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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced light water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced light-water nuclear Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nuclear Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced light-water nuclear Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 1 Managed by UT-Battelle for the...

2

Advanced Fuel Performance: Modeling and Simulation Light Water...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

models, and will be designed for implementa- tion not only on today's leadership- class computers, but also for advanced architecture platforms now under de- velopment by DOE, as...

3

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Presentations 2015 back to top Smith, K., Advances in Reactor Physics and Computational Science, Physor 2014 International Conference, "The Role of Reactor Physics toward a...

4

Thermophysical properties of saturated light and heavy water for advanced neutron source applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Neutron Source is an experimental facility being developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. As a new nuclear fission research reactor of unprecedented flux, the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor will provide the most intense steady-state beams of neutrons in the world. The high heat fluxes generated in the reactor [303 MW(t) with an average power density of 4.5 MW/L] will be accommodated by a flow of heavy water through the core at high velocities. In support of this experimental and analytical effort, a reliable, highly accurate, and uniform source of thermodynamic and transport property correlations for saturated light and heavy water were developed. In order to attain high accuracy in the correlations, the range of these correlations was limited to the proposed Advanced Neutron Source Reactor's nominal operating conditions. The temperature and corresponding saturation pressure ranges used for light water were 20--300[degrees]C and 0.0025--8.5 MPa, respectively, while those for heavy water were 50--250[degrees]C and 0.012--3.9 MPa. Deviations between the correlation predictions and data from the various sources did not exceed 1.0%. Light water vapor density was the only exception, with an error of 1.76%. The physical property package consists of analytical correlations, SAS codes, and FORTRAN subroutines incorporating these correlations, as well as an interactive, easy-to-use program entitled QuikProp.

Crabtree, A.; Siman-Tov, M.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Thermophysical properties of saturated light and heavy water for Advanced Neutron Source applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Neutron Source is an experimental facility being developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. As a new nuclear fission research reactor of unprecedented flux, the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor will provide the most intense steady-state beams of neutrons in the world. The high heat fluxes generated in the reactor [303 MW(t) with an average power density of 4.5 MW/L] will be accommodated by a flow of heavy water through the core at high velocities. In support of this experimental and analytical effort, a reliable, highly accurate, and uniform source of thermodynamic and transport property correlations for saturated light and heavy water were developed. In order to attain high accuracy in the correlations, the range of these correlations was limited to the proposed Advanced Neutron Source Reactor`s nominal operating conditions. The temperature and corresponding saturation pressure ranges used for light water were 20--300{degrees}C and 0.0025--8.5 MPa, respectively, while those for heavy water were 50--250{degrees}C and 0.012--3.9 MPa. Deviations between the correlation predictions and data from the various sources did not exceed 1.0%. Light water vapor density was the only exception, with an error of 1.76%. The physical property package consists of analytical correlations, SAS codes, and FORTRAN subroutines incorporating these correlations, as well as an interactive, easy-to-use program entitled QuikProp.

Crabtree, A.; Siman-Tov, M.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Demand Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center Technical Advisory Group Meeting August 31, 2007 10:30 AM - Noon Meeting Agenda * Introductions (10 minutes) * Main Presentation (~ 1 hour) * Questions, comments from panel (15 minutes) Project History * Lighting Scoping Study (completed January 2007) - Identified potential for energy and demand savings using demand responsive lighting systems - Importance of dimming - New wireless controls technologies * Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) Objectives * Provide up-to-date information on the reliability, predictability of dimmable lighting as a demand resource under realistic operating load conditions * Identify potential negative impacts of DR lighting on lighting quality Potential of Demand Responsive Lighting Control

7

Advanced Fuels Campaign Light Water Reactor Accident Tolerant Fuel Performance Metrics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The safe, reliable and economic operation of the nation’s nuclear power reactor fleet has always been a top priority for the United States’ nuclear industry. As a result, continual improvement of technology, including advanced materials and nuclear fuels, remains central to industry’s success. Decades of research combined with continual operation have produced steady advancements in technology and yielded an extensive base of data, experience, and knowledge on light water reactor (LWR) fuel performance under both normal and accident conditions. In 2011, following the Great East Japan Earthquake, resulting tsunami, and subsequent damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant complex, enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs became a topic of serious discussion. As a result of direction from the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) initiated an Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) Development program. The complex multiphysics behavior of LWR nuclear fuel makes defining specific material or design improvements difficult; as such, establishing qualitative attributes is critical to guide the design and development of fuels and cladding with enhanced accident tolerance. This report summarizes a common set of technical evaluation metrics to aid in the optimization and down selection of candidate designs. As used herein, “metrics” describe a set of technical bases by which multiple concepts can be fairly evaluated against a common baseline and against one another. Furthermore, this report describes a proposed technical evaluation methodology that can be applied to assess the ability of each concept to meet performance and safety goals relative to the current UO2 – zirconium alloy system and relative to one another. The resultant ranked evaluation can then inform concept down-selection, such that the most promising accident tolerant fuel design option(s) can continue to be developed for lead test rod or lead test assembly insertion into a commercial reactor within the desired timeframe (by 2022).

Brad Merrill; Melissa Teague; Robert Youngblood; Larry Ott; Kevin Robb; Michael Todosow; Chris Stanek; Mitchell Farmer; Michael Billone; Robert Montgomery; Nicholas Brown; Shannon Bragg-Sitton

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

D. E. Shropshire

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Advanced Fuels Campaign Light Water Reactor Accident Tolerant Fuel Performance Metrics Executive Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research and development (R&D) activities on advanced, higher performance Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels have been ongoing for the last few years. Following the unfortunate March 2011 events at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in Japan, the R&D shifted toward enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs. Qualitative attributes for fuels with enhanced accident tolerance, such as improved reaction kinetics with steam resulting in slower hydrogen generation rate, provide guidance for the design and development of fuels and cladding with enhanced accident tolerance. A common set of technical metrics should be established to aid in the optimization and down selection of candidate designs on a more quantitative basis. “Metrics” describe a set of technical bases by which multiple concepts can be fairly evaluated against a common baseline and against one another. This report describes a proposed technical evaluation methodology that can be applied to evaluate the ability of each concept to meet performance and safety goals relative to the current UO2 – zirconium alloy system and relative to one another. The resultant ranked evaluation can then inform concept down-selection, such that the most promising accident tolerant fuel design option(s) can continue to be developed toward qualification.

Shannon Bragg-Sitton

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Light Water Reactor Sustainability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 Light Water Reactor Sustainability ACCOMPLISHMENTS REPORT 2014 Accomplishments Report | Light Water Reactor Sustainability 2 T he mission of the Light Water Reactor...

11

Advanced dry head-end reprocessing of light water reactor spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from a light water reactor includes the step of reacting spent nuclear fuel in a voloxidation vessel with an oxidizing gas having nitrogen dioxide and oxygen for a period sufficient to generate a solid oxidation product of the spent nuclear fuel. The reacting step includes the step of reacting, in a first zone of the voloxidation vessel, spent nuclear fuel with the oxidizing gas at a temperature ranging from 200-450.degree. C. to form an oxidized reaction product, and regenerating nitrogen dioxide, in a second zone of the voloxidation vessel, by reacting oxidizing gas comprising nitrogen monoxide and oxygen at a temperature ranging from 0-80.degree. C. The first zone and the second zone can be separate. A voloxidation system is also disclosed.

Collins, Emory D.; Delcul, Guillermo D.; Hunt, Rodney D.; Johnson, Jared A.; Spencer, Barry B.

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

12

Advanced dry head-end reprocessing of light water reactor spent nuclear fuel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from a light water reactor includes the step of reacting spent nuclear fuel in a voloxidation vessel with an oxidizing gas having nitrogen dioxide and oxygen for a period sufficient to generate a solid oxidation product of the spent nuclear fuel. The reacting step includes the step of reacting, in a first zone of the voloxidation vessel, spent nuclear fuel with the oxidizing gas at a temperature ranging from 200-450.degree. C. to form an oxidized reaction product, and regenerating nitrogen dioxide, in a second zone of the voloxidation vessel, by reacting oxidizing gas comprising nitrogen monoxide and oxygen at a temperature ranging from 0-80.degree. C. The first zone and the second zone can be separate. A voloxidation system is also disclosed.

Collins, Emory D; Delcul, Guillermo D; Hunt, Rodney D; Johnson, Jared A; Spencer, Barry B

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

13

Light Duty Combustion Research: Advanced Light-Duty Combustion...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Light Duty Combustion Research: Advanced Light-Duty Combustion Experiments Light Duty Combustion Research: Advanced Light-Duty Combustion Experiments 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and...

14

Advanced light water reactor plants System 80+{trademark} design certification program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide the status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80+{trademark} during the US government`s 1995 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MW (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design covers an essentially complete plant. It is based on EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD) improvements to the Standardized System 80 Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2, and 3. The NSSS is a traditional two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs, each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard design houses the NSSS in a spherical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual barrier to radioactivity release. Other major features include an all-digital, human-factors-engineered control room, an alternate electrical AC power source, an In-Containment Refueling Water Storage Tank (IRWST), and plant arrangements providing complete separation of redundant trains in safety systems.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Advanced Light Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Next >> Next >> Visitors Access to the ALS Gate Access guest-house Guest House lab-shuttles Lab Shuttles maps-and-directions Maps and Directions Parking Safety Safety for Users safety-for-staff Safety for Staff In Case of Emergency Resources Acronyms Multimedia Employment staff-intranet Staff Intranet Site Map Contact Digg: ALSBerkeleyLab Facebook Page: 208064938929 Flickr: advancedlightsource Twitter: ALSBerkeleyLab YouTube: AdvancedLightSource January 2014 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Recent Science Highlights Minding the Gap Makes for More Efficient Solar Cells Using novel materials to develop thin, flexible, and more efficient photovoltaic cells is one of the hottest topics in current materials research. A class of transition metals undergo a dramatic change that makes them ideal for solar energy applications.

16

Some Specific CASL Requirements for Advanced Multiphase Flow Simulation of Light Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of the diversity of physical phenomena occuring in boiling, flashing, and bubble collapse, and of the length and time scales of LWR systems, it is imperative that the models have the following features: • Both vapor and liquid phases (and noncondensible phases, if present) must be treated as compressible. • Models must be mathematically and numerically well-posed. • The models methodology must be multi-scale. A fundamental derivation of the multiphase governing equation system, that should be used as a basis for advanced multiphase modeling in LWR coolant systems, is given in the Appendix using the ensemble averaging method. The remainder of this work focuses specifically on the compressible, well-posed, and multi-scale requirements of advanced simulation methods for these LWR coolant systems, because without these are the most fundamental aspects, without which widespread advancement cannot be claimed. Because of the expense of developing multiple special-purpose codes and the inherent inability to couple information from the multiple, separate length- and time-scales, efforts within CASL should be focused toward development of a multi-scale approaches to solve those multiphase flow problems relevant to LWR design and safety analysis. Efforts should be aimed at developing well-designed unified physical/mathematical and high-resolution numerical models for compressible, all-speed multiphase flows spanning: (1) Well-posed general mixture level (true multiphase) models for fast transient situations and safety analysis, (2) DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation)-like models to resolve interface level phenmena like flashing and boiling flows, and critical heat flux determination (necessarily including conjugate heat transfer), and (3) Multi-scale methods to resolve both (1) and (2) automatically, depending upon specified mesh resolution, and to couple different flow models (single-phase, multiphase with several velocities and pressures, multiphase with single velocity and pressure, etc.) A unified, multi-scale approach is advocated to extend the necessary foundations and build the capability to simultaneously solve the fluid dynamic interface problems (interface resolution) as well as multiphase mixtures (homogenization).

R. A. Berry

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Advanced Computational Thermal Fluid Physics (CTFP) and Its Assessment for Light Water Reactors and Supercritical Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background: The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of Generation IV reactor systems such as supercritical water reactors (SCWR) for higher efficiency, improved performance and operation, design simplification, enhanced safety and reduced waste and cost. The objective of this Korean / US / laboratory / university collaboration of coupled fundamental computational and experimental studies is to develop the supporting knowledge needed for improved predictive techniques for use in the technology development of Generation IV reactor concepts and their passive safety systems. The present study emphasizes SCWR concepts in the Generation IV program.

D.M. McEligot; K. G. Condie; G. E. McCreery; H. M. McIlroy; R. J. Pink; L.E. Hochreiter; J.D. Jackson; R.H. Pletcher; B.L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J.M. Wallace; J.Y. Yoo; J.S. Lee; S.T. Ro; S.O. Park

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Advanced Light Water Reactor Plants System 80+{trademark} Design Certification Program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80+{trademark} during the US government`s 1993 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MW{sub t} (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design consists of an essentially complete plant. It is based on evolutionary improvements to the Standardized System 80 nuclear steam supply system in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2, and 3, and the Duke Power Company P-81 balance-of-plant (BOP) that was designed and partially constructed at the Cherokee plant site. The System 80/P-81 original design has been substantially enhanced to increase conformance with the EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD). Some design enhancements incorporated in the System 80+ design are included in the four units currently under construction in the Republic of Korea. These units form the basis of the Korean standardization program. The full System 80+ standard design has been offered to the Republic of China, in response to their recent bid specification. The ABB-CE Standard Safety Analysis Report (CESSAR-DC) was submitted to the NRC and a Draft Safety Evaluation Report was issued by the NRC in October 1992. CESSAR-DC contains the technical basis for compliance with the EPRI URD for simplified emergency planning. The Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) is the standard ABB-Combustion Engineering two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard plant includes a sperical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual containment.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

Advanced Lighting Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minnesota Zip: 56378 Product: Advanced Lighting Systems (ALS) provides a number of LED and fiber optic lighting solutions. It was acquired by Nexxus Lighting in September...

20

LIGHT WATER REACTOR SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM ADVANCED INSTRUMENTATION, INFORMATION, AND CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGIES TECHNICAL PROGRAM PLAN FOR 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reliable instrumentation, information, and control (II&C) systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration.

Bruce Hallbert; Ken Thomas

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced light water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Light Water Reactors A DOE Energy Innovation Hub for Modeling...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors A DOE Energy Innovation Hub for Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Reactors CASL is focused on three issues for nuclear...

22

Lighting Group: Controls: Advanced Digital Controls  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Digital Controls Advanced Digital Controls HPCBS Advanced Digital Controls Objective The goal of this project is to hasten the adoption of digital lighting control systems to allow commercial building operators to optimize the neergy performance of their lighting systems, implement demand responsive control, and improve occupant comfort and productivity. The specific objectives are as follows: (1) Advance the adoption of digital lighting control systems by working with industry to embed IBECS technology into existing analog control and DALI products, and by developing compelling demonstrations of digital control systems for evaluation by early adopters. (2) In collaboration with equipment manufacturers, produce digital lighting system prototypes that demonstrate the advantages of digitally controlled lighting systems to innovative property managers and other energy stakeholders. A digitally controlled lighting system consists of lights that are individually controllable via a network. The advantages of digital control are:

23

Investigation of the use of nanofluids to enhance the In-Vessel Retention capabilities of Advanced Light Water Reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanofluids at very low concentrations experimentally exhibit a substantial increase in Critical Heat Flux (CHF) compared to water. The use of a nanofluid in the In-Vessel Retention (IVR) severe accident management strategy, ...

Hannink, Ryan Christopher

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Water: Advanced Irrigation Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Limited opportunities to further expand the volume of global freshwaters allocated to irrigation means that advanced irrigation technologies, aiming to improve efficiency of existing systems, are timely needed and are of paramount importance. This article ‘Advanced Irrigation Technologies’ describes the latest advances in irrigation application methods, irrigation management, and other novel developments. It provides a vision for the future, including emerging risks, opportunities, and technical challenges, as the world gears up to supply 50% more food to an additional 2 billion people by 2050.

C.B. Hedley; J.W. Knox; S.R. Raine; R. Smith

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Newsletter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

hydraulics software RELAP-7 (which is under development in the Light Water Reactor Sustainability LWRS Program). A novel interaction between the probabilistic part (i.e., RAVEN)...

26

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced “RISMC toolkit” that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. This report describes the RISMC methodology demonstration where the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was used as a test-bed for purposes of determining safety margins. As part of the demonstration, we describe how both the thermal-hydraulics and probabilistic safety calculations are integrated and used to quantify margin management strategies.

Curtis Smith; David Schwieder; Cherie Phelan; Anh Bui; Paul Bayless

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Light-water breeder reactors: preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning prebreeder and breeder reactors based on light-water-breeder (LWBR) Type 1 modules; light-water backfit prebreeder supplying advanced breeder; light-water backfit prebreeder/seed-blanket breeder system; and light-water backfit low-gain converter using medium-enrichment uranium, supplying a light-water backfit high-gain converter.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Advanced Hybrid Water Heater using Electrochemical Compressor...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Advanced Hybrid Water Heater using Electrochemical Compressor Advanced Hybrid Water Heater using Electrochemical Compressor Xergy is using its Electro Chemical Compression (ECC)...

29

Copyright Awwa Research Foundation 2006 Advanced Water Treatment Impacts onAdvanced Water Treatment Impacts on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, brackish groundwater, produced water, etc.produced water, etc. Advanced treatmentAdvanced treatment Water© Copyright Awwa Research Foundation 2006 Advanced Water Treatment Impacts onAdvanced Water Treatment Impacts on EnergyEnergy--Water LinkagesWater Linkages (The Water Utility Perspective)(The Water

Keller, Arturo A.

30

Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2002  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report of the Advanced Light Source details science highlights and facility improvements during the year. It also offers information on events sponsored by the facility, technical specifications, and staff and publication information.

Duque, Theresa; Greiner, Annette; Moxon, Elizabeth; Robinson, Arthur; Tamura, Lori (Editors)

2003-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

31

Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Light Water Reactor Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is developing the scientific basis to extend existing nuclear power plant operating life beyond the current 60-year licensing period and ensure long-term reliability, productivity, safety, and security. The program is conducted in collaboration with national laboratories, universities, industry, and international partners. Idaho National Laboratory serves as the Technical Integration Office and coordinates the research and development (R&D) projects in the following pathways: Materials Aging and Degradation Assessment, Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems

32

LIGHT WATER REACTOR SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM: INTRODUCTION  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LIGHT WATER REACTOR SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM: INTRODUCTION The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1...

33

Columbia Water and Light - HVAC and Lighting Efficiency Rebates |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Columbia Water and Light - HVAC and Lighting Efficiency Rebates Columbia Water and Light - HVAC and Lighting Efficiency Rebates Columbia Water and Light - HVAC and Lighting Efficiency Rebates < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Lighting: 50% of invoiced cost up to $22,500 Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount HVAC Replacements: $570 - $3,770 Lighting: $300/kW reduction or half of project cost Provider Columbia Water and Light Columbia Water and Light (CWL) offers rebates to its commercial and industrial customers for the purchase of high efficiency HVAC installations and efficient lighting. Incentives for certain measures are based upon the

34

Advanced Lighting Technology Program for Federal Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

E's Innovative Federal Collaboration E's Innovative Federal Collaboration Advanced Lighting Technology Program for Federal Buildings Federal Utility Partnership Working Group November 1, 2006 "A 3 MW Success Story: Delivering on the Promise" Today's Presentation * Setting the Scene - U.S & Global Perspective * Program Overview: - Advanced Lighting Technology Program for Federal Buildings * Benefits - Energy and environmental * Conclusion: - The Lamborghini Analogy Setting the Scene U.S. Policy: The National Direction "The answer to high energy prices is the kind of comprehensive approach embraced by the President-that includes...increasing our reliance on energy efficiency and conservation. "Let me be clear: Encouraging greater energy efficiency is part and parcel of changing the way we power our homes and

35

'Slow light' advance could speed optical computing, telecommunications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

"Slow light" and specialized metamaterials 'Slow light' advance could speed optical computing, telecommunications Researchers have made the first demonstration of rapidly switching...

36

Light-Duty Advanced Diesel Combustion Research | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Light-Duty Advanced Diesel Combustion Research Light-Duty Advanced Diesel Combustion Research Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008...

37

AFRD - Advanced Light Source Accelerator Physics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ALS Accelerator Physics ALS Accelerator Physics Home Organization Outreach and Diversity News Highlights Safety Links Intramural FPO Accelerator Physics Group This page and the Group's own site emphasize the continuing effort to improve the performance and versatility of the accelerator-related systems of the ALS. If you want to start with a nontechnical explanation of what synchrotron light is, how scientists use it, and how the Advanced Light Source works, try About the ALS. The research performed using beams from the ALS is a vast topic that spans many scientific disciplines; a good overview with in-depth links is available at the ALS Science Briefs page. The ALS is a “” synchrotron light source based on a low-emittance electron storage ring with a nominal energy of 1.9 GeV. Since the machine

38

Shaping the Next - Buildings and Energy: Advanced Lighting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

short bit on advanced lighting for the future relating specifically to controls and new tech such as LEDs

Richman, Eric E.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Light-Duty Light-Duty Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on Google Bookmark Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on Delicious Rank Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on AddThis.com... Home Overview Light-Duty Vehicles Alternative Fuel Vehicles Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Micro Hybrid Vehicles ARRA Vehicle and Infrastructure Projects EVSE Testing Energy Storage Testing Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Vehicles Other ICE

40

Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program Login Instructions go here. User ID: Password: Log In Forgot your password?...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced light water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Proposed and existing passive and inherent safety-related structures, systems, and components (building blocks) for advanced light-water reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A nuclear power plant is composed of many structures, systems, and components (SSCs). Examples include emergency core cooling systems, feedwater systems, and electrical systems. The design of a reactor consists of combining various SSCs (building blocks) into an integrated plant design. A new reactor design is the result of combining old SSCs in new ways or use of new SSCs. This report identifies, describes, and characterizes SSCs with passive and inherent features that can be used to assure safety in light-water reactors. Existing, proposed, and speculative technologies are described. The following approaches were used to identify the technologies: world technical literature searches, world patent searches, and discussions with universities, national laboratories and industrial vendors. 214 refs., 105 figs., 26 tabs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Moses, D.L.; Lewis, E.B.; Gibson, R.; Pearson, R.; Reich, W.J.; Murphy, G.A.; Staunton, R.H.; Kohn, W.E.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Advanced Light Source: Activity report 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Light Source (ALS) produces the world`s brightest light in the ultraviolet and soft x-ray regions of the spectrum. The first low-energy third-generation synchrotron source in the world, the ALS provides unprecedented opportunities for research in science and technology not possible anywhere else. This year marked the beginning of operations and the start of the user research program at the ALS, which has already produced numerous high quality results. A national user facility located at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory of the University of California, the ALS is available to researchers from academia, industry, and government laboratories. This report contains the following: (1) director`s message; (2) operations overview; (3) user program; (4) users` executive committee; (5) industrial outreach; (6) accelerator operations; (7) beamline control system; (8) insertion devices; (9) experimental systems; (10) beamline engineering; (11) first results from user beamlines; (12) beamlines for 1994--1995; (13) special events; (14) publications; (15) advisory panels; and (16) ALS staff.

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

An Evaluation of the Proliferation Resistant Characteristics of Light Water  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

An Evaluation of the Proliferation Resistant Characteristics of An Evaluation of the Proliferation Resistant Characteristics of Light Water Reactor Fuel with the Potential for Recycle in the United States An Evaluation of the Proliferation Resistant Characteristics of Light Water Reactor Fuel with the Potential for Recycle in the United States The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) of the Department of Energy has been formulated to perform research leading to advanced fuels and fuel cycles for advanced nuclear power systems. One of the objectives of AFCI is to determine if partitioning and transmutation of spent nuclear fuel will reduce the burden on the geologic repository. The AFCI program is periodically reviewed by the Advanced Nuclear Transmutation Technology (ANTT) subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee

44

The California Advanced Lighting Controls Training Program (CALCTP)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The California Advanced Lighting Controls Training Program (CALCTP) The California Advanced Lighting Controls Training Program (CALCTP) Speaker(s): Bernie Kotlier Date: March 2, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Sila Kiliccote CALCTP is a broad based partnership that is dedicated to advancing the California State policy of energy conservation as the first priority for serving the state's future energy needs. CALCTP is supported, operated and directed by representatives of the California Lighting Technology Center, the California Energy Commission, the California Community College system, investor owned utilities, municipal utilities, electrical contractors, electrical workers, and manufacturers of advanced, high efficiency lighting and lighting control systems. The mission of the California Advanced Lighting Controls Training Program (CALCTP) is to make

45

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Contact Information  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Organization LWRS Program Management Richard Reister Federal Project Director Light Water Reactor Deployment Office of Nuclear Energy U.S. Department of Energy...

46

Columbia Water and Light- Solar Rebates  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Columbia Water and Light (CWL) offers rebates to its commercial and residential customers for the purchase of solar water heaters and solar photovoltaic systems. These rebates are available for...

47

New Advanced System Utilizes Industrial Waste Heat to Power Water...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Water Reuse ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE New Advanced System Utilizes Industrial Waste Heat to Power Water Purification Introduction As population growth and associated factors...

48

Advanced Water Removal via Membrane Solvent Extraction | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Water Removal via Membrane Solvent Extraction Advanced Water Removal via Membrane Solvent Extraction advwaterremovalmse.pdf More Documents & Publications Advance Patent Waiver...

49

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Newsletter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and nuclear waste disposal. Dr. Corradini has extensive research experience in the phenomenology of beyond design basis Meet the New LWRS Program Pathway Lead accidents in light...

50

Building the World's Most Advanced Light Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

View this time-lapse video showing construction of the National Synchrotron Light Source II at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Construction is shown from 2009-2012.

None

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

51

Advanced light material interaction for direct volume rendering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we present a heuristic approach for simulating advanced light material interactions in the context of interactive volume rendering. In contrast to previous work, we are able to incorporate complex material functions, which allow to simulate ...

Florian Lindemann; Timo Ropinski

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Use of phenomena identification and ranking (PIRT) process in research related to design certification of the AP600 advanced passive light water reactor (LWR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The AP600 LWR is a new advanced passive design that has been submitted to the USNRC for design certification. Within the certification process the USNRC will perform selected system thermal hydraulic response audit studies to help confirm parts of the vendor`s safety analysis submittal. Because of certain innovative design features of the safety systems, new experimental data and related advances in the system thermal hydraulic analysis computer code are being developed by the USNRC. The PIRT process is being used to focus the experimental and analytical work to obtain a sufficient and cost effective research effort. The objective of this paper is to describe the application and most significant results of the PIRT process, including several innovative features needed in the application to accommodate the short design certification schedule. The short design certification schedule has required that many aspects of the USNRC experimental and analytical research be performed in parallel, rather than in series as was normal for currently operating LWRS. This has required development and use of management techniques that focus and integrate the various diverse parts of the research. The original PIRTs were based on inexact knowledge of an evolving reactor design, and concentrated on the new passive features of the design. Subsequently, the PIRTs have evolved in two more stages as the design became more firm and experimental and analytical data became available. A fourth and final stage is planned and in progress to complete the PIRT development. The PIRTs existing at the end of each development stage have been used to guide the experimental program, scaling analyses and code development supporting the audit studies.

Wilson, G.E.; Fletcher, C.D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Eltawila, F. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Advanced Lighting Controls - My Venture from the Ivory Tower  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Lighting Controls - My Venture from the Ivory Tower Advanced Lighting Controls - My Venture from the Ivory Tower Speaker(s): Charlie Huizenga Date: June 15, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Dragan Charlie Curcija Lighting energy represents 30-40% of commercial building electricity consumption, yet very few buildings have advanced lighting controls. The potential energy savings are tremendous as is the opportunity to reduce demand on the grid during critical peak use periods. Charlie will describe how low-cost wireless radio technology developed at UC Berkeley and commercialized by Adura Technologies is creating a paradigm shift in the way we think about controlling lighting. Beyond deep energy savings and demand response, the technology offers personal control for occupants and

54

Advanced Technology Light Duty Diesel Aftertreatment System ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Approach to Low Temperature NOx Emission Abatement Cummins' Next Generation Tier 2, Bin 2 Light Truck Diesel Engine ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engine...

55

Advanced Technology Light Duty Diesel Aftertreatment System  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Light duty diesel aftertreatment system consisting of a DOC and selective catalytic reduction catalyst on filter (SCRF), close coupled to the engine with direct gaseous ammonia delivery is designed to reduce cold start NOx and HC emissions

56

Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Light Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Doppler Velocimeter EC Top Publications A Comparison of Platform Options for Deep-water Floating Offshore Vertical Axis Wind Turbines: An Initial Study Nonlinear Time-Domain...

57

Light Water Reactors Technology Development - Nuclear Reactors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Light Water Reactors Light Water Reactors About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

58

GE Uses DOE Advanced Light Sources to Develop Revolutionary Battery  

Office of Science (SC) Website

GE Uses DOE Advanced Light Sources to Develop GE Uses DOE Advanced Light Sources to Develop Revolutionary Battery Technology Discovery & Innovation Stories of Discovery & Innovation Brief Science Highlights SBIR/STTR Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 06.13.11 GE Uses DOE Advanced Light Sources to Develop Revolutionary Battery Technology Company is constructing a new battery factory in Upstate New York that is expected to create 300+ jobs. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo GE's new Image courtesy of GE GE's new "Durathon(tm)" sodium metal halide battery. The story of American manufacturing over the past two decades has too often been a tale of outsourcing, off-shoring, and downsizing-not least in

59

Hydrogen production from water: Recent advances in photosynthesis research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The great potential of hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting is predicated on quantitative measurement of the algae`s hydrogen-producing capability, which is based on the following: (1) the photosynthetic unit size of hydrogen production; (2) the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production; (3) thermodynamic efficiencies of conversion of light energy into the Gibbs free energy of molecular hydrogen; (4) photosynthetic hydrogen production from sea water using marine algae; (5) the potential for research advances using modern methods of molecular biology and genetic engineering to maximize hydrogen production. ORNL has shown that sustained simultaneous photoevolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen can be performed with mutants of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that lack a detectable level of the Photosystem I light reaction. This result is surprising in view of the standard two-light reaction model of photosynthesis and has interesting scientific and technological implications. This ORNL discovery also has potentially important implications for maximum thermodynamic conversion efficiency of light energy into chemical energy by green plant photosynthesis. Hydrogen production performed by a single light reaction, as opposed to two, implies a doubling of the theoretically maximum thermodynamic conversion efficiency from {approx}10% to {approx}20%.

Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

60

Advanced Light Source Activity Report 1997/1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Light Source (ALS) activity report for 1997/98 discusses the following topics: Introduction and Overview; Science Highlights; Facility Report; Special Events; ALS Advisory Panels 1997/98; ALS Staff 1997/98 and Facts and Figures for the year.

Greiner, Annette (ed.)

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced light water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Cedarburg Light & Water Utility - Commercial Shared Savings Loan Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cedarburg Light & Water Utility - Commercial Shared Savings Loan Cedarburg Light & Water Utility - Commercial Shared Savings Loan Program (Wisconsin) Cedarburg Light & Water Utility - Commercial Shared Savings Loan Program (Wisconsin) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Appliances & Electronics Manufacturing Home Weatherization Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Commercial Weatherization Ventilation Construction Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate $50,000 Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount $2,500 - $50,000 Provider Cedarburg Light and Water Utility Cedarburg Light and Water Utility (CLWU) provides loans for commercial,

62

Cedarburg Light and Water Utility - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cedarburg Light and Water Utility - Commercial Energy Efficiency Cedarburg Light and Water Utility - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cedarburg Light and Water Utility - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Unspecified ($250,000 per bid cycle) Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies by measure Provider Cedarburg Light and Water Utility Cedarburg Light and Water Utility provides incentives for commercial,

63

Advanced Water Treatment System: Technological and Economic Evaluations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The supply of potable water from polluted rivers, lakes, unsafe wells, ... most effective methods to obtain low cost drinking water is desalination. In this chapter, an advanced water treatment system, based on electrodialysis

Artak Barseghyan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Apply: Solid-State Lighting Advanced Technology R&D - 2015 Funding...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Solid-State Lighting Advanced Technology R&D - 2015 Funding Opportunity Apply: Solid-State Lighting Advanced Technology R&D - 2015 Funding Opportunity October 14, 2014 - 3:57pm...

65

Sun Prairie Water & Light Comm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sun Prairie Water & Light Comm Sun Prairie Water & Light Comm Jump to: navigation, search Name Sun Prairie Water & Light Comm Place Wisconsin Utility Id 18312 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Area Lighting 1000w Halide existing poles Lighting Area Lighting 1000w Halide provided poles Lighting Area Lighting 100w HPS existing poles Lighting Area Lighting 100w HPS provided poles Lighting Area Lighting 150w HPS existing poles Lighting

66

The advanced light source: America`s brightest light for science and industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

America`s brightest light comes from the Advanced Light Source (ALS), a national facility for scientific research, product development, and manufacturing. Completed in 1993, the ALS produces light in the ultraviolet and x-ray regions of the spectrum. Its extreme brightness provides opportunities for scientific and technical progress not possible anywhere else. Technology is poised on the brink of a major revolution - one in which vital machine components and industrial processes will be drastically miniaturized. Industrialized nations are vying for leadership in this revolution - and the huge economic rewards the leaders will reap.

Cross, J.; Lawler, G.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program summary, Project No. 669  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The staff of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has prepared Volume 1 of a safety evaluation report (SER), NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document -- Program Summary,'' to document the results of its review of the Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document.'' This SER provides a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff's review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Technical Documents | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reactor Technologies » Light Water Reactor Reactor Technologies » Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program » Light Water Reactor Sustainability Technical Documents Light Water Reactor Sustainability Technical Documents April 30, 2013 LWRS Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint R&D Plan To address the challenges associated with pursuing commercial nuclear power plant operations beyond 60 years, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have established separate but complementary research and development programs: DOE-NE's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program and EPRI's Long-Term Operations (LTO) Program. April 30, 2013 Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program - Integrated Program Plan The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a research and

69

Parkland Light & Water Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Parkland Light & Water Company Parkland Light & Water Company Jump to: navigation, search Name Parkland Light & Water Company Place Washington Utility Id 14505 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Large Commercial (Over 50kVA) Commercial Residential Rate Residential Security Lights-100 WATT HP SODIUM Lighting Security Lights-200 WATT HP SODIUM Lighting Security Lights-250 WATT HP SODIUM Lighting Security Lights-400 WATT HP SODIUM Lighting Small Commercial (Under 50kVA) Commercial Average Rates

70

Albany Water Gas & Light Comm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Gas & Light Comm Water Gas & Light Comm Jump to: navigation, search Name Albany Water Gas & Light Comm Place Georgia Utility Id 230 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Demand Commercial Commercial Non-Demand Commercial Large Commercial Demand Commercial Residential Residential Security Lights 1000 Watt Metal Halide Metal Pole Lighting Security Lights 1000 Watt Metal Halide Wooden Pole Lighting Security Lights 150 HPSV Fixtures Metal Pole Lighting Security Lights 150 HPSV Fixtures Wooden Pole Lighting

71

NAN-190 POTENTIATES THE CIRCADIAN RESPONSE TO LIGHT AND SPEEDS RE-ENTRAINMENT TO ADVANCED LIGHT CYCLES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAN-190 POTENTIATES THE CIRCADIAN RESPONSE TO LIGHT AND SPEEDS RE-ENTRAINMENT TO ADVANCED LIGHT. In this study, we investigated the ability of NAN-190 to potenti- ate the circadian rhythm response to light potentiate the response to light both in dark-adapted and entrained hamsters. Furthermore, NAN- 190

Harrington, Mary

72

Insertion devices for the Advanced Light Source at LBL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory will be the first of the new generation of dedicated synchrotron light sources to be put into operation. Specially designed insertion devices will be required to realize the high brightness photon beams made possible by the low emittance of the electron beam. The complement of insertion devices on the ALS will include undulators with periods as short as 3.9 cm and one or more high field wigglers. The first device to be designed is a 5 m long, 5 cm period, hybrid undulator. The goal of very high brightness and high harmonic output imposes unusually tight tolerances on the magnetic field quality and thus on the mechanical structure. The design process, using a generic structure for all undulators, is described. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Hassenzahl, W.; Chin, J.; Halbach, K.; Hoyer, E.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.; Savoy, R.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Zircaloy performance in light water reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zircaloy has been successfully used as the primary light water reactor (LWR) core structural material since its introduction in the early days of the US naval nuclear program. Its unique combination of low neutron absorption cross section, fabricability, mechanical strength, and corrosion resistance in water and steam near 300{degrees}C has resulted in remarkable reliability of operation of pressurized and boiling water reactor (PWR, BWR) fuel through the years. At present time, BWRs use Zircaloy-2 and PWRs use Zircaloy-4 for fuel cladding. In BWRs, both Zircaloy-2 and -4 have been successfully used for spacer grids and channels, and in PWRs Zircaloy-4 is used for spacer grids and control rod guide tubes. Performance of fuel rods has been excellent thus far. The current trend for utilities worldwide is to expect both higher fuel reliability in the future. Fuel suppliers have already achieved extended exposures in lead use assemblies, and have demonstrated excellent performance in all areas; therefore unsuspected problems are not likely to arise. However, as exposure and expectations continue to increase, Zircaloy is being taken toward the limits of its known capabilities. This paper reviews Zircaloy performance capabilities in areas related to environmentally affected microstructure, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, and dimensional stability. The effects of radiation and reactor environment on each property is illustrated with data, micrographs, and analysis.

