for Soil Reinforcement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    in environmental protection projects, including geomembranes, geosynthetic clay liners (GCL), geonets barriers. Geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) are geocomposites that are prefabricated with a bentonite clayAdvances in Geosynthetics Materials and Applications for Soil Reinforcement and Environmental

  3. Materials for Advanced Engine Valve Train

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    275,000 * FY11 Funding - 225,000 Budget * Changes in internal combustion regimes * Materials properties of exhaust valves will need to change to accommodate higher temperatures...

  4. New Advance in SuperConducting Materials

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting materials will transform the world's electrical infrastructure, saving billions of dollars once the technical details and installation are in place. At Los Alamos National Laborator...  

  5. Bayer Material Science (TRL 1 2 3 System)- River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials(River DREAM)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bayer Material Science (TRL 1 2 3 System) - River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials(River DREAM)

  6. advanced structural materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    advanced structural materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Advanced Theory,...

  7. advanced polymeric materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    advanced polymeric materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Advances in and...

  8. Advanced lubrication systems and materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, S.

    1998-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report described the work conducted at the National Institute of Standards and Technology under an interagency agreement signed in September 1992 between DOE and NIST for 5 years. The interagency agreement envisions continual funding from DOE to support the development of fuel efficient, low emission engine technologies in terms of lubrication, friction, and wear control encountered in the development of advanced transportation technologies. However, in 1994, the DOE office of transportation technologies was reorganized and the tribology program was dissolved. The work at NIST therefore continued at a low level without further funding from DOE. The work continued to support transportation technologies in the development of fuel efficient, low emission engine development. Under this program, significant progress has been made in advancing the state of the art of lubrication technology for advanced engine research and development. Some of the highlights are: (1) developed an advanced high temperature liquid lubricant capable of sustaining high temperatures in a prototype heat engine; (2) developed a novel liquid lubricant which potentially could lower the emission of heavy duty diesel engines; (3) developed lubricant chemistries for ceramics used in the heat engines; (4) developed application maps for ceramic lubricant chemistry combinations for design purpose; and (5) developed novel test methods to screen lubricant chemistries for automotive air-conditioning compressors lubricated by R-134a (Freon substitute). Most of these findings have been reported to the DOE program office through Argonne National Laboratory who manages the overall program. A list of those reports and a copy of the report submitted to the Argonne National Laboratory is attached in Appendix A. Additional reports have also been submitted separately to DOE program managers. These are attached in Appendix B.

  9. Chemistry & Physics at Interfaces | Advanced Materials | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for growing functional materials, such as manganese oxides for electronic and solid-oxide fuel cell applications. Phase coexistence enables switching in strained BiFeO3 July 17,...

  10. Advanced Materials and Processes, 2010, 168(3):32-33 Blast protection materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Nikhil

    32 Advanced Materials and Processes, 2010, 168(3):32-33 Blast protection materials Nikhil Gupta1 and Kyu Cho2 1 Composite Materials and Mechanics Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 Ballistic, blast

  11. Advanced Materials Facilities & Capabilites | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP Related LinksATHENAAdministrative80-AA GeothermalAdvanced Events

  12. Advanced Materials Success Stories - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP Related LinksATHENAAdministrative80-AA GeothermalAdvancedSuccess

  13. advanced materials development: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    materials development First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Advanced batteries : material...

  14. advanced materials information: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    materials information First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Department of Advanced Materials...

  15. advanced materials program: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    materials program First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Argonne's Advanced Battery Materials...

  16. advanced optical materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    optical materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Department of Advanced Materials...

  17. advanced htgr materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    htgr materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Department of Advanced Materials Science...

  18. advanced materials strands: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    materials strands First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Department of Advanced Materials...

  19. advanced materials laboratory: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    materials laboratory First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Advanced Materials Laboratory...

  20. University of New Orleans/ Advanced Materials Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    solar cells. Their synthesis, characterization and application as photoanode materials in dye sensitized of sciences research award to fund the proposal on making efficient dye sensitized solar cells by plasmonic Core-Shell Metal-Metal Oxide 3D Nanoarchitectures for Dye Sensitized Solar Cells, Gordon Research

  1. Argonne's Advanced Battery Materials Synthesis and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    don't want to take on the financial risk of process scale-up and development for materials that haven in battery, fuel cell, and other budding technologies supporting the nation's energy and portable development, Argonne researchers use proven industrial software programs to create simulations and unit

  2. MATERIALS AND COMPONENT DEVELOPMENT FOR ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS ? PROJECT SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. A. Alvin

    2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Future hydrogen-fired or oxy-fuel turbines will likely experience an enormous level of thermal and mechanical loading, as turbine inlet temperatures (TIT) approach ?1425-1760?C (?2600-3200?F) with pressures of ?300-625 psig, respectively. Maintaining the structural integrity of future turbine components under these extreme conditions will require (1) durable thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), (2) high temperature creep resistant metal substrates, and (3) effective cooling techniques. While advances in substrate materials have been limited for the past decades, thermal protection of turbine airfoils in future hydrogen-fired and oxy-fuel turbines will rely primarily on collective advances in the TBCs and aerothermal cooling. To support the advanced turbine technology development, the Office of Research and Development (ORD) at National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has continued its collaborative research efforts with the University of Pittsburgh and West Virginia University, while working in conjunction with commercial material and coating suppliers. This paper presents the technical accomplishments that were made during FY09 in the initial areas of advanced materials, aerothermal heat transfer and non-destructive evaluation techniques for use in advanced land-based turbine applications in the Materials and Component Development for Advanced Turbine Systems project, and introduces three new technology areas ? high temperature overlayer coating development, diffusion barrier coating development, and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy development that are being conducted in this effort.

  3. Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, N.C.; Judkins, R.R. (comps.)

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objective of this materials program is to conduct R and D on materials for fossil energy applications with focus on longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The projects are organized according to materials research areas: (1) ceramics, (2) new alloys: iron aluminides, advanced austenitics and chromium niobium alloys, and (3) technology development and transfer. Separate abstracts have been prepared.

  4. Code qualification of structural materials for AFCI advanced recycling reactors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natesan, K.; Li, M.; Majumdar, S.; Nanstad, R.K.; Sham, T.-L. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (ORNL)

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the further findings from the assessments of current status and future needs in code qualification and licensing of reference structural materials and new advanced alloys for advanced recycling reactors (ARRs) in support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The work is a combined effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with ANL as the technical lead, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for AFCI Reactor Campaign. The report is the second deliverable in FY08 (M505011401) under the work package 'Advanced Materials Code Qualification'. The overall objective of the Advanced Materials Code Qualification project is to evaluate key requirements for the ASME Code qualification and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval of structural materials in support of the design and licensing of the ARR. Advanced materials are a critical element in the development of sodium reactor technologies. Enhanced materials performance not only improves safety margins and provides design flexibility, but also is essential for the economics of future advanced sodium reactors. Code qualification and licensing of advanced materials are prominent needs for developing and implementing advanced sodium reactor technologies. Nuclear structural component design in the U.S. must comply with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III (Rules for Construction of Nuclear Facility Components) and the NRC grants the operational license. As the ARR will operate at higher temperatures than the current light water reactors (LWRs), the design of elevated-temperature components must comply with ASME Subsection NH (Class 1 Components in Elevated Temperature Service). However, the NRC has not approved the use of Subsection NH for reactor components, and this puts additional burdens on materials qualification of the ARR. In the past licensing review for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project (CRBRP) and the Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM), the NRC/Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) raised numerous safety-related issues regarding elevated-temperature structural integrity criteria. Most of these issues remained unresolved today. These critical licensing reviews provide a basis for the evaluation of underlying technical issues for future advanced sodium-cooled reactors. Major materials performance issues and high temperature design methodology issues pertinent to the ARR are addressed in the report. The report is organized as follows: the ARR reference design concepts proposed by the Argonne National Laboratory and four industrial consortia were reviewed first, followed by a summary of the major code qualification and licensing issues for the ARR structural materials. The available database is presented for the ASME Code-qualified structural alloys (e.g. 304, 316 stainless steels, 2.25Cr-1Mo, and mod.9Cr-1Mo), including physical properties, tensile properties, impact properties and fracture toughness, creep, fatigue, creep-fatigue interaction, microstructural stability during long-term thermal aging, material degradation in sodium environments and effects of neutron irradiation for both base metals and weld metals. An assessment of modified versions of Type 316 SS, i.e. Type 316LN and its Japanese version, 316FR, was conducted to provide a perspective for codification of 316LN or 316FR in Subsection NH. Current status and data availability of four new advanced alloys, i.e. NF616, NF616+TMT, NF709, and HT-UPS, are also addressed to identify the R&D needs for their code qualification for ARR applications. For both conventional and new alloys, issues related to high temperature design methodology are described to address the needs for improvements for the ARR design and licensing. Assessments have shown that there are significant data gaps for the full qualification and licensing of the ARR structural materials. Development and evaluation of structural materials require a variety of experimental facilities that have been seriously degraded

  5. Characterization of advanced preprocessed materials (Hydrothermal)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachel Emerson; Garold Gresham

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial hydrothermal treatment parameters did not achieve the proposed objective of this effort; the reduction of intrinsic ash in the corn stover. However, liquid fractions from the 170°C treatments was indicative that some of the elements routinely found in the ash that negatively impact the biochemical conversion processes had been removed. After reviewing other options for facilitating ash removal, sodium-citrate (chelating agent) was included in the hydrothermal treatment process, resulting in a 69% reduction in the physiological ash. These results indicated that chelation –hydrothermal treatment is one possible approach that can be utilized to reduce the overall ash content of feedstock materials and having a positive impact on conversion performance.

  6. Materials Science & Tech Division | Advanced Materials | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from a New 183-GHzMARSecurityMaterials Science

  7. Integration of advanced nuclear materials separation processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarvinen, G.D.; Worl, L.A.; Padilla, D.D.; Berg, J.M.; Neu, M.P.; Reilly, S.D.; Buelow, S.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project has examined the fundamental chemistry of plutonium that affects the integration of hydrothermal technology into nuclear materials processing operations. Chemical reactions in high temperature water allow new avenues for waste treatment and radionuclide separation.Successful implementation of hydrothermal technology offers the potential to effective treat many types of radioactive waste, reduce the storage hazards and disposal costs, and minimize the generation of secondary waste streams. The focus has been on the chemistry of plutonium(VI) in solution with carbonate since these are expected to be important species in the effluent from hydrothermal oxidation of Pu-containing organic wastes. The authors investigated the structure, solubility, and stability of the key plutonium complexes. Installation and testing of flow and batch hydrothermal reactors in the Plutonium Facility was accomplished. Preliminary testing with Pu-contaminated organic solutions gave effluent solutions that readily met discard requirements. A new effort in FY 1998 will build on these promising initial results.

  8. MATERIALS AND COMPONENT DEVELOPMENT FOR ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. A. Alvin

    2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Future hydrogen-fired or oxy-fuel turbines will likely experience an enormous level of thermal and mechanical loading, as turbine inlet temperatures (TIT) approach 1425-1760şC with pressures of 300-625 psig, respectively. Maintaining the structural integrity of future turbine components under these extreme conditions will require durable thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), high temperature creep resistant metal substrates, and effective cooling techniques. While advances in substrate materials have been limited for the past decades, thermal protection of turbine airfoils in future hydrogen-fired and oxy-fuel turbines will rely primarily on collective advances in TBCs and aerothermal cooling. To support the advanced turbine technology development, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) at the Office of Research and Development (ORD) has initiated a research project effort in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh (UPitt), and West Virginia University (WVU), working in conjunction with commercial material and coating suppliers, to develop advanced materials, aerothermal configurations, as well as non-destructive evaluation techniques for use in advanced land-based gas turbine applications. This paper reviews technical accomplishments recently achieved in each of these areas.

  9. advanced aerospace materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aerospace materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Recent Advances in the Analysis and...

  10. advanced construction materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    advanced construction materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Sustainable and Durable...

  11. advanced ceramic materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ceramic materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Design with Advanced Ceramics Course...

  12. advanced electronic materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electronic materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 ADVANCED ELECTRON MICROSCOPY AND...

  13. advanced biomolecular materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    advanced biomolecular materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Engineered biomolecular...

  14. advanced-gas-cooled-nuclear-reactor materials evaluation: Topics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    advanced-gas-cooled-nuclear-reactor materials evaluation First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index...

  15. advanced materials research: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    materials research First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 University of New Orleans Advanced...

  16. advanced materials portfolio: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    materials portfolio First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Portfolio evaluation of advanced...

  17. Corrosion performance of advanced structural materials in sodium.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Li, M.; Rink, D.L. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report gives a description of the activities in design, fabrication, construction, and assembling of a pumped sodium loop for the sodium compatibility studies on advanced structural materials. The work is the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) portion of the effort on the work project entitled, 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Fast Reactor Materials,' and is a part of Advanced Materials Development within the Reactor Campaign. The objective of this project is to develop information on sodium corrosion compatibility of advanced materials being considered for sodium reactor applications. This report gives the status of the sodium pumped loop at Argonne National Laboratory, the specimen details, and the technical approach to evaluate the sodium compatibility of advanced structural alloys. This report is a deliverable from ANL in FY2010 (M2GAN10SF050302) under the work package G-AN10SF0503 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Fast Reactor Materials.' Two reports were issued in 2009 (Natesan and Meimei Li 2009, Natesan et al. 2009) which examined the thermodynamic and kinetic factors involved in the purity of liquid sodium coolant for sodium reactor applications as well as the design specifications for the ANL pumped loop for testing advanced structural materials. Available information was presented on solubility of several metallic and nonmetallic elements along with a discussion of the possible mechanisms for the accumulation of impurities in sodium. That report concluded that the solubility of many metals in sodium is low (<1 part per million) in the temperature range of interest in sodium reactors and such trace amounts would not impact the mechanical integrity of structural materials and components. The earlier report also analyzed the solubility and transport mechanisms of nonmetallic elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen in laboratory sodium loops and in reactor systems such as Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, Fast Flux Test Facility, and Clinch River Breeder Reactor. Among the nonmetallic elements discussed, oxygen is deemed controllable and its concentration in sodium can be maintained in sodium for long reactor life by using cold-trap method. It was concluded that among the cold-trap and getter-trap methods, the use of cold trap is sufficient to achieve oxygen concentration of the order of 1 part per million. Under these oxygen conditions in sodium, the corrosion performance of structural materials such as austenitic stainless steels and ferritic steels will be acceptable at a maximum core outlet sodium temperature of {approx}550 C. In the current sodium compatibility studies, the oxygen concentration in sodium will be controlled and maintained at {approx}1 ppm by controlling the cold trap temperature. The oxygen concentration in sodium in the forced convection sodium loop will be controlled and monitored by maintaining the cold trap temperature in the range of 120-150 C, which would result in oxygen concentration in the range of 1-2 ppm. Uniaxial tensile specimens are being exposed to flowing sodium and will be retrieved and analyzed for corrosion and post-exposure tensile properties. Advanced materials for sodium exposure include austenitic alloy HT-UPS and ferritic-martensitic steels modified 9Cr-1Mo and NF616. Among the nonmetallic elements in sodium, carbon was assessed to have the most influence on structural materials since carbon, as an impurity, is not amenable to control and maintenance by any of the simple purification methods. The dynamic equilibrium value for carbon in sodium systems is dependent on several factors, details of which were discussed in the earlier report. The current sodium compatibility studies will examine the role of carbon concentration in sodium on the carburization-decarburization of advanced structural materials at temperatures up to 650 C. Carbon will be added to the sodium by exposure of carbon-filled iron tubes, which over time will enable carbon to diffuse through iron and dissolve into sodium. The method enables addition of dissolved carbon (without carb

  18. Institute for Advanced Materials at University of Louisville

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sunkara, Mahendra; Sumaneskara, Gamini; Starr, Thomas L; Willing, G A; Robert W, Cohn

    2009-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project, a university-wide, academic center has been established entitled ?Institute for Advanced Materials and Renewable Energy?. In this institute, a comprehensive materials characterization facility has been established by co-locating several existing characterization equipment and acquiring several state of the art instrumentation such as field emission transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscope, high resolution X-ray diffractometer, Particle Size Distribution/Zeta Potential measurement system, and Ultra-microtome for TEM specimen. In addition, a renewable energy conversion and storage research facility was also established by acquiring instrumentation such as UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, Atomic Layer Deposition reactor, Solar light simulator, oxygen-free glove box, potentiostat/galvanostats and other miscellaneous items. The institute is staffed with three full-time staff members (one senior research technologist, a senior PhD level research scientist and a junior research scientist) to enable proper use of the techniques. About thirty faculty, fifty graduate students and several researchers access the facilities on a routine basis. Several industry R&D organizations (SudChemie, Optical Dynamics and Hexion) utilize the facility. The established ?Institute for Advanced Materials? at UofL has three main objectives: (a) enable a focused research effort leading to the rapid discovery of new materials and processes for advancing alternate energy conversion and storage technologies; (b) enable offering of several laboratory courses on advanced materials science and engineering; and (c) develop university-industry partnerships based on the advanced materials research. The Institute?s efforts were guided by an advisory board comprising eminent researchers from outside KY. Initial research efforts were focused on the discovery of new materials and processes for solar cells and Li ion battery electrodes. Initial sets of results helped PIs to secure a successful EPSCoR cluster implementation grant by teaming with additional researchers from UK. In addition to research efforts, the project enabled several other outcomes: (a) helped recruit a junior faculty member (Dr. Moises Carreon) and establish a lab focused on meso-porous materials toward separation and catalysis; (b) enabled offering of three new, graduate level courses (Materials characterization using spectroscopy and microscopy; Electron and x-ray diffraction; and renewable energy systems); and (c) mentoring of a junior faculty members (Dr. Gerold Willing).

  19. Economic Benefits of Advanced Materials in Nuclear Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the key obstacles for the commercial deployment of advanced fast reactors (for either transuranic element burning or power generation) is the capital cost. There is a perception of higher capital cost for fast reactor systems than advanced light water reactors (ALWR). However, the cost estimates for a fast reactor come with a large uncertainty due to the fact that far fewer fast reactors have been built than LWR facilities. Furthermore, the large variability of industrial cost estimates complicates accurate comparisons. For example, under the Gen IV program, the Japanese Sodium Fast Reactor (JSFR) has a capital cost estimate that is lower than current LWR s, and considerably lower than that for the PRISM design (which is arguably among the most mature of today s fast reactor designs). Further reductions in capital cost must be made in US fast reactor systems to be considered economically viable. Three key approaches for cost reduction can be pursued. These include design simplifications, new technologies that allow reduced capital costs, and simulation techniques that help optimize system design. While it is plausible that improved materials will provide opportunities for both simplified design and reduced capital cost, the economic benefit of advanced materials has not been quantitatively analyzed. The objective of this work is to examine the potential impact of advanced materials on the capital investment costs of fast nuclear reactors.

  20. Materials and Component Development for Advanced Turbine Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvin, M.A.; Pettit, F.; Meier, G.; Yanar, N.; Chyu, M.; Mazzotta, D.; Slaughter, W.; Karaivanov, V.; Kang, B.; Feng, C.; Chen, R.; Fu, T-C.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to meet the 2010-2020 DOE Fossil Energy goals for Advanced Power Systems, future oxy-fuel and hydrogen-fired turbines will need to be operated at higher temperatures for extended periods of time, in environments that contain substantially higher moisture concentrations in comparison to current commercial natural gas-fired turbines. Development of modified or advanced material systems, combined with aerothermal concepts are currently being addressed in order to achieve successful operation of these land-based engines. To support the advanced turbine technology development, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has initiated a research program effort in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh (UPitt), and West Virginia University (WVU), working in conjunction with commercial material and coating suppliers as Howmet International and Coatings for Industry (CFI), and test facilities as Westinghouse Plasma Corporation (WPC) and Praxair, to develop advanced material and aerothermal technologies for use in future oxy-fuel and hydrogen-fired turbine applications. Our program efforts and recent results are presented.

  1. Chemistry & Physics at Interfaces | Advanced Materials | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma of theChemistry Oxide Interfaces Chemical

  2. Report on sodium compatibility of advanced structural materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, M.; Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Rink, D.L.; Soppet, W.K.; Listwan, J.T. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an update on the evaluation of sodium compatibility of advanced structural materials. The report is a deliverable (level 3) in FY11 (M3A11AN04030403), under the Work Package A-11AN040304, 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Structural Materials' performed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for the Advanced Reactor Concepts. This work package supports the advanced structural materials development by providing corrosion and tensile data from the standpoint of sodium compatibility of advanced structural alloys. The scope of work involves exposure of advanced structural alloys such as G92, mod.9Cr-1Mo (G91) ferritic-martensitic steels and HT-UPS austenitic stainless steels to a flowing sodium environment with controlled impurity concentrations. The exposed specimens are analyzed for their corrosion performance, microstructural changes, and tensile behavior. Previous reports examined the thermodynamic and kinetic factors involved in the purity of liquid sodium coolant for sodium reactor applications as well as the design, fabrication, and construction of a forced convection sodium loop for sodium compatibility studies of advanced materials. This report presents the results on corrosion performance, microstructure, and tensile properties of advanced ferritic-martensitic and austenitic alloys exposed to liquid sodium at 550 C for up to 2700 h and at 650 C for up to 5064 h in the forced convection sodium loop. The oxygen content of sodium was controlled by the cold-trapping method to achieve {approx}1 wppm oxygen level. Four alloys were examined, G92 in the normalized and tempered condition (H1 G92), G92 in the cold-rolled condition (H2 G92), G91 in the normalized and tempered condition, and hot-rolled HT-UPS. G91 was included as a reference to compare with advanced alloy, G92. It was found that all four alloys showed weight loss after sodium exposures at 550 and 650 C. The weight loss of the four alloys was comparable after sodium exposures at 550 C; the weight loss of ferritic-martensitic steels, G92 and G91 is more significant than that of austenitic stainless steel, HT-UPS after sodium exposures at 650 C. Sodium exposures up to 2700 h at 550 C had no significant influence on tensile properties, while sodium exposures up to 5064 h at 650 C dramatically lowered the tensile strengths of the four alloys. The ultimate tensile strength of H1 G92, H2 G92, and G91 ferritic-martensitic steels was reduced to as much as nearly half of its initial value after sodium exposures at 650 C. Though the uniform elongation was recovered to some extent, these three ferritic-martensitic steels showed considerable strain softening after sodium exposures. The yield stress of HT-UPS austenitic stainless steel increased, the ultimate tensile strength decreased, and the total elongation was reduced after sodium exposures at 650 C. The dynamic strain aging effect observed in the as-received HT-UPS specimens became less pronounced after sodium exposures at 650 C. Microstructural characterization of sodium-exposed specimens showed no appreciable surface deterioration or grain structure changes under an optical microscope, except for the H2 G92 steel, in which the martensite structure transformed to large grain ferrite after sodium exposures at 650 C. TEM observations of the sodium-exposed H2 G92 steel showed significant recrystallization after sodium exposure for 2700 h at 550 C, and transformation of martensite to ferrite and high density of precipitates in nearly dislocation-free matrix after sodium exposures at 650 C. Further microstructural analysis and evaluation of decarburization/carburization behavior is needed to understand the dramatic changes in the tensile strengths of advanced ferritic-martensitic and austenitic steels after sodium exposures at 650 C.

  3. Polymers as advanced materials for desiccant applications, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czanderna, A.W.; Neidlinger, H.H.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents work to identify a next-generation, low-cost material with which solar energy or heat from another low-cost energy source can be used for regenerating the water vapor sorption activity of the desiccant. The objective of the work is to determine how the desired sorption performance of advanced desiccant materials can be predicted by understanding the role of the material modifications and material surfaces. The work concentrates on solid materials to be used for desiccant cooling systems and which process water vapor in an atmosphere to produce cooling. The work involved preparing modifications of polystyrene sulfonic acid sodium salt, synthesizing a hydrogel, and evaluating the sorption performances of these and similar commercially available polymeric materials; all materials were studied for their potential application in solid commercial desiccant cooling systems. Background information is also provided on desiccant cooling systems and the role of a desiccant material within such a system, and it includes the use of polymers as desiccant materials. 31 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Technology Readiness Levels for Advanced Nuclear Fuels and Materials Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon Carmack

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Technology Readiness Level (TRL) process is used to quantitatively assess the maturity of a given technology. The TRL process has been developed and successfully used by the Department of Defense (DOD) for development and deployment of new technology and systems for defense applications. In addition, NASA has also successfully used the TRL process to develop and deploy new systems for space applications. Advanced nuclear fuels and materials development is a critical technology needed for closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Because the deployment of a new nuclear fuel forms requires a lengthy and expensive research, development, and demonstration program, applying the TRL concept to the advanced fuel development program is very useful as a management and tracking tool. This report provides definition of the technology readiness level assessment process as defined for use in assessing nuclear fuel technology development for the Advanced Fuel Campaign (AFC).

  5. Collaborative Utility Task Force Partners with DOE to Develop...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Collaborative Utility Task Force Partners with DOE to Develop Cyber Security Requirements for Advanced Metering Infrastructure Collaborative Utility Task Force Partners with DOE to...

