National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for advanced economies recovery

  1. Advanced Technologies in Energy-Economy Models for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Technologies in Energy-Economy Models for Climate Change Assessment Jennifer F. Morris: globalchange@mit.edu Website: http://globalchange.mit.edu/ #12;1 Advanced Technologies in Energy-Economy Models is applied to a global economy-wide model to study the roles of low-carbon alternatives in the power sector

  2. PA Nanotechnology 2012 Nanotech's Role in Advancing PA's Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    PA Nanotechnology 2012 Nanotech's Role in Advancing PA's Economy June 5, 2012 Harrisburg University University Drexel Nanotechnology Institute (DNI) Harrisburg Area Community College Harrisburg University of Science and Technology Lehigh University Center for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (CAMN) Penn

  3. Advanced Computer Control Concepts Facilitate Energy Recovery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cutler, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    A process computer is a powerful tool for maximizing the use of energy and raw materials. Advanced computer control techniques are evolving which facilitate the recovery of energy by predictive control techniques. One such technique is Dynamic...

  4. How Advanced Batteries Are Energizing the Economy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Earlier today, President Obama visited Johnson Controls in Holland, Michigan to highlight how this once shuttered factory is helping rev up the advanced battery industry in the United States. This...

  5. PA Nanotechnology 2012: Nanotech's Role in Advancing PA's Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    PA Nanotechnology 2012: Nanotech's Role in Advancing PA's Economy Date: June 5, 2012 Time: 7:30 am collaborative nanotechnology research, education, technology transfer, entrepreneurship, and commercialization within the Commonwealth. · Publicize and promote PA leadership in nanotechnology R&D, workforce education

  6. Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haring, Ben

    2009-01-01

    Dynasty. (Davies 1943: pl. XXIX). Economy, Haring, UEE 2009J OHN B AINES Short Citation: Haring, 2009, Economy. UEE.Citation: Haring, Ben, 2009, Economy. In Elizabeth Frood and

  7. Advanced Membrane Separation Technologies for Energy Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-05-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to develop novel materials for use in membrane separation technologies for the recovery of waste energy and water from industrial process streams.

  8. Advanced Fluidized Bed Waste Heat Recovery Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, G. R.

    1988-01-01

    BED WASTE HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEMS G. R. PETERSON Project Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office Idaho Falls, Idaho ABSTRACT The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industri al Programs, has sponsored the development of a... Fluidized Bed Waste Heat Recovery System (FBWHRS) and a higher temperature variant, the Ceramic Tubular Distributor Plate (CTOP) Fluidized Bed Heat Exchanger (FBHX) system. Both systems recover energy from high-temperature flue gases and produce steam...

  9. Microbial enhancement of oil recovery: Recent advances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Premuzic, E.T.; Woodhead, A.D.; Vivirito, K.J.

    1992-01-01

    During recent years, systematic, scientific, and engineering effort by researchers in the United States and abroad, has established the scientific basis for Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) technology. The successful application of MEOR technology as an oil recovery process is a goal of the Department of Energy (DOE). Research efforts involving aspects of MEOR in the microbiological, biochemical, and engineering fields led DOE to sponsor an International Conference at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1992, to facilitate the exchange of information and a discussion of ideas for the future research emphasis. At this, the Fourth International MEOR Conference, where international attendees from 12 countries presented a total of 35 papers, participants saw an equal distribution between research'' and field applications.'' In addition, several modeling and state-of-the-art'' presentations summed up the present status of MEOR science and engineering. Individual papers in this proceedings have been process separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  10. Advanced heat pump for the recovery of volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) from stationary industrial and commercial sources represent a substantial portion of the total US VOC emissions. The Toxic-Release Inventory'' of The US Environmental Protection Agency estimates this to be at about 3 billion pounds per year (1987 estimates). The majority of these VOC emissions are from coating processes, cleaning processes, polymer production, fuel production and distribution, foam blowing,refrigerant production, and wood products production. The US Department of Energy's (DOE) interest in the recovery of VOC stems from the energy embodied in the recovered solvents and the energy required to dispose of them in an environmentally acceptable manner. This Phase I report documents 3M's work in close working relationship with its subcontractor Nuclear Consulting Services (Nucon) for the preliminary conceptual design of an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of VOC. Nucon designed Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of methyl ethyl ketone and toluene from coating operations at 3M Weatherford, OK, was used as a base line for the work under cooperative agreement between 3M and ODE. See appendix A and reference (4) by Kovach of Nucon. This cooperative agreement report evaluates and compares an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for solvent recovery with other competing technologies for solvent recovery and reuse. This advanced Brayton cycle heat pump is simple (very few components), highly reliable (off the shelf components), energy efficient and economically priced.

  11. Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery System Advances 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patch, K. D.; Cole, W. E.

    1986-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-IE-86-06-09.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 23561 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IE-86-06-09.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 FLUIDIZED-BED WASTE-HEAT... RECOVERY SYSTEM ADVANCES Keith D. Patch William E. Cole Thermo Electron Corporation Waltham, Massachusetts ABSTRACT The Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery (FBWHR) System is a combustion air preheater designed for existing unrecuperated...

  12. Advanced Manufacturing for a U.S. Clean Energy Economy (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Manufacturing Office. Manufacturing is central to our economy, culture, and history. The industrial sector produces 11% of U.S. gross domestic product (GDP), employs 12 million people, and generates 57% of U.S. export value. However, U.S. industry consumes about one-third of all energy produced in the United States, and significant cost-effective energy efficiency and advanced manufacturing opportunities remain unexploited. As a critical component of the National Innovation Policy for Advanced Manufacturing, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) is focused on creating a fertile environment for advanced manufacturing innovation, enabling vigorous domestic development of transformative manufacturing technologies, promoting coordinated public and private investment in precompetitive advanced manufacturing technology infrastructure, and facilitating the rapid scale-up and market penetration of advanced manufacturing technologies.

  13. An evaluation of known remaining oil resources in the United States. Appendix, Project on Advanced Oil Recovery and the States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This volume contains appendices for the following: Overview of improved oil recovery methods (enhanced oil recovery methods and advanced secondary recovery methods); Benefits of improved oil recovery, selected data for the analyzed states; and List of TORIS fields and reservoirs.

  14. Advanced Burners and Combustion Controls for Industrial Heat Recovery Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferri, J. L.

    1988-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-IE-88-09-52.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 10271 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IE-88-09-52.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ADVANCED BURNERS... AND COMBUSTION CONTROLS FOR INDUSTRIAL HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEMS J.L.FERRI GTE PRODUCTS CORPORATION TOWANDA, PA ABSTRACT When recuperators are installed on indus trial furnaces, burners and ratio control systems must continue to operate reliably under a...

  15. ADVANCED OIL RECOVERY TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVED RECOVERY FROM SLOPE BASIN CLASTIC RESERVOIRS, NASH DRAW BRUSHY CANYON POOL, EDDY COUNTY, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark B. Murphy

    2004-01-31

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

  16. ADVANCED OIL RECOVERY TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVED RECOVERY FROM SLOPE BASIN CLASTIC RESERVOIRS, NASH DRAW BRUSHY CANYON POOL, EDDY COUNTY, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark B. Murphy

    2002-12-31

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

  17. ADVANCED OIL RECOVERY TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVED RECOVERY FROM SLOPE BASIN CLASTIC RESERVOIRS, NASH DRAW BRUSHY CANYON POOL, EDDY COUNTY, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark B. Murphy

    2003-07-30

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

  18. ADVANCED OIL RECOVERY TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVED RECOVERY FROM SLOPE BASIN CLASTIC RESERVOIRS, NASH DRAW BRUSHY CANYON POOL, EDDY COUNTY, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark B. Murphy

    2003-10-31

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

  19. Vehicle Fuel Economy Improvement through Thermoelectric Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Economy Improvement through Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Vehicle Fuel Economy Improvement through Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions...

  20. ADVANCED OIL RECOVERY TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVED RECOVERY FROM SLOPE BASIN CLASTIC RESERVOIRS, NASH DRAW BRUSHY CANYON POOL, EDDY COUNTY, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark B. Murphy

    2002-09-30

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program-based on advanced reservoir management methods-can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry. This is the twenty-eighth quarterly progress report on the project. Results obtained to date are summarized.

  1. Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fletcher, James H.; Cox, Philip; Harrington, William J; Campbell, Joseph L

    2013-09-03

    ABSTRACT Project Title: Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing PROJECT OBJECTIVE The objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell system technology towards the commercial targets of power density, energy density and lifetime. These targets were laid out in the DOE’s R&D roadmap to develop an advanced direct methanol fuel cell power supply that meets commercial entry requirements. Such a power supply will enable mobile computers to operate non-stop, unplugged from the wall power outlet, by using the high energy density of methanol fuel contained in a replaceable fuel cartridge. Specifically this project focused on balance-of-plant component integration and miniaturization, as well as extensive component, subassembly and integrated system durability and validation testing. This design has resulted in a pre-production power supply design and a prototype that meet the rigorous demands of consumer electronic applications. PROJECT TASKS The proposed work plan was designed to meet the project objectives, which corresponded directly with the objectives outlined in the Funding Opportunity Announcement: To engineer the fuel cell balance-of-plant and packaging to meet the needs of consumer electronic systems, specifically at power levels required for mobile computing. UNF used existing balance-of-plant component technologies developed under its current US Army CERDEC project, as well as a previous DOE project completed by PolyFuel, to further refine them to both miniaturize and integrate their functionality to increase the system power density and energy density. Benefits of UNF’s novel passive water recycling MEA (membrane electrode assembly) and the simplified system architecture it enabled formed the foundation of the design approach. The package design was hardened to address orientation independence, shock, vibration, and environmental requirements. Fuel cartridge and fuel subsystems were improved to ensure effective fuel containment. PROJECT OVERVIEW The University of North Florida (UNF), with project partner the University of Florida, recently completed the Department of Energy (DOE) project entitled “Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing”. The primary objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell system technology towards the commercial targets as laid out in the DOE R&D roadmap by developing a 20-watt, direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), portable power supply based on the UNF innovative “passive water recovery” MEA. Extensive component, sub-system, and system development and testing was undertaken to meet the rigorous demands of the consumer electronic application. Numerous brassboard (nonpackaged) systems were developed to optimize the integration process and facilitating control algorithm development. The culmination of the development effort was a fully-integrated, DMFC, power supply (referred to as DP4). The project goals were 40 W/kg for specific power, 55 W/l for power density, and 575 Whr/l for energy density. It should be noted that the specific power and power density were for the power section only, and did not include the hybrid battery. The energy density is based on three, 200 ml, fuel cartridges, and also did not include the hybrid battery. The results show that the DP4 system configured without the methanol concentration sensor exceeded all performance goals, achieving 41.5 W/kg for specific power, 55.3 W/l for power density, and 623 Whr/l for energy density. During the project, the DOE revised its technical targets, and the definition of many of these targets, for the portable power application. With this revision, specific power, power density, specific energy (Whr/kg), and energy density are based on the total system, including fuel tank, fuel, and hybridization battery. Fuel capacity is not defined, but the same value is required for all calculations. Test data showed that the DP4 exceeded all 2011 Technical Status values; for example, the DP4 energy density was 373 Whr/l versus the DOE 2011 status of 200 Whr/l. For the

  2. Battleground Energy Recovery Project- Presentation by the Houston Advanced Research Center, June 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on the Battleground Energy Recovery Project, given by Dan Bullock of the Houston Advanced Research Center, at the U.S. DOE Industrial Distributed Energy Portfolio Review Meeting in Washington, D.C. on June 1-2, 2011.

  3. Recovery Act funds advance cleanup efforts at Cold War site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProtonAbout Us Hanford SiteRecovery Act » Recovery

  4. Microbial enhancement of oil recovery: Recent advances. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Premuzic, E.T.; Woodhead, A.D.; Vivirito, K.J.

    1992-12-31

    During recent years, systematic, scientific, and engineering effort by researchers in the United States and abroad, has established the scientific basis for Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) technology. The successful application of MEOR technology as an oil recovery process is a goal of the Department of Energy (DOE). Research efforts involving aspects of MEOR in the microbiological, biochemical, and engineering fields led DOE to sponsor an International Conference at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1992, to facilitate the exchange of information and a discussion of ideas for the future research emphasis. At this, the Fourth International MEOR Conference, where international attendees from 12 countries presented a total of 35 papers, participants saw an equal distribution between ``research`` and ``field applications.`` In addition, several modeling and ``state-of-the-art`` presentations summed up the present status of MEOR science and engineering. Individual papers in this proceedings have been process separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  5. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Mark B.

    1999-02-24

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County New Mexico is a cost-shared field demonstration project in the US Department of Energy Class II Program. A major goal of the Class III Program is to stimulate the use of advanced technologies to increase ultimate recovery from slope-basin clastic reservoirs. Advanced characterization techniques are being used at the Nash Draw project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. Analysis, interpretation, and integration of recently acquired geologic, geophysical, and engineering data revealed that the initial reservoir characterization was too simplistic to capture the critical features of this complex formation. Contrary to the initial characterization, a new reservoir description evolved that provided sufficient detail regarding the complexity of the Brushy Canyon interval at Nash Draw. This new reservoir description is being used as a risk reduction tool to identify ''sweet spots'' for a development drilling program as well as to evaluate pressure maintenance strategies. The reservoir characterization, geological modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well simulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir.

  6. Recovery Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recovery Act and Energy Department programs were designed to stimulate the economy while creating new power sources, conserving resources and aligning the nation to once again lead the global energy economy.

  7. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Mark B.

    2002-01-16

    The overall objective of this project was to demonstrate that a development program-based on advanced reservoir management methods-can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan included developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals were (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

  8. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Mark B.

    1999-11-01

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

  9. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Michael B.

    2002-02-21

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

  10. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark B. Murphy

    2005-09-30

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County New Mexico was a cost-shared field demonstration project in the U.S. Department of Energy Class III Program. A major goal of the Class III Program was to stimulate the use of advanced technologies to increase ultimate recovery from slope-basin clastic reservoirs. Advanced characterization techniques were used at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP) project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. The objective of the project was to demonstrate that a development program, which was based on advanced reservoir management methods, could significantly improve oil recovery at the NDP. Initial goals were (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to other oil and gas producers. Analysis, interpretation, and integration of recently acquired geological, geophysical, and engineering data revealed that the initial reservoir characterization was too simplistic to capture the critical features of this complex formation. Contrary to the initial characterization, a new reservoir description evolved that provided sufficient detail regarding the complexity of the Brushy Canyon interval at Nash Draw. This new reservoir description was used as a risk reduction tool to identify 'sweet spots' for a development drilling program as well as to evaluate pressure maintenance strategies. The reservoir characterization, geological modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well stimulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir. An Advanced Log Analysis technique developed from the NDP project has proven useful in defining additional productive zones and refining completion techniques. This program proved to be especially helpful in locating and evaluating potential recompletion intervals, which has resulted in low development costs with only small incremental increases in lifting costs. To develop additional reserves at lower costs, zones behind pipe in existing wells were evaluated using techniques developed for the Brushy Canyon interval. These techniques were used to complete uphole zones in thirteen of the NDP wells. A total of 14 recompletions were done: four during 1999, four during 2000, two during 2001, and four during 2002-2003. These workovers added reserves of 332,304 barrels of oil (BO) and 640,363 MCFG (thousand cubic feet of gas) at an overall weighted average development cost of $1.87 per BOE (barrel of oil equivalent). A pressure maintenance pilot project in a developed area of the field was not conducted because the pilot area was pressure depleted, and the reservoir in that area was found to be compartmentalized and discontinuous. Economic analyses and simulation studies indicated that immiscible injection of lean hydrocarbon gas for pressure maintenance was not warranted at the NDP and would need to be considered for implementation in similar fields very soon after production has started. Simulation studies suggested that the injection of miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) could recover significant quantities of oil at the NDP, but a source of low-cost CO{sub 2} was not available in the area. Results from the project indicated that further development will be under playa lakes and potash areas that were beyond the regions covered by well control and are not accessible with vertical wells. These areas, covered by 3-D seismic surveys that were obtained as part of the project, were accessed with combinations of deviated/horizontal wells. Three directional/horizontal wells have been drilled and completed to develop reserves under surface-restricted areas and potash mines. The third

  11. Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy Program Specific Recovery Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y A sCOLONY PROJECTRecord4 Advance Patent|| Department of

  12. Recovery Act - Sustainable Transportation: Advanced Electric Drive Vehicle Education Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caille, Gary

    2013-12-13

    The collective goals of this effort include: 1) reach all facets of this society with education regarding electric vehicles (EV) and plug–in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV), 2) prepare a workforce to service these advanced vehicles, 3) create web–based learning at an unparalleled level, 4) educate secondary school students to prepare for their future and 5) train the next generation of professional engineers regarding electric vehicles. The Team provided an integrated approach combining secondary schools, community colleges, four–year colleges and community outreach to provide a consistent message (Figure 1). Colorado State University Ventures (CSUV), as the prime contractor, plays a key program management and co–ordination role. CSUV is an affiliate of Colorado State University (CSU) and is a separate 501(c)(3) company. The Team consists of CSUV acting as the prime contractor subcontracted to Arapahoe Community College (ACC), CSU, Motion Reality Inc. (MRI), Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) and Ricardo. Collaborators are Douglas County Educational Foundation/School District and Gooru (www.goorulearning.org), a nonprofit web–based learning resource and Google spin–off.

  13. Recovery Act. Advanced Load Identification and Management for Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Yi; Casey, Patrick; Du, Liang; He, Dawei

    2014-02-12

    In response to the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE)’s goal of achieving market ready, net-zero energy residential and commercial buildings by 2020 and 2025, Eaton partnered with the Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Georgia Institute of Technology to develop an intelligent load identification and management technology enabled by a novel “smart power strip” to provide critical intelligence and information to improve the capability and functionality of building load analysis and building power management systems. Buildings account for 41% of the energy consumption in the United States, significantly more than either transportation or industrial. Within the building sector, plug loads account for a significant portion of energy consumption. Plug load consumes 15-20% of building energy on average. As building managers implement aggressive energy conservation measures, the proportion of plug load energy can increase to as much as 50% of building energy leaving plug loads as the largest remaining single source of energy consumption. This project focused on addressing plug-in load control and management to further improve building energy efficiency accomplished through effective load identification. The execution of the project falls into the following three major aspects; An intelligent load modeling, identification and prediction technology was developed to automatically determine the type, energy consumption, power quality, operation status and performance status of plug-in loads, using electric waveforms at a power outlet level. This project demonstrated the effectiveness of the developed technology through a large set of plug-in loads measurements and testing; A novel “Smart Power Strip (SPS) / Receptacle” prototype was developed to act as a vehicle to demonstrate the feasibility of load identification technology as a low-cost, embedded solution; and Market environment for plug-in load control and management solutions, in particular, advanced power strips (APSs) was studied. The project evaluated the market potential for Smart Power Strips (SPSs) with load identification and the likely impact of a load identification feature on APS adoption and effectiveness. The project also identified other success factors required for widespread APS adoption and market acceptance. Even though the developed technology is applicable for both residential and commercial buildings, this project is focused on effective plug-in load control and management for commercial buildings, accomplished through effective load identification. The project has completed Smart Receptacle (SR) prototype development with integration of Load ID, Control/Management, WiFi communication, and Web Service. Twenty SR units were built, tested, and demonstrated in the Eaton lab; eight SR units were tested in the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) for one-month of field testing. Load ID algorithm testing for extended load sets was conducted within the Eaton facility and at local university campuses. This report is to summarize the major achievements, activities, and outcomes under the execution of the project.

  14. Advanced Thermoelectric Materials for Efficient Waste Heat Recovery in Process Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam Polcyn; Moe Khaleel

    2009-01-06

    The overall objective of the project was to integrate advanced thermoelectric materials into a power generation device that could convert waste heat from an industrial process to electricity with an efficiency approaching 20%. Advanced thermoelectric materials were developed with figure-of-merit ZT of 1.5 at 275 degrees C. These materials were not successfully integrated into a power generation device. However, waste heat recovery was demonstrated from an industrial process (the combustion exhaust gas stream of an oxyfuel-fired flat glass melting furnace) using a commercially available (5% efficiency) thermoelectric generator coupled to a heat pipe. It was concluded that significant improvements both in thermoelectric material figure-of-merit and in cost-effective methods for capturing heat would be required to make thermoelectric waste heat recovery viable for widespread industrial application.

  15. Advanced reservoir characterization for improved oil recovery in a New Mexico Delaware basin project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, F.D.; Kendall, R.P.; Whitney, E.M.

    1997-08-01

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County, New Mexico is a field demonstration site in the Department of Energy Class III program. The basic problem at the Nash Draw Pool is the low recovery typically observed in similar Delaware fields. By comparing a control area using standard infill drilling techniques to a pilot area developed using advanced reservoir characterization methods, the goal of the project is to demonstrate that advanced technology can significantly improve oil recovery. During the first year of the project, four new producing wells were drilled, serving as data acquisition wells. Vertical seismic profiles and a 3-D seismic survey were acquired to assist in interwell correlations and facies prediction. Limited surface access at the Nash Draw Pool, caused by proximity of underground potash mining and surface playa lakes, limits development with conventional drilling. Combinations of vertical and horizontal wells combined with selective completions are being evaluated to optimize production performance. Based on the production response of similar Delaware fields, pressure maintenance is a likely requirement at the Nash Draw Pool. A detailed reservoir model of pilot area was developed, and enhanced recovery options, including waterflooding, lean gas, and carbon dioxide injection, are being evaluated.

  16. Advanced oil recovery technologies for improved recovery from slope basin clastic reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM. Quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, M.B.

    1996-04-22

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery. The demonstration plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing the performance of the control area with an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. specific goals to attain the objective are (1) to demonstrate that development drilling program and pressure maintenance program, based on advanced reservoir management methods , can significantly improve oil recovery compared with existing technology applications, and (2) to transfer the advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere in the US oil and gas industry. This is the second quarterly progress report on the project. Results obtained to date are summarized.

  17. Advanced Horizontal Well Recirculation Systems for Geothermal Energy Recovery in Sedimentary and Crystalline Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruno, Mike S.; Detwiler, Russell L.; Lao, Kang; Serajian, Vahid; Elkhoury, Jean; Diessl, Julia; White, Nicky

    2012-12-13

    There is increased recognition that geothermal energy resources are more widespread than previously thought, with potential for providing a significant amount of sustainable clean energy worldwide. Recent advances in drilling, completion, and production technology from the oil and gas industry can now be applied to unlock vast new geothermal resources, with some estimates for potential electricity generation from geothermal energy now on the order of 2 million megawatts. The primary objectives of this DOE research effort are to develop and document optimum design configurations and operating practices to produce geothermal power from hot permeable sedimentary and crystalline formations using advanced horizontal well recirculation systems. During Phase I of this research project Terralog Technologies USA and The University of California, Irvine (UCI), have completed preliminary investigations and documentation of advanced design concepts for paired horizontal well recirculation systems, optimally configured for geothermal energy recovery in permeable sedimentary and crystalline formations of varying structure and material properties. We have also identified significant geologic resources appropriate for application of such technology. The main challenge for such recirculation systems is to optimize both the design configuration and the operating practices for cost-effective geothermal energy recovery. These will be strongly influenced by sedimentary formation properties, including thickness and dip, temperature, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, permeability, and porosity; and by working fluid properties.

  18. Advanced Technologies in Energy-Economy Models for Climate Change Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, J.F.

    Considerations regarding the roles of advanced technologies are crucial in energy-economic modeling, as these technologies, while usually not yet commercially viable, could substitute for fossil energy when relevant policies ...

  19. A review on recent advances in the numerical simulation for coalbed-methane-recovery process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, X.R.; Wang, G.X.; Massarotto, P.; Golding, S.D.; Rudolph, V. [University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld. (Australia)

    2007-12-15

    The recent advances in numerical simulation for primary coalbed methane (CBM) recovery and enhanced coalbed-methane recovery (ECBMR) processes are reviewed, primarily focusing on the progress that has occurred since the late 1980s. Two major issues regarding the numerical modeling will be discussed in this review: first, multicomponent gas transport in in-situ bulk coal and, second, changes of coal properties during methane (CH{sub 4}) production. For the former issues, a detailed review of more recent advances in modeling gas and water transport within a coal matrix is presented. Further, various factors influencing gas diffusion through the coal matrix will be highlighted as well, such as pore structure, concentration and pressure, and water effects. An ongoing bottleneck for evaluating total mass transport rate is developing a reasonable representation of multiscale pore space that considers coal type and rank. Moreover, few efforts have been concerned with modeling water-flow behavior in the coal matrix and its effects on CH{sub 4} production and on the exchange of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and CH{sub 4}. As for the second issue, theoretical coupled fluid-flow and geomechanical models have been proposed to describe the evolution of pore structure during CH{sub 4} production, instead of traditional empirical equations. However, there is currently no effective coupled model for engineering applications. Finally, perspectives on developing suitable simulation models for CBM production and for predicting CO{sub 2}-sequestration ECBMR are suggested.

  20. Advanced Energy and Water Recovery Technology from Low Grade Waste Heat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dexin Wang

    2011-12-19

    The project has developed a nanoporous membrane based water vapor separation technology that can be used for recovering energy and water from low-temperature industrial waste gas streams with high moisture contents. This kind of exhaust stream is widely present in many industrial processes including the forest products and paper industry, food industry, chemical industry, cement industry, metal industry, and petroleum industry. The technology can recover not only the sensible heat but also high-purity water along with its considerable latent heat. Waste heats from such streams are considered very difficult to recover by conventional technology because of poor heat transfer performance of heat-exchanger type equipment at low temperature and moisture-related corrosion issues. During the one-year Concept Definition stage of the project, the goal was to prove the concept and technology in the laboratory and identify any issues that need to be addressed in future development of this technology. In this project, computational modeling and simulation have been conducted to investigate the performance of a nanoporous material based technology, transport membrane condenser (TMC), for waste heat and water recovery from low grade industrial flue gases. A series of theoretical and computational analyses have provided insight and support in advanced TMC design and experiments. Experimental study revealed condensation and convection through the porous membrane bundle was greatly improved over an impermeable tube bundle, because of the membrane capillary condensation mechanism and the continuous evacuation of the condensate film or droplets through the membrane pores. Convection Nusselt number in flue gas side for the porous membrane tube bundle is 50% to 80% higher than those for the impermeable stainless steel tube bundle. The condensation rates for the porous membrane tube bundle also increase 60% to 80%. Parametric study for the porous membrane tube bundle heat transfer performance was also done, which shows this heat transfer enhancement approach works well in a wide parameters range for typical flue gas conditions. Better understanding of condensing heat transfer mechanism for porous membrane heat transfer surfaces, shows higher condensation and heat transfer rates than non-permeable tubes, due to existence of the porous membrane walls. Laboratory testing has documented increased TMC performance with increased exhaust gas moisture content levels, which has exponentially increased potential markets for the product. The TMC technology can uniquely enhance waste heat recovery in tandem with water vapor recovery for many other industrial processes such as drying, wet and dry scrubber exhaust gases, dewatering, and water chilling. A new metallic substrate membrane tube development and molded TMC part fabrication method, provides an economical way to expand this technology for scaled up applications with less than 3 year payback expectation. A detailed market study shows a broad application area for this advanced waste heat and water recovery technology. A commercialization partner has been lined up to expand this technology to this big market. This research work led to new findings on the TMC working mechanism to improve its performance, better scale up design approaches, and economical part fabrication methods. Field evaluation work needs to be done to verify the TMC real world performance, and get acceptance from the industry, and pave the way for our commercial partner to put it into a much larger waste heat and waste water recovery market. This project is addressing the priority areas specified for DOE Industrial Technologies Program's (ITP's): Energy Intensive Processes (EIP) Portfolio - Waste Heat Minimization and Recovery platform.

  1. Advanced heat pump for the recovery of volatile organic compounds. Phase 1, Conceptual design of an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of volatile organic compounds: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) from stationary industrial and commercial sources represent a substantial portion of the total US VOC emissions. The ``Toxic-Release Inventory`` of The US Environmental Protection Agency estimates this to be at about 3 billion pounds per year (1987 estimates). The majority of these VOC emissions are from coating processes, cleaning processes, polymer production, fuel production and distribution, foam blowing,refrigerant production, and wood products production. The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) interest in the recovery of VOC stems from the energy embodied in the recovered solvents and the energy required to dispose of them in an environmentally acceptable manner. This Phase I report documents 3M`s work in close working relationship with its subcontractor Nuclear Consulting Services (Nucon) for the preliminary conceptual design of an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of VOC. Nucon designed Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of methyl ethyl ketone and toluene from coating operations at 3M Weatherford, OK, was used as a base line for the work under cooperative agreement between 3M and ODE. See appendix A and reference (4) by Kovach of Nucon. This cooperative agreement report evaluates and compares an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for solvent recovery with other competing technologies for solvent recovery and reuse. This advanced Brayton cycle heat pump is simple (very few components), highly reliable (off the shelf components), energy efficient and economically priced.

  2. Automatic intrusion recovery with system-wide history B.S., Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    Automatic intrusion recovery with system-wide history by Taesoo Kim B.S., Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (2009) S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2011) Submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at the MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY June 2014 c Massachusetts

  3. Advanced Horizontal Well Recirculation Systems for Geothermal Energy Recovery in Sedimentary Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Bruno; Russell L. Detwiler; Kang Lao; Vahid Serajian; Jean Elkhoury; Julia Diessl; Nicky White

    2012-09-30

    There is increased recognition that geothermal energy resources are more widespread than previously thought, with potential for providing a significant amount of sustainable clean energy worldwide. Recent advances in drilling, completion, and production technology from the oil and gas industry can now be applied to unlock vast new geothermal resources, with some estimates for potential electricity generation from geothermal energy now on the order of 2 million megawatts. Terralog USA, in collaboration with the University of California, Irvine (UCI), are currently investigating advanced design concepts for paired horizontal well recirculation systems, optimally configured for geothermal energy recovery in permeable sedimentary and crystalline formations of varying structure and material properties. This two-year research project, funded by the US Department of Energy, includes combined efforts for: 1) Resource characterization; 2) Small and large scale laboratory investigations; 3) Numerical simulation at both the laboratory and field scale; and 4) Engineering feasibility studies and economic evaluations. The research project is currently in its early stages. This paper summarizes our technical approach and preliminary findings related to potential resources, small-scale laboratory simulation, and supporting numerical simulation efforts.

