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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Lighting Group: Controls: Advanced Digital Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Digital Controls Advanced Digital Controls HPCBS Advanced Digital Controls Objective The goal of this project is to hasten the adoption of digital lighting control systems to allow commercial building operators to optimize the neergy performance of their lighting systems, implement demand responsive control, and improve occupant comfort and productivity. The specific objectives are as follows: (1) Advance the adoption of digital lighting control systems by working with industry to embed IBECS technology into existing analog control and DALI products, and by developing compelling demonstrations of digital control systems for evaluation by early adopters. (2) In collaboration with equipment manufacturers, produce digital lighting system prototypes that demonstrate the advantages of digitally controlled lighting systems to innovative property managers and other energy stakeholders. A digitally controlled lighting system consists of lights that are individually controllable via a network. The advantages of digital control are:

2

The California Advanced Lighting Controls Training Program (CALCTP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The California Advanced Lighting Controls Training Program (CALCTP) The California Advanced Lighting Controls Training Program (CALCTP) Speaker(s): Bernie Kotlier Date: March 2, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Sila Kiliccote CALCTP is a broad based partnership that is dedicated to advancing the California State policy of energy conservation as the first priority for serving the state's future energy needs. CALCTP is supported, operated and directed by representatives of the California Lighting Technology Center, the California Energy Commission, the California Community College system, investor owned utilities, municipal utilities, electrical contractors, electrical workers, and manufacturers of advanced, high efficiency lighting and lighting control systems. The mission of the California Advanced Lighting Controls Training Program (CALCTP) is to make

3

Advanced Lighting Controls - My Venture from the Ivory Tower  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Lighting Controls - My Venture from the Ivory Tower Advanced Lighting Controls - My Venture from the Ivory Tower Speaker(s): Charlie Huizenga Date: June 15, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Dragan Charlie Curcija Lighting energy represents 30-40% of commercial building electricity consumption, yet very few buildings have advanced lighting controls. The potential energy savings are tremendous as is the opportunity to reduce demand on the grid during critical peak use periods. Charlie will describe how low-cost wireless radio technology developed at UC Berkeley and commercialized by Adura Technologies is creating a paradigm shift in the way we think about controlling lighting. Beyond deep energy savings and demand response, the technology offers personal control for occupants and

4

Advanced Lighting Controls - My Venture from the Ivory Tower  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Lighting Controls - My Venture from the Ivory Tower Speaker(s): Charlie Huizenga Date: June 15, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Dragan...

5

Status report on the Advanced Light Source control system  

SciTech Connect

This paper is a status report on the ADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE (ALS) control system. The current status, performance data, and future plans will be discussed. Manpower, scheduling, and costs issues are addressed.

Magyary, S.; Chin, M.; Fahmie, M.; Lancaster, H.; Molinari, P.; Robb, A.; Timossi, C.; Young, J.

1991-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

6

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center Technical Advisory Group Meeting August 31, 2007 10:30 AM - Noon Meeting Agenda * Introductions (10 minutes) * Main Presentation (~ 1 hour) * Questions, comments from panel (15 minutes) Project History * Lighting Scoping Study (completed January 2007) - Identified potential for energy and demand savings using demand responsive lighting systems - Importance of dimming - New wireless controls technologies * Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) Objectives * Provide up-to-date information on the reliability, predictability of dimmable lighting as a demand resource under realistic operating load conditions * Identify potential negative impacts of DR lighting on lighting quality Potential of Demand Responsive Lighting Control

7

The California Advanced Lighting Controls Training Program (CALCTP...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Buildings Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows...

8

Lighting Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

corridors. The overall range of savings was six to 80 percent. The Advanced Lighting Guidelines On-Line Edition New Buildings Institute 2011 presents a table of lighting energy...

9

Evaluation of Lighting and Lighting Control Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy efficient lighting and lighting controls have been a means to significant energy savings for many facilities around the world. Advances in lighting sources often allow for the conservation of quality of light while providing more flexibility in the control of light. Additionally, advances in core technologies within the lighting marketplace regularly lead to the introduction of new lamps, fixtures and controls.  With the rapid introduction of new products and designs, it is important to ...

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

10

Advanced Lighting Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report continues the technical assessment of advanced lighting technologies in the following product areasdimmable light-emitting diode (LED) screw-in replacement lamp, hybrid compact fluorescent lamp/halogen screw-in replacement lamp, replacement recessed can LED downlight, organic LED (OLED) disc, replacement mini high-intensity discharge (HID) lamp and ballast system, and solid-state plasma lighting (miniature HID technology) high-bay fixture. The research in this project helps to demonstrate how...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

11

Advanced Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next >> Next >> Visitors Access to the ALS Gate Access guest-house Guest House lab-shuttles Lab Shuttles maps-and-directions Maps and Directions Parking Safety Safety for Users safety-for-staff Safety for Staff In Case of Emergency Resources Acronyms Multimedia Employment staff-intranet Staff Intranet Site Map Contact Digg: ALSBerkeleyLab Facebook Page: 208064938929 Flickr: advancedlightsource Twitter: ALSBerkeleyLab YouTube: AdvancedLightSource January 2014 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Recent Science Highlights Minding the Gap Makes for More Efficient Solar Cells Using novel materials to develop thin, flexible, and more efficient photovoltaic cells is one of the hottest topics in current materials research. A class of transition metals undergo a dramatic change that makes them ideal for solar energy applications.

12

Advanced Lighting Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information about energy-effective lighting technologies is required to be updated as old technologies become obsolete and new technologies begin to make important market impacts. Providing a comprehensive, state-of-the-art update of lighting technology application and information is necessary to ensure that lighting decision-makers have the best possible information available at all times.

2001-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

13

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic Linear Fluorescent Ballasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update is one of four in a series that addresses the basic dimming performance of advanced lighting sources8212linear electronic fluorescent ballasts. Chapter 1 provides a discussion of basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and controls for incandescent, fluores...

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

Advances in Lighting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasing electricity costs have made a significant impact on lighting. The Illuminating Engineering society (I.E.S.) and the lighting industry are producing new standards, procedures and products to make lighting more appropriate and energy efficient. This paper will describe the factors which affect the performance of lighting systems, introduce the new I.E.S. procedures for selecting illuminance values and lighting power limits, and illustrate some of the recent developments in the lighting industry. The importance of efficient lighting may be measured by the potential reduction in the electrical demand, and energy consumed. Since it also represents a visible use (or misuse) of energy, it may also reflect on other aspects of a company's energy management program.

Tumber, A. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Lighting Group: Controls and Communications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Communications Communications Controls and Communications The Controls and Communications research activity investigates how digital technologies, such as Bluetooth, can be applied to building lighting control systems to increase building efficiency and improve occupant comfort and productivity. Projects range from embedded device networks applied to building lighting systems, to WiFi and environmental sensing and monitoring. light switch Current Projects IBECS (Integrated Building Environmental Communications System) Wireless Lighting Controls (with DUST Networks) HPCBS Advanced Digital Controls Building Control Systems Integration Completed Projects CEC Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Projects 450 Golden Gate Project New Publications Standardizing Communication Between Lighting Devices: A Role for

16

Advanced Light Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the generation of artificial light using electric lamps, photometric and color performance have been paramount in lamp design, manufacturing, measurement, lighting design, and visual perception. Many designers and researchers have strived to understand how light and color are generated, related, and to improve them. This has stemmed from the development of incandescent lamps, halogen lamps, linear fluorescent lamps, high-intensity discharge (HID) lamps, and compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) among other...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

17

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Buildings Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows...

18

Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

upgrade on the Advanced Light Source," Nucl. Instrum. Meth.n photoemission at the Advanced Light Source," Radiât. Phys.high-pressure studies at the Advanced Light Source w i t h a

Tamura Ed., Lori S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Advanced lighting guidelines, 1993: Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The 1993 Advanced Lighting Guidelines document consists of twelve guidelines that provide an overview of specific lighting technologies and design application techniques utilizing energy-efficient lighting practice. Lighting Design Practice assesses energy-efficient lighting strategies, discusses lighting issues, and explains how to obtain quality lighting design and consulting services. Luminaires and Lighting Systems surveys luminaire equipment designed to take advantage of advanced technology lamp products and includes performance tables that allow for accurate estimation of luminaire light output and power input. The additional ten guidelines -- Computer-Aided Lighting Design, Energy-Efficient Fluorescent Ballasts, Full-Size Fluorescent Lamps, Compact Fluorescent Lamps, Tungsten- Halogen Lamps, Metal Halide and HPS Lamps, Daylighting and Lumen Maintenance, Occupant Sensors, Time Scheduling Systems, and Retrofit Control Technologies -- each provide a product technology overview, discuss current products on the lighting equipment market, and provide application techniques. This document is intended for use by electric utility personnel involved in lighting programs, lighting designers, electrical engineers, architects, lighting manufacturers' representatives, and other lighting professionals.

Eley, C.; Tolen, T.M. (Eley Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States)); Benya, J.R. (Luminae Souter Lighting Design, San Francisco, CA (United States)); Rubinstein, F.; Verderber, R. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Advanced lighting guidelines: 1993. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1993 Advanced Lighting Guidelines document consists of twelve guidelines that provide an overview of specific lighting technologies and design application techniques utilizing energy-efficient lighting practice. Lighting Design Practice assesses energy-efficient lighting strategies, discusses lighting issues, and explains how to obtain quality lighting design and consulting services. Luminaires and Lighting Systems surveys luminaire equipment designed to take advantage of advanced technology lamp products and includes performance tables that allow for accurate estimation of luminaire light output and power input. The additional ten guidelines -- Computer-Aided Lighting Design, Energy-Efficient Fluorescent Ballasts, Full-Size Fluorescent Lamps, Compact Fluorescent Lamps, Tungsten-Halogen Lamps, Metal Halide and HPS Lamps, Daylighting and Lumen Maintenance, Occupant Sensors, Time Scheduling Systems, and Retrofit Control Technologies -- each provide a product technology overview, discuss current products on the lighting equipment market, and provide application techniques. This document is intended for use by electric utility personnel involved in lighting programs, lighting designers, electrical engineers, architects, lighting manufacturers` representatives, and other lighting professionals.

Eley, C.; Tolen, T.M. [Eley Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States); Benya, J.R. [Luminae Souter Lighting Design, San Francisco, CA (United States); Rubinstein, F.; Verderber, R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Advanced Lighting Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Centre, Minnesota Zip 56378 Product Advanced Lighting Systems (ALS) provides a number of LED and fiber optic lighting solutions. It was acquired by Nexxus Lighting in September...

22

Lighting Control Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The demand for lighting control systems in residential, commercial, and industrial facilities is on the rise with the demand for increased energy savings. With lighting accounting for almost 23% of grid load, there is significant opportunity to reduce lighting load while improving the quality of light for customers. Lighting control systems are becoming more intelligent as the need for them to interface with building control systems and demand response systems also increases. Lighting control systems use...

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

23

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Fixtures, Lamps, and Drivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update addresses the dimming performance of light-emitting diode (LED) lighting. Chapter 1 provides a discussion of basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth the dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and controls for incandescent, fluorescent, high-intensity discharge (HID) and LED sources. Chapter 3 ad...

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

24

Lighting Group: Controls: Wireless Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wireless Controls Wireless Lighting Control System (with DUST Networks) Objective The project objectives are to: 1. Demonstrate that wireless technology can be cost-effectively...

25

Preliminary results from an advanced lighting controlstestbed  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary results from a large-scale testbed of advanced lighting control technologies at the Phillip Burton Federal Building at 450 Golden Gate Ave. in San Francisco are presented. The first year objective of this project is to determine the sustainable energy savings and cost-effectiveness of different lighting control technologies compared to a portion of the building where only minimal controls are installed. The paper presents the analyzed results from six months of tests focused on accurately characterizing the energy savings potential of one type of daylight-linked lighting controls compared to the lighting in similar open-planned areas without dimming controls. After analyzing a half year;s data, we determined that the annual energy savings for this type of daylight- linked controls was 41% and 30% for the outer rows of lights on the South and North sides of the building, respectively. The annual energy savings dropped to 22% and 16% for the second row of lights for the South and North, respectively, and was negligible for the third rows of lights.

Avery, Douglas; Jennings, Judity; Rubinstein, Francis

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Automatic lighting controls demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work was to demonstrate, in a real building situation, the energy and peak demand reduction capabilities of an electronically ballasted lighting control system that can utilize all types of control strategies to efficiently manage lighting. The project has demonstrated that a state-of-the-art electronically ballasted dimmable lighting system can reduce energy and lighting demand by as least 50% using various combinations of control strategies. By reducing light levels over circulation areas (tuning) and reducing after hours light levels to accommodate the less stringent lighting demands of the cleaning crew (scheduling), lighting energy consumption on weekdays was reduced an average of 54% relative to the initial condition. 10 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

Rubinstein, F.; Verderber, R.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Lighting Group: Controls: PIER Lighting Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PIER Lighting Projects CEC Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Projects Objective Lighting controls are often expensive, complex, hard to commission properly and difficult to...

28

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic (Hot and Cold Cathode) Compact Fluorescent Lamps and Ballasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update (EPRI report 1018477) is one of four in a series that addresses basic dimming performance of advanced lighting sourceselectronic (hot and cold cathode) compact fluorescent lamps and ballasts Chapter 1 discusses basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and co...

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

29

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Technologies: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Tech nologies -- Electronic Fluorescent, High-Intensity Discharge, and Light-Emitting Diode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Report is a compilation of four technical updates that address the basic dimming performance of advanced lighting sources: EPRI report 1018476 for linear fluorescent ballasts, 1018477 for hot and cold cathode compact fluorescent lamps, 1018479 for electronic high-intensity discharge (HID) ballasts, and 1018480 for light-emitting diode (LED) lighting. Chapter 1 provides a discussion of basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting con...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

30

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Advanced NOx Emissions Control Innovations for Existing Plants Advanced NOx Emissions Control Adv....

31

Lighting Group: Controls: IBECS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IBECS IBECS Integrated Building Environmental Communications System Objective The overall technical goal of the IBECS project is to develop an integrated building equipment communications network that will allow appropriate automation of lighting and envelope systems to increase energy efficiency, improve building performance, and enhance occupant experience in the space. This network will provide a low-cost means for occupants to control local lighting and window systems, thereby improving occupant comfort, satisfaction and performance. A related goal is to improve existing lighting control components and accelerate development of new daylighting technologies that will allow daylighting to be more extensively applied to a larger proportion of building floor space.

32

AUTOMATIC LIGHT CONTROL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control system for a projection kinescope used in a facsimile scanning system and, in particular, meams for maintaining substantially constant the light emanating from the flying spot on the face of the kinescope are described. In general, the invention provides a feeler member disposed in such a position with respect to a projecting lens as to intercept a portion of the light striking the lens. Suitable circuitry in conjunction with a photomultiplier tube provides a signal proportional to the light intensity of the flying spot. The grid bias on the kinescope is controlled by this signal to maintain the intensity of the spot substantially constant.

Artzt, M.

1957-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

33

The Advanced Light Source Upgrade  

SciTech Connect

The ALS, a third-generation synchrotron light source at Berkeley Lab, has been operating for almost a decade and is generating forefront science by exploiting the high brightness of a third-generation source in three areas: (1) high resolving power for spectroscopy; (2) high spatial resolution for microscopy and spectromicroscopy; and (3) high coherence for experiments such as speckle. However, the ALS was one of the first third-generation machines to be designed, and accelerator and insertion-device technology have significantly changed since its conception. As a result, its performance will inevitably be outstripped by newer, more advanced sources. To remain competitive and then set a new standard, the performance of the ALS, in particular its brightness, must be enhanced. Substantial improvements in brightness and current have always been feasible in principle, but they incur the penalty of a much reduced lifetime, which is totally unacceptable to our users. Significant brightness improvements can be realized in the core soft x-ray region by going to top-off operation, where injection would be quasi-continuous and the lifetime objections disappear. In top-off mode with higher average current, a reduced vertical emittance and beta function, and small-gap permanent-magnet or superconducting insertion devices, one to two orders of magnitude improvement in brightness can be had in the soft x-ray range. These improvements also extend the high energy range of the undulator radiation beyond the current limit of 2000 eV. Descriptions of the upgrade and the important new science achievable are presented.

Chemla, Daniel S.; Feinberg, Benjamin; Hussain, Zahid; Krebs, Gary F.; Padmore, Howard A.; Robin, David S.; Robinson, Arthur L.; Smith, Neville V.

2003-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

34

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic High-Intensity Discharge Ballasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update addresses the dimming performance of electronic high-intensity discharge (HID) ballasts. Chapter 1 provides a discussion of basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth the dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and controls for incandescent, fluorescent, high-intensity discharge (HID) and light-emit...

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

35

Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2002  

SciTech Connect

This annual report of the Advanced Light Source details science highlights and facility improvements during the year. It also offers information on events sponsored by the facility, technical specifications, and staff and publication information.

Duque, Theresa; Greiner, Annette; Moxon, Elizabeth; Robinson, Arthur; Tamura, Lori (Editors)

2003-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

36

Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an annual report, detailing activities at the Advanced Light Source for the year 2000. It includes highlights of scientific research by users of the facility as well as information about the development of the facility itself.

Greiner, A.; Moxon, L.; Robinson, A.; Tamura, L.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Advanced Lighting Technologies Application Guidelines: 1990  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Lighting Technologies Application Guidelines document consists of eight guidelines that provide an overview of specific lighting technologies and design application techniques utilizing energy-efficient lighting products. Lighting Design Practice assesses energy-efficient lighting strategies and explains how to obtain quality lighting design and consulting services. Luminaries and Lighting Systems surveys advanced lighting fixture products designed to take advantage of current energy-efficient lamp technologies and includes luminaire tables to allow users to collect photometric performance characteristics for common commercial luminaires. Each of the remaining six guidelines -- Computer-Aided Lighting Design, Energy-efficient and Electronic Ballasts, Full-Size Fluorescent Lamps, Compact Fluorescent Lamps, Conventional Shape Tungsten-Halogen Lamps, and Compact Metal Halide and White High Pressure Sodium Lamps -- includes a technology overview section, a description of current products available on the market, and an applications section. The document is intended for use by electric utility personnel involved in lighting programs, lighting designers, electrical engineers, architects, lighting manufacturers' representatives, and other lighting professionals.

Eley, C. (Eley (Charles) Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Report from the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems and Human-System Interface Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The program is operated in close collaboration with industry R&D programs to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of Nuclear Power Plants that are currently in operation. The LWRS Program focus is on longer-term and higher-risk/reward research that contributes to the national policy objectives of energy and environmental security. Advanced instruments and control (I&C) technologies are needed to support the safe and reliable production of power from nuclear energy systems during sustained periods of operation up to and beyond their expected licensed lifetime. This requires that new capabilities to achieve process control be developed and eventually implemented in existing nuclear assets. It also requires that approaches be developed and proven to achieve sustainability of I&C systems throughout the period of extended operation. The strategic objective of the LWRS Program Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technology R&D pathway is to establish a technical basis for new technologies needed to achieve safety and reliability of operating nuclear assets and to implement new technologies in nuclear energy systems. This will be achieved by carrying out a program of R&D to develop scientific knowledge in the areas of: • Sensors, diagnostics, and prognostics to support characterization and prediction of the effects of aging and degradation phenomena effects on critical systems, structures, and components (SSCs) • Online monitoring of SSCs and active components, generation of information, and methods to analyze and employ online monitoring information • New methods for visualization, integration, and information use to enhance state awareness and leverage expertise to achieve safer, more readily available electricity generation. As an initial step in accomplishing this effort, the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems and Human-System Interface Technologies was held March 20–21, 2009, in Columbus, Ohio, to enable industry stakeholders and researchers in identification of the nuclear industry’s needs in the areas of future I&C technologies and corresponding technology gaps and research capabilities. Approaches for collaboration to bridge or fill the technology gaps were presented and R&D activities and priorities recommended. This report documents the presentations and discussions of the workshop and is intended to serve as a basis for the plan under development to achieve the goals of the I&C research pathway.

Bruce P. Hallbert; J. J. Persensky; Carol Smidts; Tunc Aldemir; Joseph Naser

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Advanced Light Source: Activity report 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Light Source (ALS) produces the world`s brightest light in the ultraviolet and soft x-ray regions of the spectrum. The first low-energy third-generation synchrotron source in the world, the ALS provides unprecedented opportunities for research in science and technology not possible anywhere else. This year marked the beginning of operations and the start of the user research program at the ALS, which has already produced numerous high quality results. A national user facility located at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory of the University of California, the ALS is available to researchers from academia, industry, and government laboratories. This report contains the following: (1) director`s message; (2) operations overview; (3) user program; (4) users` executive committee; (5) industrial outreach; (6) accelerator operations; (7) beamline control system; (8) insertion devices; (9) experimental systems; (10) beamline engineering; (11) first results from user beamlines; (12) beamlines for 1994--1995; (13) special events; (14) publications; (15) advisory panels; and (16) ALS staff.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Advanced Lighting Program Development (BG9702800) Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report presents a long-range plan for a broad-based, coordinated research, development and market transformation program for reducing the lighting energy intensities in commercial and residential buildings in California without compromising lighting quality. An effective program to advance lighting energy efficiency in California must be based on an understanding that lighting is a mature field and the lighting industry has developed many specialized products that meet a wide variety of light needs for different building types. Above all else, the lighting field is diverse and there are applications for a wide range of lighting products, systems, and strategies. Given the range of existing lighting solutions, an effective energy efficient lighting research portfolio must be broad-based and diverse to match the diversity of the lighting market itself. The belief that there is one solution--a magic bullet, such as a better lamp, for example--that will propel lighting efficiency across all uses to new heights is, in the authors' opinion, an illusion. A multi-path program is the only effective means to raising lighting efficiency across all lighting applications in all building types. This report presents a list of 27 lighting technologies and concepts (key activities) that could form the basis of a coordinated research and market transformation plan for significantly reducing lighting energy intensities in California buildings. The total 27 key activities into seven broad classes as follows: Light sources; Ballasts; Luminaires; Lighting Controls; Lighting Systems in Buildings; Human Factors and Education. Each of the above technology classes is discussed in terms of background, key activities, and the energy savings potential for the state. The report concludes that there are many possibilities for targeted research, development, and market transformation activities across all sectors of the building lighting industry. A concerted investment by the state to foster efficiency improvements in lighting systems in commercial and residential buildings would have a major positive impact on energy use and environmental quality in California.

Rubinstein, Francis; Johnson, Steve

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Advanced Lighting Guidelines: 1993 (Revision 1)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This series of guidelines, originally published in 1990 by the California Energy Commission, provides both technical and practical information about energy-efficient lighting equipment and design techniques. This revised version updates the 1990 information and adds four new sections on lighting controls and daylighting. EPRI's cofunding and publication of these guidelines will facilitate utility access to this information, resulting in increased lighting quality and energy efficiency.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Avoid advanced control project mistakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On-line process optimization is worth working for but without robust advanced controls it will never happen. In this paper, the author evaluates how well advanced controls worked in five refineries. Having spent money on such projects, the refineries faced a situation in which there was no measurable improvement in overall plant performance. These refineries are owned by different companies, yet they share a pattern of mistakes in administrating advanced controls. Highlighting these mistakes shows ways to improve the organization of advanced control technology, to avoid obvious pitfalls.

Friedman, Y.Z. (Petrocontrol, Madison, NJ (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Innovative Lighting-Control and Demand-Response Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI technical update continues the technical assessment of modern lighting-control and demand-response (DR) systems in the following product areas: programmable timer switches, scalable lighting-control systems, Zigbee-based add-on control systems, and Z-Wave–based lighting controllers. This research helps to demonstrate that there is a wide variety of advanced lighting controls entering the marketplace each year, and it describes how they respond to a range of DR and power-quality ...

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

44

Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Control Types Characteristics of the most common lighting controls for offices and other public buildings are outlined below. Typical Lighting Control Applications...

45

Solid-State Lighting: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adaptive Street Lighting Adaptive Street Lighting Controls to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls on AddThis.com... Conferences & Meetings Presentations Publications Webcasts Videos Tools Adaptive Street Lighting Controls This two-part DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium webinar focused on LED street lighting equipped with adaptive control components.

46

Advanced Lighting Technology Program for Federal Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

E's Innovative Federal Collaboration E's Innovative Federal Collaboration Advanced Lighting Technology Program for Federal Buildings Federal Utility Partnership Working Group November 1, 2006 "A 3 MW Success Story: Delivering on the Promise" Today's Presentation * Setting the Scene - U.S & Global Perspective * Program Overview: - Advanced Lighting Technology Program for Federal Buildings * Benefits - Energy and environmental * Conclusion: - The Lamborghini Analogy Setting the Scene U.S. Policy: The National Direction "The answer to high energy prices is the kind of comprehensive approach embraced by the President-that includes...increasing our reliance on energy efficiency and conservation. "Let me be clear: Encouraging greater energy efficiency is part and parcel of changing the way we power our homes and

47

Advanced Light Water Reactor utility requirements document  

SciTech Connect

The ALWR Requirements Document is a primary work product of the EPRI Program. This document is an extensive compilation of the utility requirements for design, construction and performance of advanced light water reactor power plants for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document's primary emphasis is on resolution of significant problems experienced at existing nuclear power plants. It is intended to be used with companion documents, such as utility procurement specifications, which would cover the remaining detailed technical requirements applicable to new plant projects. The ALWR Requirements Document consists of several major parts. This volume is Part I, The Executive Summary. It is intended to serve as a concise, management level synopsis of advanced light water reactors including design objectives and philosophy, overall configuration and features and the steps necessary to proceed from the conceptual design stage to a completed, functioning power plant.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Distributed Control for Smart Lighting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this research, we investigate designing a smart lighting system. By extending and enhancing the centralized and distributed control algorithms we try to address the… (more)

Phadke, Swanand Shripad

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Advanced Lighting Design and the Energy Code | Building Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Version Development Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center Advanced Lighting Design and the Energy Code This course addresses the lighting requirements of the...

50

'Slow light' advance could speed optical computing, telecommunications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Slow light" and specialized metamaterials 'Slow light' advance could speed optical computing, telecommunications Researchers have made the first demonstration of rapidly switching...

51

AFRD - Advanced Light Source Accelerator Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALS Accelerator Physics ALS Accelerator Physics Home Organization Outreach and Diversity News Highlights Safety Links Intramural FPO Accelerator Physics Group This page and the Group's own site emphasize the continuing effort to improve the performance and versatility of the accelerator-related systems of the ALS. If you want to start with a nontechnical explanation of what synchrotron light is, how scientists use it, and how the Advanced Light Source works, try About the ALS. The research performed using beams from the ALS is a vast topic that spans many scientific disciplines; a good overview with in-depth links is available at the ALS Science Briefs page. The ALS is a “” synchrotron light source based on a low-emittance electron storage ring with a nominal energy of 1.9 GeV. Since the machine

52

Advanced Indoor Module Light-Soaking Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An overview of the accelerated, indoor light-soaking test station is presented in this paper, along with data obtained for six modules that underwent exposure. The station comprises a climate-controlled chamber equipped with a solar simulator that allows 1-sun light intensity exposure. Concurrently, we monitor the electrical characteristics of multiple PV modules and exercise active control over their electrical bias using programmable electronic loads, interfaced to a data acquisition system that acquires power-tracking and current-voltage data. This capability allows us to the test different bias conditions and to cyclically alternate between them. Additionally, we can vary the light intensity and module temperatures to garner realistic temperature coefficients of module performance. Data obtained on cadmium telluride (CdTe) and amorphous silicon (a-Si) modules are presented.

del Cueto, J. A.; Osterwald, C.; Pruett, J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light-Duty Light-Duty Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on Google Bookmark Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on Delicious Rank Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on AddThis.com... Home Overview Light-Duty Vehicles Alternative Fuel Vehicles Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Micro Hybrid Vehicles ARRA Vehicle and Infrastructure Projects EVSE Testing Energy Storage Testing Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Vehicles Other ICE

54

An Upgrade for the Advanced Light Source  

SciTech Connect

One of the first third-generation synchrotron light sources, the ALS, has been operating for almost a decade at Berkeley Lab, where experimenters have been exploiting its high brightness for forefront science. However, accelerator and insertion-device technology have significantly changed since the ALS was designed. As a result, the performance of the ALS is in danger of being eclipsed by that of newer, more advanced sources. The ALS upgrade that we are planning includes full-energy, top-off injection with higher storage-ring current and the replacement of five first-generation insertion devices with nine state-of-the art insertion devices and four new application-specific beamlines now being identified in a strategic planning process. The upgrade will help keep the ALS at the forefront of soft x-ray synchrotron light sources for the next two decades.

Chemla, Daniel S.; Feinberg, Benedict; Hussain, Zahid; Kirz,Janos; Krebs, Gary F.; Padmore, Howard A.; Robin, David S.; Robinson,Arthur L.; Smith, Neville V.

2004-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

55

Lighting Controls | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Use dimmers to save energy and add ambience to a room Check the packages of CFL and LED lightbulbs to see if they are compatible with dimmers Use lighting controls to...

56

Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Title Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Williams, Alison A., Barbara A. Atkinson, Karina Garbesi, Erik Page, and Francis M. Rubinstein Series Title The Journal of the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America Volume 8 Document Number 3 Pagination 161-180 Date Published January ISBN Number 1550-2716 Keywords controls, daylighting, energy, occupancy sensors, tuning. Abstract Researchers have been quantifying energy savings from lighting controls in commercial buildings for more than 30 years. This study provides a meta-analysis of lighting energy savings identified in the literature-240 savings estimates from 88 papers and case studies, categorized into daylighting strategies, occupancy strategies, personal tuning, and institutional tuning. Beginning with an overall average of savings estimates by control strategy, successive analytical filters are added to identify potential biases introduced to the estimates by different analytical approaches. Based on this meta-analysis, the bestestimates of average lighting energy savings potential are 24 percent for occupancy, 28 percent for daylighting, 31 percent for personal tuning, 36 percent for institutional tuning, and 38 percent for multiple approaches. The results also suggest that simulations significantly overestimate (by at least 10 percent) the average savings obtainable from daylighting in actual buildings.

57

Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ALS and the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The LDLR crystals,Director for the Advanced Photon Source (APS), and Steven

Duque editor, Theresa; Greiner editor, Annette; Moxon editor, Elizabeth; Robinson editor, Arthur; Tamura editor, Lori

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

LIGHTING CONTROLS: SURVEY OF MARKET POTENTIAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REFERENCES Task Report to Lighting Systems Research,Berkeley Laboratory, "Lighting Control System Market1980). Task Report to Lighting Systems Research, Lawrence

Verderber, R.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Control Lighting Control Types to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Federal Requirements Covered Product Categories Product Designation Process Low Standby Power Energy & Cost Savings Calculators Model Acquisitions Language Working Group Resources Technology Deployment Renewable Energy

60

Workshop on Diamonds for Modern Light Sources | Advanced Photon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Argonne Committees and Contacts diamond Workshop on Diamonds for Modern Light Sources May 5 and 6, 2011 Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory Room 401A1100...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

An Upgrade for the Advanced Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of an optimized third generation source not only translatesfirst third-generation synchrotron light sources, the ALS,of a third-generation synchrotron light source translates

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Lumental : web-based tunable lighting control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamically adjusting the light spectrum of spectrum-tunable light fixtures promises significant energy savings over binary or incremental dimming control. To enable this level of controllability, lighting must evolve from ...

Hall, Harrison King

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Advanced gray rod control assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced gray rod control assembly (GRCA) for a nuclear reactor. The GRCA provides controlled insertion of gray rod assemblies into the reactor, thereby controlling the rate of power produced by the reactor and providing reactivity control at full power. Each gray rod assembly includes an elongated tubular member, a primary neutron-absorber disposed within the tubular member said neutron-absorber comprising an absorber material, preferably tungsten, having a 2200 m/s neutron absorption microscopic capture cross-section of from 10 to 30 barns. An internal support tube can be positioned between the primary absorber and the tubular member as a secondary absorber to enhance neutron absorption, absorber depletion, assembly weight, and assembly heat transfer characteristics.

Drudy, Keith J; Carlson, William R; Conner, Michael E; Goldenfield, Mark; Hone, Michael J; Long, Jr., Carroll J; Parkinson, Jerod; Pomirleanu, Radu O

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

64

Lighting Controls/Sensors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Lighting ControlsSensors Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Lighting...

65

Advanced, Integrated Control for Building Operations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced, Integrated Control for Building Advanced, Integrated Control for Building Operations Advanced, Integrated Control for Building Operations The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently conducting research into advanced integrated controls for building operations and seeking to validate energy savings strategies by simulations. Project Description This project will develop an advanced, integrated control for the following building systems: Cooling and heating Lighting Ventilation Window and blind operation. A variety of operation and energy saving control strategies will be evaluated on a building equipped with alternative cooling and heating methods, including fan coil units, radiant mullions, and motorized window and blinds. Project Partners Research is being undertaken by DOE, Siemens Corporate Research, Siemens

66

Advanced nuclear plant control complex  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Adapting Wireless Technology to Lighting Control and Environmental Sensing  

SciTech Connect

The high cost of retrofitting buildings with advanced lighting control systems is a barrier to adoption of this energy-saving technology. Wireless technology, however, offers a solution to mounting installation costs since it requires no additional wiring to implement. To demonstrate the feasibility of such a system, a prototype wirelessly-controlled advanced lighting system was designed and built. The system includes the following components: a wirelessly-controllable analog circuit module (ACM), a wirelessly-controllable electronic dimmable ballast, a T8 3-lamp fixture, an environmental multi-sensor, a current transducer, and control software. The ACM, dimmable ballast, multi-sensor, and current transducer were all integrated with SmartMesh{trademark} wireless mesh networking nodes, called motes, enabling wireless communication, sensor monitoring, and actuator control. Each mote-enabled device has a reliable communication path to the SmartMesh Manager, a single board computer that controls network functions and connects the wireless network to a PC running lighting control software. The ACM is capable of locally driving one or more standard 0-10 Volt electronic dimmable ballasts through relay control and a 0-10 Volt controllable output. The mote-integrated electronic dimmable ballast is designed to drive a standard 3-lamp T8 light fixture. The environmental multi-sensor measures occupancy, light level and temperature. The current transducer is used to measure the power consumed by the fixture. Control software was developed to implement advanced lighting algorithms, including daylight ramping, occupancy control, and demand response. Engineering prototypes of each component were fabricated and tested in a bench-scale system. Based on standard industry practices, a cost analysis was conducted. It is estimated that the installation cost of a wireless advanced lighting control system for a retrofit application is at least 30% lower than a comparable wired system for a typical 16,000 square-foot office building, with a payback period of less than 3 years.

Dana Teasdale; Francis Rubinstein; Dave Watson; Steve Purdy

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

System Compatibility of Modern Lighting Control Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of lighting control technologies continues at rapid rates in efforts to reduce energy usage and improve quality of light and color. Utilities, efficiency engineers, and end users should be aware of emissions and immunity performance of a lighting device before it is accepted for use in incentive and rebate programs prior to deployment in customer facilities. Continuing its efforts in evaluating new lighting control technologies, EPRI, within its Program 170, has tested four lighting control p...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

69

Lighting Control Types | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lighting Control Types Lighting Control Types Lighting Control Types October 7, 2013 - 11:27am Addthis Characteristics of the most common lighting controls for offices and other public buildings are outlined below. Also provided is a portable document format version of How to Select Lighting Controls for Offices and Public Buildings. Typical Lighting Control Applications Type of Control Private Office Open Office - Daylit Open Office - Interior Occupancy Sensors ++ ++ ++ Time Scheduling + ++ ++ Daylight Dimming ++ ++ 0 Bi-Level Switching ++ + + Demand Lighting + ++ ++ ++ = good savings potential + = some savings potential 0 = not applicable Back to Top Occupancy Sensors Occupancy sensors are the most common lighting control used in buildings today. Two technologies dominate: infrared and ultrasonic. Infrared sensors

70

The Advanced Light Source: Technical Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wiggler --"" after upgrade / SSRL NSLS bend GeV) 1 eV 10 eVSynchrotron Light Source (NSLS), which operates two storageBunch Length (ps) Aladdin NSLS (VUV) NSLS (X-ray) SSRL (

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Michigan University and ALS), J.D. Bozek and G.D. Ackerman (Shining light on met­ als in the environment," EleinentsStray field reduc­ tion of als eddy current septum magnets,"

Tamura Ed., Lori S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Advanced Lighting Technologies:Energy Efficiency and Power Quality of Lighting Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

his EPRI technical update is the third in a series of technical assessments of advanced lighting technologies. A total of seven lighting products were assessed in 2013: low cost screw based light-emitting diode (LED) lamps, retrofit LED ceiling fixtures, suspended LED fixtures, LED-based 2x4 troffers, LED high bay fixtures, innovative LED screw based lamps, and LED hospitality lighting. Prior to beginning an in-depth assessment, the EPRI Lighting Group evaluated each of the tested technologies to ...