  6. Advanced Materials for Mercury 50 Gas Turbine Combustion System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Jeffrey

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Turbines Incorporated (Solar), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-0CH11049, has conducted development activities to improve the durability of the Mercury 50 combustion system to 30,000 hours life and reduced life cycle costs. This project is part of Advanced Materials in the Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines program in DOE's Office of Distributed Energy. The targeted development engine was the Mercury{trademark} 50 gas turbine, which was developed by Solar under the DOE Advanced Turbine Systems program (DOE contract number DE-FC21-95MC31173). As a generator set, the Mercury 50 is used for distributed power and combined heat and power generation and is designed to achieve 38.5% electrical efficiency, reduced cost of electricity, and single digit emissions. The original program goal was 20,000 hours life, however, this goal was increased to be consistent with Solar's standard 30,000 hour time before overhaul for production engines. Through changes to the combustor design to incorporate effusion cooling in the Generation 3 Mercury 50 engine, which resulted in a drop in the combustor wall temperature, the current standard thermal barrier coated liner was predicted to have 18,000 hours life. With the addition of the advanced materials technology being evaluated under this program, the combustor life is predicted to be over 30,000 hours. The ultimate goal of the program was to demonstrate a fully integrated Mercury 50 combustion system, modified with advanced materials technologies, at a host site for a minimum of 4,000 hours. Solar was the Prime Contractor on the program team, which includes participation of other gas turbine manufacturers, various advanced material and coating suppliers, nationally recognized test laboratories, and multiple industrial end-user field demonstration sites. The program focused on a dual path development route to define an optimum mix of technologies for the Mercury 50 and future gas turbine products. For liner and injector development, multiple concepts including high thermal resistance thermal barrier coatings (TBC), oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys, continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC), and monolithic ceramics were evaluated before down-selection to the most promising candidate materials for field evaluation. Preliminary, component and sub-scale testing was conducted to determine material properties and demonstrate proof-of-concept. Full-scale rig and engine testing was used to validated engine performance prior to field evaluation at a Qualcomm Inc. cogeneration site located in San Diego, California. To ensure that the CFCC liners with the EBC proposed under this program would meet the target life, field evaluations of ceramic matrix composite liners in Centaur{reg_sign} 50 gas turbine engines, which had previously been conducted under the DOE sponsored Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine program (DE-AC02-92CE40960), was continued under this program at commercial end-user sites under Program Subtask 1A - Extended CFCC Materials Durability Testing. The goal of these field demonstrations was to demonstrate significant component life, with milestones of 20,000 and 30,000 hours. Solar personnel monitor the condition of the liners at the field demonstration sites through periodic borescope inspections and emissions measurements. This program was highly successful at evaluating advanced materials and down-selecting promising solutions for use in gas turbine combustions systems. The addition of the advanced materials technology has enabled the predicted life of the Mercury 50 combustion system to reach 30,000 hours, which is Solar's typical time before overhaul for production engines. In particular, a 40 mil thick advanced Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) system was selected over various other TBC systems, ODS liners and CFCC liners for the 4,000-hour field evaluation under the program. This advanced TBC is now production bill-of-material at various thicknesses up to 40 mils for all of Solar's advanced backside-cooled combustor liners (Centaur 50, Taurus 60, Mars 100, Taurus 70,

  7. Advanced Materials Development Program: Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines program plan, 1983--1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines (CTAHE) Project is the development of an industrial technology base capable of providing reliable and cost-effective high temperature ceramic components for application in advanced heat engines. There is a deliberate emphasis on industrial'' in the purpose statement. The project is intended to support the US ceramic and engine industries by providing the needed ceramic materials technology. The heat engine programs have goals of component development and proof-of-concept. The CTAHE Project is aimed at developing generic basic ceramic technology and does not involve specific engine designs and components. The materials research and development efforts in the CTAHE Project are focused on the needs and general requirements of the advanced gas turbine and low heat rejection diesel engines. The CTAHE Project supports the DOE Office of Transportation Systems' heat engine programs, Advanced Turbine Technology Applications (ATTAP) and Heavy Duty Transport (HDT) by providing the basic technology required for development of reliable and cost-effective ceramic components. The heat engine programs provide the iterative component design, fabrication, and test development logic. 103 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.

  8. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program annual progress report, FY 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program is a part of the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, US Department of Energy (DOE). The mission of AIM is to support development and commercialization of new or improved materials to improve energy efficiency, productivity, product quality, and reduced waste in the major process industries. OIT has embarked on a fundamentally new way of working with industries--the Industries of the Future (IOF) strategy--concentrating on the major process industries that consume about 90% of the energy and generate about 90% of the waste in the industrial sector. These are the aluminum, chemical, forest products, glass, metalcasting, and steel industries. OIT has encouraged and assisted these industries in developing visions of what they will be like 20 or 30 years into the future, defining the drivers, technology needs, and barriers to realization of their visions. These visions provide a framework for development of technology roadmaps and implementation plans, some of which have been completed. The AIM Program supports IOF by conducting research and development on materials to solve problems identified in the roadmaps. This is done by National Laboratory/industry/university teams with the facilities and expertise needed to develop new and improved materials. Each project in the AIM Program has active industrial participation and support.

  9. Materials for Medical Devices New materials have played a crucial role in the advancement of medical devices. For

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Materials for Medical Devices New materials have played a crucial role in the advancement of medical devices. For example, the introduction of titanium alloys provided a high strength basis

  10. Advanced proton-exchange materials for energy efficient fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujimoto, Cy H.; Grest, Gary Stephen; Hickner, Michael A.; Cornelius, Christopher James; Staiger, Chad Lynn; Hibbs, Michael R.

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ''Advanced Proton-Exchange Materials for Energy Efficient Fuel Cells'' Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project began in October 2002 and ended in September 2005. This LDRD was funded by the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy strategic business unit. The purpose of this LDRD was to initiate the fundamental research necessary for the development of a novel proton-exchange membranes (PEM) to overcome the material and performance limitations of the ''state of the art'' Nafion that is used in both hydrogen and methanol fuel cells. An atomistic modeling effort was added to this LDRD in order to establish a frame work between predicted morphology and observed PEM morphology in order to relate it to fuel cell performance. Significant progress was made in the area of PEM material design, development, and demonstration during this LDRD. A fundamental understanding involving the role of the structure of the PEM material as a function of sulfonic acid content, polymer topology, chemical composition, molecular weight, and electrode electrolyte ink development was demonstrated during this LDRD. PEM materials based upon random and block polyimides, polybenzimidazoles, and polyphenylenes were created and evaluated for improvements in proton conductivity, reduced swelling, reduced O{sub 2} and H{sub 2} permeability, and increased thermal stability. Results from this work reveal that the family of polyphenylenes potentially solves several technical challenges associated with obtaining a high temperature PEM membrane. Fuel cell relevant properties such as high proton conductivity (>120 mS/cm), good thermal stability, and mechanical robustness were demonstrated during this LDRD. This report summarizes the technical accomplishments and results of this LDRD.

  11. advanced material processing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CiteSeer Summary: Japan is one of the most advanced countries in manufacturing technology, and lasers have played an important role in the advancement of manufacturing...

  12. Improved Thermoelectric Devices: Advanced Semiconductor Materials for Thermoelectric Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Phononic Devices is working to recapture waste heat and convert it into usable electric power. To do this, the company is using thermoelectric devices, which are made from advanced semiconductor materials that convert heat into electricity or actively remove heat for refrigeration and cooling purposes. Thermoelectric devices resemble computer chips, and they manage heat by manipulating the direction of electrons at the nanoscale. These devices aren’t new, but they are currently too inefficient and expensive for widespread use. Phononic Devices is using a high-performance, cost-effective thermoelectric design that will improve the device’s efficiency and enable electronics manufacturers to more easily integrate them into their products.

  13. A Novel Approach to Material Development for Advanced Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Was, G.S.; Atzmon, M.; Wang, L.

    2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK B188 A Novel Approach to Material Development for Advanced Reactor Systems. Year one of this project had three major goals. First, to specify, order and install a new high current ion source for more rapid and stable proton irradiation. Second, to assess the use of low temperature irradiation and chromium pre-enrichment in an effort to isolate a radiation damage microstructure in stainless steel without the effects of RIS. Third, to initiate irradiation of reactor pressure vessel steel and Zircaloy. In year 1 quarter 3, the project goal was to complete irradiation of model alloys of RPV steels for a range of doses and begin sample characterization. We also planned to prepare samples for microstructure isolation in stainless steels, and to identify sources of Zircaloy for irradiation and characterization.

  14. European Congress and Exhibition on Advanced Materials and Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    . Advanced ODS Ferritic and Martensitic Steels 8. Mechanical Alloying and Consolidation 9. Combination

  15. Advanced Materials for Reversible Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (RSOFC), Dual Mode Operation with Low

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Materials for Reversible Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (RSOFC), Dual Mode Operation with Low, Director Product Development & Federal Programs #12;Project Background f Reversible Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

  16. Roll-to-Roll Electrode Processing and Materials NDE for Advanced...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Materials NDE for Advanced Lithium Secondary Batteries 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

  17. Roll-to-Roll Electrode Processing and Materials NDE for Advanced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications Roll-to-Roll Electrode Processing and Materials NDE for Advanced Lithium Secondary Batteries Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Roll-to-Roll...

  18. Scale-up and Testing of Advanced Materials from the BATT Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Scale-up and Testing of Advanced Materials from the BATT Program Vince Battaglia LBNL May 09, 2011 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise...

  19. Exploring nanoscale magnetism in advanced materials with polarized X-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stoehr and H.C. Siegmann, „Magnetism”, Springer (2006) [93]Exploring nanoscale magnetism in advanced materials withABSTRACT Nanoscale magnetism is of paramount scientific

  20. Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity and Conductivity in Advanced Nanostructured Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teweldebrhan, Desalegne Bekuretsion

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Magnetic Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viimportants of understanding materials properties typicallyY.S. Ju, Annual Review of Materials Science, 29, 261 (1999).

  1. Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Graduate Student Talent Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    .D. Materials Science and Engineering, Lehigh University, 2009 M.S. Materials Science Program, Indian Institute.D., Materials Science and Engineering, Lehigh University, 2011 (expected) M.E., Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China, 2007 B.E., Polymeric Materials Science and Engineering

  2. Depleted uranium hexafluoride: The source material for advanced shielding systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quapp, W.J.; Lessing, P.A. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cooley, C.R. [Department of Technology, Germantown, MD (United States)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a management challenge and financial liability problem in the form of 50,000 cylinders containing 555,000 metric tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) that are stored at the gaseous diffusion plants. DOE is evaluating several options for the disposition of this UF{sub 6}, including continued storage, disposal, and recycle into a product. Based on studies conducted to date, the most feasible recycle option for the depleted uranium is shielding in low-level waste, spent nuclear fuel, or vitrified high-level waste containers. Estimates for the cost of disposal, using existing technologies, range between $3.8 and $11.3 billion depending on factors such as the disposal site and the applicability of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Advanced technologies can reduce these costs, but UF{sub 6} disposal still represents large future costs. This paper describes an application for depleted uranium in which depleted uranium hexafluoride is converted into an oxide and then into a heavy aggregate. The heavy uranium aggregate is combined with conventional concrete materials to form an ultra high density concrete, DUCRETE, weighing more than 400 lb/ft{sup 3}. DUCRETE can be used as shielding in spent nuclear fuel/high-level waste casks at a cost comparable to the lower of the disposal cost estimates. Consequently, the case can be made that DUCRETE shielded casks are an alternative to disposal. In this case, a beneficial long term solution is attained for much less than the combined cost of independently providing shielded casks and disposing of the depleted uranium. Furthermore, if disposal is avoided, the political problems associated with selection of a disposal location are also avoided. Other studies have also shown cost benefits for low level waste shielded disposal containers.

  3. advanced cathode material: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    materials. unknown authors 6 Short communication Mesoporous nitrogen-rich carbon materials as cathode catalysts in Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary:...

  4. advanced magnetic materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the selection of materials for nano-photonic devices. Key words: Plasmonic electronic materials Peale, Robert E. 294 Modelling the Induced Magnetic Signature of Naval Vessels...

  5. Development of New Advanced Materials to Get Boost

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Berkeley Lab scientist Kristin Persson co-founded the Materials Project, to accelerate discovery of new materials. (Photo by Roy KaltschmidtBerkeley Lab) The...

  6. SiXtron Advanced Materials | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey JumpAirPower PartnersSiEnergy Systems LLC

  7. ADVANCED CERAMIC MATERIALS FOR NEXT-GENERATION NUCLEAR APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marra, J.

    2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Rising global energy demands coupled with increased environmental concerns point to one solution; they must reduce their dependence on fossil fuels that emit greenhouse gases. As the global community faces the challenge of maintaining sovereign nation security, reducing greenhouse gases, and addressing climate change nuclear power will play a significant and likely growing role. In the US, nuclear energy already provides approximately one-fifth of the electricity used to power factories, offices, homes, and schools with 104 operating nuclear power plants, located at 65 sites in 31 states. Additionally, 19 utilities have applied to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for construction and operating licenses for 26 new reactors at 17 sites. This planned growth of nuclear power is occurring worldwide and has been termed the 'nuclear renaissance.' As major industrial nations craft their energy future, there are several important factors that must be considered about nuclear energy: (1) it has been proven over the last 40 years to be safe, reliable and affordable (good for Economic Security); (2) its technology and fuel can be domestically produced or obtained from allied nations (good for Energy Security); and (3) it is nearly free of greenhouse gas emissions (good for Environmental Security). Already an important part of worldwide energy security via electricity generation, nuclear energy can also potentially play an important role in industrial processes and supporting the nation's transportation sector. Coal-to-liquid processes, the generation of hydrogen and supporting the growing potential for a greatly increased electric transportation system (i.e. cars and trains) mean that nuclear energy could see dramatic growth in the near future as we seek to meet our growing demand for energy in cleaner, more secure ways. In order to address some of the prominent issues associated with nuclear power generation (i.e., high capital costs, waste management, and proliferation), the worldwide community is working to develop and deploy new nuclear energy systems and advanced fuel cycles. These new nuclear systems address the key challenges and include: (1) extracting the full energy value of the nuclear fuel; (2) creating waste solutions with improved long term safety; (3) minimizing the potential for the misuse of the technology and materials for weapons; (4) continually improving the safety of nuclear energy systems; and (5) keeping the cost of energy affordable.

  8. New Classes of Magnetoelectric Materials Can Advance Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Can Advance Computing FEBRUARY 11, 2013 Bookmark and Share An illustration of a titanium-europium oxide cage lattice studied in the experiment. To view a larger version of...

  9. Prediction of Corrosion of Advanced Materials and Fabricated Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Anderko; G. Engelhardt; M.M. Lencka (OLI Systems Inc.); M.A. Jakab; G. Tormoen; N. Sridhar (Southwest Research Institute)

    2007-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to provide materials engineers, chemical engineers and plant operators with a software tool that will enable them to predict localized corrosion of process equipment including fabricated components as well as base alloys. For design and revamp purposes, the software predicts the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environment chemistry and assists the user in selecting the optimum alloy for a given environment. For the operation of existing plants, the software enables the users to predict the remaining life of equipment and help in scheduling maintenance activities. This project combined fundamental understanding of mechanisms of corrosion with focused experimental results to predict the corrosion of advanced, base or fabricated, alloys in real-world environments encountered in the chemical industry. At the heart of this approach is the development of models that predict the fundamental parameters that control the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environmental conditions and alloy composition. The fundamental parameters that dictate the occurrence of localized corrosion are the corrosion and repassivation potentials. The program team, OLI Systems and Southwest Research Institute, has developed theoretical models for these parameters. These theoretical models have been applied to predict the occurrence of localized corrosion of base materials and heat-treated components in a variety of environments containing aggressive and non-aggressive species. As a result of this project, a comprehensive model has been established and extensively verified for predicting the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environment chemistry and temperature by calculating the corrosion and repassivation potentials.To support and calibrate the model, an experimental database has been developed to elucidate (1) the effects of various inhibiting species as well as aggressive species on localized corrosion of nickel-base alloys, stainless steels and copper-nickel alloys and (2) the effects of heat treatment on localized corrosion. Excellent agreement with experimental data has been obtained for alloys in various environments, including acids, bases, oxidizing species, inorganic inhibitors, etc. Further, a probabilistic model has been established for predicting the long-term damage due to localized corrosion on the basis of short-term inspection results. This methodology is applicable to pitting, crevice corrosion, stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. Finally, a comprehensive model has been developed for predicting sensitization of Fe-Ni-Cr-Mo-W-N alloys and its effect on localized corrosion. As a vehicle for the commercialization of this technology, OLI Systems has developed the Corrosion Analyzer, a software tool that is already used by many companies in the chemical process industry. In process design, the Corrosion Analyzer provides the industry with (1) reliable prediction of the tendency of base alloys for localized corrosion as a function of environmental conditions and (2) understanding of how to select alloys for corrosive environments. In process operations, the software will help to predict the remaining useful life of equipment based on limited input data. Thus, users will also be able to identify process changes, corrosion inhibition strategies, and other control options before costly shutdowns, energy waste, and environmental releases occur. With the Corrosion Analyzer, various corrosion mitigation measures can be realistically tested in a virtual laboratory.

  10. Innovative Partnering 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowe, Emilie

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Innovative partnering Texas A&M, McKinney develop water conservation venture The University of Texas at Arlington?s Program in Landscape Architect assisted in the design of a one-acre water conservation garden for McKinney. The garden will demonstrate... is to educate city officials, developers, landscapers, homeowners, adults, and chil- dren about water conservation and quality. The center developed a water conservation seminar series and a three-part television series on water conservation that airs...

  11. advanced anodic materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anode materia.l1-9 These materials have been showed large-14 the use of metal and carbon composites,15-20 and the introduction of nano- sized metals,21-25 have been Cho,...

  12. Page 1 of 3 MITSUBISHI CHEMICAL CENTER FOR ADVANCED MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    and hybrid organic-inorganic materials for electronic and optical device applications and has put into place involve the design, synthesis, characterization, and/or fabrication of new functional materials or devices, especially those based on organic or hybrid organic-inorganic materials, which could have application

  13. Draft Workshop Report: 30 June 2004 Workshop on Advanced Computational Materials Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gropp, Bill

    Summary The Workshop on Advanced Computational Materials Science: Application to Fusion and Generation IV and fission (Generation IV) reactors represents a significant challenge in materials science. There is a range power plants represent an even greater challenge to structural materials development and application

  14. Advances in Materials Science for Environmental and Energy Technologies II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matyas, Dr Josef [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Ohji, Tatsuki [Advanced Manufacturing Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Tec; Liu, Xingbo [West Virginia University, Morgantown; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL; Devanathan, Ram [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Fox, Kevin [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); Singh, Mrityunjay [NASA-Glenn Research Center, Cleveland; Wong-ng, Winnie [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Materials Science and Technology 2012 Conference and Exhibition (MS&T'12) was held October 7-11, 2012, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. One of the major themes of the conference was Environmental and Energy Issues. Papers from five of the symposia held under that theme are invluded in this volume. These symposia included Materials Issues in Nuclear Waste Management for the 21st Century; Green Technologies for Materials Manufacturing and Processing IV; Energy Storage: Materials, Systems and Applications; Energy Conversion-Photovoltaic, Concentraing Solar Power and Thermoelectric; and Materials Development for Nuclear Applications and Extreme Environments.

  15. Advanced Materials and Devices for Stationary Electrical Energy Storage

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'s Reply Comments AT&T, SENSIAdvancedAdvancedAdvancedApplications |

  16. Advanced Materials by Design: Programable Transient Electronics | The Ames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1BP-14 Power andAdvancedCMWGLaboratory Advanced

  17. Scale-up and Testing of Advanced Materials from the BATT Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AMR Berkeley Lab 129 Scale-up and Testing of Advanced Materials from the BATT Program Vincent Battaglia, Ph.D. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory May 16, 2012 es029 This...

  18. Scale-up and Testing of Advanced Materials from the BATT Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Scale-up and Testing of Advanced Materials from the BATT Program Vincent Battaglia, Ph.D. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory May 15, 2013 ES029) This presentation does not...

  19. Projects Selected to Advance Innovative Materials for Fossil Energy Power Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Four projects that will develop capabilities for designing sophisticated materials that can withstand the harsh environments of advanced fossil energy power systems have been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  20. Applied Materials Develops an Advanced Epitaxial Growth System to Bring Down LED Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the help of DOE funding, Applied Materials has developed an advanced epitaxial growth system for gallium nitride (GaN) LED devices that decreases operating costs, increases internal quantum efficiency, and improves binning yields.

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Advanced Bus and Truck Radial Materials for Fuel Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by PPG at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced bus and truck radial materials...

  2. Advanced engineered substrates for the integration of lattice-mismatched materials with silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacson, David Michael, 1976-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dramatic advances in Si/SiO2-based microelectronic processing witnessed over the past several decades can largely be attributed to relatively material-independent device scaling. However, with physical and economic ...

  3. Advanced Process Technology: Combi Materials Science and Atmospheric Processing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Process Technology and Advanced Concepts -- High-Throughput Combi Material Science and Atmospheric Processing that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information.

  4. Low Cost Components: Screening of Advanced Battery Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitsubishi Chemical, and ConocoPhillips Vehicle Technologies Program Barriers Identify lithium-ion battery materials, with enhanced stability, that lower cell-level costs while...

  5. Advanced Imaging and Ultra-fast Material Probing With Inverse...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imaging and Ultra-fast Material Probing With Inverse Compton Scattering A proposal to the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility Gerard Andonian, Alberto Bacci, Ubaldo...

  6. Advanced Materials for Reversible Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (RSOFC...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    RSOFC cell stack technology in the areas of durability and performance, via- - materials development, and - stack design & development. f To meet the following performance...

  7. advanced mesoporous materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mesoporous carbon-based composites for confinement of Eue Mesoporous polymer-carbon composite (CMPEICMK-3) materials were successfully prepared. After Eu(III) ions were loaded...

  8. Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Carbon Fiber SMC - Develop high-performance, cost- effective, carbon fiber SMC materials and associated processing techniques for high-volume automotive components. This...

  9. advanced nuclear materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (SM) is a universal statutory designation to indicate materials bearing uranium that is depleted in the isotope uranium-235, or at the natural isotopic ratio, and thorium. The...

  10. Innovative Partnering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowe, Emilie

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 14 T he city of McKinney, Texas and Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Urban Solutions Center at Dallas are partnering on a six-year plan to educate and bring research-based innovations to McKinney residents. The goal... is to help them manage water resources efficiently. This partnership developed after the summer of 2006 when McKinney, one of the fastest growing cities in the United States, was faced with a severe drought that placed the city in a stage three drought...

  11. advanced materials analysis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    materials analysis First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Analysis of Inorganic Materials...

  12. Sandia Energy - Sandians on the Cover of Advanced Functional Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementing Nonlinear757KelleyEffectson the Cover of Advanced Functional

  13. Advanced Modeling and Materials in Kraft Pulp Mills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiser, J.R.; Gorog, J.P.

    2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This CRADA provided technical support to the Weyerhaeuser Company on a number of issues related to the performance and/or selection of materials at a number of locations in a pulp and paper mill. The studies related primarily to components for black liquor recovery boilers, but some effort was directed toward black liquor gasifiers and rolls for paper machines. The purpose of this CRADA was to assist Weyerhaeuser in the evaluation of materials exposed in various paper mill environments and to provide direction in the selection of alternate materials, when appropriate.

  14. Task 2: Materials for Advanced Boiler and Oxy-combustion Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcolm, Gordon R.; McGhee, Barry

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The PowerPoint presentation provides an overview of the tasks for the project: Characterize advanced boiler (oxy-fuel combustion, biomass co-fired) gas compositions and ash deposits; Generate critical data on the effects of environmental conditions; develop a unified test method with a view to future standardization; Generate critical data for coating systems for use in advanced boiler systems; Generate critical data for flue gas recycle piping materials for oxy-fuel systems; and, Compile materials performance data from laboratory and pilot plant exposures of candidate alloys for use in advanced boiler systems.

  15. Advanced Materials and Nano Technology for Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Tao

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells 93.6 (2009): 670-673.1-3: The structure diagram of c-Si solar cell and HIT solarof flexible CIGS solar cells and modules." Solar Energy

  16. New classes of magnetoelectric materials promise advances in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the material." The Argonne-led team focused on the compound EuTiO3 (europium-titanium oxide), which has a simple atomic structure that suited it especially well to the...

  17. Advanced materials by design: bioelectronics | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1BP-14Scripting for Advanced Workflows Jack Deslippe

  18. advanced industrial materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    industrial materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 RIKEN Review No. 50 (January,...

  19. advanced packaging materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    packaging materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Eco Friendly Pharmaceutical...

  20. advanced luminescent materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    luminescent materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 A Possibility of Gravity Control...

  1. Group Members Synthesis of Nanostructured Materials Advanced Characterization Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of nanostructured materials. · Applications in nanophotonics, nanoelectronics, and energy. Experimental techniques, S. Gradecak,"Graphene cathode-based ZnO nanowire hybrid solar cells", Nano Letters 13, 233-239 (2013 particle composition to control structural and optical properties of GaN nanowires", Nanotechnology 23

  2. Partners | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    our partners support in our mission. Middle & High School Partners Chicago Children's Museum CNH Industrial DuPage Children's Museum Illinois Department of Commerce Northern...

  3. Nanostructured material for advanced energy storage : magnesium battery cathode development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sigmund, Wolfgang M. (University of Florida, Gainesville, FL); Woan, Karran V. (University of Florida, Gainesville, FL); Bell, Nelson Simmons

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnesium batteries are alternatives to the use of lithium ion and nickel metal hydride secondary batteries due to magnesium's abundance, safety of operation, and lower toxicity of disposal. The divalency of the magnesium ion and its chemistry poses some difficulties for its general and industrial use. This work developed a continuous and fibrous nanoscale network of the cathode material through the use of electrospinning with the goal of enhancing performance and reactivity of the battery. The system was characterized and preliminary tests were performed on the constructed battery cells. We were successful in building and testing a series of electrochemical systems that demonstrated good cyclability maintaining 60-70% of discharge capacity after more than 50 charge-discharge cycles.