  4. Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Develop thermoelectric technology for waste heat recovery with a 10% fuel economy improvement without increasing emissions.

  5. Waste Heat Recovery from the Advanced Test Reactor Secondary Coolant Loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donna Post Guillen

    2012-11-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of using a waste heat recovery system (WHRS) to recover heat from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) secondary coolant system (SCS). This heat would be used to preheat air for space heating of the reactor building, thus reducing energy consumption, carbon footprint, and energy costs. Currently, the waste heat from the reactor is rejected to the atmosphere via a four-cell, induced-draft cooling tower. Potential energy and cost savings are 929 kW and $285K/yr. The WHRS would extract a tertiary coolant stream from the SCS loop and pump it to a new plate and frame heat exchanger, from which the heat would be transferred to a glycol loop for preheating outdoor air supplied to the heating and ventilation system. The use of glycol was proposed to avoid the freezing issues that plagued and ultimately caused the failure of a WHRS installed at the ATR in the 1980s. This study assessed the potential installation of a new WHRS for technical, logistical, and economic feasibility.

  6. Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) Fiscal Year 1996 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Dennison; Pamela W. Massey; Timothy O. Nelson

    1998-10-01

    President Clinton issued Nonprolferation and Export Control Policy in September 1993 in response to the growing threat of nuclear proliferation. Four months later, in January 1994, President Clinton and Russia's President Yeltsin issued a Joint Statement Between the United States and Russia on Nonprollfieration of Weapons of Mass Destruction and the Means of Their Delivery. President Clinton announced on 1 March 1995, that approximately 200 metric tons of US- origin weapons-usable fissile materials had been declared surplus to US defense needs. The Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) Demonstration Project is one part of the scientific response to President Clinton's promise to reduce the nuclear weapons stockpile. The work accomplished on the ARIES Demonstration Project during fiscal year 1996, 10ctober 1995 through 30 September 1996, is described in this report. The Department of Energy (DOE), by forming the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD), has initiated a Fissile Materials Disposition Program. The first step is the disassembly and conversion of weapons pits. Of the 200 metric tons of US surplus fissile material, approximately 50 tons are weapons plutonium, and of these 50 tons, 2/3 is contained in pits. Weapons plutonium wili be extracted from pits, rendered to an unclassified form, and converted to oxide. The plutonium oxide will then be dispositioned either by immobilization in a ceramic matrix or blended with uranium oxide, fabricated into ceramic pellets of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, and "burned" in a commercial light water reactor. The purpose of ARIES is to demonstrate two major activities: (1) dismantlement of nuclear weapons, and (2) conversion of weapons-grade plutonium into a form required for long-term storage or in preparation for the disposition (immobilization m MOX fuel) that allows for international inspection and verification, and in accordance with safeguards regimes. Plutonium does not have to be declassified before storage; however, declassification allows plutonium to be placed under international safeguards and provides political irreversibility of the material. The OFMD sponsors the ARIES Program. The Los Alamos National Laboratory is the lead laboratory for the ARIES Demonstration Project with support from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. Also, ARIES is the lead technical activity for nationaI plutonium disposition, as well as a major effort of the Los Alamos Nuclear Materials Disposition Project. The ARIES Project Leader, Timothy O. Nelson, is a technical staff member in the Advanced Technology Group (NMT-6) who is responsible for overall project management and system implementation.

  7. Airborne LiDAR Detects Selectively Logged Tropical Forest Even in an Advanced Stage of Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, Rafi; Lindsell, Jeremy A.; Laurin, Gaia Vaglio; Valentini, Riccardo; Coomes, David A.

    2015-01-01

    logged tropical forests: the attained and the attainable. Conserv. Lett. 2012, 5, 296–303. 10. Silver, W. L.; Ostertag, R.; Lugo, a. E. The Potential for Carbon Sequestration Through Reforestation of Abandoned Tropical Agricultural and Pasture Lands... be of high conservation value [2,7–9] and act as globally-important carbon sinks [9–12]. However, there is much uncertainty regarding the changing extent of regenerating forests, their rate and stage of recovery, and the influence of recovery on further...

  8. IMPACTS ON U.S. ECONOMY NIH Funding Contributes Directly to Local Economies Across the Country

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ungerleider, Leslie G.

    June 2015 IMPACTS ON U.S. ECONOMY NIH Funding Contributes Directly to Local Economies Across and supported 7 million jobs in 2011.4 The Impact of Genomics on the U.S. Economy report estimates that the $12 Healthier Citizens Lead to a Healthier Economy NIHfueled advances contribute to the health of the nation

  9. Recovery of Information from the Fast Flux Test Facility for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, Deborah L.; Makenas, Bruce J.; Wootan, David W.; Butner, R. Scott; Omberg, Ronald P.

    2009-09-30

    The Fast Flux Test Facility is the most recent Liquid Metal Reactor to operate in the United States. Information from the design, construction, and operation of this reactor was at risk as the facilities associated with the reactor are being shut down. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative is a program managed by the Office of Nuclear Energy of the U.S. Department of Energy with a mission to develop new fuel cycle technologies to support both current and advanced reactors. Securing and preserving the knowledge gained from operation and testing in the Fast Flux Test Facility is an important part of the Knowledge Preservation activity in this program.

  10. False optimism for the hydrogen economy and the potential of biofuels and advanced energy storage to reduce domestic greenhouse gas emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, Rory, 1982-

    2004-01-01

    Discussion of the general domestic energy situation addresses the motivations which underlie the push for an hydrogen energy economy. The validity of claims about such a hydrogen economy and the official DOE position ...

  11. Advanced Membrane Separation Technologies for Energy Recovery from Industrial Process Streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiser, J.R.; Wang, D.; Bischoff, B.; Ciora; Radhakrishnan, B.; Gorti, S.B.

    2013-01-14

    Recovery of energy from relatively low-temperature waste streams is a goal that has not been achieved on any large scale. Heat exchangers do not operate efficiently with low-temperature streams and thus require such large heat exchanger surface areas that they are not practical. Condensing economizers offer one option for heat recovery from such streams, but they have not been widely implemented by industry. A promising alternative to these heat exchangers and economizers is a prototype ceramic membrane system using transport membrane technology for separation of water vapor and recovery of heat. This system was successfully tested by the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) on a natural gas fired boiler where the flue gas is relatively clean and free of contaminants. However, since the tubes of the prototype system were constructed of aluminum oxide, the brittle nature of the tubes limited the robustness of the system and even limited the length of tubes that could be used. In order to improve the robustness of the membrane tubes and make the system more suitable for industrial applications, this project was initiated with the objective of developing a system with materials that would permit the system to function successfully on a larger scale and in contaminated and potentially corrosive industrial environments. This required identifying likely industrial environments and the hazards associated with those environments. Based on the hazardous components in these environments, candidate metallic materials were identified that are expected to have sufficient strength, thermal conductivity and corrosion resistance to permit production of longer tubes that could function in the industrial environments identified. Tests were conducted to determine the corrosion resistance of these candidate alloys, and the feasibility of forming these materials into porous substrates was assessed. Once the most promising metallic materials were identified, the ability to form an alumina membrane layer on the surface of the metallic tubes was evaluated. Evaluation of this new style of membrane tube involved exposure to SO{sub 2} containing gases as well as to materials with a potential for fouling. Once the choice of substrate and membrane materials and design were confirmed, about 150 tubes were fabricated and assembled into three modules. These modules were mounted on an industrial size boiler and their performance carefully monitored during a limited testing period. The positive results of this performance test confirm the feasibility of utilizing such a system for recovery of heat and water from industrial waste streams. The improved module design along with use of long metallic substrate tubes with a ceramic membrane on the outer surface resulted in the successful, limited scale demonstration of the Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) technology in the GTI test facility. This test showed this technology can successfully recover a significant amount of heat and water from gaseous waste streams. However, before industry will make the investment to install a full scale TMC, a full scale system will need to be constructed, installed and successfully operated at a few industrial sites. Companies were identified that had an interest in serving as a host site for a demonstration system.

  12. Divorce Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

    2006-08-09

    Broadcast Transcript: Is divorce good for the economy? Some market analysts in South Korea would answer with a resounding "geu rum yo!" That's "Yes!" in Korean. Korea's rapidly rising divorce rate seems to have softened the stigma attached...

  13. Recovery Act. Development and Validation of an Advanced Stimulation Prediction Model for Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutierrez, Marte

    2013-12-31

    This research project aims to develop and validate an advanced computer model that can be used in the planning and design of stimulation techniques to create engineered reservoirs for Enhanced Geothermal Systems. The specific objectives of the proposal are to; Develop a true three-dimensional hydro-thermal fracturing simulator that is particularly suited for EGS reservoir creation; Perform laboratory scale model tests of hydraulic fracturing and proppant flow/transport using a polyaxial loading device, and use the laboratory results to test and validate the 3D simulator; Perform discrete element/particulate modeling of proppant transport in hydraulic fractures, and use the results to improve understand of proppant flow and transport; Test and validate the 3D hydro-thermal fracturing simulator against case histories of EGS energy production; and Develop a plan to commercialize the 3D fracturing and proppant flow/transport simulator. The project is expected to yield several specific results and benefits. Major technical products from the proposal include; A true-3D hydro-thermal fracturing computer code that is particularly suited to EGS; Documented results of scale model tests on hydro-thermal fracturing and fracture propping in an analogue crystalline rock; Documented procedures and results of discrete element/particulate modeling of flow and transport of proppants for EGS applications; and Database of monitoring data, with focus of Acoustic Emissions (AE) from lab scale modeling and field case histories of EGS reservoir creation.

  14. Advanced byproduct recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Fourth quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    The team of Arthur D. Little, Tufts University and Engelhard Corporation are conducting Phase 1 of a four and a half year, two-phase effort to develop and scale-up an advanced byproduct recovery technology that is a direct, single-stage, catalytic process for converting sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. This catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide (such as ceria and zirconia). The catalytic activity can be significantly promoted by active transition metals, such as copper. More than 95% elemental sulfur yield, corresponding to almost complete sulfur dioxide conversion, was obtained over a Cu-Ce-O oxide catalyst as part of an on-going DOE-sponsored, University Coal Research Program. This type of mixed metal oxide catalyst has stable activity, high selectivity for sulfur production, and is resistant to water and carbon dioxide poisoning. Tests with CO and CH{sub 4} reducing gases indicate that the catalyst has the potential for flexibility with regard to the composition of the reducing gas, making it attractive for utility use. The performance of the catalyst is consistently good over a range of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration (0.1 to 10%) indicating its flexibility in treating SO{sub 2} tail gases as well as high concentration streams.

  15. Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES): The United State's demonstration line for pit disassembly and conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Timothy O.

    1998-03-01

    The Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) is a pit disassembly and conversion demonstration line at Los Alamos National Laboratory's plutonium facility. Pits are the core of a nuclear weapon that contains fissile material. With the end of the cold war, the United States began a program to dispose of the fissile material contained in surplus nuclear weapons. In January of 1997, the Department of Energy's Office of Fissile Material Disposition issued a Record of Decision (ROD) on the disposition of surplus plutonium. This decision contained a hybrid option for disposition of the plutonium, immobilization and mixed oxide fuel. ARIES is the cornerstone of the United States plutonium disposition program that supplies the pit demonstration plutonium feed material for either of these disposition pathways. Additionally, information from this demonstration is being used to design the United States Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility. AH of the ARIES technologies were recently developed and incorporate waste minimization. The technologies include pit bisection, hydride/dehydride, metal to oxide conversion process, packaging, and nondestructive assay (NDA). The current schedule for the ARIES integrated Demonstration will begin in the Spring of 1998. The ARIES project involves a number of DOE sites including Los Alamos National Laboratory as the lead laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Sandia National Laboratories. Moreover, the ARIES team is heavily involved in working with Russia in their pit disassembly and conversion activities.

  16. Heat Recovery Boilers for Process Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganapathy, V.; Rentz, J.; Flanagan, D.

    1985-01-01

    Heat recovery boilers are widely used in process plants for recovering energy from various waste gas streams, either from the consideration of process or of economy. Sulfuric, as well as nitric, acid plant heat recovery boilers are examples...

  17. Advanced Reservoir Characterization in the Antelope Shale to Establish the Viability of C02 Enhanced Oil Recovery in California's Monterey Formation Siliceous Shales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael F. Morea

    1997-04-25

    The primary objective of this research is to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and modeling studies in the Antelope Shale reservoir. Characterization studies will be used to determine the technical feasibility of implementing a CO2 enhanced oil recovery project in the Antelope Shale in Buena Vista Hills Field. The Buena Vista Hills pilot CO2 project will demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of CO2 flooding in fractured siliceous shale reservoirs of the San Joaquin Valley. The research consists of four primary work processes: Reservoir Matrix and Fluid Characterization; Fracture Characterization; Reservoir Modeling and Simulation; and CO2 Pilot Flood and Evaluation. Work done in these areas is subdivided into two phases or budget periods. The first phase of the project will focus on the application of a variety of advanced reservoir characterization techniques to determine the production characteristics of the Antelope Shale reservoir. Reservoir models based on the results of the characterization work will be used to evaluate how the reservoir will respond to secondary recovery and EOR processes. The second phase of the project will include the implementation and evaluation of an advanced enhanced oil recovery (EOR) pilot in the West Dome of the Buena Vista Hills Field.

  18. Advanced Reservoir Characterization in the Antelope Shale to Establish the Viability of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery in California's Monterey Formation Siliceous Shales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morea, Michael F.

    1999-11-01

    The primary objective of this research is to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and modeling studies in the Antelope Shale reservoir. Characterization studies will be used to determine the technical feasibility of implementing a CO2 enhanced oil recovery project in the Antelope Shale in Buena Vista Hills Field. The Buena Vista Hills pilot CO2 project will demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of CO2 flooding in fractured siliceous shale reservoirs of the San Joaquin Valley. The research consists of four primary work processes: (1) Reservoir Matrix and Fluid Characterization; (2) Fracture characterization; (3) reservoir Modeling and Simulation; and (4) CO2 Pilot Flood and Evaluation. Work done in these areas is subdivided into two phases or budget periods. The first phase of the project will focus on the application of a variety of advanced reservoir characterization techniques to determine the production characteristics of the Antelope Shale reservoir. Reservoir models based on the results of the characterization work will be used to evaluate how the reservoir will respond to secondary recovery and EOR processes. The second phase of the project will include the implementation and evaluation of an advanced enhanced oil recovery (EOR) pilot in the United Anticline (West Dome) of the Buena Vista Hills Field.

  19. Advanced Reservoir Characterization in the Antelope Shale to Establish the Viability of C02 Enhanced Oil Recovery in California's Monterey Formation Siliceous Shales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael F. Morea.

    1998-04-23

    The primary objective of this research is to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and modeling studies in the Antelope Shale reservoir. Characterization studies will be used to determine the technical feasibility of implementing a CO2 enhanced oil recovery project in the Antelope Shale in Buena Vista Hills Field. The Buena Vista Hills pilot CO2 project will demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of CO2 flooding in fractured siliceous shale reservoirs of the San Joaquin Valley. The research consists of four primary work processes: Reservoir Matrix and Fluid Characterization; Fracture Characterization; Reservoir Modeling and Simulation; and CO2 Pilot Flood and Evaluation. Work done in these areas is subdivided into two phases or budget periods. The first phase of the project will focus on the application of a variety of advanced reservoir characterization techniques to determine the production characteristics of the Antelope Shale reservoir. Reservoir models based on the results of the characterization work will be used to evaluate how the reservoir will respond to secondary recovery and EOR processes. The second phase of the project will include the implementation and evaluation of an advanced enhanced oil recovery (EOR) pilot in the United Anticline (West Dome) of the Buena Vista Hills Field.

  20. Advanced Reservoir Characterization in the Antelope Shale to Establish the Viability of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery in California's Monterey Formation Siliceous Shales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morea, Michael F.

    1999-11-08

    The primary objective of this research is to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and modeling studies in the Antelope Shale reservoir. Characterization studies will be used to determine the technical feasibility of implementing a CO2 enhanced oil recovery project in the Antelope Shale in Buena Vista Hills Field. The Buena Vista Hills pilot CO2 project will demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of CO2 flooding in fractured siliceous shale reservoirs of the San Joaquin Valley. The research consists of four primary work processes: (1) Reservoir Matrix and Fluid Characterization; (2) Fracture characterization; (3) reservoir Modeling and Simulation; and (4) CO2 Pilot Flood and Evaluation. Work done in these areas is subdivided into two phases or budget periods. The first phase of the project will focus on the application of a variety of advanced reservoir characterization techniques to determine the production characteristics of the Antelope Shale reservoir. Reservoir models based on the results of the characterization work will be used to evaluate how the reservoir will respond to secondary recovery and EOR processes. The second phase of the project will include the implementation and evaluation of an advanced enhanced oil recovery (EOR) pilot in the United Anticline (West Dome) of the Buena Vista Hills Field.

  1. Advanced product recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Third quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    More than 170 wet scrubber systems applied to 72,000 MW of US, coal-fired, utility boilers are in operation or under construction. In these systems, the sulfur dioxide removed form the boiler flue gas is permanently bound to a sorbent material, such as lime or limestone. The sulfated sorbent must be disposed of as a waste product or, in some cases, sold as a byproduct (e.g. gypsum). The use of regenerable sorbent technologies has the potential to reduce or eliminate solid waste production, transportation and disposal. Arthur D. Little, Inc., together with its industry and commercialization advisor, Engelhard Corporation, and its university partner, Tufts, plans to develop and scale-up an advanced, byproduct recovery technology that is a direct, catalytic process for reducing sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. The principal objective of the Phase 1 program is to identify and evaluate the performance of a catalyst which is robust and flexible with regard to choice of reducing gas. In order to achieve this goal, they have planned a structured program including: market/process/cost/evaluation; lab-scale catalyst preparation/optimization studies; lab-scale, bulk/supported catalyst kinetic studies; bench-scale catalyst/process studies; and utility review. This catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide (such as ceria and zirconia). The catalytic activity can be significantly promoted by active transition metals, such as copper. This type of mixed metal oxide catalyst has stable activity, high selectivity for sulfur production, and is resistant to water and carbon dioxide poisoning.

  2. Advanced byproduct recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The team of Arthur D. Little, Tufts University and Engelhard Corporation are conducting Phase 1 of a four and a half year, two-phase effort to develop and scale-up an advanced byproduct recovery technology that is a direct, single-stage, catalytic process for converting sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. This catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide (such as ceria and zirconia). The catalytic activity can be significantly promoted by active transition metals, such as copper. More than 95% elemental sulfur yield, corresponding to almost complete sulfur dioxide conversion, was obtained over a Cu-Ce-O oxide catalyst as part of an on-going DOE-sponsored, University Coal Research Program. This type of mixed metal oxide catalyst has stable activity, high selectivity for sulfur production, and is resistant to water and carbon dioxide poisoning. Tests with CO and CH{sub 4} reducing gases indicate that the catalyst has the potential for flexibility with regard to the composition of the reducing gas, making it attractive for utility use. The performance of the catalyst is consistently good over a range of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration (0.1 to 10%) indicating its flexibility in treating SO{sub 2} tail gases as well as high concentration streams. The principal objective of the Phase 1 program is to identify and evaluate the performance of a catalyst which is robust and flexible with regard to choice of reducing gas. In order to achieve this goal, the authors have planned a structured program including: Market/process/cost/evaluation; Lab-scale catalyst preparation/optimization studies; Lab-scale, bulk/supported catalyst kinetic studies; Bench-scale catalyst/process studies; and Utility review. Progress is reported from all three organizations.

  3. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Mark B.

    2000-10-25

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool (NDP) is southeast New Mexico is one of the nine projects selected in 1995 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for participation in the Class III Reservoir Field Demonstration Program. The goals of the DOE cost-shared Class Program are to: (1) extend economic production, (2) increase ultimate recovery, and (3) broaden information exchange and technology application. Reservoirs in the Class III Program are focused on slope-basin and deep-basin clastic depositional types.

  4. An evaluation of known remaining oil resources in the state of New Mexico and Wyoming. Volume 4, Project on Advanced Oil Recovery and the States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has conducted a series of studies to evaluate the known, remaining oil resource in twenty-three (23) states. The primary objective of the IOGCC`s effort is to examine the potential impact of an aggressive and focused program of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) and technology transfer on future oil recovery in the United States. As part of a larger effort by the IOGCC, this report focuses on the potential economic benefits of improved oil recovery in the states of New Mexico and Wyoming. Individual reports for six other oil producing states and a national report have been separately published by the IOGCC. The analysis presented in this report is based on the databases and models available in the Tertiary Oil Recovery Information System (TORIS). Overall, well abandonments and more stringent environmental regulations could limit economic access to New Mexico`s known, remaining oil resource. The high risk of near-term abandonment and the significant benefits of future application of improved oil recovery technology, clearly point to a need for more aggressive transfer of currently available technologies to domestic oil producers. Development and application of advanced oil recovery technologies could have even greater benefits to the state and the nation. A collaborative, focused RD&D effort, integrating the resources and expertise of industry, state and local governments, and the Federal government, is clearly warranted. With effective RD&D and a program of aggressive technology transfer to widely disseminate its results, oil production could be maximized. The resulting increase in production rates, employment, operator profits, state and Federal tax revenues, and energy security will benefit both the states of New Mexico and Wyoming and the nation as a whole.

  5. An evaluation of known remaining oil resources in the state of Kansas and Oklahoma. Volume 5, Project on Advanced Oil Recovery and the States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has conducted a series of studies to evaluate the known, remaining oil resource in twenty-three (23) states. The primary objective of the IOGCC`s effort is to examine the potential impact of an aggressive and focused program of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) and technology transfer on future oil recovery in the United States. As part of a larger effort by the IOGCC, this report focuses on the potential economic benefits of improved oil recovery in the states of Kansas, Illinois and Oklahoma for five other oil producing states and a national report have been separately published by the IOGCC. The analysis presented in this report is based on the databases and models available in the Tertiary Oil Recovery Information System (TORIS). Overall, well abandonments and more stringent environmental regulations could limit economic access to Kansas` known, remaining oil resource. The high risk of near-term abandonment and the significant benefits of future application of improved oil recovery technology, clearly point to a need for more aggressive transfer of currently available technologies to domestic oil producers. Development and application of advanced oil recovery technologies could have even greater benefits to the state and the nation. A collaborative, focused RD&D effort, integrating the resources and expertise of industry, state and local governments, and the Federal government, is clearly warranted. With effective RD&D and a program of aggressive technology transfer to widely disseminate its results, oil production could be maximized. The resulting increase in production rates, employment, operator profits, state and Federal tax revenues, and energy security will benefit both the state of Kansas, Illinois and Oklahoma and the nation as a whole.

  6. Advanced secondary recovery demonstration for the Sooner unit. Quarterly technical report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippel, M.A.; Cammon, T.J.

    1995-12-31

    The Sooner {open_quotes}D{close_quotes} Sand Unit is located about 100 miles northeast from Denver. The Cretaceous {open_quotes}D{close_quotes} Sand has good primary recovery but disappointing waterflood performance. The nearest ten waterflood projects in the area of the Sooner Unit produced only an average of 2 percent incremental oil from waterflooding after an average primary recovery of 16 percent OOIP. Poor waterflood recovery is attributed to reservoir heterogeneity, poor reservoir management practices and lack of infill drilling. Three-dimensional (3-D) seismic had not been used in the D-J Basin for exploration or development of {open_quotes}D{close_quotes} Sand reservoirs prior to this project.

  7. Advanced Reservoir Characterization in the Antelope Shale to Establish the Viability of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery in California's Monterey Formation Siliceous Shales, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perri, Pasquale R.; Cooney, John; Fong, Bill; Julander, Dale; Marasigan, Aleks; Morea, Mike; Piceno, Deborah; Stone, Bill; Emanuele, Mark; Sheffield, Jon; Wells, Jeff; Westbrook, Bill; Karnes, Karl; Pearson, Matt; Heisler, Stuart

    2000-04-24

    The primary objective of this project was to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and modeling studies in the Antelope Shale of the Bureau Vista Hills Field. Work was subdivided into two phases or budget periods. The first phase of the project focused on a variety of advanced reservoir characterization techniques to determine the production characteristics of the Antelope Shale reservoir. Reservoir models based on the results of the characterization work would then be used to evaluate how the reservoir would respond to enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes such as of CO2 flooding. The second phase of the project would be to implement and evaluate a CO2 in the Buena Vista Hills Field. A successful project would demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of CO2 flooding in siliceous shale reservoirs of the San Joaquin Valley.

  8. An evaluation of known remaining oil resources in the state of New Mexico: Project on advanced oil recovery and the states. Volume 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-11-01

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has conducted a series of studies to evaluate the known, remaining oil resource in twenty-three (23) states. The primary objective of die IOGCC`s effort is to examine the potential impact of an aggressive and focused program of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) and technology transfer on future oil recovery in the United States. As part of a larger effort by the IOGCC, this report focuses on the potential economic benefits of improved oil recovery in the state of New Mexico. Individual reports for seven other oil producing states and a national report have been separately published by the IOGCC. Several major technical insights for state and Federal policymakers and regulators can be reached from this analysis. Overall, well abandonments and more stringent environmental regulations could limit economic access to New Mexico`s known, remaining oil resource. The high risk of near-term abandonment and the significant benefits of future application of improved oil recovery technoloy, clearly point to a need for more aggressive transfer of currently available technologies to domestic oil producers. Development and application of advanced oil recovery technologies could leave even greater benefits to the nation. A collaborative, focused RD&D effort, integrating the resources and expertise of industry, state and local governments, and the Federal government, is clearly warranted. With effective RD&D and a program of aggressive technology transfer to widely disseminate its results, New Mexico oil production could be maximized. The resulting increase and improvement in production rates, employment, operator profits, state and Federal tax revenues, energy security will benefit both the state of New Mexico and the nation as a whole.

  9. An evaluation of known remaining oil resources in the state of Oklahoma: Project on advanced oil recovery and the states. Volume 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-11-01

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has conducted a series of studies to evaluate the known, remaining oil resource in twenty-three (23) states. The primary objective of die IOGCC`s effort is to examine the potential impact of an aggressive and focused program of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) and technology transfer on future oil recovery in the United States. As part of a larger effort by the IOGCC, this report focuses on the potential economic benefits of improved oil recovery in the state of Oklahoma. Individual reports for seven other oil producing states and a national report have been separately published by the IOGCC. Several major technical insights for state and Federal policymakers and regulators can be reached from this analysis. Overall, well abandonments and more stringent environmental regulations could limit economic access to Oklahoma`s known, remaining oil resource. The high risk of near-term abandonment and the significant benefits of future application of improved oil recovery technoloy, clearly point to a need for more aggressive transfer of currently available technologies to domestic oil producers. Development and application of advanced oil recovery technologies could leave even greater benefits to the nation. A collaborative, focused RD&D effort, integrating the resources and expertise of industry, state and local governments, and the Federal government, is clearly warranted. With effective RD&D and a program of aggressive technology transfer to widely disseminate its results, Oklahoma oil production could be maximized. The resulting increase and improvement in production rates, employment, operator profits, state and Federal tax revenues, energy security will benefit both the state of Oklahoma and the nation as a whole.

  10. An evaluation of known remaining oil resources in the United States: Project on advanced oil recovery and the states. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-11-01

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has conducted a series of studies to evaluate the known, remaining oil resource in twenty-three (23) states. The primary objective of die IOGCC`s effort is to examine the potential impact of an aggressive and focused program of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) and technology transfer on future oil recovery in the United States. As part of a larger effort by the IOGCC, this report focuses on the potential economic, social, and political benefits of improved oil recovery to the nation as a whole. Individual reports for major oil producing states have been separately published. The individual state reports include California, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, and Wyoming. Overall, well abandonments and more stringent environmental regulations could limit economic access to the nation`s known, remaining oil resource. The high risk of near-term abandonment and the significant benefits of future application of improved oil recovery technoloy, clearly point to a need for more aggressive transfer of currently available technologies to domestic oil producers. Development and application of advanced oil recovery technologies could leave even greater benefits to the nation. A collaborative, focused RD&D effort, integrating the resources and expertise of industry, state and local governments, and the Federal government, is clearly warranted. With effective RD&D and a program of aggressive technology transfer to widely disseminate its results, domestic oil production could be maximized. The resulting increase and improvement in production rates, employment, operator profits, state and Federal tax revenues, energy security will benefit the nation as a whole.

  11. An evaluation of known remaining oil resources in the state of Kansas: Project on advanced oil recovery and the states. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-11-01

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has conducted a series of studies to evaluate the known, remaining oil resource in twenty-three (23) states. The primary objective of die IOGCC`s effort is to examine the potential impact of an aggressive and focused program of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) and technology transfer on future oil recovery in the United States. As part of a larger effort by the IOGCC, this report focuses on the potential economic benefits of improved oil recovery in the state of Kansas. Individual reports for seven other oil producing states and a national report have been separately published by the IOGCC. Several major technical insights for state and Federal policymakers and regulators can be reached from this analysis. Overall, well abandonments and more stringent environmental regulations could limit economic access to the nation`s known, remaining oil resource. The high risk of near-term abandonment and the significant benefits of future application of improved oil recovery technoloy, clearly point to a need for more aggressive transfer of currently available technologies to domestic oil producers. Development and application of advanced oil recovery technologies could leave even greater benefits to the nation. A collaborative, focused RD&D effort, integrating the resources and expertise of industry, state and local governments, and the Federal government, is clearly warranted. With effective RD&D and a program of aggressive technology transfer to widely disseminate its results, Kansas oil production could be maximized. The resulting increase in production rates, employment, operator profits, state and Federal tax revenues, energy security will benefit the state of Kansas and the nation as a whole.