Adamson, R.B.; Cheng, B.C.; Kruger, R.M. [GE Nuclear Energy, Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

74

Columbia Water and Light - Commercial Super Saver Loans | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Columbia Water and Light - Commercial Super Saver Loans Columbia Water and Light - Commercial Super Saver Loans Columbia Water and Light - Commercial Super Saver Loans < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heating Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Solar Maximum Rebate $30,000 Program Info Start Date 06/01/2010 State Missouri Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount Up to $30,000 Provider Columbia Water and Light Columbia Water and Light (CWL) provides Commercial Super Saver Loans, which allow C&I rate customers to replace a furnace along with a new central air conditioner or heat pump with an efficiency rating 11 EER or greater for units 6 tons or larger. No prepayment penalties are enforced through the

75

Light water reactor lower head failure analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the results from a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored research program to investigate the mode and timing of vessel lower head failure. Major objectives of the analysis were to identify plausible failure mechanisms and to develop a method for determining which failure mode would occur first in different light water reactor designs and accident conditions. Failure mechanisms, such as tube ejection, tube rupture, global vessel failure, and localized vessel creep rupture, were studied. Newly developed models and existing models were applied to predict which failure mechanism would occur first in various severe accident scenarios. So that a broader range of conditions could be considered simultaneously, calculations relied heavily on models with closed-form or simplified numerical solution techniques. Finite element techniques-were employed for analytical model verification and examining more detailed phenomena. High-temperature creep and tensile data were obtained for predicting vessel and penetration structural response.

Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.; Thinnes, G.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

McMinnville Water and Light - Conservation Service Loan Program |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

McMinnville Water and Light - Conservation Service Loan Program McMinnville Water and Light - Conservation Service Loan Program McMinnville Water and Light - Conservation Service Loan Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate $10,000 Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount $500-$10,000 Provider McMinnville Water and Light McMinnville Water and Light offers financing to residential and commercial customers to make energy efficient improvements to eligible facilities and homes. Financing is available for pre-approved conservation measures only.

77

City Water Light and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Water Light and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Water Light and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs City Water Light and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Nonprofit Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Insulation: $3,000 Retro-Commissioning: $50,000 Lighting: $15,000 Program Info State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air-Source Heat Pumps: $300/ton Geothermal Heat Pump: $500/ton Insulation: 30% Retro-Commissioning Study: $0.30 per sq. ft. of conditioned space Retro-Commissioning EMC: varies Lighting: $3 - $35/unit Lighting (Custom): $0.28/Watt reduced Water Loop Heat Pump: Contact CWLP

78

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Technical Documents | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Initiatives » Nuclear Reactor Technologies » Light Water Reactor Initiatives » Nuclear Reactor Technologies » Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program » Light Water Reactor Sustainability Technical Documents Light Water Reactor Sustainability Technical Documents September 30, 2011 Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges The most life-limiting structural component in light-water reactors (LWR) is the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) because replacement of the RPV is not considered a viable option at this time. LWR licenses are now being extended from 40y to 60y by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with intentions to extend licenses to 80y and beyond. The RPV materials exhibit varying degrees of sensitivity to irradiation-induced embrittlement

79

Advanced Lighting Program Development (BG9702800) Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LEDs (especially traffic light conversion) Commercial Better task and furniture-based lighting Improved streetlights

Rubinstein, Francis; Johnson, Steve

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Advice and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Advice and Incentives Program Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Advice and Incentives Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Manufacturing Other Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Commercial Weatherization Maximum Rebate 70% of project cost Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Commercial Dishwashers: $400 - $1500 Commercial Refrigerator: $60 - $100 Ice Machines: $100 - $400 Insulated Holding Cabinets: $250 - $600 Electric Steam Cookers: $400 Electric Convection Ovens: $200 Electric Griddles: $200 Electric Combination Ovens: $2,000

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced light water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Materials Inventory Database for the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scientific research involves the purchasing, processing, characterization, and fabrication of many sample materials. The history of such materials can become complicated over their lifetime – materials might be cut into pieces or moved to various storage locations, for example. A database with built-in functions to track these kinds of processes facilitates well-organized research. The Material Inventory Database Accounting System (MIDAS) is an easy-to-use tracking and reference system for such items. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRS), which seeks to advance the long-term reliability and productivity of existing nuclear reactors in the United States through multiple research pathways, proposed MIDAS as an efficient way to organize and track all items used in its research. The database software ensures traceability of all items used in research using built-in functions which can emulate actions on tracked items – fabrication, processing, splitting, and more – by performing operations on the data. MIDAS can recover and display the complete history of any item as a simple report. To ensure the database functions suitably for the organization of research, it was developed alongside a specific experiment to test accident tolerant nuclear fuel cladding under the LWRS Advanced Light Water Reactor Nuclear Fuels Pathway. MIDAS kept track of materials used in this experiment from receipt at the laboratory through all processes, test conduct and, ultimately, post-test analysis. By the end of this process, the database proved to be right tool for this program. The database software will help LWRS more efficiently conduct research experiments, from simple characterization tests to in-reactor experiments. Furthermore, MIDAS is a universal tool that any other research team could use to organize their material inventory.

Kazi Ahmed; Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

City Water Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

City Water Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate City Water Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs City Water Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Maximum Rebate Refrigerator Recycling: 2 units Insulation: $1,000 Program Info State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes Washer: $150 Central Air Conditioner: $9 per kBTUh Air-Source Heat Pumps: $300/ton Geothermal Heat Pump: $500 Refrigerator Recycling: $50 per appliance Insulation: 30% Provider Energy Services Office City Water Light and Power (CWLP) offers rebates to Springfield residential

83

ACKLESON, STEVEN G. Light in shallow waters: A brief research ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Office of Naval Research, 800 N. Quincy Street, Arlington, Virginia 22043 ... ecosystems, such as coral reefs or seagrasses, the in-water light field is often ...

2003-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

84

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Newsletter Rebecca Smith-Kevern  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rebecca Smith-Kevern Director, Office of Light Water Reactor Technologies. I am often asked why the Federal Government should fund a program that supports the continued operation...

85

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Newsletter Thomas M. Rosseel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laboratory (ORNL), through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, is coordinating and contracting with Zion Solutions, LLC (a...

86

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Newsletter By John Gaertner  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Year 2011 LWRS Program funding is very clear: "Regarding the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program, (Congress) expects a high cost share from industry." Cost sharing is...

87

Inverse free electron laser accelerator for advanced light sources  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We discuss the inverse free electron laser (IFEL) scheme as a compact high gradient accelerator solution for driving advanced light sources such as a soft x-ray free electron laser amplifier or an inverse Compton scattering based gamma-ray source. In particular, we present a series of new developments aimed at improving the design of future IFEL accelerators. These include a new procedure to optimize the choice of the undulator tapering, a new concept for prebunching which greatly improves the fraction of trapped particles and the final energy spread, and a self-consistent study of beam loading effects which leads to an energy-efficient high laser-to-beam power conversion.

Duris, J. P.; Musumeci, P.; Li, R. K.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Imaging spectroscopic analysis at the Advanced Light Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the major advances at the high brightness third generation synchrotrons is the dramatic improvement of imaging capability. There is a large multi-disciplinary effort underway at the ALS to develop imaging X-ray, UV and Infra-red spectroscopic analysis on a spatial scale from. a few microns to 10nm. These developments make use of light that varies in energy from 6meV to 15KeV. Imaging and spectroscopy are finding applications in surface science, bulk materials analysis, semiconductor structures, particulate contaminants, magnetic thin films, biology and environmental science. This article is an overview and status report from the developers of some of these techniques at the ALS. The following table lists all the currently available microscopes at the. ALS. This article will describe some of the microscopes and some of the early applications.

MacDowell, A. A.; Warwick, T.; Anders, S.; Lamble, G.M.; Martin, M.C.; McKinney, W.R.; Padmore, H.A.

1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

89

Shedding Light on Protein Drug Interactions | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Shedding Light on Protein Drug Interactions JANUARY 23, 2008 Bookmark and Share In this e-coli cell, the proteins (shown in blue) crowd around ribosomes (purple). These regions have a high concentration of protein, typically greater than 30 percent, which limits the ensemble of states into which the proteins can bend themselves. Download hi-res image.) Proteins, the biological molecules that are involved in virtually every action of every organism, may themselves move in surprising ways, according to a recent study carried out at the Biophysics Collaborative Access Team x-ray beamline 18-ID at the Advanced Photon Source, a national user

90

Moose Lake Water & Light Comm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake Water & Light Comm Lake Water & Light Comm Jump to: navigation, search Name Moose Lake Water & Light Comm Place Minnesota Utility Id 12897 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png 2-250HPS-FRO Lighting 250 HPS ELEOLY Lighting 3-250 HPS Lighting 4-250 HPS Lighting 400 HPS Rent Lighting BEST OIL CO Commercial BIKE TRAIL Commercial CIP Commercial Commercial Demand Commercial Commercial Electricity Commercial Demand 1 Phase Industrial

91

Event:Lighting Our Path: The Philips Experience in Promoting Advanced  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Path: The Philips Experience in Promoting Advanced Path: The Philips Experience in Promoting Advanced Lighting Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Lighting Our Path: The Philips Experience in Promoting Advanced Lighting Technologies: 12:30-2:00 Eastern Time on 2011/05/11 David Rodgers of the Global Environment Facility (GEF) would like to make you all aware of the event below titled Lighting Our Path: The Philips Experience in Promoting Advanced Lighting Technologies to be held next Weds. May 11. Event Details Name Lighting Our Path: The Philips Experience in Promoting Advanced Lighting Technologies Date 2011/05/11 Time 12:30-2:00 Eastern Time Location Washington, District of Columbia Organizer Global Environment Facility Tags CLEAN, LEDS Website Event Website Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

92

Biological soft X-ray tomography on beamline 2.1 at the Advanced Light Source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Beamline 2.1, a transmission soft X-ray microscope at the Advanced Light Source of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, is described.

Le Gros, M.A.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Funding Opportunity for Solid-State Lighting Advanced Technology R&D – 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On December 6, 2013, DOE announced solid-state lighting funding opportunity DE-FOA-0000973, "Solid-State Lighting Advanced Technology R&D - 2014." A total of up to $10 million in funding is...

94

Two Rivers Water & Light | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water & Light Water & Light Jump to: navigation, search Name Two Rivers Water & Light Place Wisconsin Utility Id 19324 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Business District Lighting- 150W HPS Lighting Business District Lighting- 200W HPS Lighting General Service- Single-Phase Commercial General Service- Single-Phase- Time-of-Day- 7am-7pm Commercial General Service- Single-Phase- Time-of-Day- 8am-8pm Commercial

95

Duquesne Light Company - Residential Solar Water Heating Program |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Duquesne Light Company - Residential Solar Water Heating Program Duquesne Light Company - Residential Solar Water Heating Program Duquesne Light Company - Residential Solar Water Heating Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Program Info Start Date 11/30/2009 Expiration Date 03/31/2013 State Pennsylvania Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $286/system Provider Duquesne Light Company Duquesne Light provides rebates to its residential customers for purchasing and installing qualifying solar water heating systems. Eligible systems may receive a flat rebate of $286 per qualifying system. Various equipment, installation, contractor, and warranty requirements apply, as summarized above and described in more detail in program documents. Customers must

96

Azusa Light and Water - Solar Partnership Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Azusa Light and Water - Solar Partnership Program Azusa Light and Water - Solar Partnership Program Azusa Light and Water - Solar Partnership Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate 50% of system cost Program Info Expiration Date 12/31/2016 State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Program is fully subscribed for fiscal year 2013-2014. New applicants will be placed on a wait list. $1.55/W-DC Provider Azusa Light and Water '''''This program is fully subscribed through fiscal year 2013/2014. New applicants will be placed on a wait list in the order they were received. ''''' Azusa Light and Water provides rebates to customers who install photovoltaic (PV) systems through the utility's Solar Partnership Program.

97

Hot New Advances in Water Heating Technology | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hot New Advances in Water Heating Technology Hot New Advances in Water Heating Technology Hot New Advances in Water Heating Technology April 18, 2013 - 1:15pm Addthis Learn how a cooperative R&D agreement with the Energy Department's Oak Ridge National Laboratory helped contributed to the success of GE's GeoSpring Hybrid Water Heater -- one of the most efficient electric heat pump water heaters on the market today. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Got Energy Efficiency Questions? Our energy efficiency and renewable energy experts will answer your questions about ways to save money and incorporate renewable energy into your home during our Earth Day Google+ Hangout on April 22 at 3 pm ET. Submit your questions on Twitter, G+ and YouTube using #askEnergy,

98

Hot New Advances in Water Heating Technology | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hot New Advances in Water Heating Technology Hot New Advances in Water Heating Technology Hot New Advances in Water Heating Technology April 18, 2013 - 1:15pm Addthis Learn how a cooperative R&D agreement with the Energy Department's Oak Ridge National Laboratory helped contributed to the success of GE's GeoSpring Hybrid Water Heater -- one of the most efficient electric heat pump water heaters on the market today. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Got Energy Efficiency Questions? Our energy efficiency and renewable energy experts will answer your questions about ways to save money and incorporate renewable energy into your home during our Earth Day Google+ Hangout on April 22 at 3 pm ET. Submit your questions on Twitter, G+ and YouTube using #askEnergy,

99

Clarksville Light & Water Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clarksville Light & Water Co Clarksville Light & Water Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Clarksville Light & Water Co Place Arkansas Utility Id 3705 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Large Commercial (Rate schedule p) Commercial Large Industrial (Rate schedule p) Industrial Residential (R1) Residential Residential Rate Schedule R-2 Residential Security Light Service (Rate schedule L)HPS 100 W Commercial Security Light Service 1000 W MH Commercial Security light service 150 W HPS Commercial

100

North Branch Municipal Water and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

North Branch Municipal Water and Light - Residential Energy North Branch Municipal Water and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program North Branch Municipal Water and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: See program website Room A/C: $25, plus $25 for recycling an old, working unit Central A/C: $100 - $200, plus additional rebate for efficiency ratings above 14.5 SEER Air Source Heat Pump:$100 - $200, plus additional rebate for efficiency ratings above 14.5 SEER Geothermal Heat Pump:$200/ton, plus $25/ton for every 1 EER above minimum

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced light water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Columbia Water and Light - Residential Super Saver Loans | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residential Super Saver Loans Residential Super Saver Loans Columbia Water and Light - Residential Super Saver Loans < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heating Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Solar Maximum Rebate $15,000 Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount Home Performance Super Saver Loan: up to $15,000 Provider Columbia Water and Light The Columbia Water and Light (CWL) Home Performance Super Saver Loan allows Columbia residents to finance energy improvements to homes with affordable, low interest loans with five to ten year terms. If a Water and Light

102

Paragould Light & Water Comm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Paragould Light & Water Comm Paragould Light & Water Comm Jump to: navigation, search Name Paragould Light & Water Comm Place Arkansas Utility Id 14446 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Single Phase Commercial General Three Phase Commercial Industrial Industrial Residential Residential Security Lighting 100 W HPS Lighting

103

Light Water Reactors [Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials] - Nuclear  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Light Water Reactors Light Water Reactors Capabilities Materials Testing Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) of Reactor Materials Corrosion Performance/Metal Dusting Overview Light Water Reactors Fatigue Testing of Carbon Steels and Low-Alloy Steels Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Ni-Base Alloys Irradiation-Induced Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steels Steam Generator Tube Integrity Program Air Oxidation Kinetics for Zr-based Alloys Fossil Energy Fusion Energy Metal Dusting Publications List Irradiated Materials Steam Generator Tube Integrity Other Facilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials Light Water Reactors Bookmark and Share To continue safe operation of current LWRs, the aging degradation of the

104

Lockwood Water & Light Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lockwood Water & Light Company Lockwood Water & Light Company Jump to: navigation, search Name Lockwood Water & Light Company Place Missouri Utility Id 11121 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Commercial Demand Industrial Industrial Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1060/kWh Commercial: $0.1110/kWh Industrial: $0.0926/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Lockwood_Water_%26_Light_Company&oldid=410998

105

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges The most life-limiting structural component in light-water reactors (LWR) is the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) because replacement of the RPV is not considered a viable option at this time. LWR licenses are now being extended from 40y to 60y by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with intentions to extend licenses to 80y and beyond. The RPV materials exhibit varying degrees of sensitivity to irradiation-induced embrittlement (decreased toughness) , as shown in Fig. 1.1, and extending operation from

106

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program - Integrated Program Plan |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program - Integrated Program Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program - Integrated Program Plan Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program - Integrated Program Plan The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), performed in close collaboration and cooperation with related industry R&D programs. The LWRS Program provides technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants, utilizing the unique capabilities of the national laboratory system. Sustainability is defined as the ability to maintain safe and economic operation of the existing fleet of nuclear power plants for a longer than-initially-licensed lifetime. It has two facets

107

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Milestone Report on Materials and Machining of Specimens for the ATR-2 Experiment Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Milestone Report on Materials and Machining of Specimens for the ATR-2 Experiment The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water reactor (LWR) represents the first line of defense against a release of radiation in case of an accident. Thus, regulations, which govern the operation of commercial nuclear power plants, require conservative margins of fracture toughness, both during normal operation and under accident scenarios. In the unirradiated condition, the RPV has sufficient fracture toughness such that failure is implausible under any postulated condition, including

108

Columbia Water and Light- Residential HVAC Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Columbia Water and Light (CWL) provides an HVAC incentive for residential customers that are replacing an older heating and cooling system. Customers should submit the mechanical permit from a...

109

Plasmonic Photoanodes for Solar Water Splitting with Visible Light  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plasmonic Photoanodes for Solar Water Splitting with Visible Light ... The contribution of X.J. was supported by a postdoctoral fellowship from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and by National Science Foundation grant no. ...

Joun Lee; Syed Mubeen; Xiulei Ji; Galen D. Stucky; Martin Moskovits

2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

110

Advanced pressurized water reactor for improved resource utilization, part II - composite advanced PWR concept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates the enhanced resource utilization in an advanced pressurized water reactor (PWR) concept using a composite of selected improvements identified in a companion study. The selected improvements were in the areas of reduced loss of neutrons to control poisons, reduced loss of neutrons in leakage from the core, and improved blanket/reflector concepts. These improvements were incorporated into a single composite advanced PWR. A preliminary assessment of resource requirements and costs and impact on safety are presented.

Turner, S.E.; Gurley, M.K.; Kirby, K.D.; Mitchell, W III

1981-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

Salt and Light Water Purification System.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The need for a proposed solution to help mitigate the world’s water crisis is presented. This need is not a new development in the 21st… (more)

Ewing, Emile

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Chapter 19 - Nanostructured Visible-Light Photocatalysts for Water Purification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Titanium oxide (TiO,) photocatalysts have been widely studied for both solar energy conversion and environmental applications in the past several decades because of their high chemical stability, good photoactivity, relatively low cost, and nontoxicity. However, the photocatalytic capability of TiO, is limited to only ultraviolet light (wavelength, A,water disinfection and removal of organic contaminants in water.

Qi Li; Pinggui Wu; Jian Ku Shang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Advanced Fuel Cycle Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Working with INL Community Outreach Visitor Information Calendar of Events ATR National Scientific User Facility Center for Advanced Energy Studies Light Water Reactor...

114

Characterization of light gluten and light steep water from a corn wet milling plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterization of light gluten and light steep water from a corn wet milling plant K.D. Rausch March 2003; accepted 10 March 2003 Abstract The primary commodity of corn wet milling is starch, but two Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Coproducts; Corn gluten meal; Corn gluten feed; Corn wet milling

115

Advanced Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objectives for this project were: (1) to identify a suitable PdCu tri-metallic alloy membrane with high stability and commercially relevant hydrogen permeation in the presence of trace amounts of carbon monoxide and sulfur; and (2) to identify and synthesize a water gas shift catalyst with a high operating life that is sulfur and chlorine tolerant at low concentrations of these impurities. This work successfully achieved the first project objective to identify a suitable PdCu tri-metallic alloy membrane composition, Pd{sub 0.47}Cu{sub 0.52}G5{sub 0.01}, that was selected based on atomistic and thermodynamic modeling alone. The second objective was partially successful in that catalysts were identified and evaluated that can withstand sulfur in high concentrations and at high pressures, but a long operating life was not achieved at the end of the project. From the limited durability testing it appears that the best catalyst, Pt-Re/Ce{sub 0.333}Zr{sub 0.333}E4{sub 0.333}O{sub 2}, is unable to maintain a long operating life at space velocities of 200,000 h{sup -1}. The reasons for the low durability do not appear to be related to the high concentrations of H{sub 2}S, but rather due to the high operating pressure and the influence the pressure has on the WGS reaction at this space velocity.

Sean Emerson; Thomas Vanderspurt; Susanne Opalka; Rakesh Radhakrishnan; Rhonda Willigan

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

116

Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 Nuclear reactors present a very harsh environment for components service. Components within a reactor core must tolerate high temperature water, stress, vibration, and an intense neutron field. Degradation of materials in this environment can lead to reduced performance, and in some cases, sudden failure. A recent EPRI-led study interviewed 47 US nuclear utility executives to gauge perspectives on long-term operation of nuclear reactors. Nearly 90% indicated that extensions of reactor lifetimes to beyond 60 years were likely. When polled on the most challenging issues facing further life extension, two-thirds cited plant reliability as the

117

Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60 Nuclear reactors present a very harsh environment for components service. Components within a reactor core must tolerate high temperature water, stress, vibration, and an intense neutron field. Degradation of materials in this environment can lead to reduced performance, and in some cases, sudden failure. A recent EPRI-led study interviewed 47 US nuclear utility executives to gauge perspectives on long-term operation of nuclear reactors. Nearly 90% indicated that extensions of reactor lifetimes to beyond 60 years were likely. When polled on the most challenging issues facing further life extension, two-thirds cited plant reliability as the

118

Ten Years of Development Experience with Advanced Light Truck...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for Control of PM from Diesel Backup Generators Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy and Light Vehicles Transportation Fuels: The Future...

119

Science at the Speed of Light: Advanced Photon Source  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

An introduction and overview of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, the technology that produces the brightest x-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere, and the research carried out by scientists using those x-rays.

Murray Gibson

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

120

Science at the Speed of Light: Advanced Photon Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An introduction and overview of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, the technology that produces the brightest x-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere, and the research carried out by scientists using those x-rays.

Murray Gibson

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced light water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Shedding Light on Chemistry with a Biological Twist | Advanced...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of a short-lived intermediate (red) whose reaction trajectory bifurcates along bicycle-pedal (left) and hula-twist (right) pathways. Many of life's processes rely on light...

122

Cedarburg Light & Water Comm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cedarburg Light & Water Comm Cedarburg Light & Water Comm Jump to: navigation, search Name Cedarburg Light & Water Comm Place Wisconsin Utility Id 3208 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service - Regular Rate - Single Phase Commercial General Service - Regular rate - Three Phase Commercial General Service Optional Time-of-Day Rate - Single Phase 7am-7pm Commercial General Service Optional Time-of-Day Rate - Single Phase 8am-8pm Commercial

123

Brodhead Water & Lighting Comm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brodhead Water & Lighting Comm Brodhead Water & Lighting Comm Jump to: navigation, search Name Brodhead Water & Lighting Comm Place Wisconsin Utility Id 2273 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service - GS-1 - Single Phase Commercial General Service - GS-1 Three Phase Commercial General-OTD 1-Three Phase Commercial General-OTD- Single Phase Commercial Industrial Power Time of day CP-3 above 1,000kW Demand Primary Metering and Transformer Discount Industrial Industrial Power Time of day CP-3 above 1,000kW Demand Industrial

124

Waterloo Light & Water Comm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waterloo Light & Water Comm Waterloo Light & Water Comm Jump to: navigation, search Name Waterloo Light & Water Comm Place Wisconsin Utility Id 20182 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service Three Phase Commercial General Service Single Phase Commercial General Service TOU Single Phase Commercial General Service TOU Three Phase Commercial Industrial TOU Industrial Large Power TOU Industrial Renewable Energy Rider 1 Commercial Renewable Energy Rider 2 Industrial

125

Apply: Solid-State Lighting Advanced Technology R&D- 2015 Funding Opportunity  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Closed Application Deadline: January 15, 2015 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced a solid-state lighting (SSL) R&D funding opportunity on October 14, 2014, titled Solid-State Lighting Advanced Technology R&D – 2015, DE-FOA-0001171.

126

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Nondestructive Evaluation for Concrete  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nondestructive Evaluation for Nondestructive Evaluation for Concrete Research and Development Roadmap Light Water Reactor Sustainability Nondestructive Evaluation for Concrete Research and Development Roadmap Materials issues are a key concern for the existing nuclear reactor fleet as material degradation can lead to increased maintenance, increased downtown, and increased risk. Extending reactor life to 60 years and beyond will likely increase susceptibility and severity of known forms of degradation. Additionally, new mechanisms of materials degradation are also possible. The purpose of the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend

127

Status of advanced light-duty transportation technologies in the US  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The need to reduce oil consumption and greenhouse gases is driving a fundamental change toward more efficient, advanced vehicles, and fuels in the transportation sector. The paper reviews the current status of light duty vehicles in the US and discusses policies to improve fuel efficiency, advanced electric drives, and sustainable cellulosic biofuels. The paper describes the cost, technical, infrastructure, and market barriers for alternative technologies, i.e., advanced biofuels and light-duty vehicles, including diesel vehicles, natural-gas vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and fuel-cell electric vehicles. The paper also presents R&D targets and technology validation programs of the US government.

David Andress; Sujit Das; Fred Joseck; T. Dean Nguyen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Advances in the Research of Heat Pump Water Heaters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Renewable Energy Resources and a Greener Future Vol.VIII-12-2 1 Advances in the Research of Heat Pump Water Heaters Shangli Shan Dandan Wang Ruixiang Wang Master Master Professor Beijing...) [21] Wang sui-lin . Affection on fin-and-tube Heat Exchanger's Properties by non azeotropic mixtures[J] . Fluid machinery , 1996 , 24 (5) [22] Ge run-ting . Foundation of Dynamic Parameter Model and Theoritical Calculation of Evaporator...

Shan, S.; Wang, D.; Wang, R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Considerations REQUEST BY ACUITY BRANDS LIGHTING, INC., FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

REQUEST BY ACUITY BRANDS LIGHTING, INC., FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND REQUEST BY ACUITY BRANDS LIGHTING, INC., FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS MADE IN THE COURSE OF OR UNDER DOE GRANT NO. DE-EE0004534; DOE WAIVERDOCKETW(A)2010-059 [ORO-801] Petitioner, Acuity Brands Lighting, Inc., (ACUITy) has made a timely request for an advance waiver to worldwide rights in Subject Inventions made in the course of or under DOE Grant No. DE-EEOOO4534 entitled, "Energy Saving Phosphorescent OLED Luminaires." The scope of the project includes ACUITY working as a subcontractor to, and in cooperation with Universal Display Corporation (UDC) as the prime contractor in the development of phosphorescent organic light-emitting diode (OLED) luminaires. In the first phase, UDC will be responsible for the basic OLED

130

Advanced, Energy-Efficient Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial Water Reuse  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Demonstrate an advanced water treatment and reuse process in a single hybrid system that combines forward osmosis with membrane distillation to achieve greater efficiency and increased water reuse.

131

Superior Water, Light and Power Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water, Light and Power Co Water, Light and Power Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Superior Water, Light and Power Co Place Wisconsin Utility Id 18336 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.1050/kWh Commercial: $0.0835/kWh Industrial: $0.0674/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Superior Water, Light and Power Co (Wisconsin). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS

132

Near-infrared light scattering by particles in coastal waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near-infrared light scattering by particles in coastal waters David Doxaran* , Marcel Babin extend over the near-infrared spectral region to up to 870 nm. The measurements were conducted in three in the near-infrared very closely matched a - spectral dependence, which is expected when the particle size

Babin, Marcel

133

Radio-toxicity of spent fuel of the advanced heavy water reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Radio-toxicity of spent fuel of the advanced heavy water reactor S. Anand * K. D. S...Mumbai 400085, India The Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is a new power...PHWR. INTRODUCTION The Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR)(1, 2), currently......

S. Anand; K. D. S. Singh; V. K. Sharma

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Advanced modeling of reaction cross sections for light nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The shell model/R-matrix technique of calculating nuclear reaction cross sections for light projectiles incident on light nuclei is discussed, particularly in the application of the technique to thermonuclear reactions. Details are presented on the computational methods for the shell model which display how easily the calculations can be performed. Results of the shell model/R-matrix technique are discussed as are some of the problems encountered in picking an appropriate nucleon-nucleon interaction for the large model spaces which must be used for current problems. The status of our work on developing an effective nucleon-nucleon interaction for use in large-basis shell model calculations is presented. This new interaction is based on a combination of global constraints and microscopic nuclear data. 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Resler, D.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assessment of High Value Surveillance Materials Assessment of High Value Surveillance Materials Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Assessment of High Value Surveillance Materials The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water reactor (LWR) represents the first line of defense against a release of radiation in case of an accident. Thus, regulations that govern the operation of commercial nuclear power plants require conservative margins of fracture toughness, both during normal operation and under accident scenarios. In the unirradiated condition, the RPV has sufficient fracture toughness such that failure is implausible under any postulated condition, including pressurized thermal shock (PTS) in pressurized water reactors (PWR). In the irradiated condition, however, the fracture toughness of the RPV may be severely

136

Large passive pressure tube light water reactor with voided calandria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reactor concept has been developed that can survive loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs) without scram and without replenishing primary coolant inventory while maintaining safe temperature limits on the fuel and pressure tube. The proposed concept is a pressure tube reactor of similar design to Canada deuterium uranium reactors but differing in three key aspects. First, a solid silicon carbide-coated graphite fuel matrix is used in place of fuel pin bundles to enable the dissipation of decay heat from the fuel in the absence of primary coolant. Second, the heavy water coolant in the pressure tubes is replaced by light water, which also serves as the moderator. Finally, the calandria tank, surrounded by a graphite reflector, contains a low-pressure gas instead of heavy water moderator, and this normally voided calandria is connected to a light water heat sink. The cover gas displaces the light water from the calandria during normal operation while during a LOCA or loss of heat sink accident, it allows passive calandria flooding. Calandria flooding also provides redundant and diverse reactor shutdown. The fuel elements can operate under post-critical-heat-flux conditions even at full power without exceeding fuel design limits. The heterogeneous arrangement of the fuel and moderator ensures a negative void coefficient under all circumstances. Although light water is used as both coolant and moderator, the reactor exhibits a high degree of neutron thermalization and a large prompt neutron lifetime, similar to D{sub 2}O-moderated cores. Moreover, the extremely large neutron migration length results in a strongly coupled core with a flat thermal flux profile and inherent stability against xenon spatial oscillations.

Hejzlar, P.; Todreas, N.E.; Driscoll, M.J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

IEP - Water-Energy Interface: Advanced Cooling Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cooling Technology Cooling Technology This component of the program is focused on research to develop technologies that improve performance and reduce costs associated with wet cooling, dry cooling, and hybrid cooling technologies. In addition, the research area covers innovative methods to control bio-fouling of cooling water intake structures as well as advances in intake structure systems. Read More! It is technically possible to cool power plants with minimal water use. However, at this time such cooling methods are not as economically feasible as traditional cooling systems. Additional research and development is necessary to develop cooling systems that use as little water as possible, but at a reasonable cost. Water intake structures are also an area of concern, especially considering the Clean Water Act 316(b) regulation which requires that the location, design, construction, and capacity of cooling water intake structures reflect the best technology available for minimizing adverse environmental impact. With plant intake structures, the particular concern is impingement and entrainment of aquatic organisms.

138

New Light on Improving Engine Efficiencies | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Crystal Structure of a Meta-stable Intermediate Particle in Virus The Crystal Structure of a Meta-stable Intermediate Particle in Virus Assembly Increasing Magnetic Response of Ferromagnetic Semiconductors under High Pressure Better Switching Through Chemistry in Thin Ferroelectrics First Molecular-Level Enzyme Images Could Improve Breast-Cancer Therapy Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed New Light on Improving Engine Efficiencies MARCH 3, 2009 Bookmark and Share The DOE, as part of its Clean Coal & Natural Gas Power Systems initiative, has a "Turbines of Tomorrow" program with the Program Performance Goal to: "By 2010, develop turbine technology that is capable of efficiently

139

DAINTREE NETWORKS PARTNERS WITH CLTC TO ADVANCE LIGHTING CONTROLS UC Davis' California Lighting Technology Center (CLTC) and Daintree team up to increase adoption with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- more - DAINTREE NETWORKS PARTNERS WITH CLTC TO ADVANCE LIGHTING CONTROLS UC Davis' California affiliate partnership with UC Davis' California Lighting Technology Center (CLTC) with the goal of advancing wireless smart building solutions for enterprise control and energy management, today announced its

California at Davis, University of

140

Advanced Photon Source, Canadian Light Source Strengthen Ties, Expand X-ray  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rose of APS and CNM One of Four DOE Early Career Award Winners Rose of APS and CNM One of Four DOE Early Career Award Winners Scientists Close-In on Artificial Spider Silk Ekiert Earns 2012 APSUO Franklin Award for Studies of Influenza Virus Clever Apes on WBEZ: Breaking the Fossil Record Gerig to Chair Particle Accelerator School Board APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed Advanced Photon Source, Canadian Light Source Strengthen Ties, Expand X-ray Technology and Research JUNE 18, 2012 Bookmark and Share The interiors of the Canadian Light Source (top) and Advanced Photon Source experiment halls. (CLS photo courtesy of Canadian Light Source) Seeking to solve some of today's greatest global problems, scientists using x-ray light source facilities at national research laboratories in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced light water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on specific industry issues, CASL engages an Industry Council chaired by the Electric Power Research Institute. CASL is committed to engaging the nuclear power industry to...

142

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

but also assure quality, flexibility, extensibility, reuse of software, and development efficiency. Use of these methodologies in the development of VERA demonstrates their...

143

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

behavior in AP1000 reactor core Test run signals emergence of the next generation in nuclear power reactor analysis tools OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Feb. 18, 2014 - Scientists and...

144

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Media Center News Obama highlights next generation nuclear reactors in the SOTU Posted: January 27, 2011 President Obama, in his State of the Union address Tuesday, cited work...

145

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

interface between analysis codes (e.g,. a physics simulation) and iterative systems analysis methods such as optimization or uncertainty quantification. It includes algorithms...

146

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

has designed and operated 52 test reactors, including EBR-1, the world's first nuclear power plant Key Contributions System safety analysis Multiscale fuel performance...

147

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the better understanding of the system uncertainties and sensitivities afforded by the virtual reactor will identify improvements in both the operation and design of the fuel...

148

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Shortly after that modeling prediction, a significant-sized sample of that actual phase material was discovered in the coolant system of an LWR. This instance is encouraging...

149

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nation's carbon-free energy and safely provides reliable baseload electricity for the US grid. CASL Names Bennett Johnston to Board of Directors Posted: August 31, 2010 Former...

150

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hotels Oak Ridge Hotels Knoxville Hotels ORNL Guest House Car Rental Taxi Service Tourism Information Regional Information Staff Directory Connect with CASL Visitor...

151

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

integrators that may be used in application codes written in Fortran, C, C++, Python, and MATLAB (sequential). PETSc provides many of the mechanisms needed within parallel...

152

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surrogate Models for Uncertainty Quantification presented by Dr. Ralph Smith, NCSU Resources OverviewFact Sheets Software ComputerComputational Science and Applied Mathematics...