  4. Industry Partners Panel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Industry Panel presenters include: Michael G. Andrew, Director - Academic and Technical Programs, Advanced Products and Materials, Johnson Controls Power Solutions Michael A. Fetcenko, Vice President and Managing Director, BASF Battery Materials – Ovonic, BASF Corporation Adam Kahn, Founder and CEO, AKHAN Technologies, Inc. Stephen E. Zimmer, Executive Director, United States Council for Automotive Research (USCAR)

  5. Advanced Materials for RSOFC Dual Operation with Low Degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric, Tang; Tony, Wood; Sofiane, Benhaddad; Casey, Brown; Hongpeng, He; Jeff, Nelson; Oliver, Grande; Ben, Nuttall; Mark, Richards; Randy, Petri

    2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Reversible solid oxide fuel cells (RSOFCs) are energy conversion devices. They are capable of operating in both power generation mode (SOFC) and electrolysis modes (SOEC). RSOFC can integrate renewable production of electricity and hydrogen when power generation and steam electrolysis are coupled in a system, which can turn intermittent solar and wind energy into "firm power." In this DOE EERE project, VPS continuously advanced RSOFC cell stack technology in the areas of endurance and performance. Over 20 types of RSOFC cells were developed in the project. Many of those exceeded performance (area specific resistance less than 300 mohmcm2) and endurance (degradation rate less than 4% per 1000 hours) targets in both fuel cell and electrolysis modes at 750C. One of those cells, RSOFC-7, further demonstrated the following: Steady-state electrolysis with a degradation rate of 1.5% per 1000 hours. Ultra high current electrolysis over 3 A/cm2 at 75% water electrolysis efficiency voltage of 1.67 V. Daily SOFC/SOEC cyclic test of over 600 days with a degradation rate of 1.5% per 1000 hours. Over 6000 SOFC/SOEC cycles in an accelerated 20-minute cycling with degradation less than 3% per 1000 cycles. In RSOFC stack development, a number of kW-class RSOFC stacks were developed and demonstrated the following: Steady-state electrolysis operation of over 5000 hours. Daily SOFC/SOEC cyclic test of 100 cycles. Scale up capability of using large area cells with 550 cm2 active area showing the potential for large-scale RSOFC stack development in the future. Although this project is an open-ended development project, this effort, leveraging Versa Power Systems' years of development experience, has the potential to bring renewable energy RSOFC storage systems significantly closer to commercial viability through improvements in RSOFC durability, performance, and cost. When unitized and deployed in renewable solar and wind installations, an RSOFC system can enable higher availability for intermittent renewable resources, thereby improving the commercial viability of these types of energy resources.

  6. Advanced Materials for PEM-Based Fuel Cell Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. McGrath

    2005-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are quickly becoming attractive alternative energy sources for transportation, stationary power, and small electronics due to the increasing cost and environmental hazards of traditional fossil fuels. Two main classes of PEMFCs include hydrogen/air or hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). The current benchmark membrane for both types of PEMFCs is Nafion, a perfluorinated sulfonated copolymer made by DuPont. Nafion copolymers exhibit good thermal and chemical stability, as well as very high proton conductivity under hydrated conditions at temperatures below 80 �������������������������������°C. However, application of these membranes is limited due to their high methanol permeability and loss of conductivity at high temperatures and low relative humidities. These deficiencies have led to the search for improved materials for proton exchange membranes. Potential PEMs should have good thermal, hydrolytic, and oxidative stability, high proton conductivity, selective permeability, and mechanical durability over long periods of time. Poly(arylene ether)s, polyimides, polybenzimidazoles, and polyphenylenes are among the most widely investigated candidates for PEMs. Poly(arylene ether)s are a promising class of proton exchange membranes due to their excellent thermal and chemical stability and high glass transition temperatures. High proton conductivity can be achieved through post-sulfonation of poly(arylene ether) materials, but this most often results in very high water sorption or even water solubility. Our research has shown that directly polymerized poly(arylene ether) copolymers show important advantages over traditional post-sulfonated systems and also address the concerns with Nafion membranes. These properties were evaluated and correlated with morphology, structure-property relationships, and states of water in the membranes. Further improvements in properties were achieved through incorporation of inorganic fillers, such as phosphotungstic acid and zirconium hydrogen phosphate. Block copolymers were also studied due to the possibility to achieve a desired combination of homopolymer properties as well as the unique morphologies that are possible with block copolymers. Bezoyl substituted poly(p-phenylene) blocks were combined with poly(arylene ether) blocks to merge the structural rigidity of the poly(p-phenylene) with the ductility and high protonic conductivity of the poly(arylene ether)s. As evidenced by our many refereed publications and preprints, the research that we have conducted over the past several years has made a valuable and significant contribution to the literature and to the state of understanding of proton exchange membranes. Our early efforts at scale-up have suggested that the directly polymerized disulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) copolymers are commercially viable alternatives for proton exchange membranes. A new process for bipolar plates was developed and is described. An important single domain PEMFC model was developed and is documented in this final report.

  7. Advanced Materials for PEM-Based Fuel Cell Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. McGrath; Donald G. Baird; Michael von Spakovsky

    2005-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are quickly becoming attractive alternative energy sources for transportation, stationary power, and small electronics due to the increasing cost and environmental hazards of traditional fossil fuels. Two main classes of PEMFCs include hydrogen/air or hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). The current benchmark membrane for both types of PEMFCs is Nafion, a perfluorinated sulfonated copolymer made by DuPont. Nafion copolymers exhibit good thermal and chemical stability, as well as very high proton conductivity under hydrated conditions at temperatures below 80 degrees C. However, application of these membranes is limited due to their high methanol permeability and loss of conductivity at high temperatures and low relative humidities. These deficiencies have led to the search for improved materials for proton exchange membranes. Potential PEMs should have good thermal, hydrolytic, and oxidative stability, high proton conductivity, selective permeability, and mechanical durability over long periods of time. Poly(arylene ether)s, polyimides, polybenzimidazoles, and polyphenylenes are among the most widely investigated candidates for PEMs. Poly(arylene ether)s are a promising class of proton exchange membranes due to their excellent thermal and chemical stability and high glass transition temperatures. High proton conductivity can be achieved through post-sulfonation of poly(arylene ether) materials, but this most often results in very high water sorption or even water solubility. Our research has shown that directly polymerized poly(arylene ether) copolymers show important advantages over traditional post-sulfonated systems and also address the concerns with Nafion membranes. These properties were evaluated and correlated with morphology, structure-property relationships, and states of water in the membranes. Further improvements in properties were achieved through incorporation of inorganic fillers, such as phosphotungstic acid and zirconium hydrogen phosphate. Block copolymers were also studied due to the possibility to achieve a desired combination of homopolymer properties as well as the unique morphologies that are possible with block copolymers. Bezoyl substituted poly(p-phenylene) blocks were combined with poly(arylene ether) blocks to merge the structural rigidity of the poly(p-phenylene) with the ductility and high protonic conductivity of the poly(arylene ether)s. As evidenced by our many refereed publications and preprints, the research that we have conducted over the past several years has made a valuable and significant contribution to the literature and to the state of understanding of proton exchange membranes. Our early efforts at scale-up have suggested that the directly polymerized disulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) copolymers are commercially viable alternatives for proton exchange membranes. A new process for bipolar plates was developed and is described. An important single domain PEMFC model was developed and is documented in herein.

  8. Vision for the University of Connecticut Technology Park Materials Discovery, Product Design & Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano-Robledo, Alvaro

    · Additive Manufacturing and Nanoscale Processing · Fuel Cells, Sustainable Energy & Energy Management & Development and Advanced Manufacturing: Partnering with Industry to Accelerate Manufacturing Innovation for the Tech Park which will house the Connecticut Collaboratory for Materials & Manufacturing (C2M2

  9. Advanced Thermoelectric Materials for Efficient Waste Heat Recovery in Process Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam Polcyn; Moe Khaleel

    2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the project was to integrate advanced thermoelectric materials into a power generation device that could convert waste heat from an industrial process to electricity with an efficiency approaching 20%. Advanced thermoelectric materials were developed with figure-of-merit ZT of 1.5 at 275 degrees C. These materials were not successfully integrated into a power generation device. However, waste heat recovery was demonstrated from an industrial process (the combustion exhaust gas stream of an oxyfuel-fired flat glass melting furnace) using a commercially available (5% efficiency) thermoelectric generator coupled to a heat pipe. It was concluded that significant improvements both in thermoelectric material figure-of-merit and in cost-effective methods for capturing heat would be required to make thermoelectric waste heat recovery viable for widespread industrial application.

  10. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) program. Compilation of project summaries and significant accomplishments FY 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In many ways, the Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program underwent a major transformation in Fiscal Year 1995 and these changes have continued to the present. When the Program was established in 1990 as the Advanced Industrial Concepts (AIC) Materials Program, the mission was to conduct applied research and development to bring materials and processing technologies from the knowledge derived from basic research to the maturity required for the end use sectors for commercialization. In 1995, the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) made radical changes in structure and procedures. All technology development was directed toward the seven {open_quotes}Vision Industries{close_quotes} that use about 80% of industrial energy and generated about 90% of industrial wastes. These are: (1) Aluminum; (2) Chemical; (3) Forest Products; (4) Glass; (5) Metal Casting; (6) Refineries; and (7) Steel. This report is a compilation of project summaries and significant accomplishments on materials.

  11. Recent advances in modeling discontinuities in anisotropic and heterogeneous materials in eddy current NDE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldrin, John C. [Computational Tools, Gurnee, IL 60031 (United States); Sabbagh, Harold A.; Murphy, R. Kim; Sabbagh, Elias H. [Victor Technologies LLC, Bloomington, IN 47401 (United States)

    2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances are presented to model discontinuities in random anisotropies that arise in certain materials, such as titanium alloys. A numerical model is developed to provide a full anisotropic representation of each crystalline in a gridded region of the material. Several simulated and experimental demonstrations are presented highlighting the effect of grain noise on eddy current measurements. Agreement between VIC-3D(c) model calculations and experimental data in titanium alloy specimens with known flaws is demonstrated.

  12. STEP Partner Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    STEP Partner Presentation, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  13. Review of the proposed materials of construction for the SBWR and AP600 advanced reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diercks, D.R.; Shack, W.J.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two advanced light water reactor (LWR) concepts, namely the General Electric Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) and the Westinghouse Advanced Passive 600 MWe Reactor (AP600), were reviewed in detail by Argonne National Laboratory. The objectives of these reviews were to (a) evaluate proposed advanced-reactor designs and the materials of construction for the safety systems, (b) identify all aging and environmentally related degradation mechanisms for the materials of construction, and (c) evaluate from the safety viewpoint the suitability of the proposed materials for the design application. Safety-related systems selected for review for these two LWRs included (a) reactor pressure vessel, (b) control rod drive system and reactor internals, (c) coolant pressure boundary, (d) engineered safety systems, (e) steam generators (AP600 only), (f) turbines, and (g) fuel storage and handling system. In addition, the use of cobalt-based alloys in these plants was reviewed. The selected materials for both reactors were generally sound, and no major selection errors were found. It was apparent that considerable thought had been given to the materials selection process, making use of lessons learned from previous LWR experience. The review resulted in the suggestion of alternate an possibly better materials choices in a number of cases, and several potential problem areas have been cited.

  14. Joining of Advanced Materials: An The revolution which has occurred in materials science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    science and engineering has not been matched by improve- ments in joining science and technology. 1t.materials require ever higher performance, the number of acceptable joining technologies becomes more re- stricted of the material are useless. Unless the shape and properties can be obtained economically, the product has limited

  15. advance electro-optic materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    advance electro-optic materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Electro-Optical Tunable...

  16. Advanced Characterisation of Pavement and Soil Engineering Materials Loizos, Scarpas & Al-Qadi (eds)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    1241 Advanced Characterisation of Pavement and Soil Engineering Materials ­ Loizos, Scarpas & Al and economical alternative for the repair of deteriorated pavements, reflective cracking continues to be major approaches have not provided a direct means for the study of crack initiation and propagation in pavements

  17. Advanced Sediment Washing for Decontamination of New York/New Jersey Harbor Dredged Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    .S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) ­ New York District, with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE1 Advanced Sediment Washing for Decontamination of New York/New Jersey Harbor Dredged Materials Focus: New York / New Jersey Harbor Region In the New York / New Jersey Harbor Region, the effect

  18. MAE SEMINAR Recent advances in Additive Manufacturing/3D Printing Technologies, Material Science and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    MAE SEMINAR Recent advances in Additive Manufacturing/3D Printing Technologies, Material Science Samueli School of Engineering University of California Irvine 3D printing or Additive Manufacturing in different shapes. 3D printing is also considered distinct from traditional machining techniques, which

  19. Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization J. Vernon Cole and Ashok Gidwani CFDRC Prepared for: DOE Hydrogen Fuel Cell Kickoff MeetingWater Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design fuel cell design and operation; Demonstrate improvements in water management resulting in improved

  20. High temperature solid lubricant materials for heavy duty and advanced heat engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DellaCorte, C.; Wood, J.C.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced engine designs incorporate higher mechanical and thermal loading to achieve efficiency improvements. This approach often leads to higher operating temperatures of critical sliding elements (e.g. piston ring/cylinder wall contacts and valve guides) which compromise the use of conventional and even advanced synthetic liquid lubricants. For these applications solid lubricants must be considered. Several novel solid lubricant composites and coatings designated PS/PM200 have been employed to dry and marginally oil lubricated contacts in advanced heat engines. These applications include cylinder kits of heavy duty diesels, and high temperature sterling engines, sidewall seals of rotary engines and various exhaust valve and exhaust component applications. The following paper describes the tribological and thermophysical properties of these tribomaterials and reviews the results of applying them to engine applications. Other potential tribological materials and applications are also discussed with particular emphasis to heavy duty and advanced heat engines.

  1. Final LDRD report : advanced materials for next generation high-efficiency thermochemistry.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ambrosini, Andrea; Miller, James Edward; Allendorf, Mark D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA; Coker, Eric Nicholas; Ermanoski, Ivan; Hogan, Roy E.,; McDaniel, Anthony H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite rapid progress, solar thermochemistry remains high risk; improvements in both active materials and reactor systems are needed. This claim is supported by studies conducted both prior to and as part of this project. Materials offer a particular large opportunity space as, until recently, very little effort apart from basic thermodynamic analysis was extended towards understanding this most fundamental component of a metal oxide thermochemical cycle. Without this knowledge, system design was hampered, but more importantly, advances in these crucial materials were rare and resulted more from intuition rather than detailed insight. As a result, only two basic families of potentially viable solid materials have been widely considered, each of which has significant challenges. Recent efforts towards applying an increased level of scientific rigor to the study of thermochemical materials have provided a much needed framework and insights toward developing the next generation of highly improved thermochemically active materials. The primary goal of this project was to apply this hard-won knowledge to rapidly advance the field of thermochemistry to produce a material within 2 years that is capable of yielding CO from CO2 at a 12.5 % reactor efficiency. Three principal approaches spanning a range of risk and potential rewards were pursued: modification of known materials, structuring known materials, and identifying/developing new materials for the application. A newly developed best-of-class material produces more fuel (9x more H2, 6x more CO) under milder conditions than the previous state of the art. Analyses of thermochemical reactor and system efficiencies and economics were performed and a new hybrid concept was reported. The larger case for solar fuels was also further refined and documented.

  2. Evaluation of critical materials in five additional advance design photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, S.A.; Watts, R.L.; Martin, P.; Gurwell, W.E.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to identify potential material supply constraints due to the large-scale deployment of five advanced photovoltaic (PV) cell designs, and to suggest strategies to reduce the impacts of these production capacity limitations and potential future material shortages. The Critical Materials Assessment Program (CMAP) screens the designs and their supply chains and identifies potential shortages which might preclude large-scale use of the technologies. The results of the screening of five advanced PV cell designs are presented: (1) indium phosphide/cadmium sulfide, (2) zinc phosphide, (3) cadmium telluride/cadmium sulfide, (4) copper indium selenium, and (5) cadmium selenide photoelectrochemical. Each of these five cells is screened individually assuming that they first come online in 1991, and that 25 Gwe of peak capacity is online by the year 2000. A second computer screening assumes that each cell first comes online in 1991 and that each cell has a 5 GWe of peak capacity by the year 2000, so that the total online capacity for the five cells is 25 GWe. Based on a review of the preliminary baseline screening results, suggestions were made for varying such parameters as the layer thickness, cell production processes, etc. The resulting PV cell characterizations were then screened again by the CMAP computer code. The CMAP methodology used to identify critical materials is described; and detailed characterizations of the advanced photovoltaic cell designs under investigation, descriptions of additional cell production processes, and the results are presented. (WHK)

  3. Comparison of Skutterudites and Advanced Thin-Film B4C/B9C and Si/SiGe Materials in Advanced Thermoelectric Energy Recovery Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendricks, Terry J.

    2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Various advanced thermoelectric (TE) materials have properties that are inherently advantageous for particular TE energy recovery applications. Skutterudites, 0- and 1-dimensional quantum-well materials, and thin-film superlattice materials are providing enhanced opportunities for advanced TE energy recovery. This work demonstrates that early skutterudites materials in dual-material, segmented couple designs may be best suited for higher temperature applications associated with spacecraft power systems and very high temperature exhaust waste heat recovery in heavy vehicles. Early thin-film BxC/Si-SiGe materials appear to be well suited for mid-temperature ranges in exhaust waste heat recovery in heavy-duty and passenger vehicles. Potential power generation at specific exhaust temperature levels and for various heat exchanger performance levels are presented showing the current design sensitivities using each of these TE material sets. Mathematical relationships inherently linking optimum TE design variables and the thermal systems design (i.e., heat exchangers) are also investigated.

  4. ECUT energy data reference series: high-temperature materials for advanced heat engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abarcar, R.B.; Hane, G.J.; Johnson, D.R.

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information that describes the use of high-temperature materials in advanced heat engines for ground transportation applications is summarized. Applications discussed are: automobiles, light trucks, and medium and heavy trucks. The information provided on each of these modes includes descriptions of the average conversion efficiency of the engine, the capital stock, the amount of energy used, and the activity level as measured in ton-miles.

  5. Partnering with NREL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview for industry and organizations about NREL's partnering opportunities including information about technology partnership agreements and technical area contacts.

  6. Partnering Institution Name Partnering Institution Name Place...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for Photovoltaics M M St Paul Minnesota http www nrel gov pv pv manufacturing html A O Smith A O Smith Milwaukee Wisconsin Test Evaluation Partner Electricity Resources Building...

  7. Master of Science project in advanced computational material physics Electrical conductivity of the correlated metal LaNiO3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellsing, Bo

    Master of Science project in advanced computational material physics Electrical conductivity of the correlated metal LaNiO3 Lanthanum nickelate, LaNiO3, belongs to the class of materials named strongly correlated metals. Several properties of these materials can not be understood based on standard

  8. Copyright 2001 by William F. Pratt. Published by Society for the Advancement of Material and Process Engineering with permission.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Matthew S.

    by Patterned Fiber Composites Inc. that predicts material stiffness and damping of carbon-fiber composite lay-ups also show excellent agreement. KEY WORDS: Advanced Composites, Carbon Fiber, Composite Materials composite materials through comparisons with Finite Element models. To do this, the stiffness and damping

  9. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program: Compilation of project summaries and significant accomplishments, FY 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program is to support development and commercialization of new or improved materials to improve energy efficiency, productivity, product quality, and reduced waste in the major process industries. A fundamentally new way of working with industries--the Industries of the Future (IOF) strategy--concentrates on the major process industries that consume about 90% of the energy and generate about 90% of the waste in the industrial sector. These are the aluminum, chemical, forest products, glass, metalcasting, and steel industries. OIT has encouraged and assisted these industries in developing visions of what they will be like 20 or 30 years into the future, defining the drivers, technology needs, and barriers to realization of their visions. These visions provide a framework for development of technology roadmaps and implementation plans. The AIM Program supports IOF by conducting research and development on materials to solve problems identified in the roadmaps. This is done by National Laboratory/industry/university teams with the facilities and expertise needed to develop new and improved materials. Each project in the AIM Program has active industrial participation and support. Assessments of materials needs and opportunities in the process industries are an on-going effort within the program. These assessments are being used for program planning and priority setting, followed by support of work to satisfy those needs. All the industries have identified materials as critical, particularly for high-temperature strength, corrosion resistance, and wear resistance. Also important from the energy efficiency viewpoint are membranes, catalytic membranes, and reactors for separations, both for processing and waste reduction. AIM focuses, therefore, on high-temperature materials, corrosion resistant materials, wear resistant materials, strong polymers, coatings, and membrane materials for industrial applications.

  10. Advanced material accountancy glove box assay system for process material at PFPF.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maruyama, H. (Hajime); Fujiwara, S. (Shigeo); Takahashi, S. (Saburo); Kuno, K.; Menlove, Howard O.; Wenz, T. R. (Tracy R.)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Material Accountancv Glove Box Assay System (MAGB) is a neutron coincidence counting system that has been developed under the akeement between Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in order to measure plutonium in the MOX transfer container in the glove box at Plutonium Fuel Production Facility (PFPF) in Japan. The system was installed at PFPF in August 1989 and afterwards it has been using for verification ofplutonium in the transfer container by inspectorate during inspection Process equipment to improve its performance has been installed in the PFPF fabrication line. As a result the number of sample requiredfor inspection increased. Since MAGBs were only used, it was anticipated that the reduction of the time of sampling and movement time of nuclear materialfor verification would be difficult. Furthermore, the sample has to be taken from the transfer containers that contain a large amount of plutonium. Therefore, in order to reduce the time for sampling, time required for the transfer container to arrive at sampling point, and personal radiation exposure, the integrated MAGB system combined with High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy (HRGS), called M G B, was developed. This system was installed at PFPF in August 2000, and then, the functional test and the calibration were carried out in the presence of inspectorate. In the course of these activities, the data that is necessary for evaluating the system were fully acquired The system is now being in the process of evaluation whether it can be used as an attended safeguards system for International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Japan Safeguards Office (JSGO).

  11. Testing of Gas Reactor Materials and Fuel in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has long been involved in testing gas reactor materials, and has developed facilities well suited for providing the right conditions and environment for gas reactor tests. This paper discusses the different types of irradiation hardware that have been utilized in past ATR irradiation tests of gas reactor materials. The new Gas Test Loop facility currently being developed for the ATR is discussed and the different approaches being considered in the design of the facility. The different options for an irradiation experiment such as active versus passive temperature control, neutron spectrum tailoring, and different types of lead experiment sweep gas monitors are also discussed. The paper is then concluded with examples of different past and present gas reactor material and fuel irradiations.

  12. TESTING OF GAS REACTOR MATERIALS AND FUEL IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grover, S.B.

    2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has long been involved in testing gas reactor materials, and has developed facilities well suited for providing the right conditions and environment for gas reactor tests. This paper discusses the different types of irradiation hardware that have been utilized in past ATR irradiation tests of gas reactor materials. The new Gas Test Loop facility currently being developed for the ATR is discussed and the different approaches being considered in the design of the facility. The different options for an irradiation experiment such as active versus passive temperature control, neutron spectrum tailoring, and different types of lead experiment sweep gas monitors are also discussed. The paper is then concluded with examples of different past and present gas reactor material and fuel irradiations.

  13. Outdoor testing of advanced optical materials for solar thermal electric applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendelin, T.J.; Jorgensen, G.; Goggin, R.M.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of low-cost, durable advanced optical materials is an important element in making solar energy viable for electricity production. It is important to determine the expected lifetime of candidate reflector materials in real-world service conditions. The demonstration of the optical durability of such materials in outdoor environments is critical to the successful commercialization of solar thermal electric technologies. For many years optical performance data have been collected and analyzed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for candidate reflector materials subjected to simulated outdoor exposure conditions. Much of this testing is accelerated in order to predict service durability. Some outdoor testing has occurred but not in a systematic manner. To date, simulated/accelerated testing has been limited correlation with actual outdoor exposure testing. Such a correlation is desirable to provide confidence in lifetime predictions based upon accelerated weathering methods. To obtain outdoor exposure data for realistic environments and to establish a data base for correlating simulated/accelerated outdoor exposure data with actual outdoor exposure data, the development of an expanded outdoor testing program has recently been initiated by NREL. Several outdoor test sites will be selected based on the solar climate, potential for solar energy utilization by industry, and cost of installation. Test results are site dependent because exposure conditions vary with geographical location. The importance of this program to optical materials development is outlined, and the process used to determine and establish the outdoor test sites is described. Candidate material identification and selection is also discussed. 10 refs.

  14. adult partner preference: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a durable power of attorney Fernandez, Eduardo 333 Mechanisms for Partnering with Oak Ridge National Laboratory Materials Science Websites Summary: and Development Agreement...

  15. addressing intimate partner: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a durable power of attorney Fernandez, Eduardo 280 Mechanisms for Partnering with Oak Ridge National Laboratory Materials Science Websites Summary: and Development Agreement...

  16. antitoxin partner phd: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a durable power of attorney Fernandez, Eduardo 456 Mechanisms for Partnering with Oak Ridge National Laboratory Materials Science Websites Summary: and Development Agreement...

  17. alters adult partner: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a durable power of attorney Fernandez, Eduardo 157 Mechanisms for Partnering with Oak Ridge National Laboratory Materials Science Websites Summary: and Development Agreement...

  18. adolescent romantic partner: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a durable power of attorney Fernandez, Eduardo 219 Mechanisms for Partnering with Oak Ridge National Laboratory Materials Science Websites Summary: and Development Agreement...

  19. affect intimate partner: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a durable power of attorney Fernandez, Eduardo 206 Mechanisms for Partnering with Oak Ridge National Laboratory Materials Science Websites Summary: and Development Agreement...

  20. american countries partner: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a durable power of attorney Fernandez, Eduardo 205 Mechanisms for Partnering with Oak Ridge National Laboratory Materials Science Websites Summary: and Development Agreement...

  1. A Novel Approach to Materials Development for Advanced Reactor Systems. Annual Report for Year 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Was, G.S.; Atzmon, M.; Wang, L.

    2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK B188 A Novel Approach to Materials Development for Advanced Reactor Systems. Annual Report for Year 1 Year one of this project had three major goals. First, to specify, order and install a new high current ion source for more rapid and stable proton irradiation. Second, to assess the use of chromium pre-enrichment and the combination of cold-work and irradiation hardening in an effort to assess the role of radiation damage in IASCC without the effects of RIS. Third, to initiate irradiation of reactor pressure vessel steel and Zircaloy. Program Achievements for Year One: Progress was made on all 4 tasks in year one.