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

73

BIM-Based Digital Lighting Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

industry has been slow to embrace new technologies and concepts, and electrical installers are largely unfamiliar with digital control technologies. For a lighting controls...

74

Lighting Controls | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fluorescent lighting fixtures rather than replace them. Dimmers and LEDs Some light-emitting diode (LED) lightbulbs can be used with dimmers. LED bulbs and fixtures must be...

75

Advanced Pulverizer Control: Design and Testbed Implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal pulverizers play an important role in all aspects of power plant performance, including availability, efficiency, and responsiveness. In relationship to dynamic response, pulverizer control often limits a plant's maximum load rate-of-change. EPRI has been investigating the use of advanced multivariable control techniques on several plant subsystems and in this project is developing an advanced pulverizer control system. The ultimate goal is to design, implement, and test an advanced control system o...

2004-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

76

Performance of Advanced Light Source particle beam diagnostics  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility, is complete. The particle beam diagnostics have been installed and tested. The beam injection systems have been running for two years. We have performance data on beam position monitors, beam intensity monitors, scintillators, beam collimators, a 50 {Omega} Faraday cup, and broad-band striplines and kickers used in the linac, transport lines, and the booster synchrotron. The single-turn monitoring capability of the booster beam position monitoring system has been particularly useful for studying beam dynamics. Beam diagnostics for the storage ring are being commissioned. In this paper we describe each instrument, show its performance, and outline how the instruments are controlled and their output data displayed.

Hinkson, J.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Program on Technology Innovation: Advanced Light Source Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Light Source (ALITE) research program is aimed at breakthrough basic research to achieve approximately 150 to 200 lumens per watt for fluorescent light sources, and to increase high intensity discharge light source efficiency by up to 50%. This report describes work on high intensity discharge (HID) lamps. These commercially available lamps currently have efficacies up to 120 lumens per watt (LPW), and radiate approximately 36% of their energy in the visible spectrum and 53% in the infrared ...

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

78

NETL: Advanced Research - Sensors & Controls Innovations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensors & Controls Sensors & Controls Advanced Research Sensors & Controls Innovations OSU's O2 Sensor Ohio State University's reference-free potentiometric oxygen sensor capable of withstanding temperatures of 800 °C. Novel Sensors and Advanced Process Control Novel Sensors and Advanced Process Control are key enabling technologies for advanced near zero emission power systems. NETL's Advanced Research Program is leading the effort to develop sensing and control technologies and methods to achieve seamless, integrated, automated, optimized, and intelligent power systems. Today, the performance of advanced power systems is limited by the lack of sensors and controls capable of withstanding high temperature and pressure conditions. Harsh environments are inherent to new systems that aim to

79

Adapting Wireless Technology to Lighting Control and Environmental Sensing  

SciTech Connect

Although advanced lighting control systems offer significant energy savings, the high cost of retrofitting buildings with advanced lighting control systems is a barrier to adoption of this energy-saving technology. Wireless technology, however, offers a solution to mounting installation costs since it requires no additional wiring to implement. To demonstrate the feasibility of such a system, a prototype wirelessly-controlled advanced lighting system was designed and built. The system includes the following components: a wirelessly-controllable analog circuit module (ACM), a wirelessly-controllable electronic dimmable ballast, a T8 3-lamp fixture, an environmental multi-sensor, a current transducer, and control software. The ACM, dimmable ballast, multi-sensor, and current transducer were all integrated with SmartMesh{trademark} wireless mesh networking nodes, called motes, enabling wireless communication, sensor monitoring, and actuator control. Each mote-enabled device has a reliable communication path to the SmartMesh Manager, a single board computer that controls network functions and connects the wireless network to a PC running lighting control software. The ACM is capable of locally driving one or more standard 0-10 Volt electronic dimmable ballasts through relay control and a 0-10 Volt controllable output, in addition to 0-24 Volt and 0-10 Volt inputs. The mote-integrated electronic dimmable ballast is designed to drive a standard 3-lamp T8 light fixture. The environmental multisensor measures occupancy, light level and temperature. The current transducer is used to measure the power consumed by the fixture. Control software was developed to implement advanced lighting algorithms, including open and closed-loop daylight ramping, occupancy control, and demand response. Engineering prototypes of each component were fabricated and tested in a bench-scale system. Based on standard industry practices, a cost analysis was conducted. It is estimated that the installation cost of a wireless advanced lighting control system for a retrofit application is at least 20% lower than a comparable wired system for a typical 16,000 square-foot office building, with a payback period of less than 3 years. At 30% market penetration saturation, a cumulative 695 Billion kWh of energy could be saved through 2025, a cost savings of $52 Billion.

Dana Teasdale; Francis Rubinstein; David S. Watson; Steve Purdy

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

80

Advanced Controls Technologies and Strategies Linking Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Controls Technologies and Strategies Linking Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Speaker(s): Sila Kiliccote Date: October 6, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Reliable...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Advanced nonlinear control of complex power systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nowadays, advanced controller design is called upon to guarantee the secure and reliable operation of power systems. To meet this requirement, this work proposed three… (more)

Li, Hong Yin.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Monitored lighting energy savings from dimmable lighting controls in The  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitored lighting energy savings from dimmable lighting controls in The Monitored lighting energy savings from dimmable lighting controls in The New York Times Headquarters Building Title Monitored lighting energy savings from dimmable lighting controls in The New York Times Headquarters Building Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-6171E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Fernandes, Luis L., Eleanor S. Lee, Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, and Andrew McNeil Journal Energy and Buildings Volume 68 Issue A Pagination 498-514 Date Published 01/2014 Keywords Building energy-efficiency, daylighting, lighting control systems Abstract Digital addressable, dimmable lighting controls were introduced to the US market in the early 2000s with the promise of facilitating capture of potential energy savings with greater flexibility over their historic, typically unreliable, analog counterpart. The New York Times Company installed this emerging technology, after having tested the system thoroughly prior to procurement, in their new building in New York, New York. Four years after full occupancy in 2007, the owner agreed to participate in a post-occupancy monitored evaluation of the dimmable lighting system to verify actual performance in the field. Annual lighting energy savings from daylighting, setpoint tuning and occupancy controls were determined for the daylit, open-plan office areas on three typical floors (6, 11, and 20th floors) of the 51-story high-rise tower. Energy savings were calculated from ballast control signal and occupancy data recorded by the manufacturer's lighting control system. The ballast data were calibrated with independent measurements of lighting energy consumption. Savings from dimming controls (daylighting and setpoint tuning) were 12.6 kWh/m2-yr (1.17 kWh/ft2-yr) for the daylit spaces on the three floors overall, or 20%, relative to ASHRAE 90.1-2007. Compared to the prescriptive code in effect at the time of the building's construction (ASHRAE 90.1-2001), savings were 21.0 kWh/m2-yr (1.95 kWh/ft2-yr) or 28%. Annual lighting energy use with all lighting control strategies was 33.9 kWh/m2-yr (3.15 kWh/ft2-yr) in the daylit, open plan zones on average for the three floors. A simple payback analysis was conducted.

83

Energy saving through effective lighting control  

SciTech Connect

The energy savings associated with various lighting control strategies was investigated at the World Trade Center in New York using a relay-based lighting control system. By reducing after-hours lighting loads to one-third of daytime levels, a 32% energy savings was realized. Combining a very tight lighting schedule with lighting-load shedding in daylit areas reduced energy consumption for lighting 52% relative to baseline operation. The dependency of energy savings on the size of the switching zone was also investigated.

Peterson, D.; Rubinstein, F.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Automatic lighting controls demonstration: Long-term results  

SciTech Connect

An advanced electronically ballasted lighting control system was installed in a portion of an office building to measure the energy and demand savings. The lighting control system used an integrated lighting control scenario that included daylight following, lumen depreciation correction, and scheduling. The system reduced lighting energy on weekdays by 62% and 51% in the north and south daylit zones, respectively, compared to a reference zone that did not have controls. During the summer, over 75% energy savings were achieved on weekdays in the north daylit zone. Even in the south interior zone, which benefitted lime from daylight, correction strategies and adjustment of the aisleway lights to a low level resulted in energy use of only half that of the reference zone. Although, in general, the savings varied over the year due to changing daylight conditions, the energy reduction achieved with controls could be fit using a simple analytical model. Significant savings also occurred during core operating hours when it is more expensive to supply and use energy. Compared to the usage in the reference zone, energy reductions of 49%, 44%, and 62% were measured in the south daylight, south interior, and north daylight zones, respectively, during core operating hours throughout the year. Lighting energy usage on weekends decreased dramatically in the zones with controls, with the usage in the north daylit zone only 10% that of the reference zone. A simple survey developed to assess occupant response to the lighting control system showed that the occupants were satisfied with the light levels provided.

Rubinstein, F. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

1991-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

85

GE Uses DOE Advanced Light Sources to Develop Revolutionary Battery  

Office of Science (SC) Website

GE Uses DOE Advanced Light Sources to Develop GE Uses DOE Advanced Light Sources to Develop Revolutionary Battery Technology Discovery & Innovation Stories of Discovery & Innovation Brief Science Highlights SBIR/STTR Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 06.13.11 GE Uses DOE Advanced Light Sources to Develop Revolutionary Battery Technology Company is constructing a new battery factory in Upstate New York that is expected to create 300+ jobs. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo GE's new Image courtesy of GE GE's new "Durathon(tm)" sodium metal halide battery. The story of American manufacturing over the past two decades has too often been a tale of outsourcing, off-shoring, and downsizing-not least in

86

System Compatibility of Modern Lighting Control Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy-saving lighting control technologies are valuable tools for reducing the amount of electricity required to deliver sufficient light levels to consumers. Many new lighting controls have been developed in recent years which provide users with a wide variety of features past ON and OFF switching. Such features include but are not limited to: scheduled dimming, lumen sensing, wireless control, demand response, color temperature adjustment, and bi-level dimming.  These features provide ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

A New Digital Lighting Control System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A New Digital Lighting Control System A New Digital Lighting Control System Speaker(s): Charles Knuffke Date: June 29, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Francis Rubinstein When various Lighting Controls components are discussed, they're usually slotted into separate "silos" - Occupancy Sensors, Relay Panels, Dimming Controls, and Daylighting Controls. Trying to combine two or more of these into a single system usually requires a fair amount of technical expertise and often help from different manufacturers. Combine that with the need under LEED to get these systems commissioned, often without detailed sequence of operation information, and that helps to explains why many view Lighting Controls as overly complex. And try to integrate the Lighting Controls into a larger overall building management system so their

88

Human Factors Aspects of Advanced Process Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy conservation practices, such as heat recovery and integration, require that many chemical and related processes use advanced control systems. Many of the more advanced process control strategies and algorithms can cause operator confusion, leading to incorrect operator actions and negating the advantages of the advanced control. If the operator makes a mistake and upsets the process, or fails to respond correctly to a process upset, the loss can exceed the possible savings of the advanced control. Further, the experience can result in the operator not using the control capability in the future. Display and man/machine interface techniques, based on an understanding of human factors and of an operator's typical analysis of a process, can be used to present information to the operator in a manner which will prevent confusion. This paper discusses techniques for selecting and displaying process and control information to the operator.

Shaw, J. A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Advanced Light Source Activity Report 1997/1998  

SciTech Connect

This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Light Source (ALS) activity report for 1997/98 discusses the following topics: Introduction and Overview; Science Highlights; Facility Report; Special Events; ALS Advisory Panels 1997/98; ALS Staff 1997/98 and Facts and Figures for the year.

Greiner, Annette (ed.)

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Analyzing occupancy profiles from a lighting controls field study  

SciTech Connect

Despite a number of published studies on the effectiveness of lighting controls in buildings, only one US study examines the occupancy patterns of building occupants. Occupancy profiles allow one to determine, for example, the probability that an office is occupied for each hour of the workday. Occupancy profiles are useful for many purposes including: (1) predicting the effectiveness of occupancy sensors for reducing peak demand, (2) evaluating the impact of human activity on building lighting and other electric loads and (3) providing lighting equipment manufacturers with detailed lighting operation data to help evaluate the impact of advanced lighting controls on equipment life. In this paper, we examine the occupancy profiles for 35 single person offices at a large office building in San Francisco and analyze the data to obtain average occupancy as a function of time of day. In addition, we analyzed the data to identify how the use of occupancy sensors may affect switching cycles and lamp life.

Rubinstein, Francis; Colak, Nesrin; Jennings, Judith; Neils, Danielle

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

91

Information Resources: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adaptive Street Lighting Controls Adaptive Street Lighting Controls This two-part DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium webinar focused on LED street lighting equipped with adaptive control components. In Part I, presenters Amy Olay of the City of San Jose, CA, and Kelly Cunningham of the California Lighting Technology Center at UC Davis discussed their experiences as early adopters of these smart street lighting systems. In Part II, presenters Laura Stuchinsky of the City of San Jose, CA, and Michael Poplawski of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory explored the MSSLC's recently released Model Specification for Adaptive Control and Remote Monitoring of LED Roadway Luminaires. Part I: Experiences and Benefits June 11, 2013 View the presentation slides Part II: Reviewing the MSSLC's Model Specification

92

System Compatibility of Modern Lighting Control Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The state of the energy industry combined with growing economic pressures will drive accelerated use of energy-efficient dimmable lighting devices and control systems. While penetration and application will be different across customer sectors, the goal is to dynamically reduce lighting load without compromising productivity and the quality of light and life in a timely manner. Continual improvement of dimmable devices and controls is paramount to achieving that goal. EPRI research concepts in system com...

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

93

Standardization of user interfaces for lighting controls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Standardization of human-machine interfaces has proved beneficial in a number of technology areas. Lighting control is a home and office technology that is of central importance in energy efficiency and could potentially benefit from standardization, ... Keywords: CIE, Concepts, HVAC, IEANA, IEC, ISO, Indicators, LED, Lighting controls, NEMA, SAE, Standards, Symbols, User interfaces

Bruce Nordman; Jessica Granderson; Kelly Cunningham

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Lighting Group: Controls: Systems Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Systems Integration Building Control Systems Integration Objective This research project investigates how diverse building control systems can be integrated to provide seamless...

95

Controls for Solid-State Lighting  

SciTech Connect

This study predicts new hybrid lighting applications for LEDs. In hybrid lighting, LEDs provide a low-energy 'standby' light level while another, more powerful, efficient light source provides light for occupied periods. Lighting controls will allow the two light sources to work together through an appropriate control strategy, typically motion-sensing. There are no technical barriers preventing the use of low through high CRI LEDs for standby lighting in many interior and exterior applications today. The total luminous efficacy of LED systems could be raised by increasing the electrical efficiency of LED drivers to the maximum practically achievable level (94%). This would increase system luminous efficacy by 20-25%. The expected market volumes for many types of LEDs should justify the evolution of new LED drivers that use highly efficient ICs and reduce parts count by means of ASICs. Reducing their electronics parts count by offloading discrete components onto integrated circuits (IC) will allow manufacturers to reduce the cost of LED driver electronics. LED luminaire manufacturers will increasingly integrate the LED driver and thermal management directly in the LED fixture. LED luminaires of the future will likely have no need for separable lamp and ballast because the equipment life of all the LED luminaire components will all be about the same (50,000 hours). The controls and communications techniques used for communicating with conventional light sources, such as dimmable fluorescent lighting, are appropriate for LED illumination for energy management purposes. DALI has been used to control LED systems in new applications and the emerging ZigBee protocol could be used for LEDs as well. Major lighting companies are already moving in this direction. The most significant finding is that there is a significant opportunity to use LEDs today for standby lighting purposes. Conventional lighting systems can be made more efficient still by using LEDs to provide a low-energy standby state when lower light levels are acceptable.

Rubinstein, Francis

2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

96

Controls for Solid-State Lighting  

SciTech Connect

This study predicts new hybrid lighting applications for LEDs. In hybrid lighting, LEDs provide a low-energy 'standby' light level while another, more powerful, efficient light source provides light for occupied periods. Lighting controls will allow the two light sources to work together through an appropriate control strategy, typically motion-sensing. There are no technical barriers preventing the use of low through high CRI LEDs for standby lighting in many interior and exterior applications today. The total luminous efficacy of LED systems could be raised by increasing the electrical efficiency of LED drivers to the maximum practically achievable level (94%). This would increase system luminous efficacy by 20-25%. The expected market volumes for many types of LEDs should justify the evolution of new LED drivers that use highly efficient ICs and reduce parts count by means of ASICs. Reducing their electronics parts count by offloading discrete components onto integrated circuits (IC) will allow manufacturers to reduce the cost of LED driver electronics. LED luminaire manufacturers will increasingly integrate the LED driver and thermal management directly in the LED fixture. LED luminaires of the future will likely have no need for separable lamp and ballast because the equipment life of all the LED luminaire components will all be about the same (50,000 hours). The controls and communications techniques used for communicating with conventional light sources, such as dimmable fluorescent lighting, are appropriate for LED illumination for energy management purposes. DALI has been used to control LED systems in new applications and the emerging ZigBee protocol could be used for LEDs as well. Major lighting companies are already moving in this direction. The most significant finding is that there is a significant opportunity to use LEDs today for standby lighting purposes. Conventional lighting systems can be made more efficient still by using LEDs to provide a low-energy standby state when lower light levels are acceptable.

Rubinstein, Francis

2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

97

Portable lamp with dynamically controlled lighting distribution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A double lamp table or floor lamp lighting system has a pair of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) arranged vertically with a reflective septum in between. By selectively turning on one or both of the CFLs, down lighting, up lighting, or both up and down lighting is produced. The control system can also vary the light intensity from each CFL. The reflective septum insures that almost all the light produced by each lamp will be directed into the desired light distribution pattern which is selected and easily changed by the user. Planar compact fluorescent lamps, e.g. circular CFLs, particularly oriented horizontally, are preferable. CFLs provide energy efficiency. The lighting system may be designed for the home, hospitality, office or other environments.

Siminovitch, Michael J. (Pinole, CA); Page, Erik R. (Berkeley, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Study of Transverse Coupled Bunch Instabilities by Using Non-Linear Taylor Maps for the Advanced Light Source (ALS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Advanced Light Source (ALS) M. Meddahi and J. Bengtssonthe Advanced Light Source (ALS)* M. Meddahi and J. Bengtssongeneration light source, ALS, it is insufficient to rely on

Meddahi, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Energy Conservation Utilizing Wireless Dimmable Lighting Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Conservation Utilizing Wireless Dimmable Lighting Control in a Shared-Space Office Yao preference and requirements vary · among individuals · with tasks · with time and age Lighting satisfaction occupants sharing an office? · Ethernet infrastructure How will the energy savings and user satisfaction

Agogino, Alice M.

100

Controlling statistical properties of stored light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Statistical properties of outgoing light pulses are studies after they have been stored in a medium of atoms in the tripod configuration. A generalized Hong-Ou-Mandel interference, storing of squeezed states and homodyne signal analysis are discussed in the context of their dependence on the parameters of the control fields used for light storage and release.

A. Raczynski; K. Slowik; J. Zaremba; S. Zielinska-Kaniasty

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Intelligent light control using sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing user comfort and reducing operation costs have always been two primary objectives of building operations and control strategies. Current building control strategies are unable to incorporate occupant level comfort and meet the operation goals ... Keywords: active sensing, intelligent buildings, light control, sensor networks

Vipul Singhvi; Andreas Krause; Carlos Guestrin; James H. Garrett, Jr.; H. Scott Matthews

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Advanced Emissions Control Development Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using the Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

M. J. Holmes

1998-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

103

Advanced Emissions Control Development Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using the Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species, hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

A. P. Evans

1998-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

104

Advanced Emissions Control Development Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W?s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

A. P. Evans

1998-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

105

Advanced Emission Control Development Program.  

SciTech Connect

Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

Evans, A.P.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

Advanced control and information systems `97  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data are presented on advanced control and information systems, describing specific application, control strategy, economics, commercial installations, and licensor. Uses include alkylation, amine treating, catalytic reforming, cryogenic separation, catalytic cracking, hydrocracking, hydrogen production, LNG separation, lube oils, olefins, plant scheduling, polymers, refineries, steam reforming, and utilities.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Sensor Control Unit Light Submitted by:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the growing need to conserve energy, more people are becoming conscious of energy consumption and are looking for ways to reduce costly waste associated with electricity. Though most consumers do not think about lighting until the light bulb fails or the power goes out, expenses incurred due to lighting have been found to be a large part of overall energy consumption and lighting has now become the focus of efforts aimed at reducing the high cost of electricity. The purpose of our project is to design an Automatic Light Control Device (ALCD) to help curb the high cost of internal lighting while creating a convenient effortlessly lighted environment for the consumer. Today, energy saving devices, such as occupancy or motion sensors, is used by a multiple of people for the conservation of power. Motion detectors cause lights to turn on after entering the room and off after no movement is detected for a certain amount of time. This unit is efficient; however, energy is loss due to the presence and absence of movement in a particular room by the sensor continuously activating on or off. Unneeded cycling uses more power and defeats the intended purpose of saving energy. The ALCD will save energy by eliminating false conditions, thereby minimizing light

Professor Joseph Picone; Ece Senior Design I; John Thompson; Marshalia Green; Brad Lowe; Lutrisha Johnson; Automatic Light Control Device

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

MERCURY CONTROL WITH ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR  

SciTech Connect

This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Program Solicitation DE-PS26-00NT40769 and specifically addressed Technical Topical Area 4-Testing Novel and Less Mature Control Technologies on Actual Flue Gas at the Pilot Scale. The project team included the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) as the main contractor; W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., as a technical and financial partner; and the Big Stone Power Plant operated by Otter Tail Power Company, host for the field-testing portion of the research. Since 1995, DOE has supported development of a new concept in particulate control called the advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC). The AHPC has been licensed to W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., and has been marketed as the Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter by Gore. The Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in a unique configuration, providing major synergism between the two collection methods, both in the particulate collection step and in the transfer of dust to the hopper. The Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and it solves the problem of reentrainment and re-collection of dust in conventional baghouses. The Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter also appears to have unique advantages for mercury control over baghouses or ESPs as an excellent gas--solid contactor. The objective of the project was to demonstrate 90% total mercury control in the Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter at a lower cost than current mercury control estimates. The approach included bench-scale batch tests, larger-scale pilot testing with real flue gas on a coal-fired combustion system, and field demonstration at the 2.5-MW (9000-acfm) scale at a utility power plant to prove scale-up and demonstrate longer-term mercury control. An additional task was included in this project to evaluate mercury oxidation upstream of a dry scrubber by using mercury oxidants. This project demonstrated at the pilot-scale level a technology that provides a cost-effective technique to control mercury and, at the same time, greatly enhances fine particulate collection efficiency. The technology can be used to retrofit systems currently employing inefficient ESP technology as well as for new construction, thereby providing a solution for improved fine particulate control combined with effective mercury control for a large segment of the U.S. utility industry as well as other industries.

Ye Zhuang; Stanley J. Miller

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

PWR Primary-Side Gas Management in Advanced Light Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The designs for advanced light water reactors (ALWRs) have incorporated new water chemistry controls that have been developed over the past few decades to improve material and equipment reliability and fuel performance and to minimize radionuclide production and transport. It is important to ensure that the new designs operate within ranges that are considered safe based on current knowledge and that industry guidance for normal operation, startup, and shutdown are updated to account for expanding ...

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

110

Advanced Nuclear Technology Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document, Revision 12  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The utility requirement document (URD) is an industry-developed technical foundation for the design of advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). It was created with the objective of providing a comprehensive set of plant functional requirements that are considered important to utilities considering the construction of a nuclear plant and in ensuring successful deployment and operation of the plant. The scope of the URD is broad, addressing the entire plant (including the nuclear steam supply system, ...

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

111

Guidelines for Particulate Control for Advanced SO2 Control Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assist utilities in complying with Phase II of the Clean Air Act Amendments, this report delineates the effects of advanced SO2 control technologies on particulate control systems. This guide can prove invaluable to environmental engineers and planners who must select compatible systems and identify sound operating strategies for these technologies.

1994-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

112

The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub for modeling and simulation of nuclear reactors. It brings together an exceptionally capable team from national labs, industry and academia that will apply existing modeling and simulation capabilities and develop advanced capabilities to create a usable environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors (LWRs). This environment, designated as the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA), will incorporate science-based models, state-of-the-art numerical methods, modern computational science and engineering practices, and uncertainty quantification (UQ) and validation against data from operating pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It will couple state-of-the-art fuel performance, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics (T-H), and structural models with existing tools for systems and safety analysis and will be designed for implementation on both today's leadership-class computers and the advanced architecture platforms now under development by the DOE. CASL focuses on a set of challenge problems such as CRUD induced power shift and localized corrosion, grid-to-rod fretting fuel failures, pellet clad interaction, fuel assembly distortion, etc. that encompass the key phenomena limiting the performance of PWRs. It is expected that much of the capability developed will be applicable to other types of reactors. CASL's mission is to develop and apply modeling and simulation capabilities to address three critical areas of performance for nuclear power plants: (1) reduce capital and operating costs per unit energy by enabling power uprates and plant lifetime extension, (2) reduce nuclear waste volume generated by enabling higher fuel burnup, and (3) enhance nuclear safety by enabling high-fidelity predictive capability for component performance.

Ronaldo Szilard; Hongbin Zhang; Doug Kothe; Paul Turinsky

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

FY2000 Progress Report for Combustion and Emission Control for Advanced CIDI Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Energy Office of Transportation Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2000 Progress Report for Combustion and Emission Control for Advanced CIDI Engines Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation Technologies Approved by Steven Chalk November 2000 Combustion and Emission Control for Advanced CIDI Engines FY 2000 Progress Report CONTENTS Page iii I. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 II. EMISSION CONTROL SUBSYSTEM DEVELOPMENT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 A. Emission Control Subsystem Evaluation for Light-Duty CIDI Vehicles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

114

Advanced Lighting Program Development (BG9702800) Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

form the basis of a new street light that would not only beefficient “white light” alternative to street lighting, CECstreet lighting design is best performed using scotopic lumens as the key design variable (i.e. , scotopic light

Rubinstein, Francis; Johnson, Steve

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Wednesday, 27 January 2010 00:00 Schemes that use one light...

116

Advanced Sensor Approaches for Monitoring and Control of Gas...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contract Value (327,501 DOE) Advanced Sensor Approaches For Monitoring and Control Of Gas Turbine Combustors Georgia Institute of Technology JSTL 101905 Advanced Sensors 10...

117

NETL: Control Technology: Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector Under DOE-NETL sponsorship, the University of North Dakota, Energy and Environmental Research Center (UND-EERC) has developed a new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC). In addition to DOE and the EERC, the project team includes W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., Allied Environmental Technologies, Inc., and the Otter Tail Power Company. The AHPC utilizes both electrostatic collection and filtration in a unique geometric configuration that achieves ultrahigh particle collection with much less collection area than conventional particulate control devices. The primary technologies for state-of-the-art particulate control are fabric filters (baghouses) and electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). A major limitation of ESPs is that the fractional penetration of 0.1- to 1.0-µm particles is typically at least an order of magnitude greater than for 10-µm particles, so a situation exists where the particles that are of greatest health concern are collected with the lowest efficiency. Fabric filters are currently considered to be the best available control technology for fine particles, but emissions are dependent on ash properties and typically increase if the air-to-cloth (A/C) ratio is increased. In addition, many fabrics cannot withstand the rigors of high-SO2 flue gases, which are typical for bituminous fuels. Fabric filters may also have problems with bag cleanability and high pressure drop, which has resulted in conservatively designed, large, costly baghouses.

118

Intelligent Light Control using Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasing user comfort and reducing operation costs have always been two primary objectives of building operations and control strategies. Current building control strategies are unable to incorporate occupant level comfort and meet the operation goals simultaneously. In this paper, we present a novel utility-based building control strategy that optimizes the tradeo# between meeting user comfort and reduction in operation cost by reducing energy usage. We present an implementation of the proposed approach as an intelligent lighting control strategy that significantly reduces energy cost. Our approach is based on a principled, decision theoretic formulation of the control task. We demonstrate the use of mobile wireless sensor networks to optimize the tradeo # between fulfilling di#erent occupants' light preferences and minimizing energy consumption. We further extend our approach to optimally exploit external light sources for additional energy savings, a process called daylight harvesting. Also we demonstrate that an active sensing approach can maximize the mobile sensor network's lifetime by sensing only during most informative situations. We provide e#cient algorithms for solving the underlying complex optimization problems, and extensively evaluate our proposed approach in a proof-of-concept testbed using MICA2 motes and dimmable lamps. Our results indicate a significant improvement in user utility and reduced energy expenditure.

Vipul Singhvi Civil; Vipul Singhvi; Civil Engineering Dept; James H. Garrett

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Lighting Control Design | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Design Design Jump to: navigation, search Name Lighting Control & Design Place Glendale, California Zip CA 91201 Product California-based manufacturer of digital lighting controls and software. Coordinates 43.125946°, -87.928409° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.125946,"lon":-87.928409,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

120

Advanced Dehumidification and Humidity Control Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical brief explains the foundation of conventional, advanced, and emerging technologies for humidity control in air-conditioned buildings in easy-to-understand language for utility executives as well as end-users. It also describes new packaged solutions that integrate vapor compression cooling and desiccant dehumidification technologies in creative ways to offer more energy efficient solutions for applications in existing or new construction, especially in humid climates.

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Design of the Advanced Light Source timing system  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a third generation synchrotron radiation facility, and as such, has several unique timing requirements. Arbitrary Storage Ring filling patterns and high single bunch purity requirements demand a highly stable, low jitter timing system with the flexibility to reconfigure on a pulse-to-pulse basis. This modular system utilizes a highly linear Gauss Clock with ``on the fly`` programmable setpoints to track a free-running Booster ramping magnet and provides digitally programmable sequencing and delay for Electron Gun, Linac, Booster Ring, and Storage Ring RF, Pulsed Magnet, and Instrumentation systems. It has proven itself over the last year of accelerator operation to be reliable and rock solid.

Fahmie, M.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Shedding Light on Protein Drug Interactions | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Shedding Light on Protein Drug Interactions JANUARY 23, 2008 Bookmark and Share In this e-coli cell, the proteins (shown in blue) crowd around ribosomes (purple). These regions have a high concentration of protein, typically greater than 30 percent, which limits the ensemble of states into which the proteins can bend themselves. Download hi-res image.) Proteins, the biological molecules that are involved in virtually every action of every organism, may themselves move in surprising ways, according to a recent study carried out at the Biophysics Collaborative Access Team x-ray beamline 18-ID at the Advanced Photon Source, a national user

123

Advanced Lighting Program Development (BG9702800) Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

other hand, if research shows that street lighting design isresearch shows that “the old way” of designing street lighting

Rubinstein, Francis; Johnson, Steve

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Lighting Controls : Daylighting The New York Times Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Controls Lighting Controls Overview The architectural approach The owner's approach Daylighting field study Daylighting control systems Automated roller shades Procurement specifications Shades and Shade Controls Lighting Controls Visualizing daylight Commissioning/ verification Demand response Mainstream solutions Post-occupancy evaluation Publications Sponsors Project team Lighting Controls The lighting controls scope of work is based upon the philosophy that occupants of commercial office buildings prefer natural light to electric light. The lighting controls system specified by the Times Company for its new headquarters building is a DALI (Digital Addressable Lighting Interface) based system with dimmable fixtures throughout the interior space. This allows the system to dim down the electric lighting in response to daylight admittance. It also provides for variable target set points for illuminance levels at the work plane. The Times Company intends to establish and adjust target set points on a departmental basis. The lighting control sequences are described within the specification 16575. These sequences utilize occupancy sensors, photo sensors, switches and a time clock to control the lighting in the interior space on each floor. The emergency lighting system is also described within the specification. The lighting control sequences are tied to Control Intent Diagrams that divide up the space on each floor into its various control zones. The overall intent is to provide electric light only when the space is occupied and to provide as little electric light as is necessary to achieve the target set point for the work plane in a given department. A department usually occupies multiple floors.

125

Event:Lighting Our Path: The Philips Experience in Promoting Advanced  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Path: The Philips Experience in Promoting Advanced Path: The Philips Experience in Promoting Advanced Lighting Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Lighting Our Path: The Philips Experience in Promoting Advanced Lighting Technologies: 12:30-2:00 Eastern Time on 2011/05/11 David Rodgers of the Global Environment Facility (GEF) would like to make you all aware of the event below titled Lighting Our Path: The Philips Experience in Promoting Advanced Lighting Technologies to be held next Weds. May 11. Event Details Name Lighting Our Path: The Philips Experience in Promoting Advanced Lighting Technologies Date 2011/05/11 Time 12:30-2:00 Eastern Time Location Washington, District of Columbia Organizer Global Environment Facility Tags CLEAN, LEDS Website Event Website Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

126

Lighting Control Testbeds at the General Services Administration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Control Testbeds at the General Services Administration: Showing Promise for Lighting Energy Reductions NOTICE Due to the current lapse of federal funding, Berkeley Lab...

127

The impact of passive safety systems on desirability of advanced light water reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work investigates whether the advanced light water reactor designs with passive safety systems are more desirable than advanced reactor designs with active safety systems from the point of view of uncertainty in the ...

Eul, Ryan C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Advanced (AI-Based) Nonlinear Controllers for Industrial Processes -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced (AI-Based) Nonlinear Controllers for Industrial Processes Advanced (AI-Based) Nonlinear Controllers for Industrial Processes Capabilities Nuclear Systems Technologies Nuclear Criticality Safety Research Reactor Analysis Decontamination and Decommissioning Systems/Process Monitoring, Diagnostics and Control Overview Process Monitoring & Signal Validation Diagnostic & Advisory Systems Advanced (AI-based) Nonlinear Controllers for Industrial Processes Artificial intelligence Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Systems/Process Monitoring, Diagnostics and Control Advanced (AI-Based) Nonlinear Controllers for Industrial Processes Bookmark and Share Advanced (AI-Based) Nonlinear Controllers for Industrial Processes The overall objective of this research is to explore and demonstrate the

129

LIGHTING CONTROLS: SURVEY OF MARKET POTENTIAL  

SciTech Connect

This study describes the impact of lighting management systems that dynamically control lights in accordance with the needs of occupants. Various control strategies are described: scheduling, tuning, lumen depreciation, and daylighting. From initial experimental results, the energy savings provided by each of the above strategies are estimated to be 26, 12, 14, and 15%, respectively. Based upon a cost of $0.05-0.10 per kWh for electric energy and a 2-, 3-, or 4-yr payback, target costs for a simple and a sophisticated lighting management system are found to be $0.24 and 1.89 per ft{sup 2}, respectively, for a cost-effective investment. A growth model, based upon an extrapolation of the increase in building stock since 1975, indicates that the commercial and industrial (C and I) building stock will grow from 40 x 10{sup 9} ft{sup 2} in 1980 to about 67 x 10{sup 9} ft{sup 2} by the year 2000. Even with the use of more efficient lighting components, the energy required for this additional C and I stock will be 307 x 10{sup 9} kWh, an increase of only 13 x 10{sup 9} kWh above current use. The specified information is used to analyze the economic impacts that using these systems will have on the lighting industry, end users, utility companies, and the nation's economy. A $1 - 4 x 10{sup 9} annual lighting control industry can be generated, creating many jobs. The estimated return on investment (ROI) for controls for end users would be between 19 and 38%. Utilities will be able to make smaller additions to capacity and invest less capital at 7-10% ROI. Finally, the annual energy savings, up to $3.4 x 10{sup 9} for end users and about $5 x 10{sup 9} for utilities, representing unneeded generating capacity, will be available to capitalize other areas of the economy.