153

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Journal and Conference Papers 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 Technical Reports 2014 2013 2012 2011 Invited Presentations 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 CASL scientists, engineers,...

154

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the VERA 2013 Test & Evaluation Release software will be provided through the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC). The package will be transmitted on...

155

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

requirements) and formality (with an eye on quality standards such as DOE O 414.1D, ISO 9001, and NQA-1-2008). Radiation Transport Methods (RTM) - Develop neutron transport...

156

Microsoft Word - Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Advanced...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on operator attention demands and limitations on operator activities based on the current conduct of operations protocols. This report will identify opportunities to maximize...

157

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mission. Industry Council Members AREVA ANSYS, Inc. Battelle Memorial Institute Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory Cray Inc. Dominion Duke Energy The EDF Group Electric Power...

158

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

state of the art in contemporary MODSIM technology g maximize value 3. Establish a self-sustaining organization, drawing from the CASL Industry Council, that is dedicated to the...

159

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PWR Fuel CRUD," Proceedings of the TMS 2013 142nd Annual Meeting and Exhibition, March 3-7, 2013, San Antonio, TX, 2013. Tryggvason, G., S. Dabiri, B. Aboulhasanzadeh, J. Lu.,...

160

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in nuclear energy R&D, as well as a record of accomplishment in leading large-scale scientific collaborations. The participation of Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Los...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced light water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to the coolant, resulting in a lower efficiency in power production. Excessive bubble production through subcooled boiling can result in undesirable local hotspots and the...

162

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

been identified at present covering the following six Challenge Problems: CRUD, GTRF PCI, RIA, LOCA and DNB; more are expected as CASL continues to evolve. The Overall Product...

163

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

integrity issues System: accessibility to RELAP5 capabilities Infrastructure: buildtest system, LIME and coupling model evaluators, data transfer and coupling toolkits,...

164

CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

best operational practices (CRUD, GTRF). Functional capability and partial assessment for RIA- and LOCA-based transient problems. * Radiation Transport Methods (RTM) - Robust 3D...

165

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

650-855-8529 Rose Montgomery Deputy Lead rmontgomery@tva.gov 865-576-1381 Steve Hess Test Stands shess@epri.com 484-753-3677 Product Integrators and Cross-Cutting Technologies...

166

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

29, 2014. Torres-Tan, S.A., Coupled Fluid Structure Simulations for Application to Grid-to-Rod Fretting, December 15, 2014. Stagg, A.K., M.A. Christon and K. Frick, Native...

167

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a general non-linear 3D heat transport equation for the crud layer including localized heat sinks due to the internal boiling within the crud layer, (2) an adaptive grid which...

168

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Uncertainties in Predictive Science presented by Dr. Hany Abdel-Khalik and Dr. Ralph Smith, NCSU Resources OverviewFact Sheets Software ComputerComputational Science and...

169

Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collaboration and Ideation (C&I) Technology Paradigms to Propel Energy Science Innovation Objectives and Strategies Facilitate collaboration and ideation through the Virtual...

170

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced light reactor Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 3 4 5 > >> Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 21 Nuclear reactor safeguards and monitoring with antineutrino detectors A. Bernsteina) Summary: at the end of 2000.2 Most are light water...

171

McMinnville Water and Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

McMinnville Water and Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate McMinnville Water and Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs McMinnville Water and Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount McMinnville Water and Light Company Provider McMinnville Water and Light McMinnville Water and Light Company offers a variety of rebates for commercial and industrial customers to make energy efficient improvements to eligible facilities. MW&L offers rebates in three categories: Lighting retrofits, motor replacements, and process efficiency. Past lighting projects have included fluorescent lighting retrofits, mercury vapor

172

LBLOCA in CANDU-NG cooled by light water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to develop methodologies for the evaluation of LBLOCA in CANDU-NG reactors with the codes DONJON and DRAGON. CANDU-NG reactor differ from traditional CANDU reactors in being cooled by light water, using enriched fuel and burnable poisons, having significantly lesser quantity of heavy water moderator. The evaluation shows that methodology developed for CANDU-NG LBLOCA properly detects positive reactivity introduced in the core by initial voiding in checkerboard pattern, peaking at 143 pcm. Such reactivity quickly becomes negative, however, bottoming at ?804 pcm and the reactor shuts down by itself without the intervention of any engineered system.

Alexi V. Popov; Andrei Olekhnovitch; Majid Fassi Fehri

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

North Branch Water & Light Comm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Branch Water & Light Comm North Branch Water & Light Comm Place Minnesota Utility Id 13681 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Commercial Large General Service Industrial Residential Residential Residential- Seasonal Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1250/kWh Commercial: $0.1140/kWh Industrial: $0.0750/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

174

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges The most life-limiting structural component in light-water reactors (LWR) is the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) because replacement of the RPV is not considered a viable option at this time. LWR licenses are now being extended from 40y to 60y by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with intentions to extend licenses to 80y and beyond. The RPV materials exhibit varying degrees of sensitivity to irradiation-induced embrittlement (decreased toughness) , as shown in Fig. 1.1, and extending operation from 40y to 80y implies a doubling of the neutron exposure for the RPV. Thus,

175

Oconto Falls Water & Light Comm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oconto Falls Water & Light Comm Oconto Falls Water & Light Comm Place Wisconsin Utility Id 13965 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 TOD Small Power Optional Time-of-Day Service Primary Metering Discount

176

Newberry Water & Light Board | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Board Board Jump to: navigation, search Name Newberry Water & Light Board Place Michigan Utility Id 13525 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Electric Commercial Residential Electric Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1100/kWh Commercial: $0.1030/kWh Industrial: $0.1390/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Newberry_Water_%26_Light_Board&oldid=411182

177

City Water and Light Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Light Plant and Light Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name City Water and Light Plant Place Arkansas Utility Id 9879 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service- Large Industrial General Service- Large(Primary Metering) Industrial General Service- Small Electric Rate Commercial General service (Residential Electric Rate) Residential

178

Lansing Board of Water and Light - Hometown Energy Savers Commercial  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savers Savers Commercial Rebates Lansing Board of Water and Light - Hometown Energy Savers Commercial Rebates < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Manufacturing Other Construction Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Incentives for Prescriptive measures may not exceed 100% of the total project cost, or $50,000 per electric meter per year. Incentives for Custom measures may not exceed 40% of the total project cost, or $20,000. Program Info Expiration Date 11/30/2013 State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Small Business Direct Install Program: No cost or purchase necessary for participation Custom $0.08/kWh Commercial Cooking Equipment: Varies

179

Single-layer mirrors for advanced research light sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray mirrors are needed for beam guidance, beam alignment and monochromatisation at third-generation synchrotron light sources (PETRA III) and forthcoming Free-Electron Lasers (LCLS, European XFEL). Amorphous carbon coatings are currently used as total reflection mirrors at FLASH to guide the photon beam to the various beamlines. These coatings were prepared by means of magnetron sputtering. The new GKSS sputtering facility for the deposition of single and multilayer mirrors with a length of up to 1500 mm and a width of up to 120 mm is in operation. In this contribution we present the results of this new deposition system. A major advantage is that it is now possible to prepare one, two or more mirrors with similar properties over the whole deposition length. The mirror properties were investigated by means of X-ray reflectometry and interference microscopy. The performance of the mirrors is analyzed, considering X-ray reflectivity, film thickness and surface roughness. The uniformity of these properties over the whole deposition length of 1500 mm is demonstrated. The results obtained will be discussed and compared with former results.

Stoermer, M.; Horstmann, C. [GKSS Research Centre Geesthacht GmbH, Institute of Materials Research, Max-Planck-Str. 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Siewert, F. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin / BESSY-II, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Scholze, F.; Krumrey, M. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Hertlein, F.; Matiaske, M.; Wiesmann, J. [Incoatec GmbH, Max-Planck-Str. 2, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Gaudin, J. [European XFEL, DESY, 22603 Hamburg (Germany)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

180

Vacuum system for the LBL advanced light source (ALS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 1.5 to 1.9 GeV synchrotron light source is being built at LBL. The vacuum system is designed to permit all synchrotron photons on the median plane to escape the electron channel and go into an antechamber through a 10 mm high slot. This slot offers effective RF isolation between the electron duct and the antechamber. All unused synchrotron photons within a few mrad of the median plane will be stopped by 96 nearly horizontal absorbers located in the antechamber. The gas, generated by the photons hitting the absorbers, will be directed down to reactive titanium surfaces. Twelve 10 meter long vessels constitute the vacuum chambers for all the lattice magnets. Each chamber will be machined from two thick plates of 5083-H321 aluminum and welded at the perimeter. The nominal wall thickness of the vacuum chamber is 40 mm, which makes it possible to machine a flange into the chamber without the use of welding. 5 refs., 5 figs.

Kennedy, K.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced light water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

TRAC-PF1: an advanced best-estimate computer program for pressurized water reactor analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) is being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in light water reactors. The TRAC-PF1 program provides this capability for pressurized water reactors and for many thermal-hydraulic experimental facilities. The code features either a one-dimensional or a three-dimensional treatment of the pressure vessel and its associated internals; a two-phase, two-fluid nonequilibrium hydrodynamics model with a noncondensable gas field; flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment; optional reflood tracking capability for both bottom flood and falling-film quench fronts; and consistent treatment of entire accident sequences including the generation of consistent initial conditions. This report describes the thermal-hydraulic models and the numerical solution methods used in the code. Detailed programming and user information also are provided.

Liles, D.R.; Mahaffy, J.H.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Lake Mills Light & Water | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Water Jump to: navigation, search Name Lake Mills Light & Water Place Wisconsin Utility Id 10605 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount Industrial

183

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY LUMILEDS LIGHTING, U.S. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY LUMILEDS LIGHTING, U.S. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC26-01NT41251; W(A)-02-005, CH-1089 The Petitioner, LumiLeds Lighting U.S. LLC (LumiLeds), was awarded this cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled, "Development of Key Technologies for White Lighting Based on LEDs". According to the State of Project Objectives attached to the waiver petition, the objective of the project is to improve the efficiency of III-N alloy light emitting diodes (LEDs) for use in white lighting. This will be accomplished by investigation of three areas: 1) the use of low defect density substrates to be used for the growth of standard and well

184

NAN-190 potentiates the circadian response to light and speeds re-entrainment to advanced light cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Health problems can arise from de-synchrony between the external environment and the endogenous circadian rhythm, yet the circadian system is not able to quickly adjust to large, abrupt changes in the external daily cycle. In this study, we investigated the ability of NAN-190 to potentiate the circadian rhythm response to light as measured by phase of behavioral activity rhythms. NAN-190 (5 mg/kg, i.p.) was able to significantly potentiate the response to light both in dark-adapted and entrained hamsters. Furthermore, NAN-190 was effective even when administered up to 6 h after light onset. Response to a light pulse was both greater in magnitude and involved fewer unstable transient cycles. Finally, NAN-190 was able to speed re-entrainment to a 6 h advance of the light/dark cycle by an average of 6 days when compared with vehicle-treated animals. This work suggests that compounds like NAN-190 may hold great potential as a pharmaceutical treatment for jetlag, shift work, and other circadian disorders.

E.J. Kessler; J. Sprouse; M.E. Harrington

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Accident Performance of Light Water Reactor Cladding Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During a loss of coolant accident as experienced at Fukushima, inadequate cooling of the reactor core forces component temperatures ever higher where they must withstand aggressive chemical environments. Conventional zirconium cladding alloys will readily oxidize in the presence of water vapor at elevated temperatures, rapidly degrading and likely failing. A cladding breach removes the critical barrier between actinides and fission products and the coolant, greatly increasing the probability of the release of radioactivity in the event of a containment failure. These factors have driven renewed international interest in both study and improvement of the materials used in commercial light water reactors. Characterization of a candidate cladding alloy or oxidation mitigation technique requires understanding of both the oxidation kinetics and hydrogen production as a function of temperature and atmosphere conditions. Researchers in the MST division supported by the DOE-NE Fuel Cycle Research and Development program are working to evaluate and quantify these parameters across a wide range of proposed cladding materials. The primary instrument employed is a simultaneous thermal analyzer (STA) equipped with a specialized water vapor furnace capable of maintaining temperatures above 1200 C in a range of atmospheres and water vapor contents. The STA utilizes thermogravimetric analysis and a coupled mass spectrometer to measure in situ oxidation and hydrogen production of candidate materials. This capability is unprecedented in study of materials under consideration for reactor cladding use, and is currently being expanded to investigate proposed coating techniques as well as the effect of coating defects on corrosion resistance.

Nelson, Andrew T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

186

High-resolution VUV spectroscopy: New results from the Advanced Light Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Third-generation synchrotron light sources are providing photon beams of unprecedented brightness for researchers in atomic and molecular physics. Beamline 9.0.1, an undulator beamline at the Advanced Light Source (ALS), produces a beam in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) region of the spectrum with exceptional flux and spectral resolution. Exciting new results from experiments in atomic and molecular VUV spectroscopy of doubly excited autoionizing states of helium, hollow lithium, and photoelectron spectroscopy of small molecules using Beamline 9.0.1 at the ALS are reported.

Schlachter, F.; Bozek, J.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Protein Structures Through use of Superbends at the Advance Light Source |  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Protein Structures Protein Structures Through use of Superbends at the Advance Light Source Laboratory Policy and Evaluation (LPE) LPE Home Staff M&O Contracts SC Laboratory Appraisal Process Laboratory Planning Process Work for Others in the Office of Science Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) DOE's Philosophy on LDRD Frequently Asked Questions Success Stories Brochures Additional Information LDRD Program Contacts Technology Transfer DOE National Laboratories Contact Information Laboratory Policy and Evaluation U.S. Department of Energy SC-32/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5447 F: (202) 586-3119 Success Stories Protein Structures Through use of Superbends at the Advance Light Source Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page

188

Advanced Photon Source lights the way to 2012 Chemistry Nobel | Argonne  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Photon Source lights the way to 2012 Chemistry Nobel Advanced Photon Source lights the way to 2012 Chemistry Nobel By Jared Sagoff * October 10, 2012 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - Thanks in part to research performed at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, the 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded today to Americans Brian Kobilka and Robert Lefkowitz for their work on G-protein-coupled receptors. G-protein-coupled receptors, or GPCRs, are a large family of proteins embedded in a cell's membrane that sense molecules outside the cell and activate a cascade of different cellular processes in response. They constitute key components of how cells interact with their environments and are the target of nearly half of today's pharmaceuticals. These medicines work by connecting with many of the 800 or so human GPCRs.

189

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Status of Silicon Carbide Joining Technology Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced, accident tolerant nuclear fuel systems are currently being investigated for potential application in currently operating light water reactors (LWR) or in reactors that have attained design certification. Evaluation of potential options for accident tolerant nuclear fuel systems point to the potential benefits of silicon carbide (SiC) relative to Zr-based alloys, including increased corrosion resistance, reduced oxidation and heat of oxidation, and reduced hydrogen generation under steam attack (off-normal conditions). If demonstrated to be applicable in the intended LWR environment, SiC could be used in nuclear fuel cladding or other in-core structural components. Achieving a SiC-SiC joint that resists corrosion with hot, flowing water, is stable under irradiation and retains hermeticity is a significant challenge. This report summarizes the current status of SiC-SiC joint development work supported by the Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. Significant progress has been made toward SiC-SiC joint development for nuclear service, but additional development and testing work (including irradiation testing) is still required to present a candidate joint for use in nuclear fuel cladding.

Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Advanced, Low-Cost Solar Water Heating Research Project | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced, Low-Cost Solar Water Heating Advanced, Low-Cost Solar Water Heating Research Project Advanced, Low-Cost Solar Water Heating Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy is currently conducting research into advanced low-cost solar water heating. This project will employ innovative techniques to adapt water heating technology to meet U.S. market requirements, including specifications, cost, and performance targets. Project Description This project seeks to identify and resolve technical, performance, and cost barriers to the development of easy-to-install and reliable solar water heating systems for all major U.S. climate regions. The project will also evaluate opportunities for breakthrough system innovations and innovations in advanced system performance ratings. Project Partners

191

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY CREE LIGHTING COMPANY, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

20 2001 09:52 FR IPL DOE CH 630 252 2779 TO FGCP-HQ P.02/04 20 2001 09:52 FR IPL DOE CH 630 252 2779 TO FGCP-HQ P.02/04 * * STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY CREE LIGHTING COMPANY, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC26- 00NT40985 W(A)-01-002, CH-1055 The Petitioner, Cree Lighting Company, (Cree), was awarded this cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled, "Energy Efficient Solid State Lamp". The purpose of the cooperative agreement is to develop high efficiency, high radiance light emitting diode (LED) chip and packaging technology that is expected to lead to novel solid state lamps capable of replacing less energy efficient incandescent and halogen reflector lamps. When compared with current incandescent reflector lamps, this revolutionary new lamp is expected to be three times more

192

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Materials Aging and Degradation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Materials Aging and Materials Aging and Degradation Technical Program Plan Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Materials Aging and Degradation Technical Program Plan Components serving in a nuclear reactor plant must withstand a very harsh environment including extended time at temperature, neutron irradiation, stress, and/or corrosive media. The many modes of degradation are complex and vary depending on location and material. However, understanding and managing materials degradation is a key for the continued safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants. Extending reactor service to beyond 60 years will increase the demands on materials and components. Therefore, an early evaluation of the possible effects of extended lifetime is critical. The recent NUREG/CR-6923 gives a

193

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program - Non-Destructive Evaluation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Program - Non-Destructive Program - Non-Destructive Evaluation R&D Roadmap for Determining Remaining Useful Life of Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program - Non-Destructive Evaluation R&D Roadmap for Determining Remaining Useful Life of Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants The purpose of the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Cables is to support the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) R&D pathway. A workshop was held to gather subject matter experts to develop the NDE R&D Roadmap for Cables. The focus of the workshop was to identify the technical gaps in detecting aging cables and predicting their remaining life expectancy. The workshop was held in Knoxville, Tennessee, on July 30, 2012, at Analysis and Measurement Services Corporation (AMS) headquarters.

194

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Integrated Program Plan |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Integrated Program Plan Integrated Program Plan Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Integrated Program Plan Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas- emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to grow by more than 30% from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license, for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power

195

Advancements in sensing and perception using structured lighting techniques :an LDRD final report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the analytical and experimental efforts for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled ''Advancements in Sensing and Perception using Structured Lighting Techniques''. There is an ever-increasing need for robust, autonomous ground vehicles for counterterrorism and defense missions. Although there has been nearly 30 years of government-sponsored research, it is undisputed that significant advancements in sensing and perception are necessary. We developed an innovative, advanced sensing technology for national security missions serving the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, and other government agencies. The principal goal of this project was to develop an eye-safe, robust, low-cost, lightweight, 3D structured lighting sensor for use in broad daylight outdoor applications. The market for this technology is wide open due to the unavailability of such a sensor. Currently available laser scanners are slow, bulky and heavy, expensive, fragile, short-range, sensitive to vibration (highly problematic for moving platforms), and unreliable for outdoor use in bright sunlight conditions. Eye-safety issues are a primary concern for currently available laser-based sensors. Passive, stereo-imaging sensors are available for 3D sensing but suffer from several limitations : computationally intensive, require a lighted environment (natural or man-made light source), and don't work for many scenes or regions lacking texture or with ambiguous texture. Our approach leveraged from the advanced capabilities of modern CCD camera technology and Center 6600's expertise in 3D world modeling, mapping, and analysis, using structured lighting. We have a diverse customer base for indoor mapping applications and this research extends our current technology's lifecycle and opens a new market base for outdoor 3D mapping. Applications include precision mapping, autonomous navigation, dexterous manipulation, surveillance and reconnaissance, part inspection, geometric modeling, laser-based 3D volumetric imaging, simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM), aiding first responders, and supporting soldiers with helmet-mounted LADAR for 3D mapping in urban-environment scenarios. The technology developed in this LDRD overcomes the limitations of current laser-based 3D sensors and contributes to the realization of intelligent machine systems reducing manpower need.

Novick, David Keith; Padilla, Denise D.; Davidson, Patrick A. Jr. (.; .); Carlson, Jeffrey J.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

DOE Awards Up to $14.6 Million to Support Development of Advanced Water  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Up to $14.6 Million to Support Development of Advanced Up to $14.6 Million to Support Development of Advanced Water Power Technologies DOE Awards Up to $14.6 Million to Support Development of Advanced Water Power Technologies September 15, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that 22 advanced water power projects will receive up to $14.6 million in funding to advance the commercial viability, market acceptance, and environmental performance for new marine and hydrokinetic technologies as well as conventional hydropower plants. The projects selected today will further the nation's supply of domestic clean hydroelectricity through technological innovation to capitalize on new sources of energy, and will advance markets and research to maximize the nation's largest renewable

197

Fuel Performance Code Benchmark for Uncertainty Analysis in Light Water Reactor Modeling.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Fuel performance codes are used in the design and safety analysis of light water reactors. The differences in the physical models and the numerics of… (more)

Blyth, Taylor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Constellation Pilot Project FY13 Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summary report for Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) activities related to the R. E. Ginna and Nine Mile Point Unit 1 for FY13.

R. Johansen

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Constellation Pilot Project FY12 Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summary report for Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) activities related to the R. E. Ginna and Nine Mile Point Unit 1 for FY12.

R. Johansen

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Characterization of light gluten and light steep water from a corn wet milling plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The primary commodity of corn wet milling is starch, but two coproducts (corn gluten feed, CGF and corn gluten meal, CGM) also are produced. CGM and CGF are marketed as animal foodstuffs and are important economically; however, variation in composition reduces quality. There are few data on the effect of composition of the parent process streams, light steep water (LSW) and light gluten (LG), respectively, on composition of CGF and CGM. The objective was to characterize LG and LSW. Samples of LG and LSW were collected: (1) hourly for one day, (2) every 3 h for 3 days, and (3) daily for 3 weeks. Dry matter, N and ash were determined. Variation in composition of LG and LSW was greatest during longer periods of time (days and weeks) rather than shorter (hourly or every 3 h). There was significant variation in DM (solids) content, which directly affected the concentration of other components. Variation in N (protein) of LG and LSW accounted for much of the variation in CGF and CG. Processes that modify processing and reduce variation could increase the quality of CGF and CGM.

K.D Rausch; C.I Thompson; R.L Belyea; M.E Tumbleson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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201

Successful Completion of the Top-off Upgrade of the Advanced Light Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An upgrade of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to enable top-off operation has been completed during the last four years. The final work centered around radiation safety aspects, culminating in a systematic proof that top-off operation is equally safe as decaying beam operation. Commissioning and transition to full user operations happened in late 2008 and early 2009. Top-off operation at the ALS provides a very large increase in time-averaged brightness (by about a factor of 10) as well as improvements in beam stability. The following sections provide an overview of the radiation safety rationale, commissioning results, as well as experience in user operations.

Steier, C.; Bailey, B.; Baptiste, K.; Barry, W.; Biocca, A.; Byrne, W.; Casey, P.; Chin, M.; Donahue, R.; Duarte, R.; Fahmie, M.; Gath, B.; Jacobson, S.; Julian, J.; Jung, J. Y.; Kritscher, M.; Kwiatkowski, S.; Marks, S.; McKean, P.; Mueller, R. [LBNL, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

202

ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, VOL. 32, JANUARY 2015, 3263 On the Radiative Properties of Ice Clouds: Light Scattering, Remote Sensing,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the radiative properties of ice clouds from three perspectives: light scattering simulations, remote sensingADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, VOL. 32, JANUARY 2015, 32­63 On the Radiative Properties of Ice Clouds: Light Scattering, Remote Sensing, and Radiation Parameterization Ping YANG1, Kuo-Nan LIOU2, Lei

Baum, Bryan A.

203

Chemical and light-stable isotope characteristics of waters from the raft  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

light-stable isotope characteristics of waters from the raft light-stable isotope characteristics of waters from the raft river geothermal area and environs, Cassia County, Idaho, Box Elder county, Utah Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Chemical and light-stable isotope characteristics of waters from the raft river geothermal area and environs, Cassia County, Idaho, Box Elder county, Utah Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Chemical and light-stable isotope data are presented for water samples from the Raft River geothermal area and environs. On the basis of chemical character, as defined by a trilinear plot of per cent milliequivalents, and light-stable isotope data, the waters in the geothermal area can be divided into waters that have and have not mixed

204

A Review of Stress Corrosion Cracking/Fatigue Modeling for Light Water  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A Review of Stress Corrosion Cracking/Fatigue Modeling for Light A Review of Stress Corrosion Cracking/Fatigue Modeling for Light Water Reactor Cooling System Components A Review of Stress Corrosion Cracking/Fatigue Modeling for Light Water Reactor Cooling System Components In the United States currently there are approximately 104 operating light water reactors. Of these, 69 are pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and 35 are boiling water reactors (BWRs). In 2007, the 104 light-water reactors (LWRs) in the United States generated approximately 100 GWe, equivalent to 20% of total US electricity production. Most of the US reactors were built before 1970 and the initial design lives of most of the reactors are 40 years. It is expected that by 2030, even those reactors that have received 20-year life extension license from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission

205

Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors. Semiannual report, October 1990--March 1991: Volume 13  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to the Regulatory and ASME Code requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties.

Doctor, S.R.; Good, M.S.; Heasler, P.G.; Hockey, R.L.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Taylor, T.T.; Vo, T.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Uncertainty analysis of LBLOCA for Advanced Heavy Water Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main objective of safety analysis is to demonstrate in a robust way that all safety requirements are met, i.e. sufficient margins exist between real values of important parameters and their threshold values at which damage of the barriers against release of radioactivity would occur. As stated in the IAEA Safety Requirements for Design of \\{NPPs\\} “a safety analysis of the plant design shall be conducted in which methods of both deterministic and probabilistic analysis shall be applied”. It is required that “the computer programs, analytical methods and plant models used in the safety analysis shall be verified and validated, and adequate consideration shall be given to uncertainties”. Uncertainties are present in calculations due to the computer codes, initial and boundary conditions, plant state, fuel parameters, scaling and numerical solution algorithm. All conservative approaches, still widely used, were introduced to cover uncertainties due to limited capability for modelling and understanding of physical phenomena at the early stages of safety analysis. The results obtained by this approach are quite unrealistic and the level of conservatism is not fully known. Another approach is the use of Best Estimate (BE) codes with realistic initial and boundary conditions. If this approach is selected, it should be based on statistically combined uncertainties for plant initial and boundary conditions, assumptions and code models. The current trends are going into direction of the best estimate code with some conservative assumptions of the system with realistic input data with uncertainty analysis. The BE analysis with evaluation of uncertainties offers, in addition, a way to quantify the existing plant safety margins. Its broader use in the future is therefore envisaged, even though it is not always feasible because of the difficulty of quantifying code uncertainties with sufficiently narrow range for every phenomenon and for each accident sequence. In this paper, uncertainty analysis for the Large Break LOCA (200% Inlet Header Break) of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) has been carried out. The uncertainty analysis was carried out for the peak cladding temperature (PCT), based on the two different methods i.e., Wilk’s method and the response surface technique. Their findings have also been compared.

A. Srivastava; H.G. Lele; A.K. Ghosh; H.S. Kushwaha

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Sustainability Considerations in Spent Light-water Nuclear Fuel Retrievability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines long-term cost differences between two competing Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels: Uranium Oxide (UOX) and Mixed Uranium Oxide-Plutonium Oxide (MOX). Since these costs are calculated on a life-cycle basis, expected savings from lower future MOX fuel prices can be used to value the option of substituting MOX for UOX, including the value of maintaining access to the used UOX fuel that could be reprocessed to make MOX. The two most influential cost drivers are the price of natural uranium and the cost of reprocessing. Significant and sustained reductions in reprocessing costs and/or sustained increases in uranium prices are required to give positive value to the retrievability of Spent Nuclear Fuel. While this option has positive economic value, it might not be exercised for 50 to 200 years. Therefore, there are many years for a program during which reprocessing technology can be researched, developed, demonstrated, and deployed. Further research is required to determine whether the cost of such a program would yield positive net present value and/or increases the sustainability of LWR energy systems.

Wood, Thomas W.; Rothwell, Geoffrey

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

208

Study of plutonium disposition using existing GE advanced Boiling Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The end of the cold war and the resulting dismantlement of nuclear weapons has resulted in the need for the US to dispose of 50 to 100 metric tons of excess of plutonium in a safe and proliferation resistant manner. A number of studies, including the recently released National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study, have recommended conversion of plutonium into spent nuclear fuel with its high radiation barrier as the best means of providing permanent conversion and long-term diversion resistance to this material. The NAS study ``Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium identified Light Water Reactor spent fuel as the most readily achievable and proven form for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium. The study also stressed the need for a US disposition program which would enhance the prospects for a timely reciprocal program agreement with Russia. This summary provides the key findings of a GE study where plutonium is converted into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel and a typical 1155 MWe GE Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) is utilized to convert the plutonium to spent fuel. A companion study of the Advanced BWR has recently been submitted. The MOX core design work that was conducted for the ABWR enabled GE to apply comparable fuel design concepts and consequently achieve full MOX core loading which optimize plutonium throughput for existing BWRs.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Chemical and light-stable isotope characteristics of waters from...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

water; (2) there is a single deep hot water, and the range of chloride concentrations is produced by the water passing through a zone of highly soluble materials (most likely in...

210

Water, Light and Heat Stress Effects on Fremont Cottonwood Photosynthesis.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Seedlings of Fremont cottonwood (Populus fremontii), a California native riparian foundation species, are vulnerable to water stress from rapid water-table declines and the interactions… (more)

Tozzi, Emily Sharp

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Columbia Water and Light - New Home Energy Star Rebate | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Columbia Water and Light - New Home Energy Star Rebate Columbia Water and Light - New Home Energy Star Rebate Columbia Water and Light - New Home Energy Star Rebate < Back Eligibility Construction Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount 1,000 Provider Columbia Water and Light Columbia Water and Light offers a $1,000 rebate to customers for the construction of new homes that achieve certification as Energy Star homes. The Energy Star designation is given to homes that receive an 85 or less on the Home Energy Rating System (HERS) index, meaning that they can be expected to use 15% less energy on average than a standard home (i.e., the

212

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration’s energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program’s plans.

Kathryn McCarthy; Jeremy Busby; Bruce Hallbert; Shannon Bragg-Sitton; Curtis Smith; Cathy Barnard

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration’s energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program’s plans.

McCarthy, Kathryn A [INL; Busby, Jeremy [ORNL; Hallbert, Bruce [INL; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon [INL; Smith, Curtis [INL; Barnard, Cathy [INL

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline - even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy's Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration's energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program's plans.

George Griffith; Robert Youngblood; Jeremy Busby; Bruce Hallbert; Cathy Barnard; Kathryn McCarthy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

McMinnville Water and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

McMinnville Water and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate McMinnville Water and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program McMinnville Water and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Water Heating Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Star Homes: up to $1,180 Energy Star Manufactured Homes: $850 Clothes Washer: $20 - $70 Refrigerator: $15 Freezer: $15 Refrigerator/Freezer Decommissioning: $100 Electric Water Heater: $25 - $50, varies by warranty Heat Pump PTCS Tune-up: contact utility Weatherization Measures: contact utility Provider McMinnville Water and Light

216

New chicane magnet design for insertion device straights at the Advanced Light Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A chicane magnet incorporating counter-rotating permanent magnet pairs together with trim coils has been designed for use in the Advanced Light Source (ALS) straights in conjunction with two insertion devices. In particular, this design is being developed for use in the existing beam line (BL) 4 elliptically polarizing undulator (EPU) straight and in the BL11 EPU straight, currently under design and construction. The purpose of the chicane is to provide a fixed angular separation between two successive EPU photon fans, and to correct steering perturbations resulting from EPU polarization state changes. Polarization changes occur on the time scale of one second; associated steering corrections must be accomplished in less than a second. Hysteresis associated with conventional iron core electromagnets prevents fast steering correction to the required precision. This consideration motivated the iron-free design presented here.

Marks, Steve; Schlueter, Ross; Anderson, David; Gath, William; Jung, Jin-Young; Robin, David; Steier, Christoph; Stevens, Troy

2001-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

217

Cross section generation strategy for high conversion light water reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High conversion water reactors (HCWR), such as the Resource-renewable Boiling Water Reactor (RBWR), are being designed with axial heterogeneity of alternating fissile and blanket zones to achieve a conversion ratio of ...

Herman, Bryan R. (Bryan Robert)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Sustained Recycle in Light Water and Sodium-Cooled Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From a physics standpoint, it is feasible to sustain recycle of used fuel in either thermal or fast reactors. This paper examines multi-recycle potential performance by considering three recycling approaches and calculating several fuel cycle parameters, including heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; radiotoxicity of waste; and uranium utilization. The first recycle approach is homogeneous mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies in a light water reactor (LWR). The transuranic portion of the MOX was varied among Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. (All-TRU means all isotopes through Cf-252.) The Pu case was allowed to go to 10% Pu in fresh fuel, but when the minor actinides were included, the transuranic enrichment was kept below 8% to satisfy the expected void reactivity constraint. The uranium portion of the MOX was enriched uranium. That enrichment was increased (to as much as 6.5%) to keep the fuel critical for a typical LWR irradiation. The second approach uses heterogeneous inert matrix fuel (IMF) assemblies in an LWR - a mix of IMF and traditional UOX pins. The uranium-free IMF fuel pins were Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. The UOX pins were limited to 4.95% U-235 enrichment. The number of IMF pins was set so that the amount of TRU in discharged fuel from recycle N (from both IMF and UOX pins) was made into the new IMF pins for recycle N+1. Up to 60 of the 264 pins in a fuel assembly were IMF. The assembly-average TRU content was 1-6%. The third approach uses fast reactor oxide fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor with transuranic conversion ratio of 0.50 and 1.00. The transuranic conversion ratio is the production of transuranics divided by destruction of transuranics. The FR at CR=0.50 is similar to the CR for the MOX case. The fast reactor cases had a transuranic content of 33-38%, higher than IMF or MOX.

Steven J. Piet; Samuel E. Bays; Michael A. Pope; Gilles J. Youinou

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

The 19th ICFA Advanced Beam Dynamics Workshop on Future Light Sources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ICFA2000t.GIF (31362 bytes) ICFA2000t.GIF (31362 bytes) The 19th ICFA Advanced Beam Dynamics Workshop on Future Light Sources Physics of and Science with The X-ray Free-Electron Laser (Arcidosso, Italy, September 10-15, 2000) Workshop Summary The19th Advanced ICFA Beam Dynamics Workshop on "The Physics of, and the Science with, X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers" took place in Arcidosso (Italy) from the 10th to the 15th of September, 2000. The Workshop was sponsored by the International Committee for Future Accelerators, the US Department of Energy, the University of California at Los Angeles, the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, together with local authorities of the Tuscany, Grosseto and Arcidosso areas. The Workshop's chairmen were M. Cornacchia (SLAC), I. Lindau (SLAC/Lund. Un.) and C. Pellegrini (UCLA). Seventy-five scientists, of which 50 are involved in the physics and technology of accelerators, free-electron lasers and x-ray optics, and 25 in the scientific applications, attended the workshop. There were plenary and parallel sessions and many lively discussions, during and after the regular workshop schedule.

220

Watts nickel and rinse water recovery via an advanced reverse osmosis system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report summarizes the results of an eight month test program conducted at the Hewlett Packard Printed Circuit Board Production Plant, Sunnyvale, CA (H.P.) to assess the effectiveness of an advanced reverse osmosis system (AROS). The AROS unit, manufactured by Water Technologies, Inc. (WTI) of Minneapolis, MN, incorporates membrane materials and system components designed to treat metal plating rinse water and produce two product streams; (1) a concentrated metal solution suitable for the plating bath, and (2) rinse water suitable for reuse as final rinse. Waste water discharge can be virtually eliminated and significant reductions realized in the need for new plating bath solution and rinse water.

Schmidt, C.; White, I.E.; Ludwig, R.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced light water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Quantum Physics Makes Water Different | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Weird Oxygen Bonding under Pressure Weird Oxygen Bonding under Pressure A Breakthrough in Improving Osteoporosis Drug Design Allaying Structural-Alloy Corrosion Putting the Pressure on MOFs Newly Described "Dragon" Protein Could Be Key to Bird Flu Cure Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Quantum Physics Makes Water Different AUGUST 11, 2008 Bookmark and Share Based on the July 22, 2008, online article in ScienceNews By Davide Castelvecchi Reprinted with permission from ScienceNews, copyright 2008 http://sciencenews.org/ Heavy water, which contains higher-than-normal quantities of the hydrogen isotope deuterium (D), is not just heavier than "ordinary" water.

