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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced coal gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Integration of carbonate fuel cells with advanced coal gasification systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbonate fuel cells have attributes which make them ideally suited to operate on coal-derived fuel gas; they can convert the methane, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide present in coal derived fuel gas directly to electricity, are not subject to thermodynamic cycle limits as are heat engines, and operate at temperatures compatible with coal gasifiers. Some new opportunities for improved efficiency have been identified in integrated coal gasification/carbonate fuel cells which take advantage of low temperature catalytic coal gasification producing a methane-rich fuel gas, and the internal methane reforming capabilities of Energy Research Corporation's carbonate fuel cells. By selecting the appropriate operating conditions and catalyst in the gasifier, methane formation is maximized to improve gasification efficiency and to take advantage of the heat management aspects of the internal reforming carbonate fuel cell. These advanced integrated gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems are projected to have better efficiencies than gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems employing conventional gasification, and also competing non-fuel cell systems. These improved efficiencies would be accompanied by a corresponding reduction in impact on the environment as well.

Steinfeld, G. (Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States)); Meyers, S.J. (Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)); Hauserman, W.B. (North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Integration of carbonate fuel cells with advanced coal gasification systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbonate fuel cells have attributes which make them ideally suited to operate on coal-derived fuel gas; they can convert the methane, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide present in coal derived fuel gas directly to electricity, are not subject to thermodynamic cycle limits as are heat engines, and operate at temperatures compatible with coal gasifiers. Some new opportunities for improved efficiency have been identified in integrated coal gasification/carbonate fuel cells which take advantage of low temperature catalytic coal gasification producing a methane-rich fuel gas, and the internal methane reforming capabilities of Energy Research Corporation`s carbonate fuel cells. By selecting the appropriate operating conditions and catalyst in the gasifier, methane formation is maximized to improve gasification efficiency and to take advantage of the heat management aspects of the internal reforming carbonate fuel cell. These advanced integrated gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems are projected to have better efficiencies than gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems employing conventional gasification, and also competing non-fuel cell systems. These improved efficiencies would be accompanied by a corresponding reduction in impact on the environment as well.

Steinfeld, G. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States); Meyers, S.J. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States); Hauserman, W.B. [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Advanced Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Gasification Carbon feedstock gasification is a promising pathway for high-efficiency, low-pollutant power generation and chemical production. The inability, however, to...

4

NETL: Gasification - Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas Processing Systems Syngas Processing Systems Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Coal Gasification Praxair Inc. Project Number: FE0004908 Project Description Praxair is conducting research to develop hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) technology to separate carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen (H2) in coal-derived syngas for IGCC applications. The project team has fabricated palladium based membranes and measured hydrogen fluxes as a function of pressure, temperature, and membrane preparation conditions. Membranes are a commercially-available technology in the chemical industry for CO2 removal and H2 purification. There is, however, no commercial application of membrane processes that aims at CO2 capture for IGCC syngas. Due to the modular nature of the membrane process, the design does not exhibit economy of scale-the cost of the system will increase linearly as the plant system scale increases making the use of commercially available membranes, for an IGCC power plant, cost prohibitive. For a membrane process to be a viable CO2 capture technology for IGCC applications, a better overall performance is required, including higher permeability, higher selectivity, and lower membrane cost.

5

Development of an Integrated Multicontaminant Removal Process Applied to Warm Syngas Cleanup for Coal-Based Advanced Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

an Integrated an Integrated Multicontaminant Removal Process Applied to Warm Syngas Cleanup for Coal-Based Advanced Gasification Systems Background The U.S. has more coal than any other country, and it can be converted through gasification into electricity, liquid fuels, chemicals, or hydrogen. However, for coal gasification to become sufficiently competitive to benefit the U.S. economy and help reduce our dependence on foreign fuels, gasification costs must be reduced

6

Coal gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A standard series of two staged gas generators (GG) has been developed in the United States for producing gas with a combustion heat from 4,700 to 7,600 kilojoules per cubic meter from coal (U). The diameter of the gas generators is from 1.4 to 3.65 meters and the thermal capacity based on purified cold gas is from 12.5 to 89 million kilojoules per hour. Certain standard sized gas generators have undergone experimental industrial tests which showed that it is most expedient to feed the coal into the gas generators pneumatically. This reduces the dimensions of the charging device, makes it possible to use more common grades of structural steels and reduces the cost of the gas. A double valve reliably prevents ejections of the gasification product and promotes the best distribution of the coal in the gas generator. The gas generators may successfully operate on high moisture (up to 36 percent) brown coal. Blasting with oxygen enriched to 38 percent made it possible to produce a gas with a combustion heat of 9,350 kilojoules per cubic meter. This supports a combustion temperature of 1,700C.

Rainey, D.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Carbon formation and metal dusting in advanced coal gasification processes  

SciTech Connect

The product gases generated by coal gasification systems contain high concentrations of CO and, characteristically, have relatively high carbon activities. Accordingly, carbon deposition and metal dusting can potentially degrade the operation of such gasifier systems. Therefore, the product gas compositions of eight representative gasifier systems were examined with respect to the carbon activity of the gases at temperatures ranging from 480 to 1,090 C. Phase stability calculations indicated that Fe{sub 3}C is stable only under very limited thermodynamic conditions and with certain kinetic assumptions and that FeO and Fe{sub 0.877}S tend to form instead of the carbide. As formation of Fe{sub 3}C is a necessary step in the metal dusting of steels, there are numerous gasifier environments where this type of carbon-related degradation will not occur, particularly under conditions associated with higher oxygen and sulfur activities. These calculations also indicated that the removal of H{sub 2}S by a hot-gas cleanup system may have less effect on the formation of Fe{sub 3}C in air-blown gasifier environments, where the iron oxide phase can exist and is unaffected by the removal of sulfur, than in oxygen-blown systems, where iron sulfide provides the only potential barrier to Fe{sub 3}C formation. Use of carbon- and/or low-alloy steels dictates that the process gas composition be such that Fe{sub 3}C cannot form if the potential for metal dusting is to be eliminated. Alternatively, process modifications could include the reintroduction of hydrogen sulfide, cooling the gas to perhaps as low as 400 C and/or steam injection. If higher-alloy steels are used, a hydrogen sulfide-free gas may be processed without concern about carbon deposition and metal dusting.

DeVan, J.H.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Judkins, R.R.; Wright, I.G.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

NETL: Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal/Biomass Feed & Gasification Coal/Biomass Feed & Gasification Coal and Coal/Biomass to Liquids Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification The Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification Key Technology is advancing scientific knowledge of the production of liquid hydrocarbon fuels from coal and/or coal-biomass mixtures. Activities support research for handling and processing of coal/biomass mixtures, ensuring those mixtures are compatible with feed delivery systems, identifying potential impacts on downstream components, catalyst and reactor optimization, and characterizing the range of products and product quality. Active projects within the program portfolio include the following: Coal-biomass fuel preparation Development of Biomass-Infused Coal Briquettes for Co-Gasification Coal-biomass gasification modeling

9

Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low Rank Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 Capture Technology for Low Rank Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems Background Gasification of coal or other solid feedstocks (wood waste, petroleum coke, etc.) is a clean way to produce electricity and produce or co-produce a variety of commercial products. The major challenge is cost reduction; current integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology is estimated to produce power at a cost higher than that of pulverized coal combustion. However, the Gasification

10

Gasification of Lignite Coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report on the gasification of lignite coal is presented in two parts. The first includes research into technology options for preparing low-rank fuels for gasification, gasifiers for converting the coal into synthesis gas, and technologies that may be used to convert synthesis gas into valuable chemical products. The second part focuses on performance and cost screening analyses for either Greenfield or retrofit gasification options fueled by low-rank lignite coal. The work was funded through Tailor...

2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

11

Advanced coal-gasification technical analyses. Appendix 2: coal fines disposal. Final report, December 1982-September 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of several studies conducted by KRSI under the Advanced Coal Gasification Technical Analyses contract with GRI. It addresses the issue of disposal and/or utilization of the coal fines that cannot be used as feedstock for fixed-bed (i.e. Lurgi) gasifiers. Specific items addressed are: (1) Technical, legal and economic aspects of fines burial, (2) Estimation of the premium for fines-free coal delivered to an SNG plant and resulting reduction in SNG production costs, (3) Comparison of the relative advantages and limitations of Winkler and GKT gasifiers to consuming fines, (4) Review of coal-size consist curves in the GRI Guidelines to assess the fines content of ROM coals, (5) a first-pass design and cost estimate using GKT gasifiers in tandem with Lurgi gasifiers in an North Dakota lignite-to-SNG plant to consume full range of coal-size consist, (6) Evaluation of the General Electric technology for extrusion of coal fines and testing of the extrudates in a fixed-bed gasifier, and (7) Investigation of equipment and variables involved in briquetting of coal fines, such that fines could be fed to the gasifiers along with the lump coal.

Cover, A.E.; Hubbard, D.A.; Jain, S.K.; Shah, K.V.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Methodology for technology evaluation under uncertainty and its application in advanced coal gasification processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology has attracted interest as a cleaner alternative to conventional coal-fired power generation processes. While a number of pilot projects have been launched to ...

Gong, Bo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

NETL: Gasification Systems - Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Coal Gasification Project No.: DE-FE0004908 Membranes shown (from top to bottom): ceramic support, activated and coated with palladium...

14

NETL: Gasification - Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas Processing Systems Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Coal Gasification Praxair Inc. Project Number: FE0004908 Project Description Praxair is conducting research to...

15

Program on Technology Innovation: Advanced Concepts in Slurry-Fed Low-Rank Coal Gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a Technology Innovation screening study of concepts for improving the performance of slurry-fed gasification combined cycle power plants on low rank coals by using two innovative coal preparation technologies: coal slurries with liquid CO2 as the fluid, and hot water drying. Slurry-fed gasification technologies have a cost advantage over dry-fed systems, but they suffer a large performance penalty when used on low rank coals because of the large fraction of water and ...

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Coal Gasification Report.indb  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Coal Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle: Market Penetration Recommendations and Strategies Produced for the Department of Energy (DOE)/ National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the Gasification Technologies Council (GTC) September 2004 Coal-Based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle: Market Penetration Strategies and Recommendations Final Report Study Performed by:

17

Program on Technology Innovation: Advanced Concepts in Slurry Fed Low Rank Coal Gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports on experimental and theoretical analyses of low rank coal/liquid CO2 slurries (LRC/CO2(l)). The results showed that viscosities of LRC/CO2(l) were much lower than for LRC/water slurries of similar coal concentrations and higher coal concentrations could be obtained for liquid CO2 slurries than for water-based slurries at flow conditions typical of industrial scale gasification systems. ASPENplus analyses of a typical integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system showed no del...

2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

18

Catalytic Coal Gasification Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalytic Coal Gasification Process Catalytic Coal Gasification Process for the Production of Methane-Rich Syngas Opportunity Research is active on the patent pending technology, titled "Production of Methane-Rich Syngas from Fuels Using Multi-functional Catalyst/Capture Agent." This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview Reducing pollution emitted by coal and waste power plants in an economically viable manner and building power plants that co-generate fuels and chemicals during times of low electricity demand are pressing goals for the energy industry. One way to achieve these goals in an economically viable manner is through the use of a catalytic gasifier that

19

Underground gasification of coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is disclosed a method for the gasification of coal in situ which comprises drilling at least one well or borehole from the earth's surface so that the well or borehole enters the coalbed or seam horizontally and intersects the coalbed in a direction normal to its major natural fracture system, initiating burning of the coal with the introduction of a combustion-supporting gas such as air to convert the coal in situ to a heating gas of relatively high calorific value and recovering the gas. In a further embodiment the recovered gas may be used to drive one or more generators for the production of electricity.

Pasini, III, Joseph (Morgantown, WV); Overbey, Jr., William K. (Morgantown, WV); Komar, Charles A. (Uniontown, PA)

1976-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

20

Plasma gasification of coal in different oxidants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxidant selection is the highest priority for advanced coal gasification-process development. This paper presents comparative analysis of the Powder River Basin bituminous-coal gasification processes for entrained-flow plasma gasifier. Several oxidants, which might be employed for perspective commercial applications, have been chosen, including air, steam/carbon-dioxide blend, carbon dioxide, steam, steam/air, steam/oxygen, and oxygen. Synthesis gas composition, carbon gasification degree, specific power consumptions, and power efficiency for these processes were determined. The influence of the selected oxidant composition on the gasification-process main characteristics have been investigated.

Matveev, I.B.; Messerle, V.E.; Ustimenko, A.B. [Applied Plasma Technology, Mclean, VA (USA)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced coal gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

PNNL Coal Gasification Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report explains the goals of PNNL in relation to coal gasification research. The long-term intent of this effort is to produce a syngas product for use by internal Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers in materials, catalysts, and instrumentation development. Future work on the project will focus on improving the reliability and performance of the gasifier, with a goal of continuous operation for 4 hours using coal feedstock. In addition, system modifications to increase operational flexibility and reliability or accommodate other fuel sources that can be used for syngas production could be useful.

Reid, Douglas J.; Cabe, James E.; Bearden, Mark D.

2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

22

Assessment of coal gasification/hot gas cleanup based advanced gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect

The major objectives of the joint SCS/DOE study of air-blown gasification power plants with hot gas cleanup are to: (1) Evaluate various power plant configurations to determine if an air-blown gasification-based power plant with hot gas cleanup can compete against pulverized coal with flue gas desulfurization for baseload expansion at Georgia Power Company's Plant Wansley; (2) determine if air-blown gasification with hot gas cleanup is more cost effective than oxygen-blown IGCC with cold gas cleanup; (3) perform Second-Law/Thermoeconomic Analysis of air-blown IGCC with hot gas cleanup and oxygen-blown IGCC with cold gas cleanup; (4) compare cost, performance, and reliability of IGCC based on industrial gas turbines and ISTIG power island configurations based on aeroderivative gas turbines; (5) compare cost, performance, and reliability of large (400 MW) and small (100 to 200 MW) gasification power plants; and (6) compare cost, performance, and reliability of air-blown gasification power plants using fluidized-bed gasifiers to air-blown IGCC using transport gasification and pressurized combustion.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Advanced coal-gasification technical analyses. Project summary. Final report, December 1982-September 1985  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work performed by KRSI to support the GRI Fossil Fuels Gasification Program in identification and development of the most economical and technically feasible process(es) for production of SNG from coal. The work was performed under several tasks that fall under three topical categories: (1) Technology Review and Evaluations, (2) Coal Fines Disposal and (3) Technical/Economic Evaluations. The final task reports appear in the three appendices of the report. The Technology Review studies provide an overview of the coal gasification, shift/methanation, acid-gas removal, and sulfur-recovery technologies for use in coal-to-SNG plant design; Side-by-side comparisons of selected processes in each category provide background for process selection. The studies relating to Coal Fines Disposal allow comparison and guidance with regard to feedstock-management options when fixed-bed gasifiers are to be used. The first-pass designs and cost estimates prepared under Technical/Economic Evaluations compare and assess North Dakota lignite-to-SNG plants based on Lurgi, Westinghouse (now KRW) and Direct Methanation processes. A plant size vs. cost study provides an insight to selection of an economical plant size.

Cover, A.E.; Hubbard, D.A.; Jain, S.K.; Shah, K.V.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Coal gasification vessel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vessel system (10) comprises an outer shell (14) of carbon fibers held in a binder, a coolant circulation mechanism (16) and control mechanism (42) and an inner shell (46) comprised of a refractory material and is of light weight and capable of withstanding the extreme temperature and pressure environment of, for example, a coal gasification process. The control mechanism (42) can be computer controlled and can be used to monitor and modulate the coolant which is provided through the circulation mechanism (16) for cooling and protecting the carbon fiber and outer shell (14). The control mechanism (42) is also used to locate any isolated hot spots which may occur through the local disintegration of the inner refractory shell (46).

Loo, Billy W. (Oakland, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

The Caterpillar Coal Gasification Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is a review of one of America's premier coal gasification installations. The caterpillar coal gasification facility located in York, Pennsylvania is an award winning facility. The plant was recognized as the 'pace setter plant of the year' in 1981 and won the 'energy conservation award' for 1983. The decision to install and operate a coal gasification plant was based on severe natural gas curtailments at York with continuing supply interruptions. This paper will present a detailed description of the equipment used in the coal gasification system and the process itself. It also includes operating and gas production information along with an economic analysis. The characteristics of producer gas and its use in the various plant applications will be reviewed and compared with natural gas. In summary, this paper deals with caterpillar's experience with coal gasification to date. Caterpillar concludes that the coal gas system has the potential to favorably affect the corporation's commitment to stimulate coal utilization. The three years' operating experience at the York plant has demonstrated the practical use of coal gas as well as the economics associated with producing gas from coal.

Welsh, J.; Coffeen, W. G., III

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Comparison of intergrated coal gasification combined cycle power plants with current and advanced gas turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two recent conceptual design studies examined ''grass roots'' integrated gasification-combined cycle (IGCC) plants for the Albany Station site of Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation. One of these studies was based on the Texaco Gasifier and the other was developed around the British Gas Co.-Lurgi slagging gasifier. Both gasifiers were operated in the ''oxygen-blown'' mode, producing medium Btu fuel gas. The studies also evaluated plant performance with both current and advanced gas turbines. Coalto-busbar efficiencies of approximately 35 percent were calculated for Texaco IGCC plants using current technology gas turbines. Efficiencies of approximately 39 percent were obtained for the same plant when using advanced technology gas turbines.

Banda, B.M.; Evans, T.F.; McCone, A.I.; Westisik, J.H.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Advanced coal-gasification technical analyses. Appendix 3: technical/economic evaluations. Final report, December 1982-September 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains the final report on four tasks performed by KRSI as part of the Advanced Coal Gasification Technical Analysis contract with GRI. It provides extensive, consistent technical and economic information regarding application of (1) Lurgi gasification, (2) Westinghouse (now KRW) gasification, and (3) Direct Methanation (with Lurgi gasifiers) processes to produce SNG from North Dakota lignite. The results of Lurgi and Westinghouse studies were used to develop a plant size vs. cost-of-SNG relationship. The report on each task consists of a block flow diagram, component material balance, process flow sheets showing operating conditions and principal equipment in each major process area, a narrative process description, utility balances, plant efficiency calculations, documentation of design and cost-estimation basis and an economic analysis performed in accordance with the GRI Guidelines. Economic analysis consisted of capital-cost breakdown according to plant areas, variable operating and maintenance costs, and calculation of levelized, constant-dollar cost-of-gas with and without process development allowances (PDA). The sensitivities of the gas cost to major variables are presented in graphical form. For the plant size vs. cost-of-SNG task, similar information is provided at eight different plant capacities based on both Lurgi or Westinghouse gasifiers.

Cover, A.E.; Hubbard, D.A.; Jain, S.K.; Shah, K.V.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Great Plains Coal Gasification Project:  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This progress report on the Great Plains Coal Gasification Project discusses Lignite coal, natural gas, and by-products production as well as gas quality. A tabulation of raw material, product and energy consumption is provided for plant operations. Capital improvement projects and plant maintenance activities are detailed and summaries are provided for environmental, safety, medical, quality assurance, and qualtiy control activities.

Not Available

1988-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

29

Beluga Coal Gasification - ISER  

SciTech Connect

ISER was requested to conduct an economic analysis of a possible 'Cook Inlet Syngas Pipeline'. The economic analysis was incorporated as section 7.4 of the larger report titled: 'Beluga Coal Gasification Feasibility Study, DOE/NETL-2006/1248, Phase 2 Final Report, October 2006, for Subtask 41817.333.01.01'. The pipeline would carry CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}-H{sub 2} from a synthetic gas plant on the western side of Cook Inlet to Agrium's facility. The economic analysis determined that the net present value of the total capital and operating lifecycle costs for the pipeline ranges from $318 to $588 million. The greatest contributor to this spread is the cost of electricity, which ranges from $0.05 to $0.10/kWh in this analysis. The financial analysis shows that the delivery cost of gas may range from $0.33 to $0.55/Mcf in the first year depending primarily on the price for electricity.

Steve Colt

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

Integrated Coal Gasification Power Plant Credit (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Integrated Coal Gasification Power Plant Credit states that an income taxpayer that makes a qualified investment in a new integrated coal gasification power plant or in the expansion of an existing...

31

CFD Simulation of Underground Coal Gasification.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) is a process in which coal is converted to syngas in-situ. UCG has gained popularity recently as it could be used… (more)

Sarraf Shirazi, Ahad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

ENCOAL Mild Coal Gasification Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

ENCOAL Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Shell Mining Company, is constructing a mild gasification demonstration plant at Triton Coal Company's Buckskin Mine near Gillette, Wyoming. The process, using Liquids From Coal (LFC) technology developed by Shell and SGI International, utilizes low-sulfur Powder River Basin Coal to produce two new fuels, Process Derived Fuel (PDF) and Coal Derived Liquids (CDL). The products, as alternative fuels sources, are expected to significantly reduce current sulfur emissions at industrial and utility boiler sites throughout the nation, thereby reducing pollutants causing acid rain.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Coal Gasification for Power Generation, 3. edition  

SciTech Connect

The report provides a concise look at the challenges faced by coal-fired generation, the ability of coal gasification to address these challenges, and the current state of IGCC power generation. Topics covered include: an overview of Coal Generation including its history, the current market environment, and the status of coal gasification; a description of gasification technology including processes and systems; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving increased interest in coal gasification; an analysis of the barriers that are hindering the implementation of coal gasification projects; a discussion of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology; an evaluation of IGCC versus other generation technologies; a discussion of IGCC project development options; a discussion of the key government initiatives supporting IGCC development; profiles of the key gasification technology companies participating in the IGCC market; and, a detailed description of existing and planned coal IGCC projects.

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

The suitability of coal gasification in India's energy sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), an advanced coal-based power generation technology, may be an important technology to help India meet its future power needs. It has the potential to provide higher generating ...

Simpson, Lori Allison

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Coal gasification apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal hydrogenation vessel has hydrogen heating passages extending vertically through its wall and opening into its interior.

Nagy, Charles K. (Monaca, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IGCC PC advanced coal-wind hybrid combined cycle power plantnatural gas combined cycle gas turbine power plant carboncrude gasification combined cycle power plant with carbon

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Short Communication Catalytic coal gasification: use of calcium versus potassium*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

career on process optimization and control, fluid mechanics, the analysis of coal gasification reactors my earlier work on coal gasification reactors, polymer fiber spinning, and the activated sludge

38

EA-1219: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County, Wyoming EA-1219: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County,...

39

Low temperature steam-coal gasification catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Shrinking domestic supplies and larger dependence on foreign sources have made an assortment of fossil fuels attractive as possible energy sources. The high sulfur and mineral coals of Illinois would be an ideal candidate as possible gasification feedstock. Large reserves of coal as fossil fuel source and a projected shortage of natural gas (methane) in the US, have made development of technology for commercial production of high Btu pipeline gases from coal of interest. Several coal gasification processes exist, but incentives remain for the development of processes that would significantly increase efficiency and lower cost. A major problem in coal/char gasification is the heat required which make the process energy intensive. Hence, there is a need for an efficient and thermally neutral gasification process. Results are described for the gasification of an Illinois No. 6 coal with transition metal catalysts and added potassium hydroxide.

Hippo, E.J.; Tandon, D. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

Advanced Concepts in Slurry-Fed Low-Rank Coal Gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After an initial scouting study (described in Electric Power Research Institute [EPRI] Technical Update 1014432) revealed that using liquid CO2 in place of water in coal slurries could have several beneficial effects on integrated-gasificationcombined-cycles (IGCCs) employing CO2 capture, EPRI's Program on Technology Innovation funded additional work on this subject. This report summarizes the results of rheological testing performed with slurries made from liquid CO2 and two types of subbituminous coal ...

2008-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced coal gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Improved catalysts for carbon and coal gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to improved catalysts for carbon and coal gasification and improved processes for catalytic coal gasification for the production of methane. The catalyst is composed of at least two alkali metal salts and a particulate carbonaceous substrate or carrier is used. 10 figures, 2 tables.

McKee, D.W.; Spiro, C.L.; Kosky, P.G.

1984-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

42

Apparatus for solar coal gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for using focused solar radiation to gasify coal and other carbonaceous materials is described. Incident solar radiation is focused from an array of heliostats through a window onto the surface of a moving bed of coal, contained within a gasification reactor. The reactor is designed to minimize contact between the window and solids in the reactor. Steam introduced into the gasification reactor reacts with the heated coal to produce gas consisting mainly of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, commonly called synthesis gas, which can be converted to methane, methanol, gasoline, and other useful products. One of the novel features of the invention is the generation of process steam in one embodiment at the rear surface of a secondary mirror used to redirect the focused sunlight. Another novel feature of the invention is the location and arrangement of the array of mirrors on an inclined surface (e.g., a hillside) to provide for direct optical communication of said mirrors and the carbonaceous feed without a secondary redirecting mirror.

Gregg, D.W.

1980-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

43

Coal gasification vessel. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vessel system comprises an outer shell of carbon fibers held in a binder, a coolant circulation mechanism and control mechanism and an inner shell comprised of a refractory material and is of light weight and capable of withstanding the extreme temperature and pressure environment of, for example, a coal gasification process. The control mechanism can be computer controlled and can be used to monitor and modulate the coolant which is provided through the circulation mechanism for cooling and protecting the carbon fiber and outer shell. The control mechanism is also used to locate any isolated hot spots which may occur through the local disintegration of the inner refractory shell.

Loo, B.W.

1981-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

44

Advanced gasification projects. [Support research needs; contains list of advanced gasification projects supported by US DOE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of the needs for coal gasification reveals the following principal categories of information gaps that can be filled by programs already in progress or those readily initiated. The gaps are technology base needs required for successful application of both currently available and advanced gasification processes. The need areas are classified as follows: Reactor design/performance, gas cleaning/cooling separation, acid-gas removal/gas shift/gas conversion, wastewater treatment, and general data base on both state-of-the-art and advanced technologies. During the future operating and optimization phases of most of the coal gasification projects, when additional troubles will surface, the technical support program described herein will have provided the additional data base needed to correct deficiencies and/or to advance the state-of-the-art. The report describes US DOE supported projects in this area: brief description, title, contractor, objective, accomplishments, current work and possible application.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Coal Fleet Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC Permitting) Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance to owners of planned Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants in order to assist them in permitting these advanced coal power generation facilities. The CoalFleet IGCC Permitting Guidelines summarize U.S. federal requirements for obtaining air, water, and solid waste permits for a generic IGCC facility, as described in the CoalFleet User Design Basis Specification (UDBS). The report presents characteristics of IGCC emissions that must be considered in the p...

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

46

Apparatus for fixed bed coal gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for fixed-bed coal gasification is described in which coal such as caking coal is continuously pyrolyzed with clump formation inhibited, by combining the coal with a combustible gas and an oxidant, and then continually feeding the pyrolyzed coal under pressure and elevated temperature into the gasification region of a pressure vessel. The materials in the pressure vessel are allowed to react with the gasifying agents in order to allow the carbon contents of the pyrolyzed coal to be completely oxidized. The combustion of gas produced from the combination of coal pyrolysis and gasification involves combining a combustible gas coal and an oxidant in a pyrolysis chamber and heating the components to a temperature of at least 1600.degree. F. The products of coal pyrolysis are dispersed from the pyrolyzer directly into the high temperature gasification region of a pressure vessel. Steam and air needed for gasification are introduced in the pressure vessel and the materials exiting the pyrolyzer flow down through the pressure vessel by gravity with sufficient residence time to allow any carbon to form carbon monoxide. Gas produced from these reactions are then released from the pressure vessel and ash is disposed of.

Sadowski, Richard S. (Greenville, SC)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Catalysts for carbon and coal gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Catalyst for the production of methane from carbon and/or coal by means of catalytic gasification. The catalyst compostion containing at least two alkali metal salts. A particulate carbonaceous substrate or carrier is used.

McKee, Douglas W. (Burnt Hills, NY); Spiro, Clifford L. (Scotia, NY); Kosky, Philip G. (Schenectady, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

ADVANCED GASIFICATION BY-PRODUCT UTILIZATION  

SciTech Connect

The results of laboratory investigations and supporting technical assessments conducted under DOE Subcontract No. DE-FG26-03NT41795 are reported for the period September 1, 2003 to August 31, 2004. This contract is with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation, which supports work with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute. The worked described was part of a project entitled ''Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization''. This work involves the development of technologies for the separation and characterization of coal gasification slags from operating gasification units, activation of these materials to increase mercury and nitrogen oxide capture efficiency, assessment of these materials as sorbents for mercury and nitrogen oxides, and characterization of these materials for use as polymer fillers.

Rodney Andrews; Aurora Rubel; Jack Groppo; Ari Geertsema; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Zhe Lu; Harold Schobert

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Production of Hydrogen from Underground Coal Gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system of obtaining hydrogen from a coal seam by providing a production well that extends into the coal seam; positioning a conduit in the production well leaving an annulus between the conduit and the coal gasification production well, the conduit having a wall; closing the annulus at the lower end to seal it from the coal gasification cavity and the syngas; providing at least a portion of the wall with a bifunctional membrane that serves the dual purpose of providing a catalyzing reaction and selectively allowing hydrogen to pass through the wall and into the annulus; and producing the hydrogen through the annulus.

Upadhye, Ravindra S. (Pleasanton, CA)

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

50

Underground coal gasification using oxygen and steam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, through model experiment of the underground coal gasification, the effects of pure oxygen gasification, oxygen-steam gasification, and moving-point gasification methods on the underground gasification process and gas quality were studied. Experiments showed that H{sub 2} and CO volume fraction in product gas during the pure oxygen gasification was 23.63-30.24% and 35.22-46.32%, respectively, with the gas heating value exceeding 11.00 MJ/m{sup 3}; under the oxygen-steam gasification, when the steam/oxygen ratio stood at 2: 1, gas compositions remained virtually stable and CO + H{sub 2} was basically between 61.66 and 71.29%. Moving-point gasification could effectively improve the changes in the cavity in the coal seams or the effects of roof inbreak on gas quality; the ratio of gas flowing quantity to oxygen supplying quantity was between 3.1:1 and 3.5:1 and took on the linear changes; on the basis of the test data, the reasons for gas quality changes under different gasification conditions were analyzed.