Verderber, R.R.; Rubinstein, F.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Controls for Solid-State Lighting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

provide a low-energy “standby” light level while another,through high CRI LEDs for standby lighting in many interioruse LEDs today for standby lighting purposes. Conventional

Rubinstein, Francis

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Advanced CIDI Emission Control System Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ford Motor Company, with ExxonMobil and FEV, participated in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Ultra-Clean Transportation Fuels Program with the goal to develop an innovative emission control system for light-duty diesel vehicles. The focus on diesel engine emissions was a direct result of the improved volumetric fuel economy (up to 50%) and lower CO2 emissions (up to 25%) over comparable gasoline engines shown in Europe. Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) with aqueous urea as the NOx reductant and a Catalyzed Diesel Particulate Filter (CDPF) were chosen as the primary emission control system components. The program expected to demonstrate more than 90% durable reduction in particulate matter (PM) and NOx emissions on a light-duty truck application, based on the FTP-75 drive cycle. Very low sulfur diesel fuel (<15 ppm-wt) enabled lower PM emissions, reduced fuel economy penalty due to the emission control system and improved long-term system durability. Significant progress was made toward a durable system to meet Tier 2 Bin 5 emission standards on a 6000 lbs light-duty truck. A 40% reduction in engine-out NOx emissions was achieved with a mid-size prototype diesel engine through engine recalibration and increased exhaust gas recirculation. Use of a rapid warm-up strategy and urea SCR provided over 90% further NOx reduction while the CDPF reduced tailpipe PM to gasoline vehicle levels. Development work was conducted to separately improve urea SCR and CDPF system durability, as well as improved oxidation catalyst function. Exhaust gas NOx and ammonia sensors were also developed further. While the final emission control system did not meet Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx after 120k mi of aging on the dynamometer, it did meet the standards for HC, NMOG, and PM, and an improved SCR catalyst was shown to have potential to meet the NOx standard, assuming the DOC durability could be improved further. Models of DOC and SCR function were developed to guide the study of several key design factors for SCR systems and aid in the development of urea control strategy for maximum NOx reduction with minimum NH3 slip. A durable co-fueling system was successfully built and tested, with the help of service station nozzle and dispenser manufacturers, for simultaneous delivery of diesel fuel and aqueous urea to the vehicle. The business case for an aqueous urea infrastructure in the US for light-duty vehicles was explored.

Lambert, Christine

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

Advanced nuclear plant control room complex  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

IEP - Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Regulatory Drivers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IEP - Advanced NOx Emissions Control Regulatory Drivers Regulatory Drivers for Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants Regulatory and legislative requirements have predominantly driven the need to develop NOx control technologies for existing coal-fired power plants. The first driver was the Title IV acid rain program, established through the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA). This program included a two-phase strategy to reduce NOx emissions from coal-fired power plants – Phase I started January 1, 1996 and Phase II started January 1, 2000. The Title IV NOx program was implemented through unit-specific NOx emission rate limits ranging from 0.40 to 0.86 lb/MMBtu depending on the type of boiler/burner configuration and based on application of LNB technology.

134

Power reduction control for inductive lighting installation  

SciTech Connect

A control system for continuously, selectively reducing power consumption in an inductive lighting installation energized from an A.C. power source, the installation including at least one gas discharge lamp such as a fluorescent lamp energized through any of a plurality of different types of electromagnetic ballast having different harmonic distortion characteristics, the control system is described comprising: load energizing circuit means, including a signal-actuated normally-closed primary switch, for connecting an A.C. power source to the lighting installation; a signal-actuated, normally-open secondary switch connected in parallel with the lighting installation; actuation means for generating actuation signals and applying such actuation signals to the primary and secondary switches to actuate the primary switch open and to actuate the secondary switch closed in approximate time coincidence in each half-cycle of the A.C. power; zero-crossing detector means for generating zero-crossing signals at times TX indicative of zero-voltage transitions in the A.C. power; and program means, connected to the zero-crossing detector means and to the actuation means, programming the actuation means to generate (a) power reduction actuation signals at times T1 and T2 in each half-cycle of the A.C. power, (b) a first filter actuation signal at a time T3 prior to each zero-crossing time TX, and (c) a second filter actuation signal at a time T4 following each zero-crossing time TX; the program means including a plurality of programs each establishing a set of times T1, T2, T3 and T4 for several different power reduction levels for a particular type of ballast; and selection means for selecting a program to match the ballast type of the load.

Falk, K.R.

1993-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

135

A living laboratory study in personalized automated lighting controls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on an experimental case study of personalized lighting controls built on top of an infrastructure designed to enable rapid development of applications in commercial buildings. Our personalized lighting controls (PLC) use an existing standard ... Keywords: energy management, lighting controls, web interface

Andrew Krioukov; Stephen Dawson-Haggerty; Linda Lee; Omar Rehmane; David Culler

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Reducing Safety Flaring through Advanced Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An advanced process control application, using DMCplus® (Aspen Technology, Inc.), was developed to substantially reduce fuel gas losses to the flare at a large integrated refining / petrochemical complex. Fluctuations in internal fuel gas system pressure required changes in C3/C4 make-up gas usage. These changes led, in turn, to some instability in the fuel gas system that sometimes required purge to the safety flare system to stabilize. As the composition of the fuel gas supply changed, so did its heating value, which caused fluctuations in the control of various fuel gas consumers. The DMCplus application now controls fuel gas pressure tightly and also stabilizes the fuel gas heating value. The understanding of each fuel gas provider and user was essential to the success of this application, as was the design of the DMCplus application. SmartStepTM (Aspen Technology, Inc.) - automated testing software - was used to efficiently develop the DMCplus models; however, a number of models were developed prior to the plant test period using long-term plant history data.

Hokanson, D.; Lehman, K.; Matsumoto, S.; Takai, N.; Takase, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Advanced Light Source activity report 1996/97  

SciTech Connect

Ten years ago, the Advanced Light Source (ALS) existed as a set of drawings, calculations, and ideas. Four years ago, it stored an electron beam for the first time. Today, the ALS has moved from those ideas and beginnings to a robust, third-generation synchrotron user facility, with eighteen beam lines in use, many more in planning or construction phases, and hundreds of users from around the world. Progress from concepts to realities is continuous as the scientific program, already strong in many diverse areas, moves in new directions to meet the needs of researchers into the next century. ALS staff members who develop and maintain the infrastructure for this research are similarly unwilling to rest on their laurels. As a result, the quality of the photon beams the authors deliver, as well as the support they provide to users, continues to improve. The ALS Activity Report is designed to share the results of these efforts in an accessible form for a broad audience. The Scientific Program section, while not comprehensive, shares the breadth, variety, and interest of recent research at the ALS. (The Compendium of User Abstracts and Technical Reports provides a more comprehensive and more technical view.) The Facility Report highlights progress in operations, ongoing accelerator research and development, and beamline instrumentation efforts. Although these Activity Report sections are separate, in practice the achievements of staff and users at the ALS are inseparable. User-staff collaboration is essential as they strive to meet the needs of the user community and to continue the ALS's success as a premier research facility.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - Second Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Second Generation Advanced Reburning Second Generation Advanced Reburning General Electric - Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE-EER) is carrying out a two Phase research program to develop novel Advanced Reburning (AR) concepts for high efficiency and low cost NOx control from coal-fired utility boilers. AR technologies are based on combination of basic reburning and N-agent/promoter injections. Phase I of the project was successfully completed and EER was selected to continue to develop AR technology during Phase II. Phase I demonstrated that AR technologies are able to provide effective NOx control for coal-fired combustors. Three technologies were originally envisioned for development: AR-Lean, AR-Rich, and Multiple Injection AR (MIAR). Along with these, three additional technologies were identified during the project: reburning plus promoted SNCR; AR-Lean plus promoted SNCR; and AR-Rich plus promoted SNCR. The promoters are sodium salts, in particular sodium carbonate. These AR technologies have different optimum reburn heat input levels and furnace temperature requirements. For full scale application, an optimum technology can be selected on a boiler-specific basis depending on furnace temperature profile and regions of injector access.

139

Modern lighting sources and controls for energy efficient lighting and a smart control algorithm application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy is an important measure of prosperity of a nation. Energy has been the life-blood for continual progress of human civilization. Since the beginning of industrial revolution around two centuries ago, the global energy consumption has increased ... Keywords: energy efficiency, energy saving, fuzzy logic, modern lighting, sensors, smart controls

?afak Sa?lam; Bülent Oral

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Lighting.  

SciTech Connect

Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Reviewing the role of photosensors in lighting control systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of innovative technologies of automatic control in lighting systems gains daily the interest of engineers, constructors and users. The main purpose of these applications is the energy savings. Daylight control is a form of automatic control ... Keywords: daylight, lighting controls, photosensor

L. Doulos; A. Tsangrassoulis; F. V. Topalis

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Intelligent lighting control principles. Report for oct 78-apr 79  

SciTech Connect

It is generally recognized that compared to illumination from ceiling-mounted electric lighting, an equal amount of daylight illumination from windows can be about three times more effective in producing visibility. If this is true, then visibility-based lighting controls will result in greater energy conservation than will illumination-based lighting controls. A mathematical technique has been developed suitable for an intelligent microprocessor-based equi-visibility lighting control system. In an example room, a computer simulation compares the energy consumption for on-off, high-low-off, equi-illumination, and equi-visibility lighting controls systems.

Pierpoint, W.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

The design and evaluation of integrated envelope and lighting control strategies for commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

This study investigates control strategies for coordinating the variable solar-optical properties of a dynamic building envelope system with a daylight controlled electric lighting system to reduce electricity consumption and increase comfort in the perimeter zone of commercial buildings. Control strategy design can be based on either simple, instantaneous measured data, or on complex, predictive algorithms that estimate the energy consumption for a selected operating state of the dynamic envelope and lighting system. The potential benefits of optimizing the operation of a dynamic envelope and lighting system are (1) significant reductions in electrical energy end-uses - lighting, and cooling due to solar and lighting heat gains - over that achieved by conventional static envelope and lighting systems, (2) significant reductions in peak demand, and (3) increased occupant visual and thermal comfort. The DOE-2 building energy simulation program was used to model two dynamic envelope and lighting systems, an automated venetian blind and an electrochromic glazing system, and their control strategies under a range of building conditions. The energy performance of simple control strategies are compared to the optimum performance of a theoretical envelope and lighting system to determine the maximum potential benefit of using more complex, predictive control algorithms. Results indicate that (1) predictive control algorithms may significantly increase the energy-efficiency of systems with non-optimal solar-optical properties such as the automated venetian blind, and (2) simpler, non-predictive control strategies may suffice for more advanced envelope systems 1 incorporating spectrally selective, narrow-band electrochromic coatings.

Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.E.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Advanced optical sensor for monitoring and control of multiple...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced optical sensor for monitoring and control of multiple gas and turbine-blade properties University of Wisconsin - Madison Department of Mechanical Engineering Principal...

145

Advanced simulations of building energy and control systems with...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Development Contact Us Department Contacts Media Contacts Advanced simulations of building energy and control systems with an example of chilled water plant modeling Title...

146

Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Schemes that use one light pulse to manipulate interactions of another with matter are well developed in the...

147

Section 5.4.4 Lighting Controls: Greening Federal Facilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

dimming ballasts can lower the lighting power to as little as 1-10%, depending on the ballast type. Ev- ery time the lights are dimmed, energy is saved. DAYLIGHT CONTROLS...

148

Building Technologies Office: Advanced, Integrated Control for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings News Building Technologies Office Announces 3 Million to Advance Building Automation Software Solutions in Small to Medium-Sized Commercial Buildings March 29,...

149

Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Control | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Control Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Control The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently conducting research into the harmonization of ZigBee, BACnet-or building automation and control network-and DALI-or digital addressable lighting interface-systems in wireless dimming lighting controls. Four proposed modules will enable "plug-and-play" capabilities for all DALI-compatible controls and BACnet-compatible systems. Project Description This project seeks to develop "plug-and-play" capabilities for lighting as an integrated component of a whole-building control system. Verified Energy, LLC, attempts to demonstrate the benefits of implementing wireless control in dimming applications using plug-and-play principles.

150

Automatic lighting controls demonstration: Long-term results. Final report, July 1991  

SciTech Connect

An advanced electronically ballasted lighting control system was installed in a portion of an office building to measure the energy and demand savings. The lighting control system used an integrated lighting control scenario that included daylight following, lumen depreciation correction, and scheduling. The system reduced lighting energy on weekdays by 62% and 51% in the north and south daylit zones, respectively, compared to a reference zone that did not have controls. During the summer, over 75% energy savings were achieved on weekdays in the north daylit zone. Even in the south interior zone, which benefitted lime from daylight, correction strategies and adjustment of the aisleway lights to a low level resulted in energy use of only half that of the reference zone. Although, in general, the savings varied over the year due to changing daylight conditions, the energy reduction achieved with controls could be fit using a simple analytical model. Significant savings also occurred during core operating hours when it is more expensive to supply and use energy. Compared to the usage in the reference zone, energy reductions of 49%, 44%, and 62% were measured in the south daylight, south interior, and north daylight zones, respectively, during core operating hours throughout the year. Lighting energy usage on weekends decreased dramatically in the zones with controls, with the usage in the north daylit zone only 10% that of the reference zone. A simple survey developed to assess occupant response to the lighting control system showed that the occupants were satisfied with the light levels provided.

Rubinstein, F. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1991-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

151

Multi-Photon Phosphor Feasibility Research: Advanced Light Source Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficiencies of commercial light sources have reached a plateau at about 33 percent of the maximum possible, but these efficiencies will have to be doubled to achieve the energy savings in lighting needed in the future. One possibility is to develop phosphor materials for application to fluorescent lamps that emit two visible photons for each absorbed ultraviolet photon. Scientists discussed the possibility of developing such phosphor materials at a workshop held May 8 through May 10, 2001 in Peabody, Ma...

2001-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

152

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - ALTA for Cyclone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Full-Scale Demonstration of ALTA NOx Control for Cyclone-Fired Boilers Full-Scale Demonstration of ALTA NOx Control for Cyclone-Fired Boilers The primary goal of this project was to evaluate a technology called advanced layered technology application (ALTA) as a means to achieve NOx emissions below 0.15 lb/MMBtu in a cyclone boiler. Reaction Engineering International (REI) conducted field testing and combustion modeling to refine the process design, define the optimum technology parameters, and assess system performance. The ALTA NOx control technology combines deep staging from overfire air, rich reagent injection (RRI), and selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR). Field testing was conducted during May-June 2005 at AmerenUE's Sioux Station Unit 1, a 500 MW cyclone boiler unit that typically burns an 80/20 blend of Powder River Basin subbituminous coal and Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal. Parametric testing was also conducted with 60/40 and 0/100 blends. The testing also evaluated process impacts on balance-of-plant issues such as the amount of unburned carbon in the ash, slag tapping, waterwall corrosion, ammonia slip, and heat distribution.

153

Controls for Solid-State Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Buildings Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows...

154

Power control architectures for cold cathode fluorescent lamp and light emitting diode based light sources.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In this dissertation, two different energy efficient power supply topologies are introduced for controlling cold cathode fluorescent lamp (CCFL) and high-brightness light emitting diode… (more)

Doshi, Montu V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Advanced Control Demonstration on a Combined Cycle Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Southern Company, Electricit de France (EDF), and EPRI have undertaken a project to demonstrate the applicability of advanced control techniques on a combined-cycle heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). This report describes progress on the project during 2005 including model identification, the advanced controller design, controller program development, and controller testing in a simulation environment. A combined-cycle plant was selected as the host plant because many combined-cycle plants have chang...

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

156

Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Office Title Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Office Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3831E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Rubinstein, Francis M., and Abby I. Enscoe Date Published 04/2010 Abstract An installation in a Federal building tested the effectiveness of a highly-controlled, workstation-specific lighting retrofit. The study took place in an open-office area with 86 cubicles and low levels of daylight. Each cubicle was illuminated by a direct/indirect pendant luminaire with three 32 watt lamps, two DALI ballasts, and an occupancy sensor. A centralized control system programmed all three lamps to turn on and off according to occupancy on a workstation-by-workstation basis. Field measurements taken over the course of several months demonstrated 40% lighting energy savings compared to a baseline without advanced controls that conforms to GSA's current retrofit standard. A photometric analysis found that the installation provided higher desktop light levels than the baseline, while an occupant survey found that occupants in general preferred the lighting system to the baseline. Simple payback is fairly high; projects that can achieve lower installation costs and/or higher energy savings and those in which greenhouse gas reduction and occupant satisfaction are significant priorities provide the ideal setting for workstation-specific lighting retrofits.

157

On the calibration and commissioning of lighting controls  

SciTech Connect

Lighting controls have the potential to capture significant energy savings in commercial buildings if properly specified, installed, commissioned and maintained. Proper commissioning is often absent in lighting projects and the lack of commissioning can significantly reduce a project`s energy savings potential. The paper focuses on the importance of good commissioning practice for obtaining satisfactory performance from lighting control systems and discusses the difficulties of commissioning today`s systems. Some practical suggestions for commissioning lighting controls is offered as well as advice to specifiers and early adopters to aid them in selecting controls that are most appropriate to their requirements.

Rubinstein, F.; Avery, D.; Jennings, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Div.; Blanc, S. [Pacific Gas and Electric Co., San Ramon, CA (United States). Customer Energy Management Dept.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

How to Select Lighting Controls for Offices and Public Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

towards greater energy efficiency, while saving taxpayer dollars. How to Select Lighting Controls For Offices and Public Buildings LT-8 PAGE 1 DECEMBER 2000 Definitions...

159

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Advanced Utility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field Testing Program Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field Testing Program Sorbent Technologies Corporation, will test an advanced halgenated activated carbon to determine the mercury removal performance and relative costs of sorbent injection for advanced sorbent materials in large-scale field trials of a variety of combinations of coal-type and utility plant-configuration. These include one site (Detroit Edison's St. Clair Station) with a cold-side ESP using subbituminous coal, or blend of subbituminous and bituminous coal, and one site (Duke Energy's Buck Plant) with a hot-side ESP which burns a bituminous coal. Related Papers and Publications: Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report for the period April 1 - October 31, 2004 [PDF-2275KB] Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report for the period of October 2003 - March 2004 [PDF-1108KB]

160

Deficiencies of Lighting Codes and Ordinances in Controlling Light Pollution from Parking Lot Lighting Installations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this research was to identify the main causes of light pollution from parking lot electric lighting installations and highlight the deficiencies of… (more)

Royal, Emily

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Advanced Light Water Reactor - Boiling Water Reactor Degradation Matrix (ALWR BWR DM), Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The advanced light water reactor–boiling water reactor degradation matrix (ALWR BWR DM) is an essential piece of the Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI’s) Advanced Nuclear Technology (ANT) materials management matrix initiative for advanced LWR designs. The materials management matrix provides a tool to assist the industry in proactive identification and consideration of materials issues as well as mitigation and management opportunities from the design phase, through component fabrication and pla...

2009-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

162

Calibration of a microchannel plate based extreme ultraviolet grazing incident spectrometer at the Advanced Light Source  

SciTech Connect

We present the design and calibration of a microchannel plate based extreme ultraviolet spectrometer. Calibration was performed at the Advance Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This spectrometer will be used to record the single shot spectrum of radiation emitted by the tapered hybrid undulator (THUNDER) undulator installed at the LOASIS GeV-class laser-plasma-accelerator. The spectrometer uses an aberration-corrected concave grating with 1200 lines/mm covering 11-62 nm and a microchannel plate detector with a CsI coated photocathode for increased quantum efficiency in the extreme ultraviolet. A touch screen interface controls the grating angle, aperture size, and placement of the detector in vacuum, allowing for high-resolution measurements over the entire spectral range.

Bakeman, M. S. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada Reno, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Tilborg, J. van; Sokollik, T.; Baum, D.; Ybarrolaza, N.; Duarte, R.; Toth, C.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Systems and Controls Analysis and Testing; Harvesting More Wind Energy with Advanced Controls Technology (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet outlines the systems and controls analysis and testing that takes place at the NWTC on the Controls Advanced Research Turbines.

Not Available

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Dynamic Electron Control using Light and Nanostructure.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The advent of nano-technology has made possible the manipulation of electron or light through nanostructures. For example, a nano-tip in near-field optical microscopy allows imaging… (more)

Huang, Cheng-Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Considerations REQUEST BY ACUITY BRANDS LIGHTING, INC., FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REQUEST BY ACUITY BRANDS LIGHTING, INC., FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND REQUEST BY ACUITY BRANDS LIGHTING, INC., FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS MADE IN THE COURSE OF OR UNDER DOE GRANT NO. DE-EE0004534; DOE WAIVERDOCKETW(A)2010-059 [ORO-801] Petitioner, Acuity Brands Lighting, Inc., (ACUITy) has made a timely request for an advance waiver to worldwide rights in Subject Inventions made in the course of or under DOE Grant No. DE-EEOOO4534 entitled, "Energy Saving Phosphorescent OLED Luminaires." The scope of the project includes ACUITY working as a subcontractor to, and in cooperation with Universal Display Corporation (UDC) as the prime contractor in the development of phosphorescent organic light-emitting diode (OLED) luminaires. In the first phase, UDC will be responsible for the basic OLED

166

Market transformation opportunities for emerging dynamic facade and dimmable lighting control systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic Façade and Dimmable Lighting Control Systems Eleanorand integrated façade and lighting system that operatesof these cases, electric lighting should be controlled to

Lee, Eleanor S.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.; Hughes, Glenn D.; Thurm, David A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Quantifying National Energy Savings Potential of Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance of Occupancy-Based Lighting Control Systems: AReview. ” Lighting Residential Technology 42:415-431. Itron,Information Template – Indoor Lighting Controls. Pacific Gas

Williams, Alison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Final LDRD report : design and fabrication of advanced device structures for ultra high efficiency solid state lighting.  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this one year LDRD was to improve the overall efficiency of InGaN LEDs by improving the extraction of light from the semiconductor chip. InGaN LEDs are currently the most promising technology for producing high efficiency blue and green semiconductor light emitters. Improving the efficiency of InGaN LEDs will enable a more rapid adoption of semiconductor based lighting. In this LDRD, we proposed to develop photonic structures to improve light extraction from nitride-based light emitting diodes (LEDs). While many advanced device geometries were considered for this work, we focused on the use of a photonic crystal for improved light extraction. Although resonant cavity LEDs and other advanced structures certainly have the potential to improve light extraction, the photonic crystal approach showed the most promise in the early stages of this short program. The photonic crystal (PX)-LED developed here incorporates a two dimensional photonic crystal, or photonic lattice, into a nitride-based LED. The dimensions of the photonic crystal are selected such that there are very few or no optical modes in the plane of the LED ('lateral' modes). This will reduce or eliminate any radiation in the lateral direction so that the majority of the LED radiation will be in vertical modes that escape the semiconductor, which will improve the light-extraction efficiency. PX-LEDs were fabricated using a range of hole diameters and lattice constants and compared to control LEDs without a photonic crystal. The far field patterns from the PX-LEDs were dramatically modified by the presence of the photonic crystal. An increase in LED brightness of 1.75X was observed for light measured into a 40 degree emission cone with a total increase in power of 1.5X for an unencapsulated LED.

Koleske, Daniel David; Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen; Shul, Randy John; Wendt, Joel Robert; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Fischer, Arthur Joseph

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Smart Engines Via Advanced Model Based Controls  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A ''new'' process for developing control systems - Less engine testing - More robust control system - Shorter development cycle time - ''Smarter'' approach to engine control - On-board models describe engine behavior - Shorter, systematic calibration process - Customer and legislative requirements designed-in.

Allain, Marc

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

170

Low Wind Speed Technology Phase I: Advanced Independent Pitch Control; Advanced Energy System, Inc.  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes a subcontract with Advanced Energy Systems, Inc. to conduct a conceptual study of independent blade pitch control and possible impact on loads and cost of energy (COE).

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

New Light on Improving Engine Efficiencies | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Crystal Structure of a Meta-stable Intermediate Particle in Virus The Crystal Structure of a Meta-stable Intermediate Particle in Virus Assembly Increasing Magnetic Response of Ferromagnetic Semiconductors under High Pressure Better Switching Through Chemistry in Thin Ferroelectrics First Molecular-Level Enzyme Images Could Improve Breast-Cancer Therapy Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed New Light on Improving Engine Efficiencies MARCH 3, 2009 Bookmark and Share The DOE, as part of its Clean Coal & Natural Gas Power Systems initiative, has a "Turbines of Tomorrow" program with the Program Performance Goal to: "By 2010, develop turbine technology that is capable of efficiently

172

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Advanced...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IEP Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Advanced Low Energy Enzyme Catalyzed Solvent for CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0004228 Akermin, Inc. is to conduct bench-scale testing...

173

Advanced Islanded-Mode Control of Microgrids.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis is focused on modeling, control, stability, and power management of electronically-interfaced distributed energy resource (DER) units for microgrids. Voltage amplitude and frequency regulation… (more)

Delghavi, Mohammad Bagher

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Orbit Control at the Advanced Photon Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Advanced Photon Source (APS) began operation in 1995 with the objective of providing ultra-stable high-brightness hard x-rays to its user community. This paper will be a review of the instrumentation and software presently in use for orbit stabilization. Broad-band and narrow-band rf beam position monitors as well as x-ray beam position monitors supporting bending magnet and insertion device source points are used in an integrated system. Status and upgrade plans for the system will be discussed.

Decker, G

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Light to Control How X Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Wednesday, 27 January 2010 00:00 Schemes that use one light pulse to manipulate interactions of another with matter are well developed in the visible-light regime where an optical control pulse influences how an optical probe pulse interacts with a medium. This approach has opened new research directions in fields like quantum computing and nonlinear optics, while also spawning entirely new research areas, such as electromagnetically induced transparency and slow light. However, it has been unclear whether similar optical control schemes could be used to modify how x rays interact with matter. In a dramatic breakthrough demonstration at the ALS, a Berkeley Lab-Argonne National Laboratory group has now used powerful visible-light lasers to render a nominally opaque material transparent to x rays. While x-ray transparency will have immediate applications at x-ray light sources, the important result is that the findings lay a foundation for a broader spectrum of applications.

176

Meeting Summary Advanced Light Water Reactor Fuels Industry Meeting Washington DC October 27 - 28, 2011  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced LWR Fuel Working Group first met in November of 2010 with the objective of looking 20 years ahead to the role that advanced fuels could play in improving light water reactor technology, such as waste reduction and economics. When the group met again in March 2011, the Fukushima incident was still unfolding. After the March meeting, the focus of the program changed to determining what we could do in the near term to improve fuel accident tolerance. Any discussion of fuels with enhanced accident tolerance will likely need to consider an advanced light water reactor with enhanced accident tolerance, along with the fuel. The Advanced LWR Fuel Working Group met in Washington D.C. on October 72-18, 2011 to continue discussions on this important topic.

Not Listed

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Advanced, Integrated Control for Building Operations to Achieve 40% Energy Saving  

SciTech Connect

we developed and demonstrated a software based integrated advanced building control platform called Smart Energy Box (SEB), which can coordinate building subsystem controls, integrate variety of energy optimization algorithms and provide proactive and collaborative energy management and control for building operations using weather and occupancy information. The integrated control system is a low cost solution and also features: Scalable component based architecture allows to build a solution for different building control system configurations with needed components; Open Architecture with a central data repository for data exchange among runtime components; Extendible to accommodate variety of communication protocols. Optimal building control for central loads, distributed loads and onsite energy resource Uses web server as a loosely coupled way to engage both building operators and building occupants in collaboration for energy conservation. Based on the open platform of SEB, we have investigated and evaluated a variety of operation and energy saving control strategies on Carnegie Mellon University Intelligent Work place which is equipped with alternative cooling/heating/ventilation/lighting methods, including radiant mullions, radiant cooling/heating ceiling panels, cool waves, dedicated ventilation unit, motorized window and blinds, and external louvers. Based on the validation results of these control strategies, they were integrated in SEB in a collaborative and dynamic way. This advanced control system was programmed and computer tested with a model of the Intelligent Workplaceâ??s northern section (IWn). The advanced control program was then installed in the IWn control system; the performance were measured and compared with that of the state of the art control system to verify the overall energy savings great than 40%. In addition advanced human machine interfaces (HMI's) were developed to communicate both with building occupants and the building operator. Lifecycle cost analyses of the advanced building control were performed, and a Building Control System Guide was prepared and published to inform owners, architects, and engineers dealing with new construction or renovation of buildings.

Dr. Zhen Song, Prof. Vivian Loftness, Dr. Kun Ji, Dr. Sam Zheng, Mr. Bertrand Lasternas, Ms. Flore Marion, Mr. Yuebin Yu

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

List of Lighting Controls/Sensors Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sensors Incentives Sensors Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 493 Lighting Controls/Sensors Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 493) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active AEP (Central and North) - CitySmart Program (Texas) Utility Rebate Program Texas Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Schools Boilers Central Air conditioners Chillers Comprehensive Measures/Whole Building Custom/Others pending approval Energy Mgmt. Systems/Building Controls Furnaces Heat pumps Lighting Lighting Controls/Sensors Motor VFDs Motors Roofs Windows Yes AEP (Central, North and SWEPCO) - Commercial Solutions Program (Texas) Utility Rebate Program Texas Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit

179

LIGHTING CONTROLS: SURVEY OF MARKET POTENTIAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Depreciation, and Daylighting This control system is moresystem can provide (scheduling, lumen depre- ciation, tuning, daylighting), andSystem Performance Scheduling Lumen Maintenance Tuning Daylighting

Verderber, R.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

LIGHTING CONTROLS: SURVEY OF MARKET POTENTIAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a simple energy management system (scheduling strategy)that all new energy management systems will employ all fourpresented on energy management systems, control strategies,

Verderber, R.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Advanced Photon Source, Canadian Light Source Strengthen Ties, Expand X-ray  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rose of APS and CNM One of Four DOE Early Career Award Winners Rose of APS and CNM One of Four DOE Early Career Award Winners Scientists Close-In on Artificial Spider Silk Ekiert Earns 2012 APSUO Franklin Award for Studies of Influenza Virus Clever Apes on WBEZ: Breaking the Fossil Record Gerig to Chair Particle Accelerator School Board APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed Advanced Photon Source, Canadian Light Source Strengthen Ties, Expand X-ray Technology and Research JUNE 18, 2012 Bookmark and Share The interiors of the Canadian Light Source (top) and Advanced Photon Source experiment halls. (CLS photo courtesy of Canadian Light Source) Seeking to solve some of today's greatest global problems, scientists using x-ray light source facilities at national research laboratories in

182

Advanced mobile networking, sensing, and controls.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an integrated approach for designing communication, sensing, and control systems for mobile distributed systems. Graph theoretic methods are used to analyze the input/output reachability and structural controllability and observability of a decentralized system. Embedded in each network node, this analysis will automatically reconfigure an ad hoc communication network for the sensing and control task at hand. The graph analysis can also be used to create the optimal communication flow control based upon the spatial distribution of the network nodes. Edge coloring algorithms tell us that the minimum number of time slots in a planar network is equal to either the maximum number of adjacent nodes (or degree) of the undirected graph plus some small number. Therefore, the more spread out that the nodes are, the fewer number of time slots are needed for communication, and the smaller the latency between nodes. In a coupled system, this results in a more responsive sensor network and control system. Network protocols are developed to propagate this information, and distributed algorithms are developed to automatically adjust the number of time slots available for communication. These protocols and algorithms must be extremely efficient and only updated as network nodes move. In addition, queuing theory is used to analyze the delay characteristics of Carrier Sense Multiple Access (CSMA) networks. This report documents the analysis, simulation, and implementation of these algorithms performed under this Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) effort.

Feddema, John Todd; Kilman, Dominique Marie; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Young, Joseph G.; Lewis, Christopher L.; Van Leeuwen, Brian P.; Robinett, Rush D. III; Harrington, John J.

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Performance modeling of daylight integrated photosensor-controlled lighting systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some building energy codes now require the incorporation of daylight into buildings and automatic photosensor-controlled switching or dimming of the electric lighting system in areas that receive daylight. This paper describes enhancements to the open-source ...

Richard G. Mistrick; Craig A. Casey

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Light control of the flow of phototactic microswimmer suspensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some micro-algae are sensitive to light intensity gradients. This property is known as phototaxis: the algae swim toward a light source (positive phototaxis). We use this property to control the motion of micro-algae within a Poiseuille flow using light. The combination of flow vorticity and phototaxis results in a concentration of algae around the center of the flow. Intermittent light exposure allows analysis of the dynamics of this phenomenon and its reversibility. With this phenomenon, we hope to pave the way toward new algae concentration techniques (a bottleneck challenge in hydrogen algal production) and toward the improvement of pollutant bio-detector technology.

Xabel Garcia; Salima Rafaï; Philippe Peyla

2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

185

Designing and Testing Controls to Mitigate Tower Dynamic Loads in the Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes NREL's efforts to design, implement, and test advanced controls for maximizing energy extraction and reducing structural dynamic loads in wind turbines.

Wright, A. D.; Fingersh, L. J.; Stol, K. A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Videos on the YouTube Channel of the Advanced Light Source (ALS)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a DOE Scientific User Facility and a division of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, is one of the world's brightest sources of ultraviolet and soft-x-ray beams, generating intense light for scientific and technical research. The ALS produces light in the x-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum that is one billion times brighter than the sun. This extraordinary tool offers unprecedented opportunities for state-of-the art research in materials science, biology, chemistry, physics, and the environmental sciences. The channel includes twelve presentations from the ALS 2012 Users Meeting.

187

Advanced concepts for controlling energy surety microgrids.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today, researchers, engineers, and policy makers are seeking ways to meet the world's growing demand for energy while addressing critical issues such as energy security, reliability, and sustainability. Many believe that distributed generators operating within a microgrid have the potential to address most of these issues. Sandia National Laboratories has developed a concept called energy surety in which five of these 'surety elements' are simultaneously considered: energy security, reliability, sustainability, safety, and cost-effectiveness. The surety methodology leads to a new microgrid design that we call an energy surety microgrid (ESM). This paper discusses the unique control requirement needed to produce a microgrid system that has high levels of surety, describes the control system from the most fundamental level through a real-world example, and discusses our ideas and concepts for a complete system.

Menicucci, David F.; Ortiz-Moyet, Juan

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Advanced Power Electronics Controllers for Substations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Substations located at various points in the power delivery system serve several purposes. In a broad sense, power substations are installations capable of interrupting or establishing electric circuits and changing the voltage level, frequency, or other characteristic of the electric energy flow. Solid-state power electronic switching devices are continuing to evolve and multi-megawatt solid-state power control systems are becoming increasingly applied in industrial electrical installations. Both have a...

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

189

Quantifying National Energy Savings Potential of Lighting Controls in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Energy Savings Potential of Lighting Controls in National Energy Savings Potential of Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Title Quantifying National Energy Savings Potential of Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Williams, Alison A., Barbara A. Atkinson, Karina Garbesi, and Francis M. Rubinstein Pagination 14 Date Published May Publisher LBNL-5895E Abstract Lighting has the largest estimated technical potential for energy savings of any U.S. building end-use. A significant fraction of that potential is believed to lie in lighting system controls. While controls are incorporated in national model building codes, their adoption and enforcement are spotty, and controls have been largely ignored in energy efficiency standards, leaving much potential untapped. The development of sound energy policy with respect to lighting controls depends on improved quantification of potential savings. Researchers have been quantifying energy savings from lighting controls in commercial buildings for more than 30 years, but results vary widely. This meta-analysis of energy savings potential used 240 savings estimates from 88 published sources, categorized into daylighting strategies, occupancy-based strategies, personal tuning, and institutional tuning. Beginning with an average of savings estimates based on the entire literature, this research added successive analytical filters to identify potential biases introduced to the estimates by different analytical approaches. We obtained relatively robust final estimates of average savings: 24% for occupancy, 28% for daylighting, 31% for personal tuning, 36% for institutional tuning, and 38% for combined approaches. Using these data and estimates of current and full penetration of controls, we calculated national energy savings potential on the order of 19%.

190

Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Schemes that use one light pulse to manipulate interactions of another with matter are well developed in the visible-light regime where an optical control pulse influences how an optical probe pulse interacts with a medium. This approach has opened new research directions in fields like quantum computing and nonlinear optics, while also spawning entirely new research areas, such as electromagnetically induced transparency and slow light. However, it has been unclear whether similar optical control schemes could be used to modify how x rays interact with matter. In a dramatic breakthrough demonstration at the ALS, a Berkeley Lab-Argonne National Laboratory group has now used powerful visible-light lasers to render a nominally opaque material transparent to x rays. While x-ray transparency will have immediate applications at x-ray light sources, the important result is that the findings lay a foundation for a broader spectrum of applications.

191

Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Schemes that use one light pulse to manipulate interactions of another with matter are well developed in the visible-light regime where an optical control pulse influences how an optical probe pulse interacts with a medium. This approach has opened new research directions in fields like quantum computing and nonlinear optics, while also spawning entirely new research areas, such as electromagnetically induced transparency and slow light. However, it has been unclear whether similar optical control schemes could be used to modify how x rays interact with matter. In a dramatic breakthrough demonstration at the ALS, a Berkeley Lab-Argonne National Laboratory group has now used powerful visible-light lasers to render a nominally opaque material transparent to x rays. While x-ray transparency will have immediate applications at x-ray light sources, the important result is that the findings lay a foundation for a broader spectrum of applications.