222

Light emission from water irradiated with high energy electrons.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Luminescence has been observed from water Irradiated with an intense pulse of high energy electrons. The angular dependence, electron energy dependence, visible spectrum, lifetime and… (more)

Shaede, Eric Albert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Visible Light Water Splitting Using Dye-Sensitized Oxide Semiconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- ical energy in the form of fuels. Hydrogen is a key solar fuel because it can be used directly. This Account describes our approach to two problems in solar water splitting: the organization of molecules in photochemistry.1,2 Efficient photocatalytic water-splitting systems could have practical value for solar energy

224

EIS-0288: Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

288: Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor 288: Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor EIS-0288: Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor SUMMARY This Environmental Impact Statement for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR EIS) evaluates the environmental impacts associated with producing tritium at one or more of the following five CLWRs: (1) Watts Bar Nuclear Plant Unit 1 (Spring City, Tennessee); (2) Sequoyah Nuclear Plant Unit 1 (Soddy Daisy, Tennessee); (3) Sequoyah Nuclear Plant Unit 2 (Soddy Daisy, Tennessee); (4) Bellefonte Nuclear Plant Unit 1 (Hollywood, Alabama); and (5) Bellefonte Nuclear Plant Unit 2 (Hollywood, Alabama). Specifically, this EIS analyzes the potential environmental impacts associated with fabricating tritium-producing

225

EIS-0288-S1: Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8-S1: Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water 8-S1: Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR) Tritium Readiness Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0288-S1: Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR) Tritium Readiness Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Summary This Supplemental EIS updates the environmental analyses in DOE's 1999 EIS for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR EIS). The CLWR EIS addressed the production of tritium in Tennessee Valley Authority reactors in Tennessee using tritium-producing burnable absorber rods. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities at this time. Documents Available for Download September 28, 2011 EIS-0288-S1: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplemental Environmental

226

Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program - R&D Roadmap for  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program - R&D Roadmap Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program - R&D Roadmap for Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of Fatigue Damage in Piping Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program - R&D Roadmap for Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of Fatigue Damage in Piping Light water reactor sustainability (LWRS) nondestructive evaluation (NDE) Workshops were held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during July 30th to August 2nd, 2012. This activity was conducted to help develop the content of the NDE R&D roadmap for the materials aging and degradation (MAaD) pathway of the LWRS program. The workshops focused on identifying NDE R&D needs in four areas: cables, concrete, reactor pressure vessel, and piping. A selected group of subject matter experts (SMEs) from DOE national

227

City Water Light and Power - Solar Rewards Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

You are here You are here Home » City Water Light and Power - Solar Rewards Program City Water Light and Power - Solar Rewards Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate $15,000 per account Program Info Start Date 01/23/2012 State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $1,500/kW Provider City Water Light and Power '''''Note: Funding for the Solar Rewards program has been exhausted. Check the program web site for more information regarding additional funding, expected March 2013.''''' City Water, Light and Power (CWLP) is now offering residential and commercial customers a $1,500 per kilowatt (kW) rebate for installing solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. Rebates are limited to $15,000 per customer

228

Pseudomorphic Mid-Ultraviolet Light-Emitting Diodes for Water Purification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

UVC light output of 66 mW at 300 mA CW has been achieved from LEDs on AlN substrates with extensive photon extraction. Proper vessel design allows for efficient irradiation of a water...

Moe, Craig; Chen, Jianfeng; Grandusky, James R; Mendrick, Mark C; Randive, Rajul; Rodak, Lee E; Sampath, Anand V; Wraback, Michael; Schowalter, Leo

229

Assessment of light water reactor power plant cost and ultra-acceleration depreciation financing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although in many regions of the U.S. the least expensive electricity is generated from light-water reactor (LWR) plants, the fixed (capital plus operation and maintenance) cost has increased to the level where the cost ...

El-Magboub, Sadek Abdulhafid.

230

Conceptual Design of a Large, Passive Pressure-Tube Light Water Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A design for a large, passive, light water reactor has been developed. The proposed concept is a pressure tube reactor of similar design to CANDU reactors, but differing in three key aspects. First, a solid SiC-coated ...

Hejzlar, P.

231

INL/EXT-14-33257 Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

57 Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program 3D J-Integral Capability in Grizzly September 2014 DOE Office of Nuclear Energy DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account...

232

Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division Smart Grid Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Light, Gas and Water Division Smart Grid Project Light, Gas and Water Division Smart Grid Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division Country United States Headquarters Location Memphis, Tennessee Recovery Act Funding $5,063,469.00 Total Project Value $13112363 Coverage Area Coverage Map: Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division Smart Grid Project Coordinates 35.1495343°, -90.0489801° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

233

Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fatigue and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for low-alloy steel used in piping and in steam generator and reactor pressure vessels have been investigated. Fatigue data were obtained on medium-sulfur-content A533-Gr B and A106-Gr B steels in high-purity (HP) deoxygenated water, in simulated pressurized water reactor water, and in air. Analytical studies focused on the behavior of carbon steels in boiling water reactor (BWR) environments. Crack-growth rates of composite fracture-mechanics specimens of A533-Gr B/Inconel-182/Inconel-600 (plated with nickel) and homogeneous specimens of A533-Gr B steel were determined under small-amplitude cyclic loading in HP water with {approx}300 pbb dissolved oxygen. Radiation-induced segregation and irradiation-assisted SCC of Type 304 SS after accumulation of relatively high fluence also have been investigated. Microchemical and microstructural changes in HP and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes used in two operating BWRs were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, and slow-strain-rate tensile tests were conducted on tubular specimens in air and in simulated BWR water at 289{degrees}C.

Kassner, T.F.; Ruther, W.E.; Chung, H.M.; Hicks, P.D.; Hins, A.G.; Park, J.Y.; Shack, W.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Advances in recording scattered light changes in crustacean nerve with electrical activation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated optical changes associated with crustacean nerve stimulation using birefringent and large angle scattered light. Improved detection schemes disclosed high temporal structure of the optical signals and allowed further investigations of biophysical mechanisms responsible for such changes. Most studies of physiological activity in neuronal tissue use techniques that measure the electrical behavior or ionic permeability of the nerve, such as voltage or ion sensitive dyes injected into cells, or invasive electric recording apparatus. While these techniques provide high resolution, they are detrimental to tissue and do not easily lend themselves to clinical applications in humans. Electrical and chemical components of neural excitation evoke physical responses observed through changes in scattered and absorbed light. This method is suited for in-vivo applications. Intrinsic optical changes have shown themselves to be multifaceted in nature and point to several different physiological processes that occur with different time courses during neural excitation. Fast changes occur concomitantly with electrical events, and slow changes parallel metabolic events including changes in blood flow and oxygenation. Previous experiments with isolated crustacean nerves have been used to study the biophysical mechanisms of fast optical changes. However, they have been confounded by multiple superimposed action potentials which make it difficult to discriminate the temporal signatures of individual optical responses. Often many averages were needed to adequately resolve the signal. More recently, optical signals have been observed in single trials. Initially large angle scattering measurements were used to record these events with much of the signal coming from cellular swelling associated with water influx during activation. By exploiting the birefringent properties derived from the molecular stiucture of nerve membranes, signals appear larger with a greater contrast, but direct comparison of birefringent and 90{sup o} scattering signals has not been reported. New developments in computer and optical technology allow optical recording with higher temporal resolution than could be achieved previously. This has led us to undertake more detailed studies of the biophysical mechanisms underlying these transient changes. Optimization of this technology in conjunction with other technical developments presents a path to noninvasive dynamic clinical observation of optical responses. To conduct these optical recordings, we placed dissected leg, claw and ventral cord nerves from crayfish and lobster in a recording chamber constructed from black Delrin. The chamber consisted of several wells situated perpendicularly to the long axis of the nerve that could beelectrically isolated for stimulating and recording electrical activation, and a window in the center for optical measurements. To measure the birefringence from the nerve, light from a 120W halogen bulb was focused onto the nerve from below the window through a 10X microscope objective and polarized at a 45 degree angle with respect to the long axis of the nerve bundle. A second polarizer turned 90 degrees with respect to the first polarizer was placed on top of the chamber and excluded direct source illumination, passing only birefringent light from the nerve. A large area photodiode placed directly on top of the polarizer detected the magnitude of the birefringent light. To measure light scattered 90 degrees by the nerve, a short length of image conduit placed perpendicularly to the nerve directed large angle scattered light from the nerve to a second photodiode. The output of each photodiode was amplified by a first stage amplifier which produced a DC level output, and was coupled to an AC amplifier (0.3 Hz High Pass) with a gain of 1000 to optimally record changes across time.

Carter, K. M. (Kathleen M.); Rector, D. M. (David M.); Martinez, A. T. (Anne T.); Guerra, F. M. (Francisco M.); George, J. S. (John S.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Advanced Light-Trapping in Thin-Film Silicon Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Light-trapping schemes are essential for high efficiency thin-film Silicon devices. Implementation of various light-trapping/scattering elements will be discussed. An optimum textured...

Wyrsch, Nicolas

236

Advanced Light Source (ALS) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Syncrotron Light Source (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects...

237

The U5. 0 undulator design for the advanced light source at LBL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U5.0 undulator, currently under design, is the first in a series of insertion devices planned for the Advanced Light Source at LBL. U5.0 parameters include a 5 cm period, 5 m length with a 0.837 T maximum field at a 14 mm gap. A hybrid configuration utilizing Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet material and Vanadium Permendur poles is used for the magnetic structure. Construction is modular with many pole assemblies attached to a pole mount, which in turn is fastened onto one of the backing beams. Vertical field integral correction at the ends is with permanent magnet rotators. The supports structure features a 4-post configuration, a rigid base with 3 kinematic floor supports and 2 rigid 5 m long backing beams that fit within the 2.4 m high accelerator enclosure. The drive system is computer controlled utilizing a stepper motor and shaft encode coupled to a roller-screw/nut and chain drive train. Vacuum chamber design is a rigid configuration with a 10 mm vertical by 218 mm horizontal aperture of 5.5 m length. Chamber fabrication features a two-piece welded chamber of 5083 H321 aluminum. Pumping is with ion and titanium sublimation pumps. 5 figs., 1 tab.

Hoyer, E.; Chin, J.; Halbach, K.; Hassenzahl, W.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.; Lancaster, H.; Plate, D.; Savoy, R.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Advanced precoat filtration and competitive processes for water purification. Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An advanced precoat filtration process system is introduced. Also presented and discussed are major competitive processes for water purification, such as conventional precoat filtration, conventional physical-chemical process, lime softening, carbon adsorption, ion exchange, activated alumina, reverse osmosis, ultrafiltration, microfiltration, electrodialysis, and packed aeration column.

Wang, L.K.; Wang, M.H.S.

1989-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

239

Advanced Perception, Navigation and Planning for Autonomous In-Water Ship Hull Inspection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Leonard Abstract Inspection of ship hulls and marine structures using autonomous underwater vehicles has operations on naval ships. 1 Introduction Security of ship hulls and marine structures is a major concernAdvanced Perception, Navigation and Planning for Autonomous In-Water Ship Hull Inspection Franz S

Kaess, Michael

240

Ferritic Alloys as Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Material for Light Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the GE project is to demonstrate that advanced steels such as iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys could be used as accident tolerant fuel cladding material in commercial light water reactors. The GE project does not include fuel development. Current findings support the concept that a FeCrAl alloy could be used for the cladding of commercial nuclear fuel. The use of this alloy will benefit the public since it is going to make the power generating light water reactors safer. In the Phase 1A of this cost shared project, GE (GRC + GNF) teamed with the University of Michigan, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study the environmental and mechanical behavior of more than eight candidate cladding material both under normal operation conditions of commercial nuclear reactors and under accident conditions in superheated steam (loss of coolant condition). The main findings are as follows: (1) Under normal operation conditions the candidate alloys (e.g. APMT, Alloy 33) showed excellent resistance to general corrosion, shadow corrosion and to environmentally assisted cracking. APMT also showed resistance to proton irradiation up to 5 dpa. (2) Under accident conditions the selected candidate materials showed several orders of magnitude improvement in the reaction with superheated steam as compared with the current zirconium based alloys. (3) Tube fabrication feasibility studies of FeCrAl alloys are underway. The aim is to obtain a wall thickness that is below 400 µm. (4) A strategy is outlined for the regulatory path approval and for the insertion of a lead fuel assembly in a commercial reactor by 2022. (5) The GE team worked closely with INL to have four rodlets tested in the ATR. GE provided the raw stock for the alloys, the fuel for the rodlets and the cost for fabrication/welding of the rodlets. INL fabricated the rodlets and the caps and welded them to provide hermetic seal. The replacement of a zirconium alloy using a ferritic material containing chromium and aluminum appears to be the most near term implementation for accident tolerant nuclear fuels.

Rebak, Raul B. [General Electric] (ORCID:0000000280704475)

2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced light water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Impact of Pilot Light Modeling on the Predicted Annual Performance of Residential Gas Water Heaters: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modeling residential water heaters with dynamic simulation models can provide accurate estimates of their annual energy consumption, if the units? characteristics and use conditions are known. Most gas storage water heaters (GSWHs) include a standing pilot light. It is generally assumed that the pilot light energy will help make up standby losses and have no impact on the predicted annual energy consumption. However, that is not always the case. The gas input rate and conversion efficiency of a pilot light for a GSWH were determined from laboratory data. The data were used in simulations of a typical GSWH with and without a pilot light, for two cases: 1) the GSWH is used alone; and 2) the GSWH is the second tank in a solar water heating (SWH) system. The sensitivity of wasted pilot light energy to annual hot water use, climate, and installation location was examined. The GSWH used alone in unconditioned space in a hot climate had a slight increase in energy consumption. The GSWH with a pilot light used as a backup to an SWH used up to 80% more auxiliary energy than one without in hot, sunny locations, from increased tank losses.

Maguire, J.; Burch, J.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Physics characteristics of a large, passive, pressure tube light water reactor with voided calandria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A light water cooled and moderated pressure tube reactor concept has been developed that can survive loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs) without scram and without replenishing primary coolant inventory, while maintaining safe temperature limits on the fuel and pressure tube. The reactor employs a solid SiC-coated graphite fuel matrix in the pressure tubes and a calandria tank containing a low-pressure gas, surrounded by a graphite reflector. This normally voided calandria is connected to a light water heat sink. The cover gas displaces light water from the calandria during normal operation, while during LOCAs it allows passive calandria flooding. It is shown that such a system, with high void fraction in the core region, exhibits a high degree of neutron thermalization and a large prompt neutron lifetime, similar to D{sub 2}O moderated cores, although light water is used as both coolant and moderator. Moreover, the extremely large neutron migration length results in a strongly coupled core with a flat thermal flux profile and inherent stability against xenon spatial oscillations. The heterogeneous arrangement of the fuel and moderator ensures a negative void coefficient under all circumstances. Flooding of the calandria space with light water results in redundant reactor shutdown. Use of particle fuel allows attainment of high burnups.

Hejzlar, P.; Driscoll, M.J.; Todreas, N.E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Proceedings of the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting: Volume 1, Plenary session; Advanced reactor research; advanced control system technology; advanced instrumentation and control hardware; human factors research; probabilistic risk assessment topics; thermal hydraulics; thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25--27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. This document, Volume 1 covers the following topics: Advanced Reactor Research; Advanced Instrumentation and Control Hardware; Advanced Control System Technology; Human Factors Research; Probabilistic Risk Assessment Topics; Thermal Hydraulics; and Thermal Hydraulic Research for Advanced Passive Light Water Reactors.

Monteleone, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [comp.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Lansing Board of Water and Light - Hometown Energy Savers® Residential  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savers® Savers® Residential Rebates Lansing Board of Water and Light - Hometown Energy Savers® Residential Rebates < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Construction Heating Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Other Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Small Business Direct Install Program: No cost or purchase necessary for participation Custom $0.08/kWh Commercial Cooking Equipment: Varies Commercial Refrigeration Equipment: Varies Lighting Compact Fluorescent Lamps: $1.50-$8 Compact Fluorescent Lamp Fixtures: $20 LED Lamps: $5-$15 LED Fixtures: $20 LED Exit Signs: $12.50

245

DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint Research and Development Plan DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint Research and Development Plan Nuclear power has contributed almost 20% of the total amount of electricity generated in the United States over the past two decades. High capacity factors and low operating costs make nuclear power plants (NPPs) some of the most economical power generators available. Further, nuclear power remains the single largest contributor (nearly 70%) of non-greenhouse gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Even when major refurbishments are performed to extend operating life, these plants continue to represent cost-effective, low-carbon assets to the nation's

246

DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint Research and Development Plan DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint Research and Development Plan Nuclear power has contributed almost 20% of the total amount of electricity generated in the United States over the past two decades. High capacity factors and low operating costs make nuclear power plants (NPPs) some of the most economical power generators available. Further, nuclear power remains the single largest contributor (nearly 70%) of non-greenhouse gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Even when major refurbishments are performed to extend operating life, these plants continue to represent cost-effective, low-carbon assets to the nation's

247

Light Water Reactor Fuel Cladding Research and Testing | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Light Water Reactor Fuel Cladding Research Light Water Reactor Fuel Cladding Research June 01, 2013 Severe Accident Test Station ORNL is the focus point for Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel cladding research and testing. The purpose of this research is to furnish U.S. industry (EPRI, Areva, Westinghouse), and regulators (NRC) with much-needed data supporting safe and economical nuclear power generation and used fuel management. LWR fuel cladding work is tightly integrated with ORNL accident tolerant fuel development and used fuel disposition programs thereby providing a powerful capability that couples basic materials science research with the nuclear applications research and development. The ORNL LWR fuel cladding program consists of five complementary areas of research: Accident tolerant fuel and cladding material testing under design

248

ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ANALYSES Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ANALYSES Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Measurement of organic compounds in Karaha- Telaga Bodas and Coso fluid inclusions shows there are strong relationships between H2 concentrations and alkane/alkene ratios and benzene concentrations. Inclusion analyses that indicate H2 concentrations > 0.001 mol % typically have ethane > ethylene, propane > propylene, and butane > butylene. There are three end member fluid compositions: type 1 fluids in which alkane compounds predominate, type 2 fluids that have ethane and propylene and no

249

Piping benchmark problems for the General Electric Advanced Boiling Water Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To satisfy the need for verification of the computer programs and modeling techniques that will be used to perform the final piping analyses for an advanced boiling water reactor standard design, three benchmark problems were developed. The problems are representative piping systems subjected to representative dynamic loads with solutions developed using the methods being proposed for analysis for the advanced reactor standard design. It will be required that the combined license holders demonstrate that their solutions to these problems are in agreement with the benchmark problem set.

Bezler, P.; DeGrassi, G.; Braverman, J.; Wang, Y.K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (US)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Environmentally assisted cracking of light-water reactor materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of lightwater reactor (LWR) materials has affected nuclear reactors from the very introduction of the technology. Corrosion problems have afflicted steam generators from the very introduction of pressurized water reactor (PWR) technology. Shippingport, the first commercial PWR operated in the United States, developed leaking cracks in two Type 304 stainless steel (SS) steam generator tubes as early as 1957, after only 150 h of operation. Stress corrosion cracks were observed in the heat-affected zones of welds in austenitic SS piping and associated components in boiling-water reactors (BRWs) as early as 1965. The degradation of steam generator tubing in PWRs and the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic SS piping in BWRs have been the most visible and most expensive examples of EAC in LWRs, and the repair and replacement of steam generators and recirculation piping has cost hundreds of millions of dollars. However, other problems associated with the effects of the environment on reactor structures and components am important concerns in operating plants and for extended reactor lifetimes. Cast duplex austenitic-ferritic SSs are used extensively in the nuclear industry to fabricate pump casings and valve bodies for LWRs and primary coolant piping in many PWRs. Embrittlement of the ferrite phase in cast duplex SS may occur after 10 to 20 years at reactor operating temperatures, which could influence the mechanical response and integrity of pressure boundary components during high strain-rate loading (e.g., seismic events). The problem is of most concern in PWRs where slightly higher temperatures are typical and cast SS piping is widely used.

Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Pyroprocessing of Light Water Reactor Spent Fuels Based on an Electrochemical Reduction Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A concept of pyroprocessing light water reactor (LWR) spent fuels based on an electrochemical reduction technology is proposed, and the material balance of the processing of mixed oxide (MOX) or high-burnup uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) spent fuel is evaluated. Furthermore, a burnup analysis for metal fuel fast breeder reactors (FBRs) is conducted on low-decontamination materials recovered by pyroprocessing. In the case of processing MOX spent fuel (40 GWd/t), UO{sub 2} is separately collected for {approx}60 wt% of the spent fuel in advance of the electrochemical reduction step, and the product recovered through the rare earth (RE) removal step, which has the composition uranium:plutonium:minor actinides:fission products (FPs) = 76.4:18.4:1.7:3.5, can be applied as an ingredient of FBR metal fuel without a further decontamination process. On the other hand, the electroreduced alloy of high-burnup UO{sub 2} spent fuel (48 GWd/t) requires further decontamination of residual FPs by an additional process such as electrorefining even if RE FPs are removed from the alloy because the recovered plutonium (Pu) is accompanied by almost the same amount of FPs in addition to RE. However, the amount of treated materials in the electrorefining step is reduced to {approx}10 wt% of the total spent fuel owing to the prior UO{sub 2} recovery step. These results reveal that the application of electrochemical reduction technology to LWR spent oxide fuel is a promising concept for providing FBR metal fuel by a rationalized process.

Ohta, Hirokazu; Inoue, Tadashi; Sakamura, Yoshiharu; Kinoshita, Kensuke

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors. Volume 14, Semiannual report, April 1991--September 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWR`s); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to the Regulatory and ASME Code requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel, and other components inspected in accordance with Section XI of the ASME Code. This is a progress report covering the programmatic work from April 1991 through September 1991.

Doctor, S.R.; Diaz, A.A.; Friley, J.R.; Good, M.S.; Greenwood, M.S.; Heasler, P.G.; Hockey, R.L.; Kurtz, R.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Taylor, T.T.; Vo, T.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors. Volume 15, Semiannual report: October 1991--March 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to ASME Code and Regulatory requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel, and other components inspected in accordance with Section XI of the ASME Code. This is a progress report covering the programmatic work from October 1991 through March 1992.

Doctor, S.R.; Diaz, A.A.; Friley, J.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors. Semiannual report, April 1992--September 1992: Volume 16  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs);using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to the Regulatory and ASME Code requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel and other components inspected in accordance with Section XI of the ASME Code. This is a programs report covering the programmatic work from April 1992 through September 1992.

Doctor, S.R.; Diaz, A.A.; Friley, J.R.; Greenwood, M.S.; Heasler, P.G.; Kurtz, R.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Vo, T.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced light alloys Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CreepResistantMg-Al-SrAlloys,JournalofAdvanced... alloys. Reducing the automobile weights by certain amount will result in similar percentage... a combination of...

256

E-Print Network 3.0 - als advanced light Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Maryland at College Park Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 6 Light trapping in plasmonic solar cells Albert Polman Summary: absorption Requirements to...

257

Sample geometry effects on incoherent small-angle scattering of light water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown that the scattering intensities of light water collected with different ratios of sample-to-beam dimension present large differences as a function of sample thickness. In particular, ratios smaller and larger than unity are considered and the results are discussed and compared with Monte Carlo simulations.

Carsughi, F.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Constellation Pilot Project FY11 Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summary report for Fiscal Year 2011 activities associated with the Constellation Pilot Project. The project is a joint effor between Constellation Nuclear Energy Group (CENG), EPRI, and the DOE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The project utilizes two CENG reactor stations: R.E. Ginna and Nine Point Unit 1. Included in the report are activities associate with reactor internals and concrete containments.

R. Johansen

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Effectiveness of AOC removal by advanced water treatment systems: a case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently, the appearance of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) in the water treatment system and effluent of the treatment plant has brought more attention to the environmental engineers. In this study, AOC removal efficiency at the Cheng-Ching Lake water treatment plant (CCLWTP) was evaluated. The main objectives of this study were to: (1) evaluate the treatability of AOC by the advanced treatment system at the CCLWTP, (2) assess the relativity of AOC and the variations of other water quality indicators, (3) evaluate the effects of sodium thiosulfate on AOC analysis, and (4) evaluate the efficiency of biofiltration process using granular activated carbon (GAC) and anthracite as the fillers. Results show that the averaged influent and final effluent AOC concentrations at the CCLWTP were approximately 124 and 30 ?g acetate-C/L, respectively. Thus, the treatment plant had an AOC removal efficiency of about 76%, and the AOC concentrations in the final effluent met the criteria established by the CCLWTP (50 ?g acetate-C/L). Results indicate that the biofiltration process might contribute to the removal of the trace AOC in the GAC filtration process. Moreover, the removal of AOC had a correlation with the decrease in concentrations of other drinking water indicators. Results from a column test show that GAC was a more appropriate material than anthracite for the AOC removal. Results from this study provide us insight into the mechanisms of AOC removal by advanced water treatment processes. These findings would be helpful in designing a modified water treatment system for AOC removal and water quality improvement.

C.C. Chien; C.M. Kao; C.D. Dong; T.Y. Chen; J.Y. Chen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Critical Facility for lattice physics experiments for the Advanced Heavy Water Reactor and the 500 MWe pressurized heavy water reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai, is embarking on a broad based program for thorium utilization in power production to achieve all-round capability in the entire thorium cycle. As a step in this direction, a low power Critical Facility is under construction at BARC. The facility will greatly contribute to the understanding and validation of the calculational models and nuclear data used in the design of thorium based Advanced Heavy Water Reactor. The facility is also designed to cater to the experimental requirements of future lattice studies related to 500 MWe pressurized heavy water reactors. This paper covers the basic design features, safety aspects and the planned experimental program of the new facility.

V.K. Raina; R. Srivenkatesan; D.C. Khatri; D.K. Lahiri

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced light water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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261

Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design Optimization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in PEM Fuel Cells: in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design Optimization J. Vernon Cole and Ashok Gidwani CFDRC Prepared for: DOE Hydrogen Fuel Cell Kickoff Meeting February 13, 2007 This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information. Background Water Management Issues Arise From: ƒ Generation of water by cathodic reaction ƒ Membrane humidification requirements ƒ Capillary pressure driven transport through porous MEA and GDL materials ƒ Scaling bipolar plate channel dimensions J.H. Nam and M. Kaviany, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 46, pp. 4595-4611 (2003) Relevant Barriers and Targets ƒ Improved Gas Diffusion Layer, Flow Fields, Membrane Electrode Assemblies Needed to Improve Water Management: * Flooding blocks reactant transport

262

Energy Department Announces $10 Million to Advance Innovative, Energy-Saving Lighting Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

As part of cutting energy waste and doubling energy productivity by 2030, the Energy Department today announced nearly $10 million to support research, development, and manufacturing of solid-state lighting (SSL) technologies across the country.

263

Application of a Solar UV/Chlorine Advanced Oxidation Process to Oil Sands Process-Affected Water Remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Application of a Solar UV/Chlorine Advanced Oxidation Process to Oil Sands Process-Affected Water Remediation ... † Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Alberta, 9105 116th Street, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2W2 ...

Zengquan Shu; Chao Li; Miodrag Belosevic; James R. Bolton; Mohamed Gamal El-Din

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

264

Suppression of thermal stratification in gravity driven water pool of an advanced reactor using shrouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Advanced and innovative reactor systems are considering the use of large pools as heat sink for various safety functions like decay heat removal or containment cooling. These designs generally have heat exchangers immersed in the pool. For enhanced safety and reliability, preferred heat transfer mode is considered to be passive so that heat sink availability is maintained even in failure of power supply and active components. However, heat transfer by natural convection in large pools poses a problem of thermal stratification. As a result of natural convection, hot layers of water may accumulate over the relatively cold one and in turn inhibit the natural convection itself. Not only the heat transfer performance may get deteriorated but some structural parts of the pool like concrete wall may be subjected to high temperature which is not desirable. In this paper, a new concept of employing shrouds around the heat source is proposed. These shrouds provide multiple natural circulation loops around the heat source, thereby facilitating mixing of hot and cold fluid, which eliminate stratification. The concept has been applied to the Gravity Driven Water Pool (GDWP) of Advance Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) in which Isolation Condensers (ICs) tubes are submerged for decay heat removal of AHWR using ICS and thermal stratification phenomenon was predicted without and with ICS. Results indicate that the shrouds have application in elimination of thermal stratification in GDWP.

P.K. Verma; A.K. Nayak; Vikas Jain; P.K. Vijayan; K.K. Vaze

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Variations in AOC and microbial diversity in an advanced water treatment plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary The objective of this study was to evaluate the variations in assimilable organic carbon (AOC) and microbial diversities in an advanced water treatment plant. The efficiency of biofiltration on AOC removal using anthracite and granular activated carbon (GAC) as the media was also evaluated through a pilot-scale column experiment. Effects of hydrological factors (seasonal effects and river flow) on AOC concentrations in raw water samples and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of biofiltration on AOC treatment were also evaluated. Results show that AOC concentrations in raw water and clear water of the plant were about 138 and 27 ?g acetate-C/L, respectively. Higher AOC concentrations were observed in wet seasons probably due to the resuspension of organic-contained sediments and discharges of non-point source (NPS) pollutants from the upper catchment. This reveals that seasonal effect played an important role in the variations in influent AOC concentrations. Approximately 82% and 70% of AOC removal efficiencies were observed in GAC and anthracite columns, respectively. Results from column experiment reveal that the applied treatment processes in the plant and biofiltration system were able to remove AOC effectively. Microbial colonization on GAC and anthracite were detected via the observation of scanning electron microscopic (SEM) images. Results of polymerase chain reaction (PCR), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), and nucleotide sequence analysis reveal significant decrease in microbial diversities after the ozonation process. Higher HRT caused higher microbial contact time, and thus, more microbial colonies and higher microbial diversity were observed in the latter part of the biofilters. Some of the dominant microbial species in the biofiltration columns belonged to the beta-proteobacterium, which might contribute to the AOC degradation. Results of this study provide us insight into the variations in AOC and microbial diversity in the advanced water treatment processes.

B.M. Yang; J.K. Liu; C.C. Chien; R.Y. Surampalli; C.M. Kao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Lighting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lighting section of ASHRAE standard 90.1 is discussed. It applies to all new buildings except low-rise residential, while excluding specialty lighting applications such as signage, art exhibits, theatrical productions, medical and dental tasks, and others. In addition, lighting for indoor plant growth is excluded if designed to operate only between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. Lighting allowances for the interior of a building are determined by the use of the system performance path unless the space functions are not fully known, such as during the initial stages of design or for speculative buildings. In such cases, the prescriptive path is available. Lighting allowances for the exterior of all buildings are determined by a table of unit power allowances. A new addition the exterior lighting procedure is the inclusion of facade lighting. However, it is no longer possible to trade-off power allotted for the exterior with the interior of a building or vice versa. A significant change is the new emphasis on lighting controls.

McKay, H.N. (Hayden McKay Lighting Design, New York, NY (US))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

New Family of Tiny Crystals Glow Bright in LED Lights | Advanced Photon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

How Serotonin Receptors Can Shape Drug Effects, from LSD to Migraine How Serotonin Receptors Can Shape Drug Effects, from LSD to Migraine Medication X-rays Paint a Picture of Picasso's Pigments Antibody Evolution Could Guide HIV Vaccine Development Blue Ruthenium Dimer Catalysis for Hydrogen Generation A High-Pressure Nano-imaging Breakthrough Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed New Family of Tiny Crystals Glow Bright in LED Lights JUNE 7, 2013 Bookmark and Share Laue microdiffraction pattern acquired from a nanoribbon in experiments at the APS. Minuscule crystals that glow different colors may be the missing ingredient for white light-emitting diode (LED) lighting that illuminates homes and

268

Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program - R&D Roadmap for  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(LWRS) Program - R&D Roadmap (LWRS) Program - R&D Roadmap for Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of Fatigue Damage in Piping Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program - R&D Roadmap for Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of Fatigue Damage in Piping Light water reactor sustainability (LWRS) nondestructive evaluation (NDE) Workshops were held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during July 30th to August 2nd, 2012. This activity was conducted to help develop the content of the NDE R&D roadmap for the materials aging and degradation (MAaD) pathway of the LWRS program. The workshops focused on identifying NDE R&D needs in four areas: cables, concrete, reactor pressure vessel, and piping. A selected group of subject matter experts (SMEs) from DOE national laboratories, academia, vendors, EPRI, and NRC were invited to each

269

Effects of light water reactor coolant environment on the fatigue lives of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effects of light water reactor coolant environment on the fatigue lives of Effects of light water reactor coolant environment on the fatigue lives of reactor materials July 8, 2013 A metal component can become progressively degraded, and its structural integrity can be adversely impacted when it is subjected to repeated fluctuating loads, or fatigue loading. Fatigue loadings on nuclear reactor pressure vessel components can occur because of changes in pressure and temperature caused by transients during operation, such as reactor startup or shutdown and turbine trip events. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code recognizes fatigue as a possible cause of failure of reactor materials and provides rules for designing nuclear power plant components to avoid fatigue failures. For various materials, the ASME Code defines the

270

Overview of the US Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is focused on the long-term operation of US commercial power plants. It encompasses two facets of long-term operation: (1) manage the aging of plant systems, structures, and components so that nuclear power plant lifetimes can be extended and the plants can continue to operate safely, efficiently, and economically; and (2) provide science-based solutions to the nuclear industry that support implementation of performance improvement technologies. An important aspect of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is partnering with industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to support and conduct the long-term research needed to inform major component refurbishment and replacement strategies, performance enhancements, plant license extensions, and age-related regulatory oversight decisions. The Department of Energy research, development, and demonstration role focuses on aging phenomena and issues that require long-term research and/or unique Department of Energy laboratory expertise and facilities and are applicable to all operating reactors. This paper gives an overview of the Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, including vision, goals, and major deliverables.

K. A. McCarthy; D. L. Williams; R. Reister

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

End-of-life destructive examination of light water breeder reactor fuel rods (LWBR Development Program)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Destructive examination of 12 representative Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rods was performed following successful operation in the Shippingport Atomic Power Station for 29,047 effective full power hours, about five years. Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rods were unique in that the thorium oxide and uranium-233 oxide fuel was contained within Zircaloy-4 cladding. Destructive examinations included analysis of released fission gas; chemical analysis of the fuel to determine depletion, iodine, and cesium levels; chemical analysis of the cladding to determine hydrogen, iodine, and cesium levels; metallographic examination of the cladding, fuel, and other rod components to determine microstructural features and cladding corrosion features; and tensile testing of the irradiated cladding to determine mechanical strength. The examinations confirmed that Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rod performance was excellent. No evidence of fuel rod failure was observed, and the fuel operating temperature was low (below 2580/sup 0/F at which an increased percentage of fission gas is released). 21 refs., 80 figs., 20 tabs.

Richardson, K.D.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Gas-liquid-liquid equilibria in mixtures of water, light gases, and hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase equilibrium in mixtures of water + light gases and water + heavy hydrocarbons has been investigated with the development of new local composition theory, new equations of state, and new experimental data. The preferential segregation and orientation of molecules due to different energies of molecular interaction has been simulated with square well molecules. Extensive simulation has been made for pure square well fluids and mixtures to find the local composition at wide ranges of states. A theory of local composition has been developed and an equation of state has been obtained for square well fluids. The new local composition theory has been embedded in several equations of state. The pressure of water is decoupled into a polar pressure and non-polar pressure according to the molecular model of water of Jorgensen et al. The polar pressure of water is combined with the BACK equation for the general description of polar fluids and their mixtures. Being derived from the steam table, the Augmented BACK equation is particularly suited for mixtures of water + non-polar substances such as the hydrocarbons. The hydrophobic character of the hydrocarbons had made their mixtures with water a special challenge. A new group contribution equation of state is developed to describe phase equilibrium and volumetric behavior of fluids while requiring only to know the molecular structure of the components. 15 refs., 1 fig.