  2. Panhandle AgriPartners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 5 Panhandle AgriPartners Story by Kathy Wythe After 33 years in agribusiness, Dennis Beiluefound he wasn?t ready to hang up hisagricultural hat when he retired in 2000.Three years later he was back in the busi- ness as a Texas... Cooperative Extension farm demon- stration assistant with the Panhandle AgriPartners Program. AgriPartners is a collaborative program between Extension, the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, farmers, farm commodity groups, industry, water districts...

  3. ENERGY EFFICIENCY CHALLENGES ADDRESSED THROUGH THE USE OF ADVANCED REFRACTORY CERAMIC MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Refractory ceramics can play a critical role in improving the energy efficiency of traditional industrial processes through increased furnace efficiency brought about by the employment of novel refractory systems and techniques. Examples of advances in refractory materials related to aluminum, gasification, glass, and lime are highlighted. Energy savings are realized based on reduction of chemical reactions, elimination of mechanical degradation caused by the service environment, reduction of temperature limitations of materials, and elimination of costly installation and repair needs. Key results of projects resulting from US Department of Energy (DOE) funded research programs are discussed with emphasis on applicability of these results to high temperature furnace applications and needed research directions for the future.

  4. Virtual Welded-Joint Design Integrating Advanced Materials and Processing Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Z.; Dong, P.; Liu, S.; Babu, S.; Olson, G.; DebRoy, T.

    2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of this project is to increase the fatigue life of a welded-joint by 10 times and to reduce energy use by 25% through product performance and productivity improvements using an integrated modeling approach. The fatigue strength of a welded-joint is currently the bottleneck to design high performance and lightweight welded structures using advanced materials such as high strength steels. In order to achieve high fatigue strength in a welded-joint it is necessary to manage the weld bead shape for lower stress concentration, produce preferable residual stress distribution, and obtain the desired microstructure for improved material toughness and strength. This is a systems challenge that requires the optimization of the welding process, the welding consumable, the base material, as well as the structure design. The concept of virtual welded-joint design has been proposed and established in this project. The goal of virtual welded-joint design is to develop a thorough procedure to predict the relationship of welding process, microstructure, property, residual stress, and the ultimate weld fatigue strength by a systematic modeling approach. The systematic approach combines five sub-models: weld thermal-fluid model, weld microstructure model, weld material property model, weld residual stress model, and weld fatigue model. The systematic approach is thus based on interdisciplinary applied sciences including heat transfer, computational fluid dynamics, materials science, engineering mechanics, and material fracture mechanics. The sub-models are based on existing models with further development. The results from modeling have been validated with critical experiments. The systematic modeling approach has been used to design high fatigue resistant welds considering the combined effects of weld bead geometry, residual stress, microstructure, and material property. In particular, a special welding wire has been developed in this project to introduce compressive residual stress at weld toe for weld fatigue resistance.

  5. WaterTransport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing and Design Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Vernon Cole; Abhra Roy; Ashok Damle; Hari Dahr; Sanjiv Kumar; Kunal Jain; Ned Djilai

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Water management in Proton Exchange Membrane, PEM, Fuel Cells is challenging because of the inherent conflicts between the requirements for efficient low and high power operation. Particularly at low powers, adequate water must be supplied to sufficiently humidify the membrane or protons will not move through it adequately and resistance losses will decrease the cell efficiency. At high power density operation, more water is produced at the cathode than is necessary for membrane hydration. This excess water must be removed effectively or it will accumulate in the Gas Diffusion Layers, GDLs, between the gas channels and catalysts, blocking diffusion paths for reactants to reach the catalysts and potentially flooding the electrode. As power density of the cells is increased, the challenges arising from water management are expected to become more difficult to overcome simply due to the increased rate of liquid water generation relative to fuel cell volume. Thus, effectively addressing water management based issues is a key challenge in successful application of PEMFC systems. In this project, CFDRC and our partners used a combination of experimental characterization, controlled experimental studies of important processes governing how water moves through the fuel cell materials, and detailed models and simulations to improve understanding of water management in operating hydrogen PEM fuel cells. The characterization studies provided key data that is used as inputs to all state-of-the-art models for commercially important GDL materials. Experimental studies and microscopic scale models of how water moves through the GDLs showed that the water follows preferential paths, not branching like a river, as it moves toward the surface of the material. Experimental studies and detailed models of water and airflow in fuel cells channels demonstrated that such models can be used as an effective design tool to reduce operating pressure drop in the channels and the associated costs and weight of blowers and pumps to force air and hydrogen gas through the fuel cell. Promising improvements to materials structure and surface treatments that can potentially aid in managing the distribution and removal of liquid water were developed; and improved steady-state and freeze-thaw performance was demonstrated for a fuel cell stack under the self-humidified operating conditions that are promising for stationary power generation with reduced operating costs.

  6. Project Description In the search for superior batteries, the road to success is paved with advanced materials: better

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoway, Donald Robert

    Project Description In the search for superior batteries, the road to success is paved with advanced materials: better cathodes, better anodes, better electrolytes. The universe of candidates is so vast and the cost of selection and testing them is so great that conventional approaches to materials

  7. Advanced Low Temperature Absorption Chiller Module Integrated...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advanced Low Temperature Absorption Chiller Module Integrated with a CHP System at a Distributed Data Center - Presentation by Exergy Partners Corp., June 2011 Advanced Low...

  8. Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program. Semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, N.C.; Judkins, R.R. [comps.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objective of this materials program is to conduct R and D on materials for fossil energy applications with focus on longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The projects are organized according to materials research areas: (1) ceramics, (2) new alloys: iron aluminides, advanced austenitics and chromium niobium alloys, and (3) technology development and transfer. Separate abstracts have been prepared.

  9. Integrating advanced materials simulation techniques into an automated data analysis workflow at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borreguero Calvo, Jose M [ORNL] [ORNL; Campbell, Stuart I [ORNL] [ORNL; Delaire, Olivier A [ORNL] [ORNL; Doucet, Mathieu [ORNL] [ORNL; Goswami, Monojoy [ORNL] [ORNL; Hagen, Mark E [ORNL] [ORNL; Lynch, Vickie E [ORNL] [ORNL; Proffen, Thomas E [ORNL] [ORNL; Ren, Shelly [ORNL] [ORNL; Savici, Andrei T [ORNL] [ORNL; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation will review developments on the integration of advanced modeling and simulation techniques into the analysis step of experimental data obtained at the Spallation Neutron Source. A workflow framework for the purpose of refining molecular mechanics force-fields against quasi-elastic neutron scattering data is presented. The workflow combines software components to submit model simulations to remote high performance computers, a message broker interface for communications between the optimizer engine and the simulation production step, and tools to convolve the simulated data with the experimental resolution. A test application shows the correction to a popular fixed-charge water model in order to account polarization effects due to the presence of solvated ions. Future enhancements to the refinement workflow are discussed. This work is funded through the DOE Center for Accelerating Materials Modeling.

  10. Steam Oxidation of Fossil Power Plant Materials: Collaborative Research to Enable Advanced Steam Power Cycles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    A. T. Fry; I. G Wright; N. J Simms; B. McGhee; G. R. Holcomb

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Research into improved materials systems and associated manufacturing and reliability issues is a major part of initiatives to produce cleaner and cheaper energy systems in the UK and the USA. Under the auspices of a Memorandum of Understanding on Energy R&D, a work programme concerned with steam oxidation has been conducted. The focus was on the generation of definitive information regarding the oxidation behaviour in steam of current and developmental ferritic steels, austenitic steels, and nickelbased alloys required to enable advanced steam power cycles. The results were intended to provide a basis for quantifying the rate of metal loss expected under advanced steam cycle conditions, as well as understanding of the evolution of oxide scale morphologies with time and temperature to identify features that could influence scale exfoliation characteristics. This understanding and acquired data were used to develop and validate models of oxide growth and loss by exfoliation. This paper provides an overview of the activity and highlights a selection of the results coming from the programme.

  11. Partnering with the Military

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Partnering with the Military Story by Kathy Wythe Texas Agricultural Experiment Stationresearchers have partnered with Fort Hoodpersonnel to identify a natural ?weapon? to restore the facility?s tank training areas?land and soils seriously eroded... Center (BREC) in Temple have determined that composted dairy manure can increase soil fertility and vegetation cover on some of the Fort?s 200,000 acres of training areas and stabilize eroded soils without excessive nutrients entering the streams...

  12. Development of Advanced Wear and Corrosion Resistant Systems Through Laser Surface Alloying and Materials Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. P. Martukanitz and S. Babu

    2007-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser surfacing in the form of cladding, alloying, and modifications are gaining widespread use because of its ability to provide high deposition rates, low thermal distortion, and refined microstructure due to high solidification rates. Because of these advantages, laser surface alloying is considered a prime candidate for producing ultra-hard coatings through the establishment or in situ formation of composite structures. Therefore, a program was conducted by the Applied Research Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop the scientific and engineering basis for performing laser-based surface modifications involving the addition of hard particles, such as carbides, borides, and nitrides, within a metallic matrix for improved wear, fatigue, creep, and corrosion resistance. This has involved the development of advanced laser processing and simulation techniques, along with the refinement and application of these techniques for predicting and selecting materials and processing parameters for the creation of new surfaces having improved properties over current coating technologies. This program has also resulted in the formulation of process and material simulation tools capable of examining the potential for the formation and retention of composite coatings and deposits produced using laser processing techniques, as well as positive laboratory demonstrations in producing these coatings. In conjunction with the process simulation techniques, the application of computational thermodynamic and kinetic models to design laser surface alloying materials was demonstrated and resulted in a vast improvement in the formulation of materials used for producing composite coatings. The methodology was used to identify materials and to selectively modify microstructures for increasing hardness of deposits produced by the laser surface alloying process. Computational thermodynamic calculations indicated that it was possible to induce the precipitation of titanium carbonitrides during laser surface alloying provided there was sufficient amount of dissolved titanium, carbon, and nitrogen in the liquid steel. This was confirmed experimentally by using a powder mixture of 431-martensitic steel, titanium carbide powder, and nitrogen shielding, during laser deposition to produce deposits exhibiting relatively high hardness (average surface hardness of 724 HV). The same approach was extended to direct diode laser processing and similar microstructures were attained. The above analysis was extended to develop an in-situ precipitation of Ti(CN) during laser deposition. The Ti addition was achieving by mixing the 431 martensitic steel powders with ferro-titanium. The dissolution of nitrogen was achieved by using 100% nitrogen shielding gas, which was indicated by thermodynamic analysis. Demonstrations were also conducted utilizing the tools developed during the program and resulted in several viable composite coating systems being identified. This included the use of TiC and ferro-titanium in martensitic-grade stainless steel matrix material with and without the use of active N2 shielding gas, WC hard particles in a martensitic-grade stainless steel matrix material, WC and BN in a nickel-based matrix material, and WC in highly alloyed iron-based matrix. Although these demonstrations indicated the potential of forming composite coatings, in certain instances, the intended industrial applications involved unique requirements, such as coating of internal surfaces, which hindered the full development of the improved coating technology. However, it is believed that the addition of common hard particles, such as WC or TiC, to matrix material representing martensitic grades of stainless steel offer opportunities for improved performance at relatively low material cost.

  13. Testing of Gas Reactor Fuel and Materials in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent growth in interest for high temperature gas reactors has resulted in an increased need for materials and fuel testing for this type of reactor. The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at the US Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory, has long been involved in testing gas reactor fuel and materials, and has facilities and capabilities to provide the right environment for gas reactor irradiation experiments. These capabilities include both passive sealed capsule experiments, and instrumented/actively controlled experiments. The instrumented/actively controlled experiments typically contain thermocouples and control the irradiation temperature, but on-line measurements and controls for pressure and gas environment have also been performed in past irradiations. The ATR has an existing automated gas temperature control system that can maintain temperature in an irradiation experiment within very tight bounds, and has developed an on-line fission product monitoring system that is especially well suited for testing gas reactor particle fuel. The ATR’s control system, which consists primarily of vertical cylinders used to rotate neutron poisons/reflectors toward or away from the reactor core, provides a constant vertical flux profile over the duration of each operating cycle. This constant chopped cosine shaped axial flux profile, with a relatively flat peak at the vertical centre of the core, is more desirable for experiments than a constantly moving axial flux peak resulting from a control system of axially positioned control components which are vertically withdrawn from the core.

  14. Advanced international training course on state systems of accounting for and control of nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report incorporates all lectures and presentations at the Advanced International Training Course on State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material held April 27 through May 12, 1981 at Santa Fe and Los Alamos, New Mexico, and Richland, Washington, USA. Authorized by the US Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, the course was developed to provide practical training in the design, implementation, and operation of a state system of nuclear materials accountability and control that satisfies both national and international safeguards. Major emphasis for the 1981 course was placed on safeguards methods used at bulk-handling facilities, particularly low-enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication plants. The course was conducted by the University of California's Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and Exxon Nuclear Company, Inc. Tours and demonstrations were arranged at both the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, and the Exxon Nuclear fuel fabrication plant, Richland, Washington.

  15. Economics of co-firing waste materials in an advanced pressurized fluidized-bed combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonk, D.L.; McDaniel, H.M. [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). Morgantown Energy Technology Center; DeLallo, M.R. Jr.; Zaharchuk, R. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (United States)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The co-firing of waste materials with coal in utility scale power plants has emerged as an effective approach to produce energy and manage municipal waste. Leading this approach is the atmospheric fluidized bed combustor (AFBC). It has demonstrated its commercial acceptance in the utility market as a reliable source of power by burning a variety of waste and alternative fuels. The fluidized bed, with its stability of combustion, reduces the amount of thermochemical transients and provides for easier process control. The application of pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC) technology, although relatively new, can provide significant enhancements to the efficient production of electricity while maintaining the waste management benefits of AFBC. A study was undertaken to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of co-firing a PFBC with coal and municipal and industrial wastes. Focus was placed on the production of electricity and the efficient disposal of wastes for application in central power station and distributed locations. Issues concerning waste material preparation and feed, PFBC operation, plant emissions, and regulations are addressed. The results and conclusions developed are generally applicable to current and advanced PFBC design concepts.

  16. Performance analysis of co-firing waste materials in an advanced pressurized fluidized-bed combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonk, D.L.; McDaniel, H.M. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); DeLallo, M.R. Jr.; Zaharchuk, R. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The co-firing of waste materials with coal in utility scale power plants has emerged as an effective approach to produce energy and manage municipal wastes. Leading this approach is the atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC). It has demonstrated its commercial acceptance in the utility market as a reliable source of power by burning a variety of waste and alternative fuels. The application of pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC) technology, although relatively new, can provide significant enhancements to the efficient production of electricity while maintaining the waste management benefits of AFBC. A study was undertaken to investigate the technical and economical feasibility of co-firing a PFBC with coal and municipal and industrial wastes. Focus was placed on the production of electricity and the efficient disposal of wastes for application in central power station and distributed locations. Issues concerning waste material preparation and feed, PFBC operation, plant emissions, and regulations are addressed. The results and conclusions developed are generally applicable to current and advanced PFBC design concepts. Wastes considered for co-firing include municipal solid waste (MSW), sewage sludge, and industrial de-inking sludge. Conceptual designs of two power plants rated at 250 MWe and 150 MWe were developed. Heat and material balances were completed for each plant along with environmental issues. With the PFBC`s operation at high temperature and pressure, efforts were centered on defining feeding systems capable of operating at these conditions. Air emissions and solid wastes were characterized to assess the environmental performance comparing them to state and Federal regulations. This paper describes the results of this investigation, presents conclusions on the key issues, and provides recommendations for further evaluation.

  17. The development of novel materials with unique properties is critical to advances in industry, medicine, energy systems, microelectronics, aeronautics and many other

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Novel Materials The development of novel materials with unique properties is critical to advances and applications. definition novel materials research focuses on improving the performance of materials of products and applications. at-a-glance researCH ProGrams in nuclear fuels and materials, biomaterials

  18. History of Resistance Welding Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Cladding and other High Temperature Materials at Center for Advanced Energy Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Zirker; Nathan Jerred; Dr. Indrajit Charit; James Cole

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research proposal 08-1079, 'A Comparative Study of Welded ODS Cladding Materials for AFCI/GNEP,' was funded in 2008 under an Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Research and Development Funding Opportunity, number DE-PS07-08ID14906. Th proposal sought to conduct research on joining oxide dispersion strengthen (ODS) tubing material to a solid end plug. This document summarizes the scientific and technical progress achieved during the project, which ran from 2008 to 2011.

  19. Advances

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1BP-14Scripting for Advanced Workflows Jack

  20. The 6th International Workshop on Advanced Smart Materials and Smart Structures Technology ANCRiSST2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greer, Julia R.

    The 6th International Workshop on Advanced Smart Materials and Smart Structures Technology ANCRi, and time of structural damage in an instrumented building. Unlike existing methods, the method is designed is conducted to provide insight into applying the method to a building. A tap test is performed on a small

  1. The 6th International Workshop on Advanced Smart Materials and Smart Structures Technology ANCRiSST2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer Jr., B.F.

    The 6th International Workshop on Advanced Smart Materials and Smart Structures Technology ANCRi) for the response reduction of building structures under seismic loading. First, the building structure used sink, the sensitivity to the amplitude of the loading and the natural frequency of the building

  2. Lightweighting Automotive Materials for Increased Fuel Efficiency and Delivering Advanced Modeling and Simulation Capabilities to U.S. Manufacturers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hale, Steve

    2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), to bring together research and development (R&D) collaborations to develop and accelerate the knowledgebase and infrastructure for lightweighting materials and manufacturing processes for their use in structural and applications in the automotive sector. The purpose/importance of this DOE program: • 2016 CAFÉ standards. • Automotive industry technology that shall adopt the insertion of lightweighting material concepts towards manufacturing of production vehicles. • Development and manufacture of advanced research tools for modeling and simulation (M&S) applications to reduce manufacturing and material costs. • U.S. competitiveness that will help drive the development and manufacture of the next generation of materials. NCMS established a focused portfolio of applied R&D projects utilizing lightweighting materials for manufacture into automotive structures and components. Areas that were targeted in this program: • Functionality of new lightweighting materials to meet present safety requirements. • Manufacturability using new lightweighting materials. • Cost reduction for the development and use of new lightweighting materials. The automotive industry’s future continuously evolves through innovation, and lightweight materials are key in achieving a new era of lighter, more efficient vehicles. Lightweight materials are among the technical advances needed to achieve fuel/energy efficiency and reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions: • Establish design criteria methodology to identify the best materials for lightweighting. • Employ state-of-the-art design tools for optimum material development for their specific applications. • Match new manufacturing technology to production volume. • Address new process variability with new production-ready processes.

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Advanced In-Situ Diagnostic Techniques for Battery Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Brookhaven National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced in...

  4. ELECTROLYTE AND FULL MATERIALS SETS There has been significant recent advancements in SOFC materials set development for use in reversible

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    MATERIALS ELECTROLYTE AND FULL MATERIALS SETS OVERVIEW There has been significant recent systems. Objectives: Address the primary shortcomings and challenges that have plagued recent reversible.10 0.90 0.90 0.10 Manual hydraulic press and 1-1/4" evacuable pellet die for making button cells #12

  5. Quantitative NDA Measurements of Advanced Reprocessing Product Materials Containing U, NP, PU, and AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard, Braden

    2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    of this first principle technique have been identified: (1) quantitative measurement of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium materials; (2) quantitative measurement of mixed oxide (MOX) materials; (3) quantitative measurement of uranium materials; and (4...

  6. Advanced Materials Manufacturing and Innovative Technologies for Natural Gas Pipeline Systems and Components

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of2Partners in the Spotlight Novelis Joins

  7. IMPROVEMENT OF WEAR COMPONENT'S PERFORMANCE BY UTILIZING ADVANCED MATERIALS AND NEW MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGIES: CASTCON PROCESS FOR MINING APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaodi Huang; Richard Gertsch

    2005-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Michigan Technological University, together with The Robbins Group, Advanced Ceramic Research, Advanced Ceramic Manufacturing, and Superior Rock Bits, evaluated a new process and a new material for producing drill bit inserts and disc cutters for the mining industry. Difficulties in the material preparation stage slowed the research initially. Prototype testing of the drill bit inserts showed that the new inserts did not perform up to the current state of the art. Due to difficulties in the prototype production of the disc cutters, the disc cutter was manufactured but not tested. Although much promising information was obtained as a result of this project, the objective of developing an effective means for producing rock drill bits and rock disc cutters that last longer, increase energy efficiency and penetration rate, and lower overall production cost was not met.

  8. Strategy Guideline: Partnering for High Performance Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prahl, D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High performance houses require a high degree of coordination and have significant interdependencies between various systems in order to perform properly, meet customer expectations, and minimize risks for the builder. Responsibility for the key performance attributes is shared across the project team and can be well coordinated through advanced partnering strategies. For high performance homes, traditional partnerships need to be matured to the next level and be expanded to all members of the project team including trades, suppliers, manufacturers, HERS raters, designers, architects, and building officials as appropriate. In an environment where the builder is the only source of communication between trades and consultants and where relationships are, in general, adversarial as opposed to cooperative, the chances of any one building system to fail are greater. Furthermore, it is much harder for the builder to identify and capitalize on synergistic opportunities. Partnering can help bridge the cross-functional aspects of the systems approach and achieve performance-based criteria. Critical success factors for partnering include support from top management, mutual trust, effective and open communication, effective coordination around common goals, team building, appropriate use of an outside facilitator, a partnering charter progress toward common goals, an effective problem-solving process, long-term commitment, continuous improvement, and a positive experience for all involved.

  9. Advanced research and technology development fossil energy materials program. Quarterly progress report for the period ending September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, R.A. (comp.) [comp.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the fourth combined quarterly progress report for those projects that are part of the Advanced Research and Technology Development Fossil Energy Materials Program. The objective is to conduct a program of research and development on materials for fossil energy applications with a focus on the longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The program includes research aimed toward a better understanding of materials behavior in fossil energy environments and the development of new materials capable of substantial enhancement of plant operations and reliability. Work performed on the program generally falls into the Applied Research and Exploratory Development categories as defined in the DOE Technology Base Review, although basic research and engineering development are also conducted. A substantial portion of the work on the AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program is performed by participating cntractor organizations. All subcontractor work is monitored by Program staff members at ORNL and Argonne National Laboratory. This report is organized in accordance with a work breakdown structure defined in the AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program Plan for FY 1981 in which projects are organized according to fossil energy technologies. We hope this series of AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program quarterly progress reports will aid in the dissemination of information developed on the program.

  10. Mechanics of Advanced Materials and Structures, 14:227244, 2007 Copyright c Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    -measuring devices [8­11]; graded refractive index materials [12]; thermionic converters [13]; den- tal and other

  11. Publications of the Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program, April 1, 1991--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, P.T. [comp.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objective of DOE`s Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for fossil energy applications, with focus on longer-term needs. The Program includes research aimed at a better understanding of materials behavior in fossil energy environments and on the development of new materials capable of substantial improvement in plant operations and reliability. Scope of the program addresses materials requirements for all fossil energy systems, including materials for coal preparation, coal liquefaction, coal gasification, heat engines and heat recovery, combustion systems, and fuel cells. Work on the Program is conducted at national and government laboratories, universities, and industrial research facilities. Research conducted on the Program is divided among the following areas: (1) ceramics, (2) new alloys, (3) corrosion research, and (4) program development and technology transfer. This bibliography covers the period of April 1, 1992, through March 31, 1993, and is a supplement to previous bibliographies in this series. The publications listed are limited to topical reports, open literature publications in refereed journals, full-length papers in published proceedings of conferences, full-length papers in unrefereed journals, and books and book articles.

  12. Publications of the Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program, April 1, 1991--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, P.T. (comp.)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objective of DOE's Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for fossil energy applications, with focus on longer-term needs. The Program includes research aimed at a better understanding of materials behavior in fossil energy environments and on the development of new materials capable of substantial improvement in plant operations and reliability. Scope of the program addresses materials requirements for all fossil energy systems, including materials for coal preparation, coal liquefaction, coal gasification, heat engines and heat recovery, combustion systems, and fuel cells. Work on the Program is conducted at national and government laboratories, universities, and industrial research facilities. Research conducted on the Program is divided among the following areas: (1) ceramics, (2) new alloys, (3) corrosion research, and (4) program development and technology transfer. This bibliography covers the period of April 1, 1992, through March 31, 1993, and is a supplement to previous bibliographies in this series. The publications listed are limited to topical reports, open literature publications in refereed journals, full-length papers in published proceedings of conferences, full-length papers in unrefereed journals, and books and book articles.

  13. Catalan vaulting in advanced material : new approaches to contemporary compressive form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramage, Michael H. (Michael Hector)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The translation of traditional building methods to modern construction techniques offers unexplored opportunities for material and form in architecture. Recent innovations in cellular ceramics married with traditional ...

  14. Modeling Creep-Fatigue-Environment Interactions in Steam Turbine Rotor Materials for Advanced Ultra-supercritical Coal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Chen

    2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to model creep-fatigue-environment interactions in steam turbine rotor materials for advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) coal power Alloy 282 plants, to develop and demonstrate computational algorithms for alloy property predictions, and to determine and model key mechanisms that contribute to the damages caused by creep-fatigue-environment interactions. The nickel based Alloy 282 is selected for this project because it is one of the leading candidate materials for the high temperature/pressure section of an A-USC steam turbine. The methods developed in the project are expected to be applicable to other metal alloys in similar steam/oxidation environments. The major developments are: ? failure mechanism and microstructural characterization ? atomistic and first principles modeling of crack tip oxygen embrittlement ? modeling of gamma prime microstructures and mesoscale microstructure-defect interactions ? microstructure and damage-based creep prediction ? multi-scale crack growth modeling considering oxidation, viscoplasticity and fatigue The technology developed in this project is expected to enable more accurate prediction of long service life of advanced alloys for A-USC power plants, and provide faster and more effective materials design, development, and implementation than current state-of-the-art computational and experimental methods. This document is a final technical report for the project, covering efforts conducted from January 2011 to January 2014.