  12. MnDRIVE Minnesota Discovery Research and InnoVation Economy Funding Program MnDRIVE: Advancing industry, conserving our environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanchette, Robert A.

    industry, conserving our environment Goal Apply research-based new technology to solve environmental impact of upcoming mining projects in northern Minnesota · Microbial bioremediation renders wastes in fracking for recovery of natural gas from shale · Microbial remediation provides solutions for currently

  13. Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Overview and status of project to develop thermoelectric generator for automotive waste heat recovery and achieve at least 10% fuel economy improvement.

  14. Battleground Energy Recovery Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel Bullock

    2011-12-31

    In October 2009, the project partners began a 36-month effort to develop an innovative, commercial-scale demonstration project incorporating state-of-the-art waste heat recovery technology at Clean Harbors, Inc., a large hazardous waste incinerator site located in Deer Park, Texas. With financial support provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Battleground Energy Recovery Project was launched to advance waste heat recovery solutions into the hazardous waste incineration market, an area that has seen little adoption of heat recovery in the United States. The goal of the project was to accelerate the use of energy-efficient, waste heat recovery technology as an alternative means to produce steam for industrial processes. The project had three main engineering and business objectives: Prove Feasibility of Waste Heat Recovery Technology at a Hazardous Waste Incinerator Complex; Provide Low-cost Steam to a Major Polypropylene Plant Using Waste Heat; and ï?· Create a Showcase Waste Heat Recovery Demonstration Project.

  15. Biomass Program Recovery Act Factsheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-03-01

    The Biomass Program has awarded about $718 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (Recovery Act) funds. The projects the Program is supporting are intended to: Accelerate advanced biofuels research, development, and demonstration; Speed the deployment and commercialization of advanced biofuels and bioproducts; Further the U.S. bioindustry through market transformation and creating or saving a range of jobs.

  16. Steelmaker Matches Recovery Act Funds to Save Energy & Reduce...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reduce Steel Production Costs ArcelorMittal Indiana Harbor Energy Recovery & Reuse 504 Boiler constructed and installed with DOE Recovery Act Funding The Advanced Manufacturing...

  17. Sipping fuel and saving lives: increasing fuel economy withoutsacrificing safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, Deborah; Greene, David L.; Ross, Marc H.; Wenzel, Tom P.

    2007-06-11

    The public, automakers, and policymakers have long worried about trade-offs between increased fuel economy in motor vehicles and reduced safety. The conclusion of a broad group of experts on safety and fuel economy in the auto sector is that no trade-off is required. There are a wide variety of technologies and approaches available to advance vehicle fuel economy that have no effect on vehicle safety. Conversely, there are many technologies and approaches available to advance vehicle safety that are not detrimental to vehicle fuel economy. Congress is considering new policies to increase the fuel economy of new automobiles in order to reduce oil dependence and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The findings reported here offer reassurance on an important dimension of that work: It is possible to significantly increase the fuel economy of motor vehicles without compromising their safety. Automobiles on the road today demonstrate that higher fuel economy and greater safety can co-exist. Some of the safest vehicles have higher fuel economy, while some of the least safe vehicles driven today--heavy, large trucks and SUVs--have the lowest fuel economy. At an October 3, 2006 workshop, leading researchers from national laboratories, academia, auto manufacturers, insurance research industry, consumer and environmental groups, material supply industries, and the federal government agreed that vehicles could be designed to simultaneously improve safety and fuel economy. The real question is not whether we can realize this goal, but the best path to get there. The experts' studies reveal important new conclusions about fuel economy and safety, including: (1) Vehicle fuel economy can be increased without affecting safety, and vice versa; (2) Reducing the weight and height of the heaviest SUVs and pickup trucks will simultaneously increase both their fuel economy and overall safety; and (3) Advanced materials can decouple size from mass, creating important new possibilities for increasing both fuel economy and safety without compromising functionality.

  18. Application of reservoir characterization and advanced technology to improve recovery and economic in a lower quality shallow shelf carbonate reservoir. First quarter 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, A.M.

    1995-05-04

    The focus of the project is to show that the use of advanced technology can improve the economics of CO{sub 2} projects in low permeability reservoirs. The approach involves the use of tomography, 3-D seismic and detailed petrophysical descriptions to enhance reservoir characterization. Cyclic CO{sub 2} stimulations and model designed frac treatments will be used to increase and facilitate oil recovery to improve project economics. The detailed reservoir characterization will be used to create a geological model for use in simulation to arrive at an optimum operating plan to be instituted during the second budget period. Objectives to be accomplished during the third quarter include: (1) Complete petrophysical description on cores from observation wells. (2) Apply petrophysical data to geologic model. (3) Conduct additional laboratory analysis on cores and fluids. (4) Refine 3-D seismic interpretations. (5) Complete tomography surveys. (6) Process tomography data. (7) Establish relationship between seismic and tomography interpretations. (8) Conduct preliminary simulator runs with improved geologic model. (9) Evaluate results of cyclic CO{sub 2} stimulation treatments. (10) Design frac treatment for linear flood fronts. All of the above objectives were worked on during the current quarter and the overall project is fairly well on schedule. The area of greatest concern time-wise is reservoir simulation. The simulator depends on the geologic model, which in turn depends on the petrophysical, 3-D seismic and tomography interpretations. Hence, the final geologic model won`t be available until all of the reservoir characterization work is completed.

  19. Advanced byproduct recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur. First quarterly technical progress report, [October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benedek, K. [Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    1996-02-01

    The team of Arthur D. Little, Tufts University and Engelhard Corporation will be conducting Phase I of a four and a half year, two-phase effort to develop and scale-up an advanced byproduct recovery technology that is a direct, single-stage, catalytic process for converting sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. this catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide (such as ceria or zirconia). The catalytic activity can be significantly promoted by active transition metals, such as copper. More than 95% elemental sulfur yield, corresponding to almost complete sulfur dioxide conversion, was obtained over a Cu-Ce-O oxide catalyst as part of an ongoing DOE-sponsored University Coal Research Program. This type of mixed metal oxide catalyst has stable activity, high selectivity for sulfur production, and is resistant to water and carbon dioxide poisoning. Tests with CO and CH{sub 4} reducing gases indicates that the catalyst has the potential for flexibility with regard to the composition of the reducing gas, making it attractive for utility use. the performance of the catalyst is consistently good over a range of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration (0.1 to 10%) indicating its flexibility in treating SO{sub 2} tail gases as well as high concentration streams.

  20. The Evaluation of Developing Vehicle Technologies on the Fuel Economy of Long-Haul Trucks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gao, Zhiming; Smith, David E.; Daw, C. Stuart; Edwards, Kevin Dean; Kaul, Brian C.; Domingo, Norberto; Parks, II, James E.; Jones, Perry T.

    2015-12-01

    We present fuel savings estimates resulting from the combined implementation of multiple advanced energy management technologies in both conventional and parallel hybrid class 8 diesel trucks. The energy management technologies considered here have been specifically targeted by the 21st Century Truck Partnership (21 CTP) between the U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. industry and include advanced combustion engines, waste heat recovery, and reductions in auxiliary loads, rolling resistance, aerodynamic drag, and gross vehicle weight. Furthermore, we estimated that combined use of all these technologies in hybrid trucks has the potential to improve fuel economy by more than 60% compared tomore »current conventional trucks, but this requires careful system integration to avoid non-optimal interactions. Major factors to be considered in system integration are discussed.« less

  1. Advanced Reservoir Characterization in the Antelope Shale to Establish the Viability of CO(2) Enhanced Oil Recovery in California`s Monterey formation Siliceous Shales. Progress report, April 1-June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morea, M.F.

    1997-07-25

    The primary objective of this research is to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and modeling studies in the Antelope Shale reservoir. Characterization studies will be used to determine the technical feasibility of implementing a C0{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery project in the Antelope Shale in Buena Vista Hills Field. The Buena Vista Hills Pilot C0{sub 2} project will demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of C0{sub 2} flooding in fractured siliceous shale reservoirs of the San Joaquin Valley. The research consists of four primary work processes: Reservoir Matrix and Fluid Characterization; Fracture Characterization; Reservoir Modeling and Simulation; and C0{sub 2} Pilot Flood and Evaluation. Work done in these areas is subdivided into two phases or budget periods. The first phase of the project will focus on the application of a variety of advanced reservoir characterization techniques to determine the production characteristics of the Antelope Shale reservoir. Reservoir models based on the results of the characterization work will be used to evaluate how the reservoir will respond to secondary recovery and EOR processes. The second phase of the project will include the implementation and evaluation of an advanced enhanced oil recovery (EOR) pilot in the United Anticline (West Dome) of the Buena Vista Hills Field.

  2. Advanced reservoir characterization in the Antelope Shale to establish the viability of CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery in California`s Monterey Formation siliceous shales. Quarterly report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toronyi, R.M.

    1996-12-31

    The primary objective of this research is to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and modeling studies in the Antelope Shale reservoir. Characterization studies will be used to determine the technical feasibility of implementing a CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery project in the Antelope Shale in Buena Vista Hills field. The Buena Vista Hills pilot CO{sub 2} project will demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of CO{sub 2} flooding in fractured siliceous shales reservoirs of the San Joaquin Valley. The research consists of four primary work processes: reservoir matrix and fluid characterization: fracture characterization; reservoir modeling and simulation; and, CO{sub 2} pilot flood and evaluation. Work done in these areas is subdivided into two phases or budget periods. The first phase of the project will focus on the application of a variety of advanced reservoir characterization techniques to determine the production characteristics of the Antelope Shale reservoir. Reservoir models based on the results of the characterization work will be used to evaluate how the reservoir will respond to secondary recovery and EOR processes. The second phase of the project will include the implementation and evaluation of an advanced enhanced oil recovery pilot in the West Dome of the Buena Vista Hills field. In this report, accomplishments for this period are presented for: reservoir matrix and fluid characterization; fracture characterization; reservoir modeling and simulation; and technology transfer.

  3. Advanced reservoir characterization in the Antelope Shale to establish the viability of CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery in California`s Monterey formation siliceous shales. Quarterly report, April 1, 1997--June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morea, M.F.

    1997-07-25

    The primary objective of this research is to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and modeling studies in the Antelope Shale reservoir. Characterization studies will be used to determine the technical feasibility of implementing a CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery project in the Antelope Shale in Buena Vista Hills Field. The Buena Vista Hills pilot CO{sub 2} project will demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of CO{sub 2} flooding in fractured siliceous shale reservoirs of the San Joaquin Valley. The research consists of four primary work processes: Reservoir Matrix and Fluid Characterization; Fracture Characterization; Reservoir Modeling and Simulation; and CO{sub 2} Pilot Flood and Evaluation. Work done in these areas is subdivided into two phases or budget periods. The first phase of the project will focus on the application of a variety of advanced reservoir characterization techniques to determine the production characteristics of the Antelope Shale reservoir. Reservoir models based on the results of the characterization work will be used to evaluate how the reservoir will respond to secondary recovery and EOR processes. The second phase of the project will include the implementation and evaluation of an advanced enhanced oil recovery (EOR) pilot in the United Anticline (West Dome) of the Buena Vista Hills Field.

  4. Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct...

  5. Fact #630: July 5, 2010 Fuel Economy vs. Weight and Performance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From 1980 to 2009, there have been significant gains made in automotive technology, but those advancements have been applied toward improved performance and safety rather than fuel economy....

  6. Car buyers and fuel economy?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turrentine, Tom; Kurani, Kenneth S

    2007-01-01

    corporate average fuel economy standards. Economic InquiryAll rights reserved. Keywords: Fuel economy; Fuel ef?ciency;improvement in the fuel economy of an SUV they have designed

  7. Property:AdvancedEconomy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2,Information Promoting CleanAdditionalRef Jump

  8. Predicting Individual Fuel Economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Zhenhong; Greene, David L

    2011-01-01

    To make informed decisions about travel and vehicle purchase, consumers need unbiased and accurate information of the fuel economy they will actually obtain. In the past, the EPA fuel economy estimates based on its 1984 rules have been widely criticized for overestimating on-road fuel economy. In 2008, EPA adopted a new estimation rule. This study compares the usefulness of the EPA's 1984 and 2008 estimates based on their prediction bias and accuracy and attempts to improve the prediction of on-road fuel economies based on consumer and vehicle attributes. We examine the usefulness of the EPA fuel economy estimates using a large sample of self-reported on-road fuel economy data and develop an Individualized Model for more accurately predicting an individual driver's on-road fuel economy based on easily determined vehicle and driver attributes. Accuracy rather than bias appears to have limited the usefulness of the EPA 1984 estimates in predicting on-road MPG. The EPA 2008 estimates appear to be equally inaccurate and substantially more biased relative to the self-reported data. Furthermore, the 2008 estimates exhibit an underestimation bias that increases with increasing fuel economy, suggesting that the new numbers will tend to underestimate the real-world benefits of fuel economy and emissions standards. By including several simple driver and vehicle attributes, the Individualized Model reduces the unexplained variance by over 55% and the standard error by 33% based on an independent test sample. The additional explanatory variables can be easily provided by the individuals.

  9. Application of reservoir characterization and advanced technologies to improve recovery and economics in a lower quality shallow shelf Sand Andreas Reservoir: Quarterly technical report, January 1, 1997--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, A.R., Hickman, T.S., Justice, J.J.

    1997-04-30

    The Class 2 Project at West Welch was designed to demonstrate the use of advanced technologies to enhance the economics of improved oil recovery (IOR) projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate (SSC) reservoirs, resulting in recovery of additional oil that would otherwise be left in the reservoir at project abandonment. Accurate reservoir description is critical to the effective evaluation and efficient design of IOR projects in the heterogeneous SSC reservoirs. Therefore, the majority of Budget Period 1 was devoted to reservoir characterization. Technologies being demonstrated include: l.Advanced petrophysics 1547 2.Three-dimensional (3-D) seismic 3.Cross-well bore tomography 4.Advanced reservoir simulation 5.Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) stimulation treatments 6.Hydraulic fracturing design and monitoring 7. Mobility control agents SUMMARY OF TECHNICAL PROGRESS West Welch Unit is one of four large waterflood units in the Welch Field in the northwestern portion of Dawson County, Texas. The Welch Field was discovered in the early 1940`s and produces oil under a solution gas drive mechanism from the San Andres formation at approximately 4800 ft. The field has been under waterflood for 30 years and a significant portion has been infill-drilled on 20-ac density. A 1982- 86 Pilot C0{sub 2} injection project in the offsetting South Welch Unit yielded positive results. Recent installation of a C0{sub 2} pipeline near the field allowed the phased development of a miscible CO injection project at the South Welch Unit.

  10. Recovery Act Energy Jobs Bring New Era of Opportunity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hundreds of thousands of people found work in the past few years thanks to Recovery Act and Energy Department programs designed to stimulate the economy while creating new power sources, conserving resources and aligning the nation to once again lead the global energy economy.

  11. Recovery from chemical, biological, and radiological incidents :

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franco, David Oliver; Yang, Lynn I.; Hammer, Ann E.

    2012-06-01

    To restore regional lifeline services and economic activity as quickly as possible after a chemical, biological or radiological incident, emergency planners and managers will need to prioritize critical infrastructure across many sectors for restoration. In parallel, state and local governments will need to identify and implement measures to promote reoccupation and economy recovery in the region. This document provides guidance on predisaster planning for two of the National Disaster Recovery Framework Recovery Support Functions: Infrastructure Systems and Economic Recovery. It identifies key considerations for infrastructure restoration, outlines a process for prioritizing critical infrastructure for restoration, and identifies critical considerations for promoting regional economic recovery following a widearea disaster. Its goal is to equip members of the emergency preparedness community to systematically prioritize critical infrastructure for restoration, and to develop effective economic recovery plans in preparation for a widearea CBR disaster.

  12. North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7409, Raleigh, NC 27695 | 919-515-3480 | www.ncsc.ncsu.edu | 1/14 Advancing Clean Energy for a Sustainable Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    city/44 hwy, Bin 5 Honda Civic Natural Gas 1.8L, Auto, Natural Gas 27 city/38 hwy, Bin 2 Honda Civic-515-3480 | www.cleantransportation.org Green Vehicle Guide: Best vehicles by size class for 2014 The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Green Vehicle Guide provides fuel economy estimates and tailpipe emission

  13. North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7409, Raleigh, NC 27695 | 919-515-3480 | www.ncsc.ncsu.edu | 7/18/13 Advancing Clean Energy for a Sustainable Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    hwy, Bin 5 Honda Civic Natural Gas 1.8L, Auto, Natural Gas 27 city/38 hwy, Bin 2 Honda Civic Hybrid 1-515-3480 | www.cleantransportation.org Green Vehicle Guide: Best vehicles by size class for 2013 The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Green Vehicle Guide provides fuel economy estimates and tailpipe emission

  14. Comparative economics: evolution and the modern economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermeij, Geerat J.

    2009-01-01

    A comparison of primate economies. Journal of Bioeconomics,1999). Complexity and the economy. Science, 284, 107–109.evolution and the modern economy Ghabrial, A. S. , &

  15. Essays in Open Economy Monetary Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castro, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    1986. [40] Svesson, L. , “Open Economy Inflation Targeting,”Policy Rules for Open Economies,” in Monetary Policy Rules,Dynamics in a Small Open Economy Model under Inflation

  16. Fuel Economy: What Drives Consumer Choice?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turrentine, Tom; Kurani, Kenneth S; Heffner, Reid R.

    2008-01-01

    Car Buyers and Fuel Economy? ” Energy Policy, vol. 35, 2007.Fuel Economy: What Drives Consumer Choice? BY TOMyou think about fuel economy? ” Rather, we listened closely

  17. Open economy politics: A critical review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lake, David A.

    2009-01-01

    brain. New Political Economy. forthcoming. Zysman, J. , & D’Press. Bates, R. H. (1997). Open-economy politics:The political economy of the world coffee trade. Princeton,

  18. Fuel Economy: What Drives Consumer Choice?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turrentine, Tom; Kurani, Kenneth; Heffner, Rusty

    2007-01-01

    Car Buyers and Fuel Economy? ” Energy Policy, vol. 35, 2007.Fuel Economy: What Drives Consumer Choice? BY TOMyou think about fuel economy? ” Rather, we listened closely

  19. Essays on Political Economy of Religion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoriadis, Theocharis Nikolaou

    2012-01-01

    Gérard. “The Political Economy of Transition”, Journal ofR. Somanathan. “The political economy of public goods: Someproduct in a capitalist economy. 38 The distinction between

  20. An evaluation of known remaining oil resources in the United States: Project on advanced oil recovery and the states. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has conducted a series of studies to evaluate the known, remaining oil resource in twenty-three (23) states. The primary objective of the IOGCC`s effort is to examine the potential impact of an aggressive and focused program of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) and technology transfer on future oil recovery in the United States. As part of a larger effort by the IOGCC, this report focuses on the potential economic, social, and political benefits of improved oil recovery to the nation as a whole. Individual reports for major oil producing states have been separately published. The individual state reports include California, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, and Wyoming. The analysis presented in this report is based on the databases and models available in the Tertiary Oil Recovery Information System (TORIS). TORIS is a tested and verified system maintained and operated by the Department of Energy`s Bartlesville Project Office. The TORTS system was used to evaluate over 2,300 major reservoirs in a consistent manner and on an individual basis, the results of which have been aggregated to arrive at the national total.

  1. Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin), Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.

    2001-11-04

    The objective of this Class III project was demonstrate that reservoir characterization and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by CO2 flood can increase production from slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico. Phase 1 of the project, reservoir characterization, focused on Geraldine Ford and East Ford fields, which are Delaware Mountain Group fields that produce from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). The demonstration phase of the project was a CO2 flood conducted in East Ford field, which is operated by Orla Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit.

  2. ASCR Recovery Act Projects | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Recovery Act Projects Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced...

  3. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-12-31

    Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates proposed a three-phase, focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling (Phase I) and a field demonstration project (Phases II and III) at Womack Hill Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. Phase I of the project has been completed. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The major tasks of the project included reservoir characterization, recovery technology analysis, recovery technology evaluation, and the decision to implement a demonstration project. Reservoir characterization consisted of geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, microbial characterization, and integration of the characterization data. Recovery technology analysis included 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and microbial core experiments. Recovery technology evaluation consisted of acquiring and evaluating new high quality 2-D seismic data, evaluating the existing pressure maintenance project in the Womack Hill Field Unit, and evaluating the concept of an immobilized enzyme technology project for the Womack Hill Field Unit. The decision to implement a demonstration project essentially resulted in the decision on whether to conduct an infill drilling project in Womack Hill Field. Reservoir performance, multiwell productivity analysis, and reservoir simulation studies indicate that water injection continues to provide stable support to maintain production from wells in the western unitized area of the field and that the strong water drive present in the eastern area of the field is adequate to sustain production from this part of the field. Although the results from the microbial characterization and microbial core experiments are very promising, it is recommended that an immobilized enzyme technology project not be implemented in the Womack Hill Field Unit until live (freshly taken and properly preserved) cores from the Smackover reservoir in the field are acquired to confirm the microbial core experiments to date. From 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir performance analysis, and reservoir simulation, four areas in the Womack Hill Field were identified as prospective infill drilling sites to recover undrained oil from the field. It was determined that the two areas in the unit area probably can be effectively drained by perforating higher zones in the Smackover reservoir in currently producing wells. The two areas in the eastern (non-unitized) part of the field require the drilling of new wells. The successful drilling and testing of a well in 2003 by J. R. Pounds, Inc. has proven the oil potential of the easternmost site in the non-unitized part of the field. Pruet Production Co. acquired new 2-D seismic data to evaluate the oil potential of the westernmost site. Because of the effects of a fault shadow from the major fault bounding the southern border of the Womack Hill Field, it is difficult to evaluate conclusively this potential drill site. Pruet Production Co. has decided not to drill this new well at this time and to further evaluate the new 2-D seismic profiles after these data have been processed using a pre-stack migration technique. Pruet Production Co. has elected not to continue into Phase II of this project because they are not prepared to make a proposal to the other mineral interest owners regarding the drilling of new wells as part of an infil

  4. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Costal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-05-31

    Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates proposed a three-phase, focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling (Phase I) and a field demonstration project (Phases II and III) at Womack Hill Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. Phase I of the project has been completed. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The major tasks of the project included reservoir characterization, recovery technology analysis, recovery technology evaluation, and the decision to implement a demonstration project. Reservoir characterization consisted of geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, microbial characterization, and integration of the characterization data. Recovery technology analysis included 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and microbial core experiments. Recovery technology evaluation consisted of acquiring and evaluating new high quality 2-D seismic data, evaluating the existing pressure maintenance project in the Womack Hill Field Unit, and evaluating the concept of an immobilized enzyme technology project for the Womack Hill Field Unit. The decision to implement a demonstration project essentially resulted in the decision on whether to conduct an infill drilling project in Womack Hill Field. Reservoir performance, multiwell productivity analysis, and reservoir simulation studies indicate that water injection continues to provide stable support to maintain production from wells in the western unitized area of the field and that the strong water drive present in the eastern area of the field is adequate to sustain production from this part of the field. Although the results from the microbial characterization and microbial core experiments are very promising, it is recommended that an immobilized enzyme technology project not be implemented in the Womack Hill Field Unit until live (freshly taken and properly preserved) cores from the Smackover reservoir in the field are acquired to confirm the microbial core experiments to date. From 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir performance analysis, and reservoir simulation, four areas in the Womack Hill Field were identified as prospective infill drilling sites to recover undrained oil from the field. It was determined that the two areas in the unit area probably can be effectively drained by perforating higher zones in the Smackover reservoir in currently producing wells. The two areas in the eastern (non-unitized) part of the field require the drilling of new wells. The successful drilling and testing of a well in 2003 by J. R. Pounds, Inc. has proven the oil potential of the easternmost site in the non-unitized part of the field. Pruet Production Co. acquired new 2-D seismic data to evaluate the oil potential of the westernmost site. Because of the effects of a fault shadow from the major fault bounding the southern border of the Womack Hill Field, it is difficult to evaluate conclusively this potential drill site. Pruet Production Co. has decided not to drill this new well at this time and to further evaluate the new 2-D seismic profiles after these data have been processed using a pre-stack migration technique. Pruet Production Co. has elected not to continue into Phase II of this project because they are not prepared to make a proposal to the other mineral interest owners regarding the drilling of new wells as part of an infil

  5. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009: Bioenergy Technologies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Bioenergy Technologies Office rewarded about 178 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 funds; the projects accelerate advanced biofuels RD&D, speed the...

  6. Advanced Reservoir Characterization in the Antelope Shale to Establish the Viability of CO{sub 2} Enhanced Oil Recovery in California's Monterey Formation Siliceous Shales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael F. Morea

    1997-03-14

    The Buena Vista Hills field is located about 25 miles southwest of Bakersfield, in Kern County, California, about two miles north of the city of Taft, and five miles south of the Elk Hills field. The Antelope Shale zone was discovered at the Buena Vista Hills field in 1952, and has since been under primary production. Little research was done to improve the completion techniques during the development phase in the 1950s, so most of the wells are completed with about 1000 ft of slotted liner. The proposed pilot consists of four existing producers on 20 acre spacing with a new 10 acre infill well drilled as the pilot CO{sub 2} injector. Most of the reservoir characterization of the first phase of the project will be performed using data collected in the pilot pattern wells. This is the first annual report of the project. It covers the period February 12, 1996 to February 11, 1997. During this period the Chevron Murvale 653Z-26B well was drilled in Section 26-T31S/R23E in the Buena Vista Hills field, Kern County, California. The Monterey Formation equivalent Brown and Antelope Shales were continuously cored, the zone was logged with several different kinds of wireline logs, and the well was cased to a total depth of 4907 ft. Core recovery was 99.5%. Core analyses that have been performed include Dean Stark porosity, permeability and fluid saturations, field wettability, anelastic strain recovery, spectral core gamma, profile permeametry, and photographic imaging. Wireline log analysis includes mineral-based error minimization (ELAN), NMR T2 processing, and dipole shear wave anisotropy. A shear wave vertical seismic profile was acquired after casing was set and processing is nearly complete.

  7. California Real Estate Recovery Begins as Economy Expands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edelstein, Robert; Kroll, Cynthia

    1997-01-01

    economic base. Since real estate is a derived demand basedrenewed prosperity in the real estate market. Will renewedREITS: Stocks, Bonds or Real Estate?" November 1995. ($5.00)

  8. Evaluating Energy Efficiency Policies with Energy-Economy Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mundaca, Luis; Neij, Lena; Worrell, Ernst; McNeil, Michael A.

    2010-08-01

    The growing complexities of energy systems, environmental problems and technology markets are driving and testing most energy-economy models to their limits. To further advance bottom-up models from a multidisciplinary energy efficiency policy evaluation perspective, we review and critically analyse bottom-up energy-economy models and corresponding evaluation studies on energy efficiency policies to induce technological change. We use the household sector as a case study. Our analysis focuses on decision frameworks for technology choice, type of evaluation being carried out, treatment of market and behavioural failures, evaluated policy instruments, and key determinants used to mimic policy instruments. Although the review confirms criticism related to energy-economy models (e.g. unrealistic representation of decision-making by consumers when choosing technologies), they provide valuable guidance for policy evaluation related to energy efficiency. Different areas to further advance models remain open, particularly related to modelling issues, techno-economic and environmental aspects, behavioural determinants, and policy considerations.

  9. Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery January 8, 2014 Los Alamos simulation to optimize carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration and enhance oil recovery (CO2-EOR) based on known production. Due to carbon capture and storage technology advances, prolonged high oil prices

  10. Power Recovery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, F.

    1986-01-01

    , will be the use of the ASTM Theoretical Steam Rate Tables. In addition, the author's experience regarding the minimum size for power recovery units that are economic in a Culf Coast plant will be presented. INTROD\\Jr.'rION When surveying an operation...)' The pressure ~ecompression term(~2) k~l, is used in the equat10n in a manner 1 which reduces the power recovery as calculated by the first term of the equation. From a practical view a decompression ra~~y ~0.3 is a good screening point. Note...

  11. Special Report "The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and the Department of Energy"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-03-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) was signed into law on February 17, 2009, as a way to jumpstart the U.S. economy, create or save millions of jobs, spur technological advances in science and health, and invest in the Nation's energy future. This national effort will require an unprecedented level of transparency and accountability to ensure that U.S. citizens know where their tax dollars are going and how they are being spent. As part of the Recovery Act, the Department of Energy will receive more than $38 billion to support a number of science, energy, and environmental initiatives. Additionally, the Department's authority to make or guarantee energy-related loans has increased to about $127 billion. The Department plans to disburse the vast majority of the funds it receives through grants, cooperative agreements, contracts, and other financial instruments. The supplemental funding provided to the Department of Energy under the Recovery Act dwarfs the Department's annual budget of about $27 billion. The infusion of these funds and the corresponding increase in effort required to ensure that they are properly controlled and disbursed in a timely manner will, without doubt, strain existing resources. It will also have an equally challenging impact on the inherent risks associated with operating the Department's sizable portfolio of missions and activities and, this is complicated by the fact that, in many respects, the Recovery Act requirements represent a fundamental transformation of the Department's mission. If these challenges are to be met successfully, all levels of the Department's structure and its many constituents, including the existing contractor community; the national laboratory system; state and local governments; community action groups and literally thousands of other contract, grant, loan and cooperative agreement recipients throughout the Nation will have to strengthen existing or design new controls to safeguard Recovery Act funds.