Yang, L.H.; Zhang, X.; Liu, S. [China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou (China)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

WABASH RIVER COAL GASIFICATION REPOWERING PROJECT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The close of 1999 marked the completion of the Demonstration Period of the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project. This Final Report summarizes the engineering and construction phases and details the learning experiences from the first four years of commercial operation that made up the Demonstration Period under Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-92MC29310. This 262 MWe project is a joint venture of Global Energy Inc. (Global acquired Destec Energy's gasification assets from Dynegy in 1999) and PSI Energy, a part of Cinergy Corp. The Joint Venture was formed to participate in the Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology (CCT) program and to demonstrate coal gasification repowering of an existing generating unit impacted by the Clean Air Act Amendments. The participants jointly developed, separately designed, constructed, own, and are now operating an integrated coal gasification combined-cycle power plant, using Global Energy's E-Gas{trademark} technology (E-Gas{trademark} is the name given to the former Destec technology developed by Dow, Destec, and Dynegy). The E-Gas{trademark} process is integrated with a new General Electric 7FA combustion turbine generator and a heat recovery steam generator in the repowering of a 1950's-vintage Westinghouse steam turbine generator using some pre-existing coal handling facilities, interconnections, and other auxiliaries. The gasification facility utilizes local high sulfur coals (up to 5.9% sulfur) and produces synthetic gas (syngas), sulfur and slag by-products. The Project has the distinction of being the largest single train coal gasification combined-cycle plant in the Western Hemisphere and is the cleanest coal-fired plant of any type in the world. The Project was the first of the CCT integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) projects to achieve commercial operation.

Unknown

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Pressure coal gasification experience in Czechoslovakia  

SciTech Connect

Czechoslovakia's large deposits of brown coal supply the country's three operating pressure gasification plants. The gas produced is suitable for further treatment to provide fuel for household and industrial consumers. Coal gasification is not new to the energy planners in Czechoslovakia. Since 1948, 56 gasifiers have been installed in the three pressure gasification plants currently in operation. The newest and biggest of these plants is at Vresova. The plant processes 5,000 tons of brown coal per day. The locally mined coal used for feed at the Vresova plant has a calorific value of 12 to 14 megajoules per kilogram (52 to 60 Btu's per pound). The gasifiers produce up to 13,000 cubic meters (459,000 cubic feet) per hour of crude gas per gasifier. Gasification technology has been under development in Czechoslovakia since 1945. The country has virtually no oil or natural gas reserves, a fact that emphasizes the importance of coal-based energy. Production of gas from coal in Czechoslovak gasifiers is based on gasification in the fixed bed of a gasifier.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Advanced Biomass Gasification Projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DOE has a major initiative under way to demonstrate two high-efficiency gasification systems for converting biomass into electricity. As this fact sheet explains, the Biomass Power Program is cost-sharing two scale-up projects with industry in Hawaii and Vermont that, if successful, will provide substantial market pull for U.S. biomass technologies, and provide a significant market edge over competing foreign technologies.

Not Available

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Coal properties and system operating parameters for underground coal gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through the model experiment for underground coal gasification, the influence of the properties for gasification agent and gasification methods on underground coal gasifier performance were studied. The results showed that pulsating gasification, to some extent, could improve gas quality, whereas steam gasification led to the production of high heating value gas. Oxygen-enriched air and backflow gasification failed to improve the quality of the outlet gas remarkably, but they could heighten the temperature of the gasifier quickly. According to the experiment data, the longitudinal average gasification rate along the direction of the channel in the gasifying seams was 1.212 m/d, with transverse average gasification rate 0.069 m/d. Experiment indicated that, for the oxygen-enriched steam gasification, when the steam/oxygen ratio was 2:1, gas compositions remained stable, with H{sub 2} + CO content virtually standing between 60% and 70% and O{sub 2} content below 0.5%. The general regularities of the development of the temperature field within the underground gasifier and the reasons for the changes of gas quality were also analyzed. The 'autopneumatolysis' and methanization reaction existing in the underground gasification process were first proposed.

Yang, L. [China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou (China)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Fluidized bed catalytic coal gasification process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal or similar carbonaceous solids impregnated with gasification catalyst constituents (16) are oxidized by contact with a gas containing between 2 volume percent and 21 volume percent oxygen at a temperature between 50.degree. C. and 250.degree. C. in an oxidation zone (24) and the resultant oxidized, catalyst impregnated solids are then gasified in a fluidized bed gasification zone (44) at an elevated pressure. The oxidation of the catalyst impregnated solids under these conditions insures that the bed density in the fluidized bed gasification zone will be relatively high even though the solids are gasified at elevated pressure and temperature.

Euker, Jr., Charles A. (15163 Dianna La., Houston, TX 77062); Wesselhoft, Robert D. (120 Caldwell, Baytown, TX 77520); Dunkleman, John J. (3704 Autumn La., Baytown, TX 77520); Aquino, Dolores C. (15142 McConn, Webster, TX 77598); Gouker, Toby R. (5413 Rocksprings Dr., LaPorte, TX 77571)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project  

SciTech Connect

The Destec gasification process features an oxygen-blown, two stage entrained flow gasifier. PSI will procure coal for the Project consistent with the design specification ranges of Destec's coal gasification facility. Destec's plant will be designed to accept coal with a maximum sulfur content of 5.9% (dry basis) and a minimum energy content of 13,5000 BTU/pound (moisture and ash free basis). PSI and Destec will test at least two other coals for significant periods during the demonstration period. In the Destec process, coal is ground with water to form a slurry. It is then pumped into a gasification vessel where oxygen is added to form a hot raw gas through partial combustion. Most of the noncarbon material in the coal melts and flows out the bottom of the vessel forming slag -- a black, glassy, non-leaching, sand-like material. Particulates, sulfur and other impurities are removed from the gas before combustion to make it acceptable fuel for the gas turbine. The synthetic fuel gas (syngas) is piped to a General Electric MS 7001F high temperature combustion turbine generator. A heat recovery steam generator recovers gas turbine exhaust heat to produce high pressure steam. This steam and the steam generated in the gasification process supply an existing steam turbine-generator. The plant will be designed to outperform air emission standards established by the Clean Air Act Amendments for the year 2000.

Amick, P.; Mann, G.J.; Cook, J.J.; Fisackerly, R.; Spears, R.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project  

SciTech Connect

The Destec gasification process features an oxygen-blown, two stage entrained flow gasifier. PSI will procure coal for the Project consistent with the design specification ranges of Destec`s coal gasification facility. Destec`s plant will be designed to accept coal with a maximum sulfur content of 5.9% (dry basis) and a minimum energy content of 13,5000 BTU/pound (moisture and ash free basis). PSI and Destec will test at least two other coals for significant periods during the demonstration period. In the Destec process, coal is ground with water to form a slurry. It is then pumped into a gasification vessel where oxygen is added to form a hot raw gas through partial combustion. Most of the noncarbon material in the coal melts and flows out the bottom of the vessel forming slag -- a black, glassy, non-leaching, sand-like material. Particulates, sulfur and other impurities are removed from the gas before combustion to make it acceptable fuel for the gas turbine. The synthetic fuel gas (syngas) is piped to a General Electric MS 7001F high temperature combustion turbine generator. A heat recovery steam generator recovers gas turbine exhaust heat to produce high pressure steam. This steam and the steam generated in the gasification process supply an existing steam turbine-generator. The plant will be designed to outperform air emission standards established by the Clean Air Act Amendments for the year 2000.

Amick, P.; Mann, G.J.; Cook, J.J.; Fisackerly, R.; Spears, R.C.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Process for fixed bed coal gasification  

SciTech Connect

The combustion of gas produced from the combination of coal pyrolysis and gasification involves combining a combustible gas coal and an oxidant in a pyrolysis chamber and heating the components to a temperature of at least 1600.degree. F. The products of coal pyrolysis are dispersed from the pyrolyzer directly into the high temperature gasification region of a pressure vessel. Steam and air needed for gasification are introduced in the pressure vessel and the materials exiting the pyrolyzer flow down through the pressure vessel by gravity with sufficient residence time to allow any carbon to form carbon monoxide. Gas produced from these reactions are then released from the pressure vessel and ash is disposed of.

Sadowski, Richard S. (Greenville, SC)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Investigation of plasma-aided bituminous coal gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents thermodynamic and kinetic modeling of plasma-aided bituminous coal gasification. Distributions of concentrations, temperatures, and velocities of the gasification products along the gasifier are calculated. Carbon gasification degree, specific power consumptions, and heat engineering characteristics of synthesis gas at the outlet of the gasifier are determined at plasma air/steam and oxygen/steam gasification of Powder River Basin bituminous coal. Numerical simulation showed that the plasma oxygen/steam gasification of coal is a more preferable process in comparison with the plasma air/steam coal gasification. On the numerical experiments, a plasma vortex fuel reformer is designed.

Matveev, I.B.; Messerle, V.E.; Ustimenko, A.B. [Applied Plasma Technology, Mclean, VA (United States)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the recent passing of new legislation designed to permanently cap and reduce mercury emissions from coal-fired utilities, it is more important than ever to develop and improve upon methods of controlling mercury emissions. One promising technique is carbon sorbent injection into the flue gas of the coal-fired power plant. Currently, this technology is very expensive as costly commercially activated carbons are used as sorbents. There is also a significant lack of understanding of the interaction between mercury vapor and the carbon sorbent, which adds to the difficulty of predicting the amount of sorbent needed for specific plant configurations. Due to its inherent porosity and adsorption properties as well as on-site availability, carbons derived from gasifiers are potential mercury sorbent candidates. Furthermore, because of the increasing restricted use of landfilling, the coal industry is very interested in finding uses for these materials as an alternative to the current disposal practice. The results of laboratory investigations and supporting technical assessments conducted under DOE Subcontract No. DE-FG26-03NT41795 are reported for the period September 1, 2004 to August 31, 2005. This contract is with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation, which supports work with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute. The worked described was part of a project entitled ''Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization''. This work involves the development of technologies for the separation and characterization of coal gasification slags from operating gasification units, activation of these materials to increase mercury and nitrogen oxide capture efficiency, assessment of these materials as sorbents for mercury and nitrogen oxides, and characterization of these materials for use as polymer fillers.

Rodney Andrews; Aurora Rubel; Jack Groppo; Ari Geertsema; Frank Huggins; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Brandie M. Markley; Harold Schobert

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced coal gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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61

Apparatus and method for solar coal gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for using focused solar radiation to gasify coal and other carbonaceous materials. Incident solar radiation is focused from an array of heliostats onto a tower-mounted secondary mirror which redirects the focused solar radiation down through a window onto the surface of a vertically-moving bed of coal, or a fluidized bed of coal, contained within a gasification reactor. The reactor is designed to minimize contact between the window and solids in the reactor. Steam introduced into the gasification reactor reacts with the heated coal to produce gas consisting mainly of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, commonly called "synthesis gas", which can be converted to methane, methanol, gasoline, and other useful products. One of the novel features of the invention is the generation of process steam at the rear surface of the secondary mirror.

Gregg, David W. (Moraga, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

HYDROGENOLYSIS OF A SUB-BITUMINOUS COAL WITH MOLTEN ZINC CHLORIDE SOLUTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Liquefaction and Gasification of Western Coals", in5272 (1976). COal Processing - Gasification, Liguefaction,or gaseous fuels, coal gasification has advanced furthest

Holten, R.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

application (coal gasification, coal combustion followed byversions of advanced gasification processes show promise ofFixed-Bed Low-Btu Coal Gasification Systems for Retrofitting

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Coal gasification apparatus. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal hydrogenation vessel has hydrogen heating passages extending vertically through its wall and opening into its interior.

Nagy, C.K.

1981-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

65

Coal gasification players, projects, prospects  

SciTech Connect

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology has been running refineries and chemical plants for decades. Power applications have dotted the globe. Two major IGCC demonstration plants operating in the United States since the mid-1900s have helped set the stage for prime time, which is now approaching. Two major reference plant designs are in the wings and at least two major US utilities are poised to build their own IGCC power plants. 2 figs.

Blankinship, S.

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project: A DOE Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Program (CCT) is to furnish the energy marketplace with a number of advanced, more efficient, and environmentally responsible coal utilization technologies through demonstration projects. These projects seek to establish the commercial feasibility of the most promising advanced coal technologies that have developed beyond the proof-of-concept stage. This document serves as a DOE post-project assessment (PPA) of a project selected in CCT Round IV, the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering (WRCGR) Project, as described in a Report to Congress (U.S. Department of Energy 1992). Repowering consists of replacing an existing coal-fired boiler with one or more clean coal technologies to achieve significantly improved environmental performance. The desire to demonstrate utility repowering with a two-stage, pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow, integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) system prompted Destec Energy, Inc., and PSI Energy, Inc., to form a joint venture and submit a proposal for this project. In July 1992, the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project Joint Venture (WRCGRPJV, the Participant) entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to conduct this project. The project was sited at PSI Energy's Wabash River Generating Station, located in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The purpose of this CCT project was to demonstrate IGCC repowering using a Destec gasifier and to assess long-term reliability, availability, and maintainability of the system at a fully commercial scale. DOE provided 50 percent of the total project funding (for capital and operating costs during the demonstration period) of $438 million.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

The Great Plains coal gasification project status  

SciTech Connect

The Great Plains Gasification Project is the first commercial-sized plant to produce substitute natural gas from coal in the United States. The plant is designed to convert 14,000 tons/D of North Dakota lignite into 137.5 million standard cubic feet of gas per day. The plant construction has been successfully completed per original design, on schedule and on budget. The plant has also been successfully turned over from construction to operations, as per the original plan. With the completion of the capital projects being implemented at the plant, plans are to achieve 70 percent stream factor in the first year of production (1985). The DOE-Chicago Operations Office has been assigned the responsibility for monitoring the project's performance against baselines of cost, schedule, and technical criteria. During the startup phase of the project, significant technological advancements have been made and considerable knowledge has been gained, both by the operators and DOE (considering this to be a first of a kind plant built in the U.S.).

Bodnaruk, B.J.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Underground Coal Gasification at Tennessee Colony  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Tennessee Colony In Situ Coal Gasification Project conducted by Basic Resources Inc. is the most recent step in Texas Utilities Company's ongoing research into the utilization of Texas lignite. The project, an application of the Soviet technology which was acquired under a license agreement in 1975, is a continuation of the field testing program to examine the feasibility of in situ lignite gasification in Texas which began with a 27-day test burn at a site near Fairfield in August of 1976. The objectives of the Tennessee Colony Project are to examine the economic, technological and environmental aspects of a commercial project. The Project which began in August of 1978 utilizes air as the oxidizing agent and is comprised of two channels of gasification operating simultaneously. The test is presently still in progress and producing gas with a heat content in the range of 8-100 Btu.

Garrard, C. W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Fluidized bed gasification of extracted coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal or similar carbonaceous solids are extracted by contacting the solids in an extraction zone (12) with an aqueous solution having a pH above 12.0 at a temperature between 65.degree. C. and 110.degree. C. for a period of time sufficient to remove bitumens from the coal into said aqueous solution and the extracted solids are then gasified at an elevated pressure and temperature in a fluidized bed gasification zone (60) wherein the density of the fluidized bed is maintained at a value above 160 kg/m.sup.3. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, water is removed from the aqueous solution in order to redeposit the extracted bitumens onto the solids prior to the gasification step.

Aquino, Dolores C. (Houston, TX); DaPrato, Philip L. (Westfield, NJ); Gouker, Toby R. (Baton Rouge, LA); Knoer, Peter (Houston, TX)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Fluidized bed gasification of extracted coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal or similar carbonaceous solids are extracted by contacting the solids in an extraction zone with an aqueous solution having a pH above 12.0 at a temperature between 65/sup 0/C and 110/sup 0/C for a period of time sufficient to remove bitumens from the coal into said aqueous solution, and the extracted solids are then gasified at an elevated pressure and temperature in a fluidized bed gasification zone (60) wherein the density of the fluidized bed is maintained at a value above 160 kg/m/sup 3/. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, water is removed from the aqueous solution in order to redeposit the extracted bitumens onto the solids prior to the gasification step. 2 figs., 1 tab.

Aquino, D.C.; DaPrato, P.L.; Gouker, T.R.; Knoer, P.

1984-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

71

The Role of Oxygen in Coal Gasification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air Products supplies oxygen to a number of coal gasification and partial oxidation facilities worldwide. At the high operating pressures of these processes, economics favor the use of 90% and higher oxygen purities. The effect of inerts in the oxidant on gasifier and downstream production units also favor the use of oxygen in place of air. Factors that must be considered in selecting the optimum oxygen purity include: end use of the gasifier products, oxygen delivery pressure and the cost of capital and energy. This paper examines the major factors in oxygen purity selection for typical coal gasifiers. Examples demonstrating the effect of oxygen purity on several processes are presented: production of synthetic natural gas (SNG), integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power generation and methanol synthesis. The potential impact of a non-cryogenic air separation process currently under development is examined based on integration with a high temperature processes.

Klosek, J.; Smith, A. R.; Solomon, J.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Advanced development of a pressurized ash agglomerating fluidized-bed coal gasification system. Fourth quarter progress report, July 1-September 30, 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Westinghouse coal gasification program is to demonstrate the viability of the Westinghouse pressurized, fluidized bed, gasification system for the production of medium-Btu fuel gas for syngas, electrical power generation, chemical feedstocks, or industrial fuels and to obtain performance and scaleup data for the process and hardware. Technical progress summaries and reports are presented for the following tasks: (1) process development unit (PDU) test operations and results (gasifier test TP-033-1 and maintenance and modifications); (2) process analysis (environmental characterization results, coal gas combustion results, and fines elutriation and consumption results); (3) cold flow scaleup (modifications and maintenance, operations, and data analysis); (4) process and component engineering and design (hot fines recycle modifications, and hot recycled fines); (5) laboratory support studies (gas-solids flow modeling and coal/ash behavior). 23 figures, 23 tables.

None

1983-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

73

Coal gasification power plant and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an integrated coal gasification power plant, a humidifier is provided for transferring as vapor, from the aqueous blowdown liquid into relatively dry air, both (I) at least a portion of the water contained in the aqueous liquid and (II) at least a portion of the volatile hydrocarbons therein. The resulting humidified air is advantageously employed as at least a portion of the hot air and water vapor included in the blast gas supplied via a boost compressor to the gasifier.

Woodmansee, Donald E. (Schenectady, NY)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Fluidized bed injection assembly for coal gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A coaxial feed system for fluidized bed coal gasification processes including an inner tube for injecting particulate combustibles into a transport gas, an inner annulus about the inner tube for injecting an oxidizing gas, and an outer annulus about the inner annulus for transporting a fluidizing and cooling gas. The combustibles and oxidizing gas are discharged vertically upward directly into the combustion jet, and the fluidizing and cooling gas is discharged in a downward radial direction into the bed below the combustion jet.

Cherish, Peter (Bethel Park, PA); Salvador, Louis A. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

The Study of Coal Gasification by Molten Blast Furnace Slag  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2011 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Waste Heat Recovery. Presentation Title, The Study of Coal Gasification by ...

76

Advanced development of a pressurized ash agglomerating fluidized-bed coal gasification system: Topical report, Process analysis, FY 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

KRW Energy Systems, Inc., is engaged in the continuing development of a pressurized, fluidized-bed gasification process at its Waltz Mill Site in Madison, Pennsylvania. The overall objective of the program is to demonstrate the viability of the KRW process for the environmentally-acceptable production of low- and medium-Btu fuel gas from a variety of fossilized carbonaceous feedstocks and industrial fuels. This report presents process analysis of the 24 ton-per-day Process Development Unit (PDU) operations and is a continuation of the process analysis work performed in 1980 and 1981. Included is work performed on PDU process data; gasification; char-ash separation; ash agglomeration; fines carryover, recycle, and consumption; deposit formation; materials; and environmental, health, and safety issues. 63 figs., 43 tabs.

None

1987-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

Catalyzed steam gasification of low-rank coals to produce hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced coal gasification technologies using low-rank coal is a promising alternative for meeting future demand for hydrogen. Steam gasification tests conducted at temperatures between 700/sup 0/ and 800/sup 0/C and atmospheric pressure resulted in product gas compositions matching those predicted by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations, 63-65 mol% hydrogen and less than 1 mol% methane. Steam gasification tests with four low-rank coals and a single bituminous coal were performed in a laboratory-scale thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) at temperatures of 700/sup 0/, 750/sup 0/, and 800/sup 0/C to evaluate process kinetics with and without catalyst addition. Catalysts screened included K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, trona, nahcolite, sunflower hull ash, and recycled lignite ash. Uncatalyzed lignites and a subbituminous coal were found to be eight to ten times more reactive with steam at 700/sup 0/ to 800/sup 0/C than an Illinois bituminous coal. This relationship, within this narrow temperature range, is important as this is the range that thermodynamically favors the production of hydrogen from steam gasification at atmospheric pressure. The reactivity of the uncatalyzed coals increased 3 to 4 times with an increase in steam gasification temperature from 700/sup 0/ to 800/sup 0/C. For the catalyzed coals during steam gasification: Reactivity increased approximately 2 times over the 700/sup 0/ to 800/sup 0/C temperature range for low-rank coals catalyzed with potassium carbonate. Sodium carbonate was found to be as effective a catalyst as potassium carbonate for the steam gasification of low-rank coal chars on a mass loading basis; and naturally occurring mineral sources of sodium carbonates/bicarbonates, trona and nahcolite, are as effective in catalyzing low-rank coal steam gasification as the pure carbonates. 18 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Sears, R.E.; Timpe, R.C.; Galegher, S.J.; Willson, W.G.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Coal Gasification Report.indb  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Booz Allen Hamilton Booz Allen Hamilton Final Report, September 3, 2004 list of acronyms List of Acronyms AEO Annual Energy Outlook ASU Air Separation Unit BACT Best Available Control Technology BTU British Thermal Unit CCPI Clean Coal Power Initiative CFB Circulating Fluidized Bed CO Carbon Monoxide CO 2 Carbon Dioxide COE Cost of Electricity Co-Op Co-Operative CRS Congressional Research Service DG Distributed Generation

79

Method for control of subsurface coal gasification  

SciTech Connect

The burn front in an in situ underground coal gasification operation is controlled by utilizing at least two parallel groups of vertical bore holes disposed in the coalbed at spaced-apart locations in planes orthogonal to the plane of maximum permeability in the coalbed. The combustion of the coal is initiated in the coalbed adjacent to one group of the bore holes to establish a combustion zone extending across the group while the pressure of the combustion supporting gas mixture and/or the combustion products is regulated at each well head by valving to control the burn rate and maintain a uniform propagation of the burn front between the spaced-apart hole groups to gasify virtually all the coal lying therebetween.

Komar, Charles A. (Uniontown, PA)

1976-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

80

Coal gasification construction materials: an overview  

SciTech Connect

Materials performance test results are presented for two coal gasification processes, HYGAS SNG process, which converts any type of coal to substitute natural gas (SNG), and U-GAS fuel gas process, which converts coal to a low- or medium-heat value gas. A description of the pilot plant for each process and discussion of some experiences with materials and components used in plant construction is presented. Metals performance inside the gasifier reactors and in off-gas locations depended upon the character of the process. At moderate operating temperatures (427/sup 0/C), low-carbon steels are advisable. Very high-temperature environments may not only require use of exotic alloys, clads, and/or coatings but may also preclude extensive use of internal piping/valving in scale-up designs. Inconel 182, 600, and Monel 400 have all performed erratically in the plants; but in quench and purification sections, austenitic stainless steels performed well. 9 references. (BLM)

Arnold, J.M. (Inst. of Gas Tech., Chicago, IL); Laurens, R.M.; Danyluk, S.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced coal gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Integrating Coal Gasification into a Rotary Kiln Electric Furnace Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal gasification is a potential alternative to conventional coal or natural gas- fired power plants ... Fundamentals of Spark-Plasma Sintering: Net-Shaping and Size Effects ... Investigation on a Microwave High-Temperature Air Heat Exchanger.

82

CoalFleet RD&D Augmentation Plan for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced, clean coal technologies such as integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) offer societies around the world the promise of efficient, affordable power generation at markedly reduced levels of emissions8212including "greenhouse gases" linked to global climate change8212relative to today's current fleet of coal-fired power plants. To help accelerate the development, demonstration, and market introduction of IGCC and other clean coal technologies, EPRI formed the CoalFleet for Tomorrow initiati...

2007-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

83

Method for in situ gasification of a subterranean coal bed  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The method of the present invention relates to providing controlled directional bores in subterranean earth formations, especially coal beds for facilitating in situ gasification operations. Boreholes penetrating the coal beds are interconnected by laser-drilled bores disposed in various arrays at selected angles to the major permeability direction in the coal bed. These laser-drilled bores are enlarged by fracturing prior to the gasification of the coal bed to facilitate the establishing of combustion zones of selected configurations in the coal bed for maximizing the efficiency of the gasification operation.

Shuck, Lowell Z. (Morgantown, WV)

1977-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

84

How Coal Gasification Power Plants Work | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gasification » How Coal Gasification » How Coal Gasification Power Plants Work How Coal Gasification Power Plants Work How Coal Gasification Power Plants Work The heart of a gasification-based system is the gasifier. A gasifier converts hydrocarbon feedstock into gaseous components by applying heat under pressure in the presence of steam. A gasifier differs from a combustor in that the amount of air or oxygen available inside the gasifier is carefully controlled so that only a relatively small portion of the fuel burns completely. This "partial oxidation" process provides the heat. Rather than burning, most of the carbon-containing feedstock is chemically broken apart by the gasifier's heat and pressure, setting into motion chemical reactions that produce "syngas." Syngas is primarily hydrogen and carbon monoxide, but can include

85

Wabash River coal gasification repowering project: Public design report  

SciTech Connect

The Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project (the Project), conceived in October of 1990 and selected by the US Department of Energy as a Clean Coal IV demonstration project in September 1991, is expected to begin commercial operations in August of 1995. The Participants, Destec Energy, Inc., (Destec) of Houston, Texas and PSI Energy, Inc., (PSI) of Plainfield, Indiana, formed the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project Joint Venture (the JV) to participate in the DOE`s Clean Coal Technology (CCT) program by demonstrating the coal gasification repowering of an existing 1950`s vintage generating unit affected by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA). The Participants, acting through the JV, signed the Cooperative Agreement with the DOE in July 1992. The Participants jointly developed, and separately designed, constructed, own, and will operate an integrated coal gasification combined cycle (CGCC) power plant using Destec`s coal gasification technology to repower Unit {number_sign}1 at PSI`s Wabash River Generating Station located in Terre Haute, Indiana. PSI is responsible for the new power generation facilities and modification of the existing unit, while Destec is responsible for the coal gasification plant. The Project demonstrates integration of the pre-existing steam turbine generator, auxiliaries, and coal handling facilities with a new combustion turbine generator/heat recovery steam generator tandem and the coal gasification facilities.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Coal gasification for power generation. 2nd ed.  

SciTech Connect

The report gives an overview of the opportunities for coal gasification in the power generation industry. It provides a concise look at the challenges faced by coal-fired generation, the ability of coal gasification to address these challenges, and the current state of IGCC power generation. Topics covered in the report include: An overview of coal generation including its history, the current market environment, and the status of coal gasification; A description of gasification technology including processes and systems; An analysis of the key business factors that are driving increased interest in coal gasification; An analysis of the barriers that are hindering the implementation of coal gasification projects; A discussion of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology; An evaluation of IGCC versus other generation technologies; A discussion of IGCC project development options; A discussion of the key government initiatives supporting IGCC development; Profiles of the key gasification technology companies participating in the IGCC market; and A description of existing and planned coal IGCC projects.

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Coal/Biomass Gasification at the Colorado School of Mines  

SciTech Connect

This program was a 2.5 year effort focused on technologies that support coal and biomass gasification. Two primary tasks were included in the effort: 1) Coal/Biomass gasification and system optimization and 2) development of high temperature microchannel ceramic heat exchangers.

Terry Parker; Robert Braun; Chris Dreyer; Anthony Dean; Mark Eberhart; Robert Kee; Jason Porter; Ivar Reimanis; Nigel Sammes

2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

88

Method for increasing steam decomposition in a coal gasification process  

SciTech Connect

The gasification of coal in the presence of steam and oxygen is significantly enhanced by introducing a thermochemical water-splitting agent such as sulfuric acid, into the gasifier for decomposing the steam to provide additional oxygen and hydrogen usable in the gasification process for the combustion of the coal and enrichment of the gaseous gasification products. The addition of the water-splitting agent into the gasifier also allows for the operation of the reactor at a lower temperature.

Wilson, Marvin W. (Fairview, WV)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Method for increasing steam decomposition in a coal gasification process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The gasification of coal in the presence of steam and oxygen is significantly enhanced by introducing a thermochemical water- splitting agent such as sulfuric acid, into the gasifier for decomposing the steam to provide additional oxygen and hydrogen usable in the gasification process for the combustion of the coal and enrichment of the gaseous gasification products. The addition of the water-splitting agent into the gasifier also allows for the operation of the reactor at a lower temperature.

Wilson, M.W.

1987-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

90

Benefits of Integrating PWR and RTI Advanced Gasification Technologies for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas Processing Systems Syngas Processing Systems Benefits of Integrating PWR and RTI Advanced Gasification Technologies for Hydrogen-Rich Syngas Production Research Triangle Institute (RTI) Project Number: FE0012066 Project Description The project will assess the potential for integrated advanced technologies to substantially reduce capital and production costs for hydrogen-rich syngas with near-zero emissions from coal gasification for power production with carbon capture and for coal-to-liquids (specifically methanol) with carbon capture. These integrated technologies include those already tested successfully at pilot-scale with a new and innovative water-gas-shift technology, to show how multiple advanced technologies will leverage each other for significant cost and efficiency gains.