Chao, K.C.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

2005 Borchardt Conference: A Seminar on Advances in Water and Wastewater Treatment February 23-25, Ann Arbor, MI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-25, Ann Arbor, MI Conference Proceedings 1 Membrane Biofilm Reactors for Water and Wastewater Treatment and Wastewater Treatment February 23-25, Ann Arbor, MI Conference Proceedings 2 (sparging) to replenish oxygen: A Seminar on Advances in Water and Wastewater Treatment February 23-25, Ann Arbor, MI Conference Proceedings

Nerenberg, Robert

274

Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of supercritical temperature and pressure light water as the coolant in a direct-cycle nuclear reactor offers potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to 46%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type recirculation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed. If a tight fuel rod lattice is adopted, it is possible to significantly reduce the neutron moderation and attain fast neutron energy spectrum conditions. In this project a supercritical water reactor concept with a simple, blanket-free, pancake-shaped core will be developed. This type of core can make use of either fertile or fertile-free fuel and retain the hard spectrum to effectively burn plutonium and minor actinides from LWR spent fuel while efficiently generating electricity.

Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Weaver, Kevan Dean

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY PHILIPS LUMILEDS LIGHTING, LLC FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

I I OF DOMESTIC AND FOJfEIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER DOE CONTRACT NO. DE-EE0005099; W(A)-2012-005 , CH-1651 The Petitioner, Philips Lumileds (Philips) was awarded this cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled , "High Power Warm White Light LED for Illumination ." According to its response to question 2, the scope of this program is to create pre-production prototypes of a warm white LED that has efficiency of 130LPW while at the same time generating 6501m of warm white light in the Correlated Color Temperature range between 2800K and 3500K with a Color Rendering Index of greater than 80, at device junction temperature of 85°C. Further details of the project's scope are provided in rJsponse to question 2. This waiver is only for inventions of Philips

276

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY PHILIPS LUMILEDS LIGHTING, LLC FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FC26-08NT01583; W(A}-09-021, CH-1488 FC26-08NT01583; W(A}-09-021, CH-1488 The Petitioner, Philips Lumileds {Philips} was awarded this cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled, "100 LPW 800 Lm Warm White Light LED for Illumination." According to its response to question 2, the scope of this program is to create pre-production· prototypes of a warm white LED that has efficiency of 100LPW while at the same time generating 800lm of warm white light in the Correlated Color Temperature range between 2800K and 3500K with a Color Rendering Index of greater than 90. Further details of the project's scope are provided in response to question 2. This waiver is only for inventions of Philips made under the cooperative agreement. The total estimated cost of the contract is $5,299,800 with Philips' providing a 50% cost-

277

Advanced Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

A fundamental concern in projecting the future attributes of light-duty vehicles-passenger cars, sport utility vehicles, pickup trucks, and minivans-is how to represent technological change and the market forces that drive it. There is always considerable uncertainty about the evolution of existing technologies, what new technologies might emerge, and how consumer preferences might influence the direction of change. Most of the new and emerging technologies expected to affect the performance and fuel use of light-duty vehicles over the next 25 years are represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS); however, the potential emergence of new, unforeseen technologies makes it impossible to address all the technology options that could come into play. The previous section of Issues in Focus discussed several potential technologies that currently are not represented in NEMS. This section discusses some of the key technologies represented in NEMS that are expected to be implemented in light-duty vehicles over the next 25 years.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Advanced Scintillator Detector Concept (ASDC): A Concept Paper on the Physics Potential of Water-Based Liquid Scintillator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent development of Water-based Liquid Scintillator (WbLS), and the concurrent development of high-efficiency and high-precision-timing light sensors, has opened up the possibility for a new kind of large-scale detector capable of a very broad program of physics. The program would include determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy and observation of CP violation with long-baseline neutrinos, searches for proton decay, ultra-precise solar neutrino measurements, geo- and supernova neutrinos including diff?use supernova antineutrinos, and neutrinoless double beta decay. We outline here the basic requirements of the Advanced Scintillation Detector Concept (ASDC), which combines the use of WbLS, doping with a number of potential isotopes for a range of physics goals, high efficiency and ultra-fast timing photosensors, and a deep underground location. We are considering such a detector at the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) far site, where the ASDC could operate in conjunction with the liquid argon t...

Alonso, J R; Bergevin, M; Bernstein, A; Bignell, L; Blucher, E; Calaprice, F; Conrad, J M; Descamps, F B; Diwan, M V; Dwyer, D A; Dye, S T; Elagin, A; Feng, P; Grant, C; Grullon, S; Hans, S; Jaffe, D E; Kettell, S H; Klein, J R; Lande, K; Learned, J G; Luk, K B; Maricic, J; Marleau, P; Mastbaum, A; McDonough, W F; Oberauer, L; Gann, G D Orebi; Rosero, R; Rountree, S D; Sanchez, M C; Shaevitz, M H; Shokair, T M; Smy, M B; Strait, M; Svoboda, R; Tolich, N; Vagins, M R; van Bibber, K A; Viren, B; Vogelaar, R B; Wetstein, M J; Winslow, L; Wonsak, B; Worcester, E T; Wurm, M; Yeh, M; Zhang, C

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Advanced Scintillator Detector Concept (ASDC): A Concept Paper on the Physics Potential of Water-Based Liquid Scintillator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent development of Water-based Liquid Scintillator (WbLS), and the concurrent development of high-efficiency and high-precision-timing light sensors, has opened up the possibility for a new kind of large-scale detector capable of a very broad program of physics. The program would include determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy and observation of CP violation with long-baseline neutrinos, searches for proton decay, ultra-precise solar neutrino measurements, geo- and supernova neutrinos including diffuse supernova antineutrinos, and neutrinoless double beta decay. We outline here the basic requirements of the Advanced Scintillation Detector Concept (ASDC), which combines the use of WbLS, doping with a number of potential isotopes for a range of physics goals, high efficiency and ultra-fast timing photosensors, and a deep underground location. We are considering such a detector at the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) far site, where the ASDC could operate in conjunction with the liquid argon tracking detector proposed by the LBNE collaboration. The goal is the deployment of a 30-100 kiloton-scale detector, the basic elements of which are being developed now in experiments such as WATCHMAN, ANNIE, SNO+, and EGADS.

J. R. Alonso; N. Barros; M. Bergevin; A. Bernstein; L. Bignell; E. Blucher; F. Calaprice; J. M. Conrad; F. B. Descamps; M. V. Diwan; D. A. Dwyer; S. T. Dye; A. Elagin; P. Feng; C. Grant; S. Grullon; S. Hans; D. E. Jaffe; S. H. Kettell; J. R. Klein; K. Lande; J. G. Learned; K. B. Luk; J. Maricic; P. Marleau; A. Mastbaum; W. F. McDonough; L. Oberauer; G. D. Orebi Gann; R. Rosero; S. D. Rountree; M. C. Sanchez; M. H. Shaevitz; T. M. Shokair; M. B. Smy; A. Stahl; M. Strait; R. Svoboda; N. Tolich; M. R. Vagins; K. A. van Bibber; B. Viren; R. B. Vogelaar; M. J. Wetstein; L. Winslow; B. Wonsak; E. T. Worcester; M. Wurm; M. Yeh; C. Zhang

2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

280

Advances in the development of energy efficient technologies: Sea Water Air Conditioning (SWAC)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sea water air conditioning (SWAC) is a cost effective and environmentally friendly alternative to and/or enhancement of air conditioning from mechanical chillers. SWAC pumps cold sea water from the appropriate ocean depths (50 to 3,000 feet depending on the climate and local characteristics) to the shore where it replaces (by direct cooling) or enhances (through use as condenser water) large mechanical chillers found in coastal facilities. SWAC direct cooling uses less than twenty per cent of the electricity of a mechanical chiller and uses no refrigerants whatsoever. Indirect cooling also offers substantial energy savings. Both systems dispense with the need for a cooling tower. Technical advances over the last twenty years in corrosion resistant alloys (titanium or aluminum), bio-fouling deterrence, and deep ocean pipeline deployment allow SWAC installations to use reliable, off-the-shelf technology. SWAC works in a variety of climates (existing installations are in Hawaii and Halifax, Nova Scotia), giving it significant domestic and international potential. Economy-of-scale advantages make it attractive to district cooling schemes.

Coony, J.E. [Boston Pacific Co., Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced light water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Development of Advanced Manufacturing Methods for Warm White LEDs for General Lighting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GE Lighting Solutions will develop precise and efficient manufacturing techniques for the “remote phosphor” platform of warm-white LED products. In volume, this will be demonstrated to drive significant materials, labor and capital productivity to achieve a maximum possible 53% reduction in overall cost. In addition, the typical total color variation for these white LEDs in production will be well within the ANSI bins and as low as a 4-step MacAdam ellipse centered on the black body curve. Achievement of both of these objectives will be demonstrated while meeting a performance target of > 75 lm/W for a warm-white LED and a reliability target of <30% lumen drop / <2-step MacAdam ellipse shift, estimated over 50,000 hrs.

Deshpande, Anirudha; Kolodin, Boris; Jacob, Cherian; Chowdhury, Ashfaqul; Kuenzler, Glenn; Sater, Karen; Aesram, Danny; Glaettli, Steven; Gallagher, Brian; Langer, Paul; Setlur, Anant; Beers, Bill

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

282

Light weight, high field, stable, superconducting magnets for advanced transportation systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although the Guideway may be the most expensive component of a MAGLEV system, the importance of a suitable magnet system should not be underestimated. The reliability of operation of MAGLEV depends on the superconducting magnets performing to their specifications in a reliable manner (i.e., without training or quenching). Besides reliability the magnets should produce high field, be sufficiently stable to withstand reasonable perturbations, be light weight, be protected in the event of a quench, and be economical (although performance should outweigh cost). We propose to develop superconducting magnets that have these features. Our magnet designs are based on internally cooled, cable-in-conduit superconductor with Polymer Matrix Composites (PMC) as the structural reinforcement. Although the initial work is with metallic superconductors such as NbTi, the processes being developed will be applicable to the High Temperature Ceramic Superconductors when they become suitable for magnet applications.

Lubell, M.S.; Dresner, L.; Kenney, W.J.; Lue, J.W.; Luton, J.N.; Schwenterly, S.W.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Advanced light ion source extraction system for a new electron cyclotron resonance ion source geometry at Saclay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the main goal of intense light ion injector projects such as IPHI, IFMIF, or SPIRAL2, is to produce high current beams while keeping transverse emittance as low as possible. To prevent emittance growth induced in a dual solenoid low energy transfer line, its length has to be minimized. This can be performed with the advanced light ion source extraction system concept that we are developing: a new ECR 2.45 GHz type ion source based on the use of an additional low energy beam transport (LEBT) short length solenoid close to the extraction aperture to create the resonance in the plasma chamber. The geometry of the source has been considerably modified to allow easy maintenance of each component and to save space in front of the extraction. The source aims to be very flexible and to be able to extract high current ion beams at energy up to 100 kV. A specific experimental setup for this source is under installation on the BETSI test bench, to compare its performances with sources developed up to now in the laboratory, such as SILHI, IFMIF, or SPIRAL2 ECR sources. This original extraction source concept is presented, as well as electromagnetic simulations with OPERA-2D code. Ion beam extraction in space charge compensation regime with AXCEL, and beam dynamics simulation with SOLMAXP codes show the beam quality improvement at the end of the LEBT.

Delferriere, O.; Gobin, R.; Harrault, F.; Nyckees, S.; Sauce, Y.; Tuske, O. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, CEA/Saclay, DSM/IRFU, 91191 Gif/Yvette (France)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

General features of direct-cycle, supercritical-pressure, light-water-cooled reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of direct-cycle, supercritical-pressure, light-water-cooled reactors is developed. Breeding is possible in the tight lattice core. The power output can be maximized in the fast converter reactor. The gross thermal efficiency of the high temperature reactor adopting Inconel as fuel cladding is expected to be 44.8%. The plant system is similar to the supercritical-fossil-fired power plant which adopts once-through type coolant circulation system. The volume and height of the containment are approximately half of the BWR. The basic safety principles follows those of LWRs. The reactor will solve the economic problems of LWR and LMFBR.

Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Thermodynamic and transport properties of thoria–urania fuel of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High temperature thermochemistry of thoria–urania fuel for Advanced Heavy Water Reactor was investigated. Oxygen potential development within the matrix and distribution behaviors of the fission products (fps) in different phases were worked out with the help of thermodynamic and transport properties of the fps as well as fission generated oxygen and the detailed balance of the elements. Some of the necessary data for different properties were generated in this laboratory while others were taken from literatures. Noting the behavior of poor transports of gases and volatile species in the thoria rich fuel (thoria–3 mol% urania), the evaluation shows that the fuel will generally bear higher oxygen potential right from early stage of burnup, and Mo will play vital role to buffer the potential through the formation of its oxygen rich chemical states. The problems related to the poor transport and larger retention of fission gases (Xe) and volatiles (I, Te, Cs) are discussed.

M. Basu (Ali); R. Mishra; S.R. Bharadwaj; D. Das

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Functional issues and environmental qualification of digital protection systems of advanced light-water nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Issues of obsolescence and lack of infrastructural support in (analog) spare parts, coupled with the potential benefits of digital systems, are driving the nuclear industry to retrofit analog instrumentation and control (I&C) systems with digital and microprocessor-based systems. While these technologies have several advantages, their application to safety-related systems in nuclear power plants raises key issues relating to the systems` environmental qualification and functional reliability. To bound the problem of new I&C system functionality and qualification, the authors focused this study on protection systems proposed for use in ALWRs. Specifically, both functional and environmental qualification issues for ALWR protection system I&C were addressed by developing an environmental, functional, and aging data template for a protection division of each proposed ALWR design. By using information provided by manufacturers, environmental conditions and stressors to which I&C equipment in reactor protection divisions may be subjected were identified. The resulting data were then compared to a similar template for an instrument string typically found in an analog protection division of a present-day nuclear power plant. The authors also identified fiber-optic transmission systems as technologies that are relatively new to the nuclear power plant environment and examined the failure modes and age-related degradation mechanisms of fiber-optic components and systems. One reason for the exercise of caution in the introduction of software into safety-critical systems is the potential for common-cause failure due to the software. This study, however, approaches the functionality problem from a systems point of view. System malfunction scenarios are postulated to illustrate the fact that, when dealing with the performance of the overall integrated system, the real issues are functionality and fault tolerance, not hardware vs. software.

Korsah, K.; Clark, R.L.; Wood, R.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

A Look at Safety Goals and Safety Design Trends for Advanced Light Water Power Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technical Paper / NSF Workshop on the Research Needs of the Next Generation Nuclear Power Technology / Nuclear Safety

David Okrent

288

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced light-water reactors Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of low-energy antineutrino detectors, together... Nuclear reactor safeguards and monitoring with ... Source: Gratta, Giorgio - Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics...

289

Depolarized light scattering and dielectric response of a peptide dissolved in water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The density and orientational relaxation of bulk water can be separately studied by depolarized light scattering (DLS) and dielectric spectroscopy (DS), respectively. Here, we ask the question of what are the leading collective modes responsible for polarization anisotropy relaxation (DLS) and dipole moment relaxation (DS) of solutions involving mostly hydrophobic solute-water interfaces. We study, by atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, the dynamics and structure of hydration water interfacing N-Acetyl-leucine-methylamide dipeptide. The DLS response of the solution is consistent with three relaxation processes: bulk water, rotations of single solutes, and collective dipole-induced-dipole polarizability of the solutes, with the time-scale of 130–200 ps. No separate DLS response of the hydration shell has been identified by our simulations. Density fluctuations of the hydration layer, which largely contribute to the response, do not produce a dynamical process distinct from bulk water. We find that the structural perturbation of the orientational distribution of hydration waters by the dipeptide solute is quite significant and propagates ?3?5 hydration layers into the bulk. This perturbation is still below that produced by hydrated globular proteins. Despite this structural perturbation, there is little change in the orientational dynamics of the hydration layers, compared to the bulk, as probed by both single-particle orientational dynamics and collective dynamics of the dipole moment of the shells. There is a clear distinction between the perturbation of the interfacial structure by the solute-solvent interaction potential and the perturbation of the interfacial dynamics by the corresponding forces.

Martin, Daniel R. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, PO Box 871604, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, PO Box 871604, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604 (United States); Fioretto, Daniele [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Perugia, via Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Perugia, via Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Matyushov, Dmitry V., E-mail: dmitrym@asu.edu [Department of Physics and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, PO Box 871604, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604 (United States)

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

290

Commercial Light Water Reactor -Tritium Extraction Facility Process Waste Assessment (Project S-6091)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been tasked by the Department of Energy (DOE) to design and construct a Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) to process irradiated tritium producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs) from a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR). The plan is for the CLWR-TEF to provide tritium to the SRS Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) in Building 233-H in support of DOE requirements. The CLWR-TEF is being designed to provide 3 kg of new tritium per year, from TPBARS and other sources of tritium (Ref. 1-4).The CLWR TPBAR concept is being developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The TPBAR assemblies will be irradiated in a Commercial Utility light water nuclear reactor and transported to the SRS for tritium extraction and processing at the CLWR-TEF. A Conceptual Design Report for the CLWR-TEF Project was issued in July 1997 (Ref. 4).The scope of this Process Waste Assessment (PWA) will be limited to CLWR-TEF processing of CLWR irradiated TPBARs. Although the CLWR- TEF will also be designed to extract APT tritium-containing materials, they will be excluded at this time to facilitate timely development of this PWA. As with any process, CLWR-TEF waste stream characteristics will depend on process feedstock and contaminant sources. If irradiated APT tritium-containing materials are to be processed in the CLWR-TEF, this PWA should be revised to reflect the introduction of this contaminant source term.

Hsu, R.H.; Delley, A.O.; Alexander, G.J.; Clark, E.A.; Holder, J.S.; Lutz, R.N.; Malstrom, R.A.; Nobles, B.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Carson, S.D. [Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, NM (United States); Peterson, P.K. [Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, NM (United States)

1997-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

291

Light  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sunlight contains energy which can be directly converted into electricity in solar cells of various types. This is an example of what is called 'direct conversion', involving no moving parts or heat conversion processes. This chapter looks at photovoltaic and photoelectric devices and also at other ideas for using light energy, some of which operate in the infrared part of the spectrum. Solar electric power is a rapidly developing field, opening up many opportunities for novel applications, as well as requirements, including for storage, with one idea being solar-powered hydrogen production and then direct conversion to electricity in fuel cells. Direct conversion is not always efficient, and this chapter introduces the concept of 'energy return on energy invested'. In speculative mood this chapter also looks at the idea of a global grid, allowing daytime solar generation to be used on the night side of the planet.

David Elliott ? Pages 4-1 to 4-20

292

NREL and Industry Advance Low-Cost Solar Water Heating R&D (Fact...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Rhotech develop cost-effective solar water heating prototype to rival natural gas water heaters. Water heating energy use represents the second largest energy demand for homes...

293

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced pressurized water Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for better managing water quality is both national... on water supply. Just as energy prices enter into national economic pressures, so will water prices... unregulated...

294

NREL and Industry Advance Low-Cost Solar Water Heating R&D (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL and Rhotech develop cost-effective solar water heating prototype to rival natural gas water heater market.

Not Available

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Categorization of failed and damaged spent LWR (light-water reactor) fuel currently in storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of a study that was jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute are described in this report. The purpose of the study was to (1) estimate the number of failed fuel assemblies and damaged fuel assemblies (i.e., ones that have sustained mechanical or chemical damage but with fuel rod cladding that is not breached) in storage, (2) categorize those fuel assemblies, and (3) prepare this report as an authoritative, illustrated source of information on such fuel. Among the more than 45,975 spent light-water reactor fuel assemblies currently in storage in the United States, it appears that there are nearly 5000 failed or damaged fuel assemblies. 78 refs., 23 figs., 19 tabs.

Bailey, W.J.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Chemical aspects of pellet-cladding interaction in light water reactor fuel elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In contrast to the extensive literature on the mechanical aspects of pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) in light water reactor fuel elements, the chemical features of this phenomenon are so poorly understood that there is still disagreement concerning the chemical agent responsible. Since the earliest work by Rosenbaum, Davies and Pon, laboratory and in-reactor experiments designed to elucidate the mechanism of PCI fuel rod failures have concentrated almost exclusively on iodine. The assumption that this is the reponsible chemical agent is contained in models of PCI which have been constructed for incorporation into fuel performance codes. The evidence implicating iodine is circumstantial, being based primarily upon the volatility and significant fission yield of this element and on the microstructural similarity of the failed Zircaloy specimens exposed to iodine in laboratory stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests to cladding failures by PCI.

Olander, D.R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Vibrational spectra of light and heavy water with application to neutron cross section calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of nuclear reactors and neutron moderators require a good representation of the interaction of low energy (E < 1 eV) neutrons with hydrogen and deuterium containing materials. These models are based on the dynamics of the material, represented by its vibrational spectrum. In this paper, we show calculations of the frequency spectrum for light and heavy water at room temperature using two flexible point charge potentials: SPC-MPG and TIP4P/2005f. The results are compared with experimental measurements, with emphasis on inelastic neutron scattering data. Finally, the resulting spectra are applied to calculation of neutron scattering cross sections for these materials, which were found to be a significant improvement over library data.

Damian, J. I. Marquez; Granada, J. R. [Neutron Physics Department and Instituto Balseiro, Centro Atomico Bariloche, CNEA (Argentina); Malaspina, D. C. [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Chemistry of Life Processes Institute, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

2013-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

298

Direct Water Splitting under Visible Light with a Nanostructured Photoanode and GaInP2 Photocathode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thin films of hematite nanorod and GaInP2 were used for direct water splitting under visible light. In open circuit conditions, the potential of hematite shifted cathodically and that of GaInP2 anodically, which generated an open circuit voltage between the two electrodes. In short circuit condition, the combination of the two photoelectrodes can split water under visible light illumination, though with a very low current of {micro}A/cm2 level even at 1 W/cm2 light. By means of chopped light, we found that hematite nanorod has a low photocurrent, which is responsible for the low short circuit current of the 2-electrode combination. The low photoresponse of hematite nanorods is due to the recombination of photo- generated charges, low holes mobility, and short diffusion length.

Wang, H.; Deutsch, T.; Turner, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Space–time kinetics modeling of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor for control studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper presents the mathematical modeling of the space–time kinetics phenomena in Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR), a 920 MW (thermal), vertical pressure tube type thorium based nuclear reactor. The physical dimensions and the internal feedback effects of the AHWR are such that it is susceptible to xenon induced spatial oscillations. For the study of spatial effects and design of suitable control strategy, the need for a suitable mathematical model which is not of a very large order arises. In this paper, a mathematical model of the reactor within the framework of nodal modeling is derived with the two group neutron diffusion equation as the basis. A linear model in standard state space form is formulated from the set of equations so obtained. It has been shown that comparison of linear system properties could be helpful in deciding upon an appropriate nodalization scheme and thus obtaining a reasonably accurate model. For validation, the transient response of the simplified model has been compared with those from a rigorous finite-difference model.

S.R. Shimjith; A.P. Tiwari; M. Naskar; B. Bandyopadhyay

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Control of xenon oscillations in Advanced Heavy Water Reactor via two-stage decomposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Xenon induced spatial oscillations developed in large nuclear reactors, like Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) need to be controlled for safe operation. Otherwise, a serious situation may arise in which different regions of the core may undergo variations in neutron flux in opposite phase. If these oscillations are left uncontrolled, the power density and rate of change of power at some locations in the reactor core may exceed their respective thermal limits, resulting in fuel failure. In this paper, a state feedback based control strategy is investigated for spatial control of AHWR. The nonlinear model of AHWR including xenon and iodine dynamics is characterized by 90 states, 5 inputs and 18 outputs. The linear model of AHWR, obtained by linearizing the nonlinear equations is found to be highly ill-conditioned. This higher order model of AHWR is first decomposed into two comparatively lower order subsystems, namely, 73rd order ‘slow’ subsystem and 17th order ‘fast’ subsystem using two-stage decomposition. Composite control law is then derived from individual subsystem feedback controls and applied to the vectorized nonlinear model of AHWR. Through the dynamic simulations it is observed that the controller is able to suppress xenon induced spatial oscillations developed in AHWR and the overall performance is found to be satisfactory.

R.K. Munje; J.G. Parkhe; B.M. Patre

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced light water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Evolution of isotopic composition of reprocessed uranium during the multiple recycling in light water reactors with natural uranium feed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A complex approach based on the consistent modeling of neutron-physics processes and processes of cascade separation of isotopes is applied for analyzing physical problems of the multiple usage of reprocessed uranium in the fuel cycle of light water reactors. A number of scenarios of multiple recycling of reprocessed uranium in light water reactors are considered. In the process, an excess absorption of neutrons by the {sup 236}U isotope is compensated by re-enrichment in the {sup 235}U isotope. Specific consumptions of natural uranium for re-enrichment of the reprocessed uranium depending on the content of the {sup 232}U isotope are obtained.

Smirnov, A. Yu., E-mail: a.y.smirnoff@rambler.ru; Sulaberidze, G. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation); Alekseev, P. N.; Dudnikov, A. A.; Nevinitsa, V. A., E-mail: neva@dhtp.kiae.ru; Proselkov, V. N.; Chibinyaev, A. V. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production, Progress Report for Work Through September 2002, 4th Quarterly Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of light water at supercritical pressures as the coolant in a nuclear reactor offers the potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to about 45%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type re-circulation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel and smaller containment building than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed. If no additional moderator is added to the fuel rod lattice, it is possible to attain fast neutron energy spectrum conditions in a supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR). This type of core can make use of either fertile or fertile-free fuel and retain a hard spectrum to effectively burn plutonium and minor actinides from LWR spent fuel while efficiently generating electricity. One can also add moderation and design a thermal spectrum SCWR. The Generation IV Roadmap effort has identified the thermal spectrum SCWR (followed by the fast spectrum SCWR) as one of the advanced concepts that should be developed for future use. Therefore, the work in this NERI project is addressing both types of SCWRs.

Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced water-cooled reactors Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in the Subcritical, Gas-Cooled Fast Transmutation Reactor Concept", Nucl... Cooled, Fast, Subcritical Advanced Burner ... Source: MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center Collection:...

304

Advances in water electrolysis technology with emphasis on use of the solid polymer electrolyte  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Efforts to improve water electrolysis technology are being made using three promising ... ) development of solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) water electrolysers, (b) increasing the operating temperature of alkaline...

P. W. T. Lu; S. Srinivasan

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

EIS-0071: Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division Industrial Fuels Gas Demonstration Plant, Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy developed this EIS to assesses the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of a 3,155-ton-per-day capacity facility, which will demonstrate the technical operability, economic viability, and environmental acceptability of the Memphis Division of Light, Gas and Water coal gasification plant at Memphis, Tennessee.

306

Adaptation of gas tagging for failed fuel identification in light water reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses experience with noble gas tagging and its adaptation to commercial reactors. It reviews the recent incidence of fuel failures in light water reactors, and methods used to identify failures, and concludes that the on-line technique of gas tagging could significantly augment present flux tilting, sipping and ultrasonic testing of assemblies. The paper describes calculations on tag gas stability in-reactor, and tag injection tests that were carried out collaboratively with Commonwealth Edison Company in the Byron-2 pressurized water reactor (P%a) and with Duke Power Company and Babcock and Wilcox Fuel Company in the Oconee-2 PWM. The tests gave information on: (a) noble gas concentration dynamics as the tag gases were dissolved in and eventually removed from subsystems of the RCS; and (b) the suitability of candidate Ar, Ne, Kr and Xe isotopes for tagging PWR fuel. It was found that the activity of Xe{sup 125} (the activation product of the tag isotope Xe{sup 124}) acted as a ``tag of a tag`` and tracked gas through the reactor; measured activities are being used to model gas movement in the RCS. Several interference molecules (trace contaminants normally present at sub-ppM concentrations in RCS samples) and entrained air in the RCS were found to affect mass spectrometer sensitivity for tag isotopes. In all instances the contaminants could be differentiated from the tag isotopes by operating the mass spectrometer at high resolution (2500). Similarly, it was possible to distinguish all the candidate tag gases against a high background of air. The test results suggested, however, that for routine analysis a high resolution static mass spectrometer will be preferable to the dynamic instrument used for the present analyses.

Lambert, J.D.B.; Gross, K.C.; Depiante, E.V. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Callis, E.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Egebrecht, P.M. [Commonwealth Edison Company, Downers Grove, IL (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Combustion Concepts- Enabling Systems and Solutions (ACCESS) for High Efficiency Light Duty Vehicles  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Robert Bosch at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced combustion concepts -...

308

Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production, 3rd Quarterly Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of light water at supercritical pressures as the coolant in a nuclear reactor offers the potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to about 45%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type re-circulation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel and smaller containment building than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed.

Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Qualification Requirements of Guided Ultrasonic Waves for Inspection of Piping in Light Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) are being increasingly used for both NDT and monitoring of piping. GUW offers advantages over many conventional NDE technologies due to the ability to inspect large volumes of piping components without significant removal of thermal insulation or protective layers. In addition, regions rendered inaccessible to more conventional NDE technologies may be more accessible using GUW techniques. For these reasons, utilities are increasingly considering the use of GUWs for performing the inspection of piping components in nuclear power plants. GUW is a rapidly evolving technology and its usage for inspection of nuclear power plant components requires refinement and qualification to ensure it is able to achieve consistent and acceptable levels of performance. This paper will discuss potential requirements for qualification of GUW techniques for the inspection of piping components in light water reactors (LWRs). The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has adopted ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code requirements in Sections V, III, and XI for nondestructive examination methods, fabrication inspections, and pre-service and in-service inspections. A Section V working group has been formed to place the methodology of GUW into the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code but no requirements for technique, equipment, or personnel exist in the Code at this time.

Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Doctor, Steven R.; Bond, Leonard J.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Analysis of assembly serial number usage in domestic light-water reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Domestic light-water reactor (LWR) fuel assemblies are identified by a serial number that is placed on each assembly. These serial numbers are used as identifiers throughout the life of the fuel. The uniqueness of assembly serial numbers is important in determining their effectiveness as unambiguous identifiers. The purpose of this study is to determine what serial numbering schemes are used, the effectiveness of these schemes, and to quantify how many duplicate serial numbers occur on domestic LWR fuel assemblies. The serial numbering scheme adopted by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) ensures uniqueness of assembly serial numbers. The latest numbering scheme adopted by General Electric (GE), was also found to be unique. Analysis of 70,971 fuel assembly serial numbers from permanently discharged fuel identified 11,948 serial number duplicates. Three duplicate serial numbers were found when analysis focused on duplication within the individual fuel inventory at each reactor site, but these were traced back to data entry errors and will be corrected by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). There were also three instances where the serial numbers used to identify assemblies used for hot cell studies differed from the serial numbers reported to the EIA. It is recommended that fuel fabricators and utilities adhere to the ANSI serial numbering scheme to ensure serial number uniqueness. In addition, organizations collecting serial number information, should request that all known serial numbers physically attached or associated with each assembly be reported and identified by the corresponding number scheme. 10 refs., 5 tabs.

Reich, W.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Moore, R.S. (Automated Sciences Group, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Assessment of the use of extended burnup fuel in light water power reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study has been conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to review the environmental and economic impacts associated with the use of extended burnup nuclear fuel in light water power reactors. It has been proposed that current batch average burnup levels of 33 GWd/t uranium be increased to above 50 GWd/t. The environmental effects of extending fuel burnup during normal operations and during accident events and the economic effects of cost changes on the fuel cycle are discussed in this report. The physical effects of extended burnup on the fuel and the fuel assembly are also presented as a basis for the environmental and economic assessments. Environmentally, this burnup increase would have no significant impact over that of normal burnup. Economically, the increased burnup would have favorable effects, consisting primarily of a reduction: (1) total fuel requirements; (2) reactor downtime for fuel replacement; (3) the number of fuel shipments to and from reactor sites; and (4) repository storage requirements. 61 refs., 4 figs., 27 tabs.

Baker, D.A.; Bailey, W.J.; Beyer, C.E.; Bold, F.C.; Tawil, J.J.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Electrolytic Reduction of Spent Light Water Reactor Fuel Bench-Scale Experiment Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of experiments were performed to demonstrate the electrolytic reduction of spent light water reactor fuel at bench-scale in a hot cell at the Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex. The process involves the conversion of oxide fuel to metal by electrolytic means, which would then enable subsequent separation and recovery of actinides via existing electrometallurgical technologies, i.e., electrorefining. Four electrolytic reduction runs were performed at bench scale using ~500 ml of molten LiCl – 1 wt% Li2O electrolyte at 650 ºC. In each run, ~50 g of crushed spent oxide fuel was loaded into a permeable stainless steel basket and immersed into the electrolyte as the cathode. A spiral wound platinum wire was immersed into the electrolyte as the anode. When a controlled electric current was conducted through the anode and cathode, the oxide fuel was reduced to metal in the basket and oxygen gas was evolved at the anode. Salt samples were extracted before and after each electrolytic reduction run and analyzed for fuel and fission product constituents. The fuel baskets following each run were sectioned and the fuel was sampled, revealing an extent of uranium oxide reduction in excess of 98%.

Steven D. Herrmann

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Survey of Worldwide Light Water Reactor Experience with Mixed Uranium-Plutonium Oxide Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US and the Former Soviet Union (FSU) have recently declared quantities of weapons materials, including weapons-grade (WG) plutonium, excess to strategic requirements. One of the leading candidates for the disposition of excess WG plutonium is irradiation in light water reactors (LWRs) as mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel. A description of the MOX fuel fabrication techniques in worldwide use is presented. A comprehensive examination of the domestic MOX experience in US reactors obtained during the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s is also presented. This experience is described by manufacturer and is also categorized by the reactor facility that irradiated the MOX fuel. A limited summary of the international experience with MOX fuels is also presented. A review of MOX fuel and its performance is conducted in view of the special considerations associated with the disposition of WG plutonium. Based on the available information, it appears that adoption of foreign commercial MOX technology from one of the successful MOX fuel vendors will minimize the technical risks to the overall mission. The conclusion is made that the existing MOX fuel experience base suggests that disposition of excess weapons plutonium through irradiation in LWRs is a technically attractive option.

Cowell, B.S.; Fisher, S.E.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Improved growth and water use efficiency of cherry saplings under reduced light intensity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cherry (Prunus avium...L.) saplings were grown under natural sunlight (controls) or moderate shading (up to 30%, depending on the incident light intensity and the hour of the day). Reduced light intensity increas...

Mauro Centritto; Francesco Loreto; Angelo Massacci…

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

TRAC-PF1/MOD1: an advanced best-estimate computer program for pressurized water reactor thermal-hydraulic analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in light-water reactors. The TRAC-PF1/MOD1 program provides this capability for pressurized water reactors and for many thermal-hydraulic test facilities. The code features either a one- or a three-dimensional treatment of the pressure vessel and its associated internals, a two-fluid nonequilibrium hydrodynamics model with a noncondensable gas field and solute tracking, flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment, optional reflood tracking capability for bottom-flood and falling-film quench fronts, and consistent treatment of entire accident sequences including the generation of consistent initial conditions. The stability-enhancing two-step (SETS) numerical algorithm is used in the one-dimensional hydrodynamics and permits this portion of the fluid dynamics to violate the material Courant condition. This technique permits large time steps and, hence, reduced running time for slow transients.

Liles, D.R.; Mahaffy, J.H.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Variation and removal efficiency of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) in an advanced water treatment system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigates the microorganism growth indicator and determines the assimilable organic carbon (AOC) content at the Cheng-Ching Lake Advanced ... (CCLAWTP) in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Notably, AOC is associat...

Jie-Chung Lou; Bi-Hsiang Chen; Ting-Wei Chang…

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

INL/EXT-14-33186 Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Safety Analysis Project Plan FY 2015 - FY 2019 Ronaldo H Szilard Curtis L Smith Robert Youngblood September 2014 DOE Office of Nuclear Energy DISCLAIMER This...