  15. News about CMI Partners | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE Project Taps HPCNew4 CarbonNews Releases

  16. Technical Readiness and Gaps Analysis of Commercial Optical Materials and Measurement Systems for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Qiao, Hong (Amy); Andersen, Eric S.; Berglin, Eric J.; Bliss, Mary; Cannon, Bret D.; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Mendoza, Albert; Sheen, David M.

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report intends to support Department of Energy’s Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap and industry stakeholders by evaluating optical-based instrumentation and control (I&C) concepts for advanced small modular reactor (AdvSMR) applications. These advanced designs will require innovative thinking in terms of engineering approaches, materials integration, and I&C concepts to realize their eventual viability and deployability. The primary goals of this report include: 1. Establish preliminary I&C needs, performance requirements, and possible gaps for AdvSMR designs based on best available published design data. 2. Document commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) optical sensors, components, and materials in terms of their technical readiness to support essential AdvSMR in-vessel I&C systems. 3. Identify technology gaps by comparing the in-vessel monitoring requirements and environmental constraints to COTS optical sensor and materials performance specifications. 4. Outline a future research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) program plan that addresses these gaps and develops optical-based I&C systems that enhance the viability of future AdvSMR designs. The development of clean, affordable, safe, and proliferation-resistant nuclear power is a key goal that is documented in the Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap. This roadmap outlines RD&D activities intended to overcome technical, economic, and other barriers, which currently limit advances in nuclear energy. These activities will ensure that nuclear energy remains a viable component to this nation’s energy security.

  17. High temperature materials technology research for advanced thermionic systems. Quarterly progress report, period ending March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zee, R.H.; Rose, M.F.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effort was concentrated on modeling the deformation process in refractory alloy single crystals and the stress distribution in metal- ceramic-metal long trilayer insulators. Resolved shear stress distributions are given for a bcc Mo single crystal tube with a [110] growth direction. Effect of 1.8% Nb additions on creep of Mo single crystals was studied, simulating the cylindrical configuration of the TFE emitter. In the area of advanced sheath trilayer insulators, radiation-induced stresses in long cylinder and effect of collector material (Nb vs Mo) were studied. 10 figs, 6 refs.

  18. Bay Area Industrial Partners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Michael Bauer, President, Chief Product Officer and Founder, Sentient Energy; Lloyd Hackel, Vice President for Advanced Technologies, Metal Improvement Corporation; and Charlie Hotz, Vice President of Research and Development, Nanosys, Inc. each presented on partnership with the National Labs.

  19. Partners and related links | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are the organizations with which EMSL maintains closest relationships in high performance computing and software development. Partners Note: The links below leave this site...

  20. Clean Cities National Partner Awards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet recognizes the 2003 Clean Cities National Partner Award winners and their outstanding efforts to promote alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles.

  1. THE ATTRACTIVENESS OF MATERIALS IN ADVANCED NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLES FOR VARIOUS PROLIFERATION AND THEFT SCENARIOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bathke, C. G.; Ebbinghaus, Bartley B.; Collins, Brian A.; Sleaford, Brad W.; Hase, Kevin R.; Robel, Martin; Wallace, R. K.; Bradley, Keith S.; Ireland, J. R.; Jarvinen, G. D.; Johnson, M. W.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Smith, Brian W.

    2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We must anticipate that the day is approaching when details of nuclear weapons design and fabrication will become common knowledge. On that day we must be particularly certain that all special nuclear materials (SNM) are adequately accounted for and protected and that we have a clear understanding of the utility of nuclear materials to potential adversaries. To this end, this paper examines the attractiveness of materials mixtures containing SNM and alternate nuclear materials associated with the plutonium-uranium reduction extraction (Purex), uranium extraction (UREX), coextraction (COEX), thorium extraction (THOREX), and PYROX (an electrochemical refining method) reprocessing schemes. This paper provides a set of figures of merit for evaluating material attractiveness that covers a broad range of proliferant state and subnational group capabilities. The primary conclusion of this paper is that all fissile material must be rigorously safeguarded to detect diversion by a state and must be provided the highest levels of physical protection to prevent theft by subnational groups; no 'silver bullet' fuel cycle has been found that will permit the relaxation of current international safeguards or national physical security protection levels. The work reported herein has been performed at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and is based on the calculation of 'attractiveness levels' that are expressed in terms consistent with, but normally reserved for, the nuclear materials in DOE nuclear facilities. The methodology and findings are presented. Additionally, how these attractiveness levels relate to proliferation resistance and physical security is discussed.

  2. Advanced thermoelectric materials and systems for automotive applications in the next millennium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morelli, D.T.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combination of environmental, economic, and technological drivers has led to a reassessment of the potential for using thermoelectric devices in several automotive applications. In order for this technology to achieve its ultimate potential, new materials with enhanced thermoelectric properties are required. Experimental results on the fundamental physical properties of some new thermoelectric materials, including filled skutterudites and 1-1-1 intermetallic semiconductors, are presented.

  3. Design and fabrication of advanced materials from Illinois coal wastes. [Quarterly] technical report, September 1--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malhotra, V.M.; Wright, M.A. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of this project is to develop a bench-scale procedure to design and fabricate advanced brake and structural composite materials from Illinois coal combustion residues. During the first quarter of the project, the thrust of the work was directed towards setting up the experimental facilities and undertaking preliminary tests to gauge the ability of coal tar derived binder in fabricating the brake skeletons. In addition systematic scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and differential thermal analysis (DTA) were conducted on PCC fly ash (Baldwin), fly ash (ADM), FBC fly ash, FBC spent bed bottom ash, bottom ash (ADM), and scrubber sludge residues to characterize their geometrical shape and thermal stability. The PCC fly ash particles being highly spherical in shape and thermally inert up to 1100{degrees}C will make an excellent raw material for our composites. This is born out by fabricating brake skeletons from PCC fly ash colloids. Unlike the PCC fly ash and FBC fly ash, the scrubber sludge particles are not suitable hosts for our brake lining materials because of a whisker-like particle structure. Six different compositions of various combustion residues were tested in the fabrication of brake skeletons, and our tar derived binder shows great promise in the fabrication of composite materials.

  4. Advanced Reflector and Absorber Materials (Fact Sheet), Thermal Systems Group: CSP Capabilities (TSG)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1BP-14 PowerAdvanced ModelingNuclear ReactorIdeally, we

  5. Partnering with the NCPV (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brochure that explains the basic partnering opportunities that exist within the National Center for Photovoltaics for industry and university groups: non-proprietary partnering opportunities, competitive solicitations, Technology Partnership Agreements, seed fund to develop Technology Partnership Agreements, Hands-On PV Experience Workshop, and NCPV Fellowship Program.

  6. Advanced phase change materials and systems for solar passive heating and cooling of residential buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salyer, I.O.; Sircar, A.K.; Dantiki, S.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last three years under the sponsorship of the DOE Solar Passive Division, the University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) has investigated four phase change material (PCM) systems for utility in thermal energy storage for solar passive heating and cooling applications. From this research on the basis of cost, performance, containment, and environmental acceptability, we have selected as our current and most promising series of candidate phase change materials, C-15 to C-24 linear crystalline alkyl hydrocarbons. The major part of the research during this contract period was directed toward the following three objectives. Find, test, and develop low-cost effective phase change materials (PCM) that melt and freeze sharply in the comfort temperature range of 73--77{degree}F for use in solar passive heating and cooling of buildings. Define practical materials and processes for fire retarding plasterboard/PCM building products. Develop cost-effective methods for incorporating PCM into building construction materials (concrete, plasterboard, etc.) which will lead to the commercial manufacture and sale of PCM-containing products resulting in significant energy conservation.

  7. International Conference on Advanced Composite Materials in Bridges and Structures Confrence Internationale sur les matriaux composites d'avant-garde pour ponts et charpentes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    6th International Conference on Advanced Composite Materials in Bridges and Structures 6ième a very low thermally conductive material. Carbon fiber (CFRP) was chosen for this research, instead Conférence Internationale sur les matériaux composites d'avant-garde pour ponts et charpentes Kingston

  8. MCWASP, Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes XI TMS (The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zabaras, Nicholas J.

    -COMPONENT ALLOYS USING LEVEL SET METHODS Nicholas Zabaras1 , Lijian Tan1 1 Materials Process Design and Control Laboratory 188 Frank H.T Rhodes Hall, Sibley school of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell, Multi-component alloy, Multi-phase, Fluid flow. Abstract A level set method combining features of front

  9. Advanced Materials . 2012, 24, 25922597 High-Rate Capability Silicon Decorated Vertically AlignedCarbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    a leading technology for medical and electronic devices as well as electric vehicles. The increasing demand.[1] Then, as nanotechnology develops, various Si-nanostructures have emerged as an appropriate anode material. Specific charge storage capacity about 2000 mAh g-1 is available and stable after one

  10. Development of Nanostructured Materials with Improved Radiation Tolerance for Advanced Nuclear Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinghang Zhang; K. Ted Hartwig

    2009-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This project will explore the fundamental mechanisms through which interfaces in nanolayered structures and grain boundaries of bulk nanomaterials are able to attract and rapidly eliminate point defects and unwanted foreign species. Candidate materials that will be studied include both nanostructured multilayer composites synthesized by magnetron sputtering and structural bulk nanomaterials produced by severed plastic deformation, equal channel angular extrusion.

  11. advanced proton-exchange materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    proton-exchange materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Development of novel anodic...

  12. Proton exchange membrane materials for the advancement of direct methanol fuel-cell technology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cornelius, Christopher J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of hybrid organic-inorganic materials, and methods of synthesis, that can be used as a proton exchange membrane in a direct methanol fuel cell. In contrast with Nafion.RTM. PEM materials, which have random sulfonation, the new class of materials have ordered sulfonation achieved through self-assembly of alternating polyimide segments of different molecular weights comprising, for example, highly sulfonated hydrophilic PDA-DASA polyimide segment alternating with an unsulfonated hydrophobic 6FDA-DAS polyimide segment. An inorganic phase, e.g., 0.5 5 wt % TEOS, can be incorporated in the sulfonated polyimide copolymer to further improve its properties. The new materials exhibit reduced swelling when exposed to water, increased thermal stability, and decreased O.sub.2 and H.sub.2 gas permeability, while retaining proton conductivities similar to Nafion.RTM.. These improved properties may allow direct methanol fuel cells to operate at higher temperatures and with higher efficiencies due to reduced methanol crossover.

  13. ADVANCED MATERIALS & PROCESSES FEBRUARY 2011 25 These are the winning entries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of duplex stainless steel (material in accordance to ASTM A 890- 5A: Standard Specification for Castings Duplex Steel Etched with LBI Lukasz Boron Foundry Research Institute Krakow, Poland Microstructure Laboratory (PNNL) Richland, Wash. SEM microphotograph of corrosion products on X65 steel after 9 days

  14. Advances in the simulation and automated measurement of well-sorted granular material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    between observed and estimated values). These methods allow non-intrusive and fully automated measurements granular material. The principal objective here is to provide simple optical techniques for the non-intrusive to images of particles with a significant apparent void fraction (i.e., non-touching particles). [5

  15. Recent Advances on Hydrogenic Retention in ITER's Plasma-Facing Materials: BE, C, W.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skinner, C H; Alimov, Kh; Bekris, N; Causey, R A; Clark, R.E.H.; Coad, J P; Davis, J W; Doerner, R P; Mayer, M; Pisarev, A; Roth, J

    2008-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Management of tritium inventory remains one of the grand challenges in the development of fusion energy and the choice of plasma-facing materials is a key factor for in-vessel tritium retention. The Atomic and Molecular Data Unit of the International Atomic Energy Agency organized a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the overall topic of tritium inventory in fusion reactors during the period 2001-2006. This dealt with hydrogenic retention in ITER's plasma-facing materials, Be, C, W, and in compounds (mixed materials) of these elements as well as tritium removal techniques. The results of the CRP are summarized in this article together with recommendations for ITER. Basic parameters of diffusivity, solubility and trapping in Be, C and W are reviewed. For Be, the development of open porosity can account for transient hydrogenic pumping but long term retention will be dominated by codeposition. Codeposition is also the dominant retention mechanism for carbon and remains a serious concern for both Be and C containing layers. Hydrogenic trapping in unirradiated tungsten is low but will increase with ion and neutron damage. Mixed materials will be formed in a tokamak and these can also retain significant amounts of hydrogen isotopes. Oxidative and photon-based techniques for detritiation of plasma-facing components are described.

  16. Energy Department Small Business Partner Success Stories | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Small Business Partner Success Stories Energy Department Small Business Partner Success Stories Energy Department Small Business Partner Success Stories...

  17. Final Scientific/Technical Report for DOE/EERE project Advanced Magnetic Refrigerant Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Francis

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A team led by GE Global Research developed new magnetic refrigerant materials needed to enhance the commercialization potential of residential appliances such as refrigerators and air conditioners based on the magnetocaloric effect (a nonvapor compression cooling cycle). The new magnetic refrigerant materials have potentially better performance at lower cost than existing materials, increasing technology readiness level. The performance target of the new magnetocaloric material was to reduce the magnetic field needed to achieve 4 °C adiabatic temperature change from 1.5 Tesla to 0.75 Tesla. Such a reduction in field minimizes the cost of the magnet assembly needed for a magnetic refrigerator. Such a reduction in magnet assembly cost is crucial to achieving commercialization of magnetic refrigerator technology. This project was organized as an iterative alloy development effort with a parallel material modeling task being performed at George Washington University. Four families of novel magnetocaloric alloys were identified, screened, and assessed for their performance potential in a magnetic refrigeration cycle. Compositions from three of the alloy families were manufactured into regenerator components. At the beginning of the project a previously studied magnetocaloric alloy was selected for manufacturing into the first regenerator component. Each of the regenerators was tested in magnetic refrigerator prototypes at a subcontractor at at GE Appliances. The property targets for operating temperature range, operating temperature control, magnetic field sensitivity, and corrosion resistance were met. The targets for adiabatic temperature change and thermal hysteresis were not met. The high thermal hysteresis also prevented the regenerator components from displaying measurable cooling power when tested in prototype magnetic refrigerators. Magnetic refrigerant alloy compositions that were predicted to have low hysteresis were not attainable with conventional alloy processing methods. Preliminary experiments with rapid solidification methods showed a path towards attaining low hysteresis compositions should this alloy development effort be continued.

  18. Standard practice for radiographic examination of advanced aero and turbine materials and components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This practice establishes the minimum requirements for radiographic examination of metallic and nonmetallic materials and components used in designated applications such as gas turbine engines and flight structures. 1.2 The requirements in this practice are intended to control the radiographic process to ensure the quality of radiographic images produced for use in designated applications such as gas turbine engines and flight structures; this practice is not intended to establish acceptance criteria for material or components. When examination is performed in accordance with this practice, engineering drawings, specifications or other applicable documents shall indicate the acceptance criteria. 1.3 All areas of this practice may be open to agreement between the cognizant engineering organization and the supplier, or specific direction from the cognizant engineering organization. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the respons...

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - GNEP PARTNERS CANDIDATE PARTNERS AND OBSERVERS...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Forum (GIF) 3. Euratom Attending Candidate Partner and Observer Countries 1. Argentina 2. Belgium 3. Brazil 4. Canada 5. Czech 6. Egypt 7. Finland 8. Germany 9. Italy 10....

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Research Partner Requests Proposals...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Research Partner Requests Proposals for Battery Cell Development Vehicle Technologies Office Research Partner Requests Proposals for Battery Cell Development February 24, 2015 -...

  1. President Obama visits Geothermal Technologies Program Partner...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    President Obama visits Geothermal Technologies Program Partner President Obama visits Geothermal Technologies Program Partner May 2, 2011 - 1:41pm Addthis President Obama visited...

  2. A Novel Approach to Material Development for Advanced Reactor Systems. Quarterly progress report, Year 1 - Quarter 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2000-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK B188 A Novel Approach to Material Development for Advanced Reactor Systems. Quarterly progress report, Year 1--Quarter 2. Year one of this project had three major goals. First, to specify, order and install a new high current ion source for more rapid and stable proton irradiation. Second, to assess the use low temperature irradiation and chromium pre-enrichment in an effort to isolate a radiation damage microstructure in stainless steels without the effects of RIS. Third, to prepare for the irradiation of reactor pressure vessel steel and Zircaloy. Program goals for Second Quarter, Year One: In year 1 quarter 2, the project goal was to complete an irradiation of an RPV steel sample and begin sample characterization. We also planned to identify sources of Zircaloy for irradiation and characterization.

  3. Multiscale Design of Advanced Materials based on Hybrid Ab Initio and Quasicontinuum Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luskin, Mitchell [University of Minnesota

    2014-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This project united researchers from mathematics, chemistry, computer science, and engineering for the development of new multiscale methods for the design of materials. Our approach was highly interdisciplinary, but it had two unifying themes: first, we utilized modern mathematical ideas about change-of-scale and state-of-the-art numerical analysis to develop computational methods and codes to solve real multiscale problems of DOE interest; and, second, we took very seriously the need for quantum mechanics-based atomistic forces, and based our methods on fast solvers of chemically accurate methods.

  4. Materials support for the development of a high temperature advanced furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breder, K.; Lin, H.T.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project is to compare a limited number of candidate ceramics proposed for use in the air heater of a coal fired high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF) for power generation. This work will provide necessary initial structural ceramic parameters for design of a prototype system. Phase 1 of the work consisted of evaluation of the mechanical properties of three structural ceramics at high temperatures in air and a preliminary evaluation of mechanical properties of these structural ceramics after exposure to coal ash. This work was described in a final report, and the results will serve as baseline data for further work. An initial screening of candidate structural ceramics with respect to their creep properties in air at selected temperatures will be performed as Phase 2, and temperatures above which creep may become a design problem will be identified. Tubes and tube sections of the candidate ceramics will then be exposed to a combination of mechanical loads, coal ash exposure and high temperature, and corrosion behavior, mechanisms and post exposure mechanical properties will be evaluated.

  5. Advanced computational simulation for design and manufacturing of lightweight material components for automotive applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simunovic, S.; Aramayo, G.A.; Zacharia, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Toridis, T.G. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Bandak, F.; Ragland, C.L. [Dept. of Transportation, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational vehicle models for the analysis of lightweight material performance in automobiles have been developed through collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration, and George Washington University. The vehicle models have been verified against experimental data obtained from vehicle collisions. The crashed vehicles were analyzed, and the main impact energy dissipation mechanisms were identified and characterized. Important structural parts were extracted and digitized and directly compared with simulation results. High-performance computing played a key role in the model development because it allowed for rapid computational simulations and model modifications. The deformation of the computational model shows a very good agreement with the experiments. This report documents the modifications made to the computational model and relates them to the observations and findings on the test vehicle. Procedural guidelines are also provided that the authors believe need to be followed to create realistic models of passenger vehicles that could be used to evaluate the performance of lightweight materials in automotive structural components.

  6. FUNCTIONALIZED SILICA AEROGELS: ADVANCED MATERIALS TO CAPTURE AND IMMOBILIZE RADIOACTIVE IODINE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matyas, Josef; Fryxell, Glen E.; Busche, Brad J.; Wallace, Krys; Fifield, Leonard S.

    2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    To support the future expansion of nuclear energy, an effective method is needed to capture and safely store radiological iodine-129 released during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. Various materials have been investigated to capture and immobilize iodine. In most cases, however, the materials that are effective for capturing iodine cannot subsequently be sintered/densified to create a stable composite that could be a viable waste form. We have developed chemically modified, highly porous, silica aerogels that show sorption capacities higher than 440 mg of I2 per gram at 150 C. An iodine uptake test in dry air containing 4.2 ppm of iodine demonstrated no breakthrough after 3.5 h and indicated a decontamination factor in excess of 310. Preliminary densification tests showed that the I2-loaded aerogels retained more than 92 wt% of I2 after thermal sintering with pressure assistance at 1200 C for 30 min. These high capture and retention efficiencies for I2 can be further improved by optimizing the functionalization process and the chemistry as well as the sintering conditions.

  7. February 2000 Advanced Technology Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Standards and Technology (NIST) is a cost-sharing program designed to partner the federal governmentFebruary 2000 Advanced Technology Program Information Infrastructure for Healthcare Focused Program: A Brief History ADADVANCEDANCED TECHNOLOGY PRTECHNOLOGY PROGRAMOGRAM NISTIR 6477 National Institute

  8. New Jersey Comfort Partners Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The New Jersey Comfort Partners program is a free of charge, direct installation energy efficiency assistance program available to most New Jersey households with significant energy usage and an...

  9. Clean Cities National Partner Awards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U. S. DOE Clean Cities Program has awarded its National Partner awards for 2002, and the awards will be presented at the Clean Cities Conference in May 2002. This fact sheets describe the winners and their contributions.

  10. Fundamental Understanding of Ambient and High-Temperature Plasticity Phenomena in Structural Materials in Advanced Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deo, Chaitanya; Zhu, Ting; McDowell, David

    2013-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research project is to develop the methods and tools necessary to link unit processes analyzed using atomistic simulations involving interaction of vacancies and interstitials with dislocations, as well as dislocation mediation at sessile junctions and interfaces as affected by radiation, with cooperative influence on higher-length scale behavior of polycrystals. These tools and methods are necessary to design and enhance radiation-induced damage-tolerant alloys. The project will achieve this goal by applying atomistic simulations to characterize unit processes of: 1. Dislocation nucleation, absorption, and desorption at interfaces 2. Vacancy production, radiation-induced segregation of substitutional Cr at defect clusters (point defect sinks) in BCC Fe-Cr ferritic/martensitic steels 3. Investigation of interaction of interstitials and vacancies with impurities (V, Nb, Ta, Mo, W, Al, Si, P, S) 4. Time evolution of swelling (cluster growth) phenomena of irradiated materials 5. Energetics and kinetics of dislocation bypass of defects formed by interstitial clustering and formation of prismatic loops, informing statistical models of continuum character with regard to processes of dislocation glide, vacancy agglomeration and swelling, climb and cross slip This project will consider the Fe, Fe-C, and Fe-Cr ferritic/martensitic material system, accounting for magnetism by choosing appropriate interatomic potentials and validating with first principles calculations. For these alloys, the rate of swelling and creep enhancement is considerably lower than that of face-centered cubic (FCC) alloys and of austenitic Fe-Cr-Mo alloys. The team will confirm mechanisms, validate simulations at various time and length scales, and improve the veracity of computational models. The proposed research?s feasibility is supported by recent modeling of radiation effects in metals and alloys, interfacial dislocation transfer reactions in nano-twinned copper, and dislocation reactions at general boundaries, along with extensive modeling cooperative effects of dislocation interactions and migration in crystals and polycrystals using continuum models.

  11. Microstructure and Property Evolution in Advanced Cladding and Duct Materials Under Long-Term Irradiation at Elevated Temperature: Critical Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Was, Gary; Jiao, Zhijie; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

    2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The in-service degradation of reactor core materials is related to underlying changes in the irradiated microstructure. During reactor operation, structural components and cladding experience displacement of atoms by collisions with neutrons at temperatures at which the radiation-induced defects are mobile, leading to microstructure evolution under irradiation that can degrade material properties. At the doses and temperatures relevant to fast reactor operation, the microstructure evolves by microchemistry changes due to radiation-induced segregation, dislocation loop formation and growth, radiation induced precipitation, destabilization of the existing precipitate structure, as well as the possibility for void formation and growth. These processes do not occur independently; rather, their evolution is highly interlinked. Radiation-induced segregation of Cr and existing chromium carbide coverage in irradiated alloy T91 track each other closely. The radiation-induced precipitation of Ni-Si precipitates and RIS of Ni and Si in alloys T91 and HCM12A are likely related. Neither the evolution of these processes nor their coupling is understood under the conditions required for materials performance in fast reactors (temperature range 300-600°C and doses to 200 dpa and beyond). Further, predictive modeling is not yet possible, as models for microstructure evolution must be developed along with experiments to characterize these key processes and provide tools for extrapolation. To extend the range of operation of nuclear fuel cladding and structural materials in advanced nuclear energy and transmutation systems to that required for the fast reactor, the irradiation-induced evolution of the microstructure, microchemistry, and the associated mechanical properties at relevant temperatures and doses must be understood. This project builds upon joint work at the proposing institutions, under a NERI-C program that is scheduled to end in September, to understand the effects of radiation on these important materials. The objective of this project is to conduct critical experiments to understand the evolution of microstructural and microchemical features (loops, voids, precipitates, and segregation) and mechanical properties (hardening and creep) under high temperature and full dose range radiation, including the effect of differences in the initial material composition and microstructure on the microstructural response, including key questions related to saturation of the microstructure at high doses and temperatures.

  12. Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR TD) Materials Program semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkins, R.R.; Cole, N.C. (comps.)

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for fossil energy applications with a focus on the longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The Program includes research aimed toward a better understanding of materials behavior in fossil energy environments and the development of new materials capable of substantial enhancement of plant operations and reliability. Research is outlined in four areas: Ceramics, New Alloys, Corrosion and Erosion Research, and Technology Development and Transfer. (VC)

  13. Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR&TD) Materials Program semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1991. Fossil Energy Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkins, R.R.; Cole, N.C. [comps.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for fossil energy applications with a focus on the longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The Program includes research aimed toward a better understanding of materials behavior in fossil energy environments and the development of new materials capable of substantial enhancement of plant operations and reliability. Research is outlined in four areas: Ceramics, New Alloys, Corrosion and Erosion Research, and Technology Development and Transfer. (VC)

  14. Design and fabrication of advanced materials from Illinois coal wastes. Quarterly report, 1 March 1995--31 May 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malhotra, V.M.; Wright, M.A.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of this project is to develop a bench-scale procedure to design and fabricate advanced brake and structural composite materials from Illinois coal combustion residues. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), differential thermal analysis (DTA), and transmission-Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) were conducted on PCC fly ash (Baldwin), FBC fly ash (ADM unit1-6), FBC fly ash (S.I. coal), FBC spent bed ash (ADM unit1-6), bottom ash, and scrubber sludge (CWLP) residues to characterize their geometrical shapes, mineral phases, and thermal stability. Our spectroscopic results indicate that the scrubber sludge is mainly composed of a gypsum-like phase whose lattice structure is different from the lattice structure of conventional gypsum, and sludge does not contain hannebachite (CaSO{sub 3}0.5H{sub 2}O) phase. In the second and third quarters the focus of research has been on developing protocols for the formation of advanced brake composites and structural composites. Our attempts to fabricate brake frictional shoes, in the form of 1.25 inch disks, from PCC fly ash, FBC spent bed ash, scrubber sludge, coal char, iron particles, and coal tar were successful. Based on the experience gained and microscopic analyses, we have now upscaled our procedures to fabricate 2.5 inch diameter disks from coal combustion residues. The SEM and Young`s modulus analyses of brake composites fabricated at 400 psi < Pressure < 2200 psi suggest pressure has a strong influence on the particle packing and the filling of interstices in our composites.