192

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY LUMILEDS LIGHTING, U.S. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY LUMILEDS LIGHTING, U.S. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC26-01NT41251; W(A)-02-005, CH-1089 The Petitioner, LumiLeds Lighting U.S. LLC (LumiLeds), was awarded this cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled, "Development of Key Technologies for White Lighting Based on LEDs". According to the State of Project Objectives attached to the waiver petition, the objective of the project is to improve the efficiency of III-N alloy light emitting diodes (LEDs) for use in white lighting. This will be accomplished by investigation of three areas: 1) the use of low defect density substrates to be used for the growth of standard and well

193

The Advantage of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercialefficient, customized lighting for open-office cubicles.s “ambient” and “task” lighting components, 2) occupancy

Rubinstein, Francis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Advanced Controls Technologies and Strategies Linking Energy Efficiency and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Controls Technologies and Strategies Linking Energy Efficiency and Advanced Controls Technologies and Strategies Linking Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Speaker(s): Sila Kiliccote Date: October 6, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Reliable supply of affordable electricity has been in the spotlight since the blackouts in California, the grid shutdown events in New England and the terrorist threats nationwide. While the array of generation technologies and transmission safety issues have been widely discussed, capacity requirements and demand side management issues have also been revisited. This presentation will concentrate on a preliminary framework to describe how advanced controls can support multiple modes of operations including both energy efficiency and demand response (DR). A general description of DR, its benefits, and nationwide status will be outlined.

195

Argonne TTRDC - Engines - Emissions Control - Advanced Diesel Particulate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration Systems Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration Systems The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations require that on-highway diesel vehicles have filtration systems to reduce tail-pipe soot emissions, known as particulate matter (PM). Diesel particulate filtration (DPF) systems are currently the most efficient at directly controlling PM. Argonne researchers, working with Corning, Inc., and Caterpillar, Inc., through a cooperative research and development agreement, are exploiting previously unavailable technology and research results on diesel PM filtration and regeneration processes, aiming to the technology transfer of advanced PM emission control to industry. Argonne's Research In operation of DPF systems, the filtration and regeneration of particulate emissions are the key processes to be controlled for high efficiency. Due to difficulties in accessing the micro-scaled structures of DPF membranes and monitoring particulate filtration and high-temperature thermal processes, however, research has been limited to macroscopic observation for the product.

196

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - Mercury...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury Speciation from NOx Control University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC) is addressing the impact that selective catalytic reduction (SCR),...

197

New lighting and controls to save 67% at mall  

SciTech Connect

A metal halide lighting system and a Staco control system that dims lighting in response to sunlight should save a Dallas hotel and office mall 67% in electricity costs. The new system replaces quartz lamps in the 160-foot-high atrium. The savings are a combination of state tax credits and lower air conditioning costs, which will pay for the $25,000 project in about 18 months. The metal halide system was chosen over sodium lighting in order to have more attractive color rendition and because it provides about twice as many lumens per watt as the quartz lamps. The Staco system will dim lamps in response to outdoor light and turn lights above a skating rink on and off at prescribed times.

Kennedy, K.

1985-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

198

High-frequency Light Reflector via Low-frequency Light Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the momentum of light can be reversed via the atomic coherence created by another light with one or two orders of magnitude lower frequency. Both the backward retrieval of single photons from a time-ordered Dicke state and the reflection of continuous waves by high-order photonic band gaps are analyzed. A proof-of-principle experiment with thermal Rb vapor is proposed based on presently available techniques. This holds promise for X-ray reflectors controlled by low-frequency light.

Wang, Da-Wei; Evers, Joerg; Scully, Marlan O

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - ALTA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the burner design is to achieve homogeneity of the combustion products in the boiler. Not only does this create ideal conditions for combustion-related NOx control, it...

200

Preliminary results from an advanced lighting controls testbed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

typical office tasks such as reading and word processing) are relatively homogeneous across all the floors of the testbed and energy usage

Rubinstein, Francis; Jennings, Judith; Avery, Douglas; Blanc, Steven

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Utilization Potential of Advanced SO2 Control By Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using results of literature surveys and preliminary market assessments, this report evaluates potential applications for advanced SO2 control by-products. Investigators formed their evaluations by comparing the marketability of these by-products with that of coal ash and wet scrubber sludge.

1987-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

202

Advanced Voltage Control Strategies for High Penetration of Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research addresses advanced voltage control strategies for inverter-connected distributed generation. The emphasis is on photovoltaic (PV) generation, and results also apply to distributed wind, fuel cells, micro-turbines, and battery systems that are connected to the grid through an inverter. In related work, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) identified a set of high-priority functions for distributed generation. These included reactive power control such as intelligent and autonomous vo...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

203

Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation Title Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5968E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Turner, William J. N., and Iain S. Walker Date Published 12/2012 Keywords ashrae standard 62,2, california title 24, passive ventilation, residential ventilation, ventilation controller Abstract Whole-house ventilation systems are becoming commonplace in new construction, remodeling/renovation, and weatherization projects, driven by combinations of specific requirements for indoor air quality (IAQ), health, and compliance with standards, such as ASHRAE 62.2. At the same time we wish to reduce the energy use in homes and therefore minimize the energy used to provide ventilation. This study examined several approaches to reducing the energy requirements of providing acceptable IAQ in residential buildings. Two approaches were taken. The first used RIVEC - the Residential Integrated VEntilation Controller - a prototype ventilation controller that aims to deliver whole-house ventilation rates that comply with ventilation standards, for the minimum use of energy. The second used passive and hybrid ventilation systems, rather than mechanical systems, to provide whole-house ventilation.

204

Supervisory Control System Architecture for Advanced Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect

This technical report was generated as a product of the Supervisory Control for Multi-Modular SMR Plants project within the Instrumentation, Control and Human-Machine Interface technology area under the Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Research and Development Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report documents the definition of strategies, functional elements, and the structural architecture of a supervisory control system for multi-modular advanced SMR (AdvSMR) plants. This research activity advances the state-of-the art by incorporating decision making into the supervisory control system architectural layers through the introduction of a tiered-plant system approach. The report provides a brief history of hierarchical functional architectures and the current state-of-the-art, describes a reference AdvSMR to show the dependencies between systems, presents a hierarchical structure for supervisory control, indicates the importance of understanding trip setpoints, applies a new theoretic approach for comparing architectures, identifies cyber security controls that should be addressed early in system design, and describes ongoing work to develop system requirements and hardware/software configurations.

Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit [ORNL] [ORNL; Cole, Daniel L [University of Pittsburgh] [University of Pittsburgh; Fugate, David L [ORNL] [ORNL; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL] [ORNL; Melin, Alexander M [ORNL] [ORNL; Muhlheim, Michael David [ORNL] [ORNL; Rao, Nageswara S [ORNL] [ORNL; Wood, Richard Thomas [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Generating polarization controllable FELs at Dalian coherent light source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The property of the FEL polarization is of great importance to the user community. FEL pulses with ultra-high intensity and flexible polarization control ability will absolutely open up new scientific realms. In this paper, several polarization control approaches are presented to investigate the great potential on Dalian coherent light source, which is a government-approved novel FEL user facility with the capability of wavelength continuously tunable in the EUV regime of 50-150 nm. The numerical simulations show that both circularly polarized FELs with highly modulating frequency and 100 microjoule level pulse energy could be generated at Dalian coherent light source.

Zhang, T; Wang, D; Zhao, Z T; Zhang, W Q; Wu, G R; Dai, D X; Yang, X M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Protein Structures Through use of Superbends at the Advance Light Source |  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Protein Structures Protein Structures Through use of Superbends at the Advance Light Source Laboratory Policy and Evaluation (LPE) LPE Home Staff M&O Contracts SC Laboratory Appraisal Process Laboratory Planning Process Work for Others in the Office of Science Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) DOE's Philosophy on LDRD Frequently Asked Questions Success Stories Brochures Additional Information LDRD Program Contacts Technology Transfer DOE National Laboratories Contact Information Laboratory Policy and Evaluation U.S. Department of Energy SC-32/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5447 F: (202) 586-3119 Success Stories Protein Structures Through use of Superbends at the Advance Light Source Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page

207

Advanced Photon Source lights the way to 2012 Chemistry Nobel | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Photon Source lights the way to 2012 Chemistry Nobel Advanced Photon Source lights the way to 2012 Chemistry Nobel By Jared Sagoff * October 10, 2012 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - Thanks in part to research performed at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, the 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded today to Americans Brian Kobilka and Robert Lefkowitz for their work on G-protein-coupled receptors. G-protein-coupled receptors, or GPCRs, are a large family of proteins embedded in a cell's membrane that sense molecules outside the cell and activate a cascade of different cellular processes in response. They constitute key components of how cells interact with their environments and are the target of nearly half of today's pharmaceuticals. These medicines work by connecting with many of the 800 or so human GPCRs.

208

Advanced Light Water Reactor utility requirements document. Part 1, Executive summary  

SciTech Connect

The ALWR Requirements Document is a primary work product of the EPRI Program. This document is an extensive compilation of the utility requirements for design, construction and performance of advanced light water reactor power plants for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document`s primary emphasis is on resolution of significant problems experienced at existing nuclear power plants. It is intended to be used with companion documents, such as utility procurement specifications, which would cover the remaining detailed technical requirements applicable to new plant projects. The ALWR Requirements Document consists of several major parts. This volume is Part I, The Executive Summary. It is intended to serve as a concise, management level synopsis of advanced light water reactors including design objectives and philosophy, overall configuration and features and the steps necessary to proceed from the conceptual design stage to a completed, functioning power plant.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document, Volume 2, Revision 8: ALWR Evolutionary Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's ALWR Program has been an industry-wide effort to establish the technical foundation for design of the advanced light water reactor (ALWR). This program included participation and sponsorship of several international utility companies and close cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. The cornerstone of the ALWR Program is a set of utility design requirements, which are contained in the ALWR Utility Requirements Document. The purpose of this document is to present a clear, complete statement...

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

210

Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document, Volume 3, Revision 8: ALWR Passive Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's ALWR Program has been an industry-wide effort to establish the technical foundation for design of the advanced light water reactor (ALWR). This program included participation and sponsorship of several international utility companies and close cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. The cornerstone of the ALWR Program is a set of utility design requirements, which are contained in the ALWR Utility Requirements Document. The purpose of this document is to present a clear, complete statement...

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

211

Program on Technology Innovation: Cooling Water Review of the Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Utility Requirements Document (URD) was developed and last revised in 1999 to provide a list of requirements for the design and construction of new nuclear power plants. The objective of this project was to review URD Vol. III. This volume covers passive advanced light water reactors (ALWRs) for plant design requirements with respect to operations and maintenance (O&M) practices of the plant's cooling water systems (not including the circulating water system used for condenser cooling). The revi...

2007-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

212

New implementation of an SX700 undulator beamline at the Advanced Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A newly engineered implementation of a collimated SX700-style beam line for soft x-rays is described. This facility is operational at the Advanced Light Source and delivers high brightness undulator beams to a scanning zone plate microscope and to an array of end stations for x-ray spectroscopic studies of wet surfaces. Switching between branches is motorized, servo-steering systems maintain throughput and the monochromator works together with the elliptical undulator for a fully automated facility.

Warwick, T.; Andresen, N.; Comins, J.; Kaznacheyev, K.; Kortright, J.B.; McKean, P.J.; Padmore, H.A.; Shuh, D.K.; Stevens, T.; Tyliszczak, T.

2004-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

213

Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies Technical Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

Reliable instrumentation, information, and control (II&C) systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration.

Bruce Hallbert

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Office  

SciTech Connect

An installation in a Federal building tested the effectiveness of a highly-controlled, workstation-specific lighting retrofit. The study took place in an open-office area with 86 cubicles and low levels of daylight. Each cubicle was illuminated by a direct/indirectpendant luminaire with three 32 watt lamps, two dimmable DALI ballasts, and an occupancy sensor. A centralized control system programmed all three lamps to turn on and off according to occupancy on a workstation-by-workstation basis. Field measurements taken over the course of several monthsdemonstrated 40% lighting energy savings compared to a baseline without advanced controls that conforms to GSA's current retrofit standard. A photometric analysis found that the installation provided higher desktop light levels than the baseline, while an occupant survey found that occupants in general preferred the lighting system to thebaseline.Simple payback is fairly high; projects that can achieve lower installation costs and/or higher energy savings and those in which greenhouse gas reduction and occupant satisfaction are significant priorities provide the ideal setting for workstation-specific lighting retrofits.

Rubinstein, Francis; Enscoe, Abby

2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

215

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - NOx Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control Options and Integration Control Options and Integration Reaction Engineering International (REI) is optimizing the performance of, and reduce the technical risks associated with the combined application of low-NOx firing systems (LNFS) and post combustion controls through modeling, bench-scale testing, and field verification. Teaming with REI are the University of Utah and Brown University. During this two-year effort, REI will assess real-time monitoring equipment to evaluate waterwall wastage, soot formation, and burner stoichiometry, demonstrate analysis techniques to improve LNFS in combination with reburning/SNCR, assess selective catalytic reduction catalyst life, and develop UBC/fly ash separation processes. The REI program will be applicable to coal-fired boilers currently in use in the United States, including corner-, wall-, turbo-, and cyclone-fired units. However, the primary target of the research will be cyclone boilers, which are high NOx producing units and represent about 20% of the U.S. generating capacity. The results will also be applicable to all U.S. coals. The research will be divided into four key components:

216

Multi-intersection Traffic Light Control Using Infinitesimal Perturbation Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We address the traffic light control problem for multiple intersections in tandem by viewing it as a stochastic hybrid system and developing a Stochastic Flow Model (SFM) for it. Using Infinitesimal Perturbation Analysis (IPA), we derive on-line gradient estimates of a cost metric with respect to the controllable green and red cycle lengths. The IPA estimators obtained require counting traffic light switchings and estimating car flow rates only when specific events occur. The estimators are used to iteratively adjust light cycle lengths to improve performance and, in conjunction with a standard gradient-based algorithm, to obtain optimal values which adapt to changing traffic conditions. Simulation results are included to illustrate the approach.

Geng, Yanfeng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY CREE LIGHTING COMPANY, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20 2001 09:52 FR IPL DOE CH 630 252 2779 TO FGCP-HQ P.02/04 20 2001 09:52 FR IPL DOE CH 630 252 2779 TO FGCP-HQ P.02/04 * * STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY CREE LIGHTING COMPANY, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC26- 00NT40985 W(A)-01-002, CH-1055 The Petitioner, Cree Lighting Company, (Cree), was awarded this cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled, "Energy Efficient Solid State Lamp". The purpose of the cooperative agreement is to develop high efficiency, high radiance light emitting diode (LED) chip and packaging technology that is expected to lead to novel solid state lamps capable of replacing less energy efficient incandescent and halogen reflector lamps. When compared with current incandescent reflector lamps, this revolutionary new lamp is expected to be three times more

218

RECENT BEAM MEASUREMENTS AND NEW INSTRUMENTATION AT THE ADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley was the first of the soft x-ray third generation light source ever built, and since 1993 has been in continuous and successful operation serving a large community of users in the VUV and soft x-ray community. During these years the storage ring underwent through several important upgrades that allowed maintaining the performance of this veteran facility at the forefront. The ALS beam diagnostics and instrumentation have followed a similar path of innovation and upgrade and nowadays include most of the modem and last generation devices and technologies that are commercially available and used in the recently constructed third generation light sources. In this paper we will not focus on such already widely known systems, but we will concentrate our effort in the description of some measurements techniques, instrumentation and diagnostic systems specifically developed at the ALS and used during the last few years.

Sannibale, Fernando; Baptiste, Kenneth; Barry, Walter; Chin, Michael; Filippetto, Daniele; Jaegerhofer, Lukas; Julian, James; Kwiatkowski, Slawomir; Low, Raymond; Plate, David; Portmann, Gregory; Robin, David; Scarvie, Tomas; Stupakov, Gennady; Weber, Jonah; Zolotorev, Max

2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

219

Recent Beam Measurements and New Instrumentation at the Advanced Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley was the first of the soft x-ray third generation light source ever built, and since 1993 has been in continuous and successful operation serving a large community of users in the VUV and soft x-ray community. During these years the storage ring underwent through several important upgrades that allowed maintaining the performance of this veteran facility at the forefront. The ALS beam diagnostics and instrumentation have followed a similar path of innovation and upgrade and nowadays include most of the modem and last generation devices and technologies that are commercially available and used in the recently constructed third generation light sources. In this paper we will not focus on such already widely known systems, but we will concentrate our effort in the description of some measurements techniques, instrumentation and diagnostic systems specifically developed at the ALS and used during the last few years.

Sannibale, F.; Baptiste, K.; Barry, W.; Chin, M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Filippetto, D.; /Frascati; Jaegerhofer, L.; /Vienna, Tech. U.; Julian, J.; Kwiatkowski, S.; Low, R.; Plate, D.; Portmann, G.; Robin, D.; Scarvie, T.; /LBL, Berkeley; Stupakov, G.; /SLAC; Weber, J.; Zolotorev, M.; /LBL, Berkeley

2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

220

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - NOx Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions from Multi-Burners Emissions from Multi-Burners The University of Utah working with Reaction Engineering International and Brigham Young University is investigating a project that consists of integrated experimental, theoretical and computational modeling efforts. The primary objective is to evaluate NOx formation/destruction processes as they occur in multi-burner arrays, a geometry almost always utilized in utility practice. Most controlled experimental work examining NOx has been conducted on single burners. The range of potential intra-burner interactions are likely to provide added degrees of freedom for reducing NOx. The resultant findings may allow existing utilities to arrange fuel and air distribution to minimize NOx. In new applications, orientation of individual burners within an array may also be altered to reduce NOx. Comprehensive combustion codes will be modified to incorporate the latest submodels of nitrogen release and heterogeneous chemistry. Comparison of pilot scale experiments and simulations will be utilized to validate/develop theory.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Program on Technology Innovation: Review of EPRI Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirement Document to Include Small Modular Light Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) conducted a limited scope assessment to better understand what areas of the current EPRI advanced light water reactor (ALWR) Utility Requirement Document (URD) should be modified to ensure that the document is applicable to light water small modular reactors (LWSMRs). The LWSMRs differ from current light water reactors in that LWSMRs are significantly smaller than existing plants and utilize revolutionary design and construction strategies.

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

222

A Meta-Analysis of Energy Savings from Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies Program: hotel guest room energy controls. Sanhotel and institutional bathroom lighting. [CEC] California Energy

Williams, Alison

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Advanced Control Design for Wind Turbines; Part I: Control Design, Implementation, and Initial Tests  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to give wind turbine engineers information and examples of the design, testing through simulation, field implementation, and field testing of advanced wind turbine controls.

Wright, A. D.; Fingersh, L. J.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Advanced Controls and Communications for Demand Response andEnergy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Commercial buildings account for a large portion of summer peak demand. Research results show that there is significant potential to reduce peak demand in commercial buildings through advanced control technologies and strategies. However, a better understanding of commercial building's contribution to peak demand and the use of energy management and control systems is required to develop this demand response resource to its full potential. This paper discusses recent research results and new opportunities for advanced building control systems to provide demand response (DR) to improve electricity markets and reduce electric grid problems. The main focus of this paper is the role of new and existing control systems for HVAC and lighting in commercial buildings. A demand-side management framework from building operations perspective with three main features: daily energy efficiency, daily peak load management and event driven, dynamic demand response is presented. A general description of DR, its benefits, and nationwide potential in commercial buildings is outlined. Case studies involving energy management and control systems and DR savings opportunities are presented. The paper also describes results from three years of research in California to automate DR in buildings. Case study results and research on advanced buildings systems in New York are also presented.

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Hansen, David

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

225

Advanced Controls and Communications for Demand Response andEnergy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Commercial buildings account for a large portion of summer peak demand. Research results show that there is significant potential to reduce peak demand in commercial buildings through advanced control technologies and strategies. However, a better understanding of commercial building's contribution to peak demand and the use of energy management and control systems is required to develop this demand response resource to its full potential. This paper discusses recent research results and new opportunities for advanced building control systems to provide demand response (DR) to improve electricity markets and reduce electric grid problems. The main focus of this paper is the role of new and existing control systems for HVAC and lighting in commercial buildings. A demand-side management framework from building operations perspective with three main features: daily energy efficiency, daily peak load management and event driven, dynamic demand response is presented. A general description of DR, its benefits, and nationwide potential in commercial buildings is outlined. Case studies involving energy management and control systems and DR savings opportunities are presented. The paper also describes results from three years of research in California to automate DR in buildings. Case study results and research on advanced buildings systems in New York are also presented.

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Hansen, David

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

226

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - SCNR Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SNCR Field Demonstration SNCR Field Demonstration American Electric Power (AEP), in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy, FuelTech, the Ohio Coal Development Office, and fourteen EPRI member utilities, performed a full-scale demonstration of a urea-based Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) system at Cardinal Unit 1. Cardinal Unit 1 is a 600MWe opposed-wall dry bottom pulverized coal-fired boiler that began service in 1967. This unit burns eastern bituminous high-sulfur coal, (3.72%S). This unit was retrofitted with low NOx burners (LNB's) during its scheduled fall 1998 outage and the SNCR system was installed concurrently. SNCR is a post-combustion NOx control process developed to reduce NOx emissions from fossil-fuel combustion systems. SNCR processes involve the injection of a chemical containing nitrogen into the combustion products, where the temperature is in the range of 1600°F - 2200°F (870°C - 1205°C). In this temperature range, the chemical reacts selectively with NOx in the presence of oxygen, forming primarily nitrogen and water. Although a number of chemicals have been investigated and implemented for SNCR NOx reduction, urea and ammonia have been most widely used for full-scale applications.

227

Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - Second Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In Situ Device for Real-Time Catalyst Deactivation Measurements in Full-Scale SCR Systems In Situ Device for Real-Time Catalyst Deactivation Measurements in Full-Scale SCR Systems To support trends in the electric generating industry of moving from seasonal to year-round operation of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) for control of NOx and mercury, as well as extending the time between generating unit outages, Fossil Energy Research Corporation (FERCo) is developing technology to determine SCR catalyst activity and remaining life without requiring an outage to obtain and analyze catalyst samples. FERCo intends to use SCR catalyst performance results measured with their in situ device at Alabama PowerÂ’s Plant Gorgas during the 2005 and 2006 ozone seasons, along with EPRIÂ’s CatReactTM catalyst management software, to demonstrate the value of real-time activity measurements with respect to the optimization of catalyst replacement strategy. Southern Company and the Electric Power Research Institute are co-funding the project.

228

LIGHTING RESEARCH PROGRAM Project 3.3 Classroom Photocell and Control System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a prototype of an advanced daylighting control system for classrooms. This system integrated dimming control of an advanced daylighting control system for classrooms. This system integrated dimming control with On the concept of an advanced daylighting control system. #12;Deliverable 3.3.15 Final Report TWS

229

Lighting  

SciTech Connect

The lighting section of ASHRAE standard 90.1 is discussed. It applies to all new buildings except low-rise residential, while excluding specialty lighting applications such as signage, art exhibits, theatrical productions, medical and dental tasks, and others. In addition, lighting for indoor plant growth is excluded if designed to operate only between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. Lighting allowances for the interior of a building are determined by the use of the system performance path unless the space functions are not fully known, such as during the initial stages of design or for speculative buildings. In such cases, the prescriptive path is available. Lighting allowances for the exterior of all buildings are determined by a table of unit power allowances. A new addition the exterior lighting procedure is the inclusion of facade lighting. However, it is no longer possible to trade-off power allotted for the exterior with the interior of a building or vice versa. A significant change is the new emphasis on lighting controls.

McKay, H.N. (Hayden McKay Lighting Design, New York, NY (US))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Testing State-Space Controls for the Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Control can improve wind turbine performance by enhancing energy capture and reducing dynamic loads. At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, we are implementing and testing state-space controls on the Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART), a turbine specifically configured to test advanced controls. We show the design of control systems to regulate turbine speed in Region 3 using rotor collective pitch and reduce dynamic loads in Regions 2 and 3 using generator torque. These controls enhance damping in the first drive train torsion mode. We base these designs on sensors typically used in commercial turbines. We evaluate the performance of these controls by showing field test results. We also compare results from these modern controllers to results from a baseline proportional integral controller for the CART. Finally, we report conclusions to this work and outline future studies.

Wright, A. D.; Fingersh, L. J.; Balas, M. J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Advanced Rooftop Control (ARC) Retrofit: Field-Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The multi-year research study was initiated to find solutions to improve packaged equipment operating efficiency in the field. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Office (BTO) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) conducted this research, development and demonstration (RD&D) study. Packaged equipment with constant speed supply fans is designed to provide ventilation at the design rate at all times when the fan is operating as required by building code. Although there are a number of hours during the day when a building may not be fully occupied or the need for ventilation is lower than designed, the ventilation rate cannot be adjusted easily with a constant speed fan. Therefore, modulating the supply fan in conjunction with demand controlled ventilation (DCV) will not only reduce the coil energy but also reduce the fan energy. The objective of this multi-year research, development and demonstration project was to determine the magnitude of energy savings achievable by retrofitting existing packaged rooftop air conditioners with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for packaged units. First, through detailed simulation analysis, it was shown that significant energy (between 24% and 35%) and cost savings (38%) from fan, cooling and heating energy consumption could be realized when packaged air conditioning units with gas furnaces are retrofitted with advanced control packages (combining multi-speed fan control, integrated economizer controls and DCV). The simulation analysis also showed significant savings for heat pumps (between 20% and 60%). The simulation analysis was followed by an extensive field test of a retrofittable advanced rooftop unit (RTU) controller.

Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Ngo, Hung; Underhill, Ronald M.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Lutes, Robert G.

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

232

The Advantage of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Advantage of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial The Advantage of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings Title The Advantage of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-2514E Year of Publication 2008 Authors Rubinstein, Francis M., Dmitriy Bolotov, Mark S. Levi, Kevin Powell, and P. Schwartz Conference Name 2008 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Volume 78 Call Number LBNL-2514E Abstract A dual-cathode arc plasma source was combined with a computer-controlled bias amplifier such as to synchronize substrate bias with the pulsed production of plasma. In this way, bias can be applied in a material-selective way. The principle has been applied to the synthesis metal-doped diamond-like carbon films, where the bias was applied and adjusted when the carbon plasma was condensing, and the substrate was at ground when the metal was incorporated. In doing so, excessive sputtering by too-energetic metal ions can be avoided while the sp3/sp2 ratio can be adjusted. It is shown that the resistivity of the film can be tuned by this species-selective bias. The principle can be extended to multiple-material plasma sources and complex materials.

233

A Beamline for High-Pressure Studies at the Advanced Light Source with a Superconducting Bending Magnet as the Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a relatively low-energy (keV. The beam size in the ALS is small, due to the smallCompared to the prototype ALS superconducting bend magnet

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Refinements and Tests of an Advanced Controller to Mitigate Fatigue Loads in the Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind turbines are complex, nonlinear, dynamic systems forced by aerodynamic, gravitational, centrifugal, and gyroscopic loads. The aerodynamics of wind turbines are nonlinear, unsteady, and complex. Turbine rotors are subjected to a complicated 3-D turbulent wind inflow field, with imbedded coherent vortices that drive fatigue loads and reduce lifetime. Design of control algorithms for wind turbines must account for multiple control objectives. Future large multi-megawatt turbines must be designed with lighter weight structures, using active controls to mitigate fatigue loads, while maximizing energy capture. Active damping should be added to these dynamic structures to maintain stability for operation in a complex environment. At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), we have designed, implemented, and tested advanced controls to maximize energy extraction and reduce structural dynamic loads. These control designs are based on linear models of the turbine that are generated by specialized modeling software. In this paper, we present field test results of an advanced control algorithm to mitigate blade, tower, and drivetrain loads in Region 3.

Wright, A.; Fleming, P.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Advanced Control Technology Update: Multi-Loop Tuning and Model Predictive Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update provides information on two projects in the advanced control area. The first project is a study of control system tuning methods for multiple interacting proportional-integral-derivative PID control loops. The traditional method for tuning such systems, common on power plant boiler control systems, is to tune each loop in a specified sequence. An alternative method, in which all loops are tuned simultaneously, is being developed in this study and will be compared to the traditional ...

2008-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

236

Advanced reactor design study. Assessing nonbackfittable concepts for improving uranium utilization in light water reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Advanced Reactor Design Study (ARDS) is to identify and evaluate nonbackfittable concepts for improving uranium utilization in light water reactors (LWRs). The results of this study provide a basis for selecting and demonstrating specific nonbackfittable concepts that have good potential for implementation. Lead responsibility for managing the study was assigned to the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Nonbackfittable concepts for improving uranium utilization in LWRs on the once-through fuel cycle were selected separately for PWRs and BWRs due to basic differences in the way specific concepts apply to those plants. Nonbackfittable concepts are those that are too costly to incorporate in existing plants, and thus, could only be economically incorporated in new reactor designs or plants in very early stages of construction. Essential results of the Advanced Reactor Design Study are summarized.

Fleischman, R.M.; Goldsmith, S.; Newman, D.F.; Trapp, T.J.; Spinrad, B.I.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Advanced Light Source Compendium of User Abstracts andTechnical Reports 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a national user facility located at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory of the University of California is available to researchers from academia, industry, and government laboratories. Operation of the ALS is funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences. This Compendium contains abstracts written by users summarizing research completed or in progress during 1997, ALS technical reports describing ongoing efforts related to improvement in machine operations and research and development projects, and information on ALS beamlines planned through 1998.

Cross, J.; Devereaux, M.K.; Dixon, D.J.; Greiner, A.; editors

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Advanced Light Source Compendium of User Abstracts andTechnical Reports 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a national user facility located at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory of the University of California is available to researchers from academia, industry, and government laboratories. Operation of the ALS is funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences. This Compendium contains abstracts written by users summarizing research completed or in progress during 1997, ALS technical reports describing ongoing efforts related to improvement in machine operations and research and development projects, and information on ALS beamlines planned through 1998.

Cross, J.; Devereaux, M.K.; Dixon, D.J.; Greiner, A.; editors

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Successful Completion of the Top-off Upgrade of the Advanced Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An upgrade of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to enable top-off operation has been completed during the last four years. The final work centered around radiation safety aspects, culminating in a systematic proof that top-off operation is equally safe as decaying beam operation. Commissioning and transition to full user operations happened in late 2008 and early 2009. Top-off operation at the ALS provides a very large increase in time-averaged brightness (by about a factor of 10) as well as improvements in beam stability. The following sections provide an overview of the radiation safety rationale, commissioning results, as well as experience in user operations.

Steier, C.; Bailey, B.; Baptiste, K.; Barry, W.; Biocca, A.; Byrne, W.; Casey, P.; Chin, M.; Donahue, R.; Duarte, R.; Fahmie, M.; Gath, B.; Jacobson, S.; Julian, J.; Jung, J. Y.; Kritscher, M.; Kwiatkowski, S.; Marks, S.; McKean, P.; Mueller, R. [LBNL, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

240

DEMONSTRATION OF ADVANCED COMBUSTION NO X CONTROL TECHNIQUES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ADVANCED COMBUSTION NO ADVANCED COMBUSTION NO X CONTROL TECHNIQUES FOR A WALL-FIRED BOILER PROJECT PERFORMANCE SUMMARY CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM JANUARY 2001 SOUTHERN COMPANY SERVICES, INC. DOE/FE-0429 Disclaimer This report was prepared using publicly available information, including the Final Technical Report and other reports prepared pursuant to a cooperative agreement partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. Neither the United States Government nor any agency, employee, contractor, or representative thereof, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe upon privately

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Incoherent light as a control resource: a route to complete controllability of quantum systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the use of incoherent light as a resource to control the atomic dynamics and review the proposed in Phys. Rev. A 84, 042106 (2011) method for a controlled transfer between any pure and mixed states of quantum systems using a combination of incoherent and coherent light. Formally, the method provides a constructive proof for an approximate open-loop Markovian state-transfer controllability of quantum system in the space of all density matrices---the strongest possible degree of quantum state control.

Alexander Pechen

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

242

Evaluation of Alternative Field Buses for Lighting Control Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of standards. WILA’s ergonomic lighting forms the basis forachievement with motivating and health enhancing lighting.We create professional lighting for professionals. DALI

Koch, Ed; Rubinstein, Francis

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

SUMMAR OF DISCUSSIONS OF USES OF THE ADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE (ALS) FOR EARTH SCIENCES RESEARCH: WORKSHOP REPORT OF THE ALS USERS' ASSOCIATION ANNUAL MEETING, LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY, BERKELEY,CA, JUNE 2-3, 1988  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Advanced Light Source (ALS) for Earth Sciences Research:Workshop Report of the ALS Users' Association Annual Meetingthe Advanced Light Source (ALS) for Earth Sciences Research:

Dillard, J.; Wallenberg, H.; Perry, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Indicator system for advanced nuclear plant control complex  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Office  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If you could change the lighting in your office, what wouldapply. Highly-Controlled Lighting 50 of 50 April 19, 2010Europa 2009, 11th European Lighting Conference, Istanbul,

Rubinstein, Francis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Progress in Implementing and Testing State-Space Controls for the Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Designing wind turbines with maximum energy production and longevity for minimal cost is a major goal of the federal wind program and the wind industry. Control can improve the performance of wind turbines by enhancing energy capture and reducing dynamic loads. At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) we are designing state-space control algorithms for turbine speed regulation and load reduction and testing them on the Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART). The CART is a test-bed especially designed to test advanced control algorithms on a two-bladed teetering hub upwind turbine. In this paper we briefly describe the design of control systems to regulate turbine speed in region 3 for the CART. These controls use rotor collective pitch to regulate speed and also enhance damping in the 1st drive-train torsion, 1st rotor symmetric flap mode, and the 1st tower fore-aft mode. We designed these controls using linear optimal control techniques using state estimation based on limited turbine measurements such as generator speed and tower fore-aft bending moment. In this paper, we describe the issues and steps involved with implementing and testing these controls on the CART, and we show simulated tests to quantify controller performance. We then present preliminary results after implementing and testing these controls on the CART. We compare results from these controls to field test results from a baseline Proportional Integral control system. Finally we report conclusions to this work and outline future studies.

Wright, A. D.; Fingersh, L. J.; Stol, K. A.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

How to Select Lighting Controls for Offices and Public Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Why Agencies Should Buy Efficient Products s Executive Order 13123 and FAR section 23.704 direct agencies to purchase products in the upper 25% of energy efficiency, including all models that qualify for the EPA/DOE ENERGY STAR ® product labeling program. s Agencies that use these guidelines to buy efficient products can realize substantial operating cost savings and help prevent pollution. s As the world's largest consumer, the federal government can help "pull" the entire U.S. market towards greater energy efficiency, while saving taxpayer dollars. How to Select Lighting Controls For Offices and Public Buildings LT-8 PAGE 1 DECEMBER 2000 Definitions Daylight dimming employs sensors that detect ambient light levels and then allow ballasts to

248

Advanced Thermo-Adsorptive Battery: Advanced Thermo-Adsorptive Battery Climate Control System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HEATS Project: MIT is developing a low-cost, compact, high-capacity, advanced thermoadsorptive battery (ATB) for effective climate control of EVs. The ATB provides both heating and cooling by taking advantage of the materials’ ability to adsorb a significant amount of water. This efficient battery system design could offer up as much as a 30% increase in driving range compared to current EV climate control technology. The ATB provides high-capacity thermal storage with little-to-no electrical power consumption. The ATB is also looking to explore the possibility of shifting peak electricity loads for cooling and heating in a variety of other applications, including commercial and residential buildings, data centers, and telecom facilities.

None

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

249

Second Generation Advanced Reburning for High Efficiency NOx Control  

SciTech Connect

This project is designed to develop a family of novel NO{sub x} control technologies, called Second Generation Advanced Reburning (SGAR) which has the potential to achieve 90+ NO{sub x} control in coal fired boilers at a significantly lower cost than Selective Catalytic Reduction. The ninth reporting period in Phase II (October 1-December 31, 1999) included preparation of the 10 x 10{sup 6} Btu/hr Tower Furnace for tests and setting the SGAR model to predict process performance under Tower Furnace conditions. Based on results of previous work, a paper has been prepared and submitted for the presentation at the 28 Symposium (International) on Combustion to be held at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland.

Vladimir M. Zamansky; Vitali V. Lissianski

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

MERCURY CONTROL WITH THE ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Program Solicitation DE-PS26-00NT40769 and specifically addresses Technical Topical Area 4-Testing Novel and Less Mature Control Technologies on Actual Flue Gas at the Pilot Scale. The project team includes the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) as the main contractor; W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., as a technical and financial partner; and the Big Stone Power Plant operated by Otter Tail Power Company, host for the field-testing portion of the research. Since 1995, DOE has supported development of a new concept in particulate control called the advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC). The AHPC has been licensed to W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., and is now marketed as the ADVANCED HYBRID{trademark} Filter by Gore. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in a unique configuration, providing major synergism between the two collection methods, both in the particulate collection step and in the transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and it solves the problem of reentrainment and re-collection of dust in conventional baghouses. The AHPC appears to have unique advantages for mercury control over baghouses or ESPs as an excellent gas-solid contactor. The objective of the three-task project is to demonstrate 90% total mercury control in the AHPC at a lower cost than current mercury control estimates. The approach includes bench-scale batch testing that ties the new work to previous results and links results with larger-scale pilot testing with real flue gas on a coal-fired combustion system, pilot-scale testing on a coal-fired combustion system with both a pulse-jet baghouse and an AHPC to prove or disprove the research hypotheses, and field demonstration pilot-scale testing at a utility power plant to prove scaleup and demonstrate longer-term mercury control. This project, if successful, will demonstrate at the pilot-scale level a technology that would provide a cost-effective technique to accomplish control of mercury emissions and, at the same time, greatly enhance fine particulate collection efficiency. The technology can be used to retrofit systems currently employing inefficient ESP technology as well as for new construction, thereby providing a solution to a large segment of the U.S. utility industry as well as other industries requiring mercury control.