  12. Supporting a Hawaii Hydrogen Economy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Download presentation slides from the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar Supporting a Hawaii Hydrogen Economy held on July 29, 2014.

  13. New York City's Informal Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sassen, Saskia

    1988-01-01

    Economic Conditions in New York City July-December 1981. NewUnderground Economy. New York City Department of Finance. (Industrial Homeworkers in New York City." Albany: Division

  14. A Time Pussy Theory on Capitalist Economy Qiudong Wang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Quidong

    , for immediate prosperity of a free market economy is largely based on the confidence and trust of all involved that, in a free market economic system, the profit businesses make today is the growth in future transforms the value of advancement of science and technology into business profits, is Joseph Schumpeter

  15. Applications of advanced petroleum production technology and water alternating gas injection for enhanced oil recovery -- Mattoon Oil Field, Illinois. First quarterly technical progress report, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baroni, M.R.

    1993-05-24

    For work during the first quarter of 1993, American Oil Recovery, Inc. targeted completion of the following specific objectives: Convene meetings of Mattoon Project subcontractors in order to plan and coordinate Project activities. Confirm organizational arrangements and plans for implementation of Mattoon Project. Complete most work on detailed analysis of reservoir geology of productive leases in the Mattoon Project. Identify first Facies Defined Subunit for initial injectivity testing to be commenced near the beginning of the second quarter. Identify additional Facies Defined Subunits for injectivity testing and characterization during the second and third quarters. Award subcontract to the Illinois State Geological Survey and commence work on preparation of a geostatistical model (STRATAMODEL) of more than 100 wells on 1,000 acres within the Mattoon Project Area. Obtain oil samples from wells in the identified Facies Subunit for reservoir rock, fluid, and CO{sub 2} compatibility testing by the Illinois State Geological Survey. Design CO{sub 2} injection pumps and injection monitoring equipment configuration. Obtain bids for required pumps and diesel motor. Accomplishments for this quarter are reported.

  16. Energy Department Announces New Investments in Advanced Nuclear...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    low-carbon economy, the Energy Department today announced 3.5 million for four advanced nuclear reactor projects that go beyond traditional light water designs. These projects --...

  17. Advanced Combustion Technology to Enable High Efficiency Clean Combustion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Summary of advanced combustion research at Cummins to explore strategies for fuel economy improvements (PCCI and HECC) and redced engine-out NOx emissions.

  18. FuelEconomy.gov What is Fuel Economy.gov?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .574.4694 saulsburyjw@ornl.gov #12;Managed by UT-Battelle for the US Department of Energy · Scan QR codes on new car economy possible from the cars they own. FuelEconomy.gov is maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy with data provided by the U.S. Environmental

  19. The sharing economy : what is it and where is it going?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nadler, Samuel (Samuel Nathan)

    2014-01-01

    Recent societal forces, combined with advances in technology, have led to the creation of the sharing economy, a 21st century socio-economic system built on the sharing of human and physical assets. This dissertation ...

  20. Turbocharged Spark Ignited Direct Injection- A Fuel Economy Solution for The US

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Turbocharged SIDI is the most promising advanced gasoline technology; combines existing & proven technologies in a synergistic manner, offers double digit fuel economy benefits, much lower cost than diesel or hybrid.

  1. REHABILITATION AND RECOVERY Rehabillitation and Recovery Following

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Lee

    REHABILITATION AND RECOVERY Rehabillitation and Recovery Following Wildfires: A Synthesis1 Lee H rehabilitation techniques applied in the Sierra Nevada, northern California, and southwestern Oregon objectives; and {5) recommend appropriate rehabilitation and recovery measures. Wildfires traditionally have

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Power Electronics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    approach towards efficient, scalable, and low cost thermoelectric waste heat recovery devices for vehicles Advanced Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power Losses...

  3. Moving Forward With Fuel Economy Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schipper, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Council. Automotive Fuel Economy: How Far Can We Go? (Lee Schipper. Automobile Fuel. Economy and CO 2 Emissions inGraham. The Effect of Fuel Economy Standards on Automobile

  4. The California Economy: Singing the Housing Blues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornberg, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    THE CALIFORNIA ECONOMY: SINGING THE HOUSING  BLUES Many  parts  of  the  economy  are  doing  better  than towards 2007 the entire economy is being threatened by the 

  5. Economy Through Product Diversity: Integrated Biorefineries ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Economy Through Product Diversity: Integrated Biorefineries Economy Through Product Diversity: Integrated Biorefineries Achieving national energy and climate goals will require an...

  6. Essays in open economy macroeconomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Indradeep, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01

    This thesis is a collection of two essays on open economy macroeconomics. The first essay is on imperfect asset substitutability and current account dynamics. It is divided into four chapters. The first chapter in this ...

  7. Active load management with advanced window wall systems: Research and industry perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01

    Building Systems Active Load Management with Advanced WindowEconomy. Active Load Management with Advanced Window WallAC03-76SF00098. Active Load Management with Advanced Window

  8. Advanced Combustion Concepts - Enabling Systems and Solutions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    advanced control concepts and enabling system to manage multi-modemulti-fuel combustion events and achieve an up to 30 percent fuel economy improvement deer11yilmaz.pdf...

  9. Economy in embodied utterances1 Matthew Stone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeCarlo, Doug

    Economy in embodied utterances1 Matthew Stone Rutgers University In natural language generation to explore one kind of brevity, TEXTUAL ECONOMY, or, more generally, COMMUNICATIVE ECONOMY, which I introduce in Section 1. In communicative economy, speakers organize their actions to contribute to multiple

  10. Dynamic Mirrlees Taxation under Political Economy Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dynamic Mirrlees Taxation under Political Economy Constraints Daron Acemoglu MIT Michael Golosov incentive-compatible taxes, in a dynamic economy subject to political economy and commitment problems economy taxes are set by a self- interested politician, without any commitment power. This politician

  11. How Human Psychology Drives the Economy and Why It Matters George A. Akerlof

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    01-08-09 How Human Psychology Drives the Economy and Why It Matters By George A. Akerlof The recent global financial crisis has made it painfully clear that powerful psychological forces are imperiling and despondence that led to the Great Depression (1929-33) and changing psychology that accompanied recovery. Like

  12. The Methanol Economy Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olah, George; Prakash, G.K.

    2013-12-31

    The Methanol Economy Project is based on the concept of replacing fossil fuels with methanol generated either from renewable resources or abundant natural (shale) gas. The full methanol cycle was investigated in this project, from production of methanol through bromination of methane, bireforming of methane to syngas, CO{sub 2} capture using supported amines, co-electrolysis of CO{sub 2} and water to formate and syngas, decomposition of formate to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}, and use of formic acid in a direct formic acid fuel cell. Each of these projects achieved milestones and provided new insights into their respective fields. ? Direct electrophilic bromination of methane to methyl bromide followed by hydrolysis to yield methanol was investigated on a wide variety of catalyst systems, but hydrolysis proved impractical for large-scale industrial application. ? Bireforming the correct ratio of methane, CO{sub 2}, and water on a NiO / MgO catalyst yielded the right proportion of H{sub 2}:CO (2:1) and proved to be stable for at least 250 hours of operation at 400 psi (28 atm). ? CO{sub 2} capture utilizing supported polyethyleneimines yielded a system capable of adsorbing CO{sub 2} from the air and release at nominal temperatures with negligible amine leaching. ? CO{sub 2} electrolysis to formate and syngas showed considerable increases in rate and selectivity by performing the reaction in a high pressure flow electrolyzer. ? Formic acid was shown to decompose selectively to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} using either Ru or Ir based homogeneous catalysts. ? Direct formic acid fuel cells were also investigated and showed higher than 40% voltage efficiency using reduced loadings of precious metals. A technoeconomic analysis was conducted to assess the viability of taking each of these processes to the industrial scale by applying the data gathered during the experiments to approximations based on currently used industrial processes. Several of these processes show significant promise for industrial scale up and use towards improving our nation’s energy independence.

  13. Advanced reservoir characterization in the Antelope Shale to establish the viability of CO2 enhanced oil recovery in California`s Monterey Formation siliceous shales. Annual report, February 7, 1997--February 6, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morea, M.F.

    1998-06-01

    The primary objective of this research is to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and modeling studies in the Antelope Shale reservoir. Characterization studies will be used to determine the technical feasibility of implementing a CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery project in the antelope Shale in Buena Vista Hills Field. The proposed pilot consists of four existing producers on 20 acre spacing with a new 10 acre infill well drilled as the pilot CO{sub 2} injector. Most of the reservoir characterization during Phase 1 of the project will be performed using data collected in the pilot pattern wells. During this period the following tasks have been completed: laboratory wettability; specific permeability; mercury porosimetry; acoustic anisotropy; rock mechanics analysis; core description; fracture analysis; digital image analysis; mineralogical analysis; hydraulic flow unit analysis; petrographic and confocal thin section analysis; oil geochemical fingerprinting; production logging; carbon/oxygen logging; complex lithologic log analysis; NMR T2 processing; dipole shear wave anisotropy logging; shear wave vertical seismic profile processing; structural mapping; and regional tectonic synthesis. Noteworthy technological successes for this reporting period include: (1) first (ever) high resolution, crosswell reflection images of SJV sediments; (2) first successful application of the TomoSeis acquisition system in siliceous shales; (3) first detailed reservoir characterization of SJV siliceous shales; (4) first mineral based saturation algorithm for SJV siliceous shales, and (5) first CO{sub 2} coreflood experiments for siliceous shale. Preliminary results from the CO{sub 2} coreflood experiments (2,500 psi) suggest that significant oil is being produced from the siliceous shale.

  14. From a Failed-Growth Economy to a Steady-State Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

    From a Failed-Growth Economy to a Steady-State Economy By Herman Daly A steady-state economy of negative growth, a depression such as we are entering now, is a failed-growth economy, not a steady-state economy. Halting an accelerating downward spiral is necessary but is not the same thing as resuming

  15. Recovery Act State Memos California

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct. 7,DOERTI | Department8Recovery ActCalifornia For

  16. Special Report on the "Department of Energy's Efforts to Meet Accountability and Performance Reporting Objectives of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) was to jumpstart the U.S. economy, create or save millions of jobs, spur technological advances in health and science, and invest in the Nation's energy future. The Department of Energy will receive an unprecedented $38 billion in Recovery Act funding to support a variety of science, energy, and environmental initiatives. The Recovery Act requires transparency and accountability over these funds. To this end, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued guidance requiring the Department to compile and report a wide variety of funding, accounting, and performance information. The Department plans to leverage existing information systems to develop accounting and performance information that will be used by program managers and ultimately reported to Recovery.gov, the government-wide source of Recovery Act information, and to OMB. The Department's iManage iPortal, a system that aggregates information from a number of corporate systems, will serve as the main reporting gateway for accounting information. In addition, the Department plans to implement a methodology or system that will permit it to monitor information reported directly to OMB by prime funding recipients. Furthermore, performance measures or metrics that outline expected outcomes are being developed, with results ultimately to be reported in a recently developed Department-wide system. Because of the significance of funds provided and their importance to strengthening the Nation's economy, we initiated this review to determine whether the Department had taken the steps necessary to ensure that Recovery Act funds can be appropriately tracked and are transparent to the public, and whether the benefits of the expenditures can be properly measured and reported clearly, accurately, and in a timely manner. Although not yet fully mature, we found that the Department's efforts to develop, refine, and apply the control structure needed to ensure accurate, timely, and reliable reporting to be both proactive and positive. We did, however, identify certain issues relating to Recovery Act performance management, accounting and reporting accuracy, and timeliness that should be addressed and resolved. In particular, at the time of our review: (1) Program officials had not yet determined whether existing information systems will be able to process anticipated transaction increases associated with the Recovery Act; (2) System modifications made to the Department's performance management system to accommodate Recovery Act performance measures had not yet been fully tested and verified; (3) The ability of prime and sub-recipients to properly segregate and report both accounting and performance information had not been determined; (4) There was a lack of coordination between Headquarters organizations related to aspects of Recovery Act reporting. For example, we observed that the Offices of Fossil Energy and Program, Analysis and Evaluation were both involved in developing job creation estimates that could yield significantly different results; and, (5) A significant portion (91 of 142, or 64 percent) of the performance measures developed for the Recovery Act activities were not quantifiable. In some instances, Project Operating Plans had not been finalized and we were not able to verify that all needed performance measures had been developed. Furthermore, the Department had not developed specific metrics to measure federal and contractor jobs creation and retention, an essential Recovery Act objective. The Department had devoted a great deal of time and resources to identifying and mitigating Recovery Act-related risks. For example, the Department developed a risk assessment tool that is intended to assist programs in identifying risks that can prevent its Recovery Act projects from meeting their intended goals. We also found that program staff and management officials at multiple levels were actively engaged in designing Recovery Act-related control and accountability programs. These efforts ra

  17. Model Year 2012 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles.

  18. Model Year 2011 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles.

  19. Model Year 2013 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-12-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles.

  20. Supporting a Hawaii Hydrogen Economy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergyPlan | Department ofSUPPLEMENT NOVEMBERSupporting a Hawaii Hydrogen Economy

  1. Gills Onions Advanced Energy Recovery System

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,Executive CompensationEnergyGet Current: Switch onDepartment of

  2. Migration and the Sending Economy: A Disaggregated Rural Economy Wide Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, J. Edward; Dyer, George

    2006-01-01

    A Stylized Village Economy-Wide Model with Nonseparable FarmNetworks in the Modern Economy: Mexican Migrants in the U.S.in a Household-farm Economy. ” Journal of Development

  3. Hidden Innovation: A Reconsideration of An 'Old Economy' Industry in a 'New Economy' Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiang, Lifang

    2008-01-01

    and a high-tech economy: California, the United States andWho gets ahead in the global economy? Industrial upgrading,T. (2004). Designing the economy: a profile of Ontario's

  4. Policies, Political-Economy, and Swidden in Southeast Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    J. C. (1976). The Moral Economy of the Peasant: Rebellionand the Political Economy of Ignorance. Agroforestryof Small-holder Oil Palm Economies of Sabah and Sarawak.

  5. Fragmented Economy, Stratified Society, and the Shattered Dream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mordechay, Kfir; Orfield, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Future of the California Economy is on the Coast, FebruaryMarch 17, 2010. Fragmented Economy, Stratified Society, andFragmented Economy, Stratified Society, and the Shattered

  6. Fuel Economy: What Drives Consumer Choice?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turrentine, Tom; Kurani, Kenneth; Heffner, Rusty

    2007-01-01

    S. Kurani, “Car Buyers and Fuel Economy? ” Energy Policy,Fuel Economy: What Drives Consumer Choice? BY TOMa car, do they think about fuel costs over time, are they

  7. A Colorado Perspective: The New Energy Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jim; Brannon, Ginny

    2009-01-01

    by pro- moting alternative energy, encouraging cleaner waysEnergy Economy include: * ConocoPhillips, which established its global alternative

  8. Constructing a Cleaner Economy Info Graphic

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An overview of the impact that the clean energy economy is having on the U.S. construction industry.

  9. Probabilistic political economy and endogenous money

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cockshott, W.P.

    Cockshott,W.P. Cottrell,A. First Conference on Probabilistic Political Economy, July 2008, University of Kingston

  10. Model Year 2006 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  11. Model Year 2005 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  12. Model Year 2010 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-10-14

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  13. Model Year 2007 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-10-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  14. Model Year 2015 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-12-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  15. Model Year 2009 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-10-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  16. Model Year 2008 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-10-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  17. Model Year 2016 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  18. Model Year 2014 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-12-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  19. Book Reviews Local Constraints vs. Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Book Reviews Local Constraints vs. Economy David E. Johnson and Shalom Lappin (IBM Thomas J. Watson, the authors summarize the Chomsky 1995 version of global economy in Chapter 2. In Chapter 3, they discuss two versions of local economy, that proposed by Collins (1997) and the one developed by Yang (1997

  20. Engineering Economy Outline IE 305-Part 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vardeman, Stephen B.

    Engineering Economy Outline IE 305-Part 1 Stephen B. Vardeman ISU Fall 2013 Stephen B. Vardeman (ISU) Engineering Economy Outline Fall 2013 1 / 53 #12;THE Basics The very basic notion that governs) Engineering Economy Outline Fall 2013 2 / 53 #12;Solving for P The (N

  1. PSCI 15 / REL 15 Catholic Political Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoiciu, Mihai

    1 PSCI 15 / REL 15 Catholic Political Economy Winter Study 2010 Professor Darel E. Paul PSCI 15 century or so, however, she has devoted particular attention to the problems of modern economies? Is love a relevant concept in political and economic analysis? What is an economy for? This course

  2. GREEN TAXES, WASTE MANAGEMENT AND POLITICAL ECONOMY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    GREEN TAXES, WASTE MANAGEMENT AND POLITICAL ECONOMY by R. Kerry Turner J. Powell A. Craighill CSERGE Working Paper WM 96-03 #12;GREEN TAXES, WASTE MANAGEMENT AND POLITICAL ECONOMY by R. Kerry Turner and advocated. The application of such instruments in the current political economy settings will however serve

  3. Should a vehicle fuel economy standard be combined with an economy-wide greenhouse gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Should a vehicle fuel economy standard be combined with an economy-wide greenhouse gas emissions: globalchange@mit.edu Website: http://globalchange.mit.edu/ #12;Should a vehicle fuel economy standard be combined with an economy-wide greenhouse gas emissions constraint? Implications for energy and climate

  4. Department of Energy Recovery Act Investment in Biomass Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-11-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) provided more than $36 billion to the Department of Energy (DOE) to accelerate work on existing projects, undertake new and transformative research, and deploy clean energy technologies across the nation. Of this funding, $1029 million is supporting innovative work to advance biomass research, development, demonstration, and deployment.

  5. Department of Energy Awards More Than $11 Million to Advance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems for Geothermal Energy Recovery project will investigate and develop advanced geothermal well designs that optimize combinations of vertical and horizontal wells....

  6. Business cycles in oil economies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Mutairi, N.H.

    1991-01-01

    This study examines the impact of oil price shocks on output fluctuations of several oil-exporting economies. In most studies of business cycles, the role of oil price is ignored; the few studies that use oil price as one of the variables in the system focus on modeling oil-importing economies. The vector autoregression (VAR) technique is used to consider the cases of Norway, Nigeria, and Mexico. Both atheoretical and structural' VARs are estimated to determine the importance of oil price impulses on output variations. The study reports two types of results: variance decomposition and impulse response functions, with particular emphasis on the issues of stationarity and co-integration among the series. The empirical results suggest that shocks to oil price are important in explaining output variations. In most cases, shocks to oil price are shown to explain more than 20% of the forecast variance of output over a 40-quarter horizon.

  7. Energy Economy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicleDepartment ofGraphicsPowerDepartmentIowa PlantEconomy

  8. Heat recovery in building envelopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-01-01

    2003). Infiltration heat recovery – ASHRAE Research ProjectModel for Infiltration Heat Recovery, Proc. 21 st AnnualN ATIONAL L ABORATORY Heat Recovery in Building Envelopes

  9. Heat Recovery in Building Envelopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2001-01-01

    Model For Infiltration Heat Recovery. Proceedings 21st AivcLBNL 47329 HEAT RECOVERY IN BUILDING ENVELOPES Max H.contribution because of heat recovery within the building

  10. Heat recovery in building envelopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-01-01

    2003). Infiltration heat recovery – ASHRAE Research ProjectModel for Infiltration Heat Recovery, Proc. 21 st AnnualWalker, I.S. (2001). "Heat Recovery in Building Envelopes".

  11. The Solar Economy: Renewable Energy for a Sustainable Global Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirza, Umar Karim

    2003-01-01

    Review: The Solar Economy: Renewable Energy for aHermann Scheer. The Solar Economy: Renewable Energy for a

  12. Promoting a Green Economy through Clean Transportation Alternatives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Documents & Publications Promoting a Green Economy through Clean Transportation Alternatives Promoting a Green Economy through Clean Transportation Alternatives EV Community...

  13. Recent Trends in Car Usage in Advanced Economies - Slower Growth...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    about the avoid, shift, improve framework for limiting air pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions. References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleRecentTrends...

  14. Recovery Act Milestones

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rogers, Matt

    2013-05-29

    Every 100 days, the Department of Energy is held accountable for a progress report on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Update at 200 days, hosted by Matt Rogers, Senior Advisor to Secretary Steven Chu for Recovery Act Implementation.

  15. Locating Heat Recovery Opportunities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterland, A. F.

    1981-01-01

    Basic concepts of heat recovery are defined as they apply to the industrial community. Methods for locating, ranking, and developing heat recovery opportunities are presented and explained. The needs for useful heat 'sinks' are emphasized as equal...

  16. Recovery Act State Memos Nevada

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct. 7,DOERTI | Department8Recovery ActCalifornia ForNevada

  17. Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haring, Ben

    2009-01-01

    hydraulic civilization in Egypt: A study of cultural ecology. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press.

  18. INFORMS `03, Atlanta GA, October 19-21 A Supply Chain Network EconomyA Supply Chain Network Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    INFORMS `03, Atlanta GA, October 19-21 A Supply Chain Network EconomyA Supply Chain Network Economy, GA, October 19-22, 2003 Supply Chain EconomySupply Chain Economy Supply Chain Economy (SCE a supply chain economy ­ Comprising heterogeneous supply chains ­ Involving in production, distribution

  19. Advanced Manufacturing Office, U.S. Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manufacturing Advanced Manufacturing Of Office fice Manufacturing is vital to the U.S. economy * 11% of U.S. GDP * 57% of U.S. Exports * 12 million U.S. jobs * Nearly 20% of the...

  20. Advanced Manufacturing Office in DOE Multimaterial Joining Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 -20 -40 -60 -80 -100 Advanced Manufacturing Office Manufacturing is vital to the U.S. economy * 57% of U.S. Exports * Nearly 20% of the worlds manufactured value added * 11% of...

  1. Political Economy and Natural Resource Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deacon, Robert; Mueller, Bernardo

    2004-01-01

    oil in the economy led to a blurring of the worlds of commerce and State policy, an outcome that promoted a rent-

  2. Human Factors Aspects of Advanced Process Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    ASPECTS OF ADVANCED PRO?CESS CONTROL John A. Shaw Combustion Engineering Taylor Instrument Division Rochester, New York ABSTRACT Energy conservation practices, such as heat recovery and integration, require that many chemical and related... processes use advanced control systems. Many of the more advanced process control strategies and algorithms can cause operator confusion, leading to incorrect operator actions and negating the advantages of the advanced control. Ifthe operator makes a...

  3. INFORMATION: Special Report on "Selected Department of Energy Program Efforts to Implement the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-12-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) was enacted on February 17, 2009, to jumpstart the economy by creating or saving millions of jobs, spurring technological advances in health and science, and investing in the Nation's energy future. The Department of Energy received over $32.7 billion in Recovery Act funding for various science, energy, and environmental programs and initiatives. As of November 2009, the Department had obligated $18.3 billion of the Recovery Act funding, but only $1.4 billion had been spent. The Department's Offices of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Fossil Energy, Environmental Management, Science, and Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability received the majority of funding allocated to the Department, about $32.3 billion. Obligating these funds by the end of Fiscal Year 2010, as required by the Recovery Act, and overseeing their effective use in succeeding years, represents a massive workload increase for the Department's programs. The effort to date has strained existing resources. As has been widely acknowledged, any effort to disburse massive additional funding and to expeditiously initiate and complete projects increases the risk of fraud, waste and abuse. It is, therefore, important for the Department's program offices to assess and mitigate these risks to the maximum extent practicable. In this light, we initiated this review as an initial step in the Office of Inspector General's charge to determine whether the Department's major program offices had developed an effective approach for identifying and mitigating risks related to achieving the goals and objectives of the Recovery Act. The Department's program offices included in our review identified risks and planned mitigation strategies that, if successfully implemented and executed, should help achieve the goals and objectives of the Recovery Act. While each office identified risks unique to its respective areas of responsibility, there were a number of risks shared in common. These included the mechanical and substantive requirements related to the award and distribution of funds; program and project performance monitoring; and, program and project execution activities. In particular, the offices self-identified common risks such as: (1) The inability to award and distribute funds in a timely manner to achieve the goals of the Recovery Act; (2) The sufficiency of monitoring procedures and resources to, among other things, prevent and detect fraud, waste and abuse throughout the performance period of financial assistance awards and contracts; and (3) The inherent cost, schedule and performance risks associated with first-of-a-kind, innovative research and demonstration projects. Our review confirmed that the Department had begun to implement a number of strategies designed to mitigate these and other program-specific risks. Our testing, however, identified challenges to the effective implementation of these mitigation strategies that need to be addressed if the Department is to meet the goals and objectives established by the Recovery Act. At the time of our review: (1) Program staffing resources, critical to the success of all other mitigation strategies, remained inadequate both in numbers and qualifications (certifications and training) for positions in procurement and acquisition, project management, and monitoring and oversight functions; (2) Performance measures for achieving Recovery Act goals such as distributing funds in an expeditious manner had not always been established and included in performance plans, and, in financial assistance and contract documents; and (3) Programs had not consistently demonstrated that previously reported deficiencies, identified through audits, inspections, investigations and other oversight activities, had been considered in designing mitigation strategies for the Recovery Act related risks. As we noted in our Special Report on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act at the Department of Energy (OAS-RA-09-01, March 2009) these sorts of deficiencies, which w

  4. Waste Heat Recovery

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DRAFT - PRE-DECISIONAL - DRAFT 1 Waste Heat Recovery 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the TechnologySystem ......

  5. BAYESIAN ESTIMATION OF FUEL ECONOMY POTENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Jim

    BAYESIAN ESTIMATION OF FUEL ECONOMY POTENTIAL DUE TO TECHNOLOGY IMPROVEMENTS by Richard W. Andrews comments. 4 #12; 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Background and Overview In 1975 the Energy Policy and Conservation Act average fuel economy (CAFE) standard. This legislation separates each manufacturer's production

  6. Engineering the computational economy Michael Wooldridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woolridge, Mike

    Engineering the computational economy Michael Wooldridge Department of Computer Science, University, such as that of an industrialised nation. The economy is generally designed/engineered by the government of the nation in order of software agents, and agent­oriented software engineering. The purpose of this presentation is first

  7. Engineering the computational economy Michael Wooldridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woolridge, Mike

    Engineering the computational economy Michael Wooldridge Department of Computer Science, University, such as that of an industrialised nation. The economy is generally designed/engineered by the government of the nation in order of software agents, and agent-oriented software engineering. The purpose of this presentation is first

  8. Power the world's powers the world's economy.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power the world's economy BUSINESS #12;powers the world's economy. Put yourself in the driver. · A buyer, merchandiser, planner or manager in a retail operation. · The manager of a restaurant or food materials firm. · A marketer promoting a business, nonprofit organization or public agency. · A small

  9. INCOME INEQUALITY IN FORMER CENTRALLY PLANNED ECONOMIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    transforms into a successful market economy, increased income inequalities may be desirable' (Doyle, 1996, p and the opportunities for non-agricultural income from the market liberalisation process would seem to be important adjustment to market in transition economies. As Doyle (1996) has stated for example: `to ensure that Russia

  10. Building an economy that works -for everyone.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    Building an economy that works - for everyone. SHB 2720 Pay It Forward: Restoring college access, not based on the cost of their degree or the size of their paycheck. A smart investment in the future, and the Fund becomes self-sustaining by year 17 of the program. Building an economy that works - for everyone

  11. WIPP Recovery Information | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    WIPP Recovery Information WIPP Recovery Information Topic: J. R. Stroble CBFO, Provided Information on Locations to Access WIPP Recovery Information. WIPP Recovery - March 26, 2014...

  12. Housing Needs and Policy Issues in High Tech Economies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Kathryn P.

    2001-01-01

    NEEDS AND POLICY ISSUES IN HIGH TECH ECONOMIES By Kathryn P.Needs and Policy Issues in High Tech Economies Kathryn P.Needs and Policy Issues in High Tech Economies Who is left

  13. Public Attitudes toward a Market Economy in Vietnam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minh Hac, Pham; Thanh Nghi, Pham

    2006-01-01

    Practices in a Transition Economy: An Exploration of WorkerConference on Transition Economies, 31 May – 1 June 2004,Office. 2002. Vietnam Economy in the Years of Reform. Hanoi:

  14. Mass and Heat Recovery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hindawai, S. M.

    2010-01-01

    In the last few years heat recovery was under spot and in air conditioning fields usually we use heat recovery by different types of heat exchangers. The heat exchanging between the exhaust air from the building with the fresh air to the building...

  15. Recovery Boiler Corrosion Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    11/13/2014 1 Recovery Boiler Corrosion Chemistry Sandy Sharp and Honghi Tran Symposium on Corrosion of a recovery boiler each cause their own forms of corrosion and cracking Understanding the origin of the corrosive conditions enables us to operate a boiler so as to minimize corrosion and cracking select

  16. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apostolos A. Nikolopoulos; Santosh K. Gangwal; William J. McMichael; Jeffrey W. Portzer

    2003-01-01

    Conventional sulfur removal in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants involves numerous steps: COS (carbonyl sulfide) hydrolysis, amine scrubbing/regeneration, Claus process, and tail-gas treatment. Advanced sulfur removal in IGCC systems involves typically the use of zinc oxide-based sorbents. The sulfides sorbent is regenerated using dilute air to produce a dilute SO{sub 2} (sulfur dioxide) tail gas. Under previous contracts the highly effective first generation Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) for catalytic reduction of this SO{sub 2} tail gas to elemental sulfur was developed. This process is currently undergoing field-testing. In this project, advanced concepts were evaluated to reduce the number of unit operations in sulfur removal and recovery. Substantial effort was directed towards developing sorbents that could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur in an Advanced Hot Gas Process (AHGP). Development of this process has been described in detail in Appendices A-F. RTI began the development of the Single-step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP) to eliminate the use of sorbents and multiple reactors in sulfur removal and recovery. This process showed promising preliminary results and thus further process development of AHGP was abandoned in favor of SSRP. The SSRP is a direct Claus process that consists of injecting SO{sub 2} directly into the quenched coal gas from a coal gasifier, and reacting the H{sub 2}S-SO{sub 2} mixture over a selective catalyst to both remove and recover sulfur in a single step. The process is conducted at gasifier pressure and 125 to 160 C. The proposed commercial embodiment of the SSRP involves a liquid phase of molten sulfur with dispersed catalyst in a slurry bubble-column reactor (SBCR).