  15. Approved Module Information for EC312C, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Advanced Materials Module Code: EC312C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neirotti, Juan Pablo

    to assess the strength and quality of in-situ concrete, including the exposure to the test methods and developments. Repair materials, polymers in concrete. Non-Destructive Testing of Concrete. Reasons for making) advanced appreciation of the main forms of deterioration that affect concrete structures, their methods

  16. Advanced Technology in Welding, Materials Processing and Evaluation, Proceedings, 5th JWS International Symposium, Tokyo, 17-19 Apr.1990. Vol.l;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    Advanced Technology in Welding, Materials Processing and Evaluation, Proceedings, 5th JWS International Symposium, Tokyo, 17-19 Apr.1990. Vol.l; S.Machida, ed. Japan Welding Society, Tokyo, 11-16. 1990 The Physics of Welding Processes Thomas W. EAGAR" Abstract Welding is an extremely complex process; however

  17. Addressing Energy Costs of Current Separation Processes with Advanced Materials and Large scale purification and separation processes transform low value resources into more

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Addressing Energy Costs of Current Separation Processes with Advanced Materials and Processes Large scale purification and separation processes transform low value resources into more useful fuels, basic chemicals, food and clean water; however, they also consume considerable energy. With growing global

  18. Design and fabrication of advanced materials from Illinois coal wastes. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malhotra, V.M.; Wright, M.A. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of this project is to develop a bench-scale procedure to design and fabricate advanced brake and structural composite materials from Illinois coal combustion residues. During the first two quarters of the project, the thrust of the work directed towards characterizing the various coal combustion residues and FGD residue, i.e., scrubber sludge. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), differential thermal analysis (DTA), and transmission-Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) were conducted on PCC fly ash (Baldwin), FBC fly ash (ADK unit l-6), FBC fly ash (S.I. coal), FBC spent bed ash (ADM, unit l-6), bottom ash, and scrubber sludge (CWLP) residues to characterize their geometrical shapes, mineral phases, and thermal stability. Our spectroscopic results indicate that the scrubber sludge is mainly composed of a gypsum-like phase whose lattice structure is different from the lattice structure of conventional gypsum, and sludge does not contain hannebachite (CaSO{sub 3}.0.5H{sub 2}O) phase. Our attempts to fabricate brake frictional shoes, in the form of 1.25 inch disks, from PCC fly ash, FBC spent bed ash, scrubber sludge, coal char, iron particles, and coal tar were successful. Based on the experience gained and microscopic analyses, we have now upscaled our procedures to fabricate 2.5 inch diameter disk,- from coal combustion residues. This has been achieved. The SEM and Young`s modulus analyses of brake composites fabricated at 400 psi < Pressure < 2200 psi suggest pressure has a strong influence on the particle packing and the filling of interstices in our composites. Also, these results along with mechanical behavior of the fabricated disks lead us to believe that the combination of surface altered PCC fly ash and scrubber sludge particles, together ed ash particles are ideal for our composite materials.

  19. Fuel Cells for Portable Power: 1. Introduction to DMFCs; 2. Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zelenay, Piotr [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Thanks to generally less stringent cost constraints, portable power fuel cells, the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) in particular, promise earlier market penetration than higher power polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) for the automotive and stationary applications. However, a large-scale commercialization of DMFC-based power systems beyond niche applications already targeted by developers will depend on improvements to fuel cell performance and performance durability as well as on the reduction in cost, especially of the portable systems on the higher end of the power spectrum (100-250 W). In this part of the webinar, we will focus on the development of advanced materials (catalysts, membranes, electrode structures, and membrane electrode assemblies) and fuel cell operating concepts capable of fulfilling two key targets for portable power systems: the system cost of $5/W and overall fuel conversion efficiency of 2.0-2.5 kWh/L. Presented research will concentrate on the development of new methanol oxidation catalysts, hydrocarbon membranes with reduced methanol crossover, and improvements to component durability. Time permitted, we will also present a few highlights from the development of electrocatalysts for the oxidation of two alternative fuels for the direct-feed fuel cells: ethanol and dimethyl ether.

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia-California Partners with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with Japanese National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) in Hydrogen-Materials Research On July 26, 2013, in CRF, Energy, Facilities, News, News &...

  1. Advances in HTS materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tixador, P

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HTS (High Temperature Superconductor) offer great opportunities to reach higher magnetic flux densities when compared with LTS (Low Temperature Superconductor). The upper generally accepted limit of 23 T using Nb3Sn can be overstep with HTS. HTS Bi-2212 round wires have shown critical current densities as higher than 1000 MA/m2 under 45 T at 4.2 K. The road for very high fields is open. The round shape suits rather well for magnets, especially with high current specifications since the “classical” high current cables (Rutherford, CIC) require elementary round conductor. The absence of current anisotropy in round conductor is another advantage. The YBaCuO coated conductors (HTS second generation conductors) show large opportunities for high fields. Their higher mechanical performances (IBAD process) compared to Bi conductor bring advantages for high field magnets. The protection of HTS magnet is an identified issue since degradations have been observed in several magnets after a quench. A state of the art ...

  2. Advanced Materials Manufacturing | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    existing manufacturing industries and result in creative new products. Stronger, more corrosion-resistant and lower cost steel alloys are being developed and commercialized to...

  3. Nanostructured Materials for Advanced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    on an already stretched world energy infrastructure. One alternative ener- gy/power source under serious consid of electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). High energy and high power densities for such electrochemical energy stor- age and conversion. It has been inten- sively studied for use as power supplies

  4. Advanced Materials | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Become agovEducationWelcomestructures | CenterCapabilities

  5. Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Business Partnering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Business Partnering Steven Chiang, Director Agribusiness Incubator a productive bioenergy industry, successful partnering amongst industry "players" is essential. This section of the Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan specifically evaluates facilitating the bioenergy industry through

  6. Top partner probes of extended Higgs sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearney, John

    Natural theories of the weak scale often include fermionic partners of the top quark. If the electroweak symmetry breaking sector contains scalars beyond a single Higgs doublet, then top partners can have sizable branching ...

  7. Voluntary Initiative: Partnering to Enhance Program Capacity...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to Enhance Program Capacity Better Buildings Residential Network Program Sustainability Peer Exchange Call Series: Voluntary Initiative: Partnering to Enhance Program...

  8. Clean Cities National Partner Awards (Fact sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Clean Cities publication regarding the National Partner Award winners announced at the 2004 Clean Cities Conference.

  9. Partners and Stakeholders: Roles and Potential Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Partners and Stakeholders: Roles and Potential Impact, Chapter 6 from the Clean Energy Finance Guide, Third Edition

  10. Letters of Outreach to Partner Communities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Letters of Outreach to Partner Communities, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  11. In-Pile Experiment of a New Hafnium Aluminide Composite Material to Enable Fast Neutron Testing in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donna Post Guillen; Douglas L. Porter; James R. Parry; Heng Ban

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new hafnium aluminide composite material is being developed as a key component in a Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL) system designed to provide fast neutron flux test capability in the Advanced Test Reactor. An absorber block comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) particles (~23% by volume) dispersed in an aluminum matrix can absorb thermal neutrons and transfer heat from the experiment to pressurized water cooling channels. However, the thermophysical properties, such as thermal conductivity, of this material and the effect of irradiation are not known. This paper describes the design of an in-pile experiment to obtain such data to enable design and optimization of the BFFL neutron filter.

  12. Partners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    asked. "Worked fine at Pine Lake." "This isn't Pine Lake," Hutch replied, "and these fish.aren't your run- of-the-mill trout." Starsky just shrugged, stubbornly baiting his hook with a fat nite- crawler. "A fish is a fish is a fish," he declared... cast. The fly landed in the grass at his feet. "Damn8. " . -y. : "Isle,'" Hutch, chided, "these Utah fish have virgin ears. Look, I'll get these cleaned and start breakfast. Holler if you need any help. ",.-.:... So you can laugh at me again...

  13. Partnering Institution Name Partnering Institution Name Place Type

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian,Parle Biscuits Pvt Ltd Jump to:Partnering Institution

  14. Copyright 2001 by William F. Pratt. Published by Society for the Advancement of Material and Process Engineering with permission.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Matthew S.

    , Carbon Fiber, Constrained Layer Damping, Composite Materials, Passive Vibration Control, Testing with permission. - 2 - Characterizing the dynamic performance of damped composite materials presents a number of the composite with a single test apparatus. Third, most dynamic test methods don't allow testing of the material

  15. Advances in Sustainable Petroleum Engineering Science, Volume 1, Issue 2, 2009, pp. 141 -162 AComprehensiveMaterialBalanceEquationwiththeInclusionof

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hossain, M. Enamul

    techniques, it is time to include all salient features of the material balance equation (MBE). The inclusion predicting petroleum reservoir performance. However, it is well known that the material balance equation AComprehensiveMaterialBalanceEquationwiththeInclusionof MemoryDuringRock-FluidDeformation M.E. Hossain Dalhousie

  16. Recent Device Developments with Advanced Bulk Thermoelectric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Device Developments with Advanced Bulk Thermoelectric Materials at RTI Recent Device Developments with Advanced Bulk Thermoelectric Materials at RTI Reviews work in engineered...

  17. Greylock Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJump to:Information 9297484°,Greylock Partners Jump

  18. Grid Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJump to:Information 9297484°,Greylock Partners25

  19. Partner Testimonials | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPO WebsitePalms Village Resort BParticleParticlesPartner

  20. Laboratory Partnering | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas » MethaneJohnsonKristina PflanzLMLaboratory Partnering

  1. ANV Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORT Americium/Curium Vitrification4th DayANV Partners Jump to:

  2. Advanced Electric Traction System Technology Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Iver

    2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    As a subcontractor to General Motors (GM), Ames Laboratory provided the technical expertise and supplied experimental materials needed to assess the technology of high energy bonded permanent magnets that are injection or compression molded for use in the Advanced Electric Traction System motor. This support was a sustained (Phase 1: 6/07 to 3/08) engineering effort that builds on the research achievements of the primary FreedomCAR project at Ames Laboratory on development of high temperature magnet alloy particulate in both flake and spherical powder forms. Ames Lab also provide guidance and direction in selection of magnet materials and supported the fabrication of experimental magnet materials for development of injection molding and magnetization processes by Arnold Magnetics, another project partner. The work with Arnold Magnetics involved a close collaboration on particulate material design and processing to achieve enhanced particulate properties and magnetic performance in the resulting bonded magnets. The overall project direction was provided by GM Program Management and two design reviews were held at GM-ATC in Torrance, CA. Ames Lab utilized current expertise in magnet powder alloy design and processing, along with on-going research advances being achieved under the existing FreedomCAR Program project to help guide and direct work during Phase 1 for the Advanced Electric Traction System Technology Development Program. The technical tasks included review of previous GM and Arnold Magnets work and identification of improvements to the benchmark magnet material, Magnequench MQP-14-12. Other benchmark characteristics of the desired magnet material include 64% volumetric loading with PPS polymer and a recommended maximum use temperature of 200C. A collaborative relationship was maintained with Arnold Magnets on the specification and processing of the bonded magnet material required by GM-ATC.

  3. Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your Home andDisposition | NationalMaterials

  4. High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials: Iron-Based Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings: SAM HPCRM Program ? FY04 Annual Report ? Rev. 0 - DARPA DSO & DOE OCRWM Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J; Haslam, J; Wong, F; Ji, S; Day, S; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Weaver, D; Aprigliano, L; Kohler, L; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Wolejsza, T; Martin, F; Yang, N; Lucadamo, G; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Heuer, A; Ernst, F; Michal, G; Kahn, H; Lavernia, E

    2007-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The multi-institutional High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Team is cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Science Office (DSO) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), and has developed new corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals that can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The Fe-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove of importance for applications on ships. Such coatings could be used as an 'integral drip shield' on spent fuel containers, as well as protective coatings that could be applied over welds, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking. In the future, such new high-performance iron-based materials could be substituted for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling a reduction in the $58-billion life cycle cost for the long-term storage of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel by tens of percent.

  5. Advanced Researech and Technology Development fossil energy materials program: Semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the ARandTD Fossil Energy Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for fossil energy applications with a focus on the longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The program includes research aimed toward a better understanding of materials behavior in fossil energy environments and the development of new materials capable of substantial enhancement of plant operations and reliability. The ORNL Fossil Energy Materials Program Office compiles and issues this combined semiannual progress report from camera-ready copies submitted by each of the participating subcontractor organizations. This report of activities on the program is organized in accordance with a work breakdown structure in which projects are organized according to materials research thrust areas. These areas are (1) Structural Ceramics, (2) Alloy Development and Mechanical Properties, (3) Corrosion and Erosion of Alloys, and (4) Assessments and Technology Transfer. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  6. Photovoltaic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duty, C.; Angelini, J.; Armstrong, B.; Bennett, C.; Evans, B.; Jellison, G. E.; Joshi, P.; List, F.; Paranthaman, P.; Parish, C.; Wereszczak, A.

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the current project was to help make the US solar industry a world leader in the manufacture of thin film photovoltaics. The overall approach was to leverage ORNL’s unique characterization and processing technologies to gain a better understanding of the fundamental challenges for solar cell processing and apply that knowledge to targeted projects with industry members. ORNL has the capabilities in place and the expertise required to understand how basic material properties including defects, impurities, and grain boundaries affect the solar cell performance. ORNL also has unique processing capabilities to optimize the manufacturing process for fabrication of high efficiency and low cost solar cells. ORNL recently established the Center for Advanced Thin-film Systems (CATS), which contains a suite of optical and electrical characterization equipment specifically focused on solar cell research. Under this project, ORNL made these facilities available to industrial partners who were interested in pursuing collaborative research toward the improvement of their product or manufacturing process. Four specific projects were pursued with industrial partners: Global Solar Energy is a solar industry leader in full scale production manufacturing highly-efficient Copper Indium Gallium diSelenide (CIGS) thin film solar material, cells and products. ORNL worked with GSE to develop a scalable, non-vacuum, solution technique to deposit amorphous or nanocrystalline conducting barrier layers on untextured stainless steel substrates for fabricating high efficiency flexible CIGS PV. Ferro Corporation’s Electronic, Color and Glass Materials (“ECGM”) business unit is currently the world’s largest supplier of metallic contact materials in the crystalline solar cell marketplace. Ferro’s ECGM business unit has been the world's leading supplier of thick film metal pastes to the crystalline silicon PV industry for more than 30 years, and has had operational cells and modules in the field for 25 years. Under this project, Ferro leveraged world leading analytical capabilities at ORNL to characterize the paste-to-silicon interface microstructure and develop high efficiency next generation contact pastes. Ampulse Corporation is developing a revolutionary crystalline-silicon (c-Si) thin-film solar photovoltaic (PV) technology. Utilizing uniquely-textured substrates and buffer materials from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and breakthroughs in Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HW-CVD) techniques in epitaxial silicon developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Ampulse is creating a solar technology that is tunable in silicon thickness, and hence in efficiency and economics, to meet the specific requirements of multiple solar PV applications. This project focused on the development of a high rate deposition process to deposit Si, Ge, and Si1-xGex films as an alternate to hot-wire CVD. Mossey Creek Solar is a start-up company with great expertise in the solar field. The primary interest is to create and preserve jobs in the solar sector by developing high-yield, low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells using MSC-patented and -proprietary technologies. The specific goal of this project was to produce large grain formation in thin, net-shape-thickness mc-Si wafers processed with high-purity silicon powder and ORNL's plasma arc lamp melting without introducing impurities that compromise absorption coefficient and carrier lifetime. As part of this project, ORNL also added specific pieces of equipment to enhance our ability to provide unique insight for the solar industry. These capabilities include a moisture barrier measurement system, a combined physical vapor deposition and sputtering system dedicated to cadmium-containing deposits, adeep level transient spectroscopy system useful for identifying defects, an integrating sphere photoluminescence system, and a high-speed ink jet printing system. These tools were combined with others to study the effect of defects on the performance of crystalline silicon and

  7. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Utility Partners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) utility partners are eager to work closely with Federal agencies to help achieve energy management goals.

  8. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Partners | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    across the country to promote energy efficiency upgrades in homes and other buildings. Partners are making progress implementing energy efficiency improvements in their...

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia Researchers, UK Partners...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Merced to SSLS Using the kinetic Wulff plot to design and control nonpolar and semipolar GaN heteroepitaxy Sandia Researchers, UK Partners Publish Groundbreaking Work on Criegee...

  10. Showcasing California Better Buildings Challenge Partners' Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    impressive energy and monetary savings. The partners, including Albertson's of Carpinteria, University of California Irvine, and HEI Hotels & Resorts' La Jolla Marriott near...

  11. Advanced Fibers and Nanocomposites Georgia Tech has a rich tradition of excellence in composite materials and structures, and is an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    -performance composites. Built on a deep understanding of constituent materials and how they interact in fabrication nanomanufacturing, integrated computational composite materials engineering, and smart composites through integrated carbon nanotube buckypaper, smart composites with embedded, non-invasive strain gauges and temperature

  12. Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology Advances in Thin Film PV: CIGS & CdTe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Léonie

    and Photovoltaics Thin film solar cells based on compound semiconductor absorbers: CIGS and CdTe High efficiency and Photovoltaics Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Science and Technology Key issues in high efficiency CIGSTe Laboratory for Thin Films and Photovoltaics Empa- Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Science

  13. BPA seeks research partners to advance technology solutions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University, U.S. Department of Energy, Sandia National Laboratories, National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories. BPA uses a two-phase...

  14. Partnering with Industry to Advance Biofuels and Bioproducts...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    level of research flexibility. In particular, it can handle a wide range of biomass feedstocks and pretreatment processes. Parallel pretreatment processing trains allow for...

  15. San Antonio Better Buildings Partners Recognized for Advancing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Secretary for Energy Efficiency met with Macy's and the San Antonio Housing Authority (SAHA), learning how each organization is meeting their commitments to improve the energy use...

  16. Energy Department Recognizes San Antonio Area Partners for Advancing Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal RegisterHydrogen and FuelDefense as Part ofEnergy |Department

  17. Energy Department Recognizes San Antonio Area Partners for Advancing Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJunetrackEllen O'KaneSystemsDepartmentCarbon |EnergyEnergy

  18. San Antonio Better Buildings Partners Recognized for Advancing Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome ton6 th US/GermanSample

  19. workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Advanced Micro Devices | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of Bad CholesteroliManage Presentation iManagemoduleof Energy

  20. Argonne National Laboratory Partners with Advanced Magnet Lab to Develop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments from Tarasa U.S.LLC |Aquion EnergyEnergyDepartment ofFirst

  1. National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC), Biofuels for Advancing America (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction to the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium, a collaboration between 17 national laboratory, university, and industry partners that is conducting cutting-edge research to develop infrastructure-compatible, sustainable, biomass-based hydrocarbon fuels.

  2. CMI Education and Outreach | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Education and Outreach The Critical Materials Institute offers a variety of educational opportunities through several partners, including the Colorado School of Mines and Iowa...

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Materials for Advanced Turbocharger Designs (Agreement ID:17257) Project ID:18518

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about materials for...

  4. Materials Engineering Research Facility | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Engineering Research Facility Argonne's new Materials Engineering Research Facility (MERF) supports the laboratory's Advanced Battery Materials Synthesis and...

  5. Structural and functional biological materials : abalone nacre, sharp materials, and abalone foot adhesion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Albert Yu-Min

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    inorganic materials could lead to significant advances in materials science, opening the door to novel synthesis

  6. Bioenergy Business Partner Information Gathering Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bioenergy Business Partner Information Gathering Form Fax completed form to the Agribusiness.hnei.hawaii.edu/bmpp/stakeholders.asp Partners are organizations that perform, intend to perform, or should perform bioenergy processes and/or requirements. Please tell us about your organization and the role it plays in bioenergy production in Hawaii

  7. Business Partnering with Open Source Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    Business Partnering with Open Source Communities: Opportunities, Perils and Pitfalls James Howison Syracuse University #12;James Howison: Open Source and Business Partnering Introductions ·Doctoral student researching FLOSS ·Online but also ApacheCon, O'Reilly OSCon, ODSC ·Developer on BibDesk, (small OS X

  8. Odd Top Partners at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archana Anandakrishnan; Jack H. Collins; Marco Farina; Eric Kuflik; Maxim Perelstein

    2015-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    LHC searches for fermionic top partners $T$ focus on three decay topologies: $T\\to bW$, $T\\to tZ$, and $T\\to th$. However, top partners may carry new conserved quantum numbers that forbid these decays. The simplest possibility is a conserved parity, under which the top partner is odd and all SM states are even. In this case, decays of top partners may involve new particle-odd scalars, leading to signal topologies more commonly associated with supersymmetry, either with or without R-parity conservation. We study a simplified model in which this possibility is realized, and estimate the bounds on the top partner mass in this model implied by LHC searches for supersymmetry. We find that the bounds can be significantly weaker than in the conventional top partner decay scenario. For example, if the new parity is exact, a 500 GeV top partner is allowed as long as the lightest parity-odd scalar mass is between 325 and 500 GeV. The lower allowed top partner mass reduces the need for fine-tuning in the Higgs mass parameter, compared to the conventional decay scenario. We also present an explicit model, the Oddest Little Higgs, which exhibits this phenomenology.

  9. ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SUBCOMMITTEE

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AND ENGINEERING Under the Advanced Fuels Cycle Initiative, Transmutation Science and Engineering is divided into four subprograms: Physics, Structural Materials, Materials...

  10. Final LDRD report : nanoscale mechanisms in advanced aging of materials during storage of spent %22high burnup%22 nuclear fuel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Blythe G.; Rajasekhara, Shreyas; Enos, David George; Dingreville, Remi Philippe Michel; Doyle, Barney Lee; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Weiner, Ruth F.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a three-year LDRD project focused on understanding microstructural evolution and related property changes in Zr-based nuclear cladding materials towards the development of high fidelity predictive simulations for long term dry storage. Experiments and modeling efforts have focused on the effects of hydride formation and accumulation of irradiation defects. Key results include: determination of the influence of composition and defect structures on hydride formation; measurement of the electrochemical property differences between hydride and parent material for understanding and predicting corrosion resistance; in situ environmental transmission electron microscope observation of hydride formation; development of a predictive simulation for mechanical property changes as a function of irradiation dose; novel test method development for microtensile testing of ionirradiated material to simulate the effect of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties; and successful demonstration of an Idaho National Labs-based sample preparation and shipping method for subsequent Sandia-based analysis of post-reactor cladding.

  11. High-Capacity Micrometer-Sized Li2S Particles as Cathode Materials for Advanced Rechargeable Lithium-Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    Lithium-Ion Batteries Yuan Yang, Guangyuan Zheng, Sumohan Misra,§ Johanna Nelson,§ Michael F. Toney for lithium metal-free rechargeable batteries. It has a theoretical capacity of 1166 mAh/g, which is nearly 1 as the cathode material for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries with high specific energy. INTRODUCTION

  12. Mechanical-plowing-based high-speed patterning on hard material via advanced-control and ultrasonic probe vibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhihua; Zou, Qingze, E-mail: qzzou@rci.rutgers.edu [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)] [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Tan, Jun; Jiang, Wei [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)] [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we present a high-speed direct pattern fabrication on hard materials (e.g., a tungsten-coated quartz substrate) via mechanical plowing. Compared to other probe-based nanolithography techniques based on chemical- and/or physical-reactions (e.g., the Dip-pen technique), mechanical plowing is meritorious for its low cost, ease of process control, and capability of working with a wide variety of materials beyond conductive and/or soft materials. However, direct patterning on hard material faces two daunting challenges. First, the patterning throughput is ultimately hindered by the “writing” (plowing) speed, which, in turn, is limited by the adverse effects that can be excited/induced during high-speed, and/or large-range plowing, including the vibrational dynamics of the actuation system (the piezoelectric actuator, the cantilever, and the mechanical fixture connecting the cantilever to the actuator), the dynamic cross-axis coupling between different axes of motion, and the hysteresis and the drift effects related to the piezoelectric actuators. Secondly, it is very challenging to directly pattern on ultra-hard materials via plowing. Even with a diamond probe, the line depth of the pattern via continuous plowing on ultra-hard materials such as tungsten, is still rather small (<0.5 nm), particularly when the “writing” speed becomes high. To overcome these two challenges, we propose to utilize a novel iterative learning control technique to achieve precision tracking of the desired pattern during high-speed, large-range plowing, and introduce ultrasonic vibration of the probe in the normal (vertical) direction during the plowing process to enable direct patterning on ultra hard materials. The proposed approach was implemented to directly fabricate patterns on a mask with tungsten coating and quartz substrate. The experimental results demonstrated that a large-size pattern of four grooves (20 ?m in length with 300 nm spacing between lines) can be fabricated at a high speed of ?5 mm/s, with the line width and the line depth at ?95 nm and 2 nm, respectively. A fine pattern of the word “NANO” is also fabricated at the speed of ?5 mm/s.

  13. battery materials | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    battery materials battery materials Leads No leads are available at this time. Modeling Interfacial Glass-Water Reactions: Recent Advances and Current Limitations. Abstract: The...

  14. Energy Department and USDA Partner to Support Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    USDA Partner to Support Energy Efficiency in Rural Communities Energy Department and USDA Partner to Support Energy Efficiency in Rural Communities February 28, 2013 - 9:45am...