91

Catalyzed steam gasification of low-rank coals to produce hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advance coal gasification technologies using low-rank coal is a promising alternative for meeting future demand for hydrogen. Steam gasification tests conducted at temperatures between 700/sup 0/ and 800/sup 0/C and atmospheric pressure resulted in product gas compositions matching those predicted by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations, 63-65 mol% hydrogen and less then 1 mol% methane. Steam gasification tests with four low-rank coals and a single bituminous coal were performed in a laboratory-scale thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) at temperatures of 700/sup 0/, 750/sup 0/, and 800/sup 0/C to evaluate process kinetics with and without catalyst addition. Catalysts screened included K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, trona, nahcolite, sunflower hull ash, and recycled lignite ash. North Dakota and Texas lignite chars were slightly more reactive than a Wyoming subbituminous coal char and eight to ten times more reactive than an Illinois bituminous coal char. Pure and mineral (trona nd nahcolite) alkali carbonates and recycled ash from K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-catalyzed steam gasification tests substantially improved low-rank coal steam gasification rates. The reactivities obtained using trona and nahcolite to catalyze the steam gasification were the highest, at nearly 3.5 times those without catalysts.

Sears, R.E.; Timpe, R.C.; Galegher, S.J.; Willson, W.G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

DIFFUSION COATINGS FOR CORROSION RESISTANT COMPONENTS IN COAL GASIFICATION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

Advanced electric power generation systems use a coal gasifier to convert coal to a gas rich in fuels such as H{sub 2} and CO. The gas stream contains impurities such as H{sub 2}S and HCl, which attack metal components of the coal gas train, causing plant downtime and increasing the cost of power generation. Corrosion-resistant coatings would improve plant availability and decrease maintenance costs, thus allowing the environmentally superior integrated gasification combined cycle plants to be more competitive with standard power-generation technologies. A startup meeting was held at the National Energy Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA site on July 28, 2003. SRI staff described the technical approach of the project.

Gopala N. Krishnan

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project Final Technical Report  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Wabash River Coal Gasification Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project Final Technical Report August 2000 Work Performed Under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-92MC29310 For: The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Morgantown, West Virginia Prepared by: The Men and Women of Wabash River Energy Ltd. For Further Information Contact: Roy A. Dowd, CHMM Environmental Supervisor Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project 444 West Sandford Avenue West Terre Haute, IN 47885 LEGAL NOTICE/DISCLAIMER This report was prepared by the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project Joint Venture pursuant to a Cooperative Agreement partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, and neither the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering

94

Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 2. Gasification of Jetson bituminous coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A single-staged, fixed-bed Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scrubber has been used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a cooperative effort by private industrial participants and governmental agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas (MIFGa) Group. This report describes the gasification testing of Jetson bituminous coal. This Western Kentucky coal was gasified during an initial 8-day and subsequent 5-day period. Material flows and compositions are reported along with material and energy balances. Operational experience is also described. 4 refs., 24 figs., 17 tabs.

Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Pooler, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittelson, D.

1985-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

Pneumatic solids feeder for coal gasification reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a pneumatic feeder system for a coal gasification reactor which includes one or more feeder tubes entering the reactor above the level of the particle bed inside the reactor. The tubes are inclined downward at their outer ends so that coal particles introduced into the tubes through an aperture at the top of the tubes slides downward away from the reactor and does not fall directly into the reactor. Pressurized gas introduced into, or resulting from ignition of recycled combustible gas in a chamber adjacent to the tube ends, propels the coal from the tube into the reactor volume and onto the particle bed. Leveling of the top of the bed is carried out by a bladed rotor mounted on the reactor stirring shaft. Coal is introduced into the tubes from containers above the tubes by means of rotary valves placed across supply conduits. This system avoids placement of feeder hardware in the plenum above the particle bed and keeps the coal from being excessively heated prior to reaching the particle bed.

Notestein, J.E.; Halow, J.S.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

96

Coal Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell System Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study analyzes the performance and economics of power generation systems based on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) technology and fueled by gasified coal. System concepts that integrate a coal gasifier with a SOFC, a gas turbine, and a steam turbine were developed and analyzed for plant sizes in excess of 200 MW. Two alternative integration configurations were selected with projected system efficiency of over 53% on a HHV basis, or about 10 percentage points higher than that of the state-of-the-art Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. The initial cost of both selected configurations was found to be comparable with the IGCC system costs at approximately $1700/kW. An absorption-based CO2 isolation scheme was developed, and its penalty on the system performance and cost was estimated to be less approximately 2.7% and $370/kW. Technology gaps and required engineering development efforts were identified and evaluated.

Chellappa Balan; Debashis Dey; Sukru-Alper Eker; Max Peter; Pavel Sokolov; Greg Wotzak

2004-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the passing of legislation designed to permanently cap and reduce mercury emissions from coal-fired utilities, it is more important than ever to develop and improve upon methods of controlling mercury emissions. One promising technique is carbon sorbent injection into the flue gas of the coal-fired power plant. Currently, this technology is very expensive as costly commercially activated carbons are used as sorbents. There is also a significant lack of understanding of the interaction between mercury vapor and the carbon sorbent, which adds to the difficulty of predicting the amount of sorbent needed for specific plant configurations. Due to its inherent porosity and adsorption properties as well as on-site availability, carbons derived from gasifiers are potential mercury sorbent candidates. Furthermore, because of the increasing restricted use of landfilling, the coal industry is very interested in finding uses for these materials as an alternative to the current disposal practice. The results of laboratory investigations and supporting technical assessments conducted under DOE Subcontract No. DE-FG26-03NT41795 are reported. This contract was with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation, which supports work with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute. The worked described was part of a project entitled ''Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization''. This work involved the development of technologies for the separation and characterization of coal gasification slags from operating gasification units, activation of these materials to increase mercury and nitrogen oxide capture efficiency, assessment of these materials as sorbents for mercury and nitrogen oxides, assessment of the potential for leaching of Hg captured by the carbons, analysis of the slags for cement applications, and characterization of these materials for use as polymer fillers. The objectives of this collaborative effort between the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute, and industry collaborators supplying gasifier char samples were to investigate the potential use of gasifier slag carbons as a source of low cost sorbent for Hg and NOX capture from combustion flue gas, concrete applications, polymer fillers and as a source of activated carbons. Primary objectives were to determine the relationship of surface area, pore size, pore size distribution, and mineral content on Hg storage of gasifier carbons and to define the site of Hg capture. The ability of gasifier slag carbon to capture NOX and the effect of NOX on Hg adsorption were goals. Secondary goals were the determination of the potential for use of the slags for cement and filler applications. Since gasifier chars have already gone through a devolatilization process in a reducing atmosphere in the gasifier, they only required to be activated to be used as activated carbons. Therefore, the principal objective of the work at PSU was to characterize and utilize gasification slag carbons for the production of activated carbons and other carbon fillers. Tests for the Hg and NOX adsorption potential of these activated gasifier carbons were performed at the CAER. During the course of this project, gasifier slag samples chemically and physically characterized at UK were supplied to PSU who also characterized the samples for sorption characteristics and independently tested for Hg-capture. At the CAER as-received slags were tested for Hg and NOX adsorption. The most promising of these were activated chemically. The PSU group applied thermal and steam activation to a representative group of the gasifier slag samples separated by particle sizes. The activated samples were tested at UK for Hg-sorption and NOX capture and the most promising Hg adsorbers were tested for Hg capture in a simulated flue gas. Both UK and PSU tested the use of the gasifier slag samples as fillers. The CAER analyzed the slags for possible use in cement applications

Rodney Andrews; Aurora Rubel; Jack Groppo; Brock Marrs; Ari Geertsema; Frank Huggins; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Brandie M. Markley; Zhe Lu; Harold Schobert

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Optimum Design of Coal Gasification Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper deals with the optimum design of heat recovery systems using the Texaco Coal Gasification Process (TCGP). TCGP uses an entrained type gasifier and produces hot gases at approximately 2500oF with high heat flux. This heat is removed by using a combination of radiant/convective waste heat boiler or by direct water quench before processing of the raw gas. The selection of an optimum heat recovery system is a function of the product slate, overall economics, and the technical risks associated with the heat recovery equipment. An extensive use of heat recovery equipment is not necessarily more economical than a simpler system with modest thermal efficiency. A full heat recovery mode consisting of radiant and convective boilers along with economizers is recommended for Coal Gasification Combined Cycle to maximize energy efficiency. A water quench mode is suggested for hydrogen production because of the need to adjust the H2O/CO ratio for shift conversion. A partial heat-recovery mode is recommended for power/methanol co-production plant. These heat recovery systems are discussed in detail along with the economics associated with each system.

Pohani, B. P.; Ray, H. P.; Wen, H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Development of an Integrated Multi-Contaminant Removal Process Applied to Warm Syngas Cleanup for Coal-Based Advanced Gasification Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project met the objective to further the development of an integrated multi-contaminant removal process in which H2S, NH3, HCl and heavy metals including Hg, As, Se and Cd present in the coal-derived syngas can be removed to specified levels in a single/integrated process step. The process supports the mission and goals of the Department of Energyâ??s Gasification Technologies Program, namely to enhance the performance of gasification systems, thus enabling U.S. industry to improve the competitiveness of gasification-based processes. The gasification program will reduce equipment costs, improve process environmental performance, and increase process reliability and flexibility. Two sulfur conversion concepts were tested in the laboratory under this project, i.e., the solventbased, high-pressure University of California Sulfur Recovery Process â?? High Pressure (UCSRP-HP) and the catalytic-based, direct oxidation (DO) section of the CrystaSulf-DO process. Each process required a polishing unit to meet the ultra-clean sulfur content goals of <50 ppbv (parts per billion by volume) as may be necessary for fuel cells or chemical production applications. UCSRP-HP was also tested for the removal of trace, non-sulfur contaminants, including ammonia, hydrogen chloride, and heavy metals. A bench-scale unit was commissioned and limited testing was performed with simulated syngas. Aspen-Plus®-based computer simulation models were prepared and the economics of the UCSRP-HP and CrystaSulf-DO processes were evaluated for a nominal 500 MWe, coal-based, IGCC power plant with carbon capture. This report covers the progress on the UCSRP-HP technology development and the CrystaSulf-DO technology.

Howard Meyer

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

100

Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project: A DOE Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Program (CCT) is to furnish the energy marketplace with a number of advanced, more efficient, and environmentally responsible coal utilization technologies through demonstration projects. These projects seek to establish the commercial feasibility of the most promising advanced coal technologies that have developed beyond the proof-of-concept stage. This document serves as a DOE post-project assessment (PPA) of a project selected in CCT Round IV, the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering (WRCGR) Project, as described in a Report to Congress (U.S. Department of Energy 1992). Repowering consists of replacing an existing coal-fired boiler with one or more clean coal technologies to achieve significantly improved environmental performance. The desire to demonstrate utility repowering with a two-stage, pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow, integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) system prompted Destec Energy, Inc., and PSI Energy, Inc., to form a joint venture and submit a proposal for this project. In July 1992, the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project Joint Venture (WRCGRPJV, the Participant) entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to conduct this project. The project was sited at PSI Energy's Wabash River Generating Station, located in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The purpose of this CCT project was to demonstrate IGCC repowering using a Destec gasifier and to assess long-term reliability, availability, and maintainability of the system at a fully commercial scale. DOE provided 50 percent of the total project funding (for capital and operating costs during the demonstration period) of $438 million. Construction for the demonstration project was started in July 1993. Pre-operational tests were initiated in August 1995, and construction was completed in November 1995. Commercial operation began in November 1995, and the demonstration period was completed in December 1999. The independent evaluation contained herein is based primarily on information provided in Wabash's Final Report (Dowd 2000), as well as other references and bibliographic sources.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced coal gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Great Plains coal gasification project - historical overview and progress  

SciTech Connect

The first commercial scale coal gasification plant in the US is nearing completion in North Dakota. The plant shares the site and other facilities with the Basin Electric Power Station. The gasification plant will draw its power directly from the Basin substation and Basin will receive coal fines from the gasification plant. (Coal fines cannot be gasified in the Lurgi units.) Planning, loan guarantee commitments, scheduling of construction, labor relations, and current situation are all briefly discussed. A table of project statistics is included.

Deeths, W.R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Cyclic flow underground coal gasification process  

SciTech Connect

The present invention is directed to a method of in situ coal gasification for providing the product gas with an enriched concentration of carbon monoxide. The method is practiced by establishing a pair of combustion zones in spaced-apart boreholes within a subterranean coal bed and then cyclically terminating the combustion in the first of the two zones to establish a forward burn in the coal bed so that while an exothermic reaction is occurring in the second combustion zone to provide CO.sub.2 -laden product gas, an endothermic CO-forming reaction is occurring in the first combustion zone between the CO.sub.2 -laden gas percolating thereinto and the hot carbon in the wall defining the first combustion zone to increase the concentration of CO in the product gas. When the endothermic reaction slows to a selected activity the roles of the combustion zones are reversed by re-establishing an exothermic combustion reaction in the first zone and terminating the combustion in the second zone.

Bissett, Larry A. (Morgantown, WV)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

LLNL Capabilities in Underground Coal Gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Underground coal gasification (UCG) has received renewed interest as a potential technology for producing hydrogen at a competitive price particularly in Europe and China. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) played a leading role in this field and continues to do so. It conducted UCG field tests in the nineteen-seventies and -eighties resulting in a number of publications culminating in a UCG model published in 1989. LLNL successfully employed the ''Controlled Retraction Injection Point'' (CRIP) method in some of the Rocky Mountain field tests near Hanna, Wyoming. This method, shown schematically in Fig.1, uses a horizontally-drilled lined injection well where the lining can be penetrated at different locations for injection of the O{sub 2}/steam mixture. The cavity in the coal seam therefore gets longer as the injection point is retracted as well as wider due to reaction of the coal wall with the hot gases. Rubble generated from the collapsing wall is an important mechanism studied by Britten and Thorsness.

Friedmann, S J; Burton, E; Upadhye, R

2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

104

CATALYTIC GASIFICATION OF COAL USING EUTECTIC SALT MIXTURES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gas Research Institute (GRI) estimates that by the year 2010, 40% or more of U.S. gas supply will be provided by supplements including substitute natural gas (SNG) from coal. These supplements must be cost competitive with other energy sources. The first generation technologies for coal gasification e.g. the Lurgi Pressure Gasification Process and the relatively newer technologies e.g. the KBW (Westinghouse) Ash Agglomerating Fluidized-Bed, U-Gas Ash Agglomerating Fluidized-Bed, British Gas Corporation/Lurgi Slagging Gasifier, Texaco Moving-Bed Gasifier, and Dow and Shell Gasification Processes, have several disadvantages. These disadvantages include high severities of gasification conditions, low methane production, high oxygen consumption, inability to handle caking coals, and unattractive economics. Another problem encountered in catalytic coal gasification is deactivation of hydroxide forms of alkali and alkaline earth metal catalysts by oxides of carbon (CO{sub x}). To seek solutions to these problems, a team consisting of Clark Atlanta University (CAU, a Historically Black College and University, HBCU), the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) and Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) proposed to identify suitable low melting eutectic salt mixtures for improved coal gasification. The research objectives of this project were to: Identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for coal gasification; Assess agglomeration tendency of catalyzed coal; Evaluate various catalyst impregnation techniques to improve initial catalyst dispersion; Determine catalyst dispersion at high carbon conversion levels; Evaluate effects of major process variables (such as temperature, system pressure, etc.) on coal gasification; Evaluate the recovery, regeneration and recycle of the spent catalysts; and Conduct an analysis and modeling of the gasification process to provide better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms and kinetics of the process.

Dr. Yaw D. Yeboah; Dr. Yong Xu; Dr. Atul Sheth; Dr. Pradeep Agrawal

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Sintering and slagging of mineral matter in South African coals during the coal gasification process.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Coals, from mines in the Highveld coalfield, as well as gasification ash samples were characterised, in order to understand the mineralogical and chemical properties… (more)

Matjie, Ratale Henry

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Study on the Nitric Compounds during Coal Gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This investigation involved the formation and evolution of NO? HCN and NH3 during coal gasification. Since HCN and NH3 are the precursors of NOX, their summation are considered to show the characteristics of the precursors in this paper. The experiments ... Keywords: gasification, NOX precursors, particle size, agent

Jun Xiang; Qingsen Zhao; Song Hu; Lushi Sun; Sheng Su; Kai Xu; Tengfei Lu; Gang Chen

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from combustion and gasification of coal – an equilibriumHolysh, M. 2005. Coke Gasification: Advanced technology forfrom a Coal-Fired Gasification Plant. Final Report, December

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

NETL: Gasification Systems - Liquid Carbon Dioxide/Coal Slurry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and storage (CCS) for future coal-based power plants, and in a CCS integrated gasification plant, relatively pure, high pressure CO2 stream(s) will be available within the...

109

NETL: Gasification Systems - Advanced CO2 Capture Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is demonstrating the technical and economic viability of a new Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant designed to efficiently process low-rank coals. The...

110

NETL: Gasification Systems - Evaluation of the Benefits of Advanced...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

economically provide feeding of low-cost, low-rank coals into commercial Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. GE is completing comparative techno-economic studies...

111

Two-stage coal gasification and desulfurization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a system which effectively integrates a two-stage, fixed-bed coal gasification arrangement with hot fuel gas desulfurization of a first stream of fuel gas from a lower stage of the two-stage gasifier and the removal of sulfur from the sulfur sorbent regeneration gas utilized in the fuel-gas desulfurization process by burning a second stream of fuel gas from the upper stage of the gasifier in a combustion device in the presence of calcium-containing material. The second stream of fuel gas is taken from above the fixed bed in the coal gasifier and is laden with ammonia, tar and sulfur values. This second stream of fuel gas is burned in the presence of excess air to provide heat energy sufficient to effect a calcium-sulfur compound forming reaction between the calcium-containing material and sulfur values carried by the regeneration gas and the second stream of fuel gas. Any ammonia values present in the fuel gas are decomposed during the combustion of the fuel gas in the combustion chamber. The substantially sulfur-free products of combustion may then be combined with the desulfurized fuel gas for providing a combustible fluid utilized for driving a prime mover. 1 fig.

Bissett, L.A.; Strickland, L.D.

1990-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

112

Coal gasification-based integrated coproduction energy facilities  

SciTech Connect

Coal gasification has been a technological reality for over a half century, being first used in great detail in Europe as an alternative to petroleum. Several projects in the US in the last decade have led to the commercial demonstration and verification of the coal gasification process. This paper reports that, in an effort to reduce the cost of electricity from an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plant, the Electric Power Research Institute embarked in a program to research, evaluate and potentially demonstrate a coal gasification-based integrated coproduction energy facility, and release an RFP in mid 1990 as Phase I of that program. Houston Lighting and Power Company responded with a proposal in its ongoing effort to study emerging technologies for electricity production. HL and P recognized the opportunities available to them in coproduction because of their close proximity to the world's largest petrochemical complex located on the Houston Ship Channel.

Baumann, P.D. (InterFact, Inc., Dallas, TX (US)); Epstein, M. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)); Kern, E.E. (Houston Lighting and Power Co., TX (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Underground coal gasification: a brief review of current status  

SciTech Connect

Coal gasification is a promising option for the future use of coal. Similarly to gasification in industrial reactors, underground coal gasification (UCG) produces syngas, which can be used for power generation or for the production of liquid hydrocarbon fuels and other valuable chemical products. As compared with conventional mining and surface gasification, UCG promises lower capital/operating costs and also has other advantages, such as no human labor underground. In addition, UCG has the potential to be linked with carbon capture and sequestration. The increasing demand for energy, depletion of oil and gas resources, and threat of global climate change lead to growing interest in UCG throughout the world. In this article, we review the current status of this technology, focusing on recent developments in various countries.

Shafirovich, E.; Varma, A. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Chemical Engineering

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Update on the Great Plains Coal Gasification Project  

SciTech Connect

The Great Plains Gasification Plant is the US's first commercial synthetic fuels project based on coal conversion. The ANG Coal Gasification Company is the administer of the Great Plains Coal Gasification Project for the United States Department of Energy. The Project is designed to convert 14 M TPD of North Dakota of lignite into 137.5 MM SCFD of pipeline quality synthetic natural gas (SNG). Located in Mercer County, North Dakota, the gasification plant, and an SNG pipeline. Some 12 years passed from the time the project was conceived unit it became a reality by producing SNG into the Northern Border pipeline in 1984 for use by millions of residential, commercial, and industrial consumers. In this paper, the basic processes utilized in the plant are presented. This is followed by a discussion of the start-up activities and schedule. Finally, some of the more interesting start-up problems are described.

Imler, D.L.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Solar coal gasification reactor with pyrolysis gas recycle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal (or other carbonaceous matter, such as biomass) is converted into a duct gas that is substantially free from hydrocarbons. The coal is fed into a solar reactor (10), and solar energy (20) is directed into the reactor onto coal char, creating a gasification front (16) and a pyrolysis front (12). A gasification zone (32) is produced well above the coal level within the reactor. A pyrolysis zone (34) is produced immediately above the coal level. Steam (18), injected into the reactor adjacent to the gasification zone (32), reacts with char to generate product gases. Solar energy supplies the energy for the endothermic steam-char reaction. The hot product gases (38) flow from the gasification zone (32) to the pyrolysis zone (34) to generate hot char. Gases (38) are withdrawn from the pyrolysis zone (34) and reinjected into the region of the reactor adjacent the gasification zone (32). This eliminates hydrocarbons in the gas by steam reformation on the hot char. The product gas (14) is withdrawn from a region of the reactor between the gasification zone (32) and the pyrolysis zone (34). The product gas will be free of tar and other hydrocarbons, and thus be suitable for use in many processes.

Aiman, William R. (Livermore, CA); Gregg, David W. (Morago, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 8. Gasification of River King Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A single-staged, fixed-bed Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scrubber has been used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a cooperative effort by private industrial participants and governmental agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas (MIFGa) Group. This report is the eighth volume in a series of reports describing the atmospheric pressure, fixed-bed gasification of US coals. This specific report describes the gasification of River King Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal. The period of gasification test was July 28 to August 19, 1983. 6 refs., 23 figs., 25 tabs.

Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Pooler, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittelson, D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

CATALYTIC GASIFICATION OF COAL USING EUTECTIC SALT MIXTURES  

SciTech Connect

This is the progress report for the DOE grant DE-FG26-97FT97263 entitled, ''Catalytic Gasification of Coal Using Eutectic Salt Mixtures'' for the period April 1999 to October 1999. The project is being conducted jointly by Clark Atlanta University, the University of Tennessee Space Institute and Georgia Institute of Technology. The overall objectives of the project are to identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for coal gasification; assess agglomeration tendency of catalyzed coal; evaluate various catalyst impregnation techniques to improve initial catalyst dispersion; evaluate effects of major process variables (such as temperature and system pressure) on coal gasification; evaluate the recovery, regeneration and recycle of the spent catalysts; and conduct thorough analysis and modeling of the gasification process to provide better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms and kinetics of the process. During this reporting period, free swelling index measurements of the coal, fixed-bed gasification experiments, kinetic modeling of the catalyzed gasification, and X-ray diffraction analysis of catalyst and gasified char samples were undertaken. The gasification experiments were carried out using two different eutectic salt mixtures of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} (LNK) system and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} (NK) system. The gasification process followed a Langmuir-Hinshelwood type model. At 10 wt% of catalyst loading, the activation energy of the ternary catalyst system (LNK) was about half (98kJ/mol) the activation energy of the single catalyst system (K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}), which is about 170 kJ/ mole. The binary catalyst system (NK) showed activation energy of about 201 kJ/mol, which is slightly higher, compared to the K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} catalyst system. The ternary catalyst system was a much better eutectic catalyst system compared to the binary or single catalyst system. In general, a eutectic with a melting point less than the gasification temperature is a better substitute to the single alkali metal salts because they have good catalyst distribution and dispersion in the carbon matrix. The free selling index of the coal was about 1.5 (1 to 2) in comparison to 2.5 (2 to 3) for the coal samples with ternary eutectic. The results for the raw coal were consistent with those from the Penn State Coal Bank. The XRD characterization showed unidentified peaks in the spectra of some of the samples and require further studies to draw any conclusions at the point.

NONE

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

NETL: Gasification Systems - Evaluation of the Benefits of Advanced Dry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feed Systems Feed Systems Evaluation of the Benefits of Advanced Dry Feed System for Low Rank Coal Project Number: DE-FE0007902 General Electric Company (GE) is evaluating and demonstrating the benefits of novel dry feed technologies to effectively, reliably, and economically provide feeding of low-cost, low-rank coals into commercial Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. GE is completing comparative techno-economic studies of two IGCC power plant cases, one without and one with advanced dry feed technologies. A common basis of design is being developed so that overall assumptions and methodologies are common in the two cases for both technical and economic areas. The baseline case, without advanced dry feed technologies, will use operational data from the Eastman Chemical Company Kingsport gasification facility in combination with DOE/NETL's Cost and Performance Baseline Low-Rank Coal to Electricity IGCC study for both cost and performance comparisons. Advanced dry feed technologies, based upon the Posimetric® pump currently under development by GE, will be developed to match the proposed plant conditions and configuration, and will be analyzed to provide comparative performance and cost information to the baseline plant case. The scope of this analysis will cover the feed system from the raw coal silo up to, and including, the gasifier injector. Test data from previous and current testing will be summarized in a report to support the assumptions used to evaluate the advanced technologies and the potential value for future applications. This study focuses primarily on IGCC systems with 90 percent carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS), but the dry feed system will be applicable to all IGCC power generating plants, as well as other industries requiring pressurized syngas.

119

Mass Balance Results for Pricetown I Underground Coal Gasification  

SciTech Connect

A mass balance model was applied to the Pricetown I test data. This model gave the values of various parameters such as water influx, percent devolatilization, percent gasification, amount of coal affected, thermal efficiency, etc., for the various phases of the test. Both hourly and daily values of the test data were used. At certain times, there was air loss to the coal seam or air gain from the coal seam as related to the underground reactor. Mass balances are modified accordingly. Realistic pyrolysis temperatures have been chosen for the different phases of the test based on the thermocouple responses. The nitrogen and argon balances gave similar results. The mass balance results showed that approximately 702 tons of coal was affected during the test. Approximately 232 tons of coal was completely gasified. The reverse combustion linkage through the virgin coal seam was dominated by the devolatilization and accounted for approximately 80% devoltilization whereas the same accounted for only 26% devolatilization during the gasification phase. During the enhanced linkage phase, the percent devolatilization ranged between that observed for the RCL and gasification phase. There was net influx of water and amounted to 0.59 barrels per ton of coal affected. The percent energy recovery for the gasification phase was 72% based on gas chromatographic data, and accounting the sensible heat of the gas and the latent heat of the water vapor in the gas.

Agarwal, A. K.; Seabaugh, P. W.; Zielinski, R. E.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Coal Power Technology Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Gasification Technologies contacts Gary J. stiegel Gasification Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4499 gary.stiegel@netl.doe.gov Ronald Breault Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4486 ronald.breault@netl.doe.gov Herbert E. andrus, Jr. Principal Investigator ALSTOM Power 2000 Day Hill Rd. Windsor, CT 06095 860-285-4770 herbert.e.andrus@power.alstom.com Hybrid Combustion-GasifiCation CHemiCal loopinG Coal power teCHnoloGy development Description Gasification technologies can provide a stable, affordable energy supply for the nation, while also providing high efficiencies and near zero pollutants. With coal

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121

Gasification CFD Modeling for Advanced Power Plant Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we have described recent progress on developing CFD models for two commercial-scale gasifiers, including a two-stage, coal slurry-fed, oxygen-blown, pressurized, entrained-flow gasifier and a scaled-up design of the PSDF transport gasifier. Also highlighted was NETL’s Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator for coupling high-fidelity equipment models with process simulation for the design, analysis, and optimization of advanced power plants. Using APECS, we have coupled the entrained-flow gasifier CFD model into a coal-fired, gasification-based FutureGen power and hydrogen production plant. The results for the FutureGen co-simulation illustrate how the APECS technology can help engineers better understand and optimize gasifier fluid dynamics and related phenomena that impact overall power plant performance.

Zitney, S.E.; Guenther, C.P.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Analysis of Biomass/Coal Co-Gasification for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems with Carbon Capture.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In recent years, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Technology (IGCC) has become more common in clean coal power operations with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS).… (more)

Long, Henry A, III

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Development of Computational Approaches for Simulation and Advanced Controls for Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computational Approaches Computational Approaches for Simulation and Advanced Controls for Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Background The United States Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) develops affordable and clean energy from coal and other fossil fuels to secure a sustainable energy economy. To further this mission, NETL funds research and development of advanced control technologies, including chemical looping (CL)

124

Thermogravimetric Study of Effect of Mineral Content and Maceral Composition on Illinois Coal Gasification.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The effects of mineral and maceral composition on Illinois coal gasification were studied by thermogravimetric analysis and semi-batch reactor. Macerals were separated from coal samples.… (more)

Zhang, Quan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

NETL: News Release - Tax Credit Program Promotes Advanced Coal Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

December 5, 2007 December 5, 2007 Tax Credit Program Promotes Advanced Coal Power Generation and Gasification Technologies DOE Will Assist Internal Revenue Service in Project Selection WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is partnering with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to evaluate five projects that have recently applied for tax credits under the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005). Accepted projects will help bring about rapid deployment of advanced coal-based power generation and gasification technologies and enable the clean and efficient use of coal, America's most abundant energy resource. In June 2007, the Treasury Department and DOE released revised guidance on the procedures for awarding the tax credits authorized under EPAct 2005 for qualifying advanced coal projects and qualifying gasification projects. Under the revised guidance, applications for DOE certification received before October 31, 2007, will be acted on in 2008.