318

MWCNT/WO{sub 3} nanocomposite photoanode for visible light induced water splitting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/WO{sub 3} nanocomposite thin films with different MWCNT’s weight percentages were prepared by sol–gel method as visible light induced photoanode in water splitting reaction. Weight percentage of MWCNT in the all nanocomposite thin films was confirmed by TGA/DSC analysis. According to XPS analysis, oxygenated groups at the surface of the MWCNT and stoichiometric formation of WO{sub 3} thin films were determined, while the crystalline structure of the nanocomposite samples was studied by XRD indicating (0 0 2) peak of MWCNT in the monoclinic phase of WO{sub 3}. The influence of different weight percentage (wt%) of MWCNT on WO{sub 3} photoactivity showed that the electron conductivity, charge transfer and electron life time had improved as compared with the pure WO{sub 3}. Based on linear sweep voltammetry and chronoamperometry measurements, the (1 wt%) MWCNT/WO{sub 3} nanocomposite thin films photoanode has a maximum photocurrent density of ?4.5 A/m{sup 2} and electron life time of about 57 s. - Graphical abstract: Photocurrent density versus time at constant potential (0.7 V) for the WO{sub 3} films containing different MWCNT weight percentages annealed at 400 °C under 1000 Wm{sup ?2} visible photo-illumination. Display Omitted - Highlights: • MWCNT/ WO{sub 3} nanocomposite thin films were synthesized using sol–gel derived method. • TGA/DSC confirmed the weight percentage of MWCNT in the all nanocomposite thin films. • XPS analysis revealed that WO{sub 3} was attached on the oxygenated group of MWCNT surface. • The Highest Photoelectrochemical activity is achieved for (1 wt%)MWCNT/WO{sub 3} thin film.

Yousefzadeh, Samira [Physics Department, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Reyhani, Ali [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Imam Khomeini International University, P.O. Box 34149-16818, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Naseri, Naimeh [Physics Department, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moshfegh, Alireza Z., E-mail: moshfegh@sharif.edu [Physics Department, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 14588-89694, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced water reactor Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water... it can be built on time and budget. Reactors currently under construction in Finland and France... are indeed well behind schedule. But there are several reactors that...

320

Cost of Ownership and Well-to-Wheels Carbon Emissions/Oil Use of Alternative Fuels and Advanced Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) updated their analysis of the well-to-wheels (WTW) greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions, petroleum use, and the cost of ownership (excluding insurance, maintenance, and miscellaneous fees) of vehicle technologies that have the potential to significantly reduce GHG emissions and petroleum consumption. The analyses focused on advanced light-duty vehicle (LDV) technologies such as plug-in hybrid, battery electric, and fuel cell electric vehicles. Besides gasoline and diesel, alternative fuels considered include natural gas, advanced biofuels, electricity, and hydrogen. The Argonne Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) and Autonomie models were used along with the Argonne and NREL H2A models.

Elgowainy, Mr. Amgad [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Rousseau, Mr. Aymeric [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Wang, Mr. Michael [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Ruth, Mr. Mark [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Andress, Mr. David [David Andress & Associates, Inc.; Ward, Jacob [U.S. Department of Energy; Joseck, Fred [U.S. Department of Energy; Nguyen, Tien [U.S. Department of Energy; Das, Sujit [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced light water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Comparison of Advanced Residential Water Heating Technologies in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage, gas tankless, condensing, electric storage, heat pump, and solar water heaters were simulated in several different climates across the US installed in both conditioned and unconditioned space and subjected to several different draw profiles. While many preexisting models were used, new models of condensing and heat pump water heaters were created specifically for this work.

Maguire, J.; Fang, X.; Wilson, E.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

U.S. Department of Energy and Illuminating Engineering Society of North America Partner to Advance Industry Lighting Standards  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES) signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to work together on the development of strong industry lighting standards. The original MOU was signed in July 2006 and a renewed MOU was signed in October 2011. It underscores the Department's commitment to support the development of needed metrics and standards for solid-state lighting (SSL) technology.

323

WaterTransport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing and Design Optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water management in Proton Exchange Membrane, PEM, Fuel Cells is challenging because of the inherent conflicts between the requirements for efficient low and high power operation. Particularly at low powers, adequate water must be supplied to sufficiently humidify the membrane or protons will not move through it adequately and resistance losses will decrease the cell efficiency. At high power density operation, more water is produced at the cathode than is necessary for membrane hydration. This excess water must be removed effectively or it will accumulate in the Gas Diffusion Layers, GDLs, between the gas channels and catalysts, blocking diffusion paths for reactants to reach the catalysts and potentially flooding the electrode. As power density of the cells is increased, the challenges arising from water management are expected to become more difficult to overcome simply due to the increased rate of liquid water generation relative to fuel cell volume. Thus, effectively addressing water management based issues is a key challenge in successful application of PEMFC systems. In this project, CFDRC and our partners used a combination of experimental characterization, controlled experimental studies of important processes governing how water moves through the fuel cell materials, and detailed models and simulations to improve understanding of water management in operating hydrogen PEM fuel cells. The characterization studies provided key data that is used as inputs to all state-of-the-art models for commercially important GDL materials. Experimental studies and microscopic scale models of how water moves through the GDLs showed that the water follows preferential paths, not branching like a river, as it moves toward the surface of the material. Experimental studies and detailed models of water and airflow in fuel cells channels demonstrated that such models can be used as an effective design tool to reduce operating pressure drop in the channels and the associated costs and weight of blowers and pumps to force air and hydrogen gas through the fuel cell. Promising improvements to materials structure and surface treatments that can potentially aid in managing the distribution and removal of liquid water were developed; and improved steady-state and freeze-thaw performance was demonstrated for a fuel cell stack under the self-humidified operating conditions that are promising for stationary power generation with reduced operating costs.

J. Vernon Cole; Abhra Roy; Ashok Damle; Hari Dahr; Sanjiv Kumar; Kunal Jain; Ned Djilai

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

324

3D Simulation of Missing Pellet Surface Defects in Light Water Reactor Fuel Rods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cladding on light water reactor (LWR) fuel rods provides a stable enclosure for fuel pellets and serves as a first barrier against fission product release. Consequently, it is important to design fuel to prevent cladding failure due to mechanical interactions with fuel pellets. Cladding stresses can be effectively limited by controlling power increase rates. However, it has been shown that local geometric irregularities caused by manufacturing defects known as missing pellet surfaces (MPS) in fuel pellets can lead to elevated cladding stresses that are sufficiently high to cause cladding failure. Accurate modeling of these defects can help prevent these types of failures. Nuclear fuel performance codes commonly use a 1.5D (axisymmetric, axially-stacked, one-dimensional radial) or 2D axisymmetric representation of the fuel rod. To study the effects of MPS defects, results from 1.5D or 2D fuel performance analyses are typically mapped to thermo-mechanical models that consist of a 2D plane-strain slice or a full 3D representation of the geometry of the pellet and clad in the region of the defect. The BISON fuel performance code developed at Idaho National Laboratory employs either a 2D axisymmetric or 3D representation of the full fuel rod. This allows for a computational model of the full fuel rod to include local defects. A 3D thermo-mechanical model is used to simulate the global fuel rod behavior, and includes effects on the thermal and mechanical behavior of the fuel due to accumulation of fission products, fission gas production and release, and the effects of fission gas accumulation on thermal conductivity across the fuel-clad gap. Local defects can be modeled simply by including them in the 3D fuel rod model, without the need for mapping between two separate models. This allows for the complete set of physics used in a fuel performance analysis to be included naturally in the computational representation of the local defect, and for the effects of the local defect to be coupled with the global fuel rod model. This approach for modeling fuel with MPS defects is demonstrated and compared with alternative techniques. The effects of varying parameters of the MPS defect are studied using this technique and presented here.

B.W. Spencer; J.D. Hales; S.R. Novascone; R.L. Williamson

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

New Advances in Shale Gas Reservoir Analysis Using Water Flowback Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shale gas reservoirs with multistage hydraulic fractures are commonly characterized by analyzing long-term gas production data, but water flowback data is usually not included in the analysis. However, this work shows there can be benefits...

Alkouh, Ahmad

2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

326

Stability analysis of the boiling water reactor : methods and advanced designs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Density Wave Oscillations (DWOs) are known to be possible when a coolant undergoes considerable density reduction while passing through a heated channel. In the development of boiling water reactors (BWRs), there has been ...

Hu, Rui, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced waste water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the Swedish report "Frbrnning av avfall en Summary: in the plants, 90-95% of the dioxins in the waste are broken down into carbon dioxide, water and hydrogen... RVF - The...

328

Research and Development of High Temperature Light Water Cooled Reactor Operating at Supercritical-Pressure in Japan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the status and future plans of research and development of the high temperature light water cooled reactor operating at supercritical-pressure in Japan. It includes; the concept development; material for the fuel cladding; water chemistry under supercritical pressure; thermal hydraulics of supercritical fluid; and the conceptual design of core and plant system. Elements of concept development of the once-through coolant cycle reactor are described, which consists of fuel, core, reactor and plant system, stability and safety. Material studies include corrosion tests with supercritical water loops and simulated irradiation tests using a high-energy transmission electron microscope. Possibilities of oxide dispersion strengthening steels for the cladding material are studied. The water chemistry research includes radiolysis and kinetics of supercritical pressure water, influence of radiolysis and radiation damage on corrosion and behavior on the interface between water and material. The thermal hydraulic research includes heat transfer tests of single tube, single rod and three-rod bundles with a supercritical Freon loop and numerical simulations. The conceptual designs include core design with a three-dimensional core simulator and sub-channel analysis, and balance of plant. (authors)

Yoshiaki Oka [Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 112-0006 (Japan); Katsumi Yamada [Isogo Nuclear Engineering Center, Toshiba Corporation, 8, Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama, 235-8523 (Japan)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Presented by CASL: The Consortium for Advanced  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

against 60% of existing U.S. reactor fleet (PWRs), using data from TVA reactors · Base M&S LWR capabilityPresented by Nuclear Energy CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors A DOE Energy Innovation Hub for Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Reactors Doug Kothe Director, CASL

330

A Synergistic Combination of Advanced Separation and Chemical Scale Inhibitor Technologies for Efficient Use of Imparied Water As Cooling Water in Coal-based Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nalco Company is partnering with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in this project to jointly develop advanced scale control technologies that will provide cost-effective solutions for coal-based power plants to operate recirculating cooling water systems at high cycles using impaired waters. The overall approach is to use combinations of novel membrane separations and scale inhibitor technologies that will work synergistically, with membrane separations reducing the scaling potential of the cooling water and scale inhibitors extending the safe operating range of the cooling water system. The project started on March 31, 2006 and ended in August 30, 2010. The project was a multiyear, multi-phase project with laboratory research and development as well as a small pilot-scale field demonstration. In Phase 1 (Technical Targets and Proof of Concept), the objectives were to establish quantitative technical targets and develop calcite and silica scale inhibitor chemistries for high stress conditions. Additional Phase I work included bench-scale testing to determine the feasibility of two membrane separation technologies (electrodialysis ED and electrode-ionization EDI) for scale minimization. In Phase 2 (Technology Development and Integration), the objectives were to develop additional novel scale inhibitor chemistries, develop selected separation processes, and optimize the integration of the technology components at the laboratory scale. Phase 3 (Technology Validation) validated the integrated system's performance with a pilot-scale demonstration. During Phase 1, Initial evaluations of impaired water characteristics focused on produced waters and reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents. Literature and new data were collected and evaluated. Characteristics of produced waters vary significantly from one site to another, whereas reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents have relatively more uniform characteristics. Assessment to date confirmed that calcite and silica/silicate are two common potential cycle-limiting minerals for using impaired waters. For produced waters, barium sulfate and calcium sulfate are two additional potential cycle-limiting minerals. For reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents, calcium phosphate scaling can be an issue, especially in the co-presence of high silica. Computational assessment, using a vast amount of Nalco's field data from coal fired power plants, showed that the limited use and reuse of impaired waters is due to the formation of deposit caused by the presence of iron, high hardness, high silica and high alkalinity in the water. Appropriate and cost-effective inhibitors were identified and developed - LL99B0 for calcite and gypsum inhibition and TX-15060 for silica inhibition. Nalco's existing dispersants HSP-1 and HSP-2 has excellent efficacy for dispersing Fe and Mn. ED and EDI were bench-scale tested by the CRADA partner Argonne National Laboratory for hardness, alkalinity and silica removal from synthetic make-up water and then cycled cooling water. Both systems showed low power consumption and 98-99% salt removal, however, the EDI system required 25-30% less power for silica removal. For Phase 2, the EDI system's performance was optimized and the length of time between clean-in-place (CIP) increased by varying the wafer composition and membrane configuration. The enhanced EDI system could remove 88% of the hardness and 99% of the alkalinity with a processing flux of 19.2 gal/hr/m{sup 2} and a power consumption of 0.54 kWh/100 gal water. Bench tests to screen alternative silica/silicate scale inhibitor chemistries have begun. The silica/silicate control approaches using chemical inhibitors include inhibition of silicic acid polymerization and dispersion of silica/silicate crystals. Tests were conducted with an initial silica concentration of 290-300 mg/L as SiO{sub 2} at pH 7 and room temperature. A proprietary new chemistry was found to be promising, compared with a current commercial product commonly used for silica/silicate control. Additional pilot cooling tower testing confirmed

Jasbir Gill

2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

331

E-Print Network 3.0 - abb-ce light water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Supplier Beginning in 1999... , community water supply systems must provide an annual report describ- ing the quality of their drinking Source: Fernndez-Juricic, Esteban -...

332

Influence of air humidity and lighting period on growth, vase life and water relations of 14 rose cultivars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of three relative air humidities (RH) (75, 83 and 91% RH corresponding to vapour pressure deficits of 550, 390 and 200 Pa, respectively) and two lighting periods (18 and 24 h day?1) on growth, vase life and leaf–water relations was studied in 14 rose cultivars. Air humidity had no effect on the number of flowering shoots while shoot fresh weight decreased by 11% as a mean of all cultivars when RH was raised from 83 to 91%. An increase in the lighting period (LP) enhanced the number of flowering shoots by 12% and fresh weight per shoot by 5%. A rise in air humidity from 75 to 91% RH reduced the vase life by 30% (varying from 12 to 75% in the different cultivars) at 18 h LP and by 44% (varying from 31 to 78% in the different cultivars) at 24 h LP, while an increase in LP reduced vase life by 23 and 38% at 75 and 91% RH, respectively. The magnitude of the responses differed significantly among cultivars. Generally, a close relationship was found between reduction in vase life and rate of water loss of detached leaves from all cultivars. It is concluded that high air humidity and continuous lighting in general should be avoided in the production of greenhouse roses.

Leiv M Mortensen; Hans R Gislerød

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Computed phase equilibria for burnable neutron absorbing materials for advanced pressurized heavy water reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Burnable neutron absorbing materials are expected to be an integral part of the new fuel design for the Advanced CANDU®[CANDU is as a registered trademark of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited.] Reactor. The neutron absorbing material is composed of gadolinia and dysprosia dissolved in an inert cubic-fluorite yttria-stabilized zirconia matrix. A thermodynamic model based on Gibbs energy minimization has been created to provide estimated phase equilibria as a function of composition and temperature. This work includes some supporting experimental studies involving X-ray diffraction.

E.C. Corcoran; B.J. Lewis; W.T. Thompson; J. Hood; F. Akbari; Z. He; P. Reid

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Advanced Metering Plan for Monitoring Energy and Potable Water Use in PNNL EMS4 Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This updated Advanced Metering Plan for monitoring whole building energy use in Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) EMS4 buildings on the PNNL campus has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), Section 103, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 430.2B, and Metering Best Practices, A Guide to Achieving Utility Resource Efficiency, Federal Energy Management Program, October 2007 (Sullivan et al. 2007). The initial PNNL plan was developed in July 2007 (Olson 2007), updated in September 2008 (Olson et al. 2008), updated in September 2009 (Olson et al. 2009), and updated again in August 2010 (Olson et al. 2010).

Pope, Jason E.; Olson, Norman J.; Berman, Marc J.; Schielke, Dale R.

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

335

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Grizzly Year-End Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Grizzly software application is being developed under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program to address aging and material degradation issues that could potentially become an obstacle to life extension of nuclear power plants beyond 60 years of operation. Grizzly is based on INL’s MOOSE multiphysics simulation environment, and can simultaneously solve a variety of tightly coupled physics equations, and is thus a very powerful and flexible tool with a wide range of potential applications. Grizzly, the development of which was begun during fiscal year (FY) 2012, is intended to address degradation in a variety of critical structures. The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) was chosen for an initial application of this software. Because it fulfills the critical roles of housing the reactor core and providing a barrier to the release of coolant, the RPV is clearly one of the most safety-critical components of a nuclear power plant. In addition, because of its cost, size and location in the plant, replacement of this component would be prohibitively expensive, so failure of the RPV to meet acceptance criteria would likely result in the shutting down of a nuclear power plant. The current practice used to perform engineering evaluations of the susceptibility of RPVs to fracture is to use the ASME Master Fracture Toughness Curve (ASME Code Case N-631 Section III). This is used in conjunction with empirically based models that describe the evolution of this curve due to embrittlement in terms of a transition temperature shift. These models are based on an extensive database of surveillance coupons that have been irradiated in operating nuclear power plants, but this data is limited to the lifetime of the current reactor fleet. This is an important limitation when considering life extension beyond 60 years. The currently available data cannot be extrapolated with confidence further out in time because there is a potential for additional damage mechanisms (i.e. late blooming phases) to become active later in life beyond the current operational experience. To develop a tool that can eventually serve a role in decision-making, it is clear that research and development must be perfomed at multiple scales. At the engineering scale, a multiphysics analysis code that can capture the thermomechanical response of the RPV under accident conditions, including detailed fracture mechanics evaluations of flaws with arbitrary geometry and orientation, is needed to assess whether the fracture toughness, as defined by the master curve, including the effects of embrittlement, is exceeded. At the atomistic scale, the fundamental mechanisms of degradation need to be understood, including the effects of that degradation on the relevant material properties. In addition, there is a need to better understand the mechanisms leading to the transition from ductile to brittle fracture through improved continuum mechanics modeling at the fracture coupon scale. Work is currently being conducted at all of these levels with the goal of creating a usable engineering tool informed by lower length-scale modeling. This report summarizes progress made in these efforts during FY 2013.

Benjamin Spencer; Yongfeng Zhang; Pritam Chakraborty; S. Bulent Biner; Marie Backman; Brian Wirth; Stephen Novascone; Jason Hales

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Reorganization of the cluster state in a C60/N-Methylpyrrolidone/water solution: Comparative characteristics of dynamic light scattering and small-angle neutron scattering data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data on dynamic light scattering from cluster solutions of C60 fullerenes in N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) and its mixture with water are analyzed. Initial C60.../NMP solutions kept for two weeks (i.e., fresher than ...

A. A. Kaznacheevskaya; O. A. Kizima…

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Visible Light-Driven Water Oxidation by Ir oxide Clusters Coupledto Single Cr Centers in Mesoporous Silica  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Visible light-induced water oxidation has been demonstrated at an Ir oxide nanocluster coupled to a single Cr{sup VI} site on the pore surface of MCM-41 mesoporous silica. The photocatalytic unit was assembled by the reaction of surface Cr=O groups with Ir(acac){sub 3} precursor followed by calcination at 300 C and bond formation monitored by FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy. High-resolution Z-contrast electron micrographs of the calcined material combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spot analysis confirmed the occlusion of Ir oxide nanoparticles inside the mesopores. Oxygen evolution of an aqueous suspension of the Ir{sub x}O{sub y}-CrMCM-41 upon visible light irradiation of the Cr{sup VI}-O ligand-to-metal charge-transfer absorption was monitored mass-spectrometrically. Comparison of the product yields for samples with low Cr content (Cr/Si {le} 0.02) and high Cr content (Cr/Si = 0.05) indicates that only isolated Cr centers are capable of extracting electrons from Ir oxide clusters, while di- or polychromate species are not. Water oxidation at a multielectron-transfer catalyst coupled to a single metal center has not been demonstrated before. The ability to drive water oxidation with a single metal center as electron pump offers opportunities for coupling the oxygen-evolving photocatalytic unit to reducing sites in the nanoporous scaffold.

Nakamura, Ryuhei; Frei, Heinz

2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

338

Analytical Challenges and Recent Advances in the Determination of Estrogens in Water Environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......micro-bacterial growth (33). The storage of the water in bottles led to no significant...L, of EE2 were detected in estuary seawater, where EE2 may affect lobster and fish abundance in the coastal seawater. Furthermore, E1, E2, and EE2 were......

Rodica Domnica Briciu; Agata Kot-Wasik; Jacek Namiesnik

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Enhanced Light Extraction from Organic Light Emitting Diodes...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solar Photovoltaic Solar Photovoltaic Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Enhanced Light...

340

Light hydrocarbons in the surface water of the mid-Atlantic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During a cruise of RV Polarstern over the Atlantic in September/October 1988, C2?C4 hydrocarbons were measured in surface sea water. The ship passed through three different ocean ... at 8° N and 3° S. Hydrocarbon

C. Plass; R. Koppmann; J. Rudolph

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced light water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Final Report - Energy Reduction and Advanced Water Removal via Membrane Solvent Extraction Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

3M and Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) collaborated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and demonstrate a novel membrane solvent extraction (MSE) process that can substantially reduce energy and water consumption in ethanol production, and accelerate the fermentation process. A cross-flow membrane module was developed, using porous membrane manufactured by 3M. A pilot process was developed that integrates fermentation, MSE and vacuum distillation. Extended experiments of 48-72 hours each were conducted to develop the process, verify its performance and begin establishing commercial viability.

Reed, John; Fanselow, Dan; Abbas, Charles; Sammons, Rhea; Kinchin, Christopher

2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

342

Chapter 12 - Design of Advanced Membranes and Substrates for Water Purification and Desalination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To be useful in a desalination process, membranes must exhibit a number of characteristics such as high water flux, high salt rejection, mechanical stability, resistance to fouling, and low cost. A number of polymer materials such as cellulose acetates, thin-film composite (TFC) polyamides, cross-linked poly (furfuryl alcohol) and sulfonated polyethersulfone have been investigated for desalination. Of these, cellulose acetates and TFC polyamides have been the most successful. However, cellulose acetate membranes slowly hydrolyze over time, are easily attacked by bacteria and generally are not used above 35°C. Aromatic polyamides, although without those problems, have low resistance to fouling, as well as a low chlorine tolerance due to the existence of secondary amides and electron-rich aromatic rings. The currently available substrates used for the preparation of TFC membranes include polysulfone and polyethersulfone. Most of these membrane substrates, however, have relatively poor chemical and thermal stabilities, and for ultrafiltration are susceptible to performance degradation caused by fouling. Therefore, the development of more thermally and chemically resistant selective top-layers and substrates is critically required for water purification. We have demonstrated a new method to conveniently make nanofiltration (NF) membranes with tailored surface chemistry from UF membranes.

James Economy; Jinwen Wang; Chaoyi Ba

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

A GASFLOW analysis of a steam explosion accident in a typical light-water reactor confinement building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steam over-pressurization resulting from ex-vessel steam explosion (fuel-coolant interaction) may pose a serious challenge to the integrity of a typical light-water reactor confinement building. If the steam generation rate exceeds the removal capacity of the Airborne Activity Confinement System, confinement over pressurization occurs. Thus, there is a large potential for an uncontrolled and unfiltered release of fission products from the confinement atmosphere to the environment at the time of the steam explosion. The GASFLOW computer code was used to analyze the effects of a hypothetical steam explosion and the transport of steam and hydrogen throughout a typical light-water reactor confinement building. The effects of rapid pressurization and the resulting forces on the internal structures and the heat exchanger service bay hatch covers were calculated. Pressurization of the ventilation system and the potential damage to the ventilation fans and high-efficiency particulate air filters were assessed. Because of buoyancy forces and the calculated confinement velocity field, the hydrogen diffuses and mixes in the confinement atmosphere but tends to be transported to its upper region.

Travis, J.R. [ESSI Inc. (United States); Wilson, T.L.; Spore, J.W.; Lam, K.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Rao, D.V. [SEA Inc. (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Advanced U–Np–Pu fuel to achieve long-life core in heavy water reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to look at the possibility of approaching the long-life core comparable with reactor life-time. The main issues are centered on U–Np–Pu fuel in a tight lattice design with heavy water as a coolant. It is found that in a hard neutron spectrum thus obtained, a large fraction of 238Pu produced by neutron capture in 237Np not only protects plutonium against uncontrolled proliferation, but substantially contributes in keeping criticality due to improved fissile properties (its capture-to-fission ratio drops below unit). Equilibrium fuel composition demonstrates excellent conversion properties that yield the burn-up value as high as 200 GWd/t at extremely small reactivity swings.

K. Nikitin; M. Saito; V. Artisyuk; A. Chmelev; V. Apse

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reduce greenhouse gas emissions. If advanced lightinggreenhouse gas emissions. ii Projected Impact of Wireless Lighting

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Laser light scattering by bubbles in water: Fundamentals and applications to acoustics.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Laser light scattering is sometimes used as an alternative to acoustical methods for monitoring bubbles in seawater. There has also been interest in using lasers to investigate bubbles in wakes. In some cases light scattering by bubbles has been used in conjunction with acoustical measurements to characterize dynamics of bubbles radiating sound [J. S. Stroud and P. L. Marston J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 94 2788–2792 (1993)]. In applications such as these it is important to understand the optical properties of bubbles that differ significantly from drops and particles. Examples include critical angle scattering and the transition to total reflection [D. S. Langley and P. L. Marston Appl. Opt. 23 1044–1054 (1984)] forward scattering and extinction [D. S. Langley and P. L. Marston Appl. Opt. 30 3452–3458 (1991); J. S. Stroud and P. L. Marston cited previously] glory back?scattering enhancements and shape effects [W. P. Arnott and P. L. Marston J. Opt. Soc. Am. A5 496–506 (1988); Appl. Opt. 30 3429–3442 (1991)] and Brewster angle scattering. Some optical effects of coatings on bubbles (which can occur naturally) have also been modeled [P. L. Marston Appl. Opt. 30 3479–3484 (1991)]. [Research supported by ONR between 1980 and 1995.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

FEASIBILITY OF RECYCLING PLUTONIUM AND MINOR ACTINIDES IN LIGHT WATER REACTORS USING HYDRIDE FUEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this DOE NERI program sponsored project was to assess the feasibility of improving the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) recycling capabilities of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) by using hydride instead of oxide fuels. There are four general parts to this assessment: 1) Identifying promising hydride fuel assembly designs for recycling Pu and MAs in PWRs 2) Performing a comprehensive systems analysis that compares the fuel cycle characteristics of Pu and MA recycling in PWRs using the promising hydride fuel assembly designs identified in Part 1 versus using oxide fuel assembly designs 3) Conducting a safety analysis to assess the likelihood of licensing hydride fuel assembly designs 4) Assessing the compatibility of hydride fuel with cladding materials and water under typical PWR operating conditions Hydride fuel was found to offer promising transmutation characteristics and is recommended for further examination as a possible preferred option for recycling plutonium in PWRs.

Greenspan, Ehud; Todreas, Neil; Taiwo, Temitope

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

348

An Advanced Computational Scheme for the Optimization of 2D Radial Reflectors in Pressurized Water Reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents a computational scheme for the determination of equivalent 2D multi-group heterogeneous reflectors in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The proposed strategy is to define a full-core calculation consistent with a reference lattice code calculation such as the Method Of Characteristics (MOC) as implemented in APOLLO2 lattice code. The computational scheme presented here relies on the data assimilation module known as "Assimilation de donn\\'{e}es et Aide \\`{a} l'Optimisation (ADAO)" of the SALOME platform developed at \\'{E}lectricit\\'{e} De France (EDF), coupled with the full-core code COCAGNE and with the lattice code APOLLO2. A first validation of the computational scheme is made using the OPTEX reflector model developed at \\'{E}cole Polytechnique de Montr\\'{e}al (EPM). As a result, we obtain 2D multi-group, spatially heterogeneous 2D reflectors, using both diffusion or $\\text{SP}_{\\text{N}}$ operators. We observe important improvements of the power discrepancies distribution over the cor...

Clerc, Thomas; Leroyer, Hadrien; Argaud, Jean-Philippe; Bouriquet, Bertrand; Ponçot, Agélique

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Application of steam injector to improved safety of light water reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Steam injector (SI) is a simply designed passive jet pump which does not require external power source or internal mechanical parts. The SI utilizes direct contact condensation between steam and water as an operational mechanism and is capable of producing higher pressure water than the inlet fluid pressures. The accident in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant caused setback to the credibility and reliability of nuclear power. One way to regain its trust from the global community, it is suggested to develop and install passive coolant injection systems that are operable even during the station black out. In this review paper, thorough and complete review of the SI system was completed and applicability of the SI system as the passive core cooling system is discussed in details. Due to its high heat removal capability, the system can possibly be applied as a high efficiency heat exchanger as well. Its design and operational mechanisms, and fundamental thermal-hydraulic theory utilized in the analysis and experimental work are reviewed. In addition, its possible application towards existing nuclear power plant systems is reviewed.

Yuto Takeya; Shuichiro Miwa; Takashi Hibiki; Michitsugu Mori

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

An Estimate of the Cost of Electricity from Light Water Reactors and Fossil Plants with Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As envisioned in this report, LIFE technology lends itself to large, centralized, baseload (or 'always on') electrical generation. Should LIFE plants be built, they will have to compete in the electricity market with other generation technologies. We consider the economics of technologies with similar operating characteristics: significant economies of scale, limited capacity for turndown, zero dependence on intermittent resources and ability to meet environmental constraints. The five generation technologies examined here are: (1) Light Water Reactors (LWR); (2) Coal; (3) Coal with Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS); (4) Natural Gas; and (5) Natural Gas with Carbon Capture and Sequestration. We use MIT's cost estimation methodology (Du and Parsons, 2009) to determine the cost of electricity at which each of these technologies is viable.

Simon, A J

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

351

Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Acceptance Criteria for Light Water Reactor Spent Fuel Storage System [OCRWM PER REV2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the decommissioning of the 324 Building Radiochemical Engineering Cells there is a need to remove commercial Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) presently stored in these hot cells. To enable fuel removal from the hot cells, the commercial LWR SNF will be packaged and shipped to the 200 Area Interim Storage Area (ISA) in a manner that satisfies site requirements for SNF interim storage. This document identifies the criteria that the 324 Building Radiochemical Engineering Cell Clean-out Project must satisfy for acceptance of the LWR SNF by the SNF Project at the 200 Area ISA. In addition to the acceptance criteria identified herein, acceptance is contingent on adherence to applicable Project Hanford Management Contract requirements and procedures in place at the time of work execution.

JOHNSON, D.M.

2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

352

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk-Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) PathwayTechnical Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). As the current Light Water Reactor (LWR) NPPs age beyond 60 years, there are possibilities for increased frequency of Systems, Structures, and Components (SSCs) degradations or failures that initiate safety-significant events, reduce existing accident mitigation capabilities, or create new failure modes. Plant designers commonly “over-design” portions of NPPs and provide robustness in the form of redundant and diverse engineered safety features to ensure that, even in the case of well-beyond design basis scenarios, public health and safety will be protected with a very high degree of assurance. This form of defense-in-depth is a reasoned response to uncertainties and is often referred to generically as “safety margin.” Historically, specific safety margin provisions have been formulated, primarily based on “engineering judgment.”

Curtis Smith; Cristian Rabiti; Richard Martineau

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Acoustic Emission and Guided Ultrasonic Waves for Detection and Continuous Monitoring of Cracks in Light Water Reactor Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acoustic emission (AE) and guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) are considered for continuous monitoring and detection of cracks in Light Water Reactor (LWR) components. In this effort, both techniques are applied to the detection and monitoring of fatigue crack growth in a full scale pipe component. AE results indicated crack initiation and rapid growth in the pipe, and significant GUW responses were observed in response to the growth of the fatigue crack. After initiation, the crack growth was detectable with AE for approximately 20,000 cycles. Signals associated with initiation and rapid growth where distinguished based on total rate of activity and differences observed in the centroid frequency of hits. An intermediate stage between initiation and rapid growth was associated with significant energy emissions, though few hits. GUW exhibit a nearly monotonic trend with crack length with an exception of measurements obtained at 41 mm and 46 mm.

Meyer, Ryan M.; Coble, Jamie B.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Watson, Bruce E.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Bond, Leonard J.

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

354

Computerized operating procedures for shearing and dissolution of segments from LWBR (Light Water Breeder Reactor) fuel rods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents two detailed computerized operating procedures developed to assist and control the shearing and dissolution of irradiated fuel rods. The procedures were employed in the destructive analysis of end-of-life fuel rods from the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) that was designed by the Westinghouse Electric Corporation Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory. Seventeen entire fuel rods from the end-of-life core of the LWBR were sheared into 169 precisely characterized segments, and more than 150 of these segments were dissolved during execution of the LWBR Proof-of-Breeding (LWBR-POB) Analytical Support Project at Argonne National Laboratory. The procedures illustrate our approaches to process monitoring, data reduction, and quality assurance during the LWBR-POB work.

Osudar, J.; Deeken, P.G.; Graczyk, D.G.; Fagan, J.E.; Martino, F.J.; Parks, J.E.; Levitz, N.M.; Kessie, R.W.; Leddin, J.M.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

EIS-0288; Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

iii iii COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: United States Department of Energy Cooperating Agency: Tennessee Valley Authority Title: Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor Contact: For additional information on this Final Environmental Impact Statement, write or call: Jay Rose Office of Defense Programs U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Attention: CLWR EIS Telephone: (202) 586-5484 For copies of the CLWR Final EIS call: 1-800-332-0801 | For general information on the DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, write or call: Carol M. Borgstrom, Director Office of NEPA Policy and Assistance (EH-42) U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585

356

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Support and Modeling for the Boiling Water Reactor Station Black Out Case Study Using RELAP and RAVEN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The existing fleet of nuclear power plants is in the process of extending its lifetime and increasing the power generated. In order to evaluate the impact of these two factors on the safety of the plant, the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) project aims to provide insight to decision makers through a series of simulations of the plant dynamics for different initial conditions (e.g., probabilistic analysis and uncertainty quantification). This report focuses, in particular, on the impact of power uprate on the safety of a boiled water reactor system. The case study considered is a loss of off-site power followed by the loss of diesel generators, i.e., a station black out (SBO) event. Analysis is performed by using a thermo-hydraulic code, i.e. RELAP-5, and a stochastic analysis tool currently under development at INL, i.e. RAVEN. Starting from the event tree models contained in SAPHIRE, we built the input file for RELAP-5 that models in great detail system dynamics under SBO conditions. We also interfaced RAVEN with RELAP-5 so that it would be possible to run multiple RELAP-5 simulation runs by changing specific keywords of the input file. We both employed classical statistical tools, i.e. Monte-Carlo, and more advanced machine learning based algorithms to perform uncertainty quantification in order to quantify changes in system performance and limitations as a consequence of power uprate. We also employed advanced data analysis and visualization tools that helped us to correlate simulation outcome such as maximum core temperature with a set of input uncertain parameters. Results obtained gave a detailed overview of the issues associated to power uprate for a SBO accident scenario. We were able to quantify how timing of safety related events were impacted by a higher reactor core power. Such insights can provide useful material to the decision makers to perform risk-infomed safety margins management.

Diego Mandelli; Curtis Smith; Thomas Riley; John Schroeder; Cristian Rabiti; Aldrea Alfonsi; Joe Nielsen; Dan Maljovec; Bie Wang; Valerio Pascucci

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

The IMM solar cell's advanced ultra-light, highly flexible design earned it a 2008 R&D 100 Award and a 2009 Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer by the Federal Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

innovati n The IMM solar cell's advanced ultra-light, highly flexible design earned it a 2008 R. The cell's inventors pioneered a new class of solar cells with marked advantages in performance--particularly for complex multijunction cells. These cells convert solar energy more efficiently than single- junction cells

358

Dysprosium as a resonance absorber and its effect on the coolant void reactivity in Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dysprosium has been used as a slow neutron absorber in the fuel assembly of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) to achieve a negative coolant void reactivity. Dysprosium as occurring in nature has as many as seven isotopes namely, 156Dy, 158Dy, 160Dy, 161Dy, 162Dy, 163Dy, and 164Dy. Of these, the isotope 164Dy has the largest absorption cross section for thermal neutrons. In the past, nuclear data libraries used in our studies have considered only 164Dy isotope and this was sufficient for performing foil activation studies of Dy. The other isotopes of Dy have significant resonances and could affect the design. The treatment of the dysprosium isotopes with resonance tabulations is required for a more accurate estimation of the lattice characteristics like the coolant void reactivity. The use of resonance tabulations for the dysprosium isotopes and its effect on the coolant void reactivity of AHWR fuel cluster has been studied in this paper. Also, the treatment of the stand-alone structural rod with dysprosium as burnable absorber having resonance tabulations has been done for the first time.