  17. SECURING OIL AND NATURAL GAS INFRASTRUCTURES IN THE NEW ECONOMY...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SECURING OIL AND NATURAL GAS INFRASTRUCTURES IN THE NEW ECONOMY SECURING OIL AND NATURAL GAS INFRASTRUCTURES IN THE NEW ECONOMY Based on the finding of a growing potential...

  18. The Political economy of environmental policy with overlapping generations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, Larry; Rezai, Amon

    2012-01-01

    Political Economy of Environmental Policy with OverlappingPolitical Economy of Environmental Policy with Overlappinggenerational con?ict, environmental policy, dynamic bar-

  19. Fuel economy and emissions reduction of HD hybrid truck over...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    economy and emissions reduction of HD hybrid truck over transient driving cycles and interstate roads Fuel economy and emissions reduction of HD hybrid truck over transient driving...

  20. Before the Subcommittee on Environment and the Economy -- House...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environment and the Economy -- House Energy and Commerce Committee Before the Subcommittee on Environment and the Economy -- House Energy and Commerce Committee Testimony of Peter...

  1. Fact #659: January 24, 2011 Fuel Economy Ratings for Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9: January 24, 2011 Fuel Economy Ratings for Vehicles Operating on Electricity Fact 659: January 24, 2011 Fuel Economy Ratings for Vehicles Operating on Electricity The...

  2. Fact #589: September 21, 2009 Proposed Fuel Economy and Greenhouse...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9: September 21, 2009 Proposed Fuel Economy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards Fact 589: September 21, 2009 Proposed Fuel Economy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards On...

  3. Before the Subcommittee on Environment and the Economy -- House...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Subcommittee on Environment and the Economy -- House Energy and Commerce Committee Before the Subcommittee on Environment and the Economy -- House Energy and Commerce Committee...

  4. Promoting a Green Economy through Clean Transportation Alternatives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Documents & Publications Promoting a Green Economy through Clean Transportation Alternatives Promoting a Green Economy through Clean Transportation Alternatives EA-1816: Final...

  5. Supporting a Hawaii Hydrogen Economy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergyPlan | Department ofSUPPLEMENT NOVEMBER

  6. Recovery Act State Memos Virginia

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    * VIRGINIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT Virginia has substantial natural resources, including coal and natural gas. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a...

  7. Advanced reservoir characterization in the Antelope Shale to establish the viability of CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery in California`s Monterey Formation siliceous shales. Annual report, February 12, 1996--February 11, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toronyi, R.M.

    1997-12-01

    The Buena Vista Hills field is located about 25 miles southwest of Bakersfield, in Kern County, California, about two miles north of the city of Taft, and five miles south of the Elk Hills field. The Antelope Shale zone was discovered at the Buena Vista Hills field in 1952, and has since been under primary production. Little research was done to improve the completion techniques during the development phase in the 1950s, so most of the wells are completed with about 1000 ft of slotted liner. The proposed pilot consists of four existing producers on 20 acre spacing with a new 10 acre infill well drilled as the pilot CO{sub 2} injector. Most of the reservoir characterization of the first phase of the project will be performed using data collected in the pilot pattern wells. This is the first annual report of the project. It covers the period February 12, 1996 to February 11, 1997. During this period the Chevron Murvale 653Z-26B well was drilled in Section 26-T31S/R23E in the Buena Vista Hills field, Kern County, California. The Monterey Formation equivalent Brown and Antelope Shales were continuously cored, the zone was logged with several different kinds of wireline logs, and the well was cased to a total depth of 4907 ft. Core recovery was 99.5%. Core analyses that have been performed include Dean Stark porosity, permeability and fluid saturations, field wettability, anelastic strain recovery, spectral core gamma, profile permeametry, and photographic imaging. Wireline log analysis includes mineral-based error minimization (ELAN), NMR T2 processing, and dipole shear wave anisotropy. A shear wave vertical seismic profile was acquired after casing was set and processing is nearly complete.

  8. ARM - Recovery Act

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of raregovAboutRecovery Act Recovery Act Logo Subscribe FAQs Recovery Act

  9. The role of networks in political economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larreguy Arbesú, Horacio Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the different roles that networks play in political economy. In the first chapter, I study how a political party uses electoral data to monitor and incentivize the political brokers who control ...

  10. Fuel Economy: What Drives Consumer Choice?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turrentine, Tom; Kurani, Kenneth S; Heffner, Reid R.

    2008-01-01

    decisions around cars, fuel economy, and hybrid vehiclesfuel-ef?cient compact cars. The hybrid buyers in this studycar models are often small. So it’s unsurprising that even hybrid

  11. Fuel Economy: What Drives Consumer Choice?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turrentine, Tom; Kurani, Kenneth; Heffner, Rusty

    2007-01-01

    decisions around cars, fuel economy, and hybrid vehiclesfuel-ef?cient compact cars. The hybrid buyers in this studycar models are often small. So it’s unsurprising that even hybrid

  12. A Caricature (Model) of the World Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caballero, Ricardo

    2010-11-23

    This paper provides a stylized model of the workings of a global economy where one of its key driving factors is economic agents’ continuous struggle to find assets in which to park financial resources. This struggle ...

  13. Tribes and the New Energy Economy Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the COTA Holdings, this two-day conference brings tribes, government, and industry together to discuss the new energy economy. Attendees will hear speakers from the U.S. Department of...

  14. The Underground Economy of Fake Antivirus Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steigerwald, Douglas; Vigna, Giovanni; Kruegel, Christopher; Kemmerer, Richard; Abman, Ryan; Stone-Gross, Brett

    2011-01-01

    Report on Rogue Security Software. In Whitepaper, 2009. 11.1 The Underground Economy of Fake Antivirus Software 17. J.Fake Antivirus Software. http://www. pcworld.com/

  15. Webinar: Supporting a Hawaii Hydrogen Economy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Supporting a Hawaii Hydrogen Economy" on Tuesday, July 29, from 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time (EDT). The webinar will...

  16. Above Vulgar Economy: Jane Austen and Money

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig, Sheryl Ann

    2010-11-20

    Abstract: "Above Vulgar Economy": Jane Austen and Money By: Sheryl Bonar Craig Jane Austen's career as an author coincided with a series of economic recessions leading to a major economic depression, a banking crisis that ...

  17. Essays on institutions in developing economies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiao Yu, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of this thesis is to gain a deeper understanding of how institutional structure responds and evolves in equilibrium, particularly in the idiosyncratic and dynamic settings of developing economies. I use ...

  18. Marketing Strategies in a Downturn Economy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, M.

    1987-01-01

    IN A DOWNTURN ECONOMY MALCOLM WILLIAMS Manager Business Development Gulf States Utilities Beaumont, ABSTRACT The economic activity in an area may affect electric utility sales more than other retailers. Statistics show that the KWH consumption... market. This paper deals with some of these new concepts being used by utilities in a downturn economy. INTRODUCTION Sales programs and marketing strategies to sell electric energy are in many ways similar to selling other types of consumer goods...

  19. Veterans Advancing Clean Energy and Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopser, Joseph; Marr, Andrea; Perez-Halperin, Elizabeth; Eckstein, Robin; Moniz, Ernest

    2013-11-11

    The Champions of Change series highlights ordinary Americans who are doing extraordinary things in their communities to out-innovate, out-educate and out-build the rest of the world. On November 5, 2013, the White House honored 12 veterans and leaders who are using the skills they learned in the armed services to advance the clean energy economy.

  20. Veterans Advancing Clean Energy and Climate

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Kopser, Joseph; Marr, Andrea; Perez-Halperin, Elizabeth; Eckstein, Robin; Moniz, Ernest

    2014-01-07

    The Champions of Change series highlights ordinary Americans who are doing extraordinary things in their communities to out-innovate, out-educate and out-build the rest of the world. On November 5, 2013, the White House honored 12 veterans and leaders who are using the skills they learned in the armed services to advance the clean energy economy.

  1. Dynamic Economy with Heterogeneous Agents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Yulei

    2013-08-06

    [32], based on US data, show that compared with high income households, low income families use cash for a higher fraction of their total consumptions. By using the cash-in-advance model, Wen[85] shows that if the annual in ation rate is 10...%, households would like to recrease up to 15% of average con- sumption an annual year in order to obtain the Friedman rule in ation rate, which is signi cantly bigger than that of with considering homogeneous agents (Lucas [66]). Therefore, the heterogeneity...

  2. Waste Steam Recovery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    An examination has been made of the recovery of waste steam by three techniques: direct heat exchange to process, mechanical compression, and thermocompression. Near atmospheric steam sources were considered, but the techniques developed are equally...

  3. Exhaust Energy Recovery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Exhaust energy recovery proposed to achieve 10% fuel efficiency improvement and reduce or eliminate the need for increased heat rejectioncapacity for future heavy duty engines in Class 8 Tractors

  4. Imbibition assisted oil recovery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pashayev, Orkhan H.

    2004-11-15

    analyzed in detail to investigate oil recovery during spontaneous imbibition with different types of boundary conditions. The results of these studies have been upscaled to the field dimensions. The validity of the new definition of characteristic length...

  5. The credit economy and the economic rationality of science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spirtes, Peter

    The credit economy and the economic rationality of science Kevin J.S. Zollman Carnegie Mellon University Rational Choice and Philosophy Conference May 17, 2014 #12;Kevin J.S. Zollman Credit Economy.S. Zollman Credit Economy Arational choices? How much time should I dedicate to science? What experiments

  6. Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation, and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, west Texas (Delaware Basin). Annual progress report, March 31, 1995--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, S.P.; Hovorka, S.D.; Cole, A.G.

    1996-08-01

    The objective of this Class III project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of clastic reservoirs in basinal sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost-effective way to recover more of the original oil in place by strategic infill-well placement and geologically based field development. Reservoirs in the Delaware Mountain Group have low producibility (average recovery <14 percent of the original oil in place) because of a high degree of vertical and lateral heterogeneity caused by depositional processes and post-depositional diagenetic modification. Detailed correlations of the Ramsey sandstone reservoirs in Geraldine Ford field suggest that lateral sandstone continuity is less than interpreted by previous studies. The degree of lateral heterogeneity in the reservoir sandstones suggests that they were deposited by eolian-derived turbidites. According to the eolian-derived turbidite model, sand dunes migrated across the exposed shelf to the shelf break during sea-level lowstands and provided well sorted sand for turbidity currents or grain flows into the deep basin.

  7. Application of reservoir characterization and advanced technology to improve recovery and economics in a lower quality shallow shelf carbonate reservoir. End of budget period report, August 3, 1994--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, A.R.; Hinterlong, G.; Watts, G.; Justice, J.; Brown, K.; Hickman, T.S.

    1997-12-01

    The Oxy West Welch project is designed to demonstrate how the use of advanced technology can improve the economics of miscible CO{sub 2} injection projects in a lower quality shallow shelf carbonate reservoir. The research and design phase primarily involves advanced reservoir characterization and accelerating the production response. The demonstration phase will implement the reservoir management plan based on an optimum miscible CO{sub 2} flood as designed in the initial phase. During Budget Period 1, work was completed on the CO{sub 2} stimulation treatments and the hydraulic fracture design. Analysis of the CO{sub 2} stimulation treatment provided a methodology for predicting results. The hydraulic fracture treatment proved up both the fracture design approach a and the use of passive seismic for mapping the fracture wing orientation. Although the 3-D seismic interpretation is still being integrated into the geologic model and interpretation of borehole seismic is still underway, the simulator has been enhanced to the point of giving good waterflood history matches. The simulator-forecasted results for an optimal designed miscible CO{sub 2} flood in the demonstration area gave sufficient economics to justify continuation of the project into Budget Period 2.

  8. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Includes $4.5 billion for the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    President Barack Obama signed into law the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (P.L.111-5). The $787 billion economic recovery package represents the largest and most ambitious effort to stimulate the economy in United States history. The Department of Energy (DOE) will be responsible for implementing over $38 billion of the $787 billion package. Of the DOE total, $4.5 Billion is allotted to the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability.

  9. Geothermal Energy Production With Innovative Methods Of Geothermal Heat Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swenson, Allen; Darlow, Rick; Sanchez, Angel; Pierce, Michael; Sellers, Blake

    2014-12-19

    The ThermalDrive™ Power System (“TDPS”) offers one of the most exciting technological advances in the geothermal power generation industry in the last 30 years. Using innovations in subsurface heat recovery methods, revolutionary advances in downhole pumping technology and a distributed approach to surface power production, GeoTek Energy, LLC’s TDPS offers an opportunity to change the geothermal power industry dynamics.

  10. Enhanced oil recovery through water imbibition in fractured reservoirs using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hervas Ordonez, Rafael Alejandro

    1994-01-01

    Conventional waterflooding methods of oil recovery are difficult to apply when reservoirs show evidence of natural fractures, because injected water advances through paths of high permeability, and oil trapped in the rock matrix system...

  11. Enhanced coalbed methane recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzotti, M.; Pini, R.; Storti, G. [ETH, Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Process Engineering

    2009-01-15

    The recovery of coalbed methane can be enhanced by injecting CO{sub 2} in the coal seam at supercritical conditions. Through an in situ adsorption/desorption process the displaced methane is produced and the adsorbed CO{sub 2} is permanently stored. This is called enhanced coalbed methane recovery (ECBM) and it is a technique under investigation as a possible approach to the geological storage of CO{sub 2} in a carbon dioxide capture and storage system. This work reviews the state of the art on fundamental and practical aspects of the technology and summarizes the results of ECBM field tests. These prove the feasibility of ECBM recovery and highlight substantial opportunities for interdisciplinary research at the interface between earth sciences and chemical engineering.

  12. Solvent recovery targeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmad, B.S.; Barton, P.I.

    1999-02-01

    One of the environmental challenges faced by the pharmaceutical and specialty chemical industries is the widespread use of organic solvents. With a solvent-based chemistry, the solvent necessarily has to be separated from the product. Chemical species in waste-solvent streams typically form multicomponent azeotropic mixtures, and this often complicates separation and, hence, recovery of solvents. A design approach is presented whereby process modifications proposed by the engineer to reduce the formation of waste-solvent streams can be evaluated systematically. This approach, called solvent recovery targeting, exploits a recently developed algorithm for elucidating the separation alternatives achievable when applying batch distillation to homogeneous multicomponent mixtures. The approach places the composition of the waste-solvent mixture correctly in the relevant residue curve map and computes the maximum amount of pure material that can be recovered via batch distillation. Solvent recovery targeting is applied to two case studies derived from real industrial processes.

  13. Industrial Heat Recovery - 1982 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Csathy, D.

    1982-01-01

    Industrial Research HTFS Re search Programme HTFS/1S/R19, "Dryout and Flow in Horizontal and Horizontal Hairpin Tubes". 6 l\\rnerican Boiler I1anufacturers Assoc iation, "Lexicon, Boiler & Auxiliary Eauinment", 7 G:t=iffith P., book of I:eat senow N... RECOVERY - 1982 by Denis Csathy, Deltak Corn,oration, !1inneapolis, 11N Two years ago I summarized 20 years of ex perience on Industrial Heat Recovery for the Energy-source Technology Conference and Exhibition held in New Orleans, Louisiana. l...

  14. Recovery Act Workforce Development | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Announces Nearly 100 Million for Smart Grid Workforce Training and Development. Congressional Testimony Recovery Act Recovery Act Interoperability Recovery Act SGIG...

  15. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2005-01-01

    Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage ‡ Afzal Sgeneration unit with heat recovery for space and watergeneration unit with heat recovery for space and water

  16. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2008-01-01

    Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage AfzalGeneration with Heat Recovery and Storage Manuscript Numberhere in order to focus on heat recovery and storage) utility

  17. A mathematical model for infiltration heat recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchanan, C.R.; Sherman, M.H.

    2000-01-01

    Simulation of Infiltration Heat Recovery”, 19 th AIVC Annualfor infiltration heat recovery could easily be incorporatedSimplified Infiltration Heat Recovery Model ……………………17

  18. Advanced sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliot, T.C.

    1994-08-01

    This article examines how advances in sensor technology are beginning to close the gap with advances in other parts of the control and sensing loops; these advances are needed to more easily meet new EPA regulations and demand for more efficient power plant operation. Topics of the article include fiberoptic sensors, sensors for the air side of the plant, and water side sensors.

  19. NASA ACTS SATELLITE: A DISASTER RECOVERY TEST Dr. Hans Kruse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kruse, Hans

    NASA ACTS SATELLITE: A DISASTER RECOVERY TEST Dr. Hans Kruse School of Communications Systems In September 1993, NASA launched its long- awaited Advanced Communication Technology (ACTS) satellite. ACTS and opening of the Ka frequency band. Among the earliest of the tests on the new satellite was a NASA

  20. Methane recovery from animal manures: A current opportunities casebook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    This Casebook examines some of the current opportunities for the recovery of methane from the anaerobic digestion of animal manures US livestock operations currently employ four types of anaerobic digester technology: Slurry, plug flow, complete mix, and covered lagoon. An introduction to the engineering economies of these technologies is provided, and possible end-use applications for the methane gas generated by the digestion process are discussed. The economic evaluations are based on engineering studies of digesters that generate electricity from the recovered methane. Regression models, which can be used to estimate digester cost and internal rate of return, are developed from the evaluations.

  1. Special Report on Review of "The Department of Energy's Quality Assurance Process for Prime Recipients' Reporting for the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-10-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) was established to jumpstart the U.S. economy, create or save millions of jobs, spur technological advances in health and science, and invest in the Nation's energy future. The Department of Energy (Department) will receive an unprecedented $37 billion in Recovery Act funding to support a variety of science, energy, and environmental initiatives. The majority of the funding received by the Department will be allocated to various recipients through grants, cooperative agreements, contracts, and other financial instruments. To ensure transparency and accountability, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) requires that recipients report on their receipt and use of Recovery Act funds on a quarterly basis to FederalReporting.gov. OMB also specifies that Federal agencies should develop and implement formal procedures to help ensure the quality of recipient reported information. Data that must be reported by recipients includes total funding received; funds expended or obligated; projects or activities for which funds were obligated or expended; and the number of jobs created and/or retained. OMB requires that Federal agencies perform limited data quality reviews of recipient data to identify material omissions and/or significant reporting errors and notify the recipients of the need to make appropriate and timely changes to erroneous reports. As part of a larger audit of recipient Recovery Act reporting and performance measurement and in support of a Government-wide review sponsored by the Recovery Accountability and Transparency Board, we completed an interim review to determine whether the Department had established a process to ensure the quality and accuracy of recipient reports. Our review revealed that the Department had developed a quality assurance process to facilitate the quarterly reviews of recipient data. The process included procedures to compare existing information from the Department's financial information systems with that reported to FederalReporting.gov by recipients. In addition, plans were in place to notify recipients of anomalies and/or errors exposed by the quality assurance process. While the Department has made a good deal of progress in this area, we did, however, identify several issues which could, if not addressed, impact the effectiveness of the quality assurance process.

  2. Advanced Combustion Concepts- Enabling Systems and Solutions (ACCESS) for High Efficiency Light Duty Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Discusses development highly capable and flexible advanced control concepts and enabling system to manage multi-mode/multi-fuel combustion events and achieve an up to 30 percent fuel economy improvement

  3. Transforming the American Economy Through Innovation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Secretary Chu joins Vice President Joe Biden as he details the role the Recovery Act has played in funding innovation that will help build a foundation for a more robust and competitive American...

  4. Challenges in Industrial Heat Recovery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dafft, T.

    2007-01-01

    This presentation will address several completed and working projects involving waste heat recovery in a chemical plant. Specific examples will be shown and some of the challenges to successful implementation and operation of heat recovery projects...

  5. New York Recovery Act Snapshot

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in New York are supporting a...

  6. NEW ECONOMY NO REQUIEM YET Rudi Dornbusch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilbao Arrese, Jesús Mario

    and labor markets and the only question now is whether the economy will slow quickly by itself or whether their pound of flesh. Risk capital is available to anyone, not just the establishment, and there is no limit quo are kicked out. Risk talking us valued rather than shunned. Young people want to be in startups

  7. Monetary Policy for Inattentive Economies Laurence Ball

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niebur, Ernst

    to derive optimal policy. In response to shocks to productivity and aggregate demand, optimal policy in the price level -- is suboptimal. When the economy is hit by shocks to aggregate demand or productivity should allow the price level to deviate from its target for a while in response to these supply shocks

  8. Transforming America's Energy Economy Transforming America's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National #12;Transforming America's Energy Economy A. Introduction: A Call for Action B. Envisioning the Future of Energy B.1 Renewable and Low-Carbon Energy Sources for Electricity Production B.2 Energy

  9. Engineering Economy Outline IE 305-Part 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vardeman, Stephen B.

    or assembled units or gallons of output. How di¤erent costs vary according to the value of such an index with the volume index. Variable costs depend upon the level of the volume index. Some costs are mixed costs¤ectively the derivative of the production-cost- versus-volume-index curve.) Stephen B. Vardeman (ISU) Engineering Economy

  10. a People Strategy for nevada's economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    CraCking the Code on SteM a People Strategy for nevada's economy Science Technology engineering Ma of nevadans who possess at least some postsecondary training in the fields of science, technology, engineering--is beginning to create supply-side pinch points that could slow future growth. nevada's Business it ecosystems

  11. KazaKhstan and theworld economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of trade policy, with a distinctive constitutional, classical-liberal defence of free trade drawn from his government at home. he strongly advocated a rule-based international economic order pillared on free tradeKazaKhstan and theworld economy: an assessment of Kazakhstan's trade policy and pending accession

  12. Richard C.Blum Center Developing Economies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakhor, Avideh

    2008 ANNUAL REPORT Real-World Solutions to Combat Poverty #12;RICHARD C. BLUM CENTER FOR DEVELOPING Center for Developing Economies. Over 1,000 students have participated in our poverty alleviation efforts and the historic tradition of service at the University of California. · Our Global Poverty and Practice minor

  13. THE BLUM CENTER FOR DEVELOPING ECONOMIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakhor, Avideh

    THE BLUM CENTER FOR DEVELOPING ECONOMIES 2009 ANNUAL REPORT Real-World Solutions to Combat Poverty academic minor in Global Poverty and Practice is now the largest on campus -- nearly 400 strong and growing participants in the fight against global poverty. We are investing in undergraduates in a way that is virtually

  14. [Waste water heat recovery system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-28

    The production capabilities for and field testing of the heat recovery system are described briefly. Drawings are included.

  15. The Traffic in Praise: Pindar and the Poetics of Social Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurke, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    in the Homeric World. ” In Economy and Society in AncientYork. ??—??. 1975. The Ancient Economy. London. ??—??. 1977.1965. Primitive Polynesian Economy. London. Fisher, N. R. E.

  16. Shadow Economy, Tax Morale, Governance and Institutional Quality: A Panel Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgler, Benno; Schneider, Friedrich

    2007-01-01

    Exploring the Underground Economy. Kalamazoo W. E. UpjohnDependent Variable: Shadow Economy A) GOVERN. /INSTIT.of Tax Reform in the Global Economy. New York: Springer, pp.

  17. Enhanced oil recovery projects data base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pautz, J.F.; Sellers, C.A.; Nautiyal, C.; Allison, E.

    1992-04-01

    A comprehensive enhanced oil recovery (EOR) project data base is maintained and updated at the Bartlesville Project Office of the Department of Energy. This data base provides an information resource that is used to analyze the advancement and application of EOR technology. The data base has extensive information on 1,388 EOR projects in 569 different oil fields from 1949 until the present, and over 90% of that information is contained in tables and graphs of this report. The projects are presented by EOR process, and an index by location is provided.

  18. Fact #870: April 27, 2015 Corporate Average Fuel Economy Progress...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Progress, 1978-2014 The Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) is the sales-weighted harmonic mean fuel economy of a manufacturer's fleet of new cars or light trucks in a certain...

  19. Agglomeration Economies and the High-Tech Computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Nancy E.; Walls, Donald

    2004-01-01

    Job Composition in 2002: High-Tech Hardware Firms Lucent2003, Globalization of a High-Tech Economy (Kluwer, NewEconomies and the High-Tech Computer Cluster Nancy E.

  20. Fuel Economy Improvements from a Hybrid-Electric/Diesel Powertrain...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Economy Improvements from a Hybrid-ElectricDiesel Powertrain in a Class 4 Parcel Delivery Vehicle Fuel Economy Improvements from a Hybrid-ElectricDiesel Powertrain in a Class 4...

  1. Aspects of the political economy of development and synthetic biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wellhausen, Rachel

    What implications might synthetic biology’s potential as a wholly new method of production have for the world economy, particularly developing countries? Theories of political economy predict that synthetic biology can ...

  2. South Africa-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Peru, Philippines, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Senegal, Serbia, South Africa and Ukraine." References "UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services" Retrieved from "http:...

  3. Incorporating Energy Efficiency into Disaster Recovery Efforts...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Incorporating Energy Efficiency into Disaster Recovery Efforts Incorporating Energy Efficiency into Disaster Recovery Efforts Better Buildings Residential Network Program...

  4. Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators Thermoelectrics have unique advantages for...

  5. THE HYDROGEN ECONOMY A non-technical review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE HYDROGEN ECONOMY A non-technical review UNITEDNATIONSENVIRONMENTPROGRAMME #12;Copyright/iStockphoto.com #12;THE HYDROGEN ECONOMY A non-technical review #12;2 Contents Acknowledgements 3 Introduction 4 The Hydrogen Economy and Sustainable Development 6 What is Hydrogen? 6 The Environmental Implications

  6. Global Political Economy Wednesdays 5:30-8:10 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Political Economy Fall 2013 Wednesdays 5:30-8:10 PM Location: ENG (Engelhard Hall) 213 Ajai economy, and the interaction between countries, regulatory systems and organizations. Attention of MNCs in the global economy. The role of economic, social and political institutions is also a central

  7. Solidarity Immersion 2015 Human Rights in the Global Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    Solidarity Immersion 2015 Human Rights in the Global Economy Dominican Republic July 30th - August the Dominican Republic and Haiti for an up-close look at how our global economy and fight for change is woven-hand understanding of the bigger picture of human rights in the global economy through direct testimony from workers

  8. Perspectives on the Current State Of the Milwaukee Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Of the Milwaukee Economy Report prepared for Wisconsin Voices Marc V. Levine of the city's tax-base and social capital). Finally, in Milwaukee's slow-growth regional economy, the labor-Growth Regional Economy: GDP Growth in Metro Milwaukee (p.3); · The Milwaukee "Jobs Gap" (p.5

  9. Global Political Economy Wednesdays 5:30-8:10 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Political Economy Fall 2014 Wednesdays 5:30-8:10 PM Location: 1 Washington Park, 508 Ajai economy, and the interaction between countries, regulatory systems and organizations. Attention of MNCs in the global economy. The role of economic, social and political institutions is also a central

  10. Page 1 from 33 The "New Economy" and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varian, Hal R.

    Page 1 from 33 The "New Economy" and Information Technology Policy Pamela Samuelson Hal R. Varian of the information technology sector (IT) in the 1980s was an important development for the economy, but it spurred that the 1990's witnessed the emergence of a "New Economy." That term dates back to the 1980's when it referred

  11. The Grid Economy RAJKUMAR BUYYA, DAVID ABRAMSON, AND SRIKUMAR VENUGOPAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    The Grid Economy RAJKUMAR BUYYA, DAVID ABRAMSON, AND SRIKUMAR VENUGOPAL Invited Paper This paper economy as a metaphor for effective management of resources and appli- cation scheduling. It identifies distributed resource management challenges and requirements of economy-based Grid systems, and discusses

  12. Global Political Economy Wednesdays 5:30-8:10 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Political Economy Fall 2012 Wednesdays 5:30-8:10 PM Ajai Gaur Room 1098, 1 Washington Park This course offers a global perspective on long term change in the world economy, and the interaction between imbalances and protectionism, foreign direct investment and the role of MNCs in the global economy. The role

  13. Economy and AnnuAl report 2013 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Ning

    Center on Japanese Economy and Business AnnuAl report 2013­ 2014 #12;Letter from the Directors 2 State Intervention and Private Enterprise: Japan, the U.S., and China 28 Restoring the Japanese Economy: Staying Behind and Moving Forward 36 How to Buy Japan: Private Equity in a Global Economy 37 Hitting

  14. Exact Measures of Income in a Hyperbolic Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pezzey, Jack

    Exact Measures of Income in a Hyperbolic Economy JOHN PEZZEY EEN0203 #12;Exact Measures of Income in a Hyperbolic Economy John C. V. Pezzey Centre for Resource and Environmental Studies Australian National.K. Draft of 23 January 2002 Abstract. Exact optimal paths are calculated for a closed economy with human

  15. Open economy models of distribution and growth Robert A. Blecker*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlini, David

    Chapter 9 Open economy models of distribution and growth Robert A. Blecker* To appear in: Eckhard-Keynesian macro models for closed economies, the present chapter focuses on extensions of these models the post-Keynesian framework to a global economy that has become much more integrated in the past few

  16. Linking Oil Prices, Gas Prices, Economy, Transport, and Land Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Linking Oil Prices, Gas Prices, Economy, Transport, and Land Use A Review of Empirical Findings/Fuel Price Travel Cost Macro-Economy Passenger: VMT or VKT Freight: Ton-Mile or Ton-KM Passenger Mode-run Short and Long-run #12;Topics covered by this presentation: Oil price and macro-economy Gas price

  17. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Zhicheng Hu.