126

CATALYTIC GASIFICATION OF COAL USING EUTECTIC SALT MIXTURES  

SciTech Connect

This progress report on the Department of Energy project DE-FG-97FT97263 entitled, ''Catalytic Gasification of Coal Using Eutectic Salt Mixtures'', covers the period April-September 1998. The specific aims of the project for this period were to identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for the gasification of Illinois No.6 coal, evaluate various impregnation or catalyst addition methods to improve catalyst dispersion, and evaluate gasification performance in a bench-scale fixed bed reactor. The project is being conducted jointly by Clark Atlanta University (CAU), the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) and the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) with CAU as the prime contractor. Several single salt catalysts and binary and ternary eutectic catalysts were investigated at Clark Atlanta University. Physical mixing and incipient wetness methods were investigated as catalyst addition techniques. Gasification was carried out using TGA at CAU and UTSI and with a fixed-bed reactor at UTSI. The results showed better gasification activity in the presence of the catalysts tested. The eutectic salt studies showed clear agreement between the melting points of the prepared eutectics and reported literature values. The order of catalytic activity observed was ternary > binary > single salt. With the soluble single salt catalysts, the incipient wetness method was found to give better results than physical mixing technique. Also, catalyst preparation conditions such as catalyst loading, drying time and temperature were found to influence the gasification rate. Based on the Clark Atlanta University studies on Task 1, the project team selected the 43.5%Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-31.5%Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-25%K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} ternary eutectic and the 29%Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-71%K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and 2.3% KNO{sub 3}-97.7%K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} binary eutectic for the fixed bed studies at UTSI. The eutectic salts were found to be highly insoluble in aqueous medium. As a result the technique of adding the eutectic to the raw coal was found to be better than using wet methods. Also, addition of the catalyst to the raw coal appeared to give better gasification results than addition to pyrolyzed coal. In addition, eutectic catalysts added to the coal yielded better gasification rates than rates obtained by mixing the individual salts in the eutectic ratio with the coal. These results, especially with the eutectic catalysts are very significant since the use of the low melting eutectics will reduce the severity of gasification processes.

NONE

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

CATALYTIC GASIFICATION OF COAL USING EUTECTIC SALT MIXTURES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This progress report on the Department of Energy project DE-FG-97FT97263 entitled, ''Catalytic Gasification of Coal Using Eutectic Salt Mixtures,'' covers the period April-September 1998. The specific aims of the project for this period were to identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for the gasification of Illinois No.6 coal, evaluate various impregnation or catalyst addition methods to improve catalyst dispersion, and evaluate gasification performance in a bench-scale fixed bed reactor. The project is being conducted jointly by Clark Atlanta University (CAU), the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) and the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) with CAU as the prime contractor. Several single salt catalysts and binary and ternary eutectic catalysts were investigated at Clark Atlanta University. Physical mixing and incipient wetness methods were investigated as catalyst addition techniques. Gasification was carried out using TGA at CAU and UTSI and with a fixed-bed reactor at UTSI. The results showed better gasification activity in the presence of the catalysts tested. The eutectic salt studies showed clear agreement between the melting points of the prepared eutectics and reported literature values. The order of catalytic activity observed was ternary > binary > single salt. With the soluble single salt catalysts, the incipient wetness method was found to give better results than physical mixing technique. Also, catalyst preparation conditions such as catalyst loading, drying time and temperature were found to influence the gasification rate. Based on the Clark Atlanta University studies on Task 1, the project team selected the 43.5%Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-31.5%Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-25%K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} ternary eutectic and the 29%Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-71%K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and 2.3%KNO{sub 3}-97.7%K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} binary eutectic for the fixed bed studies at UTSI. The eutectic salts were found to be highly insoluble in aqueous medium. As a result the technique of adding the eutectic to the raw coal was found to be better than using wet methods. Also, addition of the catalyst to the raw coal appeared to give better gasification results than addition to pyrolyzed coal. In addition, eutectic catalysts added to the coal yielded better gasification rates than rates obtained by mixing the individual salts in the eutectic ratio with the coal. These results, especially with the eutectic catalysts are very significant since the use of the low melting eutectics will reduce the severity of gasification processes.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

CATALYTIC GASIFICATION OF COAL USING EUTECTIC SALT MIXTURES  

SciTech Connect

The project, ''Catalytic Gasification of Coal Using Eutectic Salt Mixtures'', is being conducted jointly by Clark Atlanta University (CAU), the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) and the Georgia Institute of Technology (GT). The aims of the project are to: identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for the gasification of Illinois No.6 coal; evaluate various impregnation or catalyst addition methods to improve catalyst dispersion; evaluate effects of major process variables (e.g., temperature, system pressure, etc.) on coal gasification; evaluate the recovery, regeneration and recycle of the spent catalysts in a bench-scale fixed bed reactor; and conduct thorough analysis and modeling of the gasification process to provide a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms and kinetics of the process. The eutectic catalysts increased gasification rate significantly. The methods of catalyst preparation and addition had significant effect on the catalytic activity and coal gasification. The incipient wetness method gave more uniform catalyst distribution than that of physical mixing for the soluble catalysts resulting in higher gasification rates for the incipient wetness samples. The catalytic activity increased by varying degrees with catalyst loading. The above results are especially important since the eutectic catalysts (with low melting points) yield significant gasification rates even at low temperatures. Among the ternary eutectic catalysts studied, the system 39% Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-38.5% Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-22.5% Rb{sub 2}CO{sub 3} showed the best activity and will be used for further bench scale fixed-bed gasification reactor in the next period. Based on the Clark Atlanta University studies in the previous reporting period, the project team selected the 43.5% Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-31.5% Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-25% K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} ternary eutectic and the 29% Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-71% K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} binary eutectic for the fixed-bed studies at UTSI during this reporting period. Temperature was found to have a significant effect on the rate of gasification of coal. The rate of gasification increased up to 1400 F. Pressure did not have much effect on the gasification rates. The catalyst loading increased the gasification rate and approached complete conversion when 10 wt% of catalyst was added to the coal. Upon further increasing the catalyst amount to 20-wt% and above, there was no significant rise in gasification rate. The rate of gasification was lower for a 2:1 steam to char molar ratio (60%) compared to gasification rates at 3.4:1 molar ratio of steam-to-char where the conversion approached 100%. The characterization results of Georgia Tech are very preliminary and inconclusive and will be made available in the next report.

Unknown

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Steam-injected gas turbines uneconomical with coal gasification equipment  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at the Electric Power Research Institute conducted a series of engineering and economic studies to assess the possibility of substituting steam-injected gas (STIG) turbines for the gas turbines currently proposed for use in British Gas Corporation (BGC)/Lurgi coal gasification-combined cycle plants. The study sought to determine whether steam-injected gas turbines and intercooled steam-injected gas turbines, as proposed by General Electric would be economically competitive with conventional gas and steam turbines when integrated with coal gasification equipment. The results are tabulated in the paper.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Advanced High-Temperature, High-Pressure Transport Reactor Gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Coal and Environmental Systems has as its mission to develop advanced gasification-based technologies for affordable, efficient, zero-emission power generation. These advanced power systems, which are expected to produce near-zero pollutants, are an integral part of DOE's Vision 21 Program. DOE has also been developing advanced gasification systems that lower the capital and operating costs of producing syngas for chemical production. A transport reactor has shown potential to be a low-cost syngas producer compared to other gasification systems since its high-throughput-per-unit cross-sectional area reduces capital costs. This work directly supports the Power Systems Development Facility utilizing the KBR transport reactor located at the Southern Company Services Wilsonville, Alabama, site. Over 2800 hours of operation on 11 different coals ranging from bituminous to lignite along with a petroleum coke has been completed to date in the pilot-scale transport reactor development unit (TRDU) at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). The EERC has established an extensive database on the operation of these various fuels in both air-blown and oxygen-blown modes utilizing a pilot-scale transport reactor gasifier. This database has been useful in determining the effectiveness of design changes on an advanced transport reactor gasifier and for determining the performance of various feedstocks in a transport reactor. The effects of different fuel types on both gasifier performance and the operation of the hot-gas filter system have been determined. It has been demonstrated that corrected fuel gas heating values ranging from 90 to 130 Btu/scf have been achieved in air-blown mode, while heating values up to 230 Btu/scf on a dry basis have been achieved in oxygen-blown mode. Carbon conversions up to 95% have also been obtained and are highly dependent on the oxygen-coal ratio. Higher-reactivity (low-rank) coals appear to perform better in a transport reactor than the less reactive bituminous coals. Factors that affect TRDU product gas quality appear to be coal type, temperature, and air/coal ratios. Testing with a higher-ash, high-moisture, low-rank coal from the Red Hills Mine of the Mississippi Lignite Mining Company has recently been completed. Testing with the lignite coal generated a fuel gas with acceptable heating value and a high carbon conversion, although some drying of the high-moisture lignite was required before coal-feeding problems were resolved. No ash deposition or bed material agglomeration issues were encountered with this fuel. In order to better understand the coal devolatilization and cracking chemistry occurring in the riser of the transport reactor, gas and solid sampling directly from the riser and the filter outlet has been accomplished. This was done using a baseline Powder River Basin subbituminous coal from the Peabody Energy North Antelope Rochelle Mine near Gillette, Wyoming.

Michael Swanson; Daniel Laudal

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

131

Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 17. Gasification and liquids recovery of four US coals  

SciTech Connect

A single-staged, fixed-bed Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scrubber has been used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a cooperative effort by private industrial participants and government agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas (MIFGa) group. This report is the seventeenth in a series of reports describing the atmospheric pressure, fixed-bed gasification of US coals. This report describes the gasification and pyrolysis liquids recovery test for four different coals: Illinois No. 6, SUFCO, Indianhead lignite, and Hiawatha. This test series spanned from July 15, 1985, through July 28, 1985. 4 refs., 16 figs., 19 tabs.

Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Pooler, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittelson, D.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Novel approach to coal gasification using chemically incorporated catalysts (Phase II). Final report, May 1978-June 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since 1974, Battelle has been developing a catalytic treatment process that would allow more economic, efficient and reliable utilization of the vast deposits of eastern coals in gasification systems. In order to keep the process simple and economic, a disposable catalyst lime (CaO), was employed. It was found that the effectiveness of low concentrations of CaO was greatly increased by thorough incorporation into the coal. As a result of these efforts, a catalytic treatment system has been developed that promises to allow simplifications and improvements in existing commercial gasification processes as well as advanced gasification systems. One gasification system that appears exceptionally attractive utilizing the treatment system is direct fluid-bed hydrogasification or hydropyrolysis. A simple pressurized fluid-bed steam/oxygen gasification system is also an attractive option which could be commercialized quickly. Data generated under this program demonstrated the technical and economic advantages of these approaches.

Feldmann, H.F.; Conkle, H.N.; Appelbaum, H.R.; Chauhan, S.P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Catalytic Gasification of Coal using Eutectic Salt Mixtures  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this study are to: identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for coal gasification; assess agglomeration tendency of catalyzed coal; evaluate various catalyst impregnation techniques to improve initial catalyst dispersion; evaluate effects of major process variables (such as temperature, system pressure, etc.) on coal gasification; evaluate the recovery, regeneration and recycle of the spent catalysts; and conduct an analysis and modeling of the gasification process to provide better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms and kinetics of the process. A review of the collected literature was carried out. The catalysts which have been used for gasification can be roughly classified under the following five groups: alkali metal salts; alkaline earth metal oxides and salts; mineral substances or ash in coal; transition metals and their oxides and salts; and eutectic salt mixtures. Studies involving the use of gasification catalysts have been conducted. However, most of the studies focused on the application of individual catalysts. Only two publications have reported the study of gasification of coal char in CO2 and steam catalyzed by eutectic salt mixture catalysts. By using the eutectic mixtures of salts that show good activity as individual compounds, the gasification temperature can be reduced possibly with still better activity and gasification rates due to improved dispersion of the molten catalyst on the coal particles. For similar metal/carbon atomic ratios, eutectic catalysts were found to be consistently more active than their respective single salts. But the exact roles that the eutectic salt mixtures play in these are not well understood and details of the mechanisms remain unclear. The effects of the surface property of coals and the application methods of eutectic salt mixture catalysts with coal chars on the reactivity of gasification will be studied. Based on our preliminary evaluation of the literature, a ternary eutectic salt mixture consisting of Li- Na- and K- carbonates has the potential as gasification catalyst. To verify the literature reported, melting points for various compositions consisting of these three salts and the temperature range over which the mixture remained molten were determined in the lab. For mixtures with different concentrations of the three salts, the temperatures at which the mixtures were found to be in complete molten state were recorded. By increasing the amount of Li2CO3, the melting temperature range was reduced significantly. In the literature, the eutectic mixtures of Li- Na- and K-carbonates are claimed to have a lower activation energy than that of K2CO3 alone and they remain molten at a lower temperature than pure K2CO3. The slow increase in the gasification rates with eutectics reported in the literature is believed to be due to a gradual penetration of the coals and coal char particles by the molten and viscous catalyst phase. The even spreading of the salt phase seems to increase the overall carbon conversion rate. In the next reporting period, a number of eutectic salts and methods of their application on the coal will be identified and tested.

Atul Sheth; Pradeep Agrawal; Yaw D. Yeboah

1998-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

134

Modeling of contaminant transport in underground coal gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to study and discuss the impact of contaminants produced from underground coal gasification on groundwater, a coupled seepage-thermodynamics-transport model for underground gasification was developed on the basis of mass and energy conservation and pollutant-transport mechanisms, the mathematical model was solved by the upstream weighted multisell balance method, and the model was calibrated and verified against the experimental site data. The experiment showed that because of the effects of temperature on the surrounding rock of the gasification panel the measured pore-water-pressure was higher than the simulated one; except for in the high temperature zone where the simulation errors of temperature, pore water pressure, and contaminant concentration were relatively high, the simulation values of the overall gasification panel were well fitted with the measured values. As the gasification experiment progressed, the influence range of temperature field expanded, the gradient of groundwater pressure decreased, and the migration velocity of pollutant increased. Eleven months and twenty months after the test, the differences between maximum and minimum water pressure were 2.4 and 1.8 MPa, respectively, and the migration velocities of contaminants were 0.24-0.38 m/d and 0.27-0.46 m/d, respectively. It was concluded that the numerical simulation of the transport process for pollutants from underground coal gasification was valid. 42 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

Lanhe Yang; Xing Zhang [China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou (China). College of Resources and Geosciences

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Coal Technology Program Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration A DOE Assessment DOENETL-20051217 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy National Energy...

136

Potential of the heat pipe in coal gasification processes  

SciTech Connect

The declining production of natural gas in the United States has provided great impetus to the development of economcal methods of producing methane from coal. Coal gasification systems share in common a need for highly efficient heat transfer and energy recovery methods in order to maximize the coal-methane conversion efficiency. Characteristics of heat pipe heat transfer units that offer potential for increasing conversion efficiency and/or reducing production costs include: (1) complete physical separation of process streams, (2) capability of handling more than two process streams in a single unit, (3) heat removal at near-constant temperature, (4) high heat recovery efficiency, (5) low operating cost-with no requirement for auxiliary power, and (6) relative ease of cleaning. Design concepts incorporating heat pipes into indirect coal gasification units, methanators, and energy recovery units are presented and technological impediments that must be surmounted in the successful development of these units are discussed.

Ranken, W.A.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Exxon Catalytic Coal Gasification Process Predevelopment Program. Final project report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of work conducted on Predevelopment Research for the Exxon Catalytic Coal Gasification Process. The eighteen-month effort (July 1976-December 1977) was a coordinated program which included operation of a continuous fluidized-bed gasifier, parallel bench-scale research, and engineering studies leading to the preparation of a commercial-scale plant study design and economics for producing SNG from Illinois coal.

Kalina, T.; Nahas, N.C.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Gasification of New Zealand coals: a comparative simulation study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to conduct a preliminary feasibility assessment of gasification of New Zealand (NZ) lignite and sub-bituminous coals, using a commercial simulation tool. Gasification of these coals was simulated in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) application and associated preliminary economics compared. A simple method of coal characterization was developed for simulation purposes. The carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen content of the coal was represented by a three component vapor solid system of carbon, methane, and water, the composition of which was derived from proximate analysis data on fixed carbon and volatile matter, and the gross calorific value, both on a dry, ash free basis. The gasification process was modeled using Gibb's free energy minimization. Data from the U.S. Department of Energy's Shell Gasifier base cases using Illinios No. 6 coal was used to verify both the gasifier and the IGCC flowsheet models. The H:C and O:C ratios of the NZ coals were adjusted until the simulated gasifier output composition and temperature matched the values with the base case. The IGCC power output and other key operating variables such as gas turbine inlet and exhaust temperatures were kept constant for study of comparative economics. The results indicated that 16% more lignite than sub-bituminous coal was required. This translated into the requirement of a larger gasifier and air separation unit, but smaller gas and steam turbines were required. The gasifier was the largest sole contributor (30%) to the estimated capital cost of the IGCC plant. The overall cost differential associated with the processing of lignite versus processing sub-bituminous coal was estimated to be of the order of NZ $0.8/tonne. 13 refs., 9 tabs.

Smitha V. Nathen; Robert D. Kirkpatrick; Brent R. Young [University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand). Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

Separating hydrogen from coal gasification gases with alumina membranes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Synthesis gas produced in coal gasification processes contains hydrogen, along with carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, water, nitrogen, and other gases, depending on the particular gasification process. Development of membrane technology to separate the hydrogen from the raw gas at the high operating temperatures and pressures near exit gas conditions would improve the efficiency of the process. Tubular porous alumina membranes with mean pore radii ranging from about 9 to 22 {Angstrom} have been fabricated and characterized. Based on hydrostatic tests, the burst strength of the membranes ranged from 800 to 1600 psig, with a mean value of about 1300 psig. These membranes were evaluated for separating hydrogen and other gases. Tests of membrane permeabilities were made with helium, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide. Measurements were made at room temperature in the pressure range of 15 to 589 psi. Selected membranes were tested further with mixed gases simulating a coal gasification product gas. 5 refs., 7 figs.

Egan, B.Z. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Fain, D.E.; Roettger, G.E.; White, D.E. (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Southern cone energy network coal gasification for SNG production and pipeline system feasibility study (Brazil). Volume 2. Export trade information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part I of the volume reports on the coal gasification plant study performed by the Advanced Technology Division of Fluor Engineers and Constructors, Inc., together with information on coal resources and markets, gas demand, and by-product markets provided by Jaakko Poyry. Jaakko Poyry also supported the study with site, cost, economic, and other required local Brazilian data. Part II of the volume presents the results of Fluor's study of an SNG gas transport and gas distribution system. Also included are the results of an alternate study into barging coal north to a gasification plant located in the Santos area.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced coal gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Integrated coal cleaning, liquefaction, and gasification process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal is finely ground and cleaned so as to preferentially remove denser ash-containing particles along with some coal. The resulting cleaned coal portion having reduced ash content is then fed to a coal hydrogenation system for the production of desirable hydrocarbon gases and liquid products. The remaining ash-enriched coal portion is gasified to produce a synthesis gas, the ash is removed from the gasifier usually as slag, and the synthesis gas is shift converted with steam and purified to produce the high purity hydrogen needed in the coal hydrogenation system. This overall process increases the utilization of as-mined coal, reduces the problems associated with ash in the liquefaction-hydrogenation system, and permits a desirable simplification of a liquids-solids separation step otherwise required in the coal hydrogenation system.

Chervenak, Michael C. (Pennington, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Science and Technology Gaps in Underground Coal Gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Underground coal gasification (UCG) is an appropriate technology to economically access the energy resources in deep and/or unmineable coal seams and potentially to extract these reserves through production of synthetic gas (syngas) for power generation, production of synthetic liquid fuels, natural gas, or chemicals. India is a potentially good area for underground coal gasification. India has an estimated amount of about 467 billion British tons (bt) of possible reserves, nearly 66% of which is potential candidate for UCG, located at deep to intermediate depths and are low grade. Furthermore, the coal available in India is of poor quality, with very high ash content and low calorific value. Use of coal gasification has the potential to eliminate the environmental hazards associated with ash, with open pit mining and with greenhouse gas emissions if UCG is combined with re-injection of the CO{sub 2} fraction of the produced gas. With respect to carbon emissions, India's dependence on coal and its projected rapid rise in electricity demand will make it one of the world's largest CO{sub 2} producers in the near future. Underground coal gasification, with separation and reinjection of the CO{sub 2} produced by the process, is one strategy that can decouple rising electricity demand from rising greenhouse gas contributions. UCG is well suited to India's current and emerging energy demands. The syngas produced by UCG can be used to generate electricity through combined cycle. It can also be shifted chemically to produce synthetic natural gas (e.g., Great Plains Gasification Plant in North Dakota). It may also serve as a feedstock for methanol, gasoline, or diesel fuel production and even as a hydrogen supply. Currently, this technology could be deployed in both eastern and western India in highly populated areas, thus reducing overall energy demand. Most importantly, the reduced capital costs and need for better surface facilities provide a platform for rapid acceleration of coal-gas-fired electric power and other high value products. In summary, UCG has several important economic and environmental benefits relevant to India's energy goals: (1) It requires no purchase of surface gasifiers, reducing capital expense substantially. (2) It requires no ash management, since ash remains in the subsurface. (3) It reduces the cost of pollution management and emits few black-carbon particulates. (4) It greatly reduces the cost of CO2 separation for greenhouse gas management, creating the potential for carbon crediting through the Kyoto Clean Development Mechanism. (5) It greatly reduces the need to mine and transport coal, since coal is used in-situ.

Upadhye, R; Burton, E; Friedmann, J

2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

143

Coal gasification via the Lurgi process: Topical report: Volume 1, Production of SNG (substitute material gas)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Lurgi baseline study was requested by the DOE/GRI Operating Committee of the Joint Coal Gasification Program for the purpose of updating the economics of earlier Lurgi coal gasification plant studies for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) based on commercially advanced technologies. The current study incorporates the recent experience with large size Lurgi plants in an effort to improve capital and operating costs of earlier plant designs. The present coal gasification study is based on a mine mouth plant producing 250 billion Btu (HHV) per day of SNG using the Lurgi dry bottom coal gasification technology. A Western subbituminous coal was designated as the plant food, obtained from the Rosebud seam at Colstrip, Montana. This study presents the detailed description of an integrated facility which utilizes coal, air, and water to produce 250 billion Btu (HHV) per day of SNG. The plant consists of coal handling and preparation, twenty-six Lurgi dry bottom gasifiers, shift conversion, acid gas removal, methanation, compression and drying of product gas, sulfur recovery, phenol and ammonia recovery, as well as necessary support facilities. The plant is a grass roots, mine mouth facility located in a Western location similar to the town of Colstrip in Rosebud County, Montana. The Lurgi Corporation assisted in this study, under subcontract to Foster Wheeler, by supplying the heat and material balances, flow sheets, utilities, catalysts and chemical requirements, and cost data for Lurgi designed process sections. Details of material supplied by Lurgi Corporation are presented in Appendix A. 52 refs., 36 figs., 64 tabs.

Zahnstecher, L.W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Advanced Biomass Gasification Technologies Inc ABGT | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gasification Technologies Inc ABGT Gasification Technologies Inc ABGT Jump to: navigation, search Name Advanced Biomass Gasification Technologies Inc. (ABGT) Place New York, New York Zip 10036 Product Company set up by UTEK specifically for its sale to Xethanol, holding the exclusive license for microgasification technology developed at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) at the University of North Dakota. References Advanced Biomass Gasification Technologies Inc. (ABGT)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Advanced Biomass Gasification Technologies Inc. (ABGT) is a company located in New York, New York . References ↑ "Advanced Biomass Gasification Technologies Inc. (ABGT)"

145

Agglomerating combustor-gasifier method and apparatus for coal gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for gasifying coal wherein the gasification takes place in a spout fluid bed at a pressure of about 10 to 30 atmospheres and a temperature of about 1800.degree. to 2200.degree.F and wherein the configuration of the apparatus and the manner of introduction of gases for combustion and fluidization is such that agglomerated ash can be withdrawn from the bottom of the apparatus and gas containing very low dust loading is produced. The gasification reaction is self-sustaining through the burning of a stoichiometric amount of coal with air in the lower part of the apparatus to form the spout within the fluid bed. The method and apparatus are particularly suitable for gasifying coarse coal particles.

Chen, Joseph L. P. (Murrysville, PA); Archer, David H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1976-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

146

CoalFleet Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Research and Development Roadmap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an update of EPRI technical report 1013219, “CoalFleet RD&D Augmentation Plan for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plants” that was published in January 2007. The purpose of the current study is to evaluate the state of IGCC technology, gauge technology development progress made since 2007, and discuss updated estimates on the potential for advanced technologies to improve power plant performance and economics. The report consists of the following four parts: establishme...

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

147

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect

Several technology advances since the early coal-fueled turbine programs that address technical issues of coal as a turbine fuel have been developed in the early 1980s: Coal-water suspensions as fuel form, improved methods for removing ash and contaminants from coal, staged combustion for reducing NO{sub x} emissions from fuel-bound nitrogen, and greater understanding of deposition/erosion/corrosion and their control. Several Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Systems programs were awarded to gas turbine manufacturers for for components development and proof of concept tests; one of these was Allison. Tests were conducted in a subscale coal combustion facility and a full-scale facility operating a coal combustor sized to the Allison Model 501-K industrial turbine. A rich-quench-lean (RQL), low nitrogen oxide combustor design incorporating hot gas cleanup was developed for coal fuels; this should also be applicable to biomass, etc. The combustor tests showed NO{sub x} and CO emissions {le} levels for turbines operating with natural gas. Water washing of vanes from the turbine removed the deposits. Systems and economic evaluations identified two possible applications for RQL turbines: Cogeneration plants based on Allison 501-K turbine (output 3.7 MW(e), 23,000 lbs/hr steam) and combined cycle power plants based on 50 MW or larger gas turbines. Coal-fueled cogeneration plant configurations were defined and evaluated for site specific factors. A coal-fueled turbine combined cycle plant design was identified which is simple, compact, and results in lower capital cost, with comparable efficiency and low emissions relative to other coal technologies (gasification, advanced PFBC).

Wenglarz, R.A.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This program will merge significant advances made in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior. Comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors.

Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. (Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States) Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Coal Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell System Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The pre-baseline configuration for an Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell (IGFC) system has been developed. This case uses current gasification, clean-up, gas turbine, and bottoming cycle technologies together with projected large planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) technology. This pre-baseline case will be used as a basis for identifying the critical factors impacting system performance and the major technical challenges in implementing such systems. Top-level system requirements were used as the criteria to evaluate and down select alternative sub-systems. The top choice subsystems were subsequently integrated to form the pre-baseline case. The down-selected pre-baseline case includes a British Gas Lurgi (BGL) gasification and cleanup sub-system integrated with a GE Power Systems 6FA+e gas turbine and the Hybrid Power Generation Systems planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) sub-system. The overall efficiency of this system is estimated to be 43.0%. The system efficiency of the pre-baseline system provides a benchmark level for further optimization efforts in this program.

Gregory Wotzak; Chellappa Balan; Faress Rahman; Nguyen Minh

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

CoalFleet RD&D augmentation plan for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants  

SciTech Connect

To help accelerate the development, demonstration, and market introduction of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and other clean coal technologies, EPRI formed the CoalFleet for Tomorrow initiative, which facilitates collaborative research by more than 50 organizations from around the world representing power generators, equipment suppliers and engineering design and construction firms, the U.S. Department of Energy, and others. This group advised EPRI as it evaluated more than 120 coal-gasification-related research projects worldwide to identify gaps or critical-path activities where additional resources and expertise could hasten the market introduction of IGCC advances. The resulting 'IGCC RD&D Augmentation Plan' describes such opportunities and how they could be addressed, for both IGCC plants to be built in the near term (by 2012-15) and over the longer term (2015-25), when demand for new electric generating capacity is expected to soar. For the near term, EPRI recommends 19 projects that could reduce the levelized cost-of-electricity for IGCC to the level of today's conventional pulverized-coal power plants with supercritical steam conditions and state-of-the-art environmental controls. For the long term, EPRI's recommended projects could reduce the levelized cost of an IGCC plant capturing 90% of the CO{sub 2} produced from the carbon in coal (for safe storage away from the atmosphere) to the level of today's IGCC plants without CO{sub 2} capture. EPRI's CoalFleet for Tomorrow program is also preparing a companion RD&D augmentation plan for advanced-combustion-based (i.e., non-gasification) clean coal technologies (Report 1013221). 7 refs., 30 figs., 29 tabs., 4 apps.

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Method for gasification of deep, thin coal seams. [DOE patent  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of gasification of coal in deep, thin seams by using controlled bending subsidence to confine gas flow to a region close to the unconsumed coal face is given. The injection point is moved sequentially around the perimeter of a coal removal area from a production well to sweep out the area to cause the controlled bending subsidence. The injection holes are drilled vertically into the coal seam through the overburden or horizontally into the seam from an exposed coal face. The method is particularly applicable to deep, thin seams found in the eastern United States and at abandoned strip mines where thin seams were surface mined into a hillside or down a modest dip until the overburden became too thick for further mining.

Gregg, D.W.

1980-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

152

Method for gasification of deep, thin coal seams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of gasification of coal in deep, thin seams by using controlled bending subsidence to confine gas flow to a region close to the unconsumed coal face. The injection point is moved sequentially around the perimeter of a coal removal area from a production well to sweep out the area to cause the controlled bending subsidence. The injection holes are drilled vertically into the coal seam through the overburden or horizontally into the seam from an exposed coal face. The method is particularly applicable to deep, thin seams found in the eastern United States and at abandoned strip mines where thin seams were surface mined into a hillside or down a modest dip until the overburden became too thick for further mining.

Gregg, David W. (Moraga, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Combined cycle power plant incorporating coal gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combined cycle power plant incorporating a coal gasifier as the energy source. The gases leaving the coal gasifier pass through a liquid couplant heat exchanger before being used to drive a gas turbine. The exhaust gases of the gas turbine are used to generate both high pressure and low pressure steam for driving a steam turbine, before being exhausted to the atmosphere.