Stanley J. Miller; Ye Zhuang; Michelle R. Olderbak

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Mercuty Control With The Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector  

SciTech Connect

This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Program Solicitation DE-PS26-00NT40769 and specifically addresses Technical Topical Area 4 - Testing Novel and Less Mature Control Technologies on Actual Flue Gas at the Pilot Scale. The project team includes the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) as the main contractor; W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., as a technical and financial partner; and the Big Stone Plant operated by Otter Tail Power Company, host for the field testing portion of the research. Since 1995, DOE has supported development of a new concept in particulate control called the advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC). The AHPC has been licensed to W.L. Gore and Associates, Inc., and is now marketed as the Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter by Gore. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in a unique configuration, providing major synergism between the two collection methods, both in the particulate collection step and in the transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and it solves the problem of reentrainment and re-collection of dust in conventional baghouses. The AHPC appears to have unique advantages for mercury control over baghouses or ESPs as an excellent gas-solid contactor. The objective of the three-task project is to demonstrate 90% total mercury control in the AHPC at a lower cost than current mercury control estimates. The approach includes bench-scale batch testing that ties the new work to previous results and links results with larger-scale pilot testing with real flue gas on a coal-fired combustion system, pilot-scale testing on a coal-fired combustion system with both a pulse-jet baghouse and an AHPC to prove or disprove the research hypotheses, and field demonstration pilot-scale testing at a utility power plant to prove scaleup and demonstrate longer-term mercury control. This project, if successful, will demonstrate at the pilot-scale level a technology that would provide a cost-effective technique to accomplish control of mercury emissions and, at the same time, greatly enhance fine particulate collection efficiency. The technology can be used to retrofit systems currently employing inefficient ESP technology as well as for new construction, thereby providing a solution to a large segment of the U.S. utility industry as well as other industries requiring mercury control.

Ye Zhuang; Stanley J. Miller; Michelle R. Olderbak

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

Testing Controls to Mitigate Fatigue Loads in the Controls Advanced Research Turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind turbines are complex, nonlinear, dynamic systems forced by aerodynamic, gravitational, centrifugal, and gyroscopic loads. The aerodynamics of wind turbines is nonlinear, unsteady, and complex. Turbine rotors are subjected to a complicated three-dimensional (3D) turbulent wind inflow field with imbedded coherent vortices that drive fatigue loads and reduce lifetime. Design of control algorithms for wind turbines must account for multiple control objectives. Future large multi-megawatt turbines must be designed with lighter weight structures, using active controls to mitigate fatigue loads, maximize energy capture, and add active damping to maintain stability for these dynamically active structures operating in a complex environment. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory are designing, implementing, and testing advanced controls to maximize energy extraction and reduce structural dynamic loads. These control designs are based on a linear model of the turbine that is generated by specialized modeling software. This paper describes testing of a control algorithm to mitigate blade, tower, and drivetrain loads using advanced state-space control methods. The controller uses independent blade pitch to regulate the turbine's speed in Region 3, mitigate the effects of shear across the rotor disk, and add active damping to the tower's first fore-aft bending mode. Additionally, a separate generator torque control loop is designed to add active damping to the tower's first side-side mode and the first drivetraintorsion mode. This paper discusses preliminary implementation and field tests of this controller in the Controls Advanced Research Turbine at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Also included are preliminary comparisons of the performance of this controller to results from a typical baseline Proportional-Integral-Derivative controller designed with just Region 3 speed regulation as the goal.

Wright, A. D.; Fingersh, L. J.; Stol, K. A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Evaluation of Alternative Field Buses for Lighting ControlApplications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Subcontract Statement of Work consists of two major tasks. This report is the Final Report in fulfillment of the contract deliverable for Task 1. The purpose of Task 1 was to evaluate existing and emerging protocols and standards for interfacing sensors and controllers for communicating with integrated lighting control systems in commercial buildings. The detailed task description follows: Task 1. Evaluate alternative sensor/field buses. The objective of this task is to evaluate existing and emerging standards for interfacing sensors and controllers for communicating with integrated lighting control systems in commercial buildings. The protocols to be evaluated will include at least: (1) 1-Wire Net, (2) DALI, (3) MODBUS (or appropriate substitute such as EIB) and (4) ZigBee. The evaluation will include a comparative matrix for comparing the technical performance features of the different alternative systems. The performance features to be considered include: (1) directionality and network speed, (2) error control, (3) latency times, (4) allowable cable voltage drop, (5) topology, and (6) polarization. Specifically, Subcontractor will: (1) Analyze the proposed network architecture and identify potential problems that may require further research and specification. (2) Help identify and specify additional software and hardware components that may be required for the communications network to operate properly. (3) Identify areas of the architecture that can benefit from existing standards and technology and enumerate those standards and technologies. (4) Identify existing companies that may have relevant technology that can be applied to this research. (5) Help determine if new standards or technologies need to be developed.

Koch, Ed; Rubinstein, Francis

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

254

Evaluation of Alternative Field Buses for Lighting Control Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Field Buses Alternative Field Buses for Lighting Control Applications Prepared By: Ed Koch, Akua Controls Francis Rubinstein, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Prepared For: Broadata Communications Torrence, CA May 15, 2005 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by its trade name,

255

The perihelion of Mercury advance and the light bending calculated in (enhanced) Newton's theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that results of a simple dynamical gedanken experiment interpreted according to standard Newton's gravitational theory, may reveal that three-dimensional space is curved. The experiment may be used to reconstruct the curved geometry of space, i.e. its non-Euclidean metric. The perihelion of Mercury advance and the light bending calculated from the Poisson equation and the equation of motion in the curved geometry have the correct (observed) values. Independently, we also show that Newtonian gravity theory may be enhanced to incorporate the curvature of three dimensional space by adding an extra equation which links the Ricci scalar with the density of matter. Like in Einstein's general relativity, matter is the source of curvature. In the spherically symmetric (vacuum) case, the metric of space 3gik that follows from this extra equation agrees, to the expected accuracy, with the metric measured by the Newtonian gedanken experiment mentioned above.

M. A. Abramowicz; G. F. R. Ellis J. Horak; M. Wielgus

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

256

Soft x-ray spectromicroscopy development for materials science at the Advanced Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several third generation synchrotron radiation facilities are now operational and the high brightness of these photon sources offers new opportunities for x-ray microscopy. Well developed synchrotron radiation spectroscopy techniques are being applied in new instruments capable of imaging the surface of a material with a spatial resolution smaller than one micron. There are two aspects to this. One is to further the field of surface science by exploring the effects of spatial variations across a surface on a scale not previously accessible to x-ray measurements. The other is to open up new analytical techniques in materials science using x-rays, on a spatial scale comparable to that of the processes or devices to be studied. The development of the spectromicroscopy program at the Advanced Light Source will employ a variety of instruments, some are already operational. Their development and use will be discussed, and recent results will be presented to illustrate their capabilities.

Warwick, T.; Padmore, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Ade, H. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Hitchcock, A.P. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Rightor, E.G. [Dow Texas Polymer Center, Freeport, TX (United States); Tonner, B.P. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

A flammability and combustion model for integrated accident analysis. [Advanced light water reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A model for flammability characteristics and combustion of hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixtures is presented for application to severe accident analysis of Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWR's). Flammability of general mixtures for thermodynamic conditions anticipated during a severe accident is quantified with a new correlation technique applied to data for several fuel and inertant mixtures and using accepted methods for combining these data. Combustion behavior is quantified by a mechanistic model consisting of a continuity and momentum balance for the burned gases, and considering an uncertainty parameter to match the idealized process to experiment. Benchmarks against experiment demonstrate the validity of this approach for a single recommended value of the flame flux multiplier parameter. The models presented here are equally applicable to analysis of current LWR's. 21 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

Plys, M.G.; Astleford, R.D.; Epstein, M. (Fauske and Associates, Inc., Burr Ridge, IL (USA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Designing for man: advances in control room operation  

SciTech Connect

Considers the human factor in nuclear power plants in relation to improving control room and maintenance operations. Control room operators face thousands of dials, meters, and indicator lights dispersed over large control boards. Components may not be arranged in clearly identifiable panels of related elements; sometimes related controls may not be near each other. Extensive alarm systems may sometimes confuse rather than alert the operators; communications with other parts of the plant may be difficult. Maintenance personnel may have to squeeze past pipes and similar obstructions to make repairs while carrying equipment and tools, sometimes while wearing protective gear. EPRI has developed a cool suit consisting of 16 pounds of water-filled compartments built into a two-piece repair suit that can be frozen to keep body temperatures at acceptable levels for up to 2 hrs. in high-heat areas of the plant. An ergonomics guide, which examines alternative solutions to heat stress (such as rest cycles and worker screening) is also being developed. Because few new nuclear plants are currently being built, many of the improvements will be retrofits in existing plants. EPRI's human factors work emphasizes thorough validation of new techniques through simulators and mockups.

Lihach, N.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Light Control of Cholesteric Liquid Crystals Using Azoxy-Based Host Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% ZhK-440 and 25% ZLI-2011. Light Control of Cholesteric Liquid Crystals 129 #12;cholesteric systemsLight Control of Cholesteric Liquid Crystals Using Azoxy-Based Host Materials G. Chilaya A, Swarthmore, PA, USA The characteristics of cholesteric liquid crystals can be controlled by light irradiation

Collings, Peter

260

The 19th ICFA Advanced Beam Dynamics Workshop on Future Light Sources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ICFA2000t.GIF (31362 bytes) ICFA2000t.GIF (31362 bytes) The 19th ICFA Advanced Beam Dynamics Workshop on Future Light Sources Physics of and Science with The X-ray Free-Electron Laser (Arcidosso, Italy, September 10-15, 2000) Workshop Summary The19th Advanced ICFA Beam Dynamics Workshop on "The Physics of, and the Science with, X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers" took place in Arcidosso (Italy) from the 10th to the 15th of September, 2000. The Workshop was sponsored by the International Committee for Future Accelerators, the US Department of Energy, the University of California at Los Angeles, the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, together with local authorities of the Tuscany, Grosseto and Arcidosso areas. The Workshop's chairmen were M. Cornacchia (SLAC), I. Lindau (SLAC/Lund. Un.) and C. Pellegrini (UCLA). Seventy-five scientists, of which 50 are involved in the physics and technology of accelerators, free-electron lasers and x-ray optics, and 25 in the scientific applications, attended the workshop. There were plenary and parallel sessions and many lively discussions, during and after the regular workshop schedule.

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261

An ALS handbook: A summary of the capabilities and characteristics of the advanced light source  

SciTech Connect

This booklet aims to provide the prospective user of the Advanced Light Source with a concise description of the radiation a researcher might expect at his or her experimental station. The focus is therefore on the characteristics of the light that emerges from insertion devices and bending magnets and on how components of the beam lines further alter the properties of the radiation. The few specifications and operating parameters of the ALS storage ring that are of interest are those that directly determine the radiation characteristics. Sections 4 through 5 are primarily devoted to summary presentations, by means of performance plots and tabular compilations, of radiation characteristics at the ALS--spectral brightness, flux, coherent power, resolution, etc.--assuming a representative set of three undulators and one wiggler and a corresponding set of four beam lines. As a complement to these performance summaries, Section 1 is a general introductory discussion of synchrotron radiation and the ALS, and Section 2 discusses the properties of the stored electron beam that affect the radiation. Section 3 then provides an introduction to the characteristics of synchrotron radiation from bending magnets, wigglers, and undulators. In addition, Section 5 briefly introduces the theory of diffraction-grating and crystal monochromators. As compared with previous editions of this booklet, the performance plots and tabular compilations of the ALS radiation characteristics are now based on conservative engineering designs rather than preliminary physics designs.

Not Available

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

A Superbend X-Ray Microdiffraction Beamline at the Advanced Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Canadian Light Source (with groups at the APS and NSLS, the ALS has pioneered some

Tamura, N.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Daylighting: Measuring the Performance of Light Shelves and Occupant-Controlled Blinds on a Dimmed Lighting Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design of a day lighted space is both an art and a science. The biggest challenge facing the lighting designer is to admit only as much light as necessary and distribute it evenly throughout the space without introducing glare or heat. In warm climates such as Florida, it has become common practice in windowed spaces to specify blinds and glazing with high shading coefficients to control glare and minimize heat gain. However, this practice reduces the effectiveness of lighting systems that dim automatically. Improved systems are needed to capture natural daylight and distribute it uniformly throughout a space while controlling heat gain and glare. One such system is the light shelf. Light shelves shade the space from direct sunlight and reflect this sunlight onto the ceiling for a deeper and more uniform distribution. While this is not a new idea, little unbiased empirical data has been collected, outside the laboratory, that compares the performance (energy savings, uniformity, and level) of an automatic daylighting system. This study measures the effectiveness of light shelves and manually controlled horizontal blinds in an automatic daylighting system. Power consumption and interior work-plane lighting levels were compared in four essentially identical private offices. Two offices were configured with an interior light shelf, one with a white diffuse top surface and the other with a specular surface. The third office had no window treatment and the fourth office had horizontal blinds, which were manually adjusted by the user. All offices had two lamp fluorescent luminaires with dimming ballasts (min. 20%) controlled by a ceiling mounted photosensor. The study showed that daytime savings ranged from 29% to 46%, with the largest savings from the office with the light shelves. The office with horizontal blinds showed the poor savings (32%) and also the poorest light uniformity and level.

Floyd, D. B.; Parker, D. S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Advanced Control and Protection system Design Methods for Modular HTGRs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project supported the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in identifying and evaluating the regulatory implications concerning the control and protection systems proposed for use in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The NGNP, using modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology, is to provide commercial industries with electricity and high-temperature process heat for industrial processes such as hydrogen production. Process heat temperatures range from 700 to 950 C, and for the upper range of these operation temperatures, the modular HTGR is sometimes referred to as the Very High Temperature Reactor or VHTR. Initial NGNP designs are for operation in the lower temperature range. The defining safety characteristic of the modular HTGR is that its primary defense against serious accidents is to be achieved through its inherent properties of the fuel and core. Because of its strong negative temperature coefficient of reactivity and the capability of the fuel to withstand high temperatures, fast-acting active safety systems or prompt operator actions should not be required to prevent significant fuel failure and fission product release. The plant is designed such that its inherent features should provide adequate protection despite operational errors or equipment failure. Figure 1 shows an example modular HTGR layout (prismatic core version), where its inlet coolant enters the reactor vessel at the bottom, traversing up the sides to the top plenum, down-flow through an annular core, and exiting from the lower plenum (hot duct). This research provided NRC staff with (a) insights and knowledge about the control and protection systems for the NGNP and VHTR, (b) information on the technologies/approaches under consideration for use in the reactor and process heat applications, (c) guidelines for the design of highly integrated control rooms, (d) consideration for modeling of control and protection system designs for VHTR, and (e) input for developing the bases for possible new regulatory guidance to assist in the review of an NGNP license application. This NRC project also evaluated reactor and process heat application plant simulation models employed in the protection and control system designs for various plant operational modes and accidents, including providing information about the models themselves, and the appropriateness of the application of the models for control and protection system studies. A companion project for the NRC focused on the potential for new instrumentation that would be unique to modular HTGRs, as compared to light-water reactors (LWRs), due to both the higher temperature ranges and the inherent safety features.

Ball, Sydney J [ORNL; Wilson Jr, Thomas L [ORNL; Wood, Richard Thomas [ORNL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

D. E. Shropshire

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

SciDAC advances in beam dynamics simulation: from light sources to colliders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

simulations of next generation light sources and of high-RF linac for a next generation FEL light source at LBNL. Ain light sources The next generation of accelerator based

Qiang, Ji

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

SciDAC advances in beam dynamics simulation: from light sources to colliders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

simulations of next generation light sources and of high-RF linac for a next generation FEL light source at LBNL. Ain light sources The next generation of accelerator based

Qiang, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

The Advanced Light Source at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (ALS, LBL)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is a third-generation synchrotron light source designed toas a third-generation synchrotron radiation source, that is,latest generation of synchrotron light sources, l extremely

Jackson, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Advanced controls and modeling of a hybrid vehicle.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Texas Tech University Advanced Vehicle Engineering Team has been working in vehicle competitions for 20 years. From that experience the team designed a hybrid… (more)

Harrison, Matthew

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

There are many different types of artificial lights, all of which have different applications and uses. Types of lighting include:

271

Solid-State Lighting: Model Specification for Adaptive Control and Remote  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market-Based Programs Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Solid-State Lighting: Model Specification for Adaptive Control and Remote Monitoring of LED Roadway Luminaires, V1.0 to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Model Specification for Adaptive Control and Remote Monitoring of LED Roadway Luminaires, V1.0 on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Model Specification for Adaptive Control and Remote Monitoring of LED Roadway Luminaires, V1.0 on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Model Specification for Adaptive Control and Remote Monitoring of LED Roadway Luminaires, V1.0 on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Model Specification for Adaptive Control and Remote Monitoring of LED Roadway Luminaires, V1.0 on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Model Specification for Adaptive Control

272

Research report of street lighting controls for the City of Portland, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

This report examines various types of lighting controls for roadways these needs. Three types of control were explored: (1) ''Solid State ''Photocontrols; (2) Photocontrols with Partial Night Turn-off features; and (3) Variable Lighting Controls.

Qualmann, W.

1985-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

273

Baseline vs. Replacement High Bay Lighting Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy efficient lighting has been a means to significant energy savings for many facilities around the world. New developments in fluorescent, induction, LED (light-emitting diode), and plasma lighting technologies have spurred various building managers to replace or retrofit existing lighting fixtures. These advances in lighting sources often allow conservation of electricity, better quality of light, and more flexibility in the control of light. However, these new lighting sources still have ...

2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

274

Controller and computer display interface in an advanced terminal area ATC system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Controller and display interactions and information requirements in an advanced Air Traffic Control (ATC) system are investigated. A description of the present ATC system and of some proposed developments for the future ...

Dopart, Kevin Peter

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

An experimental setup to evaluate the daylighting performance of an advanced optical light pipe for deep-plan office buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research focuses on an advanced optical light pipe daylighting system as a means to deliver natural light at the back of deep-plan office buildings (15ft to 30ft), using optimized geometry and high reflective materials. The light pipe configurations follow a previous study at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Beltr??n et al., 1997). The current system is designed for College Station, TX (lat: 30?? 36??N), with predominantly mostly sunny sky conditions. This work consists of the monitoring of two scale models simulating a portion of a multi-story office building with open-plan configuration, with interior dimensions 30ft x 20ft x 10ft, built at 1:4 of its real scale, one of the models being the reference case and the other the test case where the light pipe system is placed. The main objectives of this thesis are (a) to examine this daylighting system comparative to the reference case, taking measurements for longer periods than the study at LBNL, as well as to collect detailed data of its performance under different weather conditions and with different materials; (b) to evaluate the visual comfort and possible glare problems of the light pipe system through photographic evaluation and the conduction of a survey that provides people??s opinions and suggestions about the daylighting system. The light pipe system demonstrated a higher performance than the reference case in terms of appropriate levels of light and people??s preferences. The illuminance at the workplane level showed to be adequate with any of the two different diffusing materials used to spread the light into the room. The light pipe without a diffuser was the other condition observed to further understand the bounces of the sunbeam inside the reflective chamber and its consequences on the lighting output. Recommended standards for office spaces with VDT screens together with the analysis of the daylight system, led to preliminary suggestions on how to integrate the light pipe system in an open-plan office configuration. Further study is indicated to reach the complete potential of this advanced optical light pipe that ties illuminance quality with energy savings through the integration of daylight and electric light systems.

Martins Mogo de Nadal, Betina Gisela

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

The Advantages of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conference Location Pacific Grove, CA Keywords demand response and distributed energy resources center, demand response research center, lighting Abstract The paper presents...

277

Quantifying National Energy Savings Potential of Lighting Controls...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Buildings Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows...

278

Inferential control -- Part 1: Crude unit advanced controls pass accuracy and repeatability tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An inferential model is one that provides a quality for which an analyzer is not available. This type of model uses readily available physical measurements -- such as temperatures, pressures, and flow rates -- to infer a quality such as kerosine flash point. The No. 2 crude distillation unit (CDU-2) at Singapore Refining Co. Pte. Ltd.'s Pulau Merlimau refinery has a nominal 130,000 b/d capacity. It produces naphtha, kerosine, diesel, and residue products from a wide range of crude blends. Over the past 12 months, extensive advanced control applications have been implemented on the unit. This first of two articles will describe the control system and its implementation. The second will outline the project's achievements, including reduced quality giveaway and increased profits. The paper describes background of the company and unit, the process, project implementation, the Infer model, model tuning, closed-loop control, feed rate maximization, and economic monitoring.

San, Y.P. (Singapore Refining Co. Ptd. Ltd., Pulau Merlimau (Singapore)); Landells, K.C.; Mackay, D.C. (BP Oil International, London (United Kingdom))

1994-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

279

Development of Computational Approaches for Simulation and Advanced Controls for Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computational Approaches Computational Approaches for Simulation and Advanced Controls for Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Background The United States Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) develops affordable and clean energy from coal and other fossil fuels to secure a sustainable energy economy. To further this mission, NETL funds research and development of advanced control technologies, including chemical looping (CL)

280

Designing and Testing Contols to Mitigate Dynamic Loads in the Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is designing, implementing, and testing advanced controls to maximize energy extraction and reduce structural dynamic loads of wind turbines. These control designs are based on a linear model of the turbine that is generated by specialized modeling software. In this paper, we show the design and simulation testing of a control algorithm to mitigate blade, tower, and drivetrain loads using advanced state-space control design methods.

Wright, A.D.; Stol, K.A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

High-brightness beamline for X-ray spectroscopy at the Advanced Light Source  

SciTech Connect

Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range, designed to achieve the goals of high energy resolution, high flux, and high brightness at the sample. When completed later this year, it will be the first ALS monochromatic hard-x-ray beamline, and its brightness will be an order-of-magnitude higher than presently available in this energy range. In addition, it will provide flux and resolution comparable to any other beamline now in operation. To achieve these goals, two technical improvements, relative to existing x-ray beamlines, were incorporated. First, a somewhat novel optical design for x-rays, in which matched toroidal mirrors are positioned before and after the double-crystal monochromator, was adopted. This configuration allows for high resolution by passing a collimated beam through the monochromator, and for high brightness by focusing the ALS source on the sample with unit magnification. Second, a new ''Cowan type'' double-crystal monochromator based on the design used at NSLS beamline X-24A was developed. The measured mechanical precision of this new monochromator shows significant improvement over existing designs, without using positional feedback available with piezoelectric devices. Such precision is essential because of the high brightness of the radiation and the long distance (12m) from the source (sample) to the collimating (focusing) mirror. This combination of features will provide a bright, high resolution, and stable x-ray beam for use in the x-ray spectroscopy program at the ALS.

Perera, R.C.C.; Jones, G. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (US); Lindle, D.W. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (US). Dept. of Chemistry

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Standardizing Communication Between Lighting Control Devices: A Role for IEEE P1451  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Controller Controller sensor actuator sensor sensor actuator actuator Building equipment Building equipment Building equipment Environmental Variables: Temperature Light Airflow Occupancy CO 2 É Fire É Figure 1. Shown is a generic diagram of the relationship between controller, actuators and sensors in a typical building control application. Sensors detect the key environmental parameters, while the controller "decides" which actuator is to be controlled and how. The actuators operate the building equipment, which, in turn affects the building environment. The physical connection between controller and actuator and controller and sensor usually takes place over wires carrying an analog signal. Standardizing Communication Between Lighting Control Devices A Role for IEEE P1451

283

Design of a Personalized Lighting Control System Enabled by a Space Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reports on a research effort to develop a prototype of a personalized lighting control system that adjusts the visual environment based on user preferences. Lighting controllers query a space model to retrieve lighting objects that are near given user locations and map user preferences into control actions for these lighting objects. A user scenario illustrates the concept of personalized lighting control. The scenario is used to develop functional and non-functional system requirements which inform system design. The structure of a proposed space model and space model queries are described and illustrated with examples. Implementation environments for system modules and data communication between modules are discussed. System and user tests are outlined that will be performed for initial feedback on the feasibility of personalized lighting control.

Suter, G.; Petrushevski, F.; Sipetic, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

RECENT BEAM MEASUREMENTS AND NEW INSTRUMENTATION AT THE ADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A L S many other 3rd generation sources have been and arcthe soft x-ray third generation light source ever built, andconstructed third generation light sources. In this paper we

Sannibale, Fernando

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Market transformation opportunities for emerging dynamic facade and dimmable lighting control systems  

SciTech Connect

Automated shading and daylighting control systems have been commercially available for decades. The new challenge is to provide a fully functional and integrated fagade and lighting system that operates appropriately for all environmental conditions and meets a range of occupant subjective desires and objective performance requirements. These rigorous performance goals must be achieved with solutions that are cost effective and can operate over long periods with minimal maintenance. It will take time and effort to change the marketplace for these technologies and practices, particularly in building a series of documented success stories, and driving costs and risks to much lower levels at which their use becomes the norm. In recent years, the architectural trend toward highly-transparent all-glass buildings presents a unique challenge and opportunity to advance the market for emerging, smart, dynamic window and dimmable daylighting control technologies. We believe it is possible to accelerate product market transformation by developing projects where technical advances and the interests of motivated manufacturers and innovative owners converge. In this paper we present a case study example that explains a building owner's decision-making process to use dynamic window and dimmable daylighting controls. The case study project undertaken by a major building owner in partnership with a buildings R&D group was designed explicitly to use field test data in conjunction with the market influence of a major landmark building project in New York City to stimulate change in manufacturers' product offerings. Preliminary observations on the performance of these systems are made. A cost model that was developed with the building owner is explained.

Lee, Eleanor S.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.; Hughes, Glenn D.; Thurm, David A.

2004-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

286

Market transformation opportunities for emerging dynamic facade and dimmable lighting control systems  

SciTech Connect

Automated shading and daylighting control systems have been commercially available for decades. The new challenge is to provide a fully functional and integrated fagade and lighting system that operates appropriately for all environmental conditions and meets a range of occupant subjective desires and objective performance requirements. These rigorous performance goals must be achieved with solutions that are cost effective and can operate over long periods with minimal maintenance. It will take time and effort to change the marketplace for these technologies and practices, particularly in building a series of documented success stories, and driving costs and risks to much lower levels at which their use becomes the norm. In recent years, the architectural trend toward highly-transparent all-glass buildings presents a unique challenge and opportunity to advance the market for emerging, smart, dynamic window and dimmable daylighting control technologies. We believe it is possible to accelerate product market transformation by developing projects where technical advances and the interests of motivated manufacturers and innovative owners converge. In this paper we present a case study example that explains a building owner's decision-making process to use dynamic window and dimmable daylighting controls. The case study project undertaken by a major building owner in partnership with a buildings R&D group was designed explicitly to use field test data in conjunction with the market influence of a major landmark building project in New York City to stimulate change in manufacturers' product offerings. Preliminary observations on the performance of these systems are made. A cost model that was developed with the building owner is explained.

Lee, Eleanor S.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.; Hughes, Glenn D.; Thurm, David A.

2004-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

287

Conceptual design of a pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the development of innovative pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control. The core layout is derived from a CANDU line of reactors in general, and advanced ACR-1000 design in particular. It should be stressed however, that while some of the ACR-1000 mechanical design features are adopted, the core design basics of the reactor proposed here are completely different. First, the inter fuel channels spacing, surrounded by the calandria tank, contains a low pressure gas instead of heavy water moderator. Second, the fuel channel design features an additional/external tube (designated as moderator tube) connected to a separate moderator management system. The moderator management system is design to vary the moderator tube content from 'dry' (gas) to 'flooded' (light water filled). The dynamic variation of the moderator is a unique and very important feature of the proposed design. The moderator variation allows an implementation of the 'breed and burn' mode of operation. The 'breed and burn' mode of operation is implemented by keeping the moderator tube empty ('dry' filled with gas) during the breed part of the fuel depletion and subsequently introducing the moderator by 'flooding' the moderator tube for the 'burn' part. This paper assesses the conceptual feasibility of the proposed concept from a neutronics point of view. (authors)

Rachamin, R.; Fridman, E. [Reactor Safety Div., Inst. of Resource Ecology, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, POB 51 01 19, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Galperin, A. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, POB 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Advanced Mercury Sorbents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Mercury Sorbents with Low Impact on Power Plant Operations Advanced Mercury Sorbents with Low Impact on Power Plant Operations Apogee Scientific, Inc. (Apogee) will lead a Team comprised of Southern Company Services, TXU, Tennessee Valley Authority, EPRI, URS Group, University of Illinois-Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS), Southern Research Institute (SRI), Calgon Carbon, and TDA Research, Inc., to evaluate a number of advanced sorbents for removing vapor-phase mercury from coal-fired flue gas that have minimal impact on by-product utilization and/or on existing particulate collection devices (PCD). The main objective of this program is to evaluate several advanced sorbents for removing mercury from coal-fired flue gas while posing minimal impact on plant operations through three advanced sorbent concepts: 1) Sorbents which minimize impact on concrete production through selective chemical passivation of activated carbon and use of non-carbon material, 2) sorbents that minimize baghouse pressure drop and ESP emissions, and 3) sorbents that can be recovered and reused.

289

EPRI Materials Management Matrix Project: Advanced Light-Water Reactor - Pressurized Water Reactor Degradation Matrix - Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Light Water Reactor - Pressurized Water Reactor Degradation Matrix (ALWR PWR DM) is an integral piece of the Electric Power Research Institutes (EPRIs) Materials Management Matrix (MMM) initiative for ALWR designs. The MMM provides a tool to assist the industry in proactive identification and consideration of materials issues and mitigation/management opportunities from the design phase through component fabrication and plant construction to operations and maintenance.

2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

290

Proceedings of the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting: Volume 1, Plenary session; Advanced reactor research; advanced control system technology; advanced instrumentation and control hardware; human factors research; probabilistic risk assessment topics; thermal hydraulics; thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs  

SciTech Connect

This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25--27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. This document, Volume 1 covers the following topics: Advanced Reactor Research; Advanced Instrumentation and Control Hardware; Advanced Control System Technology; Human Factors Research; Probabilistic Risk Assessment Topics; Thermal Hydraulics; and Thermal Hydraulic Research for Advanced Passive Light Water Reactors.

Monteleone, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [comp.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Field Testing LIDAR Based Feed-Forward Controls on the NREL Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind turbines are complex, nonlinear, dynamic systems driven by aerodynamic, gravitational, centrifugal, and gyroscopic forces. The aerodynamics of wind turbines are nonlinear, unsteady, and complex. Turbine rotors are subjected to a chaotic three-dimensional (3-D) turbulent wind inflow field with imbedded coherent vortices that drive fatigue loads and reduce lifetime. In order to reduce cost of energy, future large multimegawatt turbines must be designed with lighter weight structures, using active controls to mitigate fatigue loads, maximize energy capture, and add active damping to maintain stability for these dynamically active structures operating in a complex environment. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and University of Stuttgart are designing, implementing, and testing advanced feed-back and feed-forward controls in order to reduce the cost of energy for wind turbines.

Scholbrock, A. K.; Fleming, P. A.; Fingersh, L. J.; Wright, A. D.; Schlipf, D.; Haizmann, F.; Belen, F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Study of Pu consumption in Advanced Light Water Reactors. Evaluation of GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor plants  

SciTech Connect

Timely disposal of the weapons plutonium is of paramount importance to permanently safeguarding this material. GE`s 1300 MWe Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) has been designed to utilize fill] core loading of mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel. Because of its large core size, a single ABWR reactor is capable of disposing 100 metric tons of plutonium within 15 years of project inception in the spiking mode. The same amount of material could be disposed of in 25 years after the start of the project as spent fuel, again using a single reactor, while operating at 75 percent capacity factor. In either case, the design permits reuse of the stored spent fuel assemblies for electrical energy generation for the remaining life of the plant for another 40 years. Up to 40 percent of the initial plutonium can also be completely destroyed using ABWRS, without reprocessing, either by utilizing six ABWRs over 25 years or by expanding the disposition time to 60 years, the design life of the plants and using two ABWRS. More complete destruction would require the development and testing of a plutonium-base fuel with a non-fertile matrix for an ABWR or use of an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR). The ABWR, in addition, is fully capable of meeting the tritium target production goals with already developed target technology.

Not Available

1993-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

293

Advanced Wind Turbine Controls Reduce Loads (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL's National Wind Technology Center provides the world's only dedicated turbine controls testing platforms.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Advance of Systematic Design Methods on Fuzzy Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) system possesses some characteristics such as multi-parameters, nonlinear, and coupled parameters. Aimed at control problems, the author targets real-time fuzzy control and research systematically via the fuzzification method, fuzzy inference method, fuzzy control rules online obtaining and optimizing method, self-organizing fuzzy control method, and fuzzy predictive control of a time-delayed process. This paper will briefly introduce previous research results.

Zhang, J.; Chen, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Advancing lighting and daylighting simulation: The transition from analysis to design aid tools  

SciTech Connect

This paper explores three significant software development requirements for making the transition from stand-alone lighting simulation/analysis tools to simulation-based design aid tools. These requirements include specialized lighting simulation engines, facilitated methods for creating detailed simulatable building descriptions, an automated techniques for providing lighting design guidance. Initial computer implementations meant to address each of these requirements are discussed to further elaborate these requirements and to illustrate work-in-progress.

Hitchcock, R.J.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Advanced light water reactor plants system 80+{trademark} design certification program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80{sup +}{trademark} during the U.S. government`s 1994 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MW (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design covers an essentially complete plant. It is based on EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD) improvements to the Standardized System 80 Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2 and 3. The NSSS is a traditional two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs, each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard design houses the NSSS in a spherical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual barrier to radioactivity release. Other major features include an all-digital, human-factors-engineered control room, an alternate electrical AC power source, an In-Containment Refueling Water Storage Tank (IRWST), and plant arrangements providing complete separation of redundant trains in safety systems. Some design enhancements incorporated in the System 80+ design are included in the four units currently under construction in the Republic of Korea. These units and the System 80+ design form the basis of the Korean standardization program. The Nuclear Island portion of the System 80+ standard design has also been offered to the Republic of China, in response to their bid specification for an ALWR. The ABB-CE Standard Safety Analysis Report (CESSAR-DC) was docketed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in May 1991 and a Draft Safety Evaluation Report (DSER) was issued in October 1992.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

A smart GUI based air-conditioning and lighting controller for energy saving in building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper will concentrate on the algorithm and control strategies where the air-conditioners and lighting system can be controlled using microcontroller; a microcontroller is chosen due to its low cost and high flexibility. Conceptually, the controller ... Keywords: energy saving control system, graphic LCD, graphical user interface (GUI), microcontroller

M. F. Abas; N. MD. Saad; N. L. Ramli

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Design criteria for lighting and controls modifications OSW, CTF, COS buildings  

SciTech Connect

This project will retrofit the lighting systems in three (3) buildings at the Mound Plant. The buildings are Central Operational Support (COS), Component Test Facility (CTF) and operational Support West (OSW). This project consists of the installation of occupancy sensors in private offices, break areas and laboratories, automatic control lighting, (occupied/unoccupied) with the existing DDC system, removing selected light fixtures, replacing incandescent lighting and reprogramming some of the software controlling the operation of the air handling units in the a forementioned buildings.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

WPF Control Development Unleashed: Building Advanced User Experiences, 1st edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

WPF Control Development Unleashed Building Advanced User Experiences In this book, two leading Windows Presentation Foundation experts give developers everything they need to build next-generation WPF applicationssoftware that is more robust, usable, ...