    1993-09-07

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO[sub 2] in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst. 4 figures.

  18. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria (Winchester, MA); Hu, Zhicheng (Somerville, MA)

    1993-01-01

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO.sub.2 -containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO.sub.2 to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO.sub.2 in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst.

  19. Use of DRACS to Enhance HTGRs Passive Safety and Economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Ling Zou

    2011-06-01

    This paper discusses the use of DRACS to Enhance HTGRs Passive Safety and Economy. One of the important requirements for Gen. IV High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGR) is passive safety. Currently all the HTGR designs use Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) for passive decay heat removal. [1] The decay heat first is transferred to core barrel by conduction and radiation, and then to reactor vessel by thermal radiation and convection; finally the decay heat is transferred to natural circulated air or water systems. RVACS can be characterized as a surface based decay heat removal system. Similar concepts have been widely used in sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) designs, advanced light water reactors like AP1000. The RVACS is especially suitable for smaller power reactors since small systems have relatively larger surface area. RVACS tends to be less expensive. However, it limits the largest achievable power level for modular HTGRs due to the mismatch between the reactor power (proportional to volume) and decay heat removal capability (proportional to surface). When the relative decay heat removal capability is reduced, the peak fuel temperature increases, even close to the design limit. Annual designs with internal reflector can mitigate this effect therefore further increase the power. Another way to increase power is to increase power density. However, it is also limited by the decay heat removal capability. Besides safety, HTGRs also need to be economical in order to compete with other reactor designs. The limit of decay heat removal capability set by using RVACS has affected the economy of HTGRs. Forsberg [2] pointed out other disadvantages of using RVACS such as conflicting functional requirements for the reactor vessel and scaling distortion for integral effect test of the system performance. A potential alternative solution is to use a volume based passive decay removal system, call Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling Systems (DRACS), to remove or mitigate the limitation on decay heat removal capability. DRACS has been widely used in SFR designs and in liquid salt cooled high temperature reactors. The containment cooling system in BWR is another example of volume based decay removal systems. DRACS composes of natural circulation loops with two sets of heat exchangers, one in reactor side and another is in environment side. DRACS has the benefits of increasing the power as needed (scalability) and modularity. This paper introduces the concept of using DRACS to enhance HTGRs passive safety and economy.

  20. Special Report on The Department of Energy's Acquisition Workforce and its Impact on Implementation of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-03-01

    Signed by the President on February 17, 2009, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) seeks to strengthen the U.S. economy through the creation of new jobs, aiding State and local governments with budget shortfalls, and investing in the long-term health of the Nation's economic prosperity. Under the Recovery Act, the Department of Energy will receive approximately $40 billion for various energy, environmental, and science programs and initiatives. To have an immediate stimulative impact on the U.S. economy, the Department's stated goal is to ensure that these funds are spent as expeditiously as possible, without risking transparency and accountability. Given the Department's almost total reliance on the acquisition process (contracts, grants, cooperative agreements, etc.) to carry out its mission, enhanced focus on contract administration and, specifically, the work performed by Federal acquisition officials is of vital importance as the unprecedented flow of funds begins under the Recovery Act.

  1. Recovery of organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verser, Dan W. (Golden, CO); Eggeman, Timothy J. (Lakewood, CO)

    2009-10-13

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  2. Recovery of organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verser, Dan W. (Menlo Park, CA); Eggeman, Timothy J. (Lakewood, CO)

    2011-11-01

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  3. Laboratory Heat Recovery System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burrows, D. B.; Mendez, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    that they will be considerable. The system has been in successful operation since October 1979. 724 ESL-IE-81-04-123 Proceedings from the Third Industrial Energy Technology Conference Houston, TX, April 26-29, 1981 Conoco R&D West The award-winning laboratory heat-recovery... stream_source_info ESL-IE-81-04-123.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 11112 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IE-81-04-123.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 LABORATORY HEAT...

  4. ARM - Recovery Act Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska OutreachCalendarPress Releases Related2ActRecovery Act Instruments

  5. Register file soft error recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleischer, Bruce M.; Fox, Thomas W.; Wait, Charles D.; Muff, Adam J.; Watson, III, Alfred T.

    2013-10-15

    Register file soft error recovery including a system that includes a first register file and a second register file that mirrors the first register file. The system also includes an arithmetic pipeline for receiving data read from the first register file, and error detection circuitry to detect whether the data read from the first register file includes corrupted data. The system further includes error recovery circuitry to insert an error recovery instruction into the arithmetic pipeline in response to detecting the corrupted data. The inserted error recovery instruction replaces the corrupted data in the first register file with a copy of the data from the second register file.

  6. Biomass Production and Nitrogen Recovery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Peer Review WBS 4.2.2.10: Biomass Production and Nitrogen Recovery Date: March 23, 2015 Technology Area Review: Sustainability Principal Investigator: M. Cristina Negri...

  7. Sulfur recovery process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hise, R.E.; Cook, W.J.

    1991-06-04

    This paper describes a method for recovering sulfur from a process feed stream mixture of gases comprising sulfur-containing compounds including hydrogen sulfide using the Claus reaction to convert sulfur-containing compounds to elemental sulfur and crystallization to separate sulfur-containing compounds from a tail gas of the Claus reaction for further processing as a recycle stream. It comprises: providing a Claus feed stream containing a stoichiometric excess of hydrogen sulfide, the Claus feed stream including the process feed stream and the recycles stream; introducing the Claus feed stream and an oxidizing agent into a sulfur recovery unit for converting sulfur-containing compounds in the Claus feed stream to elemental sulfur; withdrawing the tail gas from the sulfur recovery unit; separating water from the tail gas to producing a dehydrated tail gas; separating sulfur-containing compounds including carbonyl sulfide from the dehydrated tail gas as an excluded material by crystallization and withdrawing an excluded material-enriched output from the crystallization to produce the recycle stream; and combining the recycle stream with the process feed stream to produce the Claus feed stream.

  8. Advanced materials: Information and analysis needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curlee, T.R.; Das, S.; Lee, R.; Trumble, D.

    1990-09-01

    This report presents the findings of a study to identify the types of information and analysis that are needed for advanced materials. The project was sponsored by the US Bureau of Mines (BOM). It includes a conceptual description of information needs for advanced materials and the development and implementation of a questionnaire on the same subject. This report identifies twelve fundamental differences between advanced and traditional materials and discusses the implications of these differences for data and analysis needs. Advanced and traditional materials differ significantly in terms of physical and chemical properties. Advanced material properties can be customized more easily. The production of advanced materials may differ from traditional materials in terms of inputs, the importance of by-products, the importance of different processing steps (especially fabrication), and scale economies. The potential for change in advanced materials characteristics and markets is greater and is derived from the marriage of radically different materials and processes. In addition to the conceptual study, a questionnaire was developed and implemented to assess the opinions of people who are likely users of BOM information on advanced materials. The results of the questionnaire, which was sent to about 1000 people, generally confirm the propositions set forth in the conceptual part of the study. The results also provide data on the categories of advanced materials and the types of information that are of greatest interest to potential users. 32 refs., 1 fig., 12 tabs.

  9. Feebates and Fuel Economy Standards: Impacts on Fuel Use in Light-Duty Vehicles and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates the potential impacts of a national feebate system, a market-based policy that consists of graduated fees on low-fuel-economy (or high-emitting) vehicles and rebates for high-fuel-economy (or lowemitting) vehicles. In their simplest form, feebate systems operate under three conditions: a benchmark divides all vehicles into two categories-those charged fees and those eligible for rebates; the sizes of the fees and rebates are a function of a vehicle's deviation from its benchmark; and placement of the benchmark ensures revenue neutrality or a desired level of subsidy or revenue. A model developed by the University of California for the California Air Resources Board was revised and used to estimate the effects of six feebate structures on fuel economy and sales of new light-duty vehicles, given existing and anticipated future fuel economy and emission standards. These estimates for new vehicles were then entered into a vehicle stock model that simulated the evolution of the entire vehicle stock. The results indicate that feebates could produce large, additional reductions in emissions and fuel consumption, in large part by encouraging market acceptance of technologies with advanced fuel economy, such as hybrid electric vehicles.

  10. US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects - Advanced Metering Infrastructure |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York: EnergyU.S. EPA RegionforUS Forest

  11. Idaho Site Advances Recovery Act Cleanup after Inventing Effective Treatment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For the first time in history, workers at the Idaho site achieved success in the initial cleanup of potentially dangerous sodium in a decommissioned nuclear reactor using an innovative treatment...

  12. Recovery Act funds advance cleanup efforts at Cold War site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    29, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering...

  13. Gills Onions Advanced Energy Recovery System | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the Bill Financing Tool Fits27, 2012Geothermal ProgramGet Current:Gifting

  14. Recovery Act. Development and Validation of an Advanced Stimulation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeedingConnect(Conference) | SciTechelectrodes.

  15. Gills Onions Advanced Energy Recovery System | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,Executive CompensationEnergyGet Current: Switch onDepartment ofGills

  16. Advanced Combustion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsicloudden DocumentationAccommodationsRegister /Advanced Energy Systems Advanced

  17. Managing Risk in a Dynamic World Economy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Harold M.; Benson, Geoffrey A.; Rosson, C. Parr

    1999-06-23

    understanding of risk and how to manage it. Sources of Risk At least four major sources of risk are important to U.S. agriculture. Each con- tains a crucial linkage to the world economy, leading to greater risk for the U.S. farmer. 1. Weather and Natural... Disasters. Normal fluctuations in global weather pat- terns affect world production of farm products, which in turn affects the prices of these products. Livestock producers are affected directly through weather impacts on forage crops and indirectly through...

  18. Green Economy Toolbox | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View New Pages RecentPlantMagmaIncentives Jump to:energyGreenGreenEconomy

  19. Clean Economy Network Foundation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County,Camilla,ThermalCubaParker,GeorgiaValleyClean Economy Network

  20. Metal recovery from porous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sturcken, E.F.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention relates to recovery of metals. More specifically, the present invention relates to the recovery of plutonium and other metals from porous materials using microwaves. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

  1. Enhanced oil recovery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldsberry, Fred L. (Spring, TX)

    1989-01-01

    All energy resources available from a geopressured geothermal reservoir are used for the production of pipeline quality gas using a high pressure separator/heat exchanger and a membrane separator, and recovering waste gas from both the membrane separator and a low pressure separator in tandem with the high pressure separator for use in enhanced oil recovery, or in powering a gas engine and turbine set. Liquid hydrocarbons are skimmed off the top of geothermal brine in the low pressure separator. High pressure brine from the geothermal well is used to drive a turbine/generator set before recovering waste gas in the first separator. Another turbine/generator set is provided in a supercritical binary power plant that uses propane as a working fluid in a closed cycle, and uses exhaust heat from the combustion engine and geothermal energy of the brine in the separator/heat exchanger to heat the propane.

  2. Energy recovery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Albert S. (Morgantown, WV); Verhoff, Francis H. (Morgantown, WV)

    1980-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an improved wet air oxidation system and method for reducing the chemical oxygen demand (COD) of waste water used from scrubbers of coal gasification plants, with this COD reduction being sufficient to effectively eliminate waste water as an environmental pollutant. The improvement of the present invention is provided by heating the air used in the oxidation process to a temperature substantially equal to the temperature in the oxidation reactor before compressing or pressurizing the air. The compression of the already hot air further heats the air which is then passed in heat exchange with gaseous products of the oxidation reaction for "superheating" the gaseous products prior to the use thereof in turbines as the driving fluid. The superheating of the gaseous products significantly minimizes condensation of gaseous products in the turbine so as to provide a substantially greater recovery of mechanical energy from the process than heretofore achieved.

  3. Speech recovery device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frankle, Christen M.

    2004-04-20

    There is provided an apparatus and method for assisting speech recovery in people with inability to speak due to aphasia, apraxia or another condition with similar effect. A hollow, rigid, thin-walled tube with semi-circular or semi-elliptical cut out shapes at each open end is positioned such that one end mates with the throat/voice box area of the neck of the assistor and the other end mates with the throat/voice box area of the assisted. The speaking person (assistor) makes sounds that produce standing wave vibrations at the same frequency in the vocal cords of the assisted person. Driving the assisted person's vocal cords with the assisted person being able to hear the correct tone enables the assisted person to speak by simply amplifying the vibration of membranes in their throat.

  4. EA-1769: Battleground Energy Recovery Project, Harris County, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide $1.94 million in cost-shared funding to the Houston Advanced Research Center for the Battleground Energy Recovery Project, which would produce 8 megawatts of electricity from high pressure steam generated by capturing heat that is currently lost at the Clean Harbors Deer Park facility. The proposed project was selected by the DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to advance research and demonstration of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies.

  5. The Political economy of environmental policy with overlapping generations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, Larry; Rezai, Amon

    2012-01-01

    current rental rate, and environmental policy increases the1998): “Environmental tax policy and intergenerationalPolitical Economy of Environmental Policy with Overlapping

  6. Commodity Money in a Convex Trading Post Sequence Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Starr, Ross M.

    2008-01-01

    that the existence of money poses to the theorist is this:signal its supply. The trading post sequence economy modelin a Walrasian trading post example,” Economics Letters,

  7. The Solar Economy: Renewable Energy for a Sustainable Global Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirza, Umar Karim

    2003-01-01

    Pakistan Hermann Scheer. The Solar Economy: Renewable EnergyRenewable Energy for a Sustainable Global Future By Hermann Scheer Reviewed by Umar Karim Mirza Pakistan

  8. Reconsidering Sustainable Development: Urbanization, Political-Economy, and Deliberative Democracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roman-Alcalá, Antonio M.M.

    2013-01-01

    32, (2012): 3-11. Sustainable Development Connelly, Michael.state economy. ” Sustainable Development Commission of theBroadview Press, 2006. Sustainable Development Jones, D.W. “

  9. Reconsidering Sustainable Development: Urbanization, Political-Economy, and Deliberative Democracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roman-Alcalá, Antonio M.M.

    2013-01-01

    300. Springer, 2007. Sustainable Development Woods, N. , and32, (2012): 3-11. Sustainable Development Connelly, Michael.state economy. ” Sustainable Development Commission of the

  10. ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 02 PETROLEUM; 01 COAL, LIGNITE...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Philippines: Asia Pacific energy series: Country report Hoffman, S. 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 02 PETROLEUM; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; PHILIPPINES; ECONOMIC...

  11. 15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of district heating systems McDonald, C.L. 15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; DISTRICT...

  12. Sustainable Energy Economy: The Next Challenge for Systems Engineers; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, N.

    2008-06-01

    This paper discusses large, past projects that may provide insights into how systems engineers can help in the transition to a sustainable energy economy.

  13. Darleane C. 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; SCIENTIFIC...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    contributions of Glenn T. Seaborg on nuclear science Hoffman, Darleane C. 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; SCIENTIFIC PERSONNEL; TECHNOLOGY IMPACTS; CHEMISTRY; EDUCATION;...

  14. Enhancing low-carbon development by greening the economy: policy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Enhancing low-carbon development by greening the economy: policy dialogue, advisory services, benchmarking Jump to: navigation, search Name Enhancing low-carbon development by...

  15. Enabling a Transition to Low Carbon Economies in Developing Countries...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bangladesh Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Enabling a Transition to Low Carbon Economies in Developing Countries: Bangladesh AgencyCompany...

  16. Promoting a Green Economy through Clean Transportation Alternatives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean Transportation Alternatives Promoting a Green Economy through Clean Transportation Alternatives Town of Hempstead: Project Energy, From Project Execution to Outreach &...

  17. CFD Simulation of Infiltration Heat Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchanan, C.R.

    2011-01-01

    So the infiltration heat recovery in most new houses wouldCFDSimulationof Infiltration Heat Recovery C.R.BuchananandSimulation of Infiltration Heat Recovery C.R. Buchanan and

  18. Carbon dioxide recovery from cogeneration and energy projects: A technically, environmentally, and economically feasible option

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rushing, S.A.

    1997-12-31

    In this paper, the topics of carbon dioxide recovery from cogeneration projects and related industrial usage of carbon dioxide will be covered from North American and international perspectives. The CO{sub 2} recovery discussion will largely focus on one particular technology, namely the application of proprietary monoethanolamine (MEA) solvents, which have a very satisfactory record of performance in the cogeneration and power production industries. The US Federal Energy Act, the impetus behind the development of such projects, will be discussed along with its impacts on the feasibility of U.S. projects. This subject would be reviewed for other developed countries and developing economies as well. Moreover, capital and operating costs and requirements will be summarized for such plants, plus existing CO{sub 2} recovery (from cogeneration) projects will be identified.

  19. Next generation processes for NGL/LPG recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitman, R.N.; Hudson, H.M.; Wilkinson, J.D.; Cuellar, K.T.

    1998-12-31

    Up to now, Ortloff`s Gas Subcooled Process (GSP) and OverHead Recycle Process (OHR) have been the state-of-the-art for efficient NGL/LPG recovery from natural gas, particularly for those gases containing significant concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). Ortloff has recently developed new NGL recovery processes that advance the start-of-the-art by offering higher recovery levels, improved efficiency, and even better CO{sub 2} tolerance. The simplicity of the new process designs and the significantly lower gas compression requirements of the new processes reduce the investment and operating costs for gas processing plants. For gas streams containing significant amounts of carbon dioxide, the CO{sub 2} removal equipment upstream of the NGL recovery plant can be smaller or eliminated entirely, reducing both the investment cost and the operating cost for gas processing companies. In addition, the new liquids extraction processes can be designed to efficiently recover or reject ethane, allowing the gas processor to respond quickly to changing market conditions. This next generation of NGL/LPG recovery processes is now being applied to natural gas processing here in the US and abroad. Two of the new plants currently under construction provide practical examples of the benefits of the new processes.

  20. Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine(s)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pike, Edward

    2014-03-31

    The objective of the Cummins ARES program, in partnership with the US Department of Energy (DOE), is to develop advanced natural gas engine technologies that increase engine system efficiency at lower emissions levels while attaining lower cost of ownership. The goals of the project are to demonstrate engine system achieving 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency (BTE) in three phases, 44%, 47% and 50% (starting baseline efficiency at 36% BTE) and 0.1 g/bhp-hr NOx system out emissions (starting baseline NOx emissions at 2 – 4 g/bhp-hr NOx). Primary path towards above goals include high Brake Mean Effective Pressure (BMEP), improved closed cycle efficiency, increased air handling efficiency and optimized engine subsystems. Cummins has successfully demonstrated each of the phases of this program. All targets have been achieved through application of a combined set of advanced base engine technologies and Waste Heat Recovery from Charge Air and Exhaust streams, optimized and validated on the demonstration engine and other large engines. The following architectures were selected for each Phase: Phase 1: Lean Burn Spark Ignited (SI) Key Technologies: High Efficiency Turbocharging, Higher Efficiency Combustion System. In production on the 60/91L engines. Over 500MW of ARES Phase 1 technology has been sold. Phase 2: Lean Burn Technology with Exhaust Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) System Key Technologies: Advanced Ignition System, Combustion Improvement, Integrated Waste Heat Recovery System. Base engine technologies intended for production within 2 to 3 years Phase 3: Lean Burn Technology with Exhaust and Charge Air Waste Heat Recovery System Key Technologies: Lower Friction, New Cylinder Head Designs, Improved Integrated Waste Heat Recovery System. Intended for production within 5 to 6 years Cummins is committed to the launch of next generation of large advanced NG engines based on ARES technology to be commercialized worldwide.

  1. Weatherization Formula Grants - American Recovery and Reinvestment...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Weatherization Formula Grants - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Weatherization Formula Grants - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) U.S. Department of...

  2. Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery The simulation provides an important approach to estimate...

  3. Cummins Waste Heat Recovery | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Waste Heat Recovery Cummins Waste Heat Recovery Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit,...

  4. Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions...

  5. Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Presentations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presentations Energy Positive Water Resource Recovery Workshop Presentations Presentations: Keynote 1: Energy-Positive Water Resource Recovery Facilities Ed McCormick, President,...

  6. Enhancing Heat Recovery for Thermoelectric Devices | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heat Recovery for Thermoelectric Devices Enhancing Heat Recovery for Thermoelectric Devices Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research...

  7. "Smart" Multifunctional Polymers for Enhanced Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles McCormick; Andrew Lowe

    2007-03-20

    Recent recommendations made by the Department of Energy, in conjunction with ongoing research at the University of Southern Mississippi, have signified a need for the development of 'smart' multi-functional polymers (SMFPs) for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) processes. Herein we summarize research from the period of September 2003 through March 2007 focusing on both Type I and Type II SMFPs. We have demonstrated the synthesis and behavior of materials that can respond in situ to stimuli (ionic strength, pH, temperature, and shear stress). In particular, Type I SMFPs reversibly form micelles in water and have the potential to be utilized in applications that serve to lower interfacial tension at the oil/water interface, resulting in emulsification of oil. Type II SMFPs, which consist of high molecular weight polymers, have been synthesized and have prospective applications related to the modification of fluid viscosity during the recovery process. Through the utilization of these advanced 'smart' polymers, the ability to recover more of the original oil in place and a larger portion of that by-passed or deemed 'unrecoverable' by conventional chemical flooding should be possible.

  8. ASSESSING GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTIONS IN THE TRANSITION ECONOMIES USING A HYBRID ENERGY-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ASSESSING GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTIONS IN THE TRANSITION ECONOMIES USING A HYBRID ENERGY- ECONOMY: Assessing Greenhouse Gas Reductions in the Transition Economies Using a Hybrid Energy- Economy Model Project/Approved: _______________________________________ #12;iii ABSTRACT In this research, the CIMS hybrid energy-economy modelling framework is used

  9. Effects of a Transition to a Hydrogen Economy on Employment in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolley, George S.; Jones, Donald W. Mintz, Marianne M.; Smith, Barton A.; Carlson, Eric; Unnasch, Stefan; Lawrence, Michael; Chmelynski, Harry

    2008-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy report, Effects of a Transition to a Hydrogen Economy on Employment in the United States Report to Congress, estimates the effects on employment of a U.S. economy transformation to hydrogen between 2020 and 2050. The report includes study results on employment impacts from hydrogen market expansion in the transportation, stationary, and portable power sectors and highlights possible skill and education needs. This study is in response to Section 1820 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Public Law 109-58) (EPACT). Section 1820, “Overall Employment in a Hydrogen Economy,” requires the Secretary of Energy to carry out a study of the effects of a transition to a hydrogen economy on several employment [types] in the United States. As required by Section 1820, the present report considers: • Replacement effects of new goods and services • International competition • Workforce training requirements • Multiple possible fuel cycles, including usage of raw materials • Rates of market penetration of technologies • Regional variations based on geography • Specific recommendations of the study Both the Administration’s National Energy Policy and the Department’s Strategic Plan call for reducing U.S. reliance on imported oil and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The National Energy Policy also acknowledges the need to increase energy supplies and use more energy-efficient technologies and practices. President Bush proposed in his January 2003 State of the Union Address to advance research on hydrogen so that it has the potential to play a major role in America’s future energy system. Consistent with these aims, EPACT 2005 authorizes a research, development, and demonstration program for hydrogen and fuel cell technology. Projected results for the national employment impacts, projections of the job creation and job replacement underlying the total employment changes, training implications, regional employment impacts and the employment impacts of a hydrogen transformation on international competitiveness are investigated and reported.

  10. Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimberly Gibson; Mark Norfolk

    2012-07-30

    The program goal of the Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center (OAEMC) is to support advanced energy manufacturing and to create responsive manufacturing clusters that will support the production of advanced energy and energy-efficient products to help ensure the nation's energy and environmental security. This goal cuts across a number of existing industry segments critical to the nation's future. Many of the advanced energy businesses are starting to make the transition from technology development to commercial production. Historically, this transition from laboratory prototypes through initial production for early adopters to full production for mass markets has taken several years. Developing and implementing manufacturing technology to enable production at a price point the market will accept is a key step. Since these start-up operations are configured to advance the technology readiness of the core energy technology, they have neither the expertise nor the resources to address manufacturing readiness issues they encounter as the technology advances toward market entry. Given the economic realities of today's business environment, finding ways to accelerate this transition can make the difference between success and failure for a new product or business. The advanced energy industry touches a wide range of industry segments that are not accustomed to working together in complex supply chains to serve large markets such as automotive and construction. During its first three years, the Center has catalyzed the communication between companies and industry groups that serve the wide range of advanced energy markets. The Center has also found areas of common concern, and worked to help companies address these concerns on a segment or industry basis rather than having each company work to solve common problems individually. EWI worked with three industries through public-private partnerships to sew together disparate segments helping to promote overall industry health. To aid the overall advanced energy industry, EWI developed and launched an Ohio chapter of the non-profit Advanced Energy Economy. In this venture, Ohio joins with six other states including Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont to help promote technologies that deliver energy that is affordable, abundant and secure. In a more specific arena, EWI's advanced energy group collaborated with the EWI-run Nuclear Fabrication Consortium to promote the nuclear supply chain. Through this project EWI has helped bring the supply chain up to date for the upcoming period of construction, and assisted them in understanding the demands for the next generation of facilities now being designed. In a more targeted manner, EWI worked with 115 individual advanced energy companies that are attempting to bring new technology to market. First, these interactions helped EWI develop an awareness of issues common to companies in different advanced energy sectors. By identifying and addressing common issues, EWI helps companies bring technology to market sooner and at a lower cost. These visits also helped EWI develop a picture of industry capability. This helped EWI provide companies with contacts that can supply commercial solutions to their new product development challenges. By providing assistance in developing supply chain partnerships, EWI helped companies bring their technology to market faster and at a lower cost than they might have been able to do by themselves. Finally, at the most granular level EWI performed dedicated research and development on new manufacturing processes for advanced energy. During discussions with companies participating in advanced energy markets, several technology issues that cut across market segments were identified. To address some of these issues, three crosscutting technology development projects were initiated and completed with Center support. This included reversible welds for batteries and high temperature heat exchangers. It also included a novel advanced weld trainer that EWI

  11. Wastewater heat recovery apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1992-09-01

    A heat recovery system is described with a heat exchanger and a mixing valve. A drain trap includes a heat exchanger with an inner coiled tube, baffle plate, wastewater inlet, wastewater outlet, cold water inlet, and preheated water outlet. Wastewater enters the drain trap through the wastewater inlet, is slowed and spread by the baffle plate, and passes downward to the wastewater outlet. Cold water enters the inner tube through the cold water inlet and flows generally upward, taking on heat from the wastewater. This preheated water is fed to the mixing valve, which includes a flexible yoke to which are attached an adjustable steel rod, two stationary zinc rods, and a pivoting arm. The free end of the arm forms a pad which rests against a valve seat. The rods and pivoting arm expand or contract as the temperature of the incoming preheated water changes. The zinc rods expand more than the steel rod, flexing the yoke and rotating the pivoting arm. The pad moves towards the valve seat as the temperature of the preheated water rises, and away as the temperature falls, admitting a variable amount of hot water to maintain a nearly constant average process water temperature. 6 figs.

  12. Wastewater heat recovery apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (108 Independent Blvd., Aiken, SC 29801)

    1992-01-01

    A heat recovery system with a heat exchanger and a mixing valve. A drain trap includes a heat exchanger with an inner coiled tube, baffle plate, wastewater inlet, wastewater outlet, cold water inlet, and preheated water outlet. Wastewater enters the drain trap through the wastewater inlet, is slowed and spread by the baffle plate, and passes downward to the wastewater outlet. Cold water enters the inner tube through the cold water inlet and flows generally upward, taking on heat from the wastewater. This preheated water is fed to the mixing valve, which includes a flexible yoke to which are attached an adjustable steel rod, two stationary zinc rods, and a pivoting arm. The free end of the arm forms a pad which rests against a valve seat. The rods and pivoting arm expand or contract as the temperature of the incoming preheated water changes. The zinc rods expand more than the steel rod, flexing the yoke and rotating the pivoting arm. The pad moves towards the valve seat as the temperature of the preheated water rises, and away as the temperature falls, admitting a variable amount of hot water to maintain a nearly constant average process water temperature.

  13. A framework for assessing the political economy of post-2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    A framework for assessing the political economy of post-2012 global climate regime Bettina Centre for Climate Change Research Working Paper 80 #12;A framework for assessing the political economy, Environment, Energy 3: Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, School of Environmental Sciences

  14. SIMULATING MARKET TRANSFORMATION DYNAMICS USING A HYBRID ENERGY ECONOMY MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ii SIMULATING MARKET TRANSFORMATION DYNAMICS USING A HYBRID ENERGY ECONOMY MODEL: A LOOK the likely effects of alternative policies, potential adoption rates of clean technologies, and costs to society in the long run. My goal was to use a "hybrid" energy economy model (CIMS), which combines

  15. A Breakout Year Propels New Jersey Economy into 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Public Policy and Sitar Company · ONCOR International Plenty of Space for Planned Projects O ffice the future. During the past four years, America went from a GO-GO economy to a SLOW-GO economy to a NO markets in Northern and Central New Jersey Published by the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning

  16. Wyoming Recovery Act State Memo

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wyoming has substantial natural resources including coal, natural gas, oil, and wind power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation’s...

  17. Waste Heat Recovery from Refrigeration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, H. Z.

    1982-01-01

    heat recovery from refrigeration machines is a concept which has great potential for implementation in many businesses. If a parallel requirement for refrigeration and hot water exists, the installation of a system to provide hot water as a by...

  18. Olefin recovery via chemical absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barchas, R.

    1998-06-01

    The recovery of fight olefins in petrochemical plants has generally been accomplished through cryogenic distillation, a process which is very capital and energy intensive. In an effort to simplify the recovery process and reduce its cost, BP Chemicals has developed a chemical absorption technology based on an aqueous silver nitrate solution. Stone & Webster is now marketing, licensing, and engineering the technology. The process is commercially ready for recovering olefins from olefin derivative plant vent gases, such as vents from polyethylene, polypropylene, ethylene oxide, and synthetic ethanol units. The process can also be used to debottleneck C{sub 2} or C{sub 3} splinters, or to improve olefin product purity. This paper presents the olefin recovery imp technology, discusses its applications, and presents economics for the recovery of ethylene and propylene.