Liljedahl, Gregory N. (Tariffville, CT); Moffat, Bruce K. (Simsbury, CT)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Figures Figure ES-1. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Basicviii Figure 1. Advanced-Coal Wind Hybrid: Basic29 Figure 9. Sensitivity to Coal

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL GASIFICATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL GASIFICATION Final Report April 2003 Prepared for: The United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under: Contract No. DE-AM26-99FT40465 between the NETL and Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) Subcontract No. 990700362 between CTC and Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group Inc. Task 50611 DOE Task Managers: James R. Longanbach Gary J. Stiegel Parsons Project Manager: Michael D. Rutkowski Principal Investigators: Thomas L. Buchanan Michael G. Klett Ronald L. Schoff PARSONS Capital and Operating Cost of Hydrogen Production from Coal Gasification Page i April 2003 TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Title Page List of Tables iii List of Figures iii

156

Underground coal gasification field experiment in the high-dipping coal seams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article the experimental conditions and process of the underground gasification in the Woniushan Mine, Xuzhou, Jiangsu Province are introduced, and the experimental results are analyzed. By adopting the new method of long-channel, big-section, and two-stage underground coal gasification, the daily gas production reaches about 36,000 m{sup 3}, with the maximum output of 103,700 m{sup 3}. The daily average heating value of air gas is 5.04 MJ/m{sup 3}, with 13.57 MJ/m{sup 3} for water gas. In combustible compositions of water gas, H{sub 2} contents stand at over 50%, with both CO and CH{sub 4} contents over 6%. Experimental results show that the counter gasification can form new temperature conditions and increase the gasification efficiency of coal seams.

Yang, L.H.; Liu, S.Q.; Yu, L.; Zhang, W. [China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou (China). College of Resources & Geoscience

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

NETL: Gasification Systems - Low Rank Coal Optimization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Area Low Rank Coal Optimization Project No.: Adv Gas-FY131415 Task 4 NETL's in-house research team is using an integrated approach to combine theory, computational modeling,...

158

NETL: News Release -Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, 2007 7, 2007 Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Credit Applications for 2007-2008 WASHINGTON, DC - The Treasury Department and the Department of Energy (DOE) released today new instructions for applying for the tax credits for advanced coal projects and gasification projects. The new instructions provide additional time to submit applications for the credits. For the 2007-2008 allocation round, applications for DOE certification are not due to the Energy Department until October 31, 2007. "To further advance our nation's energy security, this Administration had made sustained investments in research, development, and wider use of advanced coal technologies a priority," Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell said. "Through new and innovative programs such as the Clean Coal Power Initiative and FutureGen demonstration, private sector partnerships, and use of tax credits and loan guarantees, the Department of Energy is advancing research to further develop and deploy advanced coal technologies to meet growing energy demand."

159

New Projects Set to Target Efficiency, Environmental Gains at Advanced Coal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Projects Set to Target Efficiency, Environmental Gains at Projects Set to Target Efficiency, Environmental Gains at Advanced Coal Gasification Facilities New Projects Set to Target Efficiency, Environmental Gains at Advanced Coal Gasification Facilities July 27, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- Four projects that will demonstrate an innovative technology that could eventually enhance hydrogen fuel production, lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, improve efficiencies and lower consumer electricity costs from advanced coal gasification power systems have been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The projects will test membrane technology to separate hydrogen and carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal or coal/biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas), such as from Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power systems.

160

Environmental Permitting of a Low-BTU Coal Gasification Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The high price of natural gas and fuel oil for steam/power generation has alerted industry's decision makers to potentially more economical ways to provide the needed energy. Low-Btu fuel gas produced from coal appears to be an attractive alternate that merits serious consideration since only relatively small modifications to the existing oil or gas burner system may be required, and boiler derating can be minimized. The environmental permitting and planning process for a low-Btu coal gasification facility needs to address those items that are not only unique to the gasification process itself, but also items generic to conventional firing of coal. This paper will discuss the environmental data necessary for permitting a low-Btu gasification facility located in the State of Louisiana. An actual case study for a 500,000 lb/hr natural gas-fired process steam plant being converted to low Btu gas will be presented. Typical air, water and solid waste effluents that must be considered will also be described.

Murawczyk, C.; Stewart, J. T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced coal gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Encoal mild coal gasification project: Final design modifications report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design, construction and operation Phases of the Encoal Mild Coal Gasification Project have been completed. The plant, designed to process 1,000 ton/day of subbituminous Power River Basin (PRB) low-sulfur coal feed and to produce two environmentally friendly products, a solid fuel and a liquid fuel, has been operational for nearly five years. The solid product, Process Derived Fuel (PDF), is a stable, low-sulfur, high-Btu fuel similar in composition and handling properties to bituminous coal. The liquid product, Coal Derived Liquid (CDL), is a heavy, low-sulfur, liquid fuel similar in properties to heavy industrial fuel oil. Opportunities for upgrading the CDL to higher value chemicals and fuels have been identified. Significant quantities of both PDF and CDL have been delivered and successfully burned in utility and industrial boilers. A summary of the Project is given.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Development of an advanced, continuous mild gasification process for the production of co-products (Task 1), Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

Under US DOE sponsorship, a project team consisting of the Institute of Gas Technology, Peabody Holding Company, and Bechtel Group, Inc. has been developing an advanced, mild gasification process to process all types of coal and to produce solid and condensable liquid co-products that can open new markets for coal. The three and a half year program (September 1987 to June 1991) consisted of investigations in four main areas. These areas are: (1) Literature Survey of Mild Gasification Processes, Co-Product Upgrading and Utilization, and Market Assessment; (2) Mild Gasification Technology Development: Process Research Unit Tests Using Slipstream Sampling; (3) Bench-Scale Char Upgrading Study; (4) Mild Gasification Technology Development: System Integration Studies. In this report, the literature and market assessment of mild gasification processes are discussed.

Knight, R.A.; Gissy, J.L.; Onischak, M.; Babu, S.P.; Carty, R.H. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)); Duthie, R.G. (Bechtel Group, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)); Wootten, J.M. (Peabody Holding Co., Inc., St. Louis, MO (United States))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Model-based estimation of adiabatic flame temperature during coal gasification.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coal gasification temperature distribution in the gasifier is one of the importantissues. High temperature may increase the risk of corrosion of the gasifier wall or… (more)

Sarigul, Ihsan Mert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

The ENCOAL Mild Coal Gasification Project, A DOE Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a post-project assessment of the ENCOAL{reg_sign} Mild Coal Gasification Project, which was selected under Round III of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Demonstration Program. The CCT Demonstration Program is a government and industry cofunded technology development effort to demonstrate a new generation of innovative coal utilization processes in a series of commercial-scale facilities. The ENCOAL{reg_sign} Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Bluegrass Coal Development Company (formerly SMC Mining Company), which is a subsidiary of Ziegler Coal Holding Company, submitted an application to the DOE in August 1989, soliciting joint funding of the project in the third round of the CCT Program. The project was selected by DOE in December 1989, and the Cooperative Agreement (CA) was approved in September 1990. Construction, commissioning, and start-up of the ENCOAL{reg_sign} mild coal gasification facility was completed in June 1992. In October 1994, ENCOAL{reg_sign} was granted a two-year extension of the CA with the DOE, that carried through to September 17, 1996. ENCOAL{reg_sign} was then granted a six-month, no-cost extension through March 17, 1997. Overall, DOE provided 50 percent of the total project cost of $90,664,000. ENCOAL{reg_sign} operated the 1,000-ton-per-day mild gasification demonstration plant at Triton Coal Company's Buckskin Mine near Gillette, Wyoming, for over four years. The process, using Liquids From Coal (LFC{trademark}) technology originally developed by SMC Mining Company and SGI International, utilizes low-sulfur Powder River Basin (PRB) coal to produce two new fuels, Process-Derived Fuel (PDF{trademark}) and Coal-Derived Liquids (CDL{trademark}). The products, as alternative fuel sources, are capable of significantly lowering current sulfur emissions at industrial and utility boiler sites throughout the nation thus reducing pollutants causing acid rain. In support of this overall objective, the following goals were established for the ENCOAL{reg_sign} Project: Provide sufficient quantity of products for full-scale test burns; Develop data for the design of future commercial plants; Demonstrate plant and process performance; Provide capital and O&M cost data; and Support future LFC{trademark} technology licensing efforts. Each of these goals has been met and exceeded. The plant has been in operation for nearly 5 years, during which the LFC{trademark} process has been demonstrated and refined. Fuels were made, successfully burned, and a commercial-scale plant is now under contract for design and construction.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2002-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Heat exchanger for coal gasification process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a heat exchanger, particularly useful for systems requiring cooling of hot particulate solids, such as the separated fines from the product gas of a carbonaceous material gasification system. The invention allows effective cooling of a hot particulate in a particle stream (made up of hot particulate and a gas), using gravity as the motive source of the hot particulate. In a preferred form, the invention substitutes a tube structure for the single wall tube of a heat exchanger. The tube structure comprises a tube with a core disposed within, forming a cavity between the tube and the core, and vanes in the cavity which form a flow path through which the hot particulate falls. The outside of the tube is in contact with the cooling fluid of the heat exchanger.

Blasiole, George A. (Greensburg, PA)

1984-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

166

CoalFleet Advanced Combustion IGCC Permits Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CoalFleet Advanced Combustion IGCC Permits Database presents comprehensive information on permitting requirements and permit conditions for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants in an online database format. This Technical Update is a compilation of the Database contents as of March 31, 2008.

2008-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

167

NETL: C&CBTL - Investigation of Coal-Biomass Catalytic Gasification Using  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification Coal/Biomass Feed and Gasification Investigation of Coal-Biomass Catalytic Gasification Using Experiments, Reaction Kinetics and Computational Fluid Dynamics Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Project Number: FE0005476 Project Description The objectives of the proposed study are to obtain experimental reactor data and develop kinetic rate expressions for pyrolysis and char gasification for the coal-biomass blends under conditions free from transport limitations, to develop a detailed understanding of the effect of pyrolysis conditions on the porous char structure, to build mathematical models that combine true kinetic rate expressions with transport models for predicting gasification behavior for a broad range of pressures and temperatures, and to investigate the physical and chemical parameters that might lead to synergistic effects in coal-biomass blends gasification.

168

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

feasibility of combining wind farms with advanced coalfeasibility of combining wind farms with advanced coal

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

High pressure rotary piston coal feeder for coal gasification applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The subject development is directed to an apparatus for feeding pulverized coal into a coal gasifier operating at relatively high pressures and elevated temperatures. This apparatus is a rotary piston feeder which comprises a circular casing having a coal loading opening therein diametrically opposed from a coal discharge and contains a rotatable discoid rotor having a cylinder in which a reciprocateable piston is disposed. The reciprocation of the piston within the cylinder is provided by a stationary conjugate cam arrangement whereby the pulverized coal from a coal hopper at atmospheric pressure can be introduced into the cylinder cavity and then discharged therefrom into the high-pressure gasifier without the loss of high pressure gases from within the latter.

Gencsoy, Hasan T. (Morgantown, WV)

1977-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

170

UTILIZATION OF LIGHTWEIGHT MATERIALS MADE FROM COAL GASIFICATION SLAGS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the project entitled ''Utilization of Lightweight Materials Made from Coal Gasification Slags'' was to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of manufacturing low-unit-weight products from coal gasification slags which can be used as substitutes for conventional lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates. In Phase I, the technology developed by Praxis to produce lightweight aggregates from slag (termed SLA) was applied to produce a large batch (10 tons) of expanded slag using pilot direct-fired rotary kilns and a fluidized bed calciner. The expanded products were characterized using basic characterization and application-oriented tests. Phase II involved the demonstration and evaluation of the use of expanded slag aggregates to produce a number of end-use applications including lightweight roof tiles, lightweight precast products (e.g., masonry blocks), structural concrete, insulating concrete, loose fill insulation, and as a substitute for expanded perlite and vermiculite in horticultural applications. Prototypes of these end-use applications were made and tested with the assistance of commercial manufacturers. Finally, the economics of expanded slag production was determined and compared with the alternative of slag disposal. Production of value-added products from SLA has a significant potential to enhance the overall gasification process economics, especially when the avoided costs of disposal are considered.

Vas Choudhry; Stephen Kwan; Steven R. Hadley

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant public design report. Volume I  

SciTech Connect

This Public Design Report provides, in a single document, available nonproprietary design information for the Great Plains Gasification Project, the first commercial coal gasification facility in the United States. In addition to the design aspects, the history of the project, the organization of the plant owners, and the role of the Department of Energy are briefly discussed. Plant capital and operating costs are also presented. An overview of the mine and plant operations is presented and is followed by detailed nonproprietary descriptions of the individual process units, plant systems, and products. Narrative process descriptions, simplified process flow diagrams, input/output stream data, operating conditions, catalyst and chemical requirements, and utility requirements are given for each unit. The process units are described as they were planned by July 1984. Any modification or alteration that occurred after that date will be the subject of a followup work. Plant startup provisions, environmental considerations and control, monitoring and safety considerations are also addressed for each operating unit. The report is published in two volumes. Volume I contains: (1) introduction; (2) overview of project (plant and mine, plant facilities, Basin Electric Antelope Valley Station); and (3) plant process data (coal, oxygen and steam, gasification and gas processing). 53 refs., 80 figs., 36 tabs.

Miller, W.R.; Belt, R.J.; Honea, F.I.; Ness, H.M.; Lang, R.A.; Berty, T.E.; Delany, R.C.; Mako, P.F.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Method for using fast fluidized bed dry bottom coal gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carbonaceous solid material such as coal is gasified in a fast fluidized bed gasification system utilizing dual fluidized beds of hot char. The coal in particulate form is introduced along with oxygen-containing gas and steam into the fast fluidized bed gasification zone of a gasifier assembly wherein the upward superficial gas velocity exceeds about 5.0 ft/sec and temperature is 1500.degree.-1850.degree. F. The resulting effluent gas and substantial char are passed through a primary cyclone separator, from which char solids are returned to the fluidized bed. Gas from the primary cyclone separator is passed to a secondary cyclone separator, from which remaining fine char solids are returned through an injection nozzle together with additional steam and oxygen-containing gas to an oxidation zone located at the bottom of the gasifier, wherein the upward gas velocity ranges from about 3-15 ft/sec and is maintained at 1600.degree.-200.degree. F. temperature. This gasification arrangement provides for increased utilization of the secondary char material to produce higher overall carbon conversion and product yields in the process.

Snell, George J. (Fords, NJ); Kydd, Paul H. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Encoal mild coal gasification project: Commercial plant feasibility study  

SciTech Connect

In order to determine the viability of any Liquids from Coal (LFC) commercial venture, TEK-KOL and its partner, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI), have put together a technical and economic feasibility study for a commercial-size LFC Plant located at Zeigler Coal Holding Company`s North Rochelle Mine site. This resulting document, the ENCOAL Mild Coal Gasification Plant: Commercial Plant Feasibility Study, includes basic plant design, capital estimates, market assessment for coproducts, operating cost assessments, and overall financial evaluation for a generic Powder River Basin based plant. This document and format closely resembles a typical Phase II study as assembled by the TEK-KOL Partnership to evaluate potential sites for LFC commercial facilities around the world.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

EA-1642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, KY...

175

NETL, USDA design coal-stabilized biomass gasification unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal, poultry litter, contaminated corn, rice hulls, moldly hay, manure sludge - these are representative materials that could be tested as fuel feedstocks in a hybrid gasification/combustion concept studied in a recent US Department of Energy (DOE) design project. DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) collaborated to develop a design concept of a power system that incorporates Hybrid Biomass Gasification. This system would explore the use of a wide range of biomass and agricultural waste products as gasifier feedstocks. The plant, if built, would supply one-third of electrical and steam heating needs at the USDA's Beltsville (Maryland) Agricultural Research Center. 1 fig., 1 photo.

NONE

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

176

Numerical study on convection diffusion for gasification agent in underground coal gasification. Part I: establishment of mathematical models and solving method  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this article is to discuss the distribution law of the gasification agent concentration in a deep-going way during underground coal gasification and the new method of solving the problem for the convection diffusion of the gas. In this paper, the basic features of convection diffusion for the gas produced in underground coal gasification are studied. On the basis of the model experiment, through the analysis of the distribution and patterns of variation for the fluid concentration field in the process of the combustion and gasification of the coal seams within the gasifier, the 3-D non-linear unstable mathematical models on the convection diffusion for oxygen are established. In order to curb such pseudo-physical effects as numerical oscillation and surfeit which frequently occurred in the solution of the complex mathematical models, the novel finite unit algorithm, the upstream weighted multi-cell balance method is advanced in this article, and its main derivation process is introduced.

Yang, L.H.; Ding, Y.M. [China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou (China). College of Resources and Geoscience

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

A novel approach to highly dispersing catalytic materials in coal for gasification  

SciTech Connect

This project seeks to develop a technique, based on coal surface properties, for highly dispersing catalysts in coal for gasification and to investigate the potential of using potassium carbonate and calcium acetate mixtures as catalysts for coal gasification. The lower cost and higher catalytic activity of the latter compound will produce economic benefits by reducing the amount of K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} required for high coal char reactivities.

Abotsi, G.M.K.; Bota, K.B.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Plasma-enhanced gasification of low-grade coals for compact power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high temperature of a steam torch ensures an efficient gasification of low-grade coals, which is comparable to that of high-grade coals. Therefore, the coal gasification system energized by microwaves can serve as a moderately sized power plant due to its compact and lightweight design. This plasma power plant of low-grade coals would be useful in rural or sparsely populated areas without access to a national power grid.

Uhm, Han S. [Department of Electrophysics, Kwangwoon University, 447-1 Wolgye-Dong, Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Yong C.; Shin, Dong H.; Lee, Bong J. [Convergence Plasma Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahangno, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Final Report Environmental Footprints and Costs of Coal-Based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently, over 50 percent of electricity in the U.S. is generated from coal. Given that coal reserves in the U.S. are estimated to meet our energy needs over the next 250 years, coal is expected to continue to play a major role in the generation of electricity in this country. With dwindling supplies and high prices of natural gas and oil, a large proportion of the new power generation facilities built in the U.S. can be expected to use coal as the main fuel. The environmental impact of these facilities can only be minimized by innovations in technology that allow for efficient burning of coal, along with an increased capture of the air pollutants that are an inherent part of coal combustion. EPA considers integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) as one of the most promising technologies in reducing environmental consequences of generating electricity from coal. EPA has undertaken several initiatives to facilitate and incentivize development and deployment of this technology. This report is the result of one of these initiatives and it represents the combined efforts of a joint EPA/DOE team formed to advance the IGCC technology. The various offices within DOE that participated in the development/review of this report were the Office of Fossil Energy, including the Clean Coal Office and the National Energy Technology Laboratory.

Pulverized Coal; Technologies Foreword

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Advanced research in coal gasification process modification technology: catalytic cracking of aromatic hydrocarbons. Topical report, 1 October 1984-31 June 1985  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to screen inexpensive materials for potential use as disposable aromatic hydrocarbon (AHC) cracking catalysts in the reaction zone of the coal gasifier or in a fixed bed downstream from the gasifier. The approach is based on the conclusions reported in the literature that iron in a reduced state is an effective catalyst for AHC destruction. It therefore follows that chars or minerals with high iron content, high porosity, and high internal surface area will provide the most effective catalysts. We have screened all six of the following iron containing minerals: Siderite, Ankerite, Hematite, Magnetite, Pyrite, and Jarosite. The experimental tests measure the catalytic activity of these minerals for cracking benzene over the parameter range relevant to coal gasifier operation. Simulated coal gas containing 200 to 2000 ppM of model aromatic molecules will be used in all experiments and destruction of benzene will be measured over the temperature range 400 to 1000/sup 0/C. The porosity and surface area of these minerals (partially decomposed in coal gas) will be determined and utilized in a computer model describing pore structure, species transport and surface chemistry to interpret the reactivity data in terms of the intrinsic reactivity of the reduced state of each mineral. These results will provide a basis for catalyst selection, coal selection and economic comparison. 3 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

Simons, G.A.; Ham, D.A.; Moniz, G.A.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced coal gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Experimental Study on Tar-free Gasification of Coal in a Fixed Bed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Throated twin-oxidation zone gasifier of coal was exploited based on the characteristic analysis on the updraft gasifier and downdraft gasifier, and tar-free gasification of coal was experimentally investigated in the throated twin-oxidation zone gasifier. ... Keywords: tar-free gasification, fixed bed, operational parameters

Wang Lianyong; Cai Jiuju

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Credit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Credit Applications for 2007-2008 Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Credit Applications for 2007-2008 June 7, 2007 - 1:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Treasury Department and the Department of Energy (DOE) released today new instructions for applying for the tax credits for advanced coal projects and gasification projects. The new instructions provide additional time to submit applications for the credits. For the 2007-2008 allocation round, applications for DOE certification are not due to the Energy Department until October 31, 2007. "To further advance our nation's energy security, this Administration had made sustained investments in research, development, and wider use of

183

Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Credit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Credit Applications for 2007-2008 Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Credit Applications for 2007-2008 June 7, 2007 - 1:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Treasury Department and the Department of Energy (DOE) released today new instructions for applying for the tax credits for advanced coal projects and gasification projects. The new instructions provide additional time to submit applications for the credits. For the 2007-2008 allocation round, applications for DOE certification are not due to the Energy Department until October 31, 2007. "To further advance our nation's energy security, this Administration had made sustained investments in research, development, and wider use of

184

EA-1642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and 642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, KY EA-1642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, KY SUMMARY This draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment (SEA) analyzes the potential environmental impacts of DOE's proposed action of providing cost-shared funding for the University of Kentucky (UK) Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis project and of the No-Action Alternative.

185

Synthetic fuels: Status of the Great Plains coal gasification project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sponsors of the Great Plains coal gasification project in North Dakota defaulted on a federal loan in the amount of $1.54 billion. The Department of Energy has obtained title to the Great Plains project and is evaluating proposals from investment banking-type companies to assist it in selling the plant and its assets. This fact sheet highlights recent legal action concerning gas purchase agreements and mortgage foreclosure; the status of the project's sponsors' outstanding liability; DOE's progress in evaluating its options; revenue, expense, production, and plant employment data; capital improvement projects; and plant maintenance issues.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas/Electricity Via Catalytic Coal Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 Co-ProduCtion of SubStitute natural GaS / eleCtriCity via CatalytiC Coal GaSifiCation Description The United States has vast reserves of low-cost coal, estimated to be sufficient for the next 250 years. Gasification-based technology, such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), is the only environmentally friendly technology that provides the flexibility to co-produce hydrogen, substitute natural gas (SNG), premium hydrocarbon liquids including transportation fuels, and electric power in desired combinations from coal and other carbonaceous feedstocks. Rising costs and limited domestic supply of crude oil and natural gas provide a strong incentive for the development of coal gasification-based co-production processes. This project addresses the co-production of SNG and electricity from coal via gasification

187

Great Plains: status of the Great Plains coal gasification project  

SciTech Connect

Updated information is presented on the Great Plains coal gasification project in North Dakota following the default of a $1.54 billion federal loan by the project sponsors. This report includes updated information obtained through October 31, 1985, on the loan default, Great Plains loan and gas pricing formula, legal matters and agreements, the Department of Energy's options and actions, Great Plains operations, and socioeconomic issues. The new information highlights changes in the gas pricing calculations; the Department's action to pay off the defaulted loan; legal action concerning gas purchase agreements; the project sponsors' proposed settlement; September revenue, expense, and production data; coal lease payments; capital improvement projects; plant by-products; and the final results of a North Dakota task force study of the potential socioeconomic impact if the plant closes.

Not Available

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Proceedings, twenty-fourth annual international Pittsburgh coal conference  

SciTech Connect

Topics covered include: gasification technologies; coal production and preparation; combustion technologies; environmental control technologies; synthesis of liquid fuels, chemicals, materials and other non-fuel uses of coal; hydrogen from coal; advanced synthesis gas cleanup; coal chemistry, geosciences and resources; Fischer-Tropsch technology; coal and sustainability; global climate change; gasification (including underground gasification); materials, instrumentation and controls; and coal utilisation byproducts.

NONE

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis Title Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2008 Authors Phadke, Amol, Charles A....

190

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Figures Figure ES-1. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Basicviii Figure 1. Advanced-Coal Wind Hybrid: Basic21 Figure 6. Comparison of ACWH and CCGT-Wind

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Opening New Avenues for High-Efficiency, Low-Emission Coal Gasification |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Opening New Avenues for High-Efficiency, Low-Emission Coal Opening New Avenues for High-Efficiency, Low-Emission Coal Gasification Opening New Avenues for High-Efficiency, Low-Emission Coal Gasification April 10, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis A rendering of the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne high pressure, dry-solids feed pump. A rendering of the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne high pressure, dry-solids feed pump. Washington, DC - Gasification. It's a versatile technology that uses coal to produce power, chemicals, and fuels. Inherently low in air emissions, solid byproducts, and wastewater, commercial gasification plants have proven capable of exceeding the most stringent regulations for air- and solids-emissions. However, capital and operational costs have prohibited the widespread adoption of gasification, especially for power

192

Alaska coal gasification feasibility studies - Healy coal-to-liquids plant  

SciTech Connect

The Alaska Coal Gasification Feasibility Study entailed a two-phase analysis of the prospects for greater use of Alaska's abundant coal resources in industrial applications. Phase 1, Beluga Coal Gasification Feasibility Study (Report DOE/NETL 2006/1248) assessed the feasibility of using gasification technology to convert the Agrium fertilizer plant in Nikiski, Alaska, from natural gas to coal feedstock. The Phase 1 analysis evaluated coals from the Beluga field near Anchorage and from the Usibelli Coal Mine near Healy, both of which are low in sulfur and high in moisture. This study expands the results of Phase 1 by evaluating a similar sized gasification facility at the Usibelli Coal mine to supply Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquids to central Alaska. The plant considered in this study is small (14,640 barrels per day, bbl/d) compared to the recommended commercial size of 50,000 bbl/d for coal-to-liquid plants. The coal supply requirements for the Phase 1 analysis, four million tons per year, were assumed for the Phase 2 analysis to match the probable capacity of the Usibelli mining operations. Alaska refineries are of sufficient size to use all of the product, eliminating the need for F-T exports out of the state. The plant could produce marketable by-products such as sulfur as well as electric power. Slag would be used as backfill at the mine site and CO{sub 2} could be vented, captured or used for enhanced coalbed methane recovery. The unexpected curtailment of oil production from Prudhoe Bay in August 2006 highlighted the dependency of Alaskan refineries (with the exception of the Tesoro facility in Nikiski) on Alaska North Slope (ANS) crude. If the flow of oil from the North Slope declines, these refineries may not be able to meet the in-state needs for diesel, gasoline, and jet fuel. Additional reliable sources of essential fuel products would be beneficial. 36 refs., 14 figs., 29 tabs., 3 apps.

Lawrence Van Bibber; Charles Thomas; Robert Chaney [Research & Development Solutions, LLC (United States)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

Thermal-Hydrological Sensitivity Analysis of Underground Coal Gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents recent work from an ongoing project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to develop a set of predictive tools for cavity/combustion-zone growth and to gain quantitative understanding of the processes and conditions (natural and engineered) affecting underground coal gasification (UCG). We discuss the application of coupled thermal-hydrologic simulation capabilities required for predicting UCG cavity growth, as well as for predicting potential environmental consequences of UCG operations. Simulation of UCG cavity evolution involves coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical-mechanical (THCM) processes in the host coal and adjoining rockmass (cap and bedrock). To represent these processes, the NUFT (Nonisothermal Unsaturated-saturated Flow and Transport) code is being customized to address the influence of coal combustion on the heating of the host coal and adjoining rock mass, and the resulting thermal-hydrological response in the host coal/rock. As described in a companion paper (Morris et al. 2009), the ability to model the influence of mechanical processes (spallation and cavity collapse) on UCG cavity evolution is being developed at LLNL with the use of the LDEC (Livermore Distinct Element Code) code. A methodology is also being developed (Morris et al. 2009) to interface the results of the NUFT and LDEC codes to simulate the interaction of mechanical and thermal-hydrological behavior in the host coal/rock, which influences UCG cavity growth. Conditions in the UCG cavity and combustion zone are strongly influenced by water influx, which is controlled by permeability of the host coal/rock and the difference between hydrostatic and cavity pressure. In this paper, we focus on thermal-hydrological processes, examining the relationship between combustion-driven heat generation, convective and conductive heat flow, and water influx, and examine how the thermal and hydrologic properties of the host coal/rock influence those relationships. Specifically, we conducted a parameter sensitivity analysis of the influence of thermal and hydrological properties of the host coal, caprock, and bedrock on cavity temperature and steam production.

Buscheck, T A; Hao, Y; Morris, J P; Burton, E A

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

194

Kinetics of catalyzed steam gasification of low-rank coals to produce hydrogen. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal goal of coal char-steam gasification research is to establish the feasibility of low-rank coal gasification for hydrogen production. The program has focused on determining reaction conditions for maximum product gas hydrogen content and on evaluating process kinetics with and without catalyst addition. The high inherent reactivity of lignites and subbituminous coals, compared to coals of higher rank, make them the probable choice for use in steam gasification. An extensive matrix of char-steam gasification tests was performed in a laboratory-scale thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) at temperatures of 700/sup 0/, 750/sup 0/, and 800/sup 0/C. Reaction conditions for these tests were based on the results of earlier work at UNDERC in which product gases from fixed-bed, atmospheric pressure, steam gasification at temperatures of 700/sup 0/ to 750/sup 0/C were found to contain 63 to 65 mole % hydrogen, with the remainder being carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and less than 1 mole % methane. Four low-rank coals and one bituminous coal were included in the TGA test matrix. Catalysts screened in the study included K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, trona, nahcolite, sunflower hull ash, and lignite ash. Results of this study showed uncatalyzed North Dakota and Texas lignites to be slightly more reactive than a Wyoming subbituminous coal, and 8 to 10 times more reactive than an Illinois bituminous coal. Several catalysts that substantially improved low-rank coal steam gasification rates included pure and mineral (trona and nahcolite) alkali carbonates. The reactivity observed when using trona and nahcolite to catalyze the steam gasification was the highest, at nearly 3.5 times that without catalysts. The use of these inexpensive, naturally-occurring, alkalis as gasification catalysts may result in elimination of the need for catalyst recovery in the hydrogen-from-coal process. 11 refs., 23 figs., 9 tabs.