Pavan Podila; Kevin Hoffman

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Toward Femtosecond X-ray Spectroscopy at the Advanced Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www-ssrl.slac.stanford.edu/lcls/papers/syncpanel.pdf. M.F.Coherent Light Source 5 (LCLS) in the United States andwww-ssrl.slac.stanford.edu/lcls/ Accelerator 6 (TESLA) in

Chong, Henry Herng Wei

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Development of Advanced LED Phosphors by Spray-based Processes for Solid State Lighting  

SciTech Connect

The overarching goal of the project was to develop luminescent materials using aerosol processes for making improved LED devices for solid state lighting. In essence this means improving white light emitting phosphor based LEDs by improvement of the phosphor and phosphor layer. The structure of these types of light sources, displayed in Figure 1, comprises of a blue or UV LED under a phosphor layer that converts the blue or UV light to a broad visible (white) light. Traditionally, this is done with a blue emitting diode combined with a blue absorbing, broadly yellow emitting phosphor such as Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce (YAG). A similar result may be achieved by combining a UV emitting diode and at least three different UV absorbing phosphors: red, green, and blue emitting. These emitted colors mix to make white light. The efficiency of these LEDs is based on the combined efficiency of the LED, phosphor, and the interaction between the two. The Cabot SSL project attempted to improve the over all efficiency of the LED light source be improving the efficiency of the phosphor and the interaction between the LED light and the phosphor. Cabot's spray based process for producing phosphor powders is able to improve the brightness of the powder itself by increasing the activator (the species that emits the light) concentration without adverse quenching effects compared to conventional synthesis. This will allow less phosphor powder to be used, and will decrease the cost of the light source; thus lowering the barrier of entry to the lighting market. Cabot's process also allows for chemical flexibility of the phosphor particles, which may result in tunable emission spectra and so light sources with improved color rendering. Another benefit of Cabot's process is the resulting spherical morphology of the particles. Less light scattering results when spherical particles are used in the phosphor layer (Figure 1) compared to when conventional, irregular shaped phosphor particles are used. This spherical morphology will result in better light extraction and so an improvement of efficiency in the overall device. Cabot is a 2.5 billion dollar company that makes specialized materials using propriety spray based technologies. It is a core competency of Cabot's to exploit the spray based technology and resulting material/morphology advantages. Once a business opportunity is clearly identified, Cabot is positioned to increase the scale of the production to meet opportunity's need. Cabot has demonstrated the capability to make spherical morphology micron-sized phosphor powders by spray based routes for PDP and CRT applications, but the value proposition is still unproven for LED applications. Cabot believes that the improvements in phosphor powders yielded by their process will result in a commercial advantage over existing technologies. Through the SSL project, Cabot has produced a number of different compositions in a spherical morphology that may be useful for solid state lights, as well as demonstrated processes that are able to produce particles from 10 nanometers to 3 micrometers. Towards the end of the project we demonstrated that our process produces YAG:Ce powder that has both higher internal quantum efficiency (0.6 compared to 0.45) and external quantum efficiency (0.85 compared to 0.6) than the commercial standard (see section 3.4.4.3). We, however, only produced these highly bright materials in research and development quantities, and were never able to produce high quantum efficiency materials in a reproducible manner at a commercial scale.

Cabot Corporation

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

302

The advanced-step %MPC controller: optimality, stability and ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tory reactor [5] asw ell as in numerous industrial stud- ies. ... ous stirred tank reactor (C STR) example and discuss ...... Control Theory Appl., 147(4), 387-394,.

303

Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART) Commissioning and Baseline Data Collection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During FY2002, the CART turbine and controller were developed and commissioned. This included developing and checking out the protection and operational control systems. More than 50 hours of data were collected in constant and variable-speed modes. A new strategy, which underwent limited testing on the machine, was created for avoiding tower resonance. All the data from the checkout through the operational periods were organized, archived, and backed up.

Fingersh, L. J.; Johnson, K.

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Advanced Data Processing and Computing Technologies at Control Centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Control center operation is becoming more complex as new and often-conflicting reliability, economics, and public policy issues emerge. To manage the complexity, control center operators need prompt, comprehensive information about their own systems and neighboring systems. Computer simulations analyze system data and what-if-scenarios to derive succinct information for operators to make more informed decisions. This report reviews the applicability of new technologies and some solution methods for addre...

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

305

High-Brightness Beams from a Light Source Injector The Advanced Photon Source Low-Energy Undulator Test Line Linac  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of existing linacs, and in particular light source injectors, for free-electron laser (FEL) experiments is becoming more common due to the desire to test FELs at ever shorter wavelengths. The high-brightness, high-current beams required by high-gain FELs impose technical specifications that most existing linacs were not designed to meet. Moreover, the need for specialized diagnostics, especially shot-to-shot data acquisition, demands substantial modification and upgrade of conventional linacs. Improvements have been made to the Advanced Photon Source (APS) injector linac in order to produce and characterize high-brightness beams. Specifically, effort has been directed at generating beams suitable for use in the low-energy undulator test line (LEUTL) FEL in support of fourth-generation light source research. The enhancements to the linac technical and diagnostic capabilities that allowed for self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) operation of the FEL at 530 nm are described. Recent results, includi...

Travish, G; Borland, M; Hahne, M; Harkay, K C; Lewellen, J W; Lumpkin, Alex H; Milton, S V; Sereno, N S

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Advanced regulatory control and coordinated plant-wide control strategies for IGCC targeted towards improving power ramp-rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of ongoing R&D activities at the National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training & Research (AVESTAR™) Center, this paper highlights strategies for enhancing low-level regulatory control and system-wide coordinated control strategies implemented in a high-fidelity dynamic simulator for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant with carbon capture. The underlying IGCC plant dynamic model contains 20 major process areas, each of which is tightly integrated with the rest of the power plant, making individual functionally-independent processes prone to routine disturbances. Single-loop feedback control although adequate to meet the primary control objective for most processes, does not take into account in advance the effect of these disturbances, making the entire power plant undergo large offshoots and/or oscillations before the feedback action has an opportunity to impact control performance. In this paper, controller enhancements ranging from retuning feedback control loops, multiplicative feed-forward control and other control techniques such as split-range control, feedback trim and dynamic compensation, applicable on various subsections of the integrated IGCC plant, have been highlighted and improvements in control responses have been given. Compared to using classical feedback-based control structure, the enhanced IGCC regulatory control architecture reduces plant settling time and peak offshoots, achieves faster disturbance rejection, and promotes higher power ramp-rates. In addition, improvements in IGCC coordinated plant-wide control strategies for “Gasifier-Lead”, “GT-Lead” and “Plantwide” operation modes have been proposed and their responses compared. The paper is concluded with a brief discussion on the potential IGCC controller improvements resulting from using advanced process control, including model predictive control (MPC), as a supervisory control layer.

Mahapatra, P.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Controlled storage of light in silicon cavities Ali W. Elshaari*, Abdelsalam Aboketaf, and Stefan F. Preble  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Khan, S. Fan, P. R. Villeneuve, H. A. Haus, and J. D. Joannopoulos, "Coupling of modes analysis demonstration of quantum memory for light," Nature 432(7016), 482­486 (2004). 2. A. Politi, M. J. Cryan, J. G­649 (2008). 3. V. R. Almeida, C. A. Barrios, R. R. Panepucci, and M. Lipson, "All-optical control of light

Zanibbi, Richard

308

New Family of Tiny Crystals Glow Bright in LED Lights | Advanced Photon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Serotonin Receptors Can Shape Drug Effects, from LSD to Migraine How Serotonin Receptors Can Shape Drug Effects, from LSD to Migraine Medication X-rays Paint a Picture of Picasso's Pigments Antibody Evolution Could Guide HIV Vaccine Development Blue Ruthenium Dimer Catalysis for Hydrogen Generation A High-Pressure Nano-imaging Breakthrough Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed New Family of Tiny Crystals Glow Bright in LED Lights JUNE 7, 2013 Bookmark and Share Laue microdiffraction pattern acquired from a nanoribbon in experiments at the APS. Minuscule crystals that glow different colors may be the missing ingredient for white light-emitting diode (LED) lighting that illuminates homes and

309

Advanced method for increasing the efficiency of white light quantum dot LEDs  

SciTech Connect

Covering a light-emitting diode (LED) with quantum dots (QDs) can produce a broad spectrum of white light. However, current techniques for applying QDs to LEDs suffer from a high density of defects and a non-uniform distribution of QDs, which, respectively, diminish the efficiency and quality of emitted light. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has the unique capability to thermally anneal QD structures at extremely high power densities for very short durations. This process, called pulse thermal processing (PTP), reduces the number of point defects while maintaining the size and shape of the original QD nanostructure. Therefore, the efficiency of the QD wavelength conversion layer is improved without altering the emission spectrum defined by the size distribution of theQD nanoparticles. The current research uses a thermal model to predict annealing temperatures during PTP and demonstrates up to a 300% increase in photoluminescence for QDs on passive substrates.

Duty, Chad E [ORNL; Bennett, Charlee J C [ORNL; Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle [ORNL; Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; Walker, Steven C [ORNL; Ott, Ronald D [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Advanced Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

A fundamental concern in projecting the future attributes of light-duty vehiclespassenger cars, sport utility vehicles, pickup trucks, and minivans is how to represent technological change and the market forces that drive it. There is always considerable uncertainty about the evolution of existing technologies, what new technologies might emerge, and how consumer preferences might influence the direction of change. Most of the new and emerging technologies expected to affect the performance and fuel use of light-duty vehicles over the next 25 years are represented in NEMS; however, the potential emergence of new, unforeseen technologies makes it impossible to address all the technology options that could come into play. The previous section of Issues in Focus discussed several potential technologies that currently are not represented in NEMS. This section discusses some of the key technologies represented in NEMS that are expected to be implemented in light-duty vehicles over the next 25 years.

Information Center

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

IC-BASED CONTROLS FOR ENERGY-EFFICIENT LIGHTING  

SciTech Connect

A new approach for driving high frequency energy saving ballasts is developed and documented in this report. The developed approach utilizes an IC-based platform that provides the benefits of reduced system cost, reduced ballast size, and universal application to a wide range of lamp technologies, such as linear fluorescent lamps (LFL), compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) and high intensity discharge lamps (HID). The control IC chip set developed for the platform includes dual low voltage (LV) IC gate drive that provides gate drive for high and low side power switches in typical ballast circuits, and ballast controller IC that provides control functionalities optimal for different lamps and digital interface for future extension to more sophisticated control and communication.

Richard Zhang

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

iCheat: a representation for artistic control of indirect cinematic lighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thanks to an increase in rendering efficiency, indirect illumination has recently begun to be integrated in cinematic lighting design, an application where physical accuracy is less important than careful control of scene appearance. This paper presents ...

Juraj Obert; Jaroslav K?ivánek; Fabio Pellacini; Daniel Sykora; Sumanta Pattanaik

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Advanced Branching Control and Characterization of Inorganic Semiconducting Nanocrystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Shape-Controlled Colloidal CdSe Quantum Rods. Nano Lett.of highly luminescent CdSe/CdS core–shell nanocrystals viabowings, and defects in CdS, CdSe, CdTe, and …. In Journal

Hughes, Steven Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Propagation of light in serially coupled plasmonic nanowire dimer: Geometry dependence and polarization control  

SciTech Connect

We experimentally studied plasmon-polariton-assisted light propagation in serially coupled silver nanowire (Ag-NW) dimers and probed their dependence on bending-angle between the nanowires and polarization of incident light. From the angle-dependence study, we observed that obtuse angles between the nanowires resulted in better transmission than acute angles. From the polarization studies, we inferred that light emission from junction and distal ends of Ag-NW dimers can be systematically controlled. Further, we applied this property to show light routing and polarization beam splitting in obtuse-angled Ag-NW dimer. The studied geometry can be an excellent test-bed for plasmonic circuitry.

Singh, Danveer; Raghuwanshi, Mohit; Pavan Kumar, G. V. [Photonics and Optical Nanoscopy Laboratory, Department of Physics and Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune 411008 (India)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

315

Developing a dynamic envelope/lighting control system with field measurements  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of an intelligent venetian blind/lighting control system was tested in a 1:3 scale model outdoors under variable sun and sky conditions. The control algorithm, block direct sun and meet the design workplane illuminance level, was implemented using commercially available and custom designed blind and lighting systems hardware. While blocking direct sunlight, the blinds were properly controlled to maintain the design workplane illuminance within a tolerance of -10%, +25% when there was sufficient daylight. When daylight levels alone were inadequate, the electric lighting control system maintained the design workplane illuminance. The electric lighting could be turned off if a user-specified time period at minimum power was exceeded. Lighting energy savings of 51-71% (southwest) and 37-75% (south) was attained for the period from 8:00 to 17:00 on clear sunny days, compared to a fixed, partially closed blind with the same lighting system. Practical details for implementation and commissioning are discussed. The impact of control variations, such as profile angle, time step interval, and control area, on energy demand is investigated.

DiBartolomeo, D.L.; Lee, E.S.; Rubinstein, F.M.; Selkowitz, S.E.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Advanced Communication and Control Solutions of Distributed Energy Resources (DER)  

SciTech Connect

This report covers work performed in Phase II of a two phase project whose objective was to demonstrate the aggregation of multiple Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) and to offer them into the energy market. The Phase I work (DE-FC36-03CH11161) created an integrated, but distributed, system and procedures to monitor and control multiple DERs from numerous manufacturers connected to the electric distribution system. Procedures were created which protect the distribution network and personnel that may be working on the network. Using the web as the communication medium for control and monitoring of the DERs, the integration of information and security was accomplished through the use of industry standard protocols such as secure SSL,VPN and ICCP. The primary objective of Phase II was to develop the procedures for marketing the power of the Phase I aggregated DERs in the energy market, increase the number of DER units, and implement the marketing procedures (interface with ISOs) for the DER generated power. The team partnered with the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO), the local ISO, to address the energy market and demonstrate the economic dispatch of DERs in response to market signals. The selection of standards-based communication technologies offers the ability of the system to be deployed and integrated with other utilities’ resources. With the use of a data historian technology to facilitate the aggregation, the developed algorithms and procedures can be verified, audited, and modified. The team has demonstrated monitoring and control of multiple DERs as outlined in phase I report including procedures to perform these operations in a secure and safe manner. In Phase II, additional DER units were added. We also expanded on our phase I work to enhance communication security and to develop the market model of having DERs, both customer and utility owned, participate in the energy market. We are proposing a two-part DER energy market model--a utility need business model and an independent energy aggregator-business model. The approach of developing two group models of DER energy participation in the market is unique. The Detroit Edison (DECo, Utility)-led team includes: DTE Energy Technologies (Dtech, DER provider), Electrical Distribution Design (EDD, Virginia Tech company supporting EPRI’s Distribution Engineering Workstation, DEW), Systems Integration Specialists Company (SISCO, economic scheduling and real-time protocol integrator), and OSIsoft (PI software system for managing real-time information). This team is focused on developing the application engineering, including software systems necessary for DER’s integration, control and sale into the market place. Phase II Highlights Installed and tested an ICCP link with SSL (security) between DECo, the utility, and DTE Energy Technologies (DTECH), the aggregator, making DER data available to the utility for both monitoring and control. Installed and tested PI process book with circuit & DER operational models for DECo SOC/ROC operator’s use for monitoring of both utility circuit and customer DER parameters. The PI Process Book models also included DER control for the DECo SOC/ROC operators, which was tested and demonstrated control. The DER Tagging and Operating Procedures were developed, which allowed that control to be done in a safe manner, were modified for required MOC/MISO notification procedures. The Distribution Engineering Workstation (DEW) was modified to include temperature normalized load research statistics, using a 30 hour day-ahead weather feed. This allowed day-ahead forecasting of the customer load profile and the entire circuit to determine overload and low voltage problems. This forecast at the point of common coupling was passed to DTech DR SOC for use in their economic dispatch algorithm. Standard Work Instructions were developed for DER notification, sale, and operation into the MISO market. A software mechanism consisting of a suite of new and revised functionality was developed that integrated with the local ISO such that offe

Asgeirsson, Haukur; Seguin, Richard; Sherding, Cameron; de Bruet, Andre, G.; Broadwater, Robert; Dilek, Murat

2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

317

Advanced Cogeneration Control, Optimization, and Management: A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of cogeneration power plants can now be assessed on line in real time using a distributed microprocessor-based data acquisition and control system. A representative implementation is described for cogeneration power in a food processing plant. The COPA (COgeneration Performance Assessment) package comprises separate, distributed control modules for data input, performance analysis for each plant device, overall plant performance summary, and operator displays. Performance of each of the respective cogeneration devices is assessed relative to a performance model of the device, thus an accurate assessment of performance is provided under all load conditions. Operator displays provide real time depiction of the performance of each device and the overall plant performance. Deterioration of performance of a device is quantified in terms of the cost of additional fuel requirements and/or the value of power not produced.

Hinson, F.; Curtin, D.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Argonne CNM News: Shedding Light on Nature's Nanoscale Control of Solar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shedding Light on Nature's Nanoscale Control of Solar Energy Shedding Light on Nature's Nanoscale Control of Solar Energy Scanning tunneling microscopy tips A schematic of the Rhodobacter sphaerodes hexameric core, featuring the "special pair" (P) of degenerate bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) molecules, and the active (a) and inactive (b) arms of BChl and bacteriopheophytin (BPh) molecules. The transient absorption (ΔA) spectra acquired following selective excitation of P are shown. Nature's process for storing solar energy occurs in light-absorbing protein complexes called photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs). Across billions of years of evolution, Nature has retained a common light-absorbing hexameric cofactor core for carrying out the very first chemical reaction of photosynthesis, the light-induced electron transfer across approximately 3

319

Economic analysis of the daylight-linked lighting control system in office buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to perform an economic analysis of the daylight-linked automatic on/off lighting control system installed for the purpose of energy savings in office buildings. For this, a building was chosen as a typical example, and the energy cost was calculated by using the daylight and building energy analysis simulation. When the lighting control was utilized, an economic analysis was performed using a payback period that was calculated by comparing the initial cost of installing the lighting control system with the annual energy cost which was reduced thanks to the application of the lighting control. The results showed that the lighting energy consumption, when the lighting control was applied, was reduced by an average of 30.5% compared with the case that there was not lighting control applied. Also, the result for total energy consumption showed that, when lighting control was applied, this was reduced by 8.5% when the glazing ratio was 100%, 8.2% for 80%, and 7.6% for 60% when compared to non-application. The payback period was analyzed in terms of the number of floors in a building; 10 floors, 20 floors, 30 floors, and 40 floors. Hence, the building with 40 floors and glazing ratio 100% resulted in the shortest payback period of 8.8 years, the building with 10 floors and glazing ratio 60% resulted in the longest period of 12.7 years. In other words, the larger the glazing ratio and the number of building floors are, the shorter the payback period is. (author)

Yang, In-Ho; Nam, Eun-Ji [Department of Architectural Engineering, College of Engineering, Dongguk University, 26-3, Pil-dong, Chung-gu, Seoul 100-715 (Korea)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Illuminac: simultaneous naming and configuration for workspace lighting control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We explore natural and calm interfaces for configuring ubiquitous computing environments. A natural interface should enable the user to name a desired configuration and have the system enact that configuration. Users should be able to use familiar names ... Keywords: environment control, natural speech interfaces, non-negative matrix factorization

Ana Ramírez Chang; John Canny

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

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321

The Advantage of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents results from pilot studies of new 'workstation-specific' luminaires that are designed to provide highly, efficient, customized lighting for open-office cubicles. Workstation specific luminaires have the following characteristics: (1) they provide separate, dimming control of the cubicle's 'ambient' and 'task' lighting components, (2) occupancy sensors and control photosensors are integrated into the fixture's design and operation, (3) luminaires can be networked using physical cabling, microcontrollers and a PC running control software. The energy savings, demand response capabilities and quality of light from the two WS luminaires were evaluated and compared to the performance of a static, low-ambient lighting system that is uncontrolled. Initial results from weeks of operation provide strong indication that WS luminaires can largely eliminate the unnecessary lighting of unoccupied cubicles while providing IESNA-required light levels when the cubicles are occupied. Because each cubicle's lighting is under occupant sensor control, the WS luminaires can capitalize on the fact cubicles are often unoccupied during normal working hours and reduce their energy use accordingly.

Rubinstein, Francis; Bolotov, Dmitriy; Levi, Mark; Powell, Kevin; Schwartz, Peter

2008-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

322

Advanced control strategies for HVAC&R systems—An overview: Part II: Soft and fusion control  

SciTech Connect

A chronological overview of the advanced control strategies for HVAC&R is presented. The overview focuses on hard-computing or control techniques, such as proportional-integral-derivative, optimal, nonlinear, adaptive, and robust; soft-computing or control techniques, such as neural networks, fuzzy logic, genetic algorithms; and the fusion or hybrid of hard and soft control techniques. Part I focused on hardcontrol strategies; Part II focuses on soft and fusion control and some future directions in HVA&R research. This overview is not intended to be an exhaustive survey on this topic, and any omissions of other works is purely unintentional.

D. Subbaram Naidu; Craig G. Rieger

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Diesel Exhaust Emissions Control for Light-Duty Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to present the results of diesel exhaust aftertreatment testing and analysis done under the FreedomCAR program. Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) adsorber technology was selected based on a previous investigation of various NOx aftertreatment technologies including non-thermal plasma, NOx adsorber and active lean NOx. Particulate Matter (PM) emissions were addressed by developing a catalyzed particulate filter. After various iterations of the catalyst formulation, the aftertreatment components were integrated and optimized for a light duty vehicle application. This compact exhaust aftertreatment system is dual leg and consists of a sulfur trap, NOx adsorbers, and catalyzed particulate filters (CPF). During regeneration, supplementary ARCO ECD low-sulfur diesel fuel is injected upstream of the adsorber and CPF in the exhaust. Steady state and transient emission test results with and without the exhaust aftertreatment system (EAS) are presented. Results of soot filter regeneration by injecting low-sulfur diesel fuel and slip of unregulated emissions, such as NH3, are discussed. Effects of adsorber size and bypass strategy on NOx conversion efficiency and fuel economy penalty are also presented in this paper. The results indicate that if the supplementary fuel injection is optimized, NH3 slip is negligible. During the FTP cycle, injection of low sulfur diesel fuel can create temperature exotherms high enough to regenerate a loaded CPF. With the optimized NOx adsorber regeneration strategies the fuel injection penalty can be reduced by 40 to 50%. Results for various other issues like low temperature light off, reductant optimization, exhaust sulfur management, system integration and design trade-off, are also presented and discussed in this paper. (SAE Paper SAE-2003-01-0041 © 2003 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.)

Mital, R.; Li, J.; Huang, S. C.; Stroia, B. J.; Yu, R. C. (Cummins, Inc.); Anderson, J.A. (Argonne National Laboratory); Howden, Kenneth C. (U.S. Department of Energy)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Designing for man: advances in control room operation  

SciTech Connect

Power plants are made up of hardware, but they are operated and maintained by humans. Since Three Mile Island, the role of human factors in safe and economic power generation has been more fully appreciated. Control board displays, alarm systems, procedures, and even the space allotted for making repairs are all under industry study. Many of the improvements will be retrofits because so few new plants are being built. An effort will be made to pace regulatory changes and train operators with simulators so that the rate of change doesn't become a major problem. 7 references, 2 figures.

Lihach, N.; Cain, D.; Loewenstein, W.; Long, A.; O'Brien, J.; Parris, H.; Rossin, A.D.; Rubio, A.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY PHILIPS LUMILEDS LIGHTING, LLC FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

I I OF DOMESTIC AND FOJfEIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER DOE CONTRACT NO. DE-EE0005099; W(A)-2012-005 , CH-1651 The Petitioner, Philips Lumileds (Philips) was awarded this cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled , "High Power Warm White Light LED for Illumination ." According to its response to question 2, the scope of this program is to create pre-production prototypes of a warm white LED that has efficiency of 130LPW while at the same time generating 6501m of warm white light in the Correlated Color Temperature range between 2800K and 3500K with a Color Rendering Index of greater than 80, at device junction temperature of 85°C. Further details of the project's scope are provided in rJsponse to question 2. This waiver is only for inventions of Philips

326

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY PHILIPS LUMILEDS LIGHTING, LLC FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FC26-08NT01583; W(A}-09-021, CH-1488 FC26-08NT01583; W(A}-09-021, CH-1488 The Petitioner, Philips Lumileds {Philips} was awarded this cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled, "100 LPW 800 Lm Warm White Light LED for Illumination." According to its response to question 2, the scope of this program is to create pre-production· prototypes of a warm white LED that has efficiency of 100LPW while at the same time generating 800lm of warm white light in the Correlated Color Temperature range between 2800K and 3500K with a Color Rendering Index of greater than 90. Further details of the project's scope are provided in response to question 2. This waiver is only for inventions of Philips made under the cooperative agreement. The total estimated cost of the contract is $5,299,800 with Philips' providing a 50% cost-

327

Controlling of grid connected photovoltaic lighting system with fuzzy logic  

SciTech Connect

In this study, DC electrical energy produced by photovoltaic panels is converted to AC electrical energy and an indoor area is illuminated using this energy. System is controlled by fuzzy logic algorithm controller designed with 16 rules. Energy is supplied from accumulator which is charged by photovoltaic panels if its energy would be sufficient otherwise it is supplied from grid. During the 1-week usage period at the semester time, 1.968 kWh energy is used from grid but designed system used 0.542 kWh energy from photovoltaic panels at the experiments. Energy saving is determined by calculations and measurements for one education year period (9 months) 70.848 kWh. (author)

Saglam, Safak; Ekren, Nazmi; Erdal, Hasan [Technical Education Faculty, Marmara University, Istanbul 34722 (Turkey)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Energy savings and economics of advanced control strategies for packaged air conditioners with gas heat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an evaluation of the potential energy savings from adding advanced control to existing packaged air conditioners. Advanced control options include air-side economizer, multi-speed fan control, demand control ventilation and staged cooling. The energy and cost savings from the different control strategies individually and in combination are estimated using the EnergyPlus detailed energy simulation program for four building types, namely, a small office building, a stand-alone retail building, a strip mall building and a supermarket building. For each of the four building types, the simulation was run for 16 locations covering all 15 climate zones in the U.S. The maximum installed cost of a replacement controller that provides acceptable payback periods to owners is estimated.

Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Huang, Yunzhi; Brambley, Michael R.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Advanced underground Vehicle Power and Control: The locomotive Research Platform  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Develop a fuelcell mine locomotive with metal-hydride hydrogen storage. Test the locomotive for fundamental limitations preventing successful commercialization of hydride fuelcells in underground mining. During Phase 1 of the DOE-EERE sponsored project, FPI and its partner SNL, completed work on the development of a 14.4 kW fuelcell power plant and metal-hydride energy storage. An existing battery-electric locomotive with similar power requirements, minus the battery module, was used as the base vehicle. In March 2001, Atlas Copco Wagner of Portland, OR, installed the fuelcell power plant into the base vehicle and initiated integration of the system into the vehicle. The entire vehicle returned to Sandia in May 2001 for further development and integration. Initial system power-up took place in December 2001. A revision to the original contract, Phase 2, at the request of DOE Golden Field Office, established Vehicle Projects LLC as the new prime contractor,. Phase 2 allowed industry partners to conduct surface tests, incorporate enhancements to the original design by SNL, perform an extensive risk and safety analysis, and test the fuelcell locomotive underground under representative production mine conditions. During the surface tests one of the fuelcell stacks exhibited reduced power output resulting in having to replace both fuelcell stacks. The new stacks were manufactured with new and improved technology resulting in an increase of the gross power output from 14.4 kW to 17 kW. Further work by CANMET and Hatch Associates, an engineering consulting firm specializing in safety analysis for the mining industry, both under subcontract to Vehicle Projects LLC, established minimum requirements for underground testing. CANMET upgraded the Programmable Logic Control (PLC) software used to monitor and control the fuelcell power plant, taking into account locomotive operator's needs. Battery Electric, a South Africa manufacturer, designed and manufactured (at no cost to the project) a new motor controller capable of operating the higher rpm motor and different power characteristics of the fuelcells. In early August 2002, CANMET, with the technical assistance of Nuvera Fuel Cells and Battery Electric, installed the new PLC software, installed the new motor controller, and installed the new fuelcell stacks. After minor adjustments, the fuelcell locomotive pulled its first fully loaded ore cars on a surface track. The fuelcell-powered locomotive easily matched the battery powered equivalent in its ability to pull tonnage and equaled the battery-powered locomotive in acceleration. The final task of Phase 2, testing the locomotive underground in a production environment, occurred in early October 2002 in a gold mine. All regulatory requirements to allow the locomotive underground were completed and signed off by Hatch Associates prior to going underground. During the production tests, the locomotive performed flawlessly with no failures or downtime. The actual tests occurred during a 2-week period and involved moving both gold ore and waste rock over a 1,000 meter track. Refueling, or recharging, of the metal-hydride storage took place on the surface. After each shift, the metal-hydride storage module was removed from the locomotive, transported to surface, and filled with hydrogen from high-pressure tanks. The beginning of each shift started with taking the fully recharged metal-hydride storage module down into the mine and re-installing it onto the locomotive. Each 8 hour shift consumed approximately one half to two thirds of the onboard hydrogen. This indicates that the fuelcell-powered locomotive can work longer than a similar battery-powered locomotive, which operates about 6 hours, before needing a recharge.

Vehicle Projects LLC

2003-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

330

Advanced Control Design and Field Testing for Wind Turbines at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utility-scale wind turbines require active control systems to operate at variable rotational speeds. As turbines become larger and more flexible, advanced control algorithms become necessary to meet multiple objectives such as speed regulation, blade load mitigation, and mode stabilization. At the same time, they must maximize energy capture. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has developed control design and testing capabilities to meet these growing challenges.

Hand, M. M.; Johnson, K. E.; Fingersh, L. J.; Wright, A. D.

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY ALSTOM ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR AN ADVANCE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ALSTOM ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR AN ADVANCE ALSTOM ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF PATENT RIGHTS TO INVENTIONS MADE UNDER SUBCONTRACT QZ001 UNDER COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-03NT41986; W(A) 05-004; CH-1268 As set out in the attached waiver petition and in subsequent discussions with DOE Patent Counsel, Alstom Environmental Control Systems (Alstom) has requested an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions made under the above subject subcontract. The waiver will apply only to inventions made by Alstom employees under the subcontract. Alstom is a subcontractor to ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES). under the subject cooperative agreement. ADA-ES is eligible to retain title to its inventions pursuant to P.L. 96- 517. Referring to item 2 of Alstom's petition, the purpose of the subcontract is to evaluate full-

332

Table lamp with dynamically controlled lighting distribution and uniformly illuminated luminous shade  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A double lamp table or floor lamp lighting system has a pair of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) or other lamps arranged vertically, i.e. one lamp above the other, with a reflective septum in between. By selectively turning on one or both of the CFLs, down lighting, up lighting, or both up and down lighting is produced. The control system can also vary the light intensity from each CFL. The reflective septum ensures that almost all the light produced by each lamp will be directed into the desired light distribution pattern which is selected and easily changed by the user. In a particular configuration, the reflective septum is bowl shaped, with the upper CFL sitting in the bowl, and a luminous shade hanging down from the bowl. The lower CFL provides both task lighting and uniform shade luminance. Planar compact fluorescent lamps, e.g. circular CFLs, particularly oriented horizontally, are preferable. CFLs provide energy efficiency. However, other types of lamps, including incandescent, halogen, and LEDs can also be used in the fixture. The lighting system may be designed for the home, hospitality, office or other environments.

Siminovitch, Michael J. (Pinole, CA); Page, Erik R. (Berkeley, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Power Quality Hotline Call-of-the-Month for November 2009: Failure of a Lighting-Control System Caused by Electrical Fast Transients (EFTs)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Call of the Month discusses the basics of lighting-control systems, a recent failure of a lighting-control system caused by a common electrical disturbance, and some solutions to resolving compatibility problems with lighting-control systems.

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

334

System and Battery Charge Control for PV-Powered AC Lighting Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews a number of issues specific to stand-alone AC lighting systems. A review of AC lighting technology is presented, which discusses the advantages and disadvantages of various lamps. The best lamps for small lighting systems are compact fluorescent. The best lamps for intermediate-size systems are high- or low-pressure sodium. Specifications for battery charging and load control are provided with the goal of achieving lamp lifetimes on the order of 16,000 to 24,000 hours and battery lifetimes of 4 to 5 years. A rough estimate of the potential domestic and global markets for stand-alone AC lighting systems is presented. DC current injection tests were performed on high-pressure sodium lamps and the test results are presented. Finally, a prototype system was designed and a prototype system controller (with battery charger and DC/AC inverter) was developed and built.

Kern, G.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Diffracted light from latent images in photoresist for exposure control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In microelectronics manufacturing, an arrangement for monitoring and control of exposure of an undeveloped photosensitive layer on a structure susceptible to variations in optical properties in order to attain the desired critical dimension for the pattern to be developed in the photosensitive layer. This is done by ascertaining the intensities for one or more respective orders of diffracted power for an incident beam of radiation corresponding to the desired critical dimension for the photosensitive layer as a function of exposure time and optical properties of the structure, illuminating the photosensitive layer with a beam of radiation of one or more frequencies to which the photosensitive layer is not exposure-sensitive, and monitoring the intensities of the orders of diffracted radiation due to said illumination including at least the first order of diffracted radiation thereof, such that when said predetermined intensities for the diffracted orders are reached during said illumination of photosensitive layer, it is known that a pattern having at least approximately the desired critical dimension can be developed on the photosensitive layer.

Bishop, Kenneth P. (Rio Rancho, NM); Brueck, Steven R. J. (Albuquerque, NM); Gaspar, Susan M. (Albuquerque, NM); Hickman, Kirt C. (Albuquerque, NM); McNeil, John R. (Albuquerque, NM); Naqvi, S. Sohail H. (Albuquerque, NM); Stallard, Brian R. (Albuquerque, NM); Tipton, Gary D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

ADVANCED GASIFICATION MERCURY/TRACE METAL CONTROL WITH MONOLITH TRAPS  

SciTech Connect

Two Corning monoliths and a non-carbon-based material have been identified as potential additives for mercury capture in syngas at temperatures above 400°F and pressure of 600 psig. A new Corning monolith formulation, GR-F1-2189, described as an active sample appeared to be the best monolith tested to date. The Corning SR Liquid monolith concept continues to be a strong candidate for mercury capture. Both monolith types allowed mercury reduction to below 5-?g/m3 (~5 ppb), a current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal for trace metal control. Preparation methods for formulating the SR Liquid monolith impacted the ability of the monolith to capture mercury. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC)-prepared Noncarbon Sorbents 1 and 2 appeared to offer potential for sustained and significant reduction of mercury concentration in the simulated fuel gas. The Noncarbon Sorbent 1 allowed sustained mercury reduction to below 5-?g/m3 (~5 ppb). The non-carbon-based sorbent appeared to offer the potential for regeneration, that is, desorption of mercury by temperature swing (using nitrogen and steam at temperatures above where adsorption takes place). A Corning cordierite monolith treated with a Group IB metal offered limited potential as a mercury sorbent. However, a Corning carbon-based monolith containing prereduced metallic species similar to those found on the noncarbon sorbents did not exhibit significant or sustained mercury reduction. EERC sorbents prepared with Group IB and IIB selenide appeared to have some promise for mercury capture. Unfortunately, these sorbents also released Se, as was evidenced by the measurement of H2Se in the effluent gas. All sorbents tested with arsine or hydrogen selenide, including Corning monoliths and the Group IB and IIB metal-based materials, showed an ability to capture arsine or hydrogen selenide at 400°F and 600 psig. Based on current testing, the noncarbon metal-based sorbents appear to be the most effective arsine and hydrogen selenide sorbents. The noncarbon sorbent was able to reduce the concentration to 0 ppb from a starting concentration of 120 ppb. This compares to the target value of 5 ppb (~17?g/m3). The EERC-prepared metal-based pellet and coprecipitate sorbents exhibited arsine reductions of 90% or greater, being below 10 ppb. Corning SR Liquid monoliths exhibited brief periods (<1 hour) of attaining 90% arsine reduction but were able to achieve greater than 80% reduction for several hours. With respect to hydrogen selenide, all Group IB and IIB metal-based sorbents tested exhibited 100% reduction from an inlet concentration of approximately 400 ppb. Corning SR Liquid monoliths exhibited an 82% reduction when two monoliths were tested simultaneously in series.

Mark A. Musich; Michael L. Swanson; Grant E. Dunham; Joshua J. Stanislowski

2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

337

Advanced control strategies for heating, ventilation, air-conditioning, and refrigeration systems—An overview: Part I: Hard control  

SciTech Connect

A chronological overview of the advanced control strategies for heating, ventilation, air-conditioning, and refrigeration (HVAC&R) is presented in this article. The overview focuses on hard-computing or control techniques, such as proportional-integral-derivative, optimal, nonlinear, adaptive, and robust; soft-computing or control techniques, such as neural networks, fuzzy logic, genetic algorithms; and on the fusion or hybrid of hard- and soft-control techniques. Thus, it is to be noted that the terminology “hard” and “soft” computing/control has nothing to do with the “hardware” and “software” that is being generally used. Part I of a two-part series focuses on hard-control strategies, and Part II focuses on softand fusion-control in addition to some future directions in HVAC&R research. This overview is not intended to be an exhaustive survey on this topic, and any omission of other works is purely unintentional.