Umasankari Kannan; S. Ganesan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Direct Water Splitting under Visible Light with Nanostructured Hematite and WO3 Photoanodes and a GaInP2 Photocathode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A p-GaInP{sub 2} photocathode was paired with nanostructured hematite and tungsten trioxide photoanodes to investigate the utility of these systems for direct water splitting under visible light illumination. For the hematite system, under illumination at open-circuit conditions, the potential of hematite shifts cathodically and that of the GaInP{sub 2} shifts anodically. Under short-circuit condition and visible light illumination, the combination of the two photoelectrodes can split water, though with a very low rate of a few {micro}A/cm{sup 2} even at an intensity of 1 W/cm{sup 2}. It was determined that the very low photocurrent from the hematite nanorod photoelectrode limits the short-circuit current of the two-photoelectrode combination. Similar potential shifts were observed with the nanostructured WO{sub 3}/GaInP{sub 2} combination. However, at light intensities below 0.2 W/cm{sup 2}, the short-circuited combination would not split water due to an insufficient potential difference. Above 0.2 W/cm{sup 2}, the combination can split water under visible light, with {approx}20 {micro}A/cm{sup 2} obtained at 1 W/cm{sup 2}. A linear photocurrent-light intensity relationship was observed and was attributed to efficient charge transfer and a low recombination of the charge carriers. The bandgap and the associated absorption limit of WO{sub 3} remain a challenge for a higher efficiency system.

Wang, H.; Deutsch, T.; Turner, J. A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

A MELCOR Application to Two Light Water Reactor Nuclear Power Plant Core Melt Scenarios with Assumed Cavity Flooding Action  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MELCOR 1.8.4 code Bottom Head package has been applied to simulate two reactor cavity flooding scenarios for when the corium material relocates to the lower-plenum region in postulated severe accidents. The applications were preceded by a review of two main physical models, which highly impacted the results. A model comparison to available bibliography models was done, which allowed some code modifications on selected default assumptions to be undertaken. First, the corium convective heat transfer to the wall when it becomes liquid was modified, and second, the default nucleate boiling regime curve in a submerged hemisphere was replaced by a new curve (and, to a much lesser extent, the critical heat flux curve was slightly varied).The applications were devoted to two prototypical light water reactor nuclear power plants, a 2700-MW(thermal) pressurized water reactor (PWR) and a 1381-MW(thermal) boiling water reactor (BWR). The main conclusions of the cavity flooding simulations were that the PWR lower-head survivability is extended although it is clearly not guaranteed, while in the BWR sequence the corium seems to be successfully arrested in the lower plenum.Three applications of the CFX 4.4 computational fluid dynamics code were carried out in the context of the BWR scenario to support the first modification of the aforementioned two scenarios for MELCOR.Finally, in the same BWR context, a statistic predictor of selected output parameters as a function of input parameters is presented, which provides reasonable results when compared to MELCOR full calculations in much shorter CPU processing times.

Martin-Fuertes, Francisco; Martin-Valdepenas, Juan Manuel; Mira, Jose; Sanchez, Maria Jesus [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain)

2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced light water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Mechanism of Irradiation Assisted Cracking of Core Components in Light Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of the project is to determine the mechanism of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). IASCC has been linked to hardening, microstructural and microchemical changes during irradiation. Unfortunately, all of these changes occur simultaneously and at similar rates during irradiation, making attribution of IASCC to any one of these features nearly impossible to determine. The strategy set forth in this project is to develop means to separate microstructural from microchemical changes to evaluate each separately for their effect on IASCC. In the first part, post irradiation annealing (PIA) treatments are used to anneal the irradiated microstructure, leaving only radiation induced segregation (RIS) for evaluation for its contribution to IASCC. The second part of the strategy is to use low temperature irradiation to produce a radiation damage dislocation loop microstructure without radiation induced segregation in order to evaluate the effect of the dislocation microstructure alone. A radiation annealing model was developed based on the elimination of dislocation loops by vacancy absorption. Results showed that there were indeed, time-temperature annealing combinations that leave the radiation induced segregation profile largely unaltered while the dislocation microstructure is significantly reduced. Proton irradiation of 304 stainless steel irradiated with 3.2 MeV protons to 1.0 or 2.5 dpa resulted in grain boundary depletion of chromium and enrichment of nickel and a radiation damaged microstructure. Post irradiation annealing at temperatures of 500 ? 600°C for times of up to 45 min. removed the dislocation microstructure to a greater degree with increasing temperatures, or times at temperature, while leaving the radiation induced segregation profile relatively unaltered. Constant extension rate tensile (CERT) experiments in 288°C water containing 2 ppm O2 and with a conductivity of 0.2 mS/cm and at a strain rate of 3 x 10-7 s-1 showed that the IASCC susceptibility, as measured by the crack length per unit strain, decreased with very short anneals and was almost completely removed by an anneal at 500°C for 45 min. This annealing treatment removed about 15% of the dislocation microstructure and the irradiation hardening, but did not affect the grain boundary chromium depletion or nickel segregation, nor did it affect the grain boundary content of other minor impurities. These results indicate that RIS is not the sole controlling feature of IASCC in irradiated stainless steels in normal water chemistry. The isolation of the irradiated microstructure was approached using low temperature irradiation or combinations of low and high temperature irradiations to achieve a stable, irradiated microstructure without RIS. Experiments were successful in achieving a high degree of irradiation hardening without any evidence of RIS of either major or minor elements. The low temperature irradiations to doses up to 0.3 dpa at T<75°C were also very successful in producing hardening to levels considerably above that for irradiations conducted under nominal conditions of 1 dpa at 360°C. However, the microstructure consisted of an extremely fine dispersion of defect clusters of sizes that are not resolvable by either transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). The microstructure was not stable at the 288°C IASCC test temperature and resulted in rapid reduction of hardening and presumably, annealing of the defect clusters at this temperature as well. Nevertheless, the annealing studies showed that treatments that resulted in significant decreases in the hardening produced small changes in the dislocation microstructure that were confined to the elimination of the finest of loops (~1 nm). These results substantiate the importance of the very fine defect microstructure in the IASCC process. The results of this program provide the first definitive evidence that RIS is not the sole controlling factor in the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stain

Gary S. Was; Michael Atzmon; Lumin Wang

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

362

Analysis of stray radiation produced by the advanced light source (1.9 GeV synchrotron radiation source) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The yearly environmental dose equivalent likely to result at the closest site boundary from the Advanced Light Source was determined by generating multiple linear regressions. The independent variables comprised quantified accelerator operating parameters and measurements from synchronized, in-close (outside shielding prior to significant atmospheric scattering), state-of-the-art neutron remmeters and photon G-M tubes. Neutron regression models were more successful than photon models due to lower relative background radiation and redundant detectors at the site boundary. As expected, Storage Ring Beam Fill and Beam Crashes produced radiation at a higher rate than gradual Beam Decay; however, only the latter did not include zero in its 95% confidence interval. By summing for all three accelerator operating modes, a combined yearly DE of 4.3 mRem/yr with a 90% CI of (0.04-8.63) was obtained. These results fall below the DOE reporting level of 10 mRem/yr and suggest repeating the study with improved experimental conditions.

Ajemian, R.C. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

Low Molecular Weight Organic Contaminants in Advanced Treatment: Occurrence, Treatment and Implications to Desalination and Water Reuse Systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Water reuse and desalination are increasingly considered as viable sources of potable water because improvements in materials and designs have decreased the cost of reverse… (more)

Agus, Eva

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Presented by CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presented by Nuclear Energy CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors A DOE Energy Innovation Hub for Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Reactors Doug Kothe Director, CASL Oak Ridge National Laboratory #12;www.casl.gov Nuclear Power in the US Top 10 Nuclear Generating

365

Review of experiments to evaluate the ability of electrical heater rods to simulate nuclear fuel rod behavior during postulated loss-of-coolant accidents in light water reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Issues related to using electrical fuel rod simulators to simulate nuclear fuel rod behavior during postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions in light water reactors are summarized. Experimental programs which will provide a data base for comparing electrical heater rod and nuclear fuel rod LOCA responses are reviewed.

McPherson, G D; Tolman, E L

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Evaluation of weapons-grade mixed oxide fuel performance in U.S. Light Water Reactors using COMETHE 4D release 23 computer code  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The COMETHE 4D Release 23 computer code was used to evaluate the thermal, chemical and mechanical performance of weapons-grade MOX fuel irradiated under U.S. light water reactor typical conditions. Comparisons were made to and UO? fuels exhibited...

Bellanger, Philippe

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

367

Transmutation Performance Analysis for Inert Matrix Fuels in Light Water Reactors and Computational Neutronics Methods Capabilities at INL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The urgency for addressing repository impacts has grown in the past few years as a result of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) accumulation from commercial nuclear power plants. One path that has been explored by many is to eliminate the transuranic (TRU) inventory from the SNF, thus reducing the need for additional long term repository storage sites. One strategy for achieving this is to burn the separated TRU elements in the currently operating U.S. Light Water Reactor (LWR) fleet. Many studies have explored the viability of this strategy by loading a percentage of LWR cores with TRU in the form of either Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuels or Inert Matrix Fuels (IMF). A task was undertaken at INL to establish specific technical capabilities to perform neutronics analyses in order to further assess several key issues related to the viability of thermal recycling. The initial computational study reported here is focused on direct thermal recycling of IMF fuels in a heterogeneous Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) bundle design containing Plutonium, Neptunium, Americium, and Curium (IMF-PuNpAmCm) in a multi-pass strategy using legacy 5 year cooled LWR SNF. In addition to this initial high-priority analysis, three other alternate analyses with different TRU vectors in IMF pins were performed. These analyses provide comparison of direct thermal recycling of PuNpAmCmCf, PuNpAm, PuNp, and Pu. The results of this infinite lattice assembly-wise study using SCALE 5.1 indicate that it may be feasible to recycle TRU in this manner using an otherwise typical PWR assembly without violating peaking factor limits.

Michael A. Pope; Samuel E. Bays; S. Piet; R. Ferrer; Mehdi Asgari; Benoit Forget

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Prospects for and problems of using light-water supercritical-pressure coolant in nuclear reactors in order to increase the efficiency of the nuclear fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Trends in the development of the power sector of the Russian and world power industries both at present time and in the near future are analyzed. Trends in the rise of prices for reserves of fossil and nuclear fuels used for electricity production are compared. An analysis of the competitiveness of electricity production at nuclear power plants as compared to the competitiveness of electricity produced at coal-fired and natural-gas-fired thermal power plants is performed. The efficiency of the open nuclear fuel cycle and various versions of the closed nuclear fuel cycle is discussed. The requirements on light-water reactors under the scenario of dynamic development of the nuclear power industry in Russia are determined. Results of analyzing the efficiency of fuel utilization for various versions of vessel-type light-water reactors with supercritical coolant are given. Advantages and problems of reactors with supercritical-pressure water are listed.

Alekseev, P. N.; Semchenkov, Yu. M.; Sedov, A. A., E-mail: sedov@dhtp.kial.ru; Subbotin, S. A.; Chibinyaev, A. V. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

A global approach of the representativity concept: Application on a high-conversion light water reactor MOX lattice case  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of new types of reactor and the increase in the safety specifications and requirements induce an enhancement in both nuclear data knowledge and a better understanding of the neutronic properties of the new systems. This enhancement is made possible using ad hoc critical mock-up experiments. The main difficulty is to design these experiments in order to obtain the most valuable information. Its quantification is usually made by using representativity and transposition concepts. These theories enable to extract some information about a quantity of interest (an integral parameter) on a configuration, but generally a posteriori. This paper presents a more global approach of this theory, with the idea of optimizing the representativity of a new experiment, and its transposition a priori, based on a multiparametric approach. Using a quadratic sum, we show the possibility to define a global representativity which permits to take into account several quantities of interest at the same time. The maximization of this factor gives information about all quantities of interest. An optimization method of this value in relation to technological parameters (over-clad diameter, atom concentration) is illustrated on a high-conversion light water reactor MOX lattice case. This example tackles the problematic of plutonium experiment for the plutonium aging and a solution through the optimization of both the over-clad and the plutonium content. (authors)

Santos, N. D.; Blaise, P.; Santamarina, A. [CEA, DEN/DER/SPRC Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Separation and Recovery of Uranium Metal from Spent Light Water Reactor Fuel via Electrolytic Reduction and Electrorefining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of bench-scale experiments was performed in a hot cell at Idaho National Laboratory to demonstrate the separation and recovery of uranium metal from spent light water reactor (LWR) oxide fuel. The experiments involved crushing spent LWR fuel to particulate and separating it from its cladding. Oxide fuel particulate was then converted to metal in a series of six electrolytic reduction runs that were performed in succession with a single salt loading of molten LiCl – 1 wt% Li2O at 650 °C. Analysis of salt samples following the series of electrolytic reduction runs identified the diffusion of select fission products from the spent fuel to the molten salt electrolyte. The extents of metal oxide conversion in the post-test fuel were also quantified, including a nominal 99.7% conversion of uranium oxide to metal. Uranium metal was then separated from the reduced LWR fuel in a series of six electrorefining runs that were performed in succession with a single salt loading of molten LiCl-KCl-UCl3 at 500 °C. Analysis of salt samples following the series of electrorefining runs identified additional partitioning of fission products into the molten salt electrolyte. Analyses of the separated uranium metal were performed, and its decontamination factors were determined.

S. D. Herrmann; S. X. Li

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Qualifying Advanced Energy Manufacturing Investment Tax Credit | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

You are here You are here Home » Qualifying Advanced Energy Manufacturing Investment Tax Credit Qualifying Advanced Energy Manufacturing Investment Tax Credit < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Other Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Construction Heat Pumps Heating Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Design & Remodeling Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Wind Solar Maximum Rebate $30 million Program Info Funding Source The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Start Date 02/17/2009 Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support

372

Comparing removal of trace organic compounds and assimilable organic carbon (AOC) at advanced and traditional water treatment plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Stability of drinking water can be indicated by the assimilable organic carbon (AOC). This AOC value represents the regrowth capacity of microorganisms...254, and AOC) from water, experimental results indicate th...

Jie-Chung Lou; Chung-Yi Lin; Jia-Yun Han…

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Study of Pu consumption in light water reactors: Evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants, compilation of Phase 1C task reports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the evaluations conducted during Phase 1C of the Pu Disposition Study have provided further results which reinforce the conclusions reached during Phase 1A & 1B: These conclusions clearly establish the benefits of the fission option and the use of the ABWR as a reliable, proven, well-defined and cost-effective means available to disposition the weapons Pu. This project could be implemented in the near-term at a cost and on a schedule being validated by reactor plants currently under construction in Japan and by cost and schedule history and validated plans for MOX plants in Europe. Evaluations conducted during this phase have established that (1) the MOX fuel is licensable based on existing criteria for new fuel with limited lead fuel rod testing, (2) that the applicable requirements for transport, handling and repository storage can be met, and (3) that all the applicable safeguards criteria can be met.

Not Available

1994-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Gigawatt-year nuclear-geothermal energy storage for light-water and high-temperature reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Capital-intensive, low-operating cost nuclear plants are most economical when operated under base-load conditions. However, electricity demand varies on a daily, weekly, and seasonal basis. In deregulated utility markets this implies high prices for electricity at times of high electricity demand and low prices for electricity at times of low electricity demand. We examined coupling nuclear heat sources to geothermal heat storage systems to enable these power sources to meet hourly to seasonal variable electricity demand. At times of low electricity demand the reactor heats a fluid that is then injected a kilometer or more underground to heat rock to high temperatures. The fluid travels through the permeable-rock heat-storage zone, transfers heat to the rock, is returned to the surface to be reheated, and re-injected underground. At times of high electricity demand the cycle is reversed, heat is extracted, and the heat is used to power a geothermal power plant to produce intermediate or peak power. When coupling geothermal heat storage with light-water reactors (LWRs), pressurized water (<300 deg. C) is the preferred heat transfer fluid. When coupling geothermal heat storage with high temperature reactors at higher temperatures, supercritical carbon dioxide is the preferred heat transfer fluid. The non-ideal characteristics of supercritical carbon dioxide create the potential for efficient coupling with supercritical carbon dioxide power cycles. Underground rock cannot be insulated, thus small heat storage systems with high surface to volume ratios are not feasible because of excessive heat losses. The minimum heat storage capacity to enable seasonal storage is {approx}0.1 Gigawatt-year. Three technologies can create the required permeable rock: (1) hydro-fracture, (2) cave-block mining, and (3) selective rock dissolution. The economic assessments indicated a potentially competitive system for production of intermediate load electricity. The basis for a nuclear geothermal system with LWRs exists today; but, there is need for added research and development before deployment. There are significantly greater challenges for geothermal heat storage at higher temperatures. Such systems are strongly dependent upon the local geology. (authors)

Forsberg, C. W.; Lee, Y.; Kulhanek, M.; Driscoll, M. J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Sediment resuspension and light attenuation in Peoria Lake: can macrophytes improve water quality in this shallow system?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examined sediment resuspension and light attenuation in relation to the ... and clay resulted in frequent periods of sediment resuspension. As calculated (wave theory) shear stress ... measured experimentally)...

William F. James; Elly P. Best; John W. Barko

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Technology Development for Light Duty High Efficient Diesel Engines  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Improve the efficiency of diesel engines for light duty applications through technical advances in system optimization.

377

Characterization of leaf resistance to water loss in two clones of eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr.) with respect to light intensity, leaf water potential, and drought  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

occurred. The magnitude of resistance in the critical range increased as soil water supply decreased below 20X by volume. Soil water supply conditioned the influence of the measured atmospheric variables. At high soil water supplies (&20X by volume... Atmospheric Evaporative Demand Total Radiation Total Leaf Area 23 24 24 Analysis 24 IV RESULTS 26 Environmental Conditions and Growth Environmental Conditions Growth Trends of Leaf Resistance to Water Loss 26 26 31 Average Trends of Leaf...

Dougherty, Phillip Merle

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

378

Vibrational Energy Relaxation of Thiocyanate Ions in Liquid-to-Supercritical Light and Heavy Water. A Fermi’s Golden Rule Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As was discussed above, the solute stretching excitation is resonantly transferred to the bending–librational combination level (direct V–VR), and the energy transfer decelerates because the solvent acceptor level experiences an energetic downshift upon isobaric heating, thereby gradually lifting the solute–solvent resonance. ... Clearly, this infrared activity cannot correspond to the (?b + ?L) band of heavy water because the bending–librational combination tone should shift to lower energies with increasing temperature as it does for light water (see the absorption edge at 2300 cm–1 in Figure 4a). ...

Denis Czurlok; Jeannine Gleim; Jörg Lindner; Peter Vöhringer

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

LIGHTING RESEARCH PROGRAM Project 4.2 The ENERGY STAR Residential Light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIGHTING RESEARCH PROGRAM Project 4.2 The ENERGY STAR® Residential Light Fixture Advancement Report Applied Proactive Technologies/Architectural Energy Corporation PIER Lighting Research Program 2 Applied Proactive Technologies/Architectural Energy Corporation PIER Lighting Research Program 3 500

380

Advanced, Energy-Efficient Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced, Energy-Efficient Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial Water Reuse Advanced, Energy-Efficient Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial Water Reuse hybridmembranesystemsfa...

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381

Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) sponsors a program of research, development, and demonstration related to advanced non-light water reactor concepts. A goal of the program is to facilitate greater engagement between DOE and industry. During FY12, DOE established a Technical Review Panel (TRP) process to identify R&D needs for viable advanced reactor concepts in order to inform DOE-NE R&D investment decisions. That process involved the use of a Request for Information (RFI) to solicit concept information from industry and engage technical experts to evaluate those concepts. Having completed this process, DOE desires to

382

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Div  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Advanced Reactors Div Advanced Reactors Div Plutonium and Advanced Fuel Labs - PA 10 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: WESTINGHOUSE ADVANCED REACTORS DIV., PLUTONIUM FUEL LABORATORIES, AND THE ADVANCED FUEL LAB (PA.10 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Cheswick , Pennsylvania PA.10-1 Evaluation Year: Circa 1987 PA.10-1 PA.10-4 Site Operations: 1960s and 1970s - Produced light water and fast breeder reactor fuels on a development and pilot plant scale. Closed in 1979. PA.10-2 PA.10-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Decommissioned and decontaminated under another Federal program. Release condition confirmed by radiological surveys. PA.10-1 PA.10-2 PA.10-3 PA.10-4 PA.10-5 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes

383

The role of science, stakeholder engagement, and decision making process design in advancing innovation around water management in Massachusetts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Sustainable Water Management Initiative is a multi-stakeholder process that the Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs convened in early 2010 to seek advice on how to more sustainably manage ...

Corson-Rikert, Tyler Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Recent advances in clean-up strategies of waters polluted with sulfonamide antibiotics: a review of sorbents and related properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and Zea mays L. plants. Water, Air, Soil Pollution , 223 , 5243-5257. Mompelat...cations and anions. Environmental Pollution , 159 , 2616-2621. Zhao, J...different temperatures. Environmental Pollution , 181 , 60-67.

A. Martucci; I. Braschi; L. Marchese; S. Quartieri

385

Feasibility Study Of Advanced Technology Hov Systems: Volume 2b: Emissions Impact Of Roadway-powered Electric Buses, Light-duty Vehicles, And Automobiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EV's, roadway-powered electric automobiles, and light dutyFor Roadway-Powered Electric Automobiles -a---- Range ofFor Roadway-Powered Electric Automobiles Range of Estimated

Miller, Mark A.; Dato, Victor; Chira-chavala, Ted

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Superwetting of TiO2 by light-induced water-layer growth via delocalized surface electrons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Luzar A ( 2011 ) Electric control of wetting...ICT and Future Planning) (No...eV. The binding energy was calibrated by...presents the density distribution of the water...different adsorption energy of bonding for water...configurations and energies of amino acids on...

Kunyoung Lee; QHwan Kim; Sangmin An; JeongHoon An; Jongwoo Kim; Bongsu Kim; Wonho Jhe

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nuclear tors. for of of These studies can examine safety systems or safety research programsnuclear power plants, and at risk. to reduce population The Light-water Reactor Safety Research Program

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Experimental and Thermalhydraulic Code Assessment of the Transient Behavior of the Passive Condenser System in an Advanced Boiling Water Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main goal of the project was to study analytically and experimentally the condensation heat transfer for the passive condenser system such as GE Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR). The effect of noncondensable gas in condenser tube and the reduction of secondary pool water level to the condensation heat transfer coefficient was the main focus in this research. The objectives of this research were to : 1) obtain experimental data on the local and tube averaged condensation heat transfer rates for the PCCS with non-condensable and with change in the secondary pool water, 2) assess the RELAP5 and TRACE computer code against the experimental data, and 3) develop mathematical model and ehat transfer correlation for the condensation phenomena for system code application. The project involves experimentation, theoretical model development and verification, and thermal- hydraulic codes assessment.

S.T. Revankar; W. Zhou; Gavin Henderson

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

389

Effect of Fuel Wobbe Number on Pollutant Emissions from Advanced Technology Residential Water Heaters: Results of Controlled Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research summarized in this report is part of a larger effort to evaluate the potential air quality impacts of using liquefied natural gas in California. A difference of potential importance between many liquefied natural gas blends and the natural gas blends that have been distributed in California in recent years is the higher Wobbe number of liquefied natural gas. Wobbe number is a measure of the energy delivery rate for appliances that use orifice- or pressure-based fuel metering. The effect of Wobbe number on pollutant emissions from residential water heaters was evaluated in controlled experiments. Experiments were conducted on eight storage water heaters, including five with “ultra low-NO{sub X}” burners, and four on-demand (tankless) water heaters, all of which featured ultra low-NO{sub X} burners. Pollutant emissions were quantified as air-free concentrations in the appliance flue and fuel-based emission factors in units of nanogram of pollutant emitter per joule of fuel energy consumed. Emissions were measured for carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub X}), nitrogen oxide (NO), formaldehyde and acetaldehyde as the water heaters were operated through defined operating cycles using fuels with varying Wobbe number. The reference fuel was Northern California line gas with Wobbe number ranging from 1344 to 1365. Test fuels had Wobbe numbers of 1360, 1390 and 1420. The most prominent finding was an increase in NO{sub X} emissions with increasing Wobbe number: all five of the ultra low-NO{sub X} storage water heaters and two of the four ultra low-NO{sub X} on-demand water heaters had statistically discernible (p<0.10) increases in NO{sub X} with fuel Wobbe number. The largest percentage increases occurred for the ultra low-NO{sub X} water heaters. There was a discernible change in CO emissions with Wobbe number for all four of the on-demand devices tested. The on-demand water heater with the highest CO emissions also had the largest CO increase with increasing fuel Wobbe number.

Rapp, VH; Singer, BC

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Development and validation of a real-time SAFT-UT system for the inspection of light water reactor components. Semiannual report, April 1984-September 1984. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is working to design, fabricate, and evaluate a real-time flaw detection and characterization system based on the synthetic aperture focusing technique for ultrasonic testing (SAFT-UT). The system is for inservice inspection of light water reactor components. Included objectives of this program for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission are to develop procedures for system calibration and field operation, to validate the system through laboratory and field inspections, and to generate an engineering data base to support ASME Code acceptance of the technology. This process report covers the programmatic work from April 1984 through September 1984. 58 figs.

Doctor, S.R.; Busse, L.J.; Crawford, S.L.; Hall, T.E.; Gribble, R.P.; Baldwin, A.J.; Van Houten, L.P.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Development and validation of a real-time SAFT-UT system for the inspection of light water reactor components: Annual report, October 1984-September 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is working to design, fabricate, and evaluate a real-time flaw detection and characterization system based on the synthetic aperture focusing technique for ultrasonic testing (SAFT-UT). The system is designed to perform inservice inspection of light-water reactor components. Included objectives of this program for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission are to develop procedures for system calibration and field operation, to validate the system through laboratory and field inspections, and to generate an engineering data base to support ASME Code acceptance of the technology. This progress report covers the programmatic work from October 1984 through September 1985.

Doctor, S.R.; Hall, T.E.; Reid, L.D.; Crawford, S.L.; Littlefield, R.J.; Gilbert, R.W.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Mission Advancing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NETL Accomplishments NETL Accomplishments - the lab 2 Mission Advancing energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security, and improve our environment. Renewed Prosperity Through Technological Innovation - Letter from the Director NETL: the ENERGY lab 4 6 3 Contents Technology Transfer Patents and Commercialization Sharing Our Expertise Noteworthy Publications 60 62 63 64 66 Environment, Economy, & Supply Carbon Capture and Storage Partnerships Work to Reduce Atmospheric CO 2 Demand-Side Efficiencies New NETL Facility Showcases Green Technologies Environment & Economy Materials Mercury Membranes NETL Education Program Produces Significant Achievement Monitoring Water Economy & Supply NETL's Natural Gas Prediction Tool Aids Hurricane Recovery Energy Infrastructure

393

Metal nanoparticles in catalytic polymer membranes and ion-exchange systems for advanced purification of water from molecular oxygen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methods of synthesis of metal nanoparticles and metal/polymer nanocomposites including ion-exchange materials are considered. The effect of the composition and size of nanoparticles on their catalytic activity is analyzed. Attention is focused on the composites used in catalytic processes, namely, catalytic membranes and ion-exchange systems. The problems associated with the removal of dissolved oxygen from water by means of such composites are discussed. The bibliography includes 225 references.

V V Volkov; T A Kravchenko; Vyacheslav I Roldughin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Impact of Lighting Requirements on VLC Systems J. Gancarz, H. Elgala, T.D.C. Little  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report No. 11-01-2013 Abstract Advances in Solid State Lighting (SSL) are enabling Light-Emitting Diodes

Little, Thomas

395

Sixteenth water reactor safety information meeting: Proceedings: Volume 5, NUREG-1150, accident managment, recent advances in severe accident research, TMI-2, BWR Mark l shell failure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This five-volume report contains 141 papers out of the 175 that were presented at the Sixteenth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland, during the week of October 24--27, 1988. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included twenty different papers presented by researchers from Germany, Italy, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan and the United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. This document, Volume 5, discusses NUREG-1150, Accident Management, Recent Advances in Severe Accident Research, BWR Mark I Shell Failure, and the Three Mile Island-2 Reactor.

Weiss, A.J. (comp.)

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Light Induced Water Oxidation on Cobalt-Phosphate (Co-Pi) Catalyst Modified Semi-Transparent, Porous SiO2-BiVO4 Electrodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A facile and simple procedure for the synthesis of semi-transparent and porous SiO{sub 2}-BiVO{sub 4} electrodes is reported. The method involves a surfactant assisted metal-organic decomposition at 500 C. An earth abundant oxygen evolution catalyst (OEC), cobalt phosphate (Co-Pi), has been used to modify the SiO{sub 2}-BiVO{sub 4} electrode by electrodeposition (ED) and photoassisted electrodeposition (PED) methods. Modified electrodes by these two methods have been examined for light induced water oxidation and compared to the unmodified SiO{sub 2}-BiVO{sub 4} electrodes by various photoelectrochemical techniques. The PED method was a more effective method of OEC preparation than the ED method as evidenced by an increased photocurrent magnitude during photocurrent-potential (I-V) characterizations. Electrode surfaces catalyzed by PED exhibited a very large cathodic shift (420 mV) in the onset potential for water oxidation. The chopped-light I-V measurements performed at different intervals over 24-hour extended testing under illumination and applied bias conditions show a fair photostability for PED Co-Pi modified SiO{sub 2}-BiVO{sub 4}.

Pilli, S. K.; Deutsch, T. G.; Furtak, T. E.; Turner, J. A.; Brown, L. D.; Herring, A. M.

2012-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

397

CdSe-MoS2: A Quantum Size-Confined Photocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution from Water under Visible Light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and for the conversion of carbon dioxides into methanol and hydrocarbons. Metal chalcogenides1­9 are promisingCdSe-MoS2: A Quantum Size-Confined Photocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution from Water under Visible driven pathway to hydrogen. Hydrogen is not only an environmentally benign fuel for the generation

Osterloh, Frank

398

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light - New Home Construction  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light - New Home Construction Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light - New Home Construction Incentives Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light - New Home Construction Incentives < Back Eligibility Construction Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Construction Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Builder Option Package: Up to $2,000 Advanced Builder Option Package: Up to $2,800 Energy Star Qualified Home: Up to $3,500 Multi-Family Incentives: See program web site Provider

399

Novel Class of Nanohybrids for Construction of Light Harvesting...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Photovoltaic Solar Photovoltaic Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Novel Class of Nanohybrids for Construction of Light Harvesting Systems...

400

Advancement of chitosan-based adsorbents for enhanced and selective adsorption performance in water/wastewater treatment: review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper gives an overview of the results obtained by various researchers in the treatment of various suspensions and solutions by using Chitosan as an adsorbent. Chitosan, a partially deacetylated polymer obtained from the alkaline deacetylation of chitin, extracted from shellfish has been reviewed for its application in water and wastewater. Chitosan exhibits a variety of physicochemical and biological properties resulting in numerous applications in various fields. The review provides a summary of recent information obtained using batch studies, deals with the various adsorption mechanisms involved also summarises the equilibrium and kinetic modelling. It is attempted to identify the gaps in the use of Chitosan as an adsorbent and to indicate future directions useful for research.

Madhukar V. Jadhav; Yogesh S. Mahajan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced light water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The qualification of advanced composite pipe for use in fire water deluge systems on open type offshore oil platforms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Different types of FIBERBOND{reg_sign} pipe in the dry condition and with a butt and strap joint were subjected to a controlled fire for fire endurance evaluation. Testing adheres to a modification of the ASTM 1173-95 guideline, which simulates the development of an actual hydrocarbon fire. For a fire water deluge system, the pipe is in the dry condition approximately one to three minutes during an actual hydrocarbon fire. Preliminary testing shows that composite pipe is able to withstand this exposure to fire for the five minute duration of the test. This is achieved with modifying the chemical composition of the composite pipe and in some cases, adding an additional structural component to the overall pipe. Therefore, composite pipe could be used for the deluge fire system of an offshore oil platform.

Lea, R.H. [Specialty Plastics, Inc., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Stubblefield, M.A.; Pang, S.S. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Energy Department Announces New Investments in Advanced Nuclear Power  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Investments in Advanced Nuclear Investments in Advanced Nuclear Power Reactors Energy Department Announces New Investments in Advanced Nuclear Power Reactors June 27, 2013 - 2:20pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above strategy to accelerate clean energy leadership and to enable a low-carbon economy, the Energy Department today announced $3.5 million for four advanced nuclear reactor projects that go beyond traditional light water designs. These projects -- led by General Atomics, GE Hitachi, Gen4 Energy and Westinghouse -- will address key technical challenges to designing, building and operating the next generation of nuclear reactors. These steps support the President's plan to cut carbon pollution and spark innovation

403

Energy Department Announces New Investments in Advanced Nuclear Power  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Department Announces New Investments in Advanced Nuclear Energy Department Announces New Investments in Advanced Nuclear Power Reactors Energy Department Announces New Investments in Advanced Nuclear Power Reactors June 27, 2013 - 2:20pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above strategy to accelerate clean energy leadership and to enable a low-carbon economy, the Energy Department today announced $3.5 million for four advanced nuclear reactor projects that go beyond traditional light water designs. These projects -- led by General Atomics, GE Hitachi, Gen4 Energy and Westinghouse -- will address key technical challenges to designing, building and operating the next generation of nuclear reactors. These steps support the President's plan to cut carbon pollution and spark innovation

404

Evaluating Environmental, Health and Safety Impacts from Two Nuclear Fuel Cycles: A Comparative Analysis of Once-Through Uranium Use and Plutonium Recycle in Light Water Reactors.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Prioritizing the finite resources available to advance research, development and demonstration of the nuclear industry requires a comprehensive evaluation of potential advanced nuclear technologies to… (more)

Smith, Bethany Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Overview to Overview to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Overview on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Overview on Twitter Bookmark Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Overview on Google Bookmark Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Overview on Delicious Rank Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Overview on Digg Find More places to share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Overview on AddThis.com... Home Overview Light-Duty Vehicles Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Publications Overview The marketplace for advanced transportation technologies and the focus, direction, and funding of transportation programs are continually changing. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity's "2005 Overview of Advanced Technology Transportation" (PDF 736 KB) gives the latest information about

406

Emerging Lighting Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emerging Lighting Technology Emerging Lighting Technology Bruce Kinzey Pacific Northwest National Laboratory FUPWG - Portland, OR April 20, 2011 www.ssl.energy.gov 2 | Solid-State Lighting Program GATEWAY Demonstration Program * Purpose: demonstrate new SSL products in real-world applications that save energy, match or improve illumination, and are cost- effective * Demos generate critical field experience providing: - Feedback to manufacturers - Data for utility incentives - Market readiness of specific applications to users - Advancement in lighting knowledge Central Park, NY Photo: Ryan Pyle Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C. Photo: Scott Rosenfeld www.ssl.energy.gov 3 | Solid-State Lighting Program LED Product Explosion www.ssl.energy.gov 4 | Solid-State Lighting Program LEDs are Not a Universal Lighting

407

An integrated approach for the verification of fresh mixed oxide fuel (MOX) assemblies at light water reactor MOX recycle reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an integrated approach for the verification of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies prior to their being loaded into the reactor. There is a coupling of the verification approach that starts at the fuel fabrication plant and stops with the transfer of the assemblies into the thermal reactor. The key measurement points are at the output of the fuel fabrication plant, the receipt at the reactor site, and the storage in the water pool as fresh fuel. The IAEA currently has the capability to measure the MOX fuel assemblies at the output of the fuel fabrication plants using a passive neutron coincidence counting systems of the passive neutron collar (PNCL) type. Also. at the MOX reactor pool, the underwater coincidence counter (UWCC) has been developed to measure the MOX assemblies in the water. The UWCC measurement requires that the fuel assembly be lifted about two meters up in the storage rack to avoid interference from the fuel that is stored in the rack. This paper presents a new method to verify the MOX fuel assemblies that are in the storage rack without the necessity of moving the fuel. The detector system is called the Underwater MOX Verification System (UMVS). The integration and relationship of the three measurements systems is described.

Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Sang - Yoon [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Progress in evaluation and improvement in nondestructive examination reliability for inservice inspection of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) and characterize fabrication flaws in reactor pressure vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is a review of the work conducted under two programs. One (NDE Reliability Program) is a multi-year program addressing the reliability of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for the inservice inspection (ISI) of light water reactor components. This program examines the reliability of current NDE, the effectiveness of evolving technologies, and provides assessments and recommendations to ensure that the NDE is applied at the right time, in the right place with sufficient effectiveness that defects of importance to structural integrity will be reliably detected and accurately characterized. The second program (Characterizing Fabrication Flaws in Reactor Pressure Vessels) is assembling a data base to quantify the distribution of fabrication flaws that exist in US nuclear reactor pressure vessels with respect to density, size, type, and location. These programs will be discussed as two separate sections in this report. 4 refs., 7 figs.