Galegher, S.J.; Timpe, R.C.; Willson, W.G.; Farnum, S.A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-1248E Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis Principal Authors Amol Phadke1 , Charles;Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis ii LBNL-1248E Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. #12;#12;Advanced Coal

196

High Temperature Electrochemical Polishing of H(2)S from Coal Gasification Process Streams.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An advanced process for the separation of hydrogen sulfide from coal gasification streams through an electrochemical membrane is being perfected. H{sub 2}S is removed from a synthetic gas stream, split into hydrogen, which enriches the exiting syngas, and sulfur, which is condensed downstream from an inert sweep gas stream. The process allows for continuous removal of H{sub 2}S without cooling the gas stream while allowing negligible pressure loss through the separator. Moreover, the process is economically attractive due to the elimination of the need for a Claus process for sulfur recovery. To this extent the project presents a novel concept for improving utilization of coal for more efficient power generation.

Winnick, J.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

ENCOAL mild coal gasification project public design and construction report  

SciTech Connect

This Public Design Report describes the 1000 ton per day ENCOAL mild coal gasification demonstration plant now in operation at the Buckskin Mine near Gillette, Wyoming. The objective of the project is to demonstrate that the proprietary Liquids From Coal (LFC) technology can reliably and economically convert low Btu PRB coal into a superior, high-Btu solid fuel (PDF), and an environmentally attractive low-sulfur liquid fuel (CDL). The Project`s plans also call for the production of sufficient quantities of PDF and CDL to permit utility companies to carry out full scale burn tests. While some process as well as mechanical design was done in 1988, the continuous design effort was started in July 1990. Civil construction was started in October 1990; mechanical erection began in May 1991. Virtually all of the planned design work was completed by July 1991. Most major construction was complete by April 1992 followed by plant testing and commissioning. Plant operation began in late May 1992. This report covers both the detailed design and initial construction aspects of the Project.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Diffusion Coatings for Corrosion Resistant Components in Coal Gasification Systems  

SciTech Connect

Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low cost alloy may improve its resistance to such sulfidation attack and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. During this reporting period we focused on getting a bench-scale test system to expose alloy coupons to simulated gasifier environment. The test facility was designed to allow about 20 specimen coupons to be exposed simultaneously for an extend period to a simulated coal gas stream at temperatures up to 1000 C. The simulated gas stream contained about 26%H{sub 2}, 39%CO, 17%CO{sub 2}, 1.4% H{sub 2}S and balance steam. We successfully ran a 100+h test with coated and uncoated stainless steel coupons. The tested alloys include SS304, SS316, SS405, SS409, SS410, and IN800. The main finding is that Ti/Ta coating provides excellent protection to SS405 under conditions where uncoated austenitic and ferritic stainless steel alloy coupons are badly corroded. Cr coatings also appear to afford some protection against corrosion.

Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Esperanza Alvarez; Kai-Hung Lau; Angel Sanjurjo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Closely Aligned Programs Gasification Systems Technologies Closely Aligned Programs The Department of Energy's (DOE) Gasification Systems is conducted under the Clean Coal Research...

200

Hydrogen from Coal Edward Schmetz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gasification technology assumes advanced E-gas gasification. · RD&D is estimated to reduce the cost of hydrogenGenFutureGen Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Gasification Fuel Cells Turbines Gasification Fuel Cells-production plant · Hydrogen from Coal Program will coordinate with associated DOE programs in Gasification, Fuel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced coal gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Fate of catechols in coal gasification condensate waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Even after the wastewater has been subjected to rigorous cleaning, many chemicals still remain. In order to remove these compounds, they must be identified. Catechol is a compound which appears in the condensate water and, because its concentration changes, its fate is somewhat uncertain. In recent experiments modeling the condensate water conditions, catechol solutions were aerated in the presence of ammonia. Upon acidification of the solutions, a polymer precipitates. This polymer was compared to the black compound isolated from the condensate water by spectral and elemental analyses. The structures of the two polymers were reasonably similar. The kinetics of oxidation, as determined by the uptake of oxygen, indicates that the reaction was first order in catechol and oxygen. The rate was significantly enhanced by an increase in pH. Assuming that catechol is the only subunit of the polymers isolated from the different condensate waters, calculations would indicate that the initial catechol concentration varies from 440 to 1700 ppM. An attempt is being made to account for all of the carbon that appears in the water from the gasification process. Presently, only 60% to 70% of the carbon-containing products have been identified. Part of the remaining total organic carbon can be accounted for by the catechol polymer. Studying the fate of catechol in the coal gasification condensate water will help to develop an environmentally and financially feasible treatment of the wastewater. 4 refs.

Uhrich, K.E.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant Public Design Report. Volume II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Public Design Report provides, in a single document, available nonproprietary design information for the Great Plains Gasification Project, the first commercial coal gasification facility in the United States. In addition to the design aspects, the history of the project, the organization of the plant owners, and the role of the Department of Energy are briefly discussed. Plant capital and operating costs are also presented. An overview of the mine and plant operations is presented and is followed by detailed nonproprietary descriptions of the individual process units, plant systems, and products. Narrative process descriptions, simplified process flow diagrams, input/output stream data, operating conditions, catalyst and chemical requirements, and utility requirements are given for each unit. The process units are described as they were planned by July 1984. Any modification or alteration that occurred after that date will be the subject of a followup work. Plant startup provisions, environmental considerations and control, monitoring and safety considerations are also addressed for each operating unit. The report is published in two volumes. Volume II contains: (1) plant process data (sulfur recovery, main flare - area 8300, liquid processing, ash handling and solids disposal, other systems); (2) plant startup procedure and schedule; (3) plant and employee safety; (4) GPGP cost data; and (5) references. 53 refs., 46 figs., 38 tabs.

Miller, W.R.; Belt, R.J.; Honea, F.I.; Ness, H.M.; Lang, R.A.; Berty, T.E.; Delany, R.C.; Mako, P.F.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Study of factors affecting syngas quality and their interactions in fluidized bed gasification of lignite coal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of lignite coal Shayan Karimipour a , Regan Gerspacher b , Rajender Gupta a , Raymond J. Spiteri c. " The syngas quality was defined based on conversion, H2/CO, CH4/H2, yield, and gasifier efficiency. " Low coal 2012 Keywords: Lignite coal Gasification Fluidized bed Design of experiments a b s t r a c t A series

Spiteri, Raymond J.

204

The ENCOAL Mild Coal Gasification Project, A DOE Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

71 71 The ENCOAL ® Mild Coal Gasification Project A DOE Assessment March 2002 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 and P.O. Box 10940, 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 website: www.netl.doe.gov 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference

205

Status of the Great Plains coal gasification project - Summer 1983  

SciTech Connect

Construction of the Great Plains coal gasification plant in North Dakota was 3 weeks behind schedule as of May 31, 1983, but cumulative project costs were less than originally estimated. A March 1983 analysis by Great Plains raised questions about the project's economic viability, which is closely linked to future energy prices. The estimated gas prices used in the analysis were lower than those used in January 1982 to justify construction. As a result, the project's investors are concerned about possible losses during the early years of operations. GAO's review shows, however, that Great Plains did not consider substantial tax benefits which may be available to the parent companies of the project's investors. If these benefits are considered, the project's economic viability could be more positive. Should the investors end their participation, some tax benefits previously obtained would have to be repaid.

Not Available

1983-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

206

Status of the Great Plains coal gasification project  

SciTech Connect

Construction of the Great Plains coal gasification plant in North Dakota was 95 percent complete and only about 2 weeks behind schedule as of November 30, 1983. Cumulative project costs were less than originally estimated for this date. Due to a drop in forecasted energy prices, Great Plains, in September 1983, projected that plant operations could result in large after-tax losses and negative cash flows for the sponsors. Great Plains notified the Department of Energy that it was considering terminating its participation in the project in the absence of additional federal assistance. In this regard, additional assistance in the form of price guarantees for the project's synthetic natural gas are being considered by the US Synthetic Fuels Corporation.

Not Available

1984-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

207

Status of the Great Plains coal gasification project, August 1982  

SciTech Connect

Construction of the Great Plains coal gasification plant in Mercer County, North Dakota, is 4 to 6 weeks behind schedule, but no long-term impacts are anticipated. Cumulative project costs are lower than originally estimated. Overall, the management system established to oversee project construction appears comprehensive. However, some weaknesses exist in the computerized information system, which produces most project data. The Department of Energy complied with statutory requirements in awarding the Great Plains loan guarantee for an alternative fuel demonstration project and is actively working to fulfill its responsibilities as the project's overseer. However, the Department needs to audit the costs incurred by Great Plains to determine that funds are being used only for eligible project costs.

Not Available

1982-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

208

Proceedings of the ninth annual underground coal gasification symposium  

SciTech Connect

The Ninth Underground Coal Gasification Symposium was held August 7 to 10, 1983 at the Indian Lakes Resort and Conference Center in Bloomingdale, Illinois. Over one-hundred attendees from industry, academia, National Laboratories, State Government, and the US Government participated in the exchange of ideas, results and future research plans. Representatives from six countries including France, Belgium, United Kingdom, The Netherlands, West Germany, and Brazil also participated by presenting papers. Fifty papers were presented and discussed in four formal sessions and two informal poster sessions. The presentations described current and future field testing plans, interpretation of field test data, environmental research, laboratory studies, modeling, and economics. All papers were processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Wieber, P.R.; Martin, J.W.; Byrer, C.W. (eds.)

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Process for control of pollutants generated during coal gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to an improvement in the coal gasification process that effectively eliminates substantially all of the environmental pollutants contained in the producer gas. The raw producer gas is passed through a two-stage water scrubbing arrangement with the tars being condensed essentially water-free in the first stage and lower boiling condensables, including pollutant laden water, being removed in the second stage. The pollutant-laden water is introduced into an evaporator in which about 95 percent of the water is vaporized and introduced as steam into the gas producer. The condensed tars are combusted and the resulting products of combustion are admixed with the pollutant-containing water residue from the evaporator and introduced into the gas producer.

Frumerman, Robert (Pittsburgh, PA); Hooper, Harold M. (Sewickley, PA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Low-rank coal research: Volume 2, Advanced research and technology development: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Volume II contains articles on advanced combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation; coal/char reactivity; liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, and fine particulate emissions. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

Mann, M.D.; Swanson, M.L.; Benson, S.A.; Radonovich, L.; Steadman, E.N.; Sweeny, P.G.; McCollor, D.P.; Kleesattel, D.; Grow, D.; Falcone, S.K.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Development of Biomass-Infused Coal Briquettes for Co-Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass-Infused Coal Briquettes for Co-Gasification Biomass-Infused Coal Briquettes for Co-Gasification CoalTek, Inc. Project Number: FE0005293 Project Description This project will demonstrate an application of a CoalTek, Inc. (CoalTek) proprietary microwave process for treating energy feedstock materials. The process combines coal and biomass to produce an economically viable and suitable single-stream feedstock for co-gasification. Phase I of the project will focus on microwave processing, batch-scale production, and laboratory characterizations of briquettes with the objective to identify the combinations of biomass and coal types that provide the most suitable briquetted product for co-gasification. Phase II will use a larger scale, continuous mode process to (1) demonstrate the performance of the co-briquetted fuels during co-gasification in two different pilot-plant designs, i.e., fixed-bed and fluidized-bed gasifiers, and (2) enable realistic cost estimates for the construction and operation of a commercial-scale biomass-coal briquetting plant based on CoalTek's proprietary microwave process.

212

Advanced Coal Power Plant Model (ACCPM) Version 1.1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the purchase of a license for the appropriate SimTech IPSEpro modules and library, users can quickly generate performance and capital cost estimates of new, advanced coal power plants. The application allows users to screen integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technologies prior to engaging in more extensive studies of their preferred choice. Such screening activities generally require sophisticated software and qualified staff to run the models, which takes time and significant investment....

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

213

DOE/NETL-2002/1164 Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project: A DOE Assessment January 2002 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry...

214

EA-1219: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County, Wyoming  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposed Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation that would be performed at the Hoe Creek site in Campbell County, Wyoming.

215

The coal char-CO2 reaction at high temperature and pressure.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Integrated gasification combined cycle is an advanced electricity generation technology, based on coal gasification. Wider deployment requires further research into the components of the process,… (more)

Hodge, Elizabeth Marjorie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis Title Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-1248E Year of Publication 2008 Authors...

217

Coal gasification for the coproduction of electricity and fertilizer  

SciTech Connect

TVA is proposing to develop and commercially demonstrate the coproduction of electricity and fertilizer (urea) using integrated gasification/combined cycle (IGCC) technology. The coal-based coproduction demonstration project will show that the coproduction process can economically and environmentally enhance the production of both electric power and urea. As conceptualized, the proposed coproduction demonstration project facility would be designed for a nominal electrical capacity of about 250 megawatts (MW), Table I. During normal operation, the facility would produce about 150 MW of base-load electrical power and 1,000 tons per day of urea. Sulfur from the coal would be recovered as elemental sulfur. During peak power demand, the fertilizer capacity could be reduced or bypassed and the full 250 MW could be made available. This scheme would allow continuous operation of the gasifier at 100% of its rated capacity which would reduce the annual revenue requirements for power generation by permitting the production of fertilizer. As TVA's vision of this proposal matures (i.e., as consideration is given to alternative schemes, as TVA reviews its power demands, and as more detailed engineering estimates are developed), the nature and scope of cyclic-operation may be altered.

Kelly, D.A.; Nichols, D.E.; Faucett, H.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Coal gasification for the coproduction of electricity and fertilizer  

SciTech Connect

TVA is proposing to develop and commercially demonstrate the coproduction of electricity and fertilizer (urea) using integrated gasification/combined cycle (IGCC) technology. The coal-based coproduction demonstration project will show that the coproduction process can economically and environmentally enhance the production of both electric power and urea. As conceptualized, the proposed coproduction demonstration project facility would be designed for a nominal electrical capacity of about 250 megawatts (MW), Table I. During normal operation, the facility would produce about 150 MW of base-load electrical power and 1,000 tons per day of urea. Sulfur from the coal would be recovered as elemental sulfur. During peak power demand, the fertilizer capacity could be reduced or bypassed and the full 250 MW could be made available. This scheme would allow continuous operation of the gasifier at 100% of its rated capacity which would reduce the annual revenue requirements for power generation by permitting the production of fertilizer. As TVA`s vision of this proposal matures (i.e., as consideration is given to alternative schemes, as TVA reviews its power demands, and as more detailed engineering estimates are developed), the nature and scope of cyclic-operation may be altered.

Kelly, D.A.; Nichols, D.E.; Faucett, H.L.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Two-stage coal gasification and desulfurization apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a system which effectively integrates a two-stage, fixed-bed coal gasification arrangement with hot fuel gas desulfurization of a first stream of fuel gas from a lower stage of the two-stage gasifier and the removal of sulfur from the sulfur sorbent regeneration gas utilized in the fuel-gas desulfurization process by burning a second stream of fuel gas from the upper stage of the gasifier in a combustion device in the presence of calcium-containing material. The second stream of fuel gas is taken from above the fixed bed in the coal gasifier and is laden with ammonia, tar and sulfur values. This second stream of fuel gas is burned in the presence of excess air to provide heat energy sufficient to effect a calcium-sulfur compound forming reaction between the calcium-containing material and sulfur values carried by the regeneration gas and the second stream of fuel gas. Any ammonia values present in the fuel gas are decomposed during the combustion of the fuel gas in the combustion chamber. The substantially sulfur-free products of combustion may then be combined with the desulfurized fuel gas for providing a combustible fluid utilized for driving a prime mover.

Bissett, Larry A. (Morgantown, WV); Strickland, Larry D. (Morgantown, WV)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Mathematical Modeling of Coal Gasification Processes in a Well-Stirred Reactor: Effects of Devolatilization and Moisture Content  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mathematical Modeling of Coal Gasification Processes in a Well- Stirred Reactor: Effects in coal and biomass play an important role on the gasification performance of these fuels on the syngas composition. The coal conversion time is most sensitive to the heat transfer rates including both

Qiao, Li

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced coal gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Development of an advanced, continuous mild gasification process for the production of co-products (Task 1), Volume 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Under US DOE sponsorship, a project team consisting of the Institute of Gas Technology, Peabody Holding Company, and Bechtel Group, Inc. has been developing an advanced, mild gasification process to process all types of coal and to produce solid and condensable liquid co-products that can open new markets for coal. The three and a half year program (September 1987 to June 1991) consisted of investigations in four main areas. These areas are: (1) Literature Survey of Mild Gasification Processes, Co-Product Upgrading and Utilization, and Market Assessment; (2) Mild Gasification Technology Development: Process Research Unit Tests Using Slipstream Sampling; (3) Bench-Scale Char Upgrading Study; (4) Mild Gasification Technology Development: System Integration Studies. In this report, the literature and market assessment of mild gasification processes are discussed.

Knight, R.A.; Gissy, J.L.; Onischak, M.; Babu, S.P.; Carty, R.H. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Duthie, R.G. [Bechtel Group, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Wootten, J.M. [Peabody Holding Co., Inc., St. Louis, MO (United States)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Combustion and gasification characteristics of chars from four commercially significant coals of different rank. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combustion and gasification kinetics of four size graded coal chars were investigated experimentally in Combustion Engineering's Drop Tube Furnace System (DTFS). The chars were prepared in the DTFS from commercially significant coals representing a wide range of rank; these included a Pittsburgh No. 8 Seam hvAb coal, an Illinois No. 6 Seam hvCb coal, a Wyoming Sub C, and a Texas Lignite A. Additionally, a number of standard ASTM and special bench scale tests were performed on the coals and chars to characterize their physicochemical properties. Results showed that the lower rank coal chars were more reactive than the higher rank coal chars and that combustion reactions of chars were much faster than the corresponding gasification reactions. Fuel properties, temperature, and reactant gas partial pressure had a significant influence on both combustion and gasification, and particle size had a mild but discernible influence on gasification. Fuel reactivities were closely related to pore structure. Computer simulation of the combustion and gasification performances of the subject samples in the DTFS supported the experimental findings.

Nsakala, N.Y.; Patel, R.L.; Lao, T.C.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Growing concern over climate change is prompting new thinking about the technologies used to generate electricity. In the future, it is possible that new government policies on greenhouse gas emissions may favor electric generation technology options that release zero or low levels of carbon emissions. The Western U.S. has abundant wind and coal resources. In a world with carbon constraints, the future of coal for new electrical generation is likely to depend on the development and successful application of new clean coal technologies with near zero carbon emissions. This scoping study explores the economic and technical feasibility of combining wind farms with advanced coal generation facilities and operating them as a single generation complex in the Western US. The key questions examined are whether an advanced coal-wind hybrid (ACWH) facility provides sufficient advantages through improvements to the utilization of transmission lines and the capability to firm up variable wind generation for delivery to load centers to compete effectively with other supply-side alternatives in terms of project economics and emissions footprint. The study was conducted by an Analysis Team that consists of staff from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Western Interstate Energy Board (WIEB). We conducted a screening level analysis of the economic competitiveness and technical feasibility of ACWH generation options located in Wyoming that would supply electricity to load centers in California, Arizona or Nevada. Figure ES-1 is a simple stylized representation of the configuration of the ACWH options. The ACWH consists of a 3,000 MW coal gasification combined cycle power plant equipped with carbon capture and sequestration (G+CC+CCS plant), a fuel production or syngas storage facility, and a 1,500 MW wind plant. The ACWH project is connected to load centers by a 3,000 MW transmission line. In the G+CC+CCS plant, coal is gasified into syngas and CO{sub 2} (which is captured). The syngas is burned in the combined cycle plant to produce electricity. The ACWH facility is operated in such a way that the transmission line is always utilized at its full capacity by backing down the combined cycle (CC) power generation units to accommodate wind generation. Operating the ACWH facility in this manner results in a constant power delivery of 3,000 MW to the load centers, in effect firming-up the wind generation at the project site.

Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles; Larson, Doug; Carr, Tom; Rath, Larry; Balash, Peter; Yih-Huei, Wan

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

224

Solar coal-gasification reactor with pyrolysis-gas recycle. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal (or other carbonaceous matter, such as biomass) is converted into a product gas that is substantially free from hydrocarbons. The coal is fed into a solar reactor, and solar energy is directed into the reactor onto coal char, creating a gasification front and a pyrolysis front. A gasification zone is produced well above the coal level within the reactor. A pyrolysis zone is produced immediately above the coal level. Steam, injected into the reactor adjacent to the gasification zone, reacts with char to generate product gases. Solar energy supplies the energy for the endothermic steam-char reaction. The hot product gases flow from the gasification zone to the pyrolysis zone to generate hot char. Gases are withdrawn from the pyrolysis zone and reinjected into the region of the reactor adjacent the gasification zone. This eliminates hydrocarbons in the gas by steam reformation on the hot char. The product gas is withdrawn from a region of the reactor between the gasification zone and the pyrolysis zone. The product gas will be free of tar and other hydrocarbons, and thus be suitable for use in many processes.

Aiman, W.R.; Gregg, D.W.

1981-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

225

Great Plains Coal Gasification Project: Quarterly technical progress report, third fiscal quarter 1987-1988, January-March 1988  

SciTech Connect

This progress report describes the operation of the Great Plains Gasification Plant, including lignite coal production, SNG production, gas quality, by-products, and certain problems encountered. (LTN)

Not Available

1988-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

Great Plains Coal Gasification Project: Quarterly technical progress report, April-June 1988 (Fourth fiscal quarter, 1987-1988)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This progress report describes the operation of the Great Plains Gasification Plant, including lignite coal production, SNG production, gas quality, by-products, and certain problems encountered. (LTN)

Not Available

1988-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

227

Advanced High-Temperature, High-Pressure Transport Reactor Gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The transport reactor development unit (TRDU) was modified to accommodate oxygen-blown operation in support of a Vision 21-type energy plex that could produce power, chemicals, and fuel. These modifications consisted of changing the loop seal design from a J-leg to an L-valve configuration, thereby increasing the mixing zone length and residence time. In addition, the standpipe, dipleg, and L-valve diameters were increased to reduce slugging caused by bubble formation in the lightly fluidized sections of the solid return legs. A seal pot was added to the bottom of the dipleg so that the level of solids in the standpipe could be operated independently of the dipleg return leg. A separate coal feed nozzle was added that could inject the coal upward into the outlet of the mixing zone, thereby precluding any chance of the fresh coal feed back-mixing into the oxidizing zone of the mixing zone; however, difficulties with this coal feed configuration led to a switch back to the original downward configuration. Instrumentation to measure and control the flow of oxygen and steam to the burner and mix zone ports was added to allow the TRDU to be operated under full oxygen-blown conditions. In total, ten test campaigns have been conducted under enriched-air or full oxygen-blown conditions. During these tests, 1515 hours of coal feed with 660 hours of air-blown gasification and 720 hours of enriched-air or oxygen-blown coal gasification were completed under this particular contract. During these tests, approximately 366 hours of operation with Wyodak, 123 hours with Navajo sub-bituminous coal, 143 hours with Illinois No. 6, 106 hours with SUFCo, 110 hours with Prater Creek, 48 hours with Calumet, and 134 hours with a Pittsburgh No. 8 bituminous coal were completed. In addition, 331 hours of operation on low-rank coals such as North Dakota lignite, Australian brown coal, and a 90:10 wt% mixture of lignite and wood waste were completed. Also included in these test campaigns was 50 hours of gasification on a petroleum coke from the Hunt Oil Refinery and an additional 73 hours of operation on a high-ash coal from India. Data from these tests indicate that while acceptable fuel gas heating value was achieved with these fuels, the transport gasifier performs better on the lower-rank feedstocks because of their higher char reactivity. Comparable carbon conversions have been achieved at similar oxygen/coal ratios for both air-blown and oxygen-blown operation for each fuel; however, carbon conversion was lower for the less reactive feedstocks. While separation of fines from the feed coals is not needed with this technology, some testing has suggested that feedstocks with higher levels of fines have resulted in reduced carbon conversion, presumably due to the inability of the finer carbon particles to be captured by the cyclones. These data show that these low-rank feedstocks provided similar fuel gas heating values; however, even among the high-reactivity low-rank coals, the carbon conversion did appear to be lower for the fuels (brown coal in particular) that contained a significant amount of fines. The fuel gas under oxygen-blown operation has been higher in hydrogen and carbon dioxide concentration since the higher steam injection rate promotes the water-gas shift reaction to produce more CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} at the expense of the CO and water vapor. However, the high water and CO{sub 2} partial pressures have also significantly reduced the reaction of (Abstract truncated)

Michael L. Swanson

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

228

Gasification in pulverized coal flames. Semi-annual progress report, September 1977--March 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project concerns the production of power and synthesis gases from pulverized coal via suspension gasification. Cyclone and confined jet gasifier configurations with swirling flow are being investigated. Emphasis is on the final design and construction of the test facility and the two experimental reactors. Calibration procedures are presented, as are data reduction techniques and preliminary experimental results for methane and coal combustion tests.

Barnhart, J. S.; George, P. E.; Thomas, J. F.; Laurendeau, N. M.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Evaluation of a Dow-Based Gasification-Combined-Cycle Plant Using Low-Rank Coals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This feasibility study developed performance and cost data for two different Dow-based gasification-combined-cycle (GCC) power plants, designed to fire either Texas lignite or Wyoming subbituminous coals at a Gulf Coast location. It demonstrated the cost-effectiveness and efficiency of these plants for generating power from low-rank coals.

1989-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

230

Gasification Â… Program Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

th th Annual International Colloquium on Environmentally Preferred Advanced Power Generation, Costa Mesa, CA, February 7, 2012 An Overview of U.S. DOE's Gasification Systems Program Jenny B. Tennant Technology Manager - Gasification 2 Gasification Program Goal "Federal support of scientific R&D is critical to our economic competitiveness" Dr. Steven Chu, Secretary of Energy November 2010 The goal of the Gasification Program is to reduce the cost of electricity, while increasing power plant availability and efficiency, and maintaining the highest environmental standards 3 U.S. Coal Resources Low rank: lignite and sub-bituminous coal - About 50% of the U.S. coal reserves - Nearly 50% of U.S. coal production - Lower sulfur Bituminous coal

231

NETL: Turbine Projects - Advanced Coal Power Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Coal Power Systems Turbine Projects Advanced Coal Power Systems SOFC Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation DataFact Sheets SOFC Hybrid System PDF In-House FCT...

232

Combustion Engineering Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle Repowering Project, Clean Coal Technology Program. Environmental Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE entered into a cooperative agreement with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (C-E) under which DOE proposes to provide cost-shared funding to design, construct, and operate an Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) project to repower an existing steam turbine generator set at the Springfield (Illinois) City Water, Light and Power (CWL&P) Lakeside Generating Station, while capturing 90% of the coal`s sulfur and producing elemental sulfur as a salable by-product. The proposed demonstration would help determine the technical and economic feasibility of the proposed IGCC technology on a scale that would allow the utility industry to assess its applicability for repowering other coal-burning power plants. This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by DOE in compliance with the requirements of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The sources of information for this EA include the following: C-E`s technical proposal for the project submitted to DOE in response to the Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Program Opportunity Notice (PON); discussions with C-E and CWL&P staff; the volume of environmental information for the project and its supplements provided by C-E; and a site visit to the proposed project site.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Financial status of the Great Plains coal gasification project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Great Plains Gasification Associates and the Department of Energy (DOE) signed a loan guarantee agreement in January 1982 for up to $2.02 billion of the estimated $2.76 billion needed to construct a plant producing synthetic gas from coal. Faced with deteriorating financial projections in the wake of declining energy prices, Great Plains applied to the US Synthetic Fuels Corporation (SFC) for additional project assistance. In April 1984 SFC tentatively agreed to provide Great Plains up to $790 million in price guarantee assistance. In return, the Great Plains partners would contribute more equity and Great Plains would repay the DOE-guaranteed loan faster and share profits with SFC. According to GAO's assessment of SFC's proposed assistance, a lower amount of assistance could achieve the same results if Great Plains' partners could fully use certain tax credits and if energy prices and other assumptions remained the same as those SFC used in April 1984. Since April 1984, however, several changes have occurred, such as a continued decline in energy prices. An August 1984 SFC analysis indicated that the decline in energy price offset the effect of the increase tax credits. Other changes have also occurred, but SFC analyses subsequent to August 1984 showing the impact of these changes were not available to GAO. If all changes since April 1984 were incorporated into GAO's analyses, the results could be different.

Not Available

1985-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

234

A novel approach to highly dispersing catalytic materials in coal for gasification  

SciTech Connect

This project seeks to develop a technique, based on coal surface properties, for highly dispersing catalysts in coal for gasification and to investigate the potential of using potassium carbonate and calcium acetate mixtures as catalysts for coal gasification. The lower cost and high catalytic activity of the latter compound will produce economic benefits by reducing the amount of K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} required for high coal char reactivities. The work is focused on the elucidation of coal-catalyst precursor interactions in solution and the variables which control the adsorption and dispersion of coal gasification metal catalysts. In order to optimize coal-metal ion interactions and hence maximize catalyst activity, the study examines the surface electrochemistry of a lignite, a subbituminous, and a bituminous coals and their demineralized and oxidized derivatives prior to loading with the catalytic materials. The surface electrical properties of the coals are investigated with the aid of electrophoresis, while the effects of the surface charge on the adsorption of K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} are studied by agitating the coals with aqueous solutions of potassium and calcium. A zeta meter, a tube furnace, and other equipment required for the investigation have been acquired and installed. Preliminary work shows that the lignite (Psoc 1482) is negatively charged between pH 1.8 and pH 11.0 and has an isoelectric point of pH 1.8.

Abotsi, G.M.K.; Bota, K.B.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes. Annual report, October 1990--September 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This program will merge significant advances made in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior. Comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors.

Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. [Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States)]|[Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

236

Coal-gasification/MHD/steam-turbine combined-cycle (GMS) power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The coal-gasification/MHD/steam-turbine combined cycle (GMS) refers to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) systems in which coal gasification is used to supply a clean fuel (free of mineral matter and sulfur) for combustion in an MHD electrical power plant. Advantages of a clean-fuel system include the elimination of mineral matter or slag from all components other than the coal gasifier and gas cleanup system; reduced wear and corrosion on components; and increased seed recovery resulting from reduced exposure of seed to mineral matter or slag. Efficiencies in some specific GMS power plants are shown to be higher than for a comparably sized coal-burning MHD power plant. The use of energy from the MHD exhaust gas to gasify coal (rather than the typical approach of burning part of the coal) results in these higher efficiencies.

Lytle, J.M.; Marchant, D.D.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Impact of the Great Plains coal gasification decision on a coal gas industry  

SciTech Connect

In approving the special tariff and financing features of the Great Plains coal-gasification project, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission took the first major federal action toward encouraging the construction of a commercial-sized synthetic-fuels facility, asserts the law firm of Morley, Caskin and Generelly. Owned by Great Plains Gasification Associates - a partnership of five pipeline companies - the commercial-sized plant qualifies for FERC approval under the commission's RD and D regulations. The special financing terms for the project will require customers of existing natural gas companies to bear the costs incurred by the project regardless of its success in operation or the amount of gas produced for the customer's utilization. This RD and D rate treatment serves to mitigate market forces and thus operates as an effective subsidy for the pipeline industry. If this or a similar regulatory subsidy is extended to other coal-gas projects, the pipeline industry could take the lead in the nation's synfuels program.

Zipp, J.F.

1980-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

238

Gasification Portal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Home Gasification Home Gasification Home Gasification Home Gasification Home Gasification Home Gasification Home Gasification Home Gasification Home Gasification Home...

239

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the following discussion considers a comparison of coal-fired Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and pulverized coal (PC) power plants, representing a balanced...

240

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal: AlternativesSupplements to Coal - Feedstock Flexibility Waste Streams Gasification can be applied to a variety of waste streams, of which municipal solid waste (MSW)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced coal gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

REMOVAL AND RECOVERY OF DEPOSITS FROM COAL GASIFICATION ...  

A method is provided for on-line removal and recovery of deposits from fossil fuel gasification systems to improve plant performance and recover a valuable metalloid.

242

Investigation of Coal-biomass Catalytic Gasification using Experiments, Reaction Kinetics, and Computational Fluid Dynamics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal-biomass Catalytic Coal-biomass Catalytic Gasification using Experiments, Reaction Kinetics, and Computational Fluid Dynamics Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports research and development efforts targeted to improve efficiency and reduce the negative environmental effects of the use of fossil fuels. One way to achieve these goals is to combine coal with biomass to create synthesis gas (syngas) for use in turbines and refineries to produce energy, fuels,

243

FUNDAMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF FUEL TRANSFORMATIONS IN PULVERIZED COAL COMBUSTION AND GASIFICATION TECHNOLOGIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to carry out the necessary experiments and analyses to extend current capabilities for modeling fuel transformations to the new conditions anticipated in next-generation coal-based, fuel-flexible combustion and gasification processes. This multi-organization, multi-investigator project has produced data, correlations, and submodels that extend present capabilities in pressure, temperature, and fuel type. The combined experimental and theoretical/computational results are documented in detail in Chapters 1-8 of this report, with Chapter 9 serving as a brief summary of the main conclusions. Chapters 1-3 deal with the effect of elevated pressure on devolatilization, char formation, and char properties. Chapters 4 and 5 deal with advanced combustion kinetic models needed to cover the extended ranges of pressure and temperature expected in next-generation furnaces. Chapter 6 deals with the extension of kinetic data to a variety of alternative solid fuels. Chapter 7 focuses on the kinetics of gasification (rather than combustion) at elevated pressure. Finally, Chapter 8 describes the integration, testing, and use of new fuel transformation submodels into a comprehensive CFD framework. Overall, the effects of elevated pressure, temperature, heating rate, and alternative fuel use are all complex and much more work could be further undertaken in this area. Nevertheless, the current project with its new data, correlations, and computer models provides a much improved basis for model-based design of next generation systems operating under these new conditions.

Robert Hurt; Joseph Calo; Thomas H. Fletcher; Alan Sayre

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

244

Combustion Engineering Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle Repowering Project, Clean Coal Technology Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE entered into a cooperative agreement with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (C-E) under which DOE proposes to provide cost-shared funding to design, construct, and operate an Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) project to repower an existing steam turbine generator set at the Springfield (Illinois) City Water, Light and Power (CWL P) Lakeside Generating Station, while capturing 90% of the coal's sulfur and producing elemental sulfur as a salable by-product. The proposed demonstration would help determine the technical and economic feasibility of the proposed IGCC technology on a scale that would allow the utility industry to assess its applicability for repowering other coal-burning power plants. This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by DOE in compliance with the requirements of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The sources of information for this EA include the following: C-E's technical proposal for the project submitted to DOE in response to the Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Program Opportunity Notice (PON); discussions with C-E and CWL P staff; the volume of environmental information for the project and its supplements provided by C-E; and a site visit to the proposed project site.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Coal Technology Program Clean Coal Technology Program Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration A DOE Assessment DOE/NETL-2005/1217 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory April 2005 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name,

246

Fluidized-bed catalytic coal-gasification process. [US patent; pretreatment to minimize agglomeration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal or similar carbonaceous solids impregnated with gasification catalyst constituents are oxidized by contact with a gas containing between 2 vol % and 21 vol % oxygen at a temperature between 50 and 250/sup 0/C in an oxidation zone and the resultant oxidized, catalyst impregnated solids are then gasified in a fluidized bed gasification zone at an elevated pressure. The oxidation of the catalyst impregnated solids under these conditions insures that the bed density in the fluidized bed gasification zone will be relatively high even though the solids are gasified at elevated pressure and temperature.

Euker, C.A. Jr.; Wesselhoft, R.D.; Dunkleman, J.J.; Aquino, D.C.; Gouker, T.R.

1981-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

247

Eight Advanced Coal Projects Chosen for Further Development by...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Eight Advanced Coal Projects Chosen for Further Development by DOE's University Coal Research Program Eight Advanced Coal Projects Chosen for Further Development by DOE's...

248

Theoretical investigation of selected trace elements in coal gasification plants. Final report Mar 78-Nov 79  

SciTech Connect

The report gives results of a theoretical investigation of the disposition of five volatile trace elements (arsenic, boron, lead, selenium, and mercury) in SNG-producing coal gasification plants. Three coal gasification processes (dry-bottom Lurgi, Koppers-Totzek, and HYGAS) were investigated to examine the possible effects of gasifier operation conditions on the speciation of the volatile trace elements. Results of this investigation suggest that none of the trace elements considered in this study will be present in the product SNG from a coal gasification plant, but will be removed from the fuel gas by various unit operations. Results also suggest that speciation of these volatile trace elements is not significantly affected by gasifier conditions.

Hill, A.H.; Anderson, G.L.; Fleming, D.K.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

NETL: Gasification Systems - Feed Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feed Systems Gasification Systems Feed Systems Research on commercial gasifier feed systems is occurring in two primary areas of fuel (i.e. coal, biomass, etc.) feed and advanced...

250

The role of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle in the USDOE`s Clean Coal Research, Development and Demonstration Program  

SciTech Connect

For many years, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been funding research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects to develop advanced power generation technologies. The goal of this activity is to catalyze the private sector to commercialize technologies that will provide reasonably priced electricity and still meet stringent environmental standards. Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems are emerging as one of the more attractive candidate technologies to meet this goal. The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has been assigned the responsibility for implementing IGCC projects in DOE`s Clean Coal RD&D program. The IGCC technology offers the potential for significant Improvements in environmental performance, compared to today`s coal-fired power plants. Sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide emissions from IGCC systems will be less than one-tenth of existing environmental standards. Thus, the IGCC technology will make coal-based plants as clean as plants that bum natural gas.

Bajura, R.A.; Schmidt, D.K.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study are to establish the mechanisms and rates of basic steps in coal conversion processes, to integrate and incorporate this information into comprehensive computer models for coal conversion processes, to evaluate these models and to apply them to gasification, mild gasification and combustion in heat engines.

Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. (Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States)); Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. (Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Entrained-flow dry-bottom gasification of high-ash coals in coal-water slurries  

SciTech Connect

It was shown that the effective use of dry ash removal during entrained-flow gasification of coal-water slurries consists in simplification of the ash storage system and utilization of coal ash, a decrease in the coal demand, a reduction in the atmospheric emissions of noxious substances and particulate matter, and abandonment of the discharge of water used for ash slurry. According to the results of gasification of coal-water slurries (5-10 {mu}m) in a pilot oxygen-blow unit at a carbon conversion of >91%, synthesis gas containing 28.5% CO, 32.5% H{sub 2}, 8.2% CO{sub 2}, 1.5% CH{sub 4}, the rest being nitrogen, was obtained. The fly ash in its chemical composition, particle size, and density meets the requirements of the European standard EN 450 as a cement additive for concrete manufacture.

E.G. Gorlov; V.G. Andrienko; K.B. Nefedov; S.V. Lutsenko; B.K. Nefedov [Institute for Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as synthetic crude gasification combined cycle powerstand-alone integrated gasification combined cycle powertransmission integrated gasification, combined cycle power

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

NETL: Gasification Systems - Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low-Rank  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low-Rank Coal IGCC Systems Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low-Rank Coal IGCC Systems Project Number: DE-FE0007966 TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) is demonstrating the technical and economic viability of a new Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant designed to efficiently process low-rank coals. The plant uses an integrated carbon dioxide (CO2) scrubber/water gas shift (WGS) catalyst to capture more than 90 percent of the CO2 emissions, while increasing the cost of electricity by less than 10 percent compared to a plant with no carbon capture. TDA is optimizing the sorbent/catalyst and process design, and assessing the efficacy of the integrated WGS catalyst/CO2 capture system, first in bench-scale experiments and then in a slipstream field demonstration using actual coal-derived synthesis gas. The results will feed into a techno-economic analysis to estimate the impact of the WGS catalyst/CO2 capture system on the thermal efficiency of the plant and the cost of electricity.

255

A novel approach to highly dispersing catalytic materials in coal for gasification  

SciTech Connect

This project seeks to develop a technique, based on coal surface properties, for highly dispersing catalysts in coal for gasification and to investigate the potential of using potassium carbonate and calcium acetate mixtures as catalyst for coal gasification. The lower cost and high catalytic activity of the latter compound will produce economic benefits by reducing the amount of K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} required for high coal char activities. The effects of potassium impregnation conditions (pH and coal surface charge) on the reactivities, in carbon dioxide, of chars derived from demineralized lignite, subbituminous and bituminous coals have been determined. Impregnation of the acid-leached coal with potassium from strongly acidic solutions resulted in initial slow char reactivity which progressively increased with reaction time. Higher reactivities were obtained for catalyst (potassium) loaded at pH 6 or 10. The dependence of char gasification rates on catalyst addition pH increased in the order: pH 6 {approximately} pH 10 {much gt} pH 1.

Abotsi, G.M.K.; Bota, K.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Air and steam coal partial gasification in an atmospheric fluidized bed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the mixture of air and steam as gasification medium, three different rank coal partial gasification studies were carried out in a bench-scale atmospheric fluidized bed with the various operating parameters. The effects of air/coal (Fa/Fc) ratio, steam/coal (Fs/Fc) ratio, bed temperature, and coal rank on the fuel gas compositions and the high heating value (HHV) were reported in this paper. The results show that there is an optimal Fa/Fc ratio and Fs/Fc ratio for coal partial gasification. A rise of bed temperature favors the semigasification reaction of coal, but the concentrations of carbon monoxide and methane and the HHV decrease with the rise of bed temperature, except hydrogen. In addition, the gas HHVs are between 2.2 and 3.4 MJ/Nm{sup 3}. The gas yield and carbon conversion increase with Fa/Fc ratio, Fs/Fc ratio, and bed temperature, while they decrease with the rise of the rank of coal. 7 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Hongcang Zhou; Baosheng Jing; Zhaoping Zhong; Yaji Huang; Rui Xiao [Nanjing University of Information Science & Technology, Nanjing (China). Department of Environmental Science & Engineering

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Subtask 4.2 - Coal Gasification Short Course  

SciTech Connect

Major utilities, independent power producers, and petroleum and chemical companies are intent on developing a fleet of gasification plants primarily because of high natural gas prices and the implementation of state carbon standards, with federal standards looming. Currently, many projects are being proposed to utilize gasification technologies to produce a synthesis gas or fuel gas stream for the production of hydrogen, liquid fuels, chemicals, and electricity. Financing these projects is challenging because of the complexity, diverse nature of gasification technologies, and the risk associated with certain applications of the technology. The Energy & Environmental Research Center has developed a gasification short course that is designed to provide technical personnel with a broad understanding of gasification technologies and issues, thus mitigating the real or perceived risk associated with the technology. Based on a review of research literature, tutorial presentations, and Web sites on gasification, a short course presentation was prepared. The presentation, consisting of about 500 PowerPoint slides, provides at least 7 hours of instruction tailored to an audience's interests and needs. The initial short course is scheduled to be presented September 9 and 10, 2009, in Grand Forks, North Dakota.

Kevin Galbreath

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

258

ENCOAL Mild Coal Gasification Project. Annual report, October 1990--September 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

ENCOAL Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Shell Mining Company, is constructing a mild gasification demonstration plant at Triton Coal Company`s Buckskin Mine near Gillette, Wyoming. The process, using Liquids From Coal (LFC) technology developed by Shell and SGI International, utilizes low-sulfur Powder River Basin Coal to produce two new fuels, Process Derived Fuel (PDF) and Coal Derived Liquids (CDL). The products, as alternative fuels sources, are expected to significantly reduce current sulfur emissions at industrial and utility boiler sites throughout the nation, thereby reducing pollutants causing acid rain.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

A review of the factors influencing the physicochemical characteristics of underground coal gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article, the physicochemical characteristics of the oxidation zone, the reduction zone, and the destructive distillation and dry zone in the process of underground coal gasification (UCG) were explained. The effect of such major factors as temperature, coal type, water-inrush or -intake rate, the quantity and quality of wind blasting, the thickness of coal seams, operational pressure, the length, and the section of gasification gallery on the quality of the underground gas and their interrelationship were discussed. Research showed that the temperature conditions determined the underground gas compositions; the appropriate water-inrush or -intake rate was conducive to the improvement in gas heat value; the properties of the gasification agent had an obvious effect on the compositions and heat value of the product gas. Under the cyclically changing pressure, heat losses decreased by 60%, with the heat efficiency and gasification efficiency being 1.4 times and 2 times those of constant pressure, respectively. The test research further proved that the underground gasifier with a long channel and a big cross-section, to a large extent, improved the combustion-gasification conditions.

Yang, L.H. [China University of Mining and Technology, Jiangsu (China)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

NETL: Gasification Systems - Liquid Carbon Dioxide/Coal Slurry for Feeding  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feed Systems Feed Systems Liquid Carbon Dioxide/Coal Slurry for Feeding Low-Rank Coal to Gasifiers Project Number: DE-FE0007977 There is increased interest in carbon capture and storage (CCS) for future coal-based power plants, and in a CCS integrated gasification plant, relatively pure, high pressure CO2 stream(s) will be available within the power plant. Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) aims to help reduce the cost and improve the efficiency of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) with CCS by using a portion of the high purity CO2 product stream as the carrier fluid to feed low rank coal (LRC) into the gasifier. EPRI proposes to confirm the potential advantages of LRC/liquid carbon dioxide (LCO2) slurries by: Conducting plant-wide technical and economic simulations.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced coal gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Steady-state model for estimating gas production from underground coal gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pseudo-one-dimensional channel model has been developed to estimate gas production from underground coal gasification. The model incorporates a zero-dimensional steady-state cavity growth submodel and models mass transfer from the bulk gas to the coal wall using a correlation for natural convection. Simulations with the model reveal that the gas calorific value is sensitive to coal reactivity and the exposed reactive surface area per unit volume in the channel. A comparison of model results with several small-scale field trials conducted at Centralia in the U.S.A. show that the model can make good predictions of the gas production and composition under a range of different operating conditions, including operation with air and steam/oxygen mixtures. Further work is required to determine whether the model formulation is also suitable for simulating large-scale underground coal gasification field trials.

Greg Perkins; Veena Sahajwalla [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia). School of Materials Science and Engineering

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

Underground coal gasification: Its potential for long-term supply of sng. Occasional pub  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper examines the viability of underground coal gasification (UCU) as a future source of substitute natural gas (SNG). The economics of commercial scale UCG technology at a western site is estimated and compared with aboveground gasification and also with an extrapolation of GRI's Baseline Projection for natural gas prices. Although much technical and economic uncertainty exists regarding UCG, the potential reserve base for unmineable coals is very large, about four times that of currently mineable coals. Assuming that only 10 percent of the 1.8 trillion tons of marginal U.S. coal resources may be amendable to UCG, this represents 1000 trillion cubic feet of potential SNG production. The UCG economics of the paper are based on a techno-economic study conducted by Williams Brothers Engineering Company; the cosponsors included GRI, Amoco Production Company, Hunt Oil Company, and Williams Brothers Engineering Company.

Hill, V.L.; Burnham, K.B.; Barone, S.P.; Rosenberg, J.I.; Ashby, A.B.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Development of biological coal gasification (MicGAS Process)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall goal of the project is to develop an advanced, clean coal biogasification (MicGAS) Process. The objectives of the research during FY 1993--94 were to: (1) enhance kinetics of methane production (biogasification, biomethanation) from Texas lignite (TxL) by the Mic-1 consortium isolated and developed at ARCTECH, (2) increase coal solids loading, (3) optimize medium composition, and (4) reduce retention time. A closer analysis of the results described here indicate that biomethanation of TxL at >5% solids loading is feasible through appropriate development of nutrient medium and further adaptation of the microorganisms involved in this process. Further understanding of the inhibitory factors and some biochemical manipulations to overcome those inhibitions will hasten the process considerably. Results are discussed on the following: products of biomethanation and enhance of methane production including: bacterial adaptation; effect of nutrient amendment substitutes; effects of solids loading; effect of initial pH of the culture medium; effect of hydrogen donors and carbon balance.

Walia, D.S.; Srivastava, K.C.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

R&D to Prepare and Characterize Robust Coal/Biomass Mixtures for Direct Co-Feeding into Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Prepare and Characterize Robust to Prepare and Characterize Robust Coal/Biomass Mixtures for Direct Co-Feeding into Gasification Background Domestically abundant coal is a significant primary energy source and, when mixed with optimum levels of biomass, has lower carbon footprint compared to conventional petroleum fuels. Coal and biomass mixtures are converted via gasification into synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of predominantly carbon monoxide and hydrogen, which can be subsequently converted to produce liquid fuels and

265

CoalFleet Guideline for Advanced Pulverized Coal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CoalFleet Guideline for Advanced Pulverized Coal Power Plants provides an overview of state-of-the art and emerging technologies for pulverized coal-fired generating units along with lessons learned for current plants worldwide. The Guideline aims to facilitate the timely deployment of reliable, next-generation generating units that incorporate: Higher steam conditions for higher efficiency and reduced generation of pollutants Advanced environmental controls for reduced emissions and environmental im...

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

266

Advancement of High Temperature Black Liquor Gasification Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Weyerhaeuser operates the world's only commercial high-temperature black liquor gasifier at its pulp mill in New Bern, NC. The unit was started-up in December 1996 and currently processes about 15% of the mill's black liquor. Weyerhaeuser, Chemrec AB (the gasifier technology developer), and the U.S. Department of Energy recognized that the long-term, continuous operation of the New Bern gasifier offered a unique opportunity to advance the state of high temperature black liquor gasification toward the commercial-scale pressurized O2-blown gasification technology needed as a foundation for the Forest Products Bio-Refinery of the future. Weyerhaeuser along with its subcontracting partners submitted a proposal in response to the 2004 joint USDOE and USDA solicitation - 'Biomass Research and Development Initiative'. The Weyerhaeuser project 'Advancement of High Temperature Black Liquor Gasification' was awarded USDOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42259 in November 2004. The overall goal of the DOE sponsored project was to utilize the Chemrec{trademark} black liquor gasification facility at New Bern as a test bed for advancing the development status of molten phase black liquor gasification. In particular, project tasks were directed at improvements to process performance and reliability. The effort featured the development and validation of advanced CFD modeling tools and the application of these tools to direct burner technology modifications. The project also focused on gaining a fundamental understanding and developing practical solutions to address condensate and green liquor scaling issues, and process integration issues related to gasifier dregs and product gas scrubbing. The Project was conducted in two phases with a review point between the phases. Weyerhaeuser pulled together a team of collaborators to undertake these tasks. Chemrec AB, the technology supplier, was intimately involved in most tasks, and focused primarily on the design, specification and procurement of facility upgrades. Chemrec AB is also operating a pressurized, O2-blown gasifier pilot facility in Piteaa, Sweden. There was an exchange of knowledge with the pressurized projects including utilization of the experimental results from facilities in Piteaa, Sweden. Resources at the Georgia Tech Research Corporation (GTRC, a.k.a., the Institute of Paper Science and Technology) were employed primarily to conduct the fundamental investigations on scaling and plugging mechanisms and characterization of green liquor dregs. The project also tapped GTRC expertise in the development of the critical underlying black liquor gasification rate subroutines employed in the CFD code. The actual CFD code development and application was undertaken by Process Simulation, Ltd (PSL) and Simulent, Ltd. PSL focused on the overall integrated gasifier CFD code, while Simulent focused on modeling the black liquor nozzle and description of the black liquor spray. For nozzle development and testing Chemrec collaborated with ETC (Energy Technology Centre) in Piteae utilizing their test facility for nozzle spray investigation. GTI (Gas Technology Institute), Des Plains, IL supported the team with advanced gas analysis equipment during the gasifier test period in June 2005.

Craig Brown; Ingvar Landalv; Ragnar Stare; Jerry Yuan; Nikolai DeMartini; Nasser Ashgriz

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

Testing Kentucky Coal to Set Design Criteria for a Lurgi Gasification Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tri-State Synfuels Company, in cooperation with the Commonwealth of Kentucky, undertook a comprehensive coal testing program to support the development of an indirect coal liquefaction project. One of the major elements of the program was a commercial scale gasification test with Kentucky 9 coal in a Lurgi Mark IV dry-bottom gasifier at the Sasol One Plant in Sasolburg, Republic of South Africa, in 1981. The test was conducted to confirm the operability of the Lurgi process on Western Kentucky coal, and to establish the design bases for the TriState Synfuels Project. Other elements of the overall program with Kentucky 9 coal included coal selection, coal characterization, stockpile weatherability, corrosion testing, by-product characterization, and wastewater treatability. The results from this testing program formed the basis for recommendations concerning technical and environmental design criteria and permit applications.

Roeger, A., III; Jones, J. E., Jr.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

NETL: News Release - Coal Gasification Plant Returns $79 Million to DOE in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, 2006 2, 2006 Coal Gasification Plant Returns $79 Million to DOE in Revenue-Sharing Gas Sales Plant Currently Supplies Carbon Dioxide for DOE Sequestration Project Washington, DC -A coal gasification plant purchased from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 1988 recently paid millions of dollars to DOE as part of a revenue sharing agreement and continues to be an integral part of a Department project to sequester millions of tons of carbon dioxide while doubling an oil field's recovery rate. MORE INFO Learn more about the Great Plains Synfuels Plant The Dakota Gasification Company (DGC), which purchased the Great Plains Synfuels Plant near Beulah, N.D., recently announced the payment of more than $79 million to DOE as part of a revenue-sharing agreement signed in

269

BIOMASS GASIFICATION AND POWER GENERATION USING ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A multidisciplined team led by the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) and consisting of Pratt & Whitney Power Systems (PWPS), the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), KraftWork Systems, Inc. (kWS), and the Connecticut Resource Recovery Authority (CRRA) has evaluated a variety of gasified biomass fuels, integrated into advanced gas turbine-based power systems. The team has concluded that a biomass integrated gasification combined-cycle (BIGCC) plant with an overall integrated system efficiency of 45% (HHV) at emission levels of less than half of New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) is technically and economically feasible. The higher process efficiency in itself reduces consumption of premium fuels currently used for power generation including those from foreign sources. In addition, the advanced gasification process can be used to generate fuels and chemicals, such as low-cost hydrogen and syngas for chemical synthesis, as well as baseload power. The conceptual design of the plant consists of an air-blown circulating fluidized-bed Advanced Transport Gasifier and a PWPS FT8 TwinPac{trademark} aeroderivative gas turbine operated in combined cycle to produce {approx}80 MWe. This system uses advanced technology commercial products in combination with components in advanced development or demonstration stages, thereby maximizing the opportunity for early implementation. The biofueled power system was found to have a levelized cost of electricity competitive with other new power system alternatives including larger scale natural gas combined cycles. The key elements are: (1) An Advanced Transport Gasifier (ATG) circulating fluid-bed gasifier having wide fuel flexibility and high gasification efficiency; (2) An FT8 TwinPac{trademark}-based combined cycle of approximately 80 MWe; (3) Sustainable biomass primary fuel source at low cost and potentially widespread availability-refuse-derived fuel (RDF); (4) An overall integrated system that exceeds the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal of 40% (HHV) efficiency at emission levels well below the DOE suggested limits; and (5) An advanced biofueled power system whose levelized cost of electricity can be competitive with other new power system alternatives.

David Liscinsky

2002-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

270

Combustion Engineering Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle Repowering Project: Clean Coal Technology Program  

SciTech Connect

On February 22, 1988, DOE issued Program Opportunity Notice (PON) Number-DE-PS01-88FE61530 for Round II of the CCT Program. The purpose of the PON was to solicit proposals to conduct cost-shared ICCT projects to demonstrate technologies that are capable of being commercialized in the 1990s, that are more cost-effective than current technologies, and that are capable of achieving significant reduction of SO[sub 2] and/or NO[sub x] emissions from existing coal burning facilities, particularly those that contribute to transboundary and interstate pollution. The Combustion Engineering (C-E) Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Repowering Project was one of 16 proposals selected by DOE for negotiation of cost-shared federal funding support from among the 55 proposals that were received in response to the PON. The ICCT Program has developed a three-level strategy for complying with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) that is consistent with the President's Council on Environmental Quality regulations implementing NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508) and the DOE guidelines for compliance with NEPA (10 CFR 1021). The strategy includes the consideration of programmatic and project-specific environmental impacts during and subsequent to the reject selection process.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

High Temperature Electrochemical Polishing of H(2)S from Coal Gasification. Quarterly progress report, April 1-June 30, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An advanced process for the separation of hydrogen sulfide from coal gasification streams through an electrochemical membrane is being perfected. H{sub 2}S is removed from a synthetic gas stream, split into hydrogen, which enriches the exiting syngas, and sulfur, which is condensed downstream from an inert sweep gas stream. The process allows for continuous removal of H{sub 2}S without cooling the gas stream while allowing negligible pressure loss through the separator. Moreover, the process is economically attractive due to the elimination of the need for a Claus process for sulfur recovery. To this extent the project presents a novel concept for improving utilization of coal for more efficient power generation.

Winnick, J.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

Materials challenges in advanced coal conversion technologies  

SciTech Connect

Coal is a critical component in the international energy portfolio, used extensively for electricity generation. Coal is also readily converted to liquid fuels and/or hydrogen for the transportation industry. However, energy extracted from coal comes at a large environmental price: coal combustion can produce large quantities of ash and CO{sub 2}, as well as other pollutants. Advanced technologies can increase the efficiencies and decrease the emissions associated with burning coal and provide an opportunity for CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration. However, these advanced technologies increase the severity of plant operating conditions and thus require improved materials that can stand up to the harsh operating environments. The materials challenges offered by advanced coal conversion technologies must be solved in order to make burning coal an economically and environmentally sound choice for producing energy.

Powem, C.A.; Morreale, B.D. [National Energy Technology Laboratory, Albany, OR (United States)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008. “Annual Report on US Wind Power Installation, Cost,Feed Sequestration Site Wind Power Figure ES-1. AdvancedFeed Sequestration Site Wind Power Figure 1. Advanced-Coal

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Hydrogen production by high-temperature steam gasification of biomass and coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-temperature steam gasification of paper, yellow pine woodchips, and Pittsburgh bituminous coal was investigated in a batch-type flow reactor at temperatures in the range of 700 to 1,200{sup o}C at two different ratios of steam to feedstock molar ratios. Hydrogen yield of 54.7% for paper, 60.2% for woodchips, and 57.8% for coal was achieved on a dry basis, with a steam flow rate of 6.3 g/min at steam temperature of 1,200{sup o}C. Yield of both the hydrogen and carbon monoxide increased while carbon dioxide and methane decreased with the increase in gasification temperature. A 10-fold reduction in tar residue was obtained at high-temperature steam gasification, compared to low temperatures. Steam and gasification temperature affects the composition of the syngas produced. Higher steam-to-feedstock molar ratio had negligible effect on the amount of hydrogen produced in the syngas in the fixed-batch type of reactor. Gasification temperature can be used to control the amounts of hydrogen or methane produced from the gasification process. This also provides mean to control the ratio of hydrogen to CO in the syngas, which can then be processed to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuel since the liquid fuel production requires an optimum ratio between hydrogen and CO. The syngas produced can be further processed to produce pure hydrogen. Biomass fuels are good source of renewable fuels to produce hydrogen or liquid fuels using controlled steam gasification.