D. Subbaram Naidu; Craig G. Rieger

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

A new bend magnet beam line for scanning transmission x-ray microscopy at the Advanced Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high brightness of the bend magnets at the Advanced Light Source has been exploited to illuminate a Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscope (STXM). This is the first diffraction-limited scanning x-ray microscope to operate with useful count rate on a synchrotron bend magnet source. A simple, dedicated beam line has been built covering the range of photon energy from 250 eV to 600 eV. Ease of use and operational availability are radically improved compared to previous installations using undulator beams. This facility provides radiation for C 1s, N 1s and O 1s near edge x-ray absorption spectro-microscopy with a spectral resolution up to about 1:5000 and with STXM count rates in excess of 1 MHz.

Warwick, Tony; Ade, Harald; Kilcoyne, A.L. David; Kritscher, Michael; Tylisczcak, Tolek; Fakra, Sirine; Hitchcock, Adam P.; Hitchcock, Peter; Padmore, Howard A.

2001-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

339

Advanced turbine systems sensors and controls needs assessment study. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Instrumentation and Controls Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory performed an assessment of the sensors and controls needs for land-based advanced gas turbines being designed as a part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program for both utility and industrial applications. The assessment included visits to five turbine manufacturers. During these visits, in-depth discussions were held with design and manufacturing staff to obtain their views regarding the need for new sensors and controls for their advanced turbine designs. The Unsteady Combustion Facilities at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center was visited to assess the need for new sensors for gas turbine combustion research. Finally, a workshop was conducted at the South Carolina Energy Research and Development Center which provided a forum for industry, laboratory, and university engineers to discuss and prioritize sensor and control needs. The assessment identified more than 50 different measurement, control, and monitoring needs for advanced turbines that cannot currently be met from commercial sources. While all the identified needs are important, some are absolutely critical to the success of the ATS Program.

Anderson, R.L.; Fry, D.N.; McEvers, J.A.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Development of Advanced Manufacturing Methods for Warm White LEDs for General Lighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GE Lighting Solutions will develop precise and efficient manufacturing techniques for the “remote phosphor” platform of warm-white LED products. In volume, this will be demonstrated to drive significant materials, labor and capital productivity to achieve a maximum possible 53% reduction in overall cost. In addition, the typical total color variation for these white LEDs in production will be well within the ANSI bins and as low as a 4-step MacAdam ellipse centered on the black body curve. Achievement of both of these objectives will be demonstrated while meeting a performance target of > 75 lm/W for a warm-white LED and a reliability target of <30% lumen drop / <2-step MacAdam ellipse shift, estimated over 50,000 hrs.

Deshpande, Anirudha; Kolodin, Boris; Jacob, Cherian; Chowdhury, Ashfaqul; Kuenzler, Glenn; Sater, Karen; Aesram, Danny; Glaettli, Steven; Gallagher, Brian; Langer, Paul; Setlur, Anant; Beers, Bill

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

A field demonstration of energy conservation using occupancy sensor lighting control in equipment rooms  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory identified energy savings potential of automatic equipment-room lighting controls, which was demonstrated by the field experiment described in this report. Occupancy sensor applications have gained popularity in recent years due to improved technology that enhances reliability and reduces cost. Automatic lighting control using occupancy sensors has been accepted as an energy-conservation measure because it reduces wasted lighting. This study focused on lighting control for equipment rooms, which have inherent conditions ideal for automatic lighting control, i.e., an area which is seldom occupied, multiple users of the area who would not know if others are in the room when they leave, and high lighting energy intensity in the area. Two rooms were selected for this study: a small equipment room in the basement of the 337 Building, and a large equipment area in the upper level of the 329 Building. The rooms were selected to demonstrate the various degrees of complexity which may be encountered in equipment rooms throughout the Hanford Site. The 337 Building equipment-room test case demonstrated a 97% reduction in lighting energy consumption, with an annual energy savings of $184. Including lamp-replacement savings, a total savings of $306 per year is offset by an initial installation cost of $1,100. The installation demonstrates a positive net present value of $2,858 when the lamp-replacement costs are included in a life-cycle analysis. This also corresponds to a 4.0-year payback period. The 329 Building equipment-room installation resulted in a 92% reduction in lighting energy consumption. This corresponds to annual energy savings of $1,372, and a total annual savings of $2,104 per year including lamp-replacement savings. The life-cycle cost analysis shows a net present value of $15,855, with a 5.8-year payback period.

Dagle, J.E.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

26.3 / Y.-P. Huang 26.3: Multidirectional Asymmetrical Microlens-Array Light Control Films for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, leads to a ~5x gain in brightness over the MgO standard white and 12:1 contrast ratio for color STN advantages of the MAMA light control film. In this paper, we demonstrate the performances of MAMA light is poor. Adding a MAMA light control film not only shifts the peak reflectance of the STN panel from 300

Wu, Shin-Tson

343

Continuous Controls: Lighting Energy Management for Retrofit and New Construction Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rising interest of specifiers and end-users in Lighting Energy Management (LEM) control equipment has led to an increased need for further education in the selection, capabilities and applications of such equipment. This paper addresses these and related points for a particular type of LEM equipment referred to as "continuous controls." More specifically, the need for such equipment and its performance are reviewed. The remainder of the paper discusses the capabilities and applications of continuous control equipment for retrofit and new construction projects. Particular attention is drawn to the need for specifiers and end-users to become more control conscious as continuous controls become more fully integrated into building design.

Schuett, R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

A Meta-Analysis of Energy Savings from Lighting Controls in Commercial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Meta-Analysis of Energy Savings from Lighting Controls in Commercial A Meta-Analysis of Energy Savings from Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Title A Meta-Analysis of Energy Savings from Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2011 Authors Williams, Alison A., Barbara A. Atkinson, Karina Garbesi, Francis M. Rubinstein, and Erik Page Series Title LBNL-5095E Pagination 25 Date Published September Keywords controls, daylighting, occupancy sensors, tuning Abstract Researchers have been quantifying energy savings from lighting controls in commercial buildings for more than 30 years. This study provides a meta-analysis of estimates of energy savings identified in the literature-240 savings estimates from 88 papers and case studies, categorized into daylighting strategies, occupancy strategies, personal tuning, and institutional tuning. Beginning with an overall average of savings estimates by control strategy, this paper adds successive analytical filters to identify potential biases introduced to the estimates by different analytical approaches. Based on the meta-analysis, the best estimates of average energy savings potential are 24% for occupancy, 28% for daylighting, 31% for personal tuning, 36% for institutional tuning, and 38% for multiple approaches. The results suggest that simulations significantly overestimate (by at least 10%) the average savings obtainable from daylighting in actual buildings.

345

Development of Fuzzy Logic and Neural Network Control and Advanced Emissions Modeling for Parallel Hybrid Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the development of new control strategies and models for Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEV) by the Ohio State University. The report indicates results from models created in NREL's ADvanced VehIcle SimulatOR (ADVISOR 3.2), and results of a scalable IC Engine model, called in Willan's Line technique, implemented in ADVISOR 3.2.

Rajagopalan, A.; Washington, G.; Rizzoni, G.; Guezennec, Y.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Baseline Results and Future Plans for the NREL Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the 2002 - 2003 wind season, several new algorithms were tested on the Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. These include an''Optimally Tracking Rotor'' algorithm proposed before, an adaptive power tracking algorithm and several full-state feedback systems. General results from these algorithms are presented here with detailed results presented elsewhere.

Fingersh, L. J.; Johnson, K. E.

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Control System Development for an Advanced-Technology Medium-Duty Hybrid Electric Truck  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

03TB-45 Control System Development for an Advanced-Technology Medium-Duty Hybrid Electric Truck and vehicle test results for a medium-duty hybrid electric truck are reported in this paper. The design the benchmark vehicle. INTRODUCTION Hybrid powertrain is among the most visible transportation technology

Grizzle, Jessy W.

348

Energy Savings and Economics of Advanced Control Strategies for Packaged Heat Pumps  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Program (BTP), evaluated a number of control strategies for packaged cooling equipment that can be implemented in an advanced controller, which can be retrofit into existing packaged heat pump units to improve their operational efficiency. This report documents the results of that analysis.

Wang, Weimin; Huang, Yunzhi; Katipamula, Srinivas

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

349

Evaluation of advanced technologies for residential appliances and residential and commercial lighting  

SciTech Connect

Section 127 of the Energy Policy Act requires that the Department of Energy (DOE) prepare a report to Congress on the potential for the development and commercialization of appliances that substantially exceed the present federal or state efficiency standards. Candidate high-efficiency appliances must meet several criteria including: the potential exists for substantial improvement (beyond the minimum established in law) of the appliance`s energy efficiency; electric, water, or gas utilities are prepared to support and promote the commercialization of such appliances; manufacturers are unlikely to undertake development and commercialization of such appliances on their own, or development and production would be substantially accelerated by support to manufacturers. This report describes options to improve the efficiency of residential appliances, including water heaters, clothes washers and dryers, refrigerator/freezers, dishwashers, space heating and cooling devices, as well as residential and commercial lighting products. Data from this report (particularly Appendix 1)were used to prepare the report to Congress mentioned previously. For the residential sector, national energy savings are calculated using the LBL Residential Energy Model. This model projects the number of households and appliance saturations over time. First, end-use consumption is calculated for a base case where models that only meet the standard replace existing models as these reach the end of their lifetime. Second, models with efficiencies equal to the technology under consideration replace existing models that reach the end of their lifetime. For the commercial sector, the COMMEND model was utilized to project national energy savings from new technologies. In this report, energy savings are shown for the period 1988 to 2015.

Turiel, I.; Atkinson, B.; Boghosian, S.; Chan, P.; Jennings, J.; Lutz, J.; McMahon, J.; Rosenquist, G.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Advanced control methodology for intelligent universal transformers based on fuzzy logic controllers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intelligent Universal Transformer (IUT) is a power electronic base transformer introducing for Advanced Distribution Automation (ADA) in future. ADA is the state of art employing the new architecture based on both the flexible electrical network and ... Keywords: ADA, FLC, IED, IUT, membership function, power electronic

Maryam Sadeghi; Magid Gholami

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Method and system for controlling the position of a beam of light  

SciTech Connect

An method and system for laser beam tracking and pointing is based on a conventional position sensing detector (PSD) or quadrant cell but with the use of amplitude-modulated light. A combination of logarithmic automatic gain control, filtering, and synchronous detection offers high angular precision with exceptional dynamic range and sensitivity, while maintaining wide bandwidth. Use of modulated light enables the tracking of multiple beams simultaneously through the use of different modulation frequencies. It also makes the system resistant to interfering light sources such as ambient light. Beam pointing is accomplished by feeding back errors in the measured beam position to a beam steering element, such as a steering mirror. Closed-loop tracking performance is superior to existing methods, especially under conditions of atmospheric scintillation.

Steinkraus, Jr., Robert F. (San Francisco, CA); Johnson, Gary W. (Livermore, CA); Ruggiero, Anthony J. (Livermore, CA)

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

352

Advanced Control Techniques and High Performance Discharges on DIII-D  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The advancement of plasma control techniques has enabled significant progress to be made toward the scientific understanding and realization of Advanced Tokamak operation on DIII-D. The Advanced Tokamak features fully noninductive current drive, operation at high plasma pressure and high energy confinement time. These features require efficient current drive systems, simultaneous control of plasma current and pressure profiles, and active feedback control of plasma instabilities. A number of key systems on DIII-D have been developed to provide this control capability. A versatile electron cyclotron heating and current drive system is routinely providing in excess of 2 MW of power for pulse lengths from 2 to 5 s. This system has been used to provide offaxis current drive, direct electron heating and pressure profile modification, and stabilization of the Neoclassical Tearing Mode instability. A combination of control of magnetic error fields, neutral beam induced plasma rotation, and active feedback stabilization using both external and internal nonaxisymmetric coil systems has been used to stabilize the Resistive Wall Mode at high values of plasma pressure. Control of the ELM instability has recently been demonstrated using the newly installed internal coil system. The higher speed and expanded realtime diagnostic capability of our recently upgraded plasma control system permits these various control techniques to be simultaneously integrated to achieve our high performance discharges. This has resulted in fully noninductively driven plasmas with {beta}{sub N} = 3.5 and {beta}{sub T} = 3.6% sustained for up to 1 s. Upgrades and facility modifications to further enhance our control and scientific capabilities including rotation of a neutral beamline, expanded EC system power, and installation of a new lower divertor are discussed.

Kellman, A.G. [General Atomics (United States)] (and others)

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Energy Conservation Utilizing Wireless Dimmable Lighting Control in a Shared-Space Office  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

powered, the limited-energy issue typical with other wireless sensor networks powered by batteries is non energy usage of the entire system, and to reinforce the wireless network links and compensate for lostEnergy Conservation Utilizing Wireless Dimmable Lighting Control in a Shared-Space Office Yao

Agogino, Alice M.

354

PICOntrol: using a handheld projector for direct control of physical devices through visible light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today's environments are populated with a growing number of electric devices which come in diverse form factors and provide a plethora of functions. However, rich interaction with these devices can become challenging if they need be controlled from a ... Keywords: handheld projector, physical devices, visible light communication

Dominik Schmidt; David Molyneaux; Xiang Cao

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Functional issues and environmental qualification of digital protection systems of advanced light-water nuclear reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Issues of obsolescence and lack of infrastructural support in (analog) spare parts, coupled with the potential benefits of digital systems, are driving the nuclear industry to retrofit analog instrumentation and control (I&C) systems with digital and microprocessor-based systems. While these technologies have several advantages, their application to safety-related systems in nuclear power plants raises key issues relating to the systems` environmental qualification and functional reliability. To bound the problem of new I&C system functionality and qualification, the authors focused this study on protection systems proposed for use in ALWRs. Specifically, both functional and environmental qualification issues for ALWR protection system I&C were addressed by developing an environmental, functional, and aging data template for a protection division of each proposed ALWR design. By using information provided by manufacturers, environmental conditions and stressors to which I&C equipment in reactor protection divisions may be subjected were identified. The resulting data were then compared to a similar template for an instrument string typically found in an analog protection division of a present-day nuclear power plant. The authors also identified fiber-optic transmission systems as technologies that are relatively new to the nuclear power plant environment and examined the failure modes and age-related degradation mechanisms of fiber-optic components and systems. One reason for the exercise of caution in the introduction of software into safety-critical systems is the potential for common-cause failure due to the software. This study, however, approaches the functionality problem from a systems point of view. System malfunction scenarios are postulated to illustrate the fact that, when dealing with the performance of the overall integrated system, the real issues are functionality and fault tolerance, not hardware vs. software.

Korsah, K.; Clark, R.L.; Wood, R.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Advanced Sensors and Controls for Building Applications: Market Assessment and Potential R&D Pathways  

SciTech Connect

Significant energy savings can be achieved in commercial building operation, along with increased comfort and control for occupants, through the implementation of advanced technologies. This document provides a market assessment of existing building sensors and controls and presents a range of technology pathways (R&D options) for pursuing advanced sensors and building control strategies. This paper is actually a synthesis of five other white papers: the first describes the market assessment including estimates of market potential and energy savings for sensors and control strategies currently on the market as well as a discussion of market barriers to these technologies. The other four cover technology pathways: (1) current applications and strategies for new applications, (2) sensors and controls, (3) networking, security, and protocols and standards, and (4) automated diagnostics, performance monitoring, commissioning, optimal control and tools. Each technology pathway chapter gives an overview of the technology or application. This is followed by a discussion of needs and the current status of the technology. Finally, a series of research topics is proposed.

Brambley, Michael R.; Haves, Philip; McDonald, Sean C.; Torcellini, Paul; Hansen, David G.; Holmberg, David; Roth, Kurt

2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

357

Design of Controls to Attenuate Loads in the Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Designing wind turbines to maximize energy production and increase fatigue life is a major goal of the wind industry. To achieve this goal, we must design wind turbines to extract maximum energy and reduce component and system loads. This paper applies modern state-space control design methods to a two-bladed teetering-hub upwind machine located at the National Wind Technology Center*. The design objective is to regulate turbine speed in region 3 (above rated wind speed) and enhance damping in several low-damped flexible modes of the turbine. The controls approach is based on the Disturbance Accommodating Control (DAC) method and provides accountability for wind-speed disturbances. First, controls are designed using the single control input rotor collective pitch to stabilize the first drive-train torsion as well as the tower first fore-aft bending modes. Generator torque is then incorporated as an additional control input. This reduces some of the demand placed on the rotor collective pitch control system and enhances first drive train torsion mode damping. Individual blade pitch control is then used to attenuate wind disturbances having spatial variation over the rotor and effectively reduces blade flap deflections caused by wind shear.

Wright, A. D.; Balas, M. J.

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

FY2001 Progress Report for Combusion and Emission Control for Advanced CIDI Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COMBUSTION AND COMBUSTION AND EMISSION CONTROL FOR ADVANCED CIDI ENGINES 2 0 0 1 A N N U A L P R O G R E S S R E P O R T U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation Technologies A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T We would like to express our sincere appreciation to Argonne National Laboratory and QSS Group, Inc., for their artistic, editorial and technical contributions in preparing and publishing this report. In addition, we would like to thank all our program participants for their contributions to the programs and all the authors who prepared the project abstracts that comprise this report. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Transportation Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2001 Progress Report for Combustion and Emission Control for Advanced CIDI Engines

359

Guidelines for the Beneficial Use of Advanced SO2 Control By-Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This design guide describes the use of the by-products produced from advanced SO2 control processes as construction materials in high-volume applications such as road base stabilization, structural fills, manufactured aggregates, soil amendments, and concrete applications. The engineering data, major design parameters, standard specifications, and construction procedures in the report should help utility by-product managers and power plant managers incorporate these applications in their by-product manag...

1997-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

360

AISI/DOE Advanced Process Control Program Vol. 6 of 6: Temperature Measurement of Galvanneal Steel  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the successful completion of the development of an accurate in-process measurement instrument for galvanneal steel surface temperatures. This achievement results from a joint research effort that is a part of the American Iron and Steel Institute's (AISI) Advanced Process Control Program, a collaboration between the U.S> Department of Energy and fifteen North American Steelmakers. This three-year project entitled ''Temperature Measurement of Galvanneal Steel'' uses phosphor thermography, and outgrowth of Uranium enrichment research at Oak Ridge facilities. Temperature is the controlling factor regarding the distribution of iron and zinc in the galvanneal strip coating, which in turn determines the desired product properties

S.W. Allison; D.L. Beshears; W.W. Manges

1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Service- and energy-related optimization of advanced automatic train control  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) system, in collaboration with Hughes Aircraft Company and Harmon Industries, is in the process of developing an Advanced Automatic Train Control (AATC) system to replace the current fixed-block automatic system. As in the current ATC system, the trains will be controlled by station computers at the wayside; however, spread-spectrum radios rather than track-circuits will be employed to determine train locations and reliably transfer control information, allowing for finer speed and acceleration control, as well as more precise train locating capabilities and moving-block control. The authors have developed a simulator of the train control and power consumption of the AATC system, and are now employing this tool to develop enhanced train control algorithms to supplement the safety-critical controller. These algorithms do not attempt to globally optimize the control system with respect to a cost function, but rather they modify the baseline vital control to smooth the train trajectories, and to reduce energy consumption and power infrastructure requirements, through coordination of multiple trains. Several control algorithms are under development, including (1) delay recovery, which smoothly and efficiently controls trains approaching and stopped behind a delayed train, (2) interference management, which controls closely-following trains to avoid oscillatory brake/acceleration cycles, and (3) low voltage avoidance, which limits power consumption by multiple trains in an area to prevent low voltage events. The authors discuss progress to date on development of these control algorithms, as well as their service- and energy-related benefits.

Gordon, S.P. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Lehrer, D.G. [Bay Area Rapid Transit District, Oakland, CA (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Advanced Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the charging and discharging dynamics of lithium iron phosphate, a promising positive battery electrode. Summary Slide Handout Read more... ALS in the News Roman Seawater...

363

Lighting the The Advanced  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the particle sampler drew ambient air from ground-based platforms (tower for ACE-1, pier for SIO). Sampling, but they could also have formed upon drying of ocean spray in the atmosphere. According to M. Po´sfai (written

Kemner, Ken

364

DEMONSTRATION OF AN ADVANCED INTEGRATED CONTROL SYSTEM FOR SIMULTANEOUS EMISSIONS REDUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of the project titled ''Demonstration of an Advanced Integrated Control System for Simultaneous Emissions Reduction'' was to demonstrate at proof-of-concept scale the use of an online software package, the ''Plant Environmental and Cost Optimization System'' (PECOS), to optimize the operation of coal-fired power plants by economically controlling all emissions simultaneously. It combines physical models, neural networks, and fuzzy logic control to provide both optimal least-cost boiler setpoints to the boiler operators in the control room, as well as optimal coal blending recommendations designed to reduce fuel costs and fuel-related derates. The goal of the project was to demonstrate that use of PECOS would enable coal-fired power plants to make more economic use of U.S. coals while reducing emissions.

Suzanne Shea; Randhir Sehgal; Ilga Celmins; Andrew Maxson

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - Ultra Low-NOx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ultra Low NOx Integrated System Ultra Low NOx Integrated System TFS 2000(tm) Low NOx Firing System Project Summary: ALSTOM Power Inc.'s Power Plant Laboratories, working in concert with ALSTOM Power's Performance Projects Group, has teamed with the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) to conduct a comprehensive study to develop/evaluate low-cost, efficient NOx control technologies for retrofit to pulverized coal fired utility boilers. The objective of this project was to develop retrofit NOx control technology to achieve less than 0.15 lb/MMBtu NOx (for bituminous coals) and 0.10 lb/MMBtu NOx (for subbituminous coals) from existing pulverized coal fired utility boilers at a cost which is at least 25% less than SCR technology. Efficient control of NOx is seen as an important,

366

An Assessment of PWR Water Chemistry Control in Advanced Light Water Reactors: U.S. EPR™  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) developed the Water Chemistry Guidelines to support improved industry water chemistry operations. This report reviews the AREVA US EPR design to assess the applicability of the EPRI Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Primary and Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines to that design. It is anticipated that the timely identification of any inconsistencies will allow EPRI and its member utilities to resolve them before the first US EPR plant begins operation.

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

AN ADVANCED STRATEGY FOR ENERGY EFFICIENT LIGHTING INCORPORATING DISTRIBUTED SENSING AND TAILORED CONTROLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as energy security and the stability and condition of the distribution infrastructure. The building sector impact on the aging electricity grid system. The daily peak window also coincides with maximum daylight and actuators within their zones and use the provided information to create a zone energy use utility curve

Stanford University

368

An Assessment of PWR Water Chemistry Control in Advanced Light Water Reactors: APR1400  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) developed the Water Chemistry Guidelines to support improved industry water chemistry operations. This report reviews the Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power (KHNP) APR1400 design to assess the applicability of the EPRI Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Primary (Volume 1) and Secondary (Volume 2) Water Chemistry Guidelines to that design. The timely identification of any inconsistencies and technical gaps will allow EPRI and its member utilities to resolve them ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

369

Advanced Light Water Reactor Plants System 80+{trademark} Design Certification Program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80+{trademark} during the US government`s 1993 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MW{sub t} (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design consists of an essentially complete plant. It is based on evolutionary improvements to the Standardized System 80 nuclear steam supply system in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2, and 3, and the Duke Power Company P-81 balance-of-plant (BOP) that was designed and partially constructed at the Cherokee plant site. The System 80/P-81 original design has been substantially enhanced to increase conformance with the EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD). Some design enhancements incorporated in the System 80+ design are included in the four units currently under construction in the Republic of Korea. These units form the basis of the Korean standardization program. The full System 80+ standard design has been offered to the Republic of China, in response to their recent bid specification. The ABB-CE Standard Safety Analysis Report (CESSAR-DC) was submitted to the NRC and a Draft Safety Evaluation Report was issued by the NRC in October 1992. CESSAR-DC contains the technical basis for compliance with the EPRI URD for simplified emergency planning. The Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) is the standard ABB-Combustion Engineering two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard plant includes a sperical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual containment.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

370

Advanced Sensor Approaches for Monitoring and Control of Gas Turbine Combustors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seitzman and T. Lieuwen Seitzman and T. Lieuwen SCIES Project 02- 01- SR102 DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-02NT41431 Tom J. George, Program Manager, DOE/NETL Richard Wenglarz, Manager of Research, SCIES Project Awarded (5/1/2002, 36 Month Duration) $337,501 Total Contract Value ($327,501 DOE) Advanced Sensor Approaches For Monitoring and Control Of Gas Turbine Combustors Georgia Institute of Technology JS/TL 10/19/05 Advanced Sensors 10/19/05 2 Gas Turbine Need * Gas turbines must operate with ultra-low levels of pollutant emissions - Problem: lean, premixed operation causes minimal pollutant generation but introduces combustion problems, such as instabilities and blowoff * Combustor health and performance information needed to optimize engine across competing demands of emissions levels, power output, and

371

Fiber-optic, anti-cycling, high pressure sodium street light control. Final technical progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the Final Technical Progress Report on a project to develop and market a Fiber-Optic Anti-Cycling High Pressure Sodium Street Light Control. The field test units are now being made with a single vertical PC board design and contains a computer-on-a-chip or PROM IC to take the place of the majority of the components previously contained on the upper logic board. This will reduce the final costs of the unit when it is in production and increase the control`s flexibility. The authors have finished the soft tooling and have made the 400 plastic cases for the field test units. The new configuration of the cases entails a simplified design of the control shell which will have the lenses cast in place. The shell and base plastics are now finished and in final assembly awaiting the completion of the PC boards.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

OVERVIEW OF ADVANCED PETROLEUM-BASED FUELS-DIESEL EMISSIONS CONTROL PROGRAM (APBF-DEC)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels-Diesel Emissions Control Program (APBF-DEC) began in February 2000 and is supported by government agencies and industry. The purpose of the APBF-DEC program is to identify and evaluate the optimal combinations of fuels, lubricants, diesel engines, and emission control systems to meet the projected emission standards for the 2000 to 2010 time period. APBF-DEC is an outgrowth of the earlier Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects Program (DECSE), whose objective is to determine the impact of the sulfur levels in fuel on emission control systems that could lower the emissions of NOx and particulate matter (PM) from diesel powered vehicles in the 2002 to 2004 period. Results from the DECSE studies of two emission control technologies-diesel particle filter (DPF) and NOx adsorber-will be used in the APBF-DEC program. These data are expected to provide initial information on emission control technology options and the effects of fuel properties (including additives) on the performance of emission control systems.

Sverdrup, George M.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

373

Evaluations of nutrient diffusing substrates and the primary importance of light in controlling periphyton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eutrophication is an increasingly recognized threat to the health of streams and rivers in the United States. This thesis presents two studies aimed at increasing the utility of periphyton analysis as a tool for water resource managers to address eutrophication. In the first study, artificial channels were used to investigate the response of periphyton to different nutrient delivery mechanisms. In two channels, nutrients were delivered via diffusion to periphyton growth surfaces using modified Matlock Periphytometers. In two additional channels, nutrients were delivered by dosing water in the channel. The data showed that nutrient delivery via diffusion elicits a significantly greater periphyton response. The use of diffusing substrates for periphyton studies remains a viable tool for some objectives, but results should be extrapolated to natural conditions with caution. In the second study, modified Matlock Periphytometers and inexpensive light meters were used to investigate the relationship between periphyton growth and light availability in two fourth-order Texas streams. The data indicate that light availability explains 91.9 percent of the variability of observed periphyton growth under control conditions, and 99.7 percent under nutrient-enriched conditions. The strong correlation suggests that efforts to address eutrophication should recognize the importance of riparian shade. Equations to predict chlorophyll-a as a function of relative light intensity are also presented.

Murawski, Matthew Thomas

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

An advanced plasma control system for the DIII-D tokamak  

SciTech Connect

An advanced plasma control system is being implemented for the DIII-D tokamak utilizing digital technology. This system will regulate the position and shape of tokamak discharges that range from elongated limiter to single-null divertor and double-null divertor with elongation as high as 2.6. Development of this system is expected to lead to control system technology appropriate for use on future tokamaks such as ITER and BPX. The digital system will allow for increased precision in shape control through real time adjustment of the control algorithm to changes in the shape and discharge parameters such as {beta}{sub p}, {ell}{sub i} and scrape-off layer current. The system will be used for research on real time optimization of discharge performance for disruption avoidance, current and pressure profile control, optimization of rf antenna loading, or feedback on heat deposition patterns through divertor strike point position control, for example. Shape control with this system is based on linearization near a target shape of the controlled parameters as a function of the magnetic diagnostic signals. This digital system is unique in that it is designed to have the speed necessary to control the unstable vertical motion of highly elongated tokamak discharges such as those produced in DIII-D and planned for BPX and ITER. a 40 MHz Intel i860 processor is interfaced to up to 112 channels of analog input signals. The commands to the poloidal field coils can be updated at 80 {mu}s intervals for the control of vertical position with a delay between sampling of the analog signal and update of the command of less than 80 {mu}s.

Ferron, J.R.; Kellman, A.; McKee, E.; Osborne, T.; Petrach, P.; Taylor, T.S.; Wight, J. (General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)); Lazarus, E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

EUV reflectance characterization of the 94/304 ? flight secondary AIA mirror at beamline 6.3.2 of the Advanced Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The AIA secondary flight mirror, previously coated at Columbia University with Mg/SiC for the 303.8 {angstrom} channel and Mo/Y for the 93.9 {angstrom} channel was characterized by means of EUV reflectance measurements at beamline 6.3.2 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron at LBNL on January 10, 2006. Paul Boerner (LMSAL) also participated in these measurements.

Soufli, R; Spiller, E; Aquila, A L; Gullikson, E M; Windt, D L

2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

376

The progress and challenges of threshold voltage control of high-k/metal-gated devices for advanced technologies (Invited Paper)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses recent progress in and challenges of threshold voltage control for advanced high-k/metal-gated (HKMG) devices. It presents the impact on threshold voltage (V"t) control of incorporating La and Al into HKMG devices. A dipole moment ... Keywords: CMOS, Capping layer, EOT, High-k, Metal gate, Threshold voltage control

Hsing-Huang Tseng; Paul Kirsch; C. S. Park; Gennadi Bersuker; Prashant Majhi; Muhammad Hussain; Raj Jammy

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Periodic optimal control for biomass productivity maximization in a photobioreactor using natural light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We address the question of optimization of the microalgal biomass long term productivity in the framework of production in photobioreactors under the influence of day/night cycles. For that, we propose a simple bioreactor model accounting for light attenuation in the reactor due to biomass density and obtain the control law that optimizes productivity over a single day through the application of Pontryagin's maximum principle, with the dilution rate being the main control. An important constraint on the obtained solution is that the biomass in the reactor should be at the same level at the beginning and at the end of the day so that the same control can be applied everyday and optimizes some form of long term productivity. Several scenarios are possible depending on the microalgae's strain parameters and the maximal admissible value of the dilution rate: bang-bang or bang-singular-bang control or, if the growth rate of the algae is very strong in the presence of light, constant maximal dilution. A bifurcation...

Grognard, Frédéric; Bernard, Olivier

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Rooftop Unit Suite: RTU Challenge, RTU Advanced Controls and RTU Smart Monitoring and Diagnostic System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Suite of Projects Suite of Projects RTU Suite: RTU Challenge, RTU Advanced Controls and RTU Smart Monitoring and Diagnostic System Michael Brambley, Ph.D. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Michael.Brambley@pnnl.gov (509) 375-6875 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Packaged air conditioners and heat pumps (RTUs) are used in about 58% of all cooled commercial buildings, serving about 69% of the cooled commercial building floor space (EIA 2003) - Navigant estimates that packaged air conditioners

379

Rooftop Unit Suite: RTU Challenge, RTU Advanced Controls and RTU Smart Monitoring and Diagnostic System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Suite of Projects Suite of Projects RTU Suite: RTU Challenge, RTU Advanced Controls and RTU Smart Monitoring and Diagnostic System Michael Brambley, Ph.D. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Michael.Brambley@pnnl.gov (509) 375-6875 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Packaged air conditioners and heat pumps (RTUs) are used in about 58% of all cooled commercial buildings, serving about 69% of the cooled commercial building floor space (EIA 2003) - Navigant estimates that packaged air conditioners

380

U.S. Department of Energy Instrumentation and Controls Technology Research for Advanced Small Modular Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Instrumentation, controls, and human-machine interfaces (ICHMI) are essential enabling technologies that strongly influence nuclear power plant performance and operational costs. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized that ICHMI research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) is needed to resolve the technical challenges that may compromise the effective and efficient utilization of modern ICHMI technology and consequently inhibit realization of the benefits offered by expanded utilization of nuclear power. Consequently, key DOE programs have substantial ICHMI RD&D elements to their respective research portfolio. This article describes current ICHMI research to support the development of advanced small modular reactors.

Wood, Richard Thomas [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Advanced in-duct sorbent injection for SO{sub 2} control. Final technical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research project was to develop a second generation duct sorbent injection technology as a cost-effective compliance option for the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Research and development work was focused on the Advanced Coolside process, which showed the potential for exceeding the original performance targets of 90% SO{sub 2} removal and 60% sorbent utilization. Process development was conducted in a 1000 acfm pilot plant. The pilot plant testing showed that the Advanced Coolside process can achieve 90% SO{sub 2} removal at sorbent utilizations up to 75%. The testing also showed that the process has the potential to achieve very high removal efficiency (90 to >99%). By conducting conceptual process design and economic evaluations periodically during the project, development work was focused on process design improvements which substantially lowered process capital and operating costs, A final process economic study projects capital costs less than one half of those for limestone forced oxidation wet FGD. Projected total SO{sub 2} control cost is about 25% lower than wet FGD for a 260 MWe plant burning a 2.5% sulfur coal. A waste management study showed the acceptability of landfill disposal; it also identified a potential avenue for by-product utilization which should be further investigated. Based on the pilot plant performance and on the above economic projections, future work to scale up the Advanced Coolside process is recommended.

Stouffer, M.R.; Withium, J.A.; Rosenhoover, W.A.; Maskew, J.T.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Proceedings of the 2002 Advanced Vehicle Control Conference, Hiroshima, Japan, September 2002 Control of a Hybrid Electric Truck Based on Driving  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and found to work satisfactorily. Keywords / Hybrid Electric Vehicles, Powertrain Control, Heavy DutyProceedings of the 2002 Advanced Vehicle Control Conference, Hiroshima, Japan, September 2002 Control of a Hybrid Electric Truck Based on Driving Pattern Recognition Chan-Chiao Lin, Huei Peng Soonil

Peng, Huei

383

Stabilization of High Efficiency CdTe Photovoltaic Modules in Controlled Indoor Light Soaking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance and stabilization of large-area, high-efficiency 9%, CdTe photovoltaic (PV) modules maintained under controlled light-soaking nominally at 800 Watts/m2 irradiance and 65C module temperature are investigated. Degradation of module performance occurs predominantly in the first few hundred hours of exposure under these conditions; these symptoms included losses in fill factor (FF), open-circuit voltage (Voc), and short-circuit current (Isc), which amount to between 7% and 15% total loss in performance. Higher stabilized performance was achieved with lower copper content in the back contact. Transient effects in module Voc and Isc were observed, suggesting partial annealing thereof when stored under low-light levels. Performance changes are analyzed, aided by monitoring the current-voltage characteristics in situ during exposure.

del Cueto, J. A.; Pruett, J.; Cunningham, D.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Study of Pu consumption in advanced light water reactors: Evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants - compilation of Phase 1B task reports  

SciTech Connect

This report contains an extensive evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants prepared for United State Department of Energy. The general areas covered in this report are: core and system performance; fuel cycle; infrastructure and deployment; and safety and environmental approval.

NONE

1993-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

385

Advanced Combustion, Emission Control, Health Impacts, and Fuels Merit Review and Peer Evaluation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

06 06 a n n u a l p r o g r e s s r e p o r t L e s s d e p e n d e n c e o n f o r e i g n o i l t o d a y, a n d t r a n s i t i o n t o a p e t r o l e u m - f r e e , e m i s s i o n s - f r e e v e h i c l e t o m o r r o w . F r e e d o m C A r A n d V e h i C l e T e C h n o l o g i e s P r o g r A m AdvAnced combustion, emission controls, HeAltH impActs, And Fuels merit review And peer evAluAtion Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 October 2006 Dear Colleague: This document summarizes the comments provided by the Review Panel for the FY 2006 Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Combustion, Emission Controls, Health Impacts, and Fuels Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, the "ACE Review," held on May 15-18, 2006 at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The raw evaluations and comments of the panel were provided (with reviewers' names deleted) to the presenters in early June and were used by national laboratory

386

Final LDRD report human interaction with complex systems: advances in hybrid reachability and control.  