Doctor, S.R.; Bowey, R.E.; Good, M.S.; Friley, J.R.; Kurtz, R.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Taylor, T.T.; Heasler, P.G.; Andersen, E.S.; Diaz, A.A.; Greenwood, M.S.; Hockey, R.L.; Schuster, G.J.; Spanner, J.C.; Vo, T.V.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Analysis of Advanced Fuel Assemblies and Core Designs for the Current and Next Generations of LWRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to design and analyze advanced fuel assemblies for use in current and future light water reactors and to assess their ability to reduce the inventory of transuranic elements, while preserving operational safety. The reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel can delay or avoid the need for a second geological repository in the US. Current light water reactor fuel assembly designs under investigation could reduce the plutonium inventory of reprocessed fuel. Nevertheless, these designs are not effective in stabilizing or reducing the inventory of minor actinides. In the course of this project, we developed and analyzed advanced fuel assembly designs with improved thermal transmutation capability regarding transuranic elements and especially minor actinides. These designs will be intended for use in thermal spectrum (e.g., current and future fleet of light water reactors in the US). We investigated various fuel types, namely high burn-up advanced mixed oxides and inert matrix fuels, in various geometrical designs that are compliant with the core internals of current and future light water reactors. Neutronic/thermal hydraulic effects were included. Transmutation efficiency and safety parameters were used to rank and down-select the various designs.

Jean Ragusa; Karen Vierow

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Experimental measurements of the diffusion parameters of light hydrocarbons in water-saturated sedimentary rocks: II. Results and geochemical significance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diffusion parameters (diffusion coefficient, diffusion permeability, solubility coefficient) for methane, ethane, propane, n-butane, methylpropane and 2,2-dimethylpropane were measured on 21 samples of water-saturated sedimentary rocks at different temperatures (30, 50, and 70 C). The rock samples include sandstones, siltstones, and claystones with porosities ranging from 0.4 to 16.5% and permeabilities from <0.005 to 33.4 millidarcy. Experimental diffusion coefficients ranged from c. 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} to 9 {times} 10{sup {minus}13} m{sup 2}/s, solubility coefficients covered a range from c. 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}1} to 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}, and diffusion permeabilities lay between c. 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} and 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}14} m{sup 2}/s. Diffusion coefficients decrease with increasing molecular weight of the hydrocarbon compound, the decrease depending on the petrophysical properties and the mineralogy of the rocks and being most drastic in shales. None of the petrophysical parameters examined in this study (porosity, permeability, formation resistivity factor) gave a good correlation with the nonsteady-state diffusion coefficient, D. An excellent correlation was found between the formation resistivity factor, F, and the steady-state diffusion permeability. P. A possibly useful-though less significant-relation bearing some resemblance with Archie's law appears to exist between the porosity and the diffusion permeability. The temperature dependence of the diffusion parameters was determined on two calcareous sandstones. Based on an activated diffusion model activation energies for the diffusion process ranging around 50 kJ/mol were calculated for all hydrocarbons examined.

Krooss, B.M.; Leythaeuser, D. (Institute of petroleum and Organic Geochemistry, Juelich (Germany, F.R.))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Lighting Group: Software  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Software Software Lighting Software The Lighting Group has developed several computer programs in the course of conducting research on energy efficient lighting. Several of these programs have proven useful outside the research environment. One of the most popular programs for advanced lighting applications is Radiance. For more information on this program and its availability, click on the link below. RADIANCE Radiance is a suite of programs for the analysis and visualization of lighting in design. The primary advantage of Radiance over simpler lighting calculation and rendering tools is that there are no limitations on the geometry or the materials that may be simulated. Radiance is used by architects and engineers to predict illumination, visual quality and appearance of innovative design spaces, and by researchers to evaluate new

412

Photon Statistics of Semiconductor Light Sources.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In recent years, semiconductor light sources have become more and more interesting in terms of applications due to their high efficiency and low cost. Advanced… (more)

Aßmann, Marc

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Manufacturing of Protected Lithium Electrodes for Advanced Lithium...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lithium Electrodes for Advanced Lithium-Air, Lithium-Water, and Lithium-Sulfur Batteries, April 2013 Manufacturing of Protected Lithium Electrodes for Advanced Lithium-Air,...

414

Flow instabilities in the core and the coolant circuit of advances low-boiling light water reacto: classification of causes and development of simulator for the future analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

parameters due to closed loop system feedback. In turn, these cause over-circuit instability in the reactor. Core power generation changes are carried out by means of influencing the nuclear fission process through changing the multiplication factor...

Rezvyi, Aleksey

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

415

Thorium, uranium and rare earth elements content in lanthanide concentrate (LC) and water leach purification (WLP) residue of Lynas advanced materials plant (LAMP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lynas Advanced Materials Plant (LAMP) has been licensed to produce the rare earths elements since early 2013 in Malaysia. LAMP processes lanthanide concentrate (LC) to extract rare earth elements and subsequently produce large volumes of water leach purification (WLP) residue containing naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). This residue has been rising up the environmental issue because it was suspected to accumulate thorium with significant activity concentration and has been classified as radioactive residue. The aim of this study is to determine Th-232, U-238 and rare earth elements in lanthanide concentrate (LC) and water leach purification (WLP) residue collected from LAMP and to evaluate the potential radiological impacts of the WLP residue on the environment. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and ?-spectrometry were used for determination of Th, U and rare earth elements concentrations. The results of this study found that the concentration of Th in LC was 1289.7 ± 129 ppm (5274.9 ± 527.6Bq/kg) whereas the Th and U concentrations in WLP were determined to be 1952.9±17.6 ppm (7987.4 ± 71.9 Bq/kg) and 17.2 ± 2.4 ppm respectively. The concentrations of Th and U in LC and WLP samples determined by ?- spectrometry were 1156 ppm (4728 ± 22 Bq/kg) and 18.8 ppm and 1763.2 ppm (7211.4 Bq/kg) and 29.97 ppm respectively. This study showed that thorium concentrations were higher in WLP compare to LC. This study also indicate that WLP residue has high radioactivity of {sup 232}Th compared to Malaysian soil natural background (63 - 110 Bq/kg) and come under preview of Act 304 and regulations. In LC, the Ce and Nd concentrations determined by INAA were 13.2 ± 0.6% and 4.7 ± 0.1% respectively whereas the concentrations of La, Ce, Nd and Sm in WLP were 0.36 ± 0.04%, 1.6%, 0.22% and 0.06% respectively. This result showed that some amount of rare earth had not been extracted and remained in the WLP and may be considered to be reextracted.

AL-Areqi, Wadeeah M., E-mail: walareqi@yahoo.com; Majid, Amran Ab., E-mail: walareqi@yahoo.com; Sarmani, Sukiman, E-mail: walareqi@yahoo.com [Nuclear Science Programme, School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi (Malaysia)

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

416

Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about light water reactor design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC)

417

Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) sponsors a program of research, development, and demonstration related to advanced non-light water reactor concepts. A goal of the program is to facilitate greater engagement between DOE and industry. During FY12, DOE established a Technical Review Panel (TRP) process to identify R&D needs for viable advanced reactor concepts in order to inform DOE-NE R&D investment decisions. That process involved the use of a Request for Information (RFI) to solicit concept information from industry and engage technical experts to evaluate those concepts. Having completed this process, DOE desires to

418

March 2006, Report of the ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION TECHNOLOGY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

March 2006, Report of the ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION March 2006, Report of the ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SUBCOMMITTEE of the NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE March 2006, Report of the ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SUBCOMMITTEE of the NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) marks a major change in the direction of the DOE's nuclear energy R&D program. It is a coherent plan to test technologies that promise to markedly reduce the problem of nuclear waste treatment and to reduce the proliferation risk in a world with a greatly expanded nuclear power program. It brings the U.S. program into much closer alignment with that of the other major nuclear energy states. GNEP proposes to take spent fuel from existing light water reactors (LWRs),

419

CESAR: Center for Exascale Simulation of Advanced Reactors | Argonne  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CESAR: Center for Exascale Simulation of Advanced Reactors CESAR: Center for Exascale Simulation of Advanced Reactors CESAR: Center for Exascale Simulation of Advanced Reactors CESAR is an interdisciplinary center for developing an innovative, next-generation nuclear reactor analysis tool that both utilizes and guides the development of exascale computing platforms. Existing reactor analysis codes are highly tuned and calibrated for commercial light-water reactors, but they lack the physics fidelity to seamlessly carry over to new classes of reactors with significantly different design characteristics-as, for example, innovative concepts such as TerraPower's Traveling Wave reactor and Small Modular Reactor concepts. Without vastly improved modeling capabilities, the economic and safety characteristics of these and other novel systems will require tremendous

420

Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(RISMC) Advanced Test (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about light water reactor design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced light water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A SCOPING STUDY: Development of Probabilistic Risk Assessment Models for Reactivity Insertion Accidents During Shutdown In U.S. Commercial Light Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the scoping study of developing generic simplified fuel damage risk models for quantitative analysis from inadvertent reactivity insertion events during shutdown (SD) in light water pressurized and boiling water reactors. In the past, nuclear fuel reactivity accidents have been analyzed both mainly deterministically and probabilistically for at-power and SD operations of nuclear power plants (NPPs). Since then, many NPPs had power up-rates and longer refueling intervals, which resulted in fuel configurations that may potentially respond differently (in an undesirable way) to reactivity accidents. Also, as shown in a recent event, several inadvertent operator actions caused potential nuclear fuel reactivity insertion accident during SD operations. The set inadvertent operator actions are likely to be plant- and operation-state specific and could lead to accident sequences. This study is an outcome of the concern which arose after the inadvertent withdrawal of control rods at Dresden Unit 3 in 2008 due to operator actions in the plant inadvertently three control rods were withdrawn from the reactor without knowledge of the main control room operator. The purpose of this Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) Model development project is to develop simplified SPAR Models that can be used by staff analysts to perform risk analyses of operating events and/or conditions occurring during SD operation. These types of accident scenarios are dominated by the operator actions, (e.g., misalignment of valves, failure to follow procedures and errors of commissions). Human error probabilities specific to this model were assessed using the methodology developed for SPAR model human error evaluations. The event trees, fault trees, basic event data and data sources for the model are provided in the report. The end state is defined as the reactor becomes critical. The scoping study includes a brief literature search/review of historical events, developments of a small set of comprehensive event trees and fault trees and recommendation for future work.

S. Khericha

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

NETL: Advanced Research - Ultrasupercritical  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High Performance Materials > Ultrasupercritical High Performance Materials > Ultrasupercritical Advanced Research High Performance Materials Ultrasupercritical Increasing the temperature and pressure of steam improves the efficiency of boilers and turbines that use steam as the working fluid. These higher efficiency boilers and turbines require less coal and produce less greenhouse gases. Identifying materials that can operate for long periods of time at extreme temperatures and pressures is a major goal of NETL's Advanced Research Materials Program. Phase diagram of water Figure 1: Phase diagram of water To understand the terminology of boilers and turbines, it is first necessary to understand the basics of the water/steam phase diagram (see Figure 1). The normal boiling point (nbp) of water occurs at 1 atmosphere

423

Sandia National Laboratories: water scarcity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hightower, head of the Water for ... ECIS-UNM: Biomimetic Membranes for Water Purification On February 20, 2013, in Advanced Materials Laboratory, Energy Efficiency,...

424

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Newsletter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The small volume required for such analysis is beneficial for correlating with the small-scale mechanical testing currently being investigated. Further studies on the...

425

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Newsletter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the operation of commercial nuclear power plants require conservative mar- gins of fracture toughness for the RPV materials, both during normal operation and under accident...

426

Quantum Coherence in Photosynthetic Light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the following: How do light-harvesting systems deliver such high efficiency in the presence of disordered:333­61 First published online as a Review in Advance on December 13, 2011 The Annual Review of Condensed Matter quantum efficiency of photosynthetic light harvesting. Further, this speculation has led to much effort

Fleming, Graham R.

427

Lighting Group: Controls and Communications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Communications Communications Controls and Communications The Controls and Communications research activity investigates how digital technologies, such as Bluetooth, can be applied to building lighting control systems to increase building efficiency and improve occupant comfort and productivity. Projects range from embedded device networks applied to building lighting systems, to WiFi and environmental sensing and monitoring. light switch Current Projects IBECS (Integrated Building Environmental Communications System) Wireless Lighting Controls (with DUST Networks) HPCBS Advanced Digital Controls Building Control Systems Integration Completed Projects CEC Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Projects 450 Golden Gate Project New Publications Standardizing Communication Between Lighting Devices: A Role for

428

Commercial Lighting | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lighting Lighting Commercial Lighting At an estimated cost of $38 billion a year, lighting represents the largest source of electricity consumption in U.S. commercial buildings. By combining an inexpensive camera with a high-speed microprocessor and algorithms, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Lab developed an occupancy sensor can recognize the presence of human occupants more than 90 percent of the time -- an advancement that could lead to enormous energy savings in commercial buildings. At an estimated cost of $38 billion a year, lighting represents the largest source of electricity consumption in U.S. commercial buildings. By combining an inexpensive camera with a high-speed microprocessor and

429

Light Duty Combustion Research: Advanced Light-Duty Combustion Experiments  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

430

Light Duty Combustion Research: Advanced Light-Duty Combustion...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

reactor simulations with detailed chemistry clarified expected impact of , T, and EGR rate on CO and UHC oxidation Clearance volume CO and UHC measurements identify...

431

Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Goldstein, E. Blakely, K. Bjornstad, M. Martin, and W.R.M.L. Russell, and K. Bjornstad (Berkeley Lab) and M.C.Martin, E.A. Blakely, K. Bjornstad, and W.R. McKinney, “

Greiner, A.; Moxon, L.; Robinson, A.; Tamura, L.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Advanced Light Source Beam Position Monitor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 Diagram of storage ring BPM button test set. The 290 ohmmodules. Fig. 6 Drawing of BPM modules and bin. The chassis7 Basic signal flow between BPM plug-in modules. Throughout

Hinkson, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chemical states, and small metal-silicide precipi- F I G U Rmetal defects in commercial solar cell material. Left: Iron silicide

Tamura Ed., Lori S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Advanced Technology Light Duty Diesel Aftertreatment System  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Dearborn, MI T2B2 FTP-75 NOx Cycle Limit http:www.dieselnet.comstandardscyclesftp75.php ATLAS T2B2 AT Strategy Summary 1162012 U.S. Department of Energy DEER 2012 -...

435

Advanced light source. Activity report 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ALS Activity Report is designed to share the breadth, variety, and interest of the scientific program and ongoing R&D efforts in a form that is accessible to a broad audience. Recent research results are presented in six sections, each representing an important theme in ALS science. These results are designed to demonstrate the capabilities of the ALS, rather than to give a comprehensive review of 1995 experiments. Although the scientific program and facilities report are separate sections, in practice the achievements and accomplishments of users and ALS staff are interdependent. This user-staff collaboration is essential to help us direct our efforts toward meeting the needs of the user community, and to ensure the continued success of the ALS as a premier facility.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Brain protein deciphered at Advanced Light Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This computer-generated model of a rat glutamate receptor is the first complete portrait of this important link in the nervous system. At the top of the Y-shaped protein, a pair of molecules splay outward like diverging prongs. The bottom section, which is embedded in a neuronal membrane, houses the ion channel. The resolution of this image is 3.6 angstroms per pixel, or just under four ten-billionths of a meter per image unit. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2010/01/21/glutamate-receptor/

None

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Advanced, Energy-Efficient Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

MANUFACTURING OFFICE Advanced, Energy- Efficient Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial Water Reuse New Hybrid Membrane System Utilizes Industrial Waste Heat to Power Water...

438

Manufacturing of Protected Lithium Electrodes for Advanced Batteries  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Manufacturing of Protected Lithium Electrodes for Advanced Lithium-Air, Lithium-Water, and Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

439

DOE Announces Webinars on the Distributed Wind Power Market, Lighting  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lighting Retrofits Financial Analysis Tool, and More Lighting Retrofits Financial Analysis Tool, and More DOE Announces Webinars on the Distributed Wind Power Market, Lighting Retrofits Financial Analysis Tool, and More August 16, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis EERE offers webinars to the public on a range of subjects, from adopting the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies to training for the clean energy workforce. Webinars are free; however, advanced registration is typically required. You can also watch archived webinars and browse previously aired videos, slides, and transcripts. Upcoming Webinars August 21: Live Webinar on the 2012 Distributed Wind Market Report Webinar Sponsor: EERE's Wind and Water Power Technologies Program The Energy Department will present a live webcast titled "2012 Market

440

Comparison of the relationships between lidar integrated backscattered light and accumulated depolarization ratios for linear and circular polarization for water droplets, fog oil, and dust  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently, an empirical relationship between the layer integrated backscattered light and the layer accumulated depolarization ratio has been established for linear polarization for...

Cao, Xiaoying; Roy, Gilles; Roy, Nathalie; Bernier, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced light water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Reactor Physics and Criticality Benchmark Evaluations for Advanced Nuclear Fuel - Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear industry interest in advanced fuel and reactor design often drives towards fuel with uranium enrichments greater than 5 wt% 235U. Unfortunately, little data exists, in the form of reactor physics and criticality benchmarks, for uranium enrichments ranging between 5 and 10 wt% 235U. The primary purpose of this project is to provide benchmarks for fuel similar to what may be required for advanced light water reactors (LWRs). These experiments will ultimately provide additional information for application to the criticality-safety bases for commercial fuel facilities handling greater than 5 wt% 235U fuel.

William Anderson; James Tulenko; Bradley Rearden; Gary Harms

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

442

Advanced Reactors Thermal Energy Transport for Process Industries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operation temperature of advanced nuclear reactors is generally higher than commercial light water reactors and thermal energy from advanced nuclear reactor can be used for various purposes such as liquid fuel production, district heating, desalination, hydrogen production, and other process heat applications, etc. Some of the major technology challenges that must be overcome before the advanced reactors could be licensed on the reactor side are qualification of next generation of nuclear fuel, materials that can withstand higher temperature, improvement in power cycle thermal efficiency by going to combined cycles, SCO2 cycles, successful demonstration of advanced compact heat exchangers in the prototypical conditions, and from the process side application the challenge is to transport the thermal energy from the reactor to the process plant with maximum efficiency (i.e., with minimum temperature drop). The main focus of this study is on doing a parametric study of efficient heat transport system, with different coolants (mainly, water, He, and molten salts) to determine maximum possible distance that can be achieved.

P. Sabharwall; S.J. Yoon; M.G. McKellar; C. Stoots; George Griffith

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

Frances M. Marshall; Jeff Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Advanced Energy Fund | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Energy Fund Advanced Energy Fund Advanced Energy Fund < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Wind Solar Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Program Info State Ohio Program Type Public Benefits Fund Provider Ohio Development Services Agency Ohio's Advanced Energy Fund was originally authorized by the state's 1999 electric restructuring legislation. The Fund supports the Advanced Energy Program, which at different times has provided grants for renewable energy and energy efficiency projects to different economic sectors. Grant and loan funds are awarded through periodic Notices of Funding Availability

445

Advanced Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Express Licensing Active Terahertz Metamaterial Devices Express Licensing Anion-Conducting Polymer, Composition, And Membrane Express Licensing Analysis Of Macromolecule, Liggands And Macromolecule-Lingand Complexes Express Licensing Carbon Microtubes Express Licensing Chemical Synthesis Of Chiral Conducting Polymers Express Licensing Forming Adherent Coatings Using Plasma Processing Express Licensing Hydrogen Scavengers Express Licensing Laser Welding Of Fused Quartz Express Licensing Multiple Feed Powder Splitter Negotiable Licensing Boron-10 Neutron Detectors for Helium-3 Replacement Negotiable Licensing Insensitive Extrudable Explosive Negotiable Licensing Durable Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) Express Licensing Method of Synthesis of Proton Conducting Materials

446

Overview of the DOE Advanced Combustion Engine R&D  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

& Non-Carbon) Electricity (Conventional & Renewable Sources) Improve Fuel Economy Reduce GHG Emissions Displace Petroleum IC Engine and Transmission Advances Light & Heavy-Duty...

447

Light Portal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Light Portal was designed to organize and mark the pedestrian paths that circumnavigate the rectangle of the...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Category:Smart Grid Projects - Advanced Metering Infrastructure | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Metering Infrastructure Metering Infrastructure Jump to: navigation, search Smart Grid Projects - Advanced Metering Infrastructure category Pages in category "Smart Grid Projects - Advanced Metering Infrastructure" The following 31 pages are in this category, out of 31 total. A ALLETE Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power Smart Grid Project B Baltimore Gas and Electric Company Smart Grid Project Black Hills Power, Inc. Smart Grid Project Black Hills/Colorado Electric Utility Co. Smart Grid Project C CenterPoint Energy Smart Grid Project Central Maine Power Company Smart Grid Project Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power Company Smart Grid Project City of Fulton, Missouri Smart Grid Project City of Glendale Water and Power Smart Grid Project City of Quincy, FL Smart Grid Project City of Westerville, OH Smart Grid Project

449

Light's twist  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...equal to the optical power divided by the speed of light, and hence go unnoticed in our everyday lives...approaching object equal to the power in the light beam (P) divided by the speed of light. The movement of the approaching object does...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Light Properties Light travels at the speed of light `c'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIGHT!! #12;Light Properties Light travels at the speed of light `c' C = 3 x 108 m/s Or 190.nasa.gov #12;The speed of light The speed of light `c' is equal to the frequency ` times the wavelength,000 miles/second!! Light could travel around the world about 8 times in one second #12;What is light?? Light

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

451

Lighting Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Purple LED lamp Purple LED lamp Lighting Systems Lighting research is aimed at improving the energy efficiency of lighting systems in buildings and homes across the nation. The goal is to reduce lighting energy consumption by 50% over twenty years by improving the efficiency of light sources, and controlling and delivering illumination so that it is available, where and when needed, and at the required intensity. Research falls into four main areas: Sources and Ballasts, Light Distribution Systems, Controls and Communications, and Human Factors. Contacts Francis Rubinstein FMRubinstein@lbl.gov (510) 486-4096 Links Lighting Research Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends

452

Light Sources Directorate Strategic Plan  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Light Sources Directorate Light Sources Directorate Strategic Plan December 2009 Light Sources Directorate Strategic Plan December 2009 ii | Vision and Mission Light Sources Directorate Strategic Plan The VISION of the Light Sources Directorate is: to be a provider of choice for world-class photon science and facilities that deliver outstanding scientific productivity and impact, and to be recognized as a leader in developing innovative techniques and ap- plications of photon science Our MISSION is defined by the set of activities that are required to realize this vision: to advance scientific knowledge and to solve critical problems through the design, construction, operation, and use of premier photon science facilities | Table of Contents Light Sources Directorate Strategic Plan

453

Diffraction: Enhanced Light Absorption of Solar Cells and Photodetecto...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Diffraction: Enhanced Light Absorption of Solar Cells and Photodetectors Sandia National Laboratories Contact...

454

Technology Development for Light Duty High Efficient Diesel Engines...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

optimization. deer09stanton.pdf More Documents & Publications Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion Advanced Diesel Engine Technology Development for HECC Effects of Biomass Fuels...

455

Effects of an Advanced Reactor’s Design, Use of Automation, and Mission on Human Operators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The roles, functions, and tasks of the human operator in existing light water nuclear power plants (NPPs) are based on sound nuclear and human factors engineering (HFE) principles, are well defined by the plant’s conduct of operations, and have been validated by years of operating experience. However, advanced NPPs whose engineering designs differ from existing light-water reactors (LWRs) will impose changes on the roles, functions, and tasks of the human operators. The plans to increase the use of automation, reduce staffing levels, and add to the mission of these advanced NPPs will also affect the operator’s roles, functions, and tasks. We assert that these factors, which do not appear to have received a lot of attention by the design engineers of advanced NPPs relative to the attention given to conceptual design of these reactors, can have significant risk implications for the operators and overall plant safety if not mitigated appropriately. This paper presents a high-level analysis of a specific advanced NPP and how its engineered design, its plan to use greater levels of automation, and its expanded mission have risk significant implications on operator performance and overall plant safety.

Jeffrey C. Joe; Johanna H. Oxstrand

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Advanced Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Systems: Advanced Systems: high Performance fenestration systems Research areas: Research activities to improve the performance of windows and other fenestration products must address window systems issues as well as Glazing Materials research. LBNL activities in the area of Advanced Systems include research at both the product level and the building envelope and building systems levels. Highly insulating windows - using non structural center layers Lower cost solutions to more insulating three layer glazing systems, with the potential to turn windows in U.S. heating dominated residential applications into net-energy gainers. Highly Insulating Window Frames In collaboration with the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, we are researching the potentials for highly insulating window frames. Our initial work examines European frames with reported U-factors under 0.15 Btu/hr-ft2-F. Future research aims to analyze these designs, verify these performance levels and ensure that procedures used to calculate frame performance are accurate.

457

Lighting and Daylighting Products and Services | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lighting and Daylighting Products and Services Lighting and Daylighting Products and Services Lighting and Daylighting Products and Services July 29, 2012 - 5:06pm Addthis Lighting and Daylighting Products and Services Use the following links to get product information and locate professional services for lighting and daylighting. Product Information Advanced Lighting Package ENERGY STAR® Information on the ENERGY STAR Advanced Lighting Project, which allows homeowners to upgrade their light fixtures to more energy efficient products. Energy-efficient Lights ENERGY STAR® Information on the benefits of ENERGY STAR qualified light bulbs. Fixtures Guide ENERGY STAR® Examples and pictures of ENERGY STAR qualified light fixtures. How to Select Residential LED Under-cabinet Lighting (PDF) Alliance for Solid-State Illumination Systems and Technologies

458

Lighting and Daylighting Products and Services | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lighting and Daylighting Products and Services Lighting and Daylighting Products and Services Lighting and Daylighting Products and Services July 29, 2012 - 5:06pm Addthis Lighting and Daylighting Products and Services Use the following links to get product information and locate professional services for lighting and daylighting. Product Information Advanced Lighting Package ENERGY STAR® Information on the ENERGY STAR Advanced Lighting Project, which allows homeowners to upgrade their light fixtures to more energy efficient products. Energy-efficient Lights ENERGY STAR® Information on the benefits of ENERGY STAR qualified light bulbs. Fixtures Guide ENERGY STAR® Examples and pictures of ENERGY STAR qualified light fixtures. How to Select Residential LED Under-cabinet Lighting (PDF) Alliance for Solid-State Illumination Systems and Technologies

459

Development and validation of a real-time SAFT-UT (synthetic aperture focusing technique for ultrasonic testing) system for the inspection of light water reactor components: Annual report, October 1985-September 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is working to design, fabricate, and evaluate a real-time flaw detection and characterization system based on the synthetic aperture focusing technique for ultrasonic testing (SAFT-UT). The system is designed to perform inservice inspection of light-water reactor components. Included objectives of this program for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission are to develop procedures for system calibration and field operation, to validate the system through laboratory and field inspections, and to generate an engineering data base to support ASME Code acceptance of the technology. This progress report covers the programmatic work from October 1985 through September 1986. 45 figs., 8 tabs.

Doctor, S.R.; Hall, T.E.; Reid, L.D.; Mart, G.A.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Inhibitory Effect of Green Tea in the Drinking Water on Tumorigenesis by Ultraviolet Light and 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate in the Skin of SKH-1 Mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mm I.D.). The green tea water extracts...phase contained three solvents (Solvent A, acetonitrile...Solvent B, 5% Solvent C); and 24 to 30 min (100% Solvent A). The retention...min, respectively. Green tea extracts were...

Zhi-Yuan Wang; Mou-Tuan Huang; Thomas Ferraro; Ching-Quo Wong; You-Rong Lou; Kenneth Reuhl; Michael Iatropoulos; Chung S. Yang; and Allan H. Conney

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced light water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Sandia National Laboratories: industrial water use  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to saltwater to meet their water ... ECIS-UNM: Biomimetic Membranes for Water Purification On February 20, 2013, in Advanced Materials Laboratory, Energy Efficiency,...

462

Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial Water Reuse  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Demonstrate an advanced water treatment and reuse process in a single hybrid system that combines forward osmosis with membrane distillation to achieve greater efficiency and increased water reuse.

463

Lighting Renovations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

When undertaking a lighting renovation in a Federal building, daylighting is the primary renewable energy opportunity. Photovoltaics (PV) also present an excellent opportunity. While this guide...

464

Cerenkov Light  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The bright blue glow from nuclear reactors is Cerenkov light. Karl Slifer describes how nuclear physicists can use this phenomenon to study the nucleus of the atom.

Slifer, Karl

2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

465

DOE Announces Webinars on the Distributed Wind Power Market, Lighting  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Announces Webinars on the Distributed Wind Power Market, DOE Announces Webinars on the Distributed Wind Power Market, Lighting Retrofits Financial Analysis Tool, and More DOE Announces Webinars on the Distributed Wind Power Market, Lighting Retrofits Financial Analysis Tool, and More August 16, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis EERE offers webinars to the public on a range of subjects, from adopting the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies to training for the clean energy workforce. Webinars are free; however, advanced registration is typically required. You can also watch archived webinars and browse previously aired videos, slides, and transcripts. Upcoming Webinars August 21: Live Webinar on the 2012 Distributed Wind Market Report Webinar Sponsor: EERE's Wind and Water Power Technologies Program The Energy Department will present a live webcast titled "2012 Market

466

Applications of advanced petroleum production technology and water alternating gas injection for enhanced oil recovery - Mattoon Oil Field, Illinois. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase I results of a C0{sub 2}-assisted oil recovery demonstration project in selected Cypress Sandstone reservoirs at Mattoon Field, Illinois are reported. The design and scope of this project included C0{sub 2} injectvity testing in the Pinnell and Sawyer units, well stimulaton treatments with C0{sub 2} in the Strong unit and infill well drilling, completion and oil production. The field activities were supported by extensive C0{sub 2}-oil-water coreflood experiments, CO{sub 2} oil-phase interaction experiments, and integrated geologic modeling and reservoir simulations. The progress of the project was made public through presentations at an industry meeting and a DOEs contractors` symposium, through quarterly reports and one-to-one consultations with interested operators. Phase II of this project was not implemented. It would have been a water-alternating-gas (WAG) project of longer duration.

Baroni, M. [American Oil Recovery, Inc., Decatur, IL (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-Off Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) Nuclear Fuel Development Research and Development (R&D) Pathway encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. To achieve significant operating improvements while remaining within safety boundaries, significant steps beyond incremental improvements in the current generation of nuclear fuel are required. Fundamental improvements are required in the areas of nuclear fuel composition, cladding integrity, and the fuel/cladding interaction to allow power uprates and increased fuel burn-up allowance while potentially improving safety margin through the adoption of an “accident tolerant” fuel system that would offer improved coping time under accident scenarios. With a development time of about 20 – 25 years, advanced fuel designs must be started today and proven in current reactors if future reactor designs are to be able to use them with confidence.

Kristine Barrett; Shannon Bragg-Sitton

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Northern Lights  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Northern Lights Northern Lights Nature Bulletin No. 178-A February 6, 1965 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation NORTHERN LIGHTS To a person seeing the Aurora Borealis or "northern lights" for the first time, it is an uncanny awe-inspiring spectacle. Sometimes it begins as a glow of red on the northern horizon, ominously suggesting a great fire, gradually changing to a curtain of violet-white, or greenish-yellow light extending from east to west. Some times this may be transformed to appear as fold upon fold of luminous draperies that march majestically across the sky; sometimes as a vast multitude of gigantic flaming swords furiously slashing at the heavens; sometimes as a flowing crown with long undulating colored streamers fanning downward and outward.

469

Advanced Search  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Publications Publications Advanced Search Most publications by Environmental Energy Technologies Division authors are searchable from this page, including peer-reviewed publications, book chapters, conference proceedings and LBNL reports. Filter Advanced Search Publications list This publications database is an ongoing project, and not all Division publications are represented here yet. For additional help see the bottom of this page. Documents Found: 4418 Title Keyword LBNL Number Author - Any - Abadie, Marc O Abbey, Chad Abdolrazaghi, Mohamad Aberg, Annika Abhyankar, Nikit Abraham, Marvin M Abshire, James B Abushakra, Bass Acevedo-Ruiz, Manuel Aceves, Salvador Ache, Hans J Ackerly, David D Ackerman, Andrew S Adamkiewicz, Gary Adams, J W Adams, Carl Adamson, Bo Addy, Nathan Addy, Susan E Aden, Nathaniel T Adesola, Bunmi Adhikari,

470

Advanced Combustion  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Systems Systems Advanced Combustion Background Conventional coal-fired power plants utilize steam turbines to generate electricity, which operate at efficiencies of 35-37 percent. Operation at higher temperatures and pressures can lead to higher efficiencies, resulting in reduced fuel consumption and lower greenhouse gas emissions. Higher efficiency also reduces CO2 production for the same amount of energy produced, thereby facilitating a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. When combined, oxy-combustion comes with an efficiency hit, so it will actually increase the amount of CO2 to be captured. But without so much N2 in the flue gas, it will be easier and perhaps more efficient to capture, utilize and sequester. NETL's Advanced Combustion Project and members of the NETL-Regional University

471

Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In this process, hydrogen is produced from water using sunlight and specialized semiconductors called photoelectrochemical materials. In the photoelectrochemical (PEC) system, the semiconductor uses light energy to directly dissociate water molecules into hydrogen and oxygen. Different semiconductor materials work at particular wavelengths of light and energies.

472

Advancement of Electrochromic Windows  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advancement of Electrochromic Windows Advancement of Electrochromic Windows Title Advancement of Electrochromic Windows Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-59821 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Lee, Eleanor S., Stephen E. Selkowitz, Robert D. Clear, Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, Joseph H. Klems, Luis L. Fernandes, Gregory J. Ward, Vorapat Inkarojrit, and Mehry Yazdanian Date Published 04/2006 Other Numbers CEC-500-2006-052 Keywords commercial buildings, daylight, daylighting controls, Electrochromic windows, energy efficiency, human factors, peak demand, switchable windows, visual comfort Abstract This guide provides consumer-oriented information about switchable electrochromic (EC) windows. Electrochromic windows change tint with a small applied voltage, providing building owners and occupants with the option to have clear or tinted windows at any time, irrespective of whether it's sunny or cloudy. EC windows can be manually or automatically controlled based on daylight, solar heat gain, glare, view, energy-efficiency, peak electricity demand response, or other criteria. Window controls can be integrated with other building systems, such as lighting and heating/cooling mechanical systems, to optimize interior environmental conditions, occupant comfort, and energy-efficiency.

473

Horizontal Advanced Tensiometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An horizontal advanced tensiometer is described that allows the monitoring of the water pressure of soil positions, particularly beneath objects or materials that inhibit the use of previous monitoring wells. The tensiometer includes a porous cup, a pressure transducer (with an attached gasket device), an adaptive chamber, at least one outer guide tube which allows access to the desired horizontal position, a transducer wire, a data logger and preferably an inner guide tube and a specialized joint which provides pressure on the inner guide tube to maintain the seal between the gasket of the transducer and the adaptive chamber.

Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

2004-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

474

Recently Funded Projects Related to Water-Energy | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Water Management Tools Advanced Particle Gels Advanced Hydraulic Fracturing Methods Web-Based Tool for Unconventional Natural Gas Development Optimized Fluid Management in...

475

Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Market-Based Programs Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on AddThis.com... LED Lighting Facts CALiPER Program Standards Development Technical Information Network Gateway Demonstrations Municipal Consortium Design Competitions LED Lighting Facts LED lighting facts - A Program of the U.S. DOE DOE's LED Lighting Facts® program showcases LED products for general

476

Advanced Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ductility EnhancEmEnt of molybDEnum Ductility EnhancEmEnt of molybDEnum PhasE by nano-sizED oxiDE DisPErsions Description Using computational modeling techniques, this research aims to develop predictive capabilities to facilitate the design and optimization of molybdenum (Mo), chromium (Cr), and other high-temperature structural materials to enable these materials to withstand the harsh environments of advanced power generation systems, such as gasification-based systems. These types of materials are essential to the development of highly efficient, clean energy technologies such as low-emission power systems that use coal or other fossil fuels.