  19. Wisconsin Recovery Act State Memo

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Wisconsin has substantial natural resources, including biomass and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA)is making a meaningful down payment on the nation’s energy...

  20. Heat Recovery Steam Generator Simulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganapathy, V.

    1993-01-01

    The paper discusses the applications of Heat Recovery Steam Generator Simulation. Consultants, plant engineers and plant developers can evaluate the steam side performance of HRSGs and arrive at the optimum system which matches the needs...

  1. With or Against the People? The Impact of a Bottom-Up Approach on Tax Morale and the Shadow Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgler, Benno; Schneider, Friedrich; Schaltegger, Christoph A.

    2007-01-01

    Corruption and the Shadow Economy: An Empirical Analysis,Journal of Political Economy Feld, L. P. , Kirchgässner,G. 2001. The Political Economy of Direct Legislation: Direct

  2. Analysis of the Relationship Between Vehicle Weight/Size and Safety, and Implications for Federal Fuel Economy Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenzel, Thomas P.

    2010-01-01

    for Federal Fuel Economy Regulation Final Report preparedand have higher fuel economy, and safer than conventionaland have higher fuel economy, without sacrificing safety. 1.

  3. Recovery Act | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFinancialInvesting inServicesRecovery Act » Recovery Act

  4. Advanced Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, Gordon R.

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  5. TEXTUAL ECONOMY THROUGH CLOSE COUPLING OF SYNTAX AND SEMANTICS Matthew Stone Bonnie Webber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Matthew

    TEXTUAL ECONOMY THROUGH CLOSE COUPLING OF SYNTAX AND SEMANTICS Matthew Stone Bonnie Webber Dept, thatexploitsthe hearer's recognitionof inferentiallinkstomaterial elsewhere withina sentence. Textual economy argue that achieving textual economy imposes strong requirements on the representation and reasoning

  6. Aggregate Dynamics in a Large Virtual Economy: Prices and Real Activity in Team Fortress 2*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumer, Matt; Kephart, Curtis

    2015-01-01

    The Journal of Political Economy, pages 34–55, 1974. Adamin a Large Virtual Economy: Prices and Real Activity in Teamactivity in a large virtual economy which was designed to

  7. Fact #813: January 20, 2014 New Light Vehicle Fuel Economy Continues...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3: January 20, 2014 New Light Vehicle Fuel Economy Continues to Rise Fact 813: January 20, 2014 New Light Vehicle Fuel Economy Continues to Rise The sales-weighted fuel economy...

  8. a survey of michigan residents PUBLIC OPINION OF THE NEW ECONOMY,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riley, Shawn J.

    a survey of michigan residents PUBLIC OPINION OF THE NEW ECONOMY, PLACEMAKING AND ECONOMIC's Michigan Applied Public Policy Research Grant. #12;Public Opinion of the New Economy, Placemaking................................................................................................................................................1 The New Economy and the Michigan Prosperity Initiative

  9. Fact #626: June 7, 2010 Fuel Economy for Light and Heavy Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6: June 7, 2010 Fuel Economy for Light and Heavy Vehicles Fact 626: June 7, 2010 Fuel Economy for Light and Heavy Vehicles In the next few years it is expected that fuel economy...

  10. Law for a Flat World: Legal Infrastructure and the New Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadfield, Gillian K

    2010-01-01

    we are  witnessing in the economy and global economic methods of the old economy.   It requires nothing less than Greenspan “The American Economy in World Context” Remarks 

  11. Automobile Fuel; Economy and CO2 Emissions in Industrialized Countries: Troubling Trends through 2005/6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schipper, Lee

    2008-01-01

    K. , 1993b, Fuel Prices and Economy: Factors Effecting LandCar Test and Actual Fuel Economy: Yet Another Gap? Transportof automobile fuel economy in Europe. Energy Policy 34 14.

  12. Increasing the Fuel Economy and Safety of New Light-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenzel, Tom; Ross, Marc

    2006-01-01

    Automotive Technology and Fuel Economy Trends: 1975 Through2004. “The effect of fuel economy on automobile safety: aM. , 2002. “Near-term fuel economy potential for light-duty

  13. Shadow Economy, Tax Morale, Governance and Institutional Quality: A Panel Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgler, Benno; Schneider, Friedrich

    2007-01-01

    Exploring the Underground Economy. Kalamazoo W. E. UpjohnDependent Variable: Shadow Economy FE A) GOVERN. /INSTIT.of Tax Reform in the Global Economy. New York: Springer, pp.

  14. Fact #588: September 14, 2009 Fuel Economy Changes Due to Ethanol...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8: September 14, 2009 Fuel Economy Changes Due to Ethanol Content Fact 588: September 14, 2009 Fuel Economy Changes Due to Ethanol Content The fuel economy of a vehicle is...

  15. Heavy-Duty Truck Engine: 2007 Emissions with Excellent Fuel Economy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Truck Engine: 2007 Emissions with Excellent Fuel Economy Heavy-Duty Truck Engine: 2007 Emissions with Excellent Fuel Economy 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER)...

  16. Rejuvenating the Chinese Defense Economy: Present Developments and Future Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHEUNG, Tai Ming

    2011-01-01

    2011 Rejuvenating the Chinese Defense Economy: Presentand future prospects of the Chinese defense economy. Fifteeneven accelerate, as long as the Chinese leadership remains

  17. Rejuvenating the Chinese Defense Economy: Present Developments and Future Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHEUNG, Tai Ming

    2011-01-01

    AND ENGINEERING TALENT The Chinese defense economy has aand engineering graduates to satisfy demand from both the civilian and defense economies,

  18. Fact #833: August 11, 2014 Fuel Economy Rated Second Most Important...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3: August 11, 2014 Fuel Economy Rated Second Most Important Vehicle Attribute Fact 833: August 11, 2014 Fuel Economy Rated Second Most Important Vehicle Attribute A 2014 survey...

  19. The Effect of Driving Intensity and Incomplete Charging on the Fuel Economy of a Hymotion Prius PHEV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Barney Carlson

    2009-10-01

    On-road testing was conducted on a Hymotion Prius plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) at the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation in Phoenix, Arizona. The tests were comprised of on-road urban and highway driving during charge-depleting and charge-sustaining operation. Determining real-world effectiveness of PHEVs at reducing petroleum consumption in real world driving was the main focus of the study. Throughout testing, several factors that affect fuel consumption of PHEVs were identified. This report discusses two of these factors: driving intensity (i.e., driving aggressiveness) and battery charging completeness. These two factors are unrelated, yet both significantly impact the vehicle’s fuel economy. Driving intensity was shown to decrease fuel economy by up to half. Charging completeness, which was affected by human factors and ambient temperature conditions, also showed to have great impact on fuel economy for the Hymotion Prius. These tests were performed for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Vehicle Technology Program, is conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation.

  20. Safety Training for the Hydrogen Economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fassbender, Linda L.; Kinzey, Bruce R.; Akers, Bret M.

    2006-04-11

    PNNL and the Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training and Education Center are helping to prepare emergency responders and permitting/code enforcement officials for their respective roles in the future Hydrogen Economy. Safety will be a critical component of the anticipated hydrogen transition. Public confidence goes hand in hand with perceived safety to such an extent that, without it, the envisioned transition is unlikely to occur. Stakeholders and the public must be reassured that hydrogen, although very different from gasoline and other conventional fuels, is no more dangerous. Ensuring safety in the hydrogen infrastructure will require a suitably trained emergency response force for containing the inevitable incidents as they occur, coupled with knowledgeable code officials to ensure that such incidents are kept to a minimum. PNNL and HAMMER are, therefore, designing a hydrogen safety training program, funded by DOE's Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program, and modeled after the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s multi-tiered approach to hazardous materials training. Capabilities under development at HAMMER include classroom and long-distance (i.e., satellite and internet broadcast) learning, as well as life-size, hands-on hydrogen burn props for “training as real as it gets.” This paper presents insights gained from the early emergency response hydrogen safety training courses held in 2005 and current plans for design and construction of a number of hydrogen burn props.

  1. Monitoring- Based Commissioning with Advanced EMIS Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratkovich, B.

    2013-01-01

    ?Based?Commissioning? with?Advanced?EMIS?Analysis Boban?Ratkovich,?MEng,?PEng,?CEM,?BESA,?LEED?AP President Presentation?Overview 1. Monitoring?Based?Commissioning?Objective? 2. Definition?of?Monitoring?Based?Commissioning?(MBCx) 3. MBCx ? Value?Added?Proposal? 4. MBCx...,?targeting?LEED?Gold ? High?performance?envelope ? BAS?integrated?lighting?with?occ? sensor?and?photocell?control ? VAV?Energy?Recovery?Ventilators? with?VFDs?and?occ?sensor?enabling ? Reversible?ASHPs?with?condensing? boiler...

  2. Method of predicting a change in an economy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pryor, Richard J (Albuquerque, NM); Basu, Nipa (Albany, NY)

    2006-01-10

    An economy whose activity is to be predicted comprises a plurality of decision makers. Decision makers include, for example, households, government, industry, and banks. The decision makers are represented by agents, where an agent can represent one or more decision makers. Each agent has decision rules that determine the agent's actions. Each agent can affect the economy by affecting variable conditions characteristic of the economy or the internal state of other agents. Agents can communicate actions through messages. On a multiprocessor computer, the agents can be assigned to processing elements.

  3. Northeast States Hydrogen Economy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills and Reduce CarbonEnergy Fuel

  4. Advanced LIGO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration

    2014-11-17

    The Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are second generation instruments designed and built for the two LIGO observatories in Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA. The two instruments are identical in design, and are specialized versions of a Michelson interferometer with 4 km long arms. As in initial LIGO, Fabry-Perot cavities are used in the arms to increase the interaction time with a gravitational wave, and power recycling is used to increase the effective laser power. Signal recycling has been added in Advanced LIGO to improve the frequency response. In the most sensitive frequency region around 100 Hz, the design strain sensitivity is a factor of 10 better than initial LIGO. In addition, the low frequency end of the sensitivity band is moved from 40 Hz down to 10 Hz. All interferometer components have been replaced with improved technologies to achieve this sensitivity gain. Much better seismic isolation and test mass suspensions are responsible for the gains at lower frequencies. Higher laser power, larger test masses and improved mirror coatings lead to the improved sensitivity at mid- and high- frequencies. Data collecting runs with these new instruments are planned to begin in mid-2015.

  5. Advanced Materials | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Specific Binding ORNL discovery holds potential for separations, sensors, batteries, biotech and more Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials Advanced Materials |...

  6. Environmental policy in transition economies : the effectiveness of pollution changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Söderholm, Patrik

    1999-01-01

    Most economists and analysts claim that extended use of pollution charges in environmental policy will have substantial efficiency advantages in countries undergoing transition to market economies. Essentially this paper ...

  7. Assessment of California reformulated gasoline impact on vehicle fuel economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aceves, S., LLNL

    1997-01-01

    Fuel economy data contained in the 1996 California Air Resources Board (CARB) report with respect to the introduction of California Reformulated Gasoline (CaRFG) has been examined and reanalyzed by two additional statistical methodologies. Additional data has also been analyzed by these two statistical approaches. Within the assumptions of the analysis, point estimates for the reduction in fuel economy using CaRFG as compared to conventional, non-reformulated gasoline were 2-4%, with a 95% upper confidence bound of 6%. Substantial variations in fuel economy are routine and inevitable due to additional factors which affect mileage, even if there is no change in fuel reformulation. This additional analysis confirms the conclusion reached by CARB with respect to the impact of CaRFG on fuel economy.

  8. By Marc Hequet VVhen the economy tanked and business-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Susan L.

    By Marc Hequet VVhen the economy tanked and business- es closed, landlords got creative, filling little ability to shield neigh- bors from the impact. The League of Ari^iona Cities and Towns opposed

  9. Extractive Economies, Growth, and the Poor Graham A. Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , poverty, or per capita gross domestic product (GDP) relative to the level of that same indicator in a group of peer economies; and their growth in human devel- opment, poverty, or per capita GDP relative

  10. A Strong California Economy Spurs Real Estate Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroll, Cynthia

    1998-01-01

    94720-1922 Fisher Center for Real Estate and Urban EconomicsFall Fisher Center f or Real Estate and Urban Economics •A Strong California Economy Spurs Real Estate Activity T he

  11. Public Attitudes toward a Market Economy in Vietnam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minh Hac, Pham; Thanh Nghi, Pham

    2006-01-01

    of Worker Skill Acquisition in Vietnam. Paper read at theStatistics Office. 2002. Vietnam Economy in the Years ofProgram. Vo Dai Luoc. 2004. Vietnam’s economic renovation

  12. Supply chain practices in the context of an emerging economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhaumik, Vijan

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of the BRIC economies of Brazil, Russia, India and China as a formidable economic powerhouse is turning into a reality. The center of the world's economic gravity is slowly shifting towards these emerging ...

  13. Before the Subcommittee on Environment and the Economy - House...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Ernest Moniz, Secretary of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Environment and the Economy - House Energy and Commerce Committee 7-31-13ErnestMoniz FT HEC.pdf More Documents &...

  14. Fact #684: July 18, 2011 Fuel Economy versus Fuel Savings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An increase in fuel economy by 5 miles per gallon (mpg) does not translate to a constant fuel savings amount. Thus, trading a low-mpg car or truck for one with just slightly better mpg will save...

  15. New spaces for living and working in the creative economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    England, Krystal Ann, 1977-

    2004-01-01

    With economic development agencies and city planners increasingly aware of the role of the arts in local economies, artist housing appears to be an essential step in the cultivation and retention of an arts community. While ...

  16. The Road to Improved Heavy Duty Fuel Economy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Heavy duty diesel engine fuel economy is improved by lowering the viscosity of engine lubricant, especially when engine speed is increased or load is decreased, as in long distance on-highway driving

  17. When governments break contracts : foreign firms in emerging economies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wellhausen, Rachel L. (Rachel Louise)

    2012-01-01

    Emerging economy governments commit to protect the property rights of foreign firms through a variety of contracts, from treaties to direct agreements. In an era of liberalized capital flows, these contracts are thought ...

  18. Fact #692: September 12, 2011 Fuel Economy Distribution for New...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    are still in the 15-20 mpg range, more than 37% in 2009 and 2010 were 20 mpg or higher. New Car Market Share by Fuel Economy, MY1975-2010 Graph showing new car market share by...

  19. New Vehicle Fuel Economy Standards Will Continue to Inspire Innovation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    sets aggressive new fuel-economy standards for cars and light-duty trucks. A number of Energy Department projects and investments are unleashing innovation that will create jobs...

  20. Fuel Prices and New Vehicle Fuel Economy in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klier, Thomas

    This paper evaluates the effect of fuel prices on new vehicle fuel economy in the eight largest European markets. The analysis spans the years 2002–2007 and uses detailed vehicle registration and specification data to ...

  1. Recovery | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProtonAbout Us Hanford SiteRecovery Act »Recovery Act

  2. Road to Recovery: Bringing Recovery to Small Town America

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Nettamo, Paivi

    2012-06-14

    The Recovery Act hits the road to reach out to surrounding towns of the Savannah River Site that are struggling with soaring unemployment rates. This project helps recruit thousands of people to new jobs in environmental cleanup at the Savannah River Site.

  3. Advanced development of rotary stratified charge 750 and 1500 HP military multi-fuel engines at Curtiss-Wright

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, C.

    1984-01-01

    During the period from 1977 to 1982, two and four rotor naturally aspirated Stratified Charge Rotary Combustion engines were under development for the U.S. Marine Corps. These engines are described and highlights of work conducted under the government ''Advanced Development'' contracts are discussed. The basic direct injected and spark ignited stratified charge technology was defined during 1973-1976 for automotive engine applications. It was then demonstrated that the unthrottled naturally aspirated Rotary could match indirect injected diesel fuel consumption, without regard to fuel cetane or octane rating. This same technology was scaled from the 60''/sup 3//rotor automotive engine module to the 350''/sup 3//rotor military engine size. In addition, parallel company-sponsored research efforts were undertaken to explore growth directions. Tests showed significant thermal efficiency improvement at lean air-fuel ratios. When turbocharged, high exhaust energy recovery of this ported engine provided induction airflow sufficient for increased output plus excess for operation at the lean mixture strengths of best combustion efficiency. With additive improvements in mechanical efficiency accruing to higher BMEP operation, the potential for fuel economy in the same range as direct injected diesels was demonstrated. These lightweight, compact, multi-fuel engines are believed to open new possiblities for lightweight, reliable, highly mobile and agile military fighting vehicles of the future.

  4. Recovery Act Federal Register Notices | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a grant from the Department of Energy's Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) Program. More Congressional Testimony Recovery Act Recovery Act Interoperability Recovery Act SGIG...

  5. Microsoft Word - Attachment 3 Recovery Act notification | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Microsoft Word - Attachment 3 Recovery Act notification Microsoft Word - Attachment 3 Recovery Act notification More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - Attachment 3 Recovery...

  6. Connecticut Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Connecticut Recovery Act State Memo Connecticut Recovery Act State Memo The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful downpayment on the nation's energy...

  7. Modeling, Estimation, and Control of Waste Heat Recovery Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luong, David

    2013-01-01

    System for Waste Heat Recovery. ” Journal of Heat Transfer,Rankine cycle for waste heat recovery. ” Energy, 29:1207–Strategy of Waste Heat Recovery Organic Rankine Cycles. ”

  8. Effect of Intake Air Filter Condition on Vehicle Fuel Economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman, Kevin M; Huff, Shean P; West, Brian H

    2009-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) jointly maintain a fuel economy website (www.fueleconomy.gov), which helps fulfill their responsibility under the Energy Policy Act of 1992 to provide accurate fuel economy information [in miles per gallon (mpg)] to consumers. The site provides information on EPA fuel economy ratings for passenger cars and light trucks from 1985 to the present and other relevant information related to energy use such as alternative fuels and driving and vehicle maintenance tips. In recent years, fluctuations in the price of crude oil and corresponding fluctuations in the price of gasoline and diesel fuels have renewed interest in vehicle fuel economy in the United States. (User sessions on the fuel economy website exceeded 20 million in 2008 compared to less than 5 million in 2004 and less than 1 million in 2001.) As a result of this renewed interest and the age of some of the references cited in the tips section of the website, DOE authorized the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Fuels, Engines, and Emissions Research Center (FEERC) to initiate studies to validate and improve these tips. This report documents a study aimed specifically at the effect of engine air filter condition on fuel economy. The goal of this study was to explore the effects of a clogged air filter on the fuel economy of vehicles operating over prescribed test cycles. Three newer vehicles (a 2007 Buick Lucerne, a 2006 Dodge Charger, and a 2003 Toyota Camry) and an older carbureted vehicle were tested. Results show that clogging the air filter has no significant effect on the fuel economy of the newer vehicles (all fuel injected with closed-loop control and one equipped with MDS). The engine control systems were able to maintain the desired AFR regardless of intake restrictions, and therefore fuel consumption was not increased. The carbureted engine did show a decrease in fuel economy with increasing restriction. However, the level of restriction required to cause a substantial (10-15%) decrease in fuel economy (such as that cited in the literature) was so severe that the vehicle was almost undrivable. Acceleration performance on all vehicles was improved with a clean air filter. Once it was determined how severe the restriction had to be to affect the carbureted vehicle fuel economy, the 2007 Buick Lucerne was retested in a similar manner. We were not able to achieve the level of restriction that was achieved with the 1972 Pontiac with the Lucerne. The Lucerne's air filter box would not hold the filter in place under such severe conditions. (It is believed that this testing exceeded the design limits of the air box.) Tests were conducted at a lower restriction level (although still considerably more severe than the initial clogged filter testing), allowing the air filter to stay seated in the air box, and no significant change was observed in the Lucerne's fuel economy or the AFR over the HFET cycle. Closed-loop control in modern fuel injected vehicle applications is sophisticated enough to keep a clogged air filter from affecting the vehicle fuel economy. However for older, open-loop, carbureted vehicles, a clogged air filter can affect the fuel economy. For the vehicle tested, the fuel economy with a new air filter improved as much as 14% over that with a severely clogged filter (in which the filter was so clogged that drivability was impacted). Under a more typical state of clog, the improvement with a new filter ranged from 2 to 6%.

  9. The Political economy of the Film Industry in Tanzania: From Socialism to an Open Market economy, 1961-2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mwakalinga, Mona Ngusekela

    2010-12-15

    This study examines the film industry in Tanzania from the 1960s to 2010 and assesses how government policies, legislation, and cultural institutions have impacted filmmaking in Tanzania. By employing a critical political economy theoretical...

  10. EHRS Impact on Engine Warm-up and Fuel Economy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents an investigation performed on a Toyota Prius III with the objective to quantify and demonstrate the benefits of current exhaust heat recovery technologies

  11. Performance and cost models for the direct sulfur recovery process. Task 1 Topical report, Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frey, H.C. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Williams, R.B. [Carneigie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop performance and cost models of the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). The DSRP is an emerging technology for sulfur recovery from advanced power generation technologies such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. In IGCC systems, sulfur present in the coal is captured by gas cleanup technologies to avoid creating emissions of sulfur dioxide to the atmosphere. The sulfur that is separated from the coal gas stream must be collected. Leading options for dealing with the sulfur include byproduct recovery as either sulfur or sulfuric acid. Sulfur is a preferred byproduct, because it is easier to handle and therefore does not depend as strongly upon the location of potential customers as is the case for sulfuric acid. This report describes the need for new sulfur recovery technologies.

  12. Biosurfactant and enhanced oil recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McInerney, Michael J. (Norman, OK); Jenneman, Gary E. (Norman, OK); Knapp, Roy M. (Norman, OK); Menzie, Donald E. (Norman, OK)

    1985-06-11

    A pure culture of Bacillus licheniformis strain JF-2 (ATCC No. 39307) and a process for using said culture and the surfactant lichenysin produced thereby for the enhancement of oil recovery from subterranean formations. Lichenysin is an effective surfactant over a wide range of temperatures, pH's, salt and calcium concentrations.

  13. ENERGY RECOVERY COUNCIL WEEKLY UPDATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Vincent Langone, vice president of Wheelabrator for the New York and Connecticut region. "Over the course of the first mobile app dedicated to Waste to Energy facilities. The new application "Waste2EnENERGY RECOVERY COUNCIL WEEKLY UPDATE June 21, 2013 WTE DEVELOPMENTS The U.S. Energy Department

  14. Promising Technology: Energy Recovery Ventilation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy recovery ventilation (ERV) systems exchange heat between outgoing exhaust air and the incoming outdoor air. Using exhaust air to pre-condition supply air can reduce the capacity of the heating and cooling system and save heating and cooling energy consumption.

  15. Automated intrusion recovery for web applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandra, Ramesh, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    In this dissertation, we develop recovery techniques for web applications and demonstrate that automated recovery from intrusions and user mistakes is practical as well as effective. Web applications play a critical role ...

  16. Web Services for Recovery.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, Erik; Kansa, Eric C; Yee, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    of Information Report 2009-035 Web Services for Recovery.govInformation Report 2009-035 Web Services for Recovery.gov [and Sam Ruby. RESTful Web Services. O’Reilly & Associates,

  17. Multiwavelength all-optical clock recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, C.; Demarest, Kenneth; Allen, Christopher Thomas; Hui, Rongqing; Peddanarappagari, K. V.; Zhu, B.

    1999-07-01

    Multiwavelength clock recovery is especially desirable in systems that use wavelength-division-multipleged technology. A multiwavelength clock-recovery device can greatly simplify costs by eliminating the need to have a separate regenerator for each...

  18. District of Columbia Recovery Act State Memo

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation’s energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in the District of Columbia...

  19. Seeing Green: Speculative Urbanism in the Green Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knuth, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    energy, energy efficiency and building weatherization, andthe advanced energy efficiency-building materials cluster(s)power, energy efficiency, advanced building materials, green

  20. Technological options of Taiwan to mitigate global warming: Perspectives of a newly industrialized economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, R.T.; Fang, L.J.

    1996-12-31

    While there is no shortage of studies on whether and how OECD countries can stabilize their CO{sub 2} emissions, the situation in developing countries has been subjected to much less scrutiny. Although current emission levels in developing countries are low, they can vastly increase in the future due to higher economic growth rates. Of particular interest are newly industrializing economies; they are positioned to be the first group of countries to catch up with OECD emission levels. In this paper, the authors examine the CO{sub 2} emission scenarios in Taiwan, whose economy is still growing at more than 6% after years of impressive performance. A dynamic, multi-period optimization model was constructed to evaluate various energy system development paths. Both currently utilized technologies and advanced technologies that may become available are considered. The model meets externally specified final energy sectoral demands while keeping the objective function minimal. For devising a practical program to control greenhouse gases emissions, relative advantages of the conventional regulation approach with incentive-based approaches are compared. The comparison is made by running the model using different objective functions.

  1. Overview of Recovery Act FAR Clauses | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrder 422.1, CONDUCT OFER-B-00-020Overview of Recovery Act FAR

  2. Technology status and project development risks of advanced coal power generation technologies in APEC developing economies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lusica, N.; Xie, T.; Lu, T.

    2008-10-15

    The report reviews the current status of IGCC and supercritical/ultrasupercritical pulverized-coal power plants and summarizes risks associated with project development, construction and operation. The report includes an economic analysis using three case studies of Chinese projects; a supercritical PC, an ultrasupercritical PC, and an IGCC plant. The analysis discusses barriers to clean coal technologies and ways to encourage their adoption for new power plants. 25 figs., 25 tabs.

  3. QER- Comment of Advanced Energy Economy on behalf of State Energy Advisory Board

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Karen G. Wayland, Ph.D. Deputy Director for State, Local and Tribal Cooperation Energy Policy and Systems Analysis

  4. Recent Trends in Car Usage in Advanced Economies - Slower Growth Ahead? |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/WaterEnergy MarketingNewOpen Energy Information Trends in

  5. 17.100J / 14.781J / 15.678J Political Economy I: Theories of the State and the Economy, Fall 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piore, Michael

    Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, ...

  6. Advanced Boost System Developing for High EGR Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Harold

    2012-09-30

    To support industry efforts of clean and efficient internal combustion engine development for passenger and commercial applications • This program focuses on turbocharger improvement for medium and light duty diesel applications, from complete system optimization percepective to enable commercialization of advanced diesel combustion technologies, such as HCCI/LTC. • Improve combined turbocharger efficiency up to 10% or fuel economy by 3% on FTP cycle at Tier II Bin 5 emission level.

  7. Appendix 69 Bull Trout Draft Recovery Plan. Chapter 3: Clark Fork Recovery Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix 69 Bull Trout Draft Recovery Plan. Chapter 3: Clark Fork Recovery Unit #12;Chapter 3 State(s): Montana, Idaho, and Washington Recovery Unit Name: Clark Fork River (Including Lake Pend Oreille, Priest and Wildlife Service. 2002. Chapter 3, Clark Fork River Recovery Unit, Montana, Idaho, and Washington. 285 p. U

  8. Drain-Water Heat Recovery | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Drain-Water Heat Recovery Drain-Water Heat Recovery June 15, 2012 - 6:20pm Addthis Diagram of a drain water heat recovery system. Diagram of a drain water heat recovery system. How...

  9. Engineering-economic analyses of automotive fuel economy potential in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.; DeCicco, J.

    2000-02-01

    Over the past 25 years more than 20 major studies have examined the technological potential to improve the fuel economy of passenger cars and light trucks in the US. The majority has used technology/cost analysis, a combination of analytical methods from the disciplines of economics and automotive engineering. In this paper the authors describe the key elements of this methodology, discuss critical issues responsible for the often widely divergent estimates produced by different studies, review the history of its use, and present results from six recent assessments. Whereas early studies tended to confine their scope to the potential of proven technology over a 10-year time period, more recent studies have focused on advanced technologies, raising questions about how best to include the likelihood of technological change. The paper concludes with recommendations for further research.

  10. Since 1975, the fuel economy of passenger cars and light trucks has been regulated by the corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standards,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Since 1975, the fuel economy of passenger cars and light trucks has been regulated by the corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standards, established during the energy crises of the 1970s. Calls to increase fuel economy are usually met by a fierce debate on the effectiveness of the CAFE standards

  11. Activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force; Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, July--September 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiedemann, H.A. )

    1991-05-01

    The report contains a general introduction and background to DOE's revised National Energy Strategy Advanced Oil Recovery Program and activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force; a detailed synopsis of the symposium, including technical presentations, comments and suggestions; a section of technical information on deltaic reservoirs; and appendices containing a comprehensive listing of references keyed to general deltaic and geological aspects of reservoirs and those relevant to six selected deltaic plays. Enhanced recovery processes include chemical floodings, gas displacement, thermal recovery, geoscience, and microbial recovery.

  12. AVTA: ChargePoint America Recovery Act Charging Infrastructure Reports

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act supported a number of projects that together made up the largest ever deployment of plug-in electric vehicles and charging infrastructure in the U.S. The following reports describe results of data collected through the Chargepoint America project, which deployed 4,600 public and home charging stations throughout the U.S. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  13. The Advanced Manufacturing Partnership and the Advanced Manufacturing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Advanced Manufacturing Partnership and the Advanced Manufacturing National Program Office The Advanced Manufacturing Partnership and the Advanced Manufacturing National Program...

  14. Sandia Energy - Advanced Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Imaging Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Reacting Flow Experiments Advanced Imaging Advanced ImagingAshley Otero2015-10-30T01:47:37+00:00...

  15. Engine breather oil recovery system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speer, S.R.; Norton, J.G.; Wilson, J.D.