SciTech Connect

This document describes new advances in hybrid reachability techniques accomplished during the course of a one-year Truman Postdoctoral Fellowship. These techniques provide guarantees of safety in complex systems, which is especially important in high-risk, expensive, or safety-critical systems. My work focused on new approaches to two specific problems motivated by real-world issues in complex systems: (1) multi-objective controller synthesis, and (2) control for recovery from error. Regarding the first problem, a novel application of reachability analysis allowed controller synthesis in a single step to achieve (a) safety, (b) stability, and (c) prevent input saturation. By extending the state to include the input parameters, constraints for stability, saturation, and envelope protection are incorporated into a single reachability analysis. Regarding the second problem, a new approach to the problem of recovery provides (a) states from which recovery is possible, and (b) controllers to guide the system during a recovery maneuver from an error state to a safe state in minimal time. Results are computed in both problems on nonlinear models of single longitudinal aircraft dynamics and two-aircraft lateral collision avoidance dynamics.

Oishi, Meeko M.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Geometry and Structural Properties for the Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART) from Model Tuning: August 25, 2003--November 30, 2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART) is a modified Westinghouse WWG-0600 machine rated at 600 kW. It is located at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) in Boulder, Colorado, and has been installed to test new control schemes for power and load regulation. In its original configuration, the WWG-0600 uses a synchronous generator, fluid coupling, and hydraulic collective pitch actuation. However, the CART is fitted with an induction generator, rigid coupling, and individual electromechanical pitch actuators. The rotor runs upwind of the tower and consists of two blades and a teetering hub. In order to design advanced control schemes for the CART, representative computational models are essential.

Stol, K. A.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Advanced Instrumentation and Control Methods for Small and Medium Reactors with IRIS Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

Development and deployment of small-scale nuclear power reactors and their maintenance, monitoring, and control are part of the mission under the Small Modular Reactor (SMR) program. The objectives of this NERI-consortium research project are to investigate, develop, and validate advanced methods for sensing, controlling, monitoring, diagnosis, and prognosis of these reactors, and to demonstrate the methods with application to one of the proposed integral pressurized water reactors (IPWR). For this project, the IPWR design by Westinghouse, the International Reactor Secure and Innovative (IRIS), has been used to demonstrate the techniques developed under this project. The research focuses on three topical areas with the following objectives. Objective 1 - Develop and apply simulation capabilities and sensitivity/uncertainty analysis methods to address sensor deployment analysis and small grid stability issues. Objective 2 - Develop and test an autonomous and fault-tolerant control architecture and apply to the IRIS system and an experimental flow control loop, with extensions to multiple reactor modules, nuclear desalination, and optimal sensor placement strategy. Objective 3 - Develop and test an integrated monitoring, diagnosis, and prognosis system for SMRs using the IRIS as a test platform, and integrate process and equipment monitoring (PEM) and process and equipment prognostics (PEP) toolboxes. The research tasks are focused on meeting the unique needs of reactors that may be deployed to remote locations or to developing countries with limited support infrastructure. These applications will require smaller, robust reactor designs with advanced technologies for sensors, instrumentation, and control. An excellent overview of SMRs is described in an article by Ingersoll (2009). The article refers to these as deliberately small reactors. Most of these have modular characteristics, with multiple units deployed at the same plant site. Additionally, the topics focus on meeting two of the eight needs outlined in the recently published 'Technology Roadmap on Instrumentation, Control, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) to Support DOE Advanced Nuclear Energy Programs' which was created 'to provide a systematic path forward for the integration of new ICHMI technologies in both near-term and future nuclear power plants and the reinvigoration of the U.S. nuclear ICHMI community and capabilities.' The research consortium is led by The University of Tennessee (UT) and is focused on three interrelated topics: Topic 1 (simulator development and measurement sensitivity analysis) is led by Dr. Mike Doster with Dr. Paul Turinsky of North Carolina State University (NCSU). Topic 2 (multivariate autonomous control of modular reactors) is led by Dr. Belle Upadhyaya of the University of Tennessee (UT) and Dr. Robert Edwards of Penn State University (PSU). Topic 3 (monitoring, diagnostics, and prognostics system development) is led by Dr. Wes Hines of UT. Additionally, South Carolina State University (SCSU, Dr. Ken Lewis) participated in this research through summer interns, visiting faculty, and on-campus research projects identified throughout the grant period. Lastly, Westinghouse Science and Technology Center (Dr. Mario Carelli) was a no-cost collaborator and provided design information related to the IRIS demonstration platform and defining needs that may be common to other SMR designs. The results of this research are reported in a six-volume Final Report (including the Executive Summary, Volume 1). Volumes 2 through 6 of the report describe in detail the research and development under the topical areas. This volume serves to introduce the overall NERI-C project and to summarize the key results. Section 2 provides a summary of the significant contributions of this project. A list of all the publications under this project is also given in Section 2. Section 3 provides a brief summary of each of the five volumes (2-6) of the report. The contributions of SCSU are described in Section 4, including a summary of undergraduate research exper

J. Wesley Hines; Belle R. Upadhyaya; J. Michael Doster; Robert M. Edwards; Kenneth D. Lewis; Paul Turinsky; Jamie Coble

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

Evaluating the impact of advanced vehicle and fuel technologies in U.S. light duty vehicle fleet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The unrelenting increase in oil use by the U.S. light-duty vehicle (LDV) fleet presents an extremely challenging energy and environmental problem. A variety of propulsion technologies and fuels have the promise to reduce ...

Bandivadekar, Anup P

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Quantifying National Energy Savings Potential of Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

type, such as wasted light hours and energy costs. However,percent of wasted light hours. Figure 3. Energy Savings for

Williams, Alison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion on a Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Diesel Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactivity controlled compression ignition is a low-temperature combustion technique that has been shown, both in computational fluid dynamics modeling and single-cylinder experiments, to obtain diesel-like efficiency or better with ultra-low nitrogen oxide and soot emissions, while operating primarily on gasoline-like fuels. This paper investigates reactivity controlled compression ignition operation on a four-cylinder light-duty diesel engine with production-viable hardware using conventional gasoline and diesel fuel. Experimental results are presented over a wide speed and load range using a systematic approach for achieving successful steady-state reactivity controlled compression ignition combustion. The results demonstrated diesel-like efficiency or better over the operating range explored with low engine-out nitrogen oxide and soot emissions. A peak brake thermal efficiency of 39.0% was demonstrated for 2600 r/min and 6.9 bar brake mean effective pressure with nitrogen oxide emissions reduced by an order of magnitude compared to conventional diesel combustion operation. Reactivity controlled compression ignition emissions and efficiency results are compared to conventional diesel combustion operation on the same engine.

Curran, Scott [ORNL; Hanson, Reed M [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

DOE Advanced Controls R&D Planning Workshop, June 11, 2003, Washington DC: Workshop Results  

SciTech Connect

On June 11, 2003, representatives from universities, federal and state government agencies, Department of Energy national laboratories, and the private sector attended a one-day workshop in Washington, DC. The objective of the workshop was to review and provide input into DOE's assessment of the market for advanced sensors and controls technology and potential R&D pathways to enhance their success in the buildings market place. The workshop consisted of two sessions. During the morning session, participants were given an overview on the following topics: market assessment, current applications and strategies for new applications, sensors and controls, networking, security, and protocols and standards, and automated diagnostics, performance measurement, commissioning and optimal control and tools. In the sessions, workshop participants were asked to review the potential R&D pathways, identify high priority activities, and outline a five year path for each of these activities. Priorities were as follows: largest and quickest impact; best use of finite resources; greatest likelihood for market penetration; and ability to replicate results. The participants identified several promising R&D opportunities.

Brambley, Michael R.; Haves, Philip; McDonald, Sean C.; Torcellini, Paul; Hansen, David G.; Holmberg, David; Roth, Kurt

2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

393

Cyclone Boiler Reburn NOx Control Improvements via Cyclone Design Improvements and Advanced Air Staging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eastman Kodak owns three Babcock & Wilcox coal fired cyclone boilers and one Combustion Engineering pulverized coal boiler located at Kodak Park in Rochester, New York. Duke Energy Generation Services (DEGS) operates and maintains the steam and electric generation equipment for Kodak and has primary responsibility for related capital project development and execution. The Kodak plant is capable of generating approximately 1,900,000 pounds of steam and 130 MW’s of electrical power. To achieve the required level of NOx control, Kodak chose The Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) Company's, Natural Gas Reburn technology for the three cyclone boilers. The relatively low capital cost of the system and reasonable cost of natural gas in the mid 1990’s made Natural Gas Reburn an economic fit for the RACT requirements of 0.60#’s/Mmbtu NOx. The run up in natural gas prices since 2002 has increased the cost of NOx removed from ~ $2000/ton to ~$5000/ton based on fuel expense alone. In an effort to curtail the cost of control, Duke Energy Generations Services and Kodak implemented a series of projects that integrated Cyclone Design Improvements and Advancements in Air Staging along with ESP inlet flue modifications that resulted in decreasing the Natural Gas required for NOx control ~ 40% from baseline levels saving the plant several million dollars per year in fuel expense. Significant improvements in opacity and filterable PM were also realized by these changes.

Morabito, B.; Nee, B.; Goff, V.; Maringo, G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Advanced Combustion Diagnostics and Control for Furnaces, Fired Heaters and Boilers  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to develop and apply enabling tools and methods towards advanced combustion diagnostics and control of fired-equipment in large-scale petrochemical manufacturing. There are a number of technology gaps and opportunities for combustion optimization, including technologies involving advanced in-situ measurements, modeling, and thermal imaging. These technologies intersect most of manufacturing and energy systems within the chemical industry. This project leveraged the success of a previous DOE funded project led by Dow, where we co-developed an in-situ tunable diode laser (TDL) analyzer platform (with Analytical Specialties Inc, now owned by Yokogawa Electric Corp.). The TDL platform has been tested and proven in a number of combustion processes within Dow and outside of Dow. The primary focus of this project was on combustion diagnostics and control applied towards furnaces, fired heaters and boilers. Special emphasis was placed on the development and application of in-situ measurements for O2, CO and methane since these combustion gases are key variables in optimizing and controlling combustion processes safely. Current best practice in the industry relies on measurements that suffer from serious performance gaps such as limited sampling volume (point measurements), poor precision and accuracy, and poor reliability. Phase I of the project addressed these gaps by adding improved measurement capabilities such as CO and methane (ppm analysis at combustion zone temperatures) as well as improved optics to maintain alignment over path lengths up to 30 meters. Proof-of-concept was demonstrated on a modern olefins furnace located at Dow Chemical's facility in Freeport TX where the improved measurements were compared side-by-side to accepted best practice techniques (zirconium oxide and catalytic bead or thick film sensors). After developing and installing the improved combustion measurements (O2, CO, and methane), we also demonstrated the ability to improve control of an olefins furnace (via CO-trim) that resulted in significant energy savings and lower emissions such as NOx and other greenhouse gases. The cost to retrofit measurements on an existing olefins furnace was found to be very attractive, with an estimated payback achieved in 4 months or less.

Tate, J. D.; Le, Linh D.; Knittel,Trevor; Cowie, Alan

2010-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

395

Advanced Combustion Diagnostics and Control for Furnaces, Fired Heaters and Boilers  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to develop and apply enabling tools and methods towards advanced combustion diagnostics and control of fired-equipment in large-scale petrochemical manufacturing. There are a number of technology gaps and opportunities for combustion optimization, including technologies involving advanced in-situ measurements, modeling, and thermal imaging. These technologies intersect most of manufacturing and energy systems within the chemical industry. This project leveraged the success of a previous DOE funded project led by Dow, where we co-developed an in-situ tunable diode laser (TDL) analyzer platform (with Analytical Specialties Inc, now owned by Yokogawa Electric Corp.). The TDL platform has been tested and proven in a number of combustion processes within Dow and outside of Dow. The primary focus of this project was on combustion diagnostics and control applied towards furnaces, fired heaters and boilers. Special emphasis was placed on the development and application of in-situ measurements for O2, CO and methane since these combustion gases are key variables in optimizing and controlling combustion processes safely. Current best practice in the industry relies on measurements that suffer from serious performance gaps such as limited sampling volume (point measurements), poor precision and accuracy, and poor reliability. Phase I of the project addressed these gaps by adding improved measurement capabilities such as CO and methane (ppm analysis at combustion zone temperatures) as well as improved optics to maintain alignment over path lengths up to 30 meters. Proof-of-concept was demonstrated on a modern olefins furnace located at Dow Chemical's facility in Freeport TX where the improved measurements were compared side-by-side to accepted best practice techniques (zirconium oxide and catalytic bead or thick film sensors). After developing and installing the improved combustion measurements (O2, CO, and methane), we also demonstrated the ability to improve control of an olefins furnace (via CO-trim) that resulted in significant energy savings and lower emissions such as NOx and other greenhouse gases. The cost to retrofit measurements on an existing olefins furnace was found to be very attractive, with an estimated payback achieved in 4 months or less.

Tate, J. D.; Le, Linh D.; Knittel,Trevor; Cowie, Alan

2010-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

396

ADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The components of a modern Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) nuclear power plant are modeled in this thesis) is a single-cycle, forced circulation, light-water nuclear reactor designed by the General Electric Company better control of the nuclear reaction in the fuel core. 2.1 Modifications to the BWR [1] · The reactor

Mitchell, John E.

397

Advanced Communication and Control of Distributed Energy Resources at Detroit Edison  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project objective was to create the communication and control system, the process and the economic procedures that will allow owners (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial, manufacturing, etc.) of Distributed Energy Resources (DER) connected in parallel to the electric distribution to have their resources operated in a manner that protects the electric utility distribution network and personnel that may be working on the network. The Distribution Engineering Workstation (DEW) (a power flow and short circuit modeling tool) was modified to calculate the real-time characteristics of the distribution network based on the real-time electric distribution network information and provide DER operating suggestions to the Detroit Edison system operators so that regional electric stability is maintained. Part of the suggestion algorithm takes into account the operational availability of DER’s, which is known by the Energy Aggregator, DTE Energy Technologies. The availability information will be exchanged from DTE Energy Technologies to Detroit Edison. For the calculated suggestions to be used by the Detroit Edison operators, procedures were developed to allow an operator to operate a DER by requesting operation of the DER through DTE Energy Technologies. Prior to issuing control of a DER, the safety of the distribution network and personnel needs to be taken into account. This information will be exchanged from Detroit Edison to DTE Energy Technologies. Once it is safe to control the DER, DTE Energy Technologies will issue the control signal. The real-time monitoring of the DECo system will reflect the DER control. Multi-vendor DER technologies’ representing approximately 4 MW of capacity was monitored and controlled using a web-based communication path. The DER technologies included are a photovoltaic system, energy storage, fuel cells and natural gas/diesel internal combustion engine generators. This report documents Phase I result for the Detroit Edison (Utility) led team, which also includes: DTE Energy Technology (DER provider & Aggregator), Electrical Distribution Design (Virginia Tech company supporting DEW); Systems Integration Specialists Company (real-time protocol integrator); and OSIsoft (software system for managing real-time information). This work was performed in anticipation of being selected for Phase II of the Advanced Communication and Control of Distributed Energy Resources project.

Haukur Asgeirsson; Richard Seguin

2004-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

398

Integration of Advanced Emissions Controls to Produce Next-Generation Circulating Fluid Bed Coal Generating Unit (withdrawn prior to award)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

contacts contacts Brad tomer Director Office of Major Demonstrations National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4692 brad.tomer@netl.doe.gov PaRtIcIPant Colorado Springs Utilities Colorado Springs, CO aDDItIonaL tEaM MEMBERs Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. Clinton, NJ IntegratIon of advanced emIssIons controls to Produce next-generatIon cIrculatIng fluId Bed coal generatIng unIt (wIthdrawn PrIor to award) Project Description Colorado Springs Utilities (Springs Utilities) and Foster Wheeler are planning a joint demonstration of an advanced coal-fired electric power plant using advanced, low-cost emission control systems to produce exceedingly low emissions. Multi- layered emission controls will be

399

The Advantages of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4E 4E The Advantages of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings F. Rubinstein & D. Bolotov Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory M. Levi & K. Powell U.S. General Services Administration P. Schwartz Peter Schwartz, & Associates, LLC August 2008 Presented at the 2008 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Pacific Grove, CA, August 17-22, 2008, and published in the Proceedings DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes

400

Advanced international training course on state systems of accounting for and control of nuclear materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report incorporates all lectures and presentations at the Advanced International Training Course on State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material held April 27 through May 12, 1981 at Santa Fe and Los Alamos, New Mexico, and Richland, Washington, USA. Authorized by the US Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, the course was developed to provide practical training in the design, implementation, and operation of a state system of nuclear materials accountability and control that satisfies both national and international safeguards. Major emphasis for the 1981 course was placed on safeguards methods used at bulk-handling facilities, particularly low-enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication plants. The course was conducted by the University of California's Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and Exxon Nuclear Company, Inc. Tours and demonstrations were arranged at both the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, and the Exxon Nuclear fuel fabrication plant, Richland, Washington.

Not Available

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Advanced Communication and Control for Distributed Energy Resource Integration: Phase 2 Scientific Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to demonstrate sensing, communication, information and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of multivendor distributed energy resource (DER) units at aggregation levels that meet individual user requirements for facility operations (residential, commercial, industrial, manufacturing, etc.) and further serve as resource options for electric and natural gas utilities. The fully demonstrated DER aggregation system with embodiment of communication and control technologies will lead to real-time, interactive, customer-managed service networks to achieve greater customer value. Work on this Advanced Communication and Control Project (ACCP) consists of a two-phase approach for an integrated demonstration of communication and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of DER units to reach progressive levels of aggregated power output. Phase I involved design and proof-of-design, and Phase II involves real-world demonstration of the Phase I design architecture. The scope of work for Phase II of this ACCP involves demonstrating the Phase I design architecture in large scale real-world settings while integrating with the operations of one or more electricity supplier feeder lines. The communication and control architectures for integrated demonstration shall encompass combinations of software and hardware components, including: sensors, data acquisition and communication systems, remote monitoring systems, metering (interval revenue, real-time), local and wide area networks, Web-based systems, smart controls, energy management/information systems with control and automation of building energy loads, and demand-response management with integration of real-time market pricing. For Phase II, BPL Global shall demonstrate the Phase I design for integrating and controlling the operation of more than 10 DER units, dispersed at various locations in one or more Independent System Operator (ISO) Control Areas, at an aggregated scale of more than 1 MW, to provide grid support. Actual performance data with respect to each specified function above is to be collected during the Phase II field demonstration. At a minimum, the Phase II demonstration shall span one year of field operations. The demonstration performance will need to be validated by the target customer(s) for acceptance and subsequent implementation. An ISO must be involved in demonstration planning and execution. As part of the Phase II work, BPL Global shall develop a roadmap to commercialization that identifies and quantifies the potential markets for the integrated, aggregated DER systems and for the communication and control technologies demonstrated in Phase I. In addition, the roadmap must identify strategies and actions, as well as the regional and national markets where the aggregated DER systems with communication and control solutions will be introduced, along with a timeline projected for introduction into each identified market. In Phase I of this project, we developed a proof-of-concept ACCP system and architecture and began to test its functionality at real-world sites. These sites had just over 10 MW of DERs and allowed us to identify what needed to be done to commercialize this concept. As a result, we started Phase II by looking at our existing platform and identified its strengths and weaknesses as well as how it would need to evolve for commercialization. During this process, we worked with different stakeholders in the market including: Independent System Operators, DER owners and operators, and electric utility companies to fully understand the issues from all of the different perspectives. Once we had an understanding of the commercialized ACCP system, we began to document and prepare detailed designs of the different system components. The components of the system with the most significant design improvements were: the on-site remote terminal unit, the communication technology between the remote site and the data center, and the scalability and reliability of the data center application.

BPL Global

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

402

Energy and lighting design  

SciTech Connect

A detailed examination of the current energy conservation practices for lighting systems is presented. This first part of a two-part presentation covers the following: energy and lighting design; lighting and energy standards; lighting efficiency factors; light control and photometrics; lighting and the architectural interior; luminaire impact on the environment; basic design techniques; the lighting power budget; and conservation through control.

Helms, R.N.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Edmund G. Brown Jr. LIGHTING CALIFORNIA'S FUTURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Keywords: Solidstate lighting, LED, light emitting diode, indirect downlight, energy efficiency #12;viii, advanced light emitting diode downlighting system. Performance objectives included compliance with ENERGY an advanced light emitting diode downlight system, retooling the traditional downlight and optimizing

404

Advanced Outage and Control Center: Strategies for Nuclear Plant Outage Work Status Capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research effort is a part of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program. LWRS is a research and development program sponsored by the Department of Energy, performed in close collaboration with industry to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS Program serves to help the US nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. The Outage Control Center (OCC) Pilot Project was directed at carrying out the applied research for development and pilot of technology designed to enhance safe outage and maintenance operations, improve human performance and reliability, increase overall operational efficiency, and improve plant status control. Plant outage management is a high priority concern for the nuclear industry from cost and safety perspectives. Unfortunately, many of the underlying technologies supporting outage control are the same as those used in the 1980’s. They depend heavily upon large teams of staff, multiple work and coordination locations, and manual administrative actions that require large amounts of paper. Previous work in human reliability analysis suggests that many repetitive tasks, including paper work tasks, may have a failure rate of 1.0E-3 or higher (Gertman, 1996). With between 10,000 and 45,000 subtasks being performed during an outage (Gomes, 1996), the opportunity for human error of some consequence is a realistic concern. Although a number of factors exist that can make these errors recoverable, reducing and effectively coordinating the sheer number of tasks to be performed, particularly those that are error prone, has the potential to enhance outage efficiency and safety. Additionally, outage management requires precise coordination of work groups that do not always share similar objectives. Outage managers are concerned with schedule and cost, union workers are concerned with performing work that is commensurate with their trade, and support functions (safety, quality assurance, and radiological controls, etc.) are concerned with performing the work within the plants controls and procedures. Approaches to outage management should be designed to increase the active participation of work groups and managers in making decisions that closed the gap between competing objectives and the potential for error and process inefficiency.

Gregory Weatherby

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Program on Technology Innovation: Weld Metals and Welding Processes for Fabrication of Advanced Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Light water reactors have traditionally been constructed using roll-formed plates for the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) shells, which were assembled via horizontal and vertical seam welds. Weld filler metals often contained significant quantities of copper, other residual elements such as vanadium, and nonmetallic elements such as phosphorous and sulfur. Low-alloy steel weld filler metals of this chemical composition contributed to the degree of neutron radiation-induced embrittlement of vessel ...

2013-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

406

Energy Savings and Economics of Advanced Control Strategies for Packaged Air-Conditioning Units with Gas Heat  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Building Technologies Program (BTP) evaluated a number of control strategies that can be implemented in a controller, to improve the operational efficiency of the packaged air conditioning units. The two primary objectives of this research project are: (1) determine the magnitude of energy savings achievable by retrofitting existing packaged air conditioning units with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for packaged units and (2) estimating what the installed cost of a replacement control with the desired features should be in various regions of the U.S. This document reports results of the study.

Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Huang, Yunzhi; Brambley, Michael R.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

407

Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels--Diesel Emissions Control Project (APBF-DEC): Lubricants Project, Phase 1 Summary, July 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advanced Petroleum Based Fuels-Diesel Emission Control project is a government/industry collaborative project to identify the optimal combinations of low-sulfur diesel fuels, lubricants, diesel engines, and emission control systems to meet projected emission standards for the 2004-2010 time period. This summary describes the results of the first phase of the lubricants study investigating the impact on lubricant formulation on engine-out emissions.

Not Available

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

DOE Project: Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies "University Research in Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control" Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the present technology development was to increase the efficiency of internal combustion engines while minimizing the energy penalty of meeting emissions regulations. This objective was achieved through experimentation and the development of advanced combustion regimes and emission control strategies, coupled with advanced petroleum and non-petroleum fuel formulations. To meet the goals of the project, it was necessary to improve the efficiency of expansion work extraction, and this required optimized combustion phasing and minimized in-cylinder heat transfer losses. To minimize fuel used for diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration, soot emissions were also minimized. Because of the complex nature of optimizing production engines for real-world variations in fuels, temperatures and pressures, the project applied high-fidelity computing and high-resolution engine experiments synergistically to create and apply advanced tools (i.e., fast, accurate predictive models) developed for low-emission, fuel-efficient engine designs. The companion experiments were conducted using representative single- and multi-cylinder automotive and truck diesel engines.

Reitz, Rolf; Foster, D.; Ghandhi, J.; Rothamer, D.; Rutland, C.; Sanders, S.; Trujillo, M.

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

409

Arnold Schwarzenegger LIGHTING RESEARCH PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Summaries ELEMENT 2: ADVANCE LIGHTING TECHNOLOGIES PROJECT 2.1 LIGHT EMITTING DIODE (LED light emitting diodes (LED) technology for general lighting applications by developing a task lamp

410

2011 Quantum Control of Light & Matter Gordon Research Conference (July 31-August 5, 2011, Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, MA)  

SciTech Connect

Quantum control of light and matter is the quest to steer a physical process to a desirable outcome, employing constructive and destructive interference. Three basic questions address feasibility of quantum control: (1) The problem of controllability, does a control field exist for a preset initial and target state; (2) Synthesis, constructively finding the field that leads to the target; and (3) Optimal Control Theory - optimizing the field that carries out this task. These continue to be the fundamental theoretical questions to be addressed in the conference. How to realize control fields in the laboratory is an ongoing challenge. This task is very diverse viewing the emergence of control scenarios ranging from attoseconds to microseconds. How do the experimental observations reflect on the theoretical framework? The typical arena of quantum control is an open environment where much of the control is indirect. How are control scenarios realized in dissipative open systems? Can new control opportunities emerge? Can one null decoherence effects? An ideal setting for control is ultracold matter. The initial and final state can be defined more precisely. Coherent control unifies many fields of physical science. A lesson learned in one field can reflect on another. Currently quantum information processing has emerged as a primary target of control where the key issue is controlling quantum gate operation. Modern nonlinear spectroscopy has emerged as another primary field. The challenge is to unravel the dynamics of molecular systems undergoing strong interactions with the environment. Quantum optics where non-classical fields are to be generated and employed. Finally, coherent control is the basis for quantum engineering. These issues will be under the limelight of the Gordon conference on Quantum Control of Light and Matter.

Thomas Weinacht

2011-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

411

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study  

SciTech Connect

Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced “RISMC toolkit” that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. This report describes the RISMC methodology demonstration where the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was used as a test-bed for purposes of determining safety margins. As part of the demonstration, we describe how both the thermal-hydraulics and probabilistic safety calculations are integrated and used to quantify margin management strategies.

Curtis Smith; David Schwieder; Cherie Phelan; Anh Bui; Paul Bayless

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Advanced In-Furnace NOx Control for Wall and Cyclone-Fired Boilers  

SciTech Connect

A NO{sub x} minimization strategy for coal-burning wall-fired and cyclone boilers was developed that included deep air staging, innovative oxygen use, reburning, and advanced combustion control enhancements. Computational fluid dynamics modeling was applied to refine and select the best arrangements. Pilot-scale tests were conducted by firing an eastern high-volatile bituminous Pittsburgh No.8 coal at 5 million Btu/hr in a facility that was set up with two-level overfire air (OFA) ports. In the wall-fired mode, pulverized coal was burned in a geometrically scaled down version of the B and W DRB-4Z{reg_sign} low-NO{sub x} burner. At a fixed overall excess air level of 17%, NO{sub x} emissions with single-level OFA ports were around 0.32 lb/million Btu at 0.80 burner stoichiometry. Two-level OFA operation lowered the NO{sub x} levels to 0.25 lb/million Btu. Oxygen enrichment in the staged burner reduced the NO{sub x} values to 0.21 lb/million Btu. Oxygen enrichment plus reburning and 2-level OFA operation further curbed the NO{sub x} emissions to 0.19 lb/million Btu or by 41% from conventional air-staged operation with single-level OFA ports. In the cyclone firing arrangement, oxygen enrichment of the cyclone combustor enabled high-temperature and deeply staged operation while maintaining good slag tapping. Firing the Pittsburgh No.8 coal in the optimum arrangement generated 112 ppmv NO{sub x} (0.15 lb/million Btu) and 59 ppmv CO. The optimum emissions results represent 88% NO{sub x} reduction from the uncontrolled operation. Levelized costs for additional NO{sub x} removal by various in-furnace control methods in reference wall-fired or cyclone-fired units already equipped with single-level OFA ports were estimated and compared with figures for SCR systems achieving 0.1 lb NO{sub x}/10{sup 6} Btu. Two-level OFA ports could offer the most economical approach for moderate NO{sub x} control, especially for smaller units. O{sub 2} enrichment in combination with 2-level OFA was not cost effective for wall-firing. For cyclone units, NO{sub x} removal by two-level OFA plus O{sub 2} enrichment but without coal reburning was economically attractive.

Hamid Sarv

2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

413

Second Generation Advanced Reburning for High Efficiency N0x Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy and Environmental Research Corporation is developing a family of high efficiency and low cost NO{sub x} control technologies for coal fired utility boilers based on Advanced Reburning (AR), a synergistic integration of basic reburning with injection of an N-agent. In conventional AR, injection of the reburn fuel is followed by simultaneous N-agent and overfire air injection. The second generation AR systems incorporate several components which can be used in different combinations. These components include: (1) Reburning Injection of the reburn fuel and overfire air. (2) N-agent Injection The N-agent (ammonia or urea) can be injected at different locations: into the reburning zone, along with the overfire air, and downstream of the overfire air injection. (3) N-agent Promotion Several sodium compounds can considerably enhance the NO{sub x} control from N-agent injection. These ''promoters'' can be added to aqueous N-agents. (4) Two Stages of N-agent Injection and Promotion Two N-agents with or without promoters can be injected at different locations for deeper NO{sub x} control. AR systems are intended for post-RACT applications in ozone non-attainment areas where NO{sub x} control in excess of 80% is required. AR will provide flexible installations that allow NO{sub x} levels to be lowered when regulations become more stringent. The total cost of NO{sub x} control for AR systems is approximately half of that for SCR. Experimental and kinetic modeling results for development of these novel AR systems are presented. Tests have been conducted in a 1.0 MMBtu/hr Boiler Simulator Facility with coal as the main fuel and natural gas as the reburning fuel. The results show that high efficiency NO{sub x} control, in the range 84-95%, can be achieved with various elements of AR. A comparative byproduct emission study was performed to compare the emissions from different variants of AR with commercial technologies (reburning and SNCR). For each technology sampling included: CO, SO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, total hydrocarbons, NH{sub 3}, HCN, SO{sub 3}, fly ash mass loading and size distribution, PM10, and carbon in ash. AR technologies do not generate significant byproduct emissions in comparison with basic reburning and SNCR processes under similar conditions. In most cases, byproduct emissions were found to be lower for the AR technologies. Kinetic modeling predictions qualitatively explain the experimental trends observed in the combustion tests. The detailed reaction mechanism can describe the interaction of NO and ammonia in the reburning and overfire air zones, the effect of mixing times, and the sodium promotion effect.

Zamansky, Vladimir M.; Maly, Peter, M.; Sheldon, Mark; Seeker, W. Randall; Folsom, Blair A.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

Advanced Power Electronic Interfaces for Distributed Energy Systems, Part 2: Modeling, Development, and Experimental Evaluation of Advanced Control Functions for Single-Phase Utility-Connected Inverter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrating renewable energy and distributed generations into the Smart Grid architecture requires power electronic (PE) for energy conversion. The key to reaching successful Smart Grid implementation is to develop interoperable, intelligent, and advanced PE technology that improves and accelerates the use of distributed energy resource systems. This report describes the simulation, design, and testing of a single-phase DC-to-AC inverter developed to operate in both islanded and utility-connected mode. It provides results on both the simulations and the experiments conducted, demonstrating the ability of the inverter to provide advanced control functions such as power flow and VAR/voltage regulation. This report also analyzes two different techniques used for digital signal processor (DSP) code generation. Initially, the DSP code was written in C programming language using Texas Instrument's Code Composer Studio. In a later stage of the research, the Simulink DSP toolbox was used to self-generate code for the DSP. The successful tests using Simulink self-generated DSP codes show promise for fast prototyping of PE controls.

Chakraborty, S.; Kroposki, B.; Kramer, W.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Development, Implementation, and Testing of Fault Detection Strategies on the National Wind Technology Center's Controls Advanced Research Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Wind Technology Center dedicates two 600 kW turbines for advanced control systems research. A fault detection system for both turbines has been developed, analyzed, and improved across years of experiments to protect the turbines as each new controller is tested. Analysis of field data and ongoing fault detection strategy improvements have resulted in a system of sensors, fault definitions, and detection strategies that have thus far been effective at protecting the turbines. In this paper, we document this fault detection system and provide field data illustrating its operation while detecting a range of failures. In some cases, we discuss the refinement process over time as fault detection strategies were improved. The purpose of this article is to share field experience obtained during the development and field testing of the existing fault detection system, and to offer a possible baseline for comparison with more advanced turbine fault detection controllers.

Johnson, K. E.; Fleming, P. A.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Desulfurization Effects on a Light-Duty Diesel Vehicle NOx Adsorber Exhaust Emission Control System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analyzes the effects on gaseous emissions, before and after desulfurization, on a light-duty diesel vehicle with a NOx adsorber catalyst.

Tatur, M.; Tomazic, D.; Tyrer, H.; Thornton, M.; Kubsh, J.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Office  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

workstation density, timeouts, standby power, and controlthose that achieve very low standby power will have the mostWS lighting. Third, standby power contributes significantly

Rubinstein, Francis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapter 1, project number 669  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume 1, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapters 2-13, project number 669  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume I, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Performance of electronic ballasts and lighting controllers with 34-W fluorescent lamps: Final report  

SciTech Connect

This study has measured the performance of energy-saving 34-watt F40, T-12, rapid-start, lite white fluorescent lamps being operated by solid-state ballasts and lighting control equipment. The performances of these lamps are compared with those of 40-watt F40, T-12 rapid-start cool white fluorescent lamp systems studied in the prior phase of this project. With the 34-watt F40 lamps and various solid-state ballasts, system efficacy ranged from 67 to 84 lumens per watt and ballast factor from 0.756 to 0.908. Average system efficacy using the 34-watt lamps exceeded that of systems using 40-watt lamps and the same solid-state ballasts by only 1 percent even though the 34-watt lamps is about 6 percent more efficacious than the 40-watt lamp. This apparent discrepancy is due to increased ballast losses when operating the 34-watt lamps. However, the system efficacy of the 34-watt lamps used with a solid-state ballast exceeded that of a 34-watt, two-lamp system using the standard core-coil ballast by as much as 29 percent. A T-8 fluorescent lamp system with a smaller lamp diameter was also included in the study. Operating this lamp with a solid-state ballast produced a high system efficacy of 90 lumens per watt, a 39 percent improvement over the efficacy of a 40-watt F40 system using the standard core-coil ballast. The use of static controllers with 34-watt F40 lamps can result in excessive flickering (46 percent) and the generation of a second harmonic as high as 96 percent of the fundamental frequency. The dynamic controllers, when used to dim the 34-watt lamps generally cannot be dimmed as low as the 40-watt lamp system without flickering. In general, the 34-watt energy-saving lamps are appropriate as a retrofit to reduce illumination levels. However, for new construction, the 40-watt F40 argon filled lamps cost less, perform better, and provide a more reliable system. 5 refs., 27 figs., 9 tabs.

Verderber, R.R.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

422

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

423

EK101 Engineering Light Smart Lighting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

extensively in concert lighting and are finding increased usage in dance lighting because refers to the upstage back curtain (is white or a light color), which can be us for lighting or special Mixer #12;Monitor House speaker Lighting System Control Board: Similar to the sound board, the light

Bifano, Thomas

424

A Touch-Dim Network for the Dimming Control of Lighting System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DALI is a popular interface of lighting network system with an excellent dimming facility, but it is too complicated when it is applied in family house. Touch-Dim installation of DALI ballast is then developed. The installation and operation are much ... Keywords: DALI, lighting, network, Touch-Dim

Jyh-Ching Juang; Hung-Chi Wang; Chun-Lin Lu; Wen-Ming Chen; Ching-Wen Hsu

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Benefits of Utilizing Advanced Metering Provided Information Support and Control Capabilities in Distribution Automation Application s  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Metering systems can serve a variety of applications beyond revenue cycle services. This paper describes several distribution automation functions that can significantly benefit from integration with the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI). Installation of Smart Meters with two-way communications is under way at several service territories of electric utilities throughout North America, Europe, Asia and Australia. These meters could be capable of providing a variety of data representing the p...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.