  15. Departments of Energy, Defense Partner to Install Fuel Cell Backup...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy, Defense Partner to Install Fuel Cell Backup Power Units at Eight Military Installations Departments of Energy, Defense Partner to Install Fuel Cell Backup Power Units at...

  16. Energy Department Partners with Industry to Train Federal Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Partners with Industry to Train Federal Energy Managers and Reduce Energy Costs Energy Department Partners with Industry to Train Federal Energy Managers and Reduce Energy Costs...

  17. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: El Camino Real Charter...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    El Camino Real Charter High School Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: El Camino Real Charter High School Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: El Camino Real Charter High School...

  18. DOE and Partners Demonstrate Mobile Geothermal Power System at...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE and Partners Demonstrate Mobile Geothermal Power System at 2009 Geothermal Energy Expo DOE and Partners Demonstrate Mobile Geothermal Power System at 2009 Geothermal Energy...

  19. DOE and Partners Test Enhanced Geothermal Systems Technologies...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Partners Test Enhanced Geothermal Systems Technologies DOE and Partners Test Enhanced Geothermal Systems Technologies February 20, 2008 - 4:33pm Addthis DOE has embarked on a...

  20. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: State University of New...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    State University of New York at New Paltz Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: State University of New York at New Paltz Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: State University of...

  1. It's Academic: BetterBuildings for Michigan Partners With University...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    It's Academic: BetterBuildings for Michigan Partners With University to Reach Employees It's Academic: BetterBuildings for Michigan Partners With University to Reach Employees...

  2. San Jose, California, Partners With Established Community Groups...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    California, Partners With Established Community Groups to Win Over Homeowners San Jose, California, Partners With Established Community Groups to Win Over Homeowners A photo of a...

  3. Advanced gas cooled nuclear reactor materials evaluation and development program. Progress report, October 1, 1979-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of work performed from October 1, 1979 through December 31, 1979. Work covered in this report includes the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The progress in the screening test program is described. This includes: screening creep results, weight gain and post-exposure mechanical properties for materials thermally exposed at 750/sup 0/ and 850/sup 0/C (1382/sup 0/ and 1562/sup 0/F). In addition, the status of the data management system is described.

  4. Exotic top partners and Little Higgs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearney, John

    Little Higgs models often give rise to top partners beyond the minimal ones necessary for the cancellation of quadratic divergences. We review how this occurs and discuss the phenomenology of these exotic states. We emphasize ...

  5. New Partners for Smart Growth Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The New Partners for Smart Growth Conference is the nation's largest smart growth and sustainability conference. The three-day conference is themed, "Practical Tools and Innovative Strategies for Creating Great Communities."

  6. Partnering with Utilities for Energy Efficiency & Security

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers partnering with utilities for energy efficiency and security and presenting it at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

  7. City of Palo Alto Utilities- PV Partners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Palo Alto Utilities (CPAU) PV Partners Program offers incentives to customers that install qualifying PV systems. The program, which has a budget of approximately $13 million over 10...

  8. Theory VI. Computational Materials Sciences Network (CMSN)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z Y

    2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Computational Materials Sciences Network (CMSN) is a virtual center consisting of scientists interested in working together, across organizational and disciplinary boundaries, to formulate and pursue projects that reflect challenging and relevant computational research in the materials sciences. The projects appropriate for this center involve those problems best pursued through broad cooperative efforts, rather than those key problems best tackled by single investigator groups. CMSN operates similarly to the DOE Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials, coordinated by George Samara at Sandia. As in the Synthesis and Processing Center, the intent of the modest funding for CMSN is to foster partnering and collective activities. All CMSN proposals undergo external peer review and are judged foremost on the quality and timeliness of the science and also on criteria relevant to the objective of the center, especially concerning a strategy for partnering. More details about CMSN can be found on the CMSN webpages at: http://cmpweb.ameslab.gov/ccms/CMSN-homepage.html.

  9. Dyadic, Partner, and Social Network Influences on Intimate Partner Violence among Male-Male Couples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephenson, Rob; Sato, Kimi Noe; Finneran, Cathrine

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dyadic, Partner, and Social Network Influences on Intimateage differences, and social network characteristics ofviolence. Having social networks that contained more gay

  10. InGaAsN: A Novel Material for High-Efficiency Solar Cells and Advanced Photonic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allerman, Andrew A.; Follstaedt, David M.; Gee, James M.; Jones, Eric D.; Kurtz, Steven R.; Modine, Norman A.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report represents the completion of a 6 month Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program that focused on research and development of novel compound semiconductor, InGaAsN. This project seeks to rapidly assess the potential of InGaAsN for improved high-efficiency photovoltaic. Due to the short time scale, the project focused on quickly investigating the range of attainable compositions and bandgaps while identifying possible material limitations for photovoltaic devices. InGaAsN is a new semiconductor alloy system with the remarkable property that the inclusion of only 2% nitrogen reduces the bandgap by more than 30%. In order to help understand the physical origin of this extreme deviation from the typically observed nearly linear dependence of alloy properties on concentration, we have investigated the pressure dependence of the excited state energies using both experimental and theoretical methods. We report measurements of the low temperature photoluminescence energy of the material for pressures between ambient and 110 kbar. We describe a simple, density-functional-theory-based approach to calculating the pressure dependence of low lying excitation energies for low concentration alloys. The theoretically predicted pressure dependence of the bandgap is in excellent agreement with the experimental data. Based on the results of our calculations, we suggest an explanation for the strongly non-linear pressure dependence of the bandgap that, surprisingly, does not involve a nitrogen impurity band. Additionally, conduction-band mass measurements, measured by three different techniques, will be described and finally, the magnetoluminescence determined pressure coefficient for the conduction-band mass is measured. The design, growth by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition, and processing of an In{sub 0.07}Ga{sub 0.93}As{sub 0.98}N{sub 0.02} solar cell, with 1.0 eV bandgap, lattice matched to GaAs is described. The hole diffusion length in annealed, n-type InGaAsN is 0.6-0.8 pm, and solar cell internal quantum efficiencies >70% are obtained. Optical studies indicate that defects or impurities, from doping and nitrogen incorporation, limit cell performance.

  11. NASA Partners License Nanotube Technology for Commercial Use...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    prnewswire.comnews-releasesnasa-partners-license-nanotube-technology-for-commercial-use-149724205.html Submitted: Tuesday, May...

  12. Microstructure and Property Evolution in Advanced Cladding and Duct Materials Under Long-Term and Elevated Temperature Irradiation: Modeling and Experimental Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wirth, Brian; Morgan, Dane; Kaoumi, Djamel; Motta, Arthur

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The in-service degradation of reactor core materials is related to underlying changes in the irradiated microstructure. During reactor operation, structural components and cladding experience displacement of atoms by collisions with neutrons at temperatures at which the radiation-induced defects are mobile, leading to microstructure evolution under irradiation that can degrade material properties. At the doses and temperatures relevant to fast reactor operation, the microstructure evolves by dislocation loop formation and growth, microchemistry changes due to radiation-induced segregation, radiation-induced precipitation, destabilization of the existing precipitate structure, and in some cases, void formation and growth. These processes do not occur independently; rather, their evolution is highly interlinked. Radiationinduced segregation of Cr and existing chromium carbide coverage in irradiated alloy T91 track each other closely. The radiation-induced precipitation of Ni-Si precipitates and RIS of Ni and Si in alloys T91 and HCM12A are likely related. Neither the evolution of these processes nor their coupling is understood under the conditions required for materials performance in fast reactors (temperature range 300-600°C and doses beyond 200 dpa). Further, predictive modeling is not yet possible as models for microstructure evolution must be developed along with experiments to characterize these key processes and provide tools for extrapolation. To extend the range of operation of nuclear fuel cladding and structural materials in advanced nuclear energy and transmutation systems to that required for the fast reactor, the irradiation-induced evolution of the microstructure, microchemistry, and the associated mechanical properties at relevant temperatures and doses must be understood. Predictive modeling relies on an understanding of the physical processes and also on the development of microstructure and microchemical models to describe their evolution under irradiation. This project will focus on modeling microstructural and microchemical evolution of irradiated alloys by performing detailed modeling of such microstructure evolution processes coupled with well-designed in situ experiments that can provide validation and benchmarking to the computer codes. The broad scientific and technical objectives of this proposal are to evaluate the microstructure and microchemical evolution in advanced ferritic/martensitic and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys for cladding and duct reactor materials under long-term and elevated temperature irradiation, leading to improved ability to model structural materials performance and lifetime. Specifically, we propose four research thrusts, namely Thrust 1: Identify the formation mechanism and evolution for dislocation loops with Burgers vector of a<100> and determine whether the defect microstructure (predominately dislocation loop/dislocation density) saturates at high dose. Thrust 2: Identify whether a threshold irradiation temperature or dose exists for the nucleation of growing voids that mark the beginning of irradiation-induced swelling, and begin to probe the limits of thermal stability of the tempered Martensitic structure under irradiation. Thrust 3: Evaluate the stability of nanometer sized Y- Ti-O based oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) particles at high fluence/temperature. Thrust 4: Evaluate the extent to which precipitates form and/or dissolve as a function of irradiation temperature and dose, and how these changes are driven by radiation induced segregation and microchemical evolutions and determined by the initial microstructure.

  13. INTERDISCIPLINARY MATERIALS SCIENCE GRADUATE PROGRAM IN MATERIALS SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simaan, Nabil

    .m.satterwhite@vanderbilt.edu Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Materials Science Vanderbilt University School of Engineering PMB 350106INTERDISCIPLINARY MATERIALS SCIENCE GRADUATE PROGRAM IN MATERIALS SCIENCE Materials advancements, faculty members from chemistry, physics, materials engineering, chemical engineering, electrical

  14. Materials Research in the Information Age

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Research in the Information Age Accelerating Advanced Material Development NERSC Science Gateway a 'Google of Material Properties' October 31, 2011 | Tags: Materials...

  15. ORNL partners on critical materials hub | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627Homeland SecurityJonathan Mbah

  16. XG Sciences, ORNL partner on titanium-graphene composite materials |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat isJoin theanniversaryI 1 0ornl.gov XG

  17. MEDIA PARTNER PRIZE PARTNER ON BEHALF OF FEDERAL LAND MANAGEMENT AGENCIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    .org Bureau of Land Management blm.gov Bureau of Reclamation usbr.gov National Park Service nps.gov U.S. Fish by the Bureau of Land Management, the Bureau of Reclamation, the National Park Service, the U.S. FishMEDIA PARTNER PRIZE PARTNER ON BEHALF OF FEDERAL LAND MANAGEMENT AGENCIES new

  18. Energy and environmental research emphasizing low-rank coal: Task 6.2. Joining of advanced structural materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowok, J.W.; Hurley, J.P.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is considered an attractive material for structural applications in fossil energy systems because of its corrosion and wear resistance, high thermoconductivity, and high temperature strength. These same properties make it difficult to sinter or join SiC. Conventional sintering techniques require applying pressure and heating to temperatures near 2000{degree}C, or the use of binders with lower melting temperatures, or pressureless sintering with the aid of carbon and boron to near full density about 2100{degree}C. The sintering temperature can be reduced to 1850{degree}--2000{degree}C if SiC is sintered with the addition of small quantities of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} {plus} Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. In addition, reaction sintering has been used by mixing Si and C with SiC powder and heating the mixture to 1400{degree}C to cause the Si and C to react and form SiC, which bonds the aggregate together. Work proposed for this year was to center on determining gas compositions that could be used to increase the sinterability of oxide binders and on using the binder and gas combinations to join bars of SiC, alumina, and mullite (3Al{sub 2}O{center_dot}2SiO{sub 2}). During the course of the year the focus was shifted to SiC joining alone, because it was felt that alumina and mullite are too prone to thermal shock for use in structural applications in fossil energy systems. Because of a thermal expansion mismatch between alumina and SiC, only SiC and mullite were investigated as joining aides for SiC. Therefore, the objectives of this work evolved into examining the sintering phenomena of SiC and mullite-derived binders at and below 1500{degree}C in various atmospheres and determining which conditions are suitable to form strong joints in monolithic SiC structures to be used at temperatures of 1000{degree}--1400{degree}C.

  19. Materials Science & Tech Division | Advanced Materials | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    production of battery cells, magnetic field processing, specialized rolling technologies, additive manufacturing, etc. Laboratories for comprehensive evaluations of low-level...

  20. Functional Materials for Energy | Advanced Materials | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof Energy ForrestalPrincetonF2: JetInnovationFun Energy

  1. Computational physics and applied mathematics capability review June 8-10, 2010 (Advance materials to committee members)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Stephen R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory will review its Computational Physics and Applied Mathematics (CPAM) capabilities in 2010. The goals of capability reviews are to assess the quality of science, technology, and engineering (STE) performed by the capability, evaluate the integration of this capability across the Laboratory and within the scientific community, examine the relevance of this capability to the Laboratory's programs, and provide advice on the current and future directions of this capability. This is the first such review for CPAM, which has a long and unique history at the laboratory, starting from the inception of the Laboratory in 1943. The CPAM capability covers an extremely broad technical area at Los Alamos, encompassing a wide array of disciplines, research topics, and organizations. A vast array of technical disciplines and activities are included in this capability, from general numerical modeling, to coupled mUlti-physics simulations, to detailed domain science activities in mathematics, methods, and algorithms. The CPAM capability involves over 12 different technical divisions and a majority of our programmatic and scientific activities. To make this large scope tractable, the CPAM capability is broken into the following six technical 'themes.' These themes represent technical slices through the CP AM capability and collect critical core competencies of the Laboratory, each of which contributes to the capability (and each of which is divided into multiple additional elements in the detailed descriptions of the themes in subsequent sections): (1) Computational Fluid Dynamics - This theme speaks to the vast array of scientific capabilities for the simulation of fluids under shocks, low-speed flow, and turbulent conditions - which are key, historical, and fundamental strengths of the laboratory; (2) Partial Differential Equations - The technical scope of this theme is the applied mathematics and numerical solution of partial differential equations (broadly defined) in a variety of settings, including particle transport, solvers, and plasma physics; (3) Monte Carlo - Monte Carlo was invented at Los Alamos, and this theme discusses these vitally important methods and their application in everything from particle transport, to condensed matter theory, to biology; (4) Molecular Dynamics - This theme describes the widespread use of molecular dynamics for a variety of important applications, including nuclear energy, materials science, and biological modeling; (5) Discrete Event Simulation - The technical scope of this theme represents a class of complex system evolutions governed by the action of discrete events. Examples include network, communication, vehicle traffic, and epidemiology modeling; and (6) Integrated Codes - This theme discusses integrated applications (comprised of all of the supporting science represented in Themes 1-5) that are of strategic importance to the Laboratory and the nation. The laboratory has in approximately 10 million source lines of code in over 100 different such strategically important applications. Of these themes, four of them will be reviewed during the 2010 review cycle: Themes 1, 2, 3, and 6. Because these capability reviews occur every three years, Themes 4 and 5 will be reviewed in 2013, along with Theme 6 (which will be reviewed during each review, owing to this theme's role as an integrator of the supporting science represented by the other 5 themes). Yearly written status reports will be provided to the Capability Review Committee Chair during off-cycle years.

  2. Partnering to achieve success in energy management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, T.C.; Caldwell, S.J.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Army National Guard (ARNG) has over 110,000,000 square feet of heated, cooled and lighted facilities in all 50 States and the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and Guam. Facilities mix runs the gamut from aviation hangers to weekend use armories. Utility costs are paid by Federal, State, and local agencies, and sometimes with different agencies sharing costs in the same facility. Facilities ages range from early 1900s converted horse stables to current ultra-modern office buildings. Each ARNG State energy manager has a formidable challenge and many innovative ideas for reducing energy costs have evolved. These ideas can be summed up in a concept referred to as {open_quotes}Partnering.{close_quotes} This concept of partnering at all levels of government has enabled the National Guard to lower its overall utility costs by 10% in the last three years. In its {open_quotes}Road Map to Facilities Energy Management,{close_quotes} an ARNG Handbook developed for Energy Managers, Partnering has a separate chapter with a mission statement of `Developing partnerships is to encourage agencies to work together to maximize energy savings and promote energy conservation awareness.` This presentation will cover how the Army National Guard has partnered with Federal, State, Regional, and local government agencies to achieve its Facility Energy Management Successes. Examples will be presented showing successful partnering with government agencies and partnerships with manufacturers and Energy Service Companies in conducting audits and ESPC contracting. The projects performed range from Eskimo Scout Armories in Alaska, installing Solar Hot Water heating in Colorado, and Waste Oil burners in Maine, developing plans for wind energy generators in Utah. and conducting lighting projects in Mississippi. Inventive partnering has allowed the Army National Guard to really stretch its utility dollars.

  3. Materials - Next-generation insulation ... | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials - Next-generation insulation ... A composite foam insulation panel being developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and partners could reduce wall-generated heating and...

  4. NERI FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT, DE-FC07-O5ID14647, OPTIMIZATION OF OXIDE COMPOUNDS FOR ADVANCED INERT MATRIX MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PI: JUAN C. NINO, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

    2009-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to reduce the current excesses of plutonium (both weapon grade and reactor grade) and other transuranium elements, a concept of inert matrix fuel (IMF) has been proposed for an uranium free transmutation of fissile actinides which excludes continuous uranium-plutonium conversion in thermal reactors and advanced systems. Magnesium oxide (MgO) is a promising candidate for inert matrix (IM) materials due to its high melting point (2827 C), high thermal conductivity (13 W/K {center_dot} m at 1000 C), good neutronic properties, and irradiation stability However, MgO reacts with water and hydrates easily, which prevents it from being used in light water reactors (LWRs) as an IM. To improve the hydration resistance of MgO-based inert matrix materials, Medvedev and coworkers have recently investigated the introduction of a secondary phase that acts as a hydration barrier. An MgO-ZrO{sub 2} composite was specifically studied and the results showed that the composite exhibited improved hydration resistance than pure MgO. However, ZrO{sub 2} is insoluble in most acids except HF, which is undesirable for fuel reprocessing. Moreover, the thermal conductivity of ZrO{sub 2} is low and typically less than 3 W {center_dot} m{sup -1} {center_dot} K{sup -1} at 1000 C. In search for an alternative composite strategy, Nd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}, an oxide compound with pyrochlore structure, has been proposed recently as a corrosion resistant phase, and MgO-Nd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} composites have been investigated as potential IM materials. An adequate thermal conductivity of 6 W {center_dot} m{sup -} 1 {center_dot} K{sup -1} at 1000 C for the MgO-Nd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} composite with 90 vol% MgO was recently calculated and reported. Other simulations proposed that the MgO-pyrochlore composites could exhibit higher radiation stability than previously reported. Final optimization of the composite microstructure was performed on the 70 vol% MgO-Nd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} composite that burnup calculations had shown to have the closest profile to that of MOX fuel. Theoretical calculations also indicated that a homogeneous 70 vol% MgO composite could achieve the desired microstructure that would result in satisfying the dual requirements of good thermal properties.

  5. Community Partners A New Leaf Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    Community Partners A New Leaf Program A+ Nursery A+ Preschool ABCD Early Head Start Addiction Treatment Center of New England African Apostolate of Manchester Diocese AIDS Action Committee Allston at Home Program Home for Little Wanderers - Therapeutic Foster Care Program Horace Mann School

  6. Materials for Advanced Turbocharger Design

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for the U.S. Department of Energy Presentationname Milestones * FY2012 - complete neutron-scattering residual-stress measurements on wheelshaft assemblies (Dec, 2011,...

  7. Materials for Advanced Turbocharger Designs

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy Presentationname Milestones * FY2010 - new project * FY2011 - begin neutron-scattering residual-stress measurements on wheelshaft assemblies (Dec, 2010,...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: advanced materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News, News & Events, Renewable Energy, Solar, Systems Engineering...

  9. Advanced Materials / Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoubridge, Eric

    range from superconductors to insulators, from emitters to sensors and from static to THz or even opticO metallic, TiO2 insulator · SrTiO3: insulator, SrTiO3:Nb (0.5 %wt) metallic and superconducting below 900 mCu3O7-d : superconductor high Tc : 93K #12;Composition · Small compositional variations can

  10. News Releases | Advanced Materials | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing nanorodSizeprogramProjectReleases

  11. Advanced Materials Manufacturing (AMM) Session

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1 AAcceleratedDepartment of Energy LWRThe DOE Office ofEric

  12. Supporting Organizations | Advanced Materials | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solid ...Success StoriesSupplementNetwork Monitoring andEnergy

  13. Energy Department Partners with EU on Electric Vehicle and Smart...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Partners with EU on Electric Vehicle and Smart Grid Coordination Energy Department Partners with EU on Electric Vehicle and Smart Grid Coordination July 19, 2013 - 5:17pm Addthis...

  14. Global Energy Partners, LLC 500 Ygnacio Valley Road, Suite 450

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Energy Partners, LLC 500 Ygnacio Valley Road, Suite 450 Walnut Creek, CA 94596 P: 925. This report was prepared by Global Energy Partners, LLC 500 Ygnacio Valley Blvd., Suite 450 Walnut Creek, CA

  15. Thorium, uranium and rare earth elements content in lanthanide concentrate (LC) and water leach purification (WLP) residue of Lynas advanced materials plant (LAMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AL-Areqi, Wadeeah M., E-mail: walareqi@yahoo.com; Majid, Amran Ab., E-mail: walareqi@yahoo.com; Sarmani, Sukiman, E-mail: walareqi@yahoo.com [Nuclear Science Programme, School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi (Malaysia)

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Lynas Advanced Materials Plant (LAMP) has been licensed to produce the rare earths elements since early 2013 in Malaysia. LAMP processes lanthanide concentrate (LC) to extract rare earth elements and subsequently produce large volumes of water leach purification (WLP) residue containing naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). This residue has been rising up the environmental issue because it was suspected to accumulate thorium with significant activity concentration and has been classified as radioactive residue. The aim of this study is to determine Th-232, U-238 and rare earth elements in lanthanide concentrate (LC) and water leach purification (WLP) residue collected from LAMP and to evaluate the potential radiological impacts of the WLP residue on the environment. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and ?-spectrometry were used for determination of Th, U and rare earth elements concentrations. The results of this study found that the concentration of Th in LC was 1289.7 ± 129 ppm (5274.9 ± 527.6Bq/kg) whereas the Th and U concentrations in WLP were determined to be 1952.9±17.6 ppm (7987.4 ± 71.9 Bq/kg) and 17.2 ± 2.4 ppm respectively. The concentrations of Th and U in LC and WLP samples determined by ?- spectrometry were 1156 ppm (4728 ± 22 Bq/kg) and 18.8 ppm and 1763.2 ppm (7211.4 Bq/kg) and 29.97 ppm respectively. This study showed that thorium concentrations were higher in WLP compare to LC. This study also indicate that WLP residue has high radioactivity of {sup 232}Th compared to Malaysian soil natural background (63 - 110 Bq/kg) and come under preview of Act 304 and regulations. In LC, the Ce and Nd concentrations determined by INAA were 13.2 ± 0.6% and 4.7 ± 0.1% respectively whereas the concentrations of La, Ce, Nd and Sm in WLP were 0.36 ± 0.04%, 1.6%, 0.22% and 0.06% respectively. This result showed that some amount of rare earth had not been extracted and remained in the WLP and may be considered to be reextracted.

  16. Partnering with Industry to Shape the Future (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacheco, M. A.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Keynote presentation given at the 2013 NTEA Green Truck Summit titled Partnering with Industry to Shape the Future.

  17. Clean Cities National Partner Awards: Clean Cities Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaRocque, T.

    2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet briefly describes each of the 10 winners of the Clean Cities National Partner Awards.

  18. News Letter Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    of advanced nuclear reactors like fast reactors or fusion reactors, where materials undergo intensive

  19. Global Energy Partners, LLC 500 Ygnacio Valley Road, Suite 450

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FOR MIDWEST ISO Draft Report #1314 July 2010 #12;#12;Global Energy Partners, LLC iii DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTIES Response and Energy Efficiency Potential for Midwest ISO, Global Energy Partners, LLC. Walnut Creek, CA 2010. Report Number 1314. #12;#12;Global Energy Partners, LLC v EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Midwest ISO

  20. EMSL - battery materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    battery-materials en Modeling Interfacial Glass-Water Reactions: Recent Advances and Current Limitations. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsmodeling-interfacial-glass-wa...

  1. MANUFACTURING ACCELERATING THE INCORPORATION OF MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    MANUFACTURING ACCELERATING THE INCORPORATION OF MATERIALS ADVANCES INTO MANUFACTURING PROCESSES NATIONAL NEED The proposed topic "Accelerating the Incorporation of Materials Advances into Manufacturing organizations, leading researchers from academic institutions, and others. Materials performance is often

  2. NNSA and Small Business Partnering for Success

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    robust surveillance and assessment activities, both enabled by investments in the science, technology, and engineering base; * Advance Naval Nuclear Propulsion by supporting...

  3. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: National Renewable Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    energy and energy efficiency technologies and practices, advance related science and engineering, and transfer knowledge and innovations. A 1,800-car parking garage at NREL's...

  4. Recycled Materials Resource Jeffrey S. Melton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recycled Materials Resource Center Jeffrey S. Melton Outreach Director Recycled Materials Resource Center NCC Meeting, April 9th, 2008 #12;Recycled Materials Resource Center Partner laboratory of FHWA Founded in 1998, renewed in 2007 Dedicated to the appropriate use of recycled materials in the highway

  5. Intercalation Kinetics and Ion Mobility in Electrode Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Intercalation Kinetics and Ion Mobility in Electrode Materials for Advanced Lithium Ion Batteries Intercalation Kinetics and Ion Mobility in Electrode Materials for Advanced...

  6. Energy Department Completes Salt Coolant Material Transfer to...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Completes Salt Coolant Material Transfer to Czech Republic for Advanced Reactor Research Energy Department Completes Salt Coolant Material Transfer to Czech Republic for Advanced...