    1990-08-14

    This patent describes an engine breather oil recovery system, for use with reciprocating engines having an oil breather and an oil reservoir recovery system. It comprises:an engine breather outlet from the engine; a vapor and oil separator device in fluid flow connection with the engine breather outlet; a motive flow suction means in fluid flow connection between the separator device and the engine, so as to provide a substantially continuous pressure drop between the separator device and the engine oil reservoir; an engine fluid system in parallel with the separator device; and an engine driven pump in fluid flow connection with such other engine fluid system, wherein the motive force for the motive flow suction means is provided by the fluid from the engine pump.

  16. Counterpulse railgun energy recovery circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honig, Emanuel M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1986-01-01

    In an electromagnetic launcher such as a railgun for propelling a projectile at high velocity, a counterpulse energy recovery circuit is employed to transfer stored inductive energy from a source inductor to the railgun inductance to propel the projectile down the railgun. Switching circuitry and an energy transfer capacitor are used to switch the energy back to the source inductor in readiness for a repetitive projectile propelling cycle.

  17. Overpulse railgun energy recovery circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honig, Emanuel M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1989-01-01

    In an electromagnetic launcher such as a railgun for propelling a projectile at high velocity, an overpulse energy recovery circuit is employed to transfer stored inductive energy from a source inductor to the railgun inductance to propel the projectile down the railgun. Switching circuitry and an energy transfer capacitor are used to switch the energy back to the source inductor in readiness for a repetitive projectile propelling cycle.

  18. Recovery Act State Memos Tennessee

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool FitsProject Developsfor UCNIEnvironmental Impact StatementRecovery Act Smart

  19. Metabolic paths in world economy and crude oil price

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Picciolo, Francesco; Ruzzenenti, Franco

    2015-01-01

    In 1983 Hamilton demonstrated the correlation between the price of oil and gross national product for the U.S. economy. A prolific literature followed exploring the potential correlation of oil prices with other important indices like inflation, industrial production, and food prices, using increasingly refined tools. Our work sheds new light on the role of oil prices in shaping the world economy by investigating the metabolic paths of value across trade between 1960 and 2010, by means of Markov Chain analysis. We show that the interdependence of countries' economies are strictly (anti)correlated to the price of oil. We observed a remarkably high correlation of 0.85, unmatched by any former study addressing the correlation between oil price and major economic indicators.

  20. Multiply Connected Topological Economics, Confidence Relation and Political Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Fang Chang

    2010-02-14

    Using the similar formulas of the preference relation and the utility function, we propose the confidence relations and the corresponding influence functions that represent various interacting strengths of different families, cliques and systems of organization. Since they can affect products, profit and prices, etc., in an economic system, and are usually independent of economic results, therefore, the system can produce a multiply connected topological economics. If the political economy is an economy chaperoned polity, it will produce consequentially a binary economy. When the changes of the product and the influence are independent one another, they may be a node or saddle point. When the influence function large enough achieves a certain threshold value, it will form a wormhole with loss of capital. Various powers produce usually the economic wormhole and various corruptions.

  1. Advanced Thermal Control

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    thermal models power density cost lifetime Advanced Thermal Interface Materials Advanced Heat Transfer Technologies Air Cooling Thermal System Performance and Integration Thermal...

  2. NREL - Advanced Vehicles and Fuels Basics - Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-01

    We can improve the fuel economy of our cars, trucks, and buses by designing them to use the energy in fuels more efficiently. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are helping the nation achieve these goals by developing transportation technologies like: advanced vehicle systems and components; alternative fuels; as well as fuel cells, hybrid electric, and plug-in hybrid vehicles. For a text version of this video visit http://www.nrel.gov/learning/advanced_vehicles_fuels.html

  3. FY2010 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Gurpreet

    2010-12-01

    The Advanced Combustion Engine R&D subprogram supports the mission of the Vehicle Technologies Program by removing the critical technical barriers to commercialization of advanced internal combustion engines (ICEs) for passenger and commercial vehicles that meet future Federal emissions regulations. Dramatically improving the efficiency of ICEs and enabling their introduction in conventional as well as hybrid electric vehicles is the most promising and cost-effective approach to increasing vehicle fuel economy over the next 30 years.

  4. NREL - Advanced Vehicles and Fuels Basics - Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems 2010

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29

    We can improve the fuel economy of our cars, trucks, and buses by designing them to use the energy in fuels more efficiently. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are helping the nation achieve these goals by developing transportation technologies like: advanced vehicle systems and components; alternative fuels; as well as fuel cells, hybrid electric, and plug-in hybrid vehicles. For a text version of this video visit http://www.nrel.gov/learning/advanced_vehicles_fuels.html

  5. Enhancing America's Manufacturing Competitiveness: A Review of the NIST Advanced Technology Program's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;#12;Enhancing America's Manufacturing Competitiveness: A Review of the NIST Advanced Technology Program's Investments in Manufacturing Technologies "Manufacturing is an essential part of our economy. Not only are manufactured goods the currency of world trade, but manufacturing is what creates wealth

  6. Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles: Resources for Fleet Managers (Clean Cities) (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennan, A.

    2011-04-01

    A discussion of the tools and resources on the Clean Cities, Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center, and the FuelEconomy.gov Web sites that can help vehicle fleet managers make informed decisions about implementing strategies to reduce gasoline and diesel fuel use.

  7. Waste heat recovery from adiabatic diesel engines by exhaust-driven Brayton cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalifa, H.E.

    1983-12-01

    This report presents an evaluation of Brayton Bottoming Systems (BBS) as waste heat recovery devices for future adiabatic diesel engines in heavy duty trucks. Parametric studies were performed to evaluate the influence of external and internal design parameters on BBS performance. Conceptual design and trade-off studies were undertaken to estimate the optimum configuration, size, and cost of major hardware components. The potential annual fuel savings of long-haul trucks equipped with BBS were estimated. The addition of a BBS to a turbocharged, nonaftercooled adiabatic engine would improve fuel economy by as much as 12%. In comparison with an aftercooled, turbocompound engine, the BBS-equipped turbocharged engine would offer a 4.4% fuel economy advantage. It is also shown that, if installed in tandem with an aftercooled turbocompound engine, the BBS could effect a 7.2% fuel economy improvement. The cost of a mass-produced 38 Bhp BBS is estimated at about $6460 or $170/Bhp. Technical and economic barriers that would hinder the commercial introduction of bottoming systems were identified.

  8. ENGINEERING EVALUATION OF HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION WITH SULFUR RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.W. ROBERTS; J.W. PORTZER; S.C. KOZUP; S.K. GANGWAL

    1998-05-31

    Engineering evaluations and economic comparisons of two hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) processes with elemental sulfur recovery, being developed by Research Triangle Institute, are presented. In the first process, known as the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP), the SO{sub 2} tail gas from air regeneration of zinc-based HGD sorbent is catalytically reduced to elemental sulfur with high selectivity using a small slipstream of coal gas. DSRP is a highly efficient first-generation process, promising sulfur recoveries as high as 99% in a single reaction stage. In the second process, known as the Advanced Hot Gas Process (AHGP), the zinc-based HGD sorbent is modified with iron so that the iron portion of the sorbent can be regenerated using SO{sub 2} . This is followed by air regeneration to fully regenerate the sorbent and provide the required SO{sub 2} for iron regeneration. This second-generation process uses less coal gas than DSRP. Commercial embodiments of both processes were developed. Process simulations with mass and energy balances were conducted using ASPEN Plus. Results show that AHGP is a more complex process to operate and may require more labor cost than the DSRP. Also capital costs for the AHGP are higher than those for the DSRP. However, annual operating costs for the AHGP appear to be considerably less than those for the DSRP with a potential break-even point between the two processes after just 2 years of operation for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant using 3 to 5 wt% sulfur coal. Thus, despite its complexity, the potential savings with the AHGP encourage further development and scaleup of this advanced process.

  9. Advanced Manufacturing Office News

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-08-08

    News stories about advanced manufacturing, events, and office accomplishments. Subscribe to receive updates.

  10. Exhaust Energy Recovery | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Application of organic Rankine cycle to achieve 10% fuel economy improvement in heavy-duty diesel engine deer08nelson.pdf More Documents & Publications CDLB-1003.PDF&0;...

  11. Ohio Celebrates Recovery Act Weatherization Program Performance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to work, but ... here in Ohio, we are positioning ourselves to be at the front of this wave of the new energy economy." The Carrs' home was weatherized by LEADS Community Action...

  12. Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Economies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milbrandt, A.; Overend, R. P.

    2009-08-01

    The goal of this study is to examine the marginal lands in Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) economies and evaluate their biomass productivity potential. Twelve categories of marginal lands are identified using the Global Agro-Ecological Zones system of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization.

  13. GREEN ENERGY ECONOMIES THE SEARCH FOR CLEAN AND RENEWABLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    GREEN ENERGY ECONOMIES THE SEARCH FOR CLEAN AND RENEWABLE ENERGY Edited by JOHN BYRNE YOUNG in discussions of potential energy futures has steadily grown. The increasing awareness of--and importance given to photovoltaics (PV) and other renewable energy installations, and grows by a factor of four when resources

  14. PA Regional Nanotechnology Conference Collaborating in Today's Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    4/23/2009 Present PA Regional Nanotechnology Conference Collaborating in Today's Economy May 27 of green technologies and alternative energy. The PA Initiative for Nanotechnology (PIN), established organizations - Drexel University's DNI, the LNN of Lehigh University, and The Nanotechnology Institute (NTI

  15. Ask the Experts: How Hurricanes Affect Our Wallets & the Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Ask the Experts: How Hurricanes Affect Our Wallets & the Economy by John Kiernan on November 12 costs in its aftermath? And are there ways that we can better prepare for hurricanes in the future of the universities that are most vulnerable to and familiar with hurricanes, including Florida Atlantic University

  16. Automobile Prices, Gasoline Prices, and Consumer Demand for Fuel Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    Automobile Prices, Gasoline Prices, and Consumer Demand for Fuel Economy Ashley Langer University 2008 Abstract The relationship between gasoline prices and the demand for vehicle fuel efficiency evidence that automobile manufacturers set vehicle prices as if consumers respond to gasoline prices. We

  17. GREEN ENERGY ECONOMIES THE SEARCH FOR CLEAN AND RENEWABLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    . While working toward an alternative-energy future, the practical and philosophical narratives offered incorporates long-term environmental and social considerations, thus introducing wholly new, alternative energyGREEN ENERGY ECONOMIES THE SEARCH FOR CLEAN AND RENEWABLE ENERGY Edited by JOHN BYRNE YOUNG

  18. A HYDROGEN ECONOMY MATTVINCENTILLUSTRATION;JOERAEDLEGettyImages(photograph)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    A HYDROGEN ECONOMY MATTVINCENTILLUSTRATION;JOERAEDLEGettyImages(photograph) Developing cleaner of hydrogen as a transportation fuel. Unfortunately, the commercializa- tion of electric vehicles has been- butionwillbecostly. High Hopes for 94 SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN Will motorists someday fill up their tanks with hydrogen

  19. DISCUSSION: ECONOMIES OF SCALE AND SCOPE IN AGRICULTURAL BIOTECHNOLOGY RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foltz, Jeremy D.

    incentives for research, new avenues of rents for firms and the public sector in agriculture, and new types and applied research or product development) as well as between dif- ferent types of research organizationsDISCUSSION: ECONOMIES OF SCALE AND SCOPE IN AGRICULTURAL BIOTECHNOLOGY RESEARCH JEREMY D. FOLTZ

  20. DRI Model of the U.S. Economy -- Model Documentation:

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1993-01-01

    Provides documentation on Data Resources, Inc., DRI Model of the U.S. Economy and the DRI Personal Computer Input/Output Model. It also describes the theoretical basis, structure and functions of both DRI models; and contains brief descriptions of the models and their equations.

  1. HOW CONSUMERS VALUE FUEL ECONOMY: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -6283 managed by UT-BATTELLE, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 #12 ...............................................................................................................1 2. ALTERNATIVE MODELS OF CONSUMERS' EVALUATION OF FUEL ECONOMY ........................................................................................................................59 Appendix: REFERENCE ASSUMPTIONS ABOUT VEHICLE USE, LIFETIME AND DISCOUNTING

  2. ESTIMATING CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR IN AN ENERGY-ECONOMY POLICY MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    furnace emissions to 2050. Despite insufficient variation in energy prices over the historical periodESTIMATING CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR IN AN ENERGY-ECONOMY POLICY MODEL by Dale Beugin B.A.Sc., University Degree: Master of Resource Management Title of Thesis: Estimating Consumer Behaviour in an Energy

  3. Oil vs. Natural Gas: Prices and US Economy Wide Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Oil vs. Natural Gas: Prices and US Economy Wide Factors UC Davis October 1, 2015 Stephen Brown.S. reliance on imported natural gas · Substantially lower natural gas prices · How has natural gas consumption responded? · Will natural gas prices remain low relative to oil? · Brown and Yücel (2008); Huntington (2007

  4. Modelling the balanced transition to a sustainable economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bastin, Georges

    of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) which is the major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. The model emissions, CO2 intensity, ecological Department of Mathematical Engineering, ICTEAM, Universit´e catholique. We consider a world economy with two subregions that are endowed with greenhouse gas emissions

  5. III. -ECONOMY Pig production : short-term prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . The price formation of other components in the « feedstuff cost » (manioc, bran, other oilmeals) is also price forecasting H. MAROUBY LT.P., Service Economie, 34, bd de la Gare, 3150!0 Toulouse As pig price forecasting, a management based on forecasting in livestock rearing relies on an estimation of the feed price

  6. Overpulse railgun energy recovery circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honig, E.M.

    1984-09-28

    The invention presented relates to a high-power pulsing circuit and more particularly to a repetitive pulse inductive energy storage and transfer circuit for an electromagnetic launcher. In an electromagnetic launcher such as a railgun for propelling a projectile at high velocity, an overpulse energy recovery circuit is employed to transfer stored inductive energy from a source inductor to the railgun inductance to propel the projectile down the railgun. Switching circuitry and an energy transfer capacitor are used to switch the energy back to the source inductor in readiness for a repetitive projectile propelling cycle.

  7. Counterpulse railgun energy recovery circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honig, E.M.

    1984-09-28

    The invention presented relates to a high-power pulsing circuit and more particularly to a repetitive pulse inductive energy storage and transfer circuit for an electromagnetic launcher. In an electromagnetic launcher such as a railgun for propelling a projectile at high velocity, a counterpulse energy recovery circuit is employed to transfer stored inductive energy from a source inductor to the railgun inductance to propel the projectile down the railgun. Switching circuitry and an energy transfer capacitor are used to switch the energy back to the source inductor in readiness for a repetitive projectile propelling cycle.

  8. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TAPropaneand Los Alamos NationalAmerican Recovery

  9. Heat recovery | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent|CornHeat recovery Jump to:

  10. Recovery Act | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report Appendices |ProjectKnow YourDepartment ofAugustPastRecovery Act

  11. Comments on the Joint Proposed Rulemaking to Establish Light-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emission Standards and Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenzel, Thomas P

    2010-01-01

    on occupant safety than fuel economy standards that arethe automobile fuel economy standards program, NHTSA docketCorporate Average Fuel Economy Standards Docket No. NHTSA–

  12. Novel 125 I production and recovery system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kar, Adwitiya

    2009-05-15

    ????????????......... 32 5 Recovery of iodine versus initial mass (measured by spectrometry).............. 33 6 Recovery of iodine following distillation of extracted solution (measured by NAA)????????????????????????? ...... 34 7 Iodine recovery from... (6) In both cases the new isotope will carry the same mass number but a different atomic number than its parent. The iodine-125 formed will now undergo electron capture and decay to stable tellurium-125 completing the radioactive decay process...

  13. The Political Economy of Agri-Environmental Policies in the EU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swinnen, Johan

    2005-01-01

    Economy of Agri-Environmental Policies in the EU JohanEconomy of Agri-Environmental Policies in the EU Johan F.M.changes” Agri-environmental policies are only fraction of

  14. Fact #870: April 27, 2015 Corporate Average Fuel Economy Progress, 1978-2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) is the sales-weighted harmonic mean fuel economy of a manufacturer’s fleet of new cars or light trucks in a certain model year (MY). First enacted by...

  15. Equilibrium and Media of Exchange in A Convex Trading Post Economy with Transaction Cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Starr, Ross M.

    2007-01-01

    that the existence of money poses to the theorist is this:Exchange in a Convex Trading Post Economy with TransactionExchange in a Convex Trading Post Economy with Transaction

  16. Bioenergy Demand in a Market Driven Forest Economy (U.S. South...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Demand in a Market Driven Forest Economy (U.S. South) Bioenergy Demand in a Market Driven Forest Economy (U.S. South) Breakout Session 1A: Biomass Feedstocks for the...

  17. Survey of Biomass Resource Assessments and Assessment Capabilities in APEC Economies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milbrandt, A.; Overend, R. P

    2008-11-01

    This survey of biomass resource assessments and assessment capabilities in Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) economies considered various sources: academic and government publications, media reports, and personal communication with contacts in member economies.

  18. Impacts of House Bill 56 on the Construction Economy in Alabama 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilbo, David; Escamilla, Edelmiro; Bigelow, Ben F.; Garcia, Jose

    2014-01-01

    bill, and its impact on the construction economy in Alabama. The study utilized construction employment rates, construction GDP, and construction spending as the major indices detailing the “health” of the construction economy in Alabama. This research...

  19. The High-Tech Economy, Work, and Democracy 2.0: A Research Agenda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berins Collier, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    issues that arise with new hi-tech economy, that is, issuesconsists of those in new hi-tech fields. Needless to say,associated with the new hi-tech economy, they are familiar

  20. Of energy and the economy : theory and evidence for their functional relationship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Vincent H. (Vincent Hua-Cheng)

    2007-01-01

    This paper offers a set of explicit functional relationships that link energy and the economy. Despite the reliance on energy permeating the whole economy, no such complete relationships had been presented before. How ...

  1. Recipe for Reform: The Food Economy Movement in Britain During the First World War

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckley, Michael Dennis

    2009-01-01

    May 1917: 7. "More ration recipes: Rice pancakes and economyFood Economy League. War-Time Recipes for Households WhereFood in War Time and Recipes for Penny Meals. London, 1915-

  2. Political Economy Graduate Certificate c/o Department of Political Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Political Economy Graduate Certificate c/o Department of Political Science Clark C346 Colorado.stevis@colostate.edu Political Economy Graduate Interdisciplinary Studies Program Enrollment Form (*) (03/01/05) Name

  3. Fact #730: June 4, 2012 Fuel Economy of New Light Vehicles is...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0: June 4, 2012 Fuel Economy of New Light Vehicles is Up 19% from 1980 to 2011 Fact 730: June 4, 2012 Fuel Economy of New Light Vehicles is Up 19% from 1980 to 2011 In addition to...

  4. Fact #680: June 20, 2011 Fuel Economy is "Most Important" When...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0: June 20, 2011 Fuel Economy is "Most Important" When Buying a Vehicle Fact 680: June 20, 2011 Fuel Economy is "Most Important" When Buying a Vehicle A June 2011 survey asked the...

  5. Building on the Past, Facing the Future: Renewing the Creative Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    Building on the Past, Facing the Future: Renewing the Creative Economy of New Mexico 1 UNM Bureau's Arts and Cultural Economy #12;Bureau of Business & Economic Research Inventory & Analysis of NM

  6. Project Information Form Project Title Reducing Truck Emissions and Improving Truck Fuel Economy via ITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Project Information Form Project Title Reducing Truck Emissions and Improving Truck Fuel Economy new traffic flow and traffic light control concepts with respect to emissions and fuel economy. Some

  7. Spring 2012 MIA FARROW'S DARFUR ARCHIVE LOOKING AT WORLD RELIGIONS DRIVING THE ECONOMY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Spring 2012 MIA FARROW'S DARFUR ARCHIVE · LOOKING AT WORLD RELIGIONS · DRIVING THE ECONOMY GENO, and the hope that they will help make the world a better place. Driving the Economy Mary Holz

  8. Fact #657: January 10, 2011 Record Increase for New Light Vehicle Fuel Economy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The sales-weighted fuel economy average of all light vehicles sold in model year (MY) 2009 was 1.4 miles per gallon (mpg) higher than MY2008. This is the largest annual increase in fuel economy...

  9. Fact #793: August 19, 2013 Improvements in Fuel Economy for Low...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3: August 19, 2013 Improvements in Fuel Economy for Low-MPG Vehicles Yield the Greatest Fuel Savings Fact 793: August 19, 2013 Improvements in Fuel Economy for Low-MPG Vehicles...

  10. Rare booms and disasters in a multi-sector endowment economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahana, Michael J.

    Rare booms and disasters in a multi-sector endowment economy Jerry Tsai University of Oxford to booms than for those that are not. We build a general equilibrium endowment economy in which growth

  11. 54.5 MPG and Beyond: Materials Lighten the Load for Fuel Economy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    54.5 MPG and Beyond: Materials Lighten the Load for Fuel Economy 54.5 MPG and Beyond: Materials Lighten the Load for Fuel Economy December 4, 2012 - 12:06pm Addthis Lightweight...

  12. Regulating the cellular economy of supply and demand Jan-Hendrik S. HofmeyraY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minireview Regulating the cellular economy of supply and demand Jan-Hendrik S. HofmeyraY *, Athel March 2000 Edited by Gunnar von Heijne Abstract Cellular metabolism is a molecular economy

  13. Fact #594: October 26, 2009 Fuel Economy and Annual Fuel Cost...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4: October 26, 2009 Fuel Economy and Annual Fuel Cost Ranges for Vehicle Classes Fact 594: October 26, 2009 Fuel Economy and Annual Fuel Cost Ranges for Vehicle Classes The graph...

  14. 2012 Fuel Economy of New Vehicles Sets Record High: EPA | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2012 Fuel Economy of New Vehicles Sets Record High: EPA 2012 Fuel Economy of New Vehicles Sets Record High: EPA December 18, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis The U.S. Environmental...

  15. Reclaiming the Economy: Alternatives to Market Fundamentalism in Scotland and Beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reclaiming the Economy: Alternatives to Market Fundamentalism in Scotland and Beyond edited to explain why it is essential to retain public ownership. To begin with, as #12;Reclaiming the Economy

  16. Fact #629: June 28, 2010 Top Ten Misconceptions about Fuel Economy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    629: June 28, 2010 Top Ten Misconceptions about Fuel Economy The Fuel Economy Guide Web site, sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection...

  17. Appel d'offre Call for application Chaire Economie de l'innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rennes, Université de

    appel d'offre pour la création d'une chaire de recherche et de formationAppel d'offre ­ Call for application Chaire « Economie de l Economie et Management). Il pourra aussi faciliter les interactions de recherche

  18. Fuel Economy and Emmissions of the Ethanol-Optimized Saab 9-5...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fuel Economy and Emmissions of the Ethanol-Optimized Saab 9-5 Biopower Fuel Economy and Emmissions of the Ethanol-Optimized Saab 9-5 Biopower This page contains information on the...

  19. Fact #692: September 12, 2011 Fuel Economy Distribution for New Cars and Light Trucks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nearly 64% of new cars sold in model year (MY) 1975 had combined highway/city fuel economy of 15 miles per gallon (mpg) or less [blue shading]. By 2010, 63% of cars had fuel economy of 25 mpg or...

  20. Fact #591: October 5, 2009 Consumer Reports Tests Vehicle Fuel Economy by Speed

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Seven vehicles were tested by Consumer Reports recently to determine the fuel economy of the vehicles at a given speed. For these vehicles, the decline in fuel economy from a speed of 55 miles per...

  1. The 2014 Fuel Economy Guide Can Help You Choose Your Next Fuel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Read the 2014 Fuel Economy Guide to inform your new car purchase this year. | Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.comThomasEyeDesign Read the 2014 Fuel Economy Guide to inform your...

  2. How Does Your Fuel Economy Compare to the Test Ratings on Fueleconomy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Does Your Fuel Economy Compare to the Test Ratings on Fueleconomy.gov? How Does Your Fuel Economy Compare to the Test Ratings on Fueleconomy.gov? November 12, 2009 - 8:36am Addthis...

  3. Automobile Fuel; Economy and CO2 Emissions in Industrialized Countries: Troubling Trends through 2005/6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schipper, Lee

    2008-01-01

    Circle of Measuring Automobile Fuel Use, Energy Policy 21. (M. , Dolan, K. , 1993b, Fuel Prices and Economy: Factors1994. New Car Test and Actual Fuel Economy: Yet Another Gap?

  4. Sipping fuel and saving lives: increasing fuel economy without sacrificing safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Deborah; Greene, David L.; Ross, Marc H.; Wenzel, Tom P.

    2008-01-01

    Ford delays plans to boost fuel economy of its SUVs. WallImproving safety without impacting fuel economy. Honda MotorCompany, October 4. SIPPING FUEL AND SAVING LIVES / 24

  5. Multi-Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel Economy in...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel Economy in Light-Duty Diesel Engines Multi-Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel Economy in Light-Duty Diesel Engines February...

  6. Recovery Act Progress Update: Reactor Closure Feature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2010-01-01

    A Recovery Act Progress Update. Decommissioning of two nuclear reactor sites at the Department of Energy's facilities has been approved and is underway.

  7. Faces of the Recovery Act: 1366 Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LEXINGTON, MA - At 1366 Technologies, Ely Sachs and Frank van Mierlo are using ARPA-E Recovery Act funding to dramatically reduce the costs of solar panel production.

  8. Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - Allentown, PA A microbial reverse electrodialysis technology will be combined with waste heat recovery to convert effluents into electricity and chemical products, including...

  9. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Accelerated Milestones

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    RECOVERY PROJECT OR ACTIVITY ACCELERATED MILESTONE TITLE MILESTONE DUE DATE EXPECTED ACCELERATED COMPLETION DATE WITH ARRA FUNDING STATUS INL - Cleanup of Surplus Nuclear...

  10. Faces of the Recovery Act: Sun Catalytix

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dan Nocera talks about Sun Catalytix, the next generation of solar energy, and ARPA-E funding through the Recovery Act.

  11. Industrial Plate Exchangers Heat Recovery and Fouling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cross, P. H.

    1981-01-01

    Plate and Frame Heat Exchangers have special characteristics for both fouling and heat recovery. These are discussed in general then related to two industrial examples....

  12. Recovery News Flashes | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    June 7, 2011 Recovery Act Supports Construction of Site's Largest Groundwater Treatment Facility Construction of the largest groundwater treatment facility at the Hanford Site...

  13. Recovery Act Progress Update: Reactor Closure Feature

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14

    A Recovery Act Progress Update. Decommissioning of two nuclear reactor sites at the Department of Energy's facilities has been approved and is underway.

  14. The Evolution of Economies of Scale Regarding Pollution Control: Cross-Sectional Evidence from a Transition Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earnhart, Dietrich H.; Lizal, Lubomir

    2011-01-01

    This paper assesses whether firms face economies and/or diseconomies of scale with respect to air pollution control by evaluating the effects of production on firm-level air emission levels. To achieve this objective, this paper uses an unbalanced...

  15. The Great Transformation: Looking back on Kenya’s economy to examine the spaces for alternative economies today 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemdriksen, Kirri

    2014-11-27

    surrounding ‘alternative’ spaces. Using the case study, it finds the notion of alternative to be subjective and dynamic. It finds that some elements of being alternative are more an extension of the market economy rather against it, the term in some cases...

  16. Measuring the Non-Observed Economy: A Survey-Based Study of Demand in the Korean Prostitution Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KIM, WONSOON

    2013-01-01

    the Non- Observed Economy: A Handbook, with Development,Brigita, comp. Non-Observed Economy In National Accounts.Measuring the Non-observed Economy. Publication. 5th ed.

  17. Brushing up on oil recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackey, J.

    1995-12-01

    To be prepared for a range of oil spills, emergency response organizations must have an arsenal of powerful and adaptable equipment. Around the coastal United States, a network of oil spill cooperatives and emergency response organizations stand ready with the technology and the know-how to respond to the first sign of an oil spill. When the telephone rings, they may be required to mop up 200 gallons of oil that leaked off the deck of a ship or to contain and skim 2,000 gallons of oil from a broken hose at a loading terminal. In a few cases each year, they may find themselves responding to a major pollution incident, one that involves hundreds of people and tons of equipment. To clean an oil spill at a New Jersey marine terminal, the local cooperative used the Lundin Oil Recovery Inc. (LORI) skimming system to separate the oil and water and the lift the oil out of the river. The LORI skimming technology is based on sound principles of fluid management - using the natural movement of water instead of trying to fight against it. A natural feeding mechanism delivers oily water through the separation process, and a simple mechanical separation and recovery device - a brush conveyor - removes the pollutants from the water.

  18. Effects of fracturing fluid recovery upon well performance and ultimate recovery of hydraulically fractured gas wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berthelot, Jan Marie

    1990-01-01

    EFFECTS OF FRACTURING FLUID RECOVERY UPON WELL PERFORMANCE AND ULTIMATE RECOVERY OF HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED GAS WELLS A Thesis IAN MARIE BERTHELOT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AdtM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1990 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering EFFECTS OF FRACTURING FLUID RECOVERY UPON WELL PERFORMANCE AND ULTIMATE RECOVERY OF HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED GAS WELLS by JAN MARIE BERTIIELOT Appmved...

  19. Using simulation software to solve engineering economy problems Eyler R. Coatesa,*, Michael E. Kuhlb,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhl, Michael E.

    Using simulation software to solve engineering economy problems Eyler R. Coatesa,*, Michael E in engineering economy problems can be fairly well defined. Much required information is uncertain the project life. Engineering economy problems with all deterministic inputs are actually special cases

  20. A fuel economy optimization system with applications in vehicles with human drivers and autonomous vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Changxu (Sean)

    A fuel economy optimization system with applications in vehicles with human drivers and autonomous University of New York, Buffalo, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Keywords: Vehicle fuel economy Eco-driving Human developed and validated a new fuel-economy optimization system (FEOS), which receives input from vehicle