  7. The Clemson University School of Materials Science and Engineering is soliciting applications and nominations for the J. E. Sirrine Textile Foundation Endowed Chair in Advanced Polymer Fibers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    The Clemson University School of Materials Science and Engineering is soliciting applications and Engineering, with a distinguished track record of scholarship in polymer materials science, who can lead the efforts in the development of fundamental science and engineering of new fiber-based polymeric materials

  8. TEP Power Partners Project [Tucson Electric Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arizona Governor’s Office of Energy Policy, in partnership with Tucson Electric Power (TEP), Tendril, and Next Phase Energy (NPE), formed the TEP Power Partners pilot project to demonstrate how residential customers could access their energy usage data and third party applications using data obtained from an Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) network. The project applied for and was awarded a Smart Grid Data Access grant through the U.S. Department of Energy. The project participants’ goal for Phase I is to actively engage 1,700 residential customers to demonstrate sustained participation, reduction in energy usage (kWh) and cost ($), and measure related aspects of customer satisfaction. This Demonstration report presents a summary of the findings, effectiveness, and customer satisfaction with the 15-month TEP Power Partners pilot project. The objective of the program is to provide residential customers with energy consumption data from AMR metering and empower these participants to better manage their electricity use. The pilot recruitment goals included migrating 700 existing customers from the completed Power Partners Demand Response Load Control Project (DRLC), and enrolling 1,000 new participants. Upon conclusion of the project on November 19, 2013: ? 1,390 Home Area Networks (HANs) were registered. ? 797 new participants installed a HAN. ? Survey respondents’ are satisfied with the program and found value with a variety of specific program components. ? Survey respondents report feeling greater control over their energy usage and report taking energy savings actions in their homes after participating in the program. ? On average, 43 % of the participants returned to the web portal monthly and 15% returned weekly. ? An impact evaluation was completed by Opinion Dynamics and found average participant savings for the treatment period1 to be 2.3% of their household use during this period.2 In total, the program saved 163 MWh in the treatment period of 2013.

  9. Builder Partner Agreement | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof Energy Future of CSP:Brookhaven Teaching FellowsBuilder Partner

  10. GNEP Partners and Observers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologiesNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTALnaturalGENII2 DOEGNEP Partners

  11. Ethos Partners Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania: Energy Resources(RECP) in Developing andEthos Partners Ltd

  12. Jane Capital Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInterias SolarJane Capital Partners Jump to: navigation, search Logo:

  13. Partnering with Utilities and Other Program Administrators

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in235-1 Termoelectrica U.SPRESSHeavy-duty Engine usingPartnering

  14. Partners of the MFRC | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access toTestPhysicsParticipantsPartners of the MFRC The current

  15. Novus Energy Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellence Seed LLCShores,Activity onNovus Energy Partners

  16. Black Forest Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher HomesLyonsBirch Creek VillageForest Partners

  17. Blue Hill Partners LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher HomesLyonsBirchBlockVI JumpBlue Hill Partners

  18. CleanTech Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformation SmyrnaNewClay ElectricCleangoogle hangoutCleanTech Partners

  19. E3 Energy Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision| Open EnergyProjectDraper,NCNH)E ON JumpPartners Jump

  20. \\ Whither At first glance, many advanced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    /characteristics that could be of critical or ofsecondary intportance to the part design. The dimensionalih; oj a materials/ I ) ...... ···\\ Whither ADVANCED MATERIALS? At first glance, many advanced materials promise. Thomas W. Eagar* Massachusetts Institute ofTeclmologt; Cambridge dvanced materials have exciting prop

  1. Composite materials with integrated embedded sensing networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaaf, Kristin Leigh

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials for Structural Health Monitoring. ProceedingsWorkshop on Structural Health Monitoring: Advancements andWorkshop on Structural Health Monitoring: Advancements and

  2. Climate VISION: Events - Climate VISION Partners Highlight Success...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and prospective industry partners to share experiences and lessons learned through case studies and to explore new opportunities for collaboration. The one-day event was...

  3. GE Partners on Microgrid Project | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Academia Partner on Microgrid Project GE Awarded a 1.2M Department of Energy Grant to Design Technology to Keep Electricity Flowing after Catastrophic Weather Events...

  4. ORNL, CINCINNATI partner to develop commercial large-scale additive...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory 865-574-7308 ORNL, CINCINNATI partner to develop commercial large-scale additive manufacturing system (From left) David Danielson, the Energy Department's...

  5. Partnering With Utilities to Offer Energy Efficiency Programs Webinar Transcript

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Partnering With Utilities to Offer Energy Efficiency Programs Webinar Transcript, from the U.S. Department of Energy Technical Assistance Program (TAP).

  6. TAP Webinar: Better Buildings Challenge K-12 Education Partners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by DOE's Technical Assistance Program (TAP), this webinar will cover the Better Buildings Challenge K-12 Education Partners are demonstrating how clean energy initiatives can be achievable...

  7. Better Buildings Partners Gather to Plan for the Future | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    held in October in Burlington, Vermont, helped partners conceptualize and enhance their business models to ensure that their efforts thrive well into the future. "We wanted to...

  8. Effective Strategies for Working with Workforce Development Partners...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Workforce Peer Exchange Call: Effective Strategies for Working with Workforce Development Partners, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, May 19, 2011. Call Slides and...

  9. EERE Partner Testimonials- Darren Jamison, Capstone Turbine Corporation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Darren Jamison, President and CEO of Capstone Turbine Corporation, shares his experience of partnering with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  10. New Better Buildings Challenge Partners Commit 70 Million Square...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Moniz. "Joining hundreds of other organizations, these new partners are taking action to save money by saving energy, while also cutting carbon pollution and creating jobs."...

  11. Tree roots and their microbial partners may provide answers to...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    865.576.1946 Tree roots and their microbial partners may provide answers to productivity Researchers investigate cottonwood poplars in Tennessee to understand plant root...

  12. Department of Energy Receives 2013 Partners in Conservation Award...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE), along with its partners the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), received the...

  13. Future Perfect Partnering with Portuguese Environmental Protection...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Topics: GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type: Case studiesexamples, Training materials Website: www.gpstrategiesltd.comdivisions...

  14. Cooperative Research and Development for Advanced Microturbines Program on Advanced Integrated Microturbine System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael J. Bowman

    2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Integrated Microturbine Systems (AIMS) project was kicked off in October of 2000 to develop the next generation microturbine system. The overall objective of the project was to develop a design for a 40% electrical efficiency microturbine system and demonstrate many of the enabling technologies. The project was initiated as a collaborative effort between several units of GE, Elliott Energy Systems, Turbo Genset, Oak Ridge National Lab and Kyocera. Since the inception of the project the partners have changed but the overall direction of the project has stayed consistent. The project began as a systems study to identify design options to achieve the ultimate goal of 40% electrical efficiency. Once the optimized analytical design was identified for the 40% system, it was determined that a 35% efficient machine would be capable of demonstrating many of the advanced technologies within the given budget and timeframe. The items that would not be experimentally demonstrated were fully produced ceramic parts. However, to understand the requirements of these ceramics, an effort was included in the project to experimentally evaluate candidate materials in representative conditions. The results from this effort would clearly identify the challenges and improvement required of these materials for the full design. Following the analytical effort, the project was dedicated to component development and testing. Each component and subsystem was designed with the overall system requirements in mind and each tested to the fullest extent possible prior to being integrated together. This method of component development and evaluation helps to minimize the technical risk of the project. Once all of the components were completed, they were assembled into the full system and experimentally evaluated.

  15. RESEARCH ENGINEER IN ADVANCED ANALYTICAL ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    RESEARCH ENGINEER IN ADVANCED ANALYTICAL ELECTRON MICROSCOPY Department of Materials Science. #12;Job Description (for website) Job Title: Research Engineer in Advanced Analytical Electron or an engineering discipline and four years of demonstrated experience in electron microscopy. Requirements

  16. Overview financial instruments for collaboration with international (strategic) partners 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    At the university wide level of Utrecht University additional funds are available for some specific collaboration activities with international strategic partners of Utrecht University, the Utrecht University Partners (A Utrecht for 3 months in 2011. Applications must be sent in by a Utrecht supervisor and therefore

  17. IBM Tivoli Cloud Computing: Technical Enablement for IBM Business Partners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IBM Tivoli Cloud Computing: Technical Enablement for IBM Business Partners Cloud computing is a key part of driving greater alignment between business and IT. IBM Service Management and Cloud Computing to the IBM technical community. IBM Cloud Computing Business Partner Technical Enablement Offering

  18. X(3872) and Its Iso-Triplet Partners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunihiko Terasaki

    2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Decays of X(3872) and its partners as hidden-charm axial-vector tetra-quark mesons are studied. As the result, it is seen that the iso-triplet partners of X(3872) can be broad, and therefore, higher statistics would be needed to find them.

  19. EERE Partner Testimonials- Wayne Eckerle, Cummins Inc.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wayne Eckerle, VP of Corporate Research and Technology at Cummins Inc., talks about how its partnership with EERE has helped move waste heat recovery advances for vehicles into production and will help them reach fuel consumption reductions of 20-30% over the next decade.

  20. Project Partners DTU KT, MEK, IMM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    · University of Southern California · Mćrsk Oil and Gas A/S Numerical Simulation and Optimization Informatics and Mathematical Modelling Advanced Oil-Recovery Methods ­ ADORE. Major Research Project 2007 - 2012 The world's oil fields have an expected average recovery of 50%. With an increasing demand for oil

  1. Ceramics Technology Project database: September 1991 summary report. [Materials for piston ring-cylinder liner for advanced heat/diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The piston ring-cylinder liner area of the internal combustion engine must withstand very-high-temperature gradients, highly-corrosive environments, and constant friction. Improving the efficiency in the engine requires ring and cylinder liner materials that can survive this abusive environment and lubricants that resist decomposition at elevated temperatures. Wear and friction tests have been done on many material combinations in environments similar to actual use to find the right materials for the situation. This report covers tribology information produced from 1986 through July 1991 by Battelle columbus Laboratories, Caterpillar Inc., and Cummins Engine Company, Inc. for the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP). All data in this report were taken from the project's semiannual and bimonthly progress reports and cover base materials, coatings, and lubricants. The data, including test rig descriptions and material characterizations, are stored in the CTP database and are available to all project participants on request. Objective of this report is to make available the test results from these studies, but not to draw conclusions from these data.

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: materials science and engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    science and engineering Joint Hire Increases Materials Science Collaboration for Sandia, UNM On September 16, 2014, in Advanced Materials Laboratory, Capabilities, Energy, Energy...

  3. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials-

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to reduce automobile weight without compromising other attributes.

  4. Advanced Test Reactor Tour

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, Don

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  5. Advanced Test Reactor Tour

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Miley, Don

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  6. Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Events Additive Manufacturing Workshop Poster Abstract Submission - deadline July 10, 2015 Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Materials using in situ sensors,...

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Battery Development, System...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    materials and applied battery research into full battery systems for vehicles. The Vehicle Technologies Office's (VTO) Advanced Battery Development, System Analysis, and...

  8. Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Electrolyte Additives Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal & overcharge abuse Advanced Electrolyte Additives for PHEVEV Lithium-ion Battery...

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Research & Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Personnel Water Power in the News Geothermal Advanced Bit Development Geothermal Energy & Drilling Technology Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Materials & Components...

  10. Field of Expertise Materials Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in materials research co-operates intensively with many globally active companies, such as Infineon, Austria and hybrid solar cells Ceramic semiconductors, sensors and piezoelectric components Lithium-ion batteries New welding methods RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES FOR COMPANIES AND SCIENTIFIC PARTNERS © TU Graz© TU Graz

  11. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Partnerships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; Jeff B. Benson; James I. Cole; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2007, the United States Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory, as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposer's physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, and obtained access to additional PIE equipment. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program enables and facilitates user access to several university and national laboratories. So far, seven universities and one national laboratory have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these universities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the user's technical needs. Universities and laboratories included in the ATR NSUF partnership program are as follows: (1) Nuclear Services Laboratories at North Carolina State University; (2) PULSTAR Reactor Facility at North Carolina State University; (3) Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory (1.7 MV Tandetron accelerator) at the University of Michigan; (4) Irradiated Materials at the University of Michigan; (5) Harry Reid Center Radiochemistry Laboratories at University of Nevada, Las Vegas; (6) Characterization Laboratory for Irradiated Materials at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (7) Tandem Accelerator Ion Beam. (1.7 MV terminal voltage tandem ion accelerator) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (8) Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) Materials Research Collaborative Access Team (MRCAT) beamline at Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Photon Source; and (9) Nanoindenter in the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) Nuclear Engineering laboratory Materials have been analyzed for ATR NSUF users at the Advanced Photon Source at the MRCAT beam, the NIST Center for Neutron Research in Gaithersburg, MD, the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, and the SHaRE user facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Additionally, ORNL has been accepted as a partner facility to enable ATR NSUF users to access the facilities at the High Flux Isotope Reactor and related facilities.

  12. advanced fuel science: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Laboratory 15 Hindawi Publishing Corporation Advances in Materials Science and Engineering Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary:...

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced in situ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in situ Diagnostic Techniques for Battery Materials Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced in situ Diagnostic Techniques for Battery Materials Presentation given...

  14. advanced chemistry basins: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    material listed extended material on chemical kinetcs. (The topics covered are in the Syllabus below.) This means that Raina, Ramesh 3 Course Syllabus ATMO 613: Advanced...

  15. advanced composites production: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 ULTRASONIC CHARACTERIZATION OF ADVANCED COMPOSITE MATERIALS CiteSeer Summary: With increased use of composite materials in critical structural...

  16. advanced composite substrate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Research Foundation 2 ULTRASONIC CHARACTERIZATION OF ADVANCED COMPOSITE MATERIALS CiteSeer Summary: With increased use of composite materials in critical structural...

  17. advanced composite aileron: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 ULTRASONIC CHARACTERIZATION OF ADVANCED COMPOSITE MATERIALS CiteSeer Summary: With increased use of composite materials in critical structural...

  18. advanced ultrasonic methods: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 ULTRASONIC CHARACTERIZATION OF ADVANCED COMPOSITE MATERIALS CiteSeer Summary: With increased use of composite materials in critical structural...

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: advanced gas-sensor development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gas-sensor development Joint Hire Increases Materials Science Collaboration for Sandia, UNM On September 16, 2014, in Advanced Materials Laboratory, Capabilities, Energy, Energy...

  20. Overview of the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Material BATT and the Battery Industry Block copolymer electrolytes for Li-metal batteries (Balsara) being commercialized by Seeo, Inc. Advanced cathode materials (Manthiram)...

  1. Selection of a Wear-Resistant Tractor Drivetrain Material: Success...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Advanced Battery Materials Characterization: Success stories from the High Temperature Materials...

  2. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 11. Recycling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1. Recycling FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 11. Recycling Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: high-temperature materials and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    temperature materials and devices Joint Hire Increases Materials Science Collaboration for Sandia, UNM On September 16, 2014, in Advanced Materials Laboratory, Capabilities,...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: materials technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Researchers Win CSP:ELEMENTS Funding Award On June 4, 2014, in Advanced Materials Laboratory, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities, National...

  5. Department of Energy - Oak Ridge Operations and URS - CH2M Oak Ridge LLC. Partnering Framework for the Cleanup of the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA - 12348

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schubert, Allen L. [URS - CH2M Oak Ridge LLC (UCOR), East Tennessee Technology Park D and D and Environmental Remediation Project, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cleanup and re-industrialization of the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) hinges on a collaborative working relationship between the cleanup contractor and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE)-Oak Ridge Office (ORO). A Partnering Framework document was signed on June 30, 2011, with an ultimate goal of completing the contract scope of work ahead of schedule and under budget. This partnering process was the first time that DOE and its contractor, jointly developed and signed such an agreement before the contractor assumed management responsibilities of the Site. A strong desire of both parties to utilize a partnering approach in the performance of their respective responsibilities is evident. The Partnering Framework was modeled after a partnering process employed by the California Department of Transportation, Division of Construction. This partnering process has been used successfully by the California Department of Transportation and its major contractors for many years with great success. The partnering process used at ETTP was a phased approach. First, a Partnering Framework document was developed and signed June 30, 2011, by the Partnering Sponsors, the two leaders of the ETTP cleanup and re-industrialization project, the DOE-ORO Assistant Manager for Environmental Management and the contractor's President and Program Manager. In this way the partnering process could begin when the contactor assumed ETTP Site management responsibilities on August 1, 2011. The Partnering Framework then set the stage for the second phase of the partnering process which would be development of the Partnering Agreement and the kick-off of the first of a number of facilitated Partnering Workshops. Key elements of the Partnering Framework document include: (1) a statement of commitment which affirms the desire of both parties to work collaboratively toward the cleanup and re-industrialization of the ETTP Site; (2) a vision which describes both parties ultimate goal of safe, efficient cleanup, and (3) an implementation section which describes how the partnering process will be conducted, as well as how disputes will be managed. The signed Partnering Framework and Partnering Agreement provide the needed foundation of the safe and cost-effective cleanup and re-industrialization of the ETTP Site. The benefits of partnering have already been observed as the Partnering Teams effectively addressed a number of early contract and project challenges such as funding reductions and progress in resolving Material Differences. Based, in part of the successes achieved as a result of the partnering between UCOR and DOE-ORO, UCOR and DOE-ORO are extending this partnering approach to a number of the ETTP Site stakeholders. For example, DOE-ORO, UCOR and CROET signed a Partnering Agreement on November 3, 2011. This Partnering Agreement affirms the parties' commitment to work collaboratively to re-industrialize the ETTP Site. Both DOE-ORO and UCOR are looking to extend this partnering approach with other Site stakeholders such as its employees, its subcontractors, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Y-12 Security Complex in the future. (authors)

  6. A Study of Advanced Materials for Gas Turbine Coatings at Elevated Temperatures Using Selected Microstructures and Characteristic Environments for Syngas Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravinder Diwan; Patrick Mensah; Guoqiang Li; Nalini Uppu; Strphen Akwaboa; Monica Silva; Ebubekir Beyazoglu; Ogad Agu; Naresh Polasa; Lawrence Bazille; Douglas Wolfe; Purush Sahoo

    2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) that can be suitable for use in industrial gas turbine engines have been processed and compared with electron beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) microstructures for applications in advanced gas turbines that use coal-derived synthesis gas. Thermo-physical properties have been evaluated of the processed air plasma sprayed TBCs with standard APS-STD and vertically cracked APS-VC coatings samples up to 1300 C. Porosity of these selected coatings with related microstructural effects have been analyzed in this study. Wet and dry thermal cycling studies at 1125 C and spalling resistance thermal cycling studies to 1200 C have also been carried out. Type I and Type II hot corrosion tests were carried out to investigate the effects of microstructure variations and additions of alumina in YSZ top coats in multi-layered TBC structures. The thermal modeling of turbine blade has also been carried out that gives the capability to predict in-service performance temperature gradients. In addition to isothermal high temperature oxidation kinetics analysis in YSZ thermal barrier coatings of NiCoCrAlY bond coats with 0.25% Hf. This can affect the failure behavior depending on the control of the thermally grown oxide (TGO) growth at the interface. The TGO growth kinetics is seen to be parabolic and the activation energies correspond to interfacial growth kinetics that is controlled by the diffusion of O{sub 2} in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The difference between oxidation behavior of the VC and STD structures are attributed to the effects of microstructure morphology and porosity on oxygen ingression into the zirconia and TGO layers. The isothermal oxidation resistance of the STD and VC microstructures is similar at temperatures up to 1200 C. However, the generally thicker TGO layer thicknesses and the slightly faster oxidation rates in the VC microstructures are attributed to the increased ingression of oxygen through the grain boundaries of the vertically cracked microstructures. The plasma sprayed TBC microstructure (VC and STD) with NiCoCrAlY-Hf bond coat are stable up to 1100 C. However, as with other TBC structures, a considerable amount of interdiffusion was observed in the different layers, although the TBC growth was self-limiting and parabolic. The addition of Hf to the VC microstructure appears to have some potential for the future development of robust TBCs with improved isothermal and service temperatures in advanced gas turbines.

  7. Blade Energy Partners STW Water Process & Technologies SMU Cox...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Blade Energy Partners STW Water Process & Technologies SMU Cox Executive Education AltaRock Energy, Inc. SedHeat Tranter, Inc. Registration and event details: http:smu.edu...

  8. Step 6: Make Your Workforce True Partners | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    as they arise. Engaging partners to find solutions in areas over which they have some control (e.g., work orders, evaluation reports) will help maintain buy-in, while...

  9. Madison Gas and Electric- Clean Power Partner Solar Buyback Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''The Clean Power Partners Program has reached the 1 MW cap. Applicants can be placed on a waiting list or participate in MGE's [http://www.mge.com/Home/rates/cust_gen.htm net metering program]....

  10. TAP Webinar: Better Buildings Challenge K-12 Education Partners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar, held on Jan. 21, 2015, covered the Better Buildings Challenge K-12 Education Partners are demonstrating how clean energy initiatives can be achievable and effective in reducing energy costs and climate impact.

  11. Residential Air Conditioner Direct Load Control "Energy Partners Program"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, J. D.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RESIDENTIAL AIR CONDITIONER DIRECT LOAD CONTROL "ENERGY PARTNERS PROGRAMn John D. Cook Supervisor Houston ABSTRACT Demand side management programs like Energy Partners can provide an effective peak reducing capability which within a.... In this partnership the customer allows HLfP to install a I switch on his/her air conditioner or heat pump and i periodically cycle the unit off during the hottest summer 1 days. In return the customer benefits by receiving an incentive payment, as well...

  12. Advanced building skins : translucent thermal storage elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kienzl, Nico, 1971-

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in the material sciences continue to provide designers with a wealth of new materials that challenge preconceived notions of the building envelope and its performance. These new technologies can be used to create ...

  13. EMBL International PhD Programme Excellence in advanced training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uppsala Universitet

    EMBL International PhD Programme Excellence in advanced training European Molecular Biology Laboratory #12;#12;Welcome to the EMBL International PhD Programme 4 Freedom for your independent spirit 6 What's the best thing about doing your PhD at EMBL? 9 EMBL research units 12 EMBL sites 16 Our partner

  14. Postdoctoral Researcher, Materials Chemistry (2 year contract)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphrys, Mark

    Postdoctoral Researcher, Materials Chemistry (2 year contract) Adaptive Sensors Group Dublin City Foundation Ireland through the CLARITY CSET (www.clarity- centre.org), supplemented by significant project partners. The group's research strategy in materials chemistry research is to closely align activity

  15. Materials Project: A Materials Genome Approach

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Ceder, Gerbrand (MIT); Persson, Kristin (LBNL)

    Technological innovation - faster computers, more efficient solar cells, more compact energy storage - is often enabled by materials advances. Yet, it takes an average of 18 years to move new materials discoveries from lab to market. This is largely because materials designers operate with very little information and must painstakingly tweak new materials in the lab. Computational materials science is now powerful enough that it can predict many properties of materials before those materials are ever synthesized in the lab. By scaling materials computations over supercomputing clusters, this project has computed some properties of over 80,000 materials and screened 25,000 of these for Li-ion batteries. The computations predicted several new battery materials which were made and tested in the lab and are now being patented. By computing properties of all known materials, the Materials Project aims to remove guesswork from materials design in a variety of applications. Experimental research can be targeted to the most promising compounds from computational data sets. Researchers will be able to data-mine scientific trends in materials properties. By providing materials researchers with the information they need to design better, the Materials Project aims to accelerate innovation in materials research.[copied from http://materialsproject.org/about] You will be asked to register to be granted free, full access.

  16. Advanced Cell Development and Degradation Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; R. C. O'Brien; K. G. Condie; M. Sohal; G. K. Housley; J. J. Hartvigsen; D. Larsen; G. Tao; B. Yildiz; V. Sharma; P. Singh; N. Petigny; T. L. Cable

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been researching the application of solid-oxide electrolysis cells for large-scale hydrogen production from steam over a temperature range of 800 to 900şC. From 2003 – 2009, this work was sponsored by the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI). Starting in 2010, the HTE research program has been sponsored by the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program. HTSE research priorities in FY10 are centered on understanding and reducing cell and stack performance degradation to an acceptable level to advance the technology readiness level of HTSE and to justify further large-scale demonstration activities. This report provides a summary of our FY10 experimental program, which has been focused on advanced cell and stack development and degradation studies. Advanced cell and stack development activities are under way at five technology partners: MSRI, Versa Power, Ceramatec, NASA Glenn, and St. Gobain. Performance evaluation of the advanced technology cells and stacks has been performed by the technology partners, by MIT and the University of Connecticut and at the INL HTE Laboratory. Summaries of these development activities and test results are presented.

  17. Carbon-based Materials for Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rice, Lynn Margaret

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    K. and Beguin, F. et. al Materials Science and Engineering BF. Advanced Functional Materials 17, 11, 1828-1836 (2007)and Silicone- Modified Materials ch7, 82-99 (2007) 3. Gädda,

  18. Towards an integrated materials characterization toolbox

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, Ian M.

    The material characterization toolbox has recently experienced a number of parallel revolutionary advances, foreshadowing a time in the near future when material scientists can quantify material structure evolution across ...

  19. Advanced Electric Drive Vehicle Education Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AutoExposure * Subcontractor * Outside Industry * Partnered to develop training videos - Eaton Corporation * Subcontractor * Outside Industry * Partnered to develop Infrastructure...

  20. Commercial Building Partners Catalyze High Performance Buildings Across the Nation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, Michael C.; Dillon, Heather E.; Bartlett, Rosemarie

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2008 the US Department of Energy (DOE) launched the Commercial Buildings Partnership (CBP) project to accelerate market adoption of commercially available energy saving technologies into the design process for new and upgraded commercial buildings. The CBP represents a unique collaboration between industry leaders and DOE to develop high performance buildings as a model for future construction and renovation. CBP was implemented in two stages. This paper focuses on lessons learned at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in the first stage and discusses some partner insights from the second stage. In the first stage, PNNL and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory recruited CBP partners that own large portfolios of buildings. The labs provide assistance to the partners' design teams and make a business case for energy investments.