Kriengsak, S.N.; Buczynski, R.; Gmurczyk, J.; Gupta, A.K. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Product Characterization for Entrained Flow Coal/Biomass Co-Gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy‘s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) is exploring affordable technologies and processes to convert domestic coal and biomass resources to high-quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels. This interest is primarily motivated by the need to increase energy security and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the United States. Gasification technologies represent clean, flexible and efficient conversion pathways to utilize coal and biomass resources. Substantial experience and knowledge had been developed worldwide on gasification of either coal or biomass. However, reliable data on effects of blending various biomass fuels with coal during gasification process and resulting syngas composition are lacking. In this project, GE Global Research performed a complete characterization of the gas, liquid and solid products that result from the co-gasification of coal/biomass mixtures. This work was performed using a bench-scale gasifier (BSG) and a pilot-scale entrained flow gasifier (EFG). This project focused on comprehensive characterization of the products from gasifying coal/biomass mixtures in a high-temperature, high-pressure entrained flow gasifier. Results from this project provide guidance on appropriate gas clean-up systems and optimization of operating parameters needed to develop and commercialize gasification technologies. GE‘s bench-scale test facility provided the bulk of high-fidelity quantitative data under temperature, heating rate, and residence time conditions closely matching those of commercial oxygen-blown entrained flow gasifiers. Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) pilot-scale test facility provided focused high temperature and pressure tests at entrained flow gasifier conditions. Accurate matching of syngas time-temperature history during cooling ensured that complex species interactions including homogeneous and heterogeneous processes such as particle nucleation, coagulation, surface condensation, and gas-phase reactions were properly reproduced and lead to representative syngas composition at the syngas cooler outlet. The experimental work leveraged other ongoing GE R&D efforts such as biomass gasification and dry feeding systems projects. Experimental data obtained under this project were used to provide guidance on the appropriate clean-up system(s) and operating parameters to coal and biomass combinations beyond those evaluated under this project.

Maghzi, Shawn; Subramanian, Ramanathan; Rizeq, George; Singh, Surinder; McDermott, John; Eiteneer, Boris; Ladd, David; Vazquez, Arturo; Anderson, Denise; Bates, Noel

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

276

Product Characterization for Entrained Flow Coal/Biomass Co-Gasification  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energyâ??s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) is exploring affordable technologies and processes to convert domestic coal and biomass resources to high-quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels. This interest is primarily motivated by the need to increase energy security and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the United States. Gasification technologies represent clean, flexible and efficient conversion pathways to utilize coal and biomass resources. Substantial experience and knowledge had been developed worldwide on gasification of either coal or biomass. However, reliable data on effects of blending various biomass fuels with coal during gasification process and resulting syngas composition are lacking. In this project, GE Global Research performed a complete characterization of the gas, liquid and solid products that result from the co-gasification of coal/biomass mixtures. This work was performed using a bench-scale gasifier (BSG) and a pilot-scale entrained flow gasifier (EFG). This project focused on comprehensive characterization of the products from gasifying coal/biomass mixtures in a high-temperature, high-pressure entrained flow gasifier. Results from this project provide guidance on appropriate gas clean-up systems and optimization of operating parameters needed to develop and commercialize gasification technologies. GEâ??s bench-scale test facility provided the bulk of high-fidelity quantitative data under temperature, heating rate, and residence time conditions closely matching those of commercial oxygen-blown entrained flow gasifiers. Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) pilot-scale test facility provided focused high temperature and pressure tests at entrained flow gasifier conditions. Accurate matching of syngas time-temperature history during cooling ensured that complex species interactions including homogeneous and heterogeneous processes such as particle nucleation, coagulation, surface condensation, and gas-phase reactions were properly reproduced and lead to representative syngas composition at the syngas cooler outlet. The experimental work leveraged other ongoing GE R&D efforts such as biomass gasification and dry feeding systems projects. Experimental data obtained under this project were used to provide guidance on the appropriate clean-up system(s) and operating parameters to coal and biomass combinations beyond those evaluated under this project.

Shawn Maghzi; Ramanathan Subramanian; George Rizeq; Surinder Singh; John McDermott; Boris Eiteneer; David Ladd; Arturo Vazquez; Denise Anderson; Noel Bates

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

277

NETL: Gasification Systems - Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training And Research (AVESTAR(tm)) Facility Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training And Research (AVESTAR(tm)) Facility Project No: Adv Gas-FY131415 Task 6 Developed as a part of NETL's initiative to advance new clean coal technology, the Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training And Research (AVESTARTM) Center is focused on training engineers and energy plant operators in the efficient, productive, and safe operation of highly efficient power generation systems that also protect the environment. Comprehensive dynamic simulator-based instruction better prepares operators and engineers to manage advanced energy plants according to economic constraints while minimizing or avoiding the impact of any potentially harmful, wasteful, or inefficient events. Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research Center - AVESTAR

278

Thermal energy storage for an integrated coal gasification combined-cycle power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study investigates the use of molten nitrate salt thermal energy storage in an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant allowing the facility to economically provide peak- and intermediate-load electric power. The results of the study show that an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant with thermal energy storage can reduce the cost of coal-fired peak- or intermediate-load electric power by between 5% and 20% depending on the plants operating schedule. The use of direct-contact salt heating can further improve the economic attractiveness of the concept. 11 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Brown, D.R.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Thermal energy storage for an integrated coal gasification combined-cycle power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the use of molten nitrate salt thermal energy storage in an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant allowing the facility to economically provide peak- and intermediate-load electric power. The results of the study show that an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant with thermal energy storage can reduce the cost of coal-fired peak- or intermediate-load electric power by between 5% and 20% depending on the plants operating schedule. The use of direct-contact salt heating can further improve the economic attractiveness of the concept. 12 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Drost, K.; Antoniak, Z.; Brown, D.; Somasundaram, S.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Assessment of underground coal gasification in bituminous coals: potential UCG products and markets. Final report, Phase I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following conclusions were drawn from the study: (1) The US will continue to require new sources of energy fuels and substitutes for petrochemical feedstocks into the foreseeable future. Most of this requirement will be met using coal. However, the cost of mining, transporting, cleaning, and preparing coal, disposing of ash or slag and scrubbing stack gases continues to rise; particularly, in the Eastern US where the need is greatest. UCG avoids these pitfalls and, as such, should be considered a viable alternative to the mining of deeper coals. (2) Of the two possible product gases LBG and MBG, MBG is the most versatile. (3) The most logical use for UCG product in the Eastern US is to generate power on-site using a combined-cycle or co-generation system. Either low or medium Btu gas (LBG or MBG) can be used. (4) UCG should be an option whenever surface gasification is considered; particularly, in areas where deeper, higher sulfur coal is located. (5) There are environmental and social benefits to use of UCG over surface gasification in the Eastern US. (6) A site could be chosen almost anywhere in the Illinois and Ohio area where amenable UCG coal has been determined due to the existence of existing transportation or transmission systems. (7) The technology needs to be demonstrated and the potential economic viability determined at a site in the East-North-Central US which has commercial quantities of amenable bituminous coal before utilities will show significant interest.

None

1982-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced coal gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Modeling the Performance, Emissions, and Costs of Texaco Gasifier-Based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems are an advanced power generation concept with the flexibility to use coal, heavy oils, petroleum coke, biomass, and waste… (more)

Akunuri, Naveen

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Effect of pretreatment and additives on boron release during pyrolysis and gasification of coal  

SciTech Connect

Boron is one of the most toxic and highly volatile elements present in coal. As part of a series of studies carried out on coal cleaning to prevent environmental problems and to promote efficient coal utilization processes, the removal of boron by leaching with water and acetic acid has been investigated. The effects of the addition of ash components, that is, SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and CaO on the control of boron release during pyrolysis and gasification were investigated. Here, 20-70% of boron in coal was removed by leaching the coal with water and acetic acid. Boron leached by water and acetic acid was related to the volatiles released from coal in pyrolysis below 1173 K. The addition of ash components such as SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was found to be effective in suppressing the release of boron during pyrolysis at temperatures below and above 1173 K, respectively. The addition of CaO to coal was effective in suppressing the release of boron during gasification at 1173 K. 26 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Yuuki Mochizuki; Katsuyasu Sugawara; Yukio Enda [Akita University, Akita (Japan). Faculty of Engineering and Resources Science

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Fixed bed gasification studies on coal-feedlot biomass and coal-chicken litter biomass under batch mode operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the U.S. alone, approximately 200 million tons of dry cattle waste are being produced annually. Recently, cattle and poultry manure have been classified as biomass fuels and have been identified as sources of renewable energy. One of the processes for energy conversion of biomass fuels is thermochemical gasification. For the current study, a laboratory scale, 10 kW[th], fixed-bed gasifier (reactor internal diameter 0.15 m, reactor height 0.30 m) facility was built at the Texas A&M University Boiler Burner Laboratory, and was fired with a) coal, b) feedlot biomass (FB), c) chicken litter biomass (LB), d) high ash feedlot biomass (HFB), e) coal: FB blend (CFB), f) coal: LB blend (CLB), g) coal: HFB blend (CHFB), and h) LB: HFB blend (LHFB). The temperature profiles, and the gas species profile in the bed are measured and the species analyzed for heat contribution. The parametric studies include the effect of fuel particle size (average particle used were 0.52 mm and 9.5 mm), and the air flow rate (45 and 60 SCFH) on the gasification characteristics of the fuels. A summary of the results is as follows: The peak temperature in the bed was about 1500 K for coal (4.28 % ash), 1350 K for FB (14.83 % ash), and 1200 K for LB (43.85 % ash), correlating the decreased peak temperature with increased ash content. The devolatilization of coal, FB, and LB yielded the following: CH? (%): 2.5, 1.8, 1.0, CO (%): 27.9, 29.1, 29.1, H?: 8.5, 8.0, 7.0. On an average, the heating value of the product gas leaving the gasifier was about 5.0 MJ/m³ for coal, 4.8 MJ/m³ for FB, and 4.5 MJ/m³ for LB. The gasification efficiency (45 SCFH) was the lowest for coal (37 %), followed by 39 % for FB, and 68.47 % for LB fuels. LB (18.9 % (Na?O + K?O) in ash) showed consistent bed agglomeration, while FB (7.03 %) showed a reduced tendency for agglomeration, and coal (1.98 %) exhibited no agglomeration in the bed. Based on the current gasification study FB is preferred compared to LB, since the former has a lesser tendency to agglomerate.

Priyadarsan, Soyuz

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Effect of steam partial pressure on gasification rate and gas composition of product gas from catalytic steam gasification of HyperCoal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HyperCoal was produced from coal by a solvent extraction method. The effect of the partial pressure of steam on the gasification rate and gas composition at temperatures of 600, 650, 700, and 750{sup o}C was examined. The gasification rate decreased with decreasing steam partial pressure. The reaction order with respect to steam partial pressure was between 0.2 and 0.5. The activation energy for the K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-catalyzed HyperCoal gasification was independent of the steam partial pressure and was about 108 kJ/mol. The gas composition changed with steam partial pressure and H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} decreased and CO increased with decreasing steam partial pressure. By changing the partial pressure of the steam, the H{sub 2}/CO ratio of the synthesis gas can be controlled. 18 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Atul Sharma; Ikuo Saito; Toshimasa Takanohashi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Ibaraki (Japan). Advanced Fuel Group

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

CoalFleet Integrated-Gasification-Combined-Cycle (IGCC) Permitting Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRIs CoalFleet for Tomorrow Program was formed to accelerate the deployment and commercialization of clean, efficient, advanced coal-fired power systems. During the planning and construction of these power systems, facility owners must obtain permits for plant construction and operation, discharge of pollutants to air and water, land and water use, and other areas of regulatory control. Such permits must be negotiated with regulators who are often not familiar with advanced coal technologies. These Coal...

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

286

Theoretical and experimental studies of fixed-bed coal gasification reactors. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A laboratory fixed-bed gasification reactor was designed and built with the objective of collecting operational data for model validation and parameter estimation. The reactor consists of a 4 inch stainless steel tube filled with coal or char. Air and steam is fed at one end of the reactor and the dynamic progress of gasification in the coal or char bed is observed through thermocouples mounted at various radial and axial locations. Product gas compositions are also monitored as a function of time. Results of gasification runs using Wyoming coal are included in this report. In parallel with the experimental study, a two-dimensional model of moving bed gasifiers was developed, coded into a computer program and tested. This model was used to study the laboratory gasifier by setting the coal feed rate equal to zero. The model is based on prior work on steady state and dynamic modeling done at Washington University and published elsewhere in the literature. Comparisons are made between model predictions and experimental results. These are also included in this report. 23 references, 18 figures, 6 tables.

Joseph, B.; Bhattacharya, A.; Salam, L.; Dudukovic, M.P.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Credit Applications for 2007-2008 Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Credit Applications for...

288

Exxon catalytic coal gasification process: predevelopment program. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1976  

SciTech Connect

Predevelopment Program activities for the Exxon Catalytic Gasification Process include: recommissioning of the existing 20 lbs/hr Fluid Bed Gasifier (FBG); modifications to the FBG data acquisition system including the on-line computer program for the calculation of unit material balances from process variable data; start-up and initial operations of the 1-3 lbs/hr Continuous Gasification Unit (CGU); and computer programs development for CRT display of the CGU operating variables profile and for on-line material balance calculations. Data were obtained in the CGU for the gasification of catalyzed Illinois coal during four continuous and two captive fluid-bed yield periods. Good agreement was obtained with previous fixed bed kinetic data. This project is an ERDA-sponsored extension of previous EXXON results.

Kalina, T.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Construction Begins on First-of-its-Kind Advanced Clean Coal Electric  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction Begins on First-of-its-Kind Advanced Clean Coal Construction Begins on First-of-its-Kind Advanced Clean Coal Electric Generating Facility Construction Begins on First-of-its-Kind Advanced Clean Coal Electric Generating Facility September 10, 2007 - 3:16pm Addthis ORLANDO, Fla. - Officials representing the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Southern Company, KBR Inc. and the Orlando Utilities Commission (OUC) today broke ground to begin construction of an advanced 285-megawatt integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) facility near Orlando, Fla. The new generating station will be among the cleanest, most efficient coal-fueled power plants in the world. Southern Company will operate the facility through its Southern Power subsidiary, which builds, owns, and manages the company's competitive generation assets. It will be located at OUC's Stanton Energy Center in

290

Improving process performances in coal gasification for power and synfuel production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is aimed at developing process alternatives of conventional coal gasification. A number of possibilities are presented, simulated, and discussed in order to improve the process performances, to avoid the use of pure oxygen, and to reduce the overall CO{sub 2} emissions. The different process configurations considered include both power production, by means of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant, and synfuel production, by means of Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis. The basic idea is to thermally couple a gasifier, fed with coal and steam, and a combustor where coal is burnt with air, thus overcoming the need of expensive pure oxygen as a feedstock. As a result, no or little nitrogen is present in the syngas produced by the gasifier; the required heat is transferred by using an inert solid as the carrier, which is circulated between the two modules. First, a thermodynamic study of the dual-bed gasification is carried out. Then a dual-bed gasification process is simulated by Aspen Plus, and the efficiency and overall CO{sub 2} emissions of the process are calculated and compared with a conventional gasification with oxygen. Eventually, the scheme with two reactors (gasifier-combustor) is coupled with an IGCC process. The simulation of this plant is compared with that of a conventional IGCC, where the gasifier is fed by high purity oxygen. According to the newly proposed configuration, the global plant efficiency increases by 27.9% and the CO{sub 2} emissions decrease by 21.8%, with respect to the performances of a conventional IGCC process. 29 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

M. Sudiro; A. Bertucco; F. Ruggeri; M. Fontana [University of Padova, Milan (Italy). Italy and Foster Wheeler Italiana Spa

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

runs a very active Carbon Storage Program as a companion strategic activity to gasification, under the Coal and Power Systems Program. Also, see the Carbon Sequestration...

292

Great plains coal gasification plant: Technical lessons learned report  

SciTech Connect

In a first of a kind, grass roots plant of the complexity of the Great Plains Gasification Plant the lessons learned are numerous and encompass a wide range of items. This report documents the lessons learned from all phases of the project from preliminary design through the most recent operation of the plant. Based on these lessons learned, suggestions are made for changes and/or process improvements to future synfuel plants. In addition, recommendations are made for research and development in selected areas. 46 refs., 31 figs., 33 tabs.

Delaney, R.C.; Mako, P.F.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

NETL: Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Systems Coal and Power Systems Gasification Systems Gasifier Optimization & Plant Supporting Systems Feed Systems Feed Systems Gasifier Optimization & Plant Supporting...

294

AVESTAR® - Gasification Dynamic Simulator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meet Our Partners Simulators IGCC Gasification Combined Cycle NGCC SCOT Oxy-coal Shale Gas 3D Virtual IGCC Training How to Register for Training IGCC Gasification Combined...

295

Great Plains Coal Gasification project. Quarterly technical progress report, third quarter 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The operations of the Great Plains Gasification Plant are reported for the third quarter of 1985. Contents include the following: (1) lignite coal production; (2) SNG production; (3) SNG gas quality; (4) by-products production and inventories; (5) on-stream factors; (6) raw material, product and by-product consumption and energy consumption for plant operations; (7) plant modifications-1985; (8) plant maintenance; (9) safety; (10) industrial hygiene; (11) medical services; (12) environmental; and (13) quality assurance/quality control activities.

Not Available

1985-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

296

Great Plains Coal Gasification project. Quarterly technical progress report fourth quarter, 1985  

SciTech Connect

The operations of the Great Plains Gasification plant are reported for the fourth quarter of 1985. Contents include the following: (1) lignite coal production; (2) SNG production; (3) SNG gas quality; (4) by-products production and inventories; (5) on-stream factors; (6) raw material, product and by-product consumption and energy consumption for plant operations; (7) plant modifications - 1985; (8) plant maintenance; (9) safety; (10) industrial hygiene; (11) medical service; (12) environmental; and (13) quality assurance/quality control activities.

Not Available

1986-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

In situ formation of coal gasification catalysts from low cost alkali metal salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A carbonaceous material, such as crushed coal, is admixed or impregnated with an inexpensive alkali metal compound, such as sodium chloride, and then pretreated with a stream containing steam at a temperature of 350.degree. to 650.degree. C. to enhance the catalytic activity of the mixture in a subsequent gasification of the mixture. The treatment may result in the transformation of the alkali metal compound into another, more catalytically active, form.

Wood, Bernard J. (Santa Clara, CA); Brittain, Robert D. (Cupertino, CA); Sancier, Kenneth M. (Menlo Park, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Wiang Haeng coal-water fuel preparation and gasification, Thailand - task 39  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to an inquiry by the Department of Mineral Resources (DMR) in Thailand, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) prepared a four-task program to assess the responsiveness of Wiang Haeng coal to the temperature and pressure conditions of hot-water drying (HWD). The results indicate that HWD made several improvements in the coal, notably increases (HWD). The results indicate that HWD made several improvements in the coal, notably increases in heating value and carbon content and reductions in equilibrium moisture and oxygen content. The equilibrium moisture content decreased from 37.4 wt% for the raw coal to about 20 wt% for the HWD coals. The energy density for a pumpable coal-water fuel indicates an increase from 4450 to 6650 Btu/lb by hydrothermal treatment. Raw and HWD coal were then gasified at various mild gasification conditions of 700{degrees}C and 30 psig. The tests indicated that the coal is probably similar to other low-rank coals, will produce high levels of hydrogen, and be fairly reactive.

Anderson, C.M.; Musich, M.A.; Young, B.C. [and others

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume III  

SciTech Connect

A generalized one-dimensional, heterogeneous, steady-state, fixed-bed model for coal gasification and combustion is presented. The model, FBED-1, is a design and analysis tool that can be used to simulate a variety of gasification, devolatilization, and combustion processes. The model considers separate gas and solid temperatures, axially variable solid and gas flow rates, variable bed void fraction, coal drying, devolatilization based on chemical functional group composition, depolymerization, vaporization and crosslinking, oxidation, and gasification of char, and partial equilibrium in the gas phase.

Ghani, M.U.; Hobbs, M.L.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Climate VISION: Events - Advanced Clean Coal Workshop  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Advanced Clean Coal Workshop Advanced Clean Coal Workshop Objective: Industry and government discussion of key issues and policy options related to deploying clean coal power plants in the marketplace. The following documents are available for download as Adobe PDF documents. Download Acrobat Reader AGENDA July 29, 2004 EEI Conference Center 701 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 8:15 Welcome from Host Thomas Kuhn, President, EEI Opening (Context & Goals) & Introduction Larisa Dobriansky, DOE Kyle McSlarrow, Deputy Secretary, DOE James E. Rogers, Chairman, Cinergy 8:45 Framing the Risks and Challenges for Commercial Clean Coal Plants Results of Risk Framework Analysis, David Berg, DOE (PDF 267 KB) Cost Comparison of IGCC and Advanced Clean Coal Plants, Stu Dalton, EPRI (PDF 684 KB)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced coal gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Gasification Â… Program Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clearwater Clean Coal Conference, Clearwater, Florida, June 5 to 9, 2011 Clearwater Clean Coal Conference, Clearwater, Florida, June 5 to 9, 2011 Gasification Technologies Advances for Future Energy Plants Jenny B. Tennant Technology Manager - Gasification 2 Gasification Program Goal "Federal support of scientific R&D is critical to our economic competitiveness" Dr. Steven Chu, Secretary of Energy November 2010 The goal of the Gasification Program is to reduce the cost of electricity, while increasing power plant availability and efficiency, and maintaining the highest environmental standards 3 Oxygen Membrane - APCI - 25% capital cost reduction - 5.0% COE reduction Warm Gas Cleaning - RTI in combination with H 2 /CO 2 Membrane - Eltron - 2.9 % pt efficiency increase - 12% COE decrease Oxygen CO 2 H 2 rich stream Water Gas Shift*

302

High-yield hydrogen production by catalytic gasification of coal or biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gasification of coal or wood, catalyzed by soluble metallic cations to maximize reaction rates and hydrogen yields, offers a potential for large-scale, economical hydrogen production with near-commercial technology. With optimum reaction conditions and catalysts, product gas rich in both hydrogen and methane can be used in fuel cells to produce electricity at efficiencies nearly double those of conventional power plant. If plantation silvaculture techniques can produce wood at a raw energy cost competitive with coal, further enhancement of product gas yields may be possible, with zero net contribution of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere.

Hauserman, W.B.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Great Plains Coal Gasification Project. Quarterly technical progress report, second quarter 1986. [Lurgi process  

SciTech Connect

The operations of the Great Plains coal gasification plant are reported for the second quarter of 1986. The following areas are covered: (1) lignite coal production; (2) SNG production; (3) SNG gas quality; (4) by-products production and inventories; (5) on-stream factors; (6) raw material, product and by-product consumption and energy consumption for plant operations; (7) plant modifications - 1986 budget; (8) plant maintenance; (9) safety; (10) industrial hygiene; (11) medical services; (12) environmental executive summary; and (13) quality assurance/quality control activities. (AT)

Not Available

1986-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

Great Plains coal gasification project: Quarterly technical progress report, Third quarter 1986. [Lurgi process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accomplishments for the third quarter of 1986 are presented for the Great Plains coal gasification plant. The following areas are discussed: (1) lignite coal production; (2) SNG production; (3) SNG gas quality; (4) by-products production and inventories; (5) onstream factors; (6) raw material, product and by-product consumption and energy consumption for plant operations; (7) plant modifications - 1986 budget; (8) plant maintenance; (9) safety; (10) industrial hygiene; (11) medical services; (12) environmental executive summary; and (13) quality assurance/quality control activities.

Not Available

1986-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

305

Flash pyrolysis and gasification of coal through laser heating  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental results obtained from the rapid pyrolysis of finely powdered coal are presented. The experiments are designed to provide basic information on gas yield, gas composition, optimum fluxes, and temperature history of coal samples under high intensity laser radiation. The information obtained from these experiments will be used to test concepts for the use of concentrated sunlight to produce fuel gases from coal. Heating the coal at rates of 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 4/ C/s in an inert atmosphere of argon results in pyrolysis at temperatures between 400 and 800/sup 0/C. The gases evolved are primarily CO, H/sub 2/, and CH/sub 4/ with lesser amounts of CO/sub 2/ and other light hydrocarbons. Mass spectrometry is used to determine the composition of the evolved gases. The optimum flux for laser pyrolysis of coal was found to be 250 W/cm/sup 2/. Results from experiments wherein the char created by pyrolysis is gasified to CO in an atmosphere of CO/sub 2/ are also presented.

Beattie, W.H.; Sullivan, J.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

The influence of CO? on the steam gasification rate of a typical South African coal / Gillis J.D. Du Toit.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??It is recognised that the reactions with steam and CO2 are the rate limiting step during coal gasification, and a vast number of studies has… (more)

Du Toit, Gillis Johannes Dekorte

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

G+CC+CCS IGCC+CCS FT HVAC HVDC IGCC PC advanced coal-windthan the Base Case (HVDC Only Transmission) Sensitivity toused in the FEAST model. HVDC transmission lines have lower

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Coal-Wind Non-Hybrid SNG IGCC+CCS PC CCGT Windor a synthetic natural gas (SNG) production facility) and anwithout Fuel With with SNG Production or Syncrude Production

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

NETL: Gasification Systems - Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feed Systems Feed Systems Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for the Utilization of Low-Rank Coals Project Number: DE-FE0007759 Refinery offgas PSA at Air Products' facility in Baytown, TX Refinery offgas PSA at Air Products' facility in Baytown, TX. Air Products, in collaboration with the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC), is testing its Sour Pressure Swing Adsorption (Sour PSA) process that separates syngas into an hydrogen-rich stream and second stream comprising of sulfur compounds(primarily hydrogen sulfide)carbon dioxide (CO2), and other impurities. The adsorbent technology testing that has been performed to date utilized syngas streams derived from higher rank coals and petcoke. Using data from experiments based on petcoke-derived syngas, replacing the

310

Gasification | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gasification Gasification Gasification The Wabash River Clean Coal Power Plant The Wabash River Clean Coal Power Plant Gasification Technology R&D Coal gasification offers one of the most versatile and clean ways to convert coal into electricity, hydrogen, and other valuable energy products. Coal gasification electric power plants are now operating commercially in the United States and in other nations, and many experts predict that coal gasification will be at the heart of future generations of clean coal technology plants. Rather than burning coal directly, gasification (a thermo-chemical process) breaks down coal - or virtually any carbon-based feedstock - into its basic chemical constituents. In a modern gasifier, coal is typically exposed to steam and carefully controlled amounts of air or oxygen under high

311

Advanced power systems featuring a closely coupled catalytic gasification carbonate fuel cell plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pursuing the key national goal of clean and efficient uulization of the abundant domestic coal resources for power generation, a study was conducted with DOE/METC support to evaluate the potential of integrated gasification/carbonate fuel cell power generation systems. By closely coupling the fuel cell with the operation of a catalytic gasifier, the advantages of both the catalytic gasification and the high efficiency fuel cell complement each other, resulting in a power plant system with unsurpassed efficiencies approaching 55% (HHV). Low temperature catalytic gasification producing a high methane fuel gas offers the potential for high gas efficiencies by operating with minimal or no combustion. Heat required for gasification is provided by combination of recycle from the fuel cell and exothermic methanation and shift reactions. Air can be supplemented if required. In combination with internally reforming carbonate fuel cells, low temperature catalytic gasification can achieve very attractive system efficiencies while producing extremely low emissions compared to conventional plants utilizing coal. Three system configurations based on recoverable and disposable gasification catalysts were studied. Experimental tests were conducted to evaluate these gasification catalysts. The recoverable catalyst studied was potassium carbonate, and the disposable catalysts were calcium in the form of limestone and iron in the form of taconite. Reactivities of limestone and iron were lower than that of potassium, but were improved by using the catalyst in solution form. Promising results were obtained in the system evaluations as well as the experimental testing of the gasification catalysts. To realize the potential of these high efficiency power plant systems more effort is required to develop catalytic gasification systems and their integration with carbonate fuel cells.

Steinfeld, G.; Wilson, W.G.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Advanced power systems featuring a closely coupled catalytic gasification carbonate fuel cell plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pursuing the key national goal of clean and efficient uulization of the abundant domestic coal resources for power generation, a study was conducted with DOE/METC support to evaluate the potential of integrated gasification/carbonate fuel cell power generation systems. By closely coupling the fuel cell with the operation of a catalytic gasifier, the advantages of both the catalytic gasification and the high efficiency fuel cell complement each other, resulting in a power plant system with unsurpassed efficiencies approaching 55% (HHV). Low temperature catalytic gasification producing a high methane fuel gas offers the potential for high gas efficiencies by operating with minimal or no combustion. Heat required for gasification is provided by combination of recycle from the fuel cell and exothermic methanation and shift reactions. Air can be supplemented if required. In combination with internally reforming carbonate fuel cells, low temperature catalytic gasification can achieve very attractive system efficiencies while producing extremely low emissions compared to conventional plants utilizing coal. Three system configurations based on recoverable and disposable gasification catalysts were studied. Experimental tests were conducted to evaluate these gasification catalysts. The recoverable catalyst studied was potassium carbonate, and the disposable catalysts were calcium in the form of limestone and iron in the form of taconite. Reactivities of limestone and iron were lower than that of potassium, but were improved by using the catalyst in solution form. Promising results were obtained in the system evaluations as well as the experimental testing of the gasification catalysts. To realize the potential of these high efficiency power plant systems more effort is required to develop catalytic gasification systems and their integration with carbonate fuel cells.

Steinfeld, G.; Wilson, W.G.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Hydrogen separation by ceramic membranes in coal gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project objectives are to develop hydrogen-permselective ceramic membranes for water-gas shift membrane-reactor suitable for hydrogen production from coal gas, and to evaluate the technical and economic potential of the membrane-reactor. Work performed during reporting period included membrane deposition and stability testing.

Gavalas, G.R.

1992-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

314

Coal Gasification Research, Development and Demonstration- Needs and Opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The resolution of the carbon/energy/environment conflict is the key issue for future coalbased power generation. Concern over CO2 emissions and their effect on global climate may lead to a more carbon constrained world and possible CO2 emissions related legislation. This adds another dimension to natural gas/coal strategic planning. Since

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration (Project)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains a description of technical progress made on the Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration Project (ACCP). The project is a US Department of Energy Innovative Clean Coal Technology Project. The cooperative agreement defining the project is between DOE and the Rosebud SynCoal Partnership RSCP. The RSCP is a partnership between Western Energy Company (WECo), a subsidiary of Entech, Montana Power's non-utility group, and NRG, a subsidiary of Northern States Power. The ACCP is a method of upgrading low ranked coals by reducing the moisture and sulfur content and increasing the heating value. The facility is being constructed at WECo's Rosebud No. 6 coal mine, west of Colstrip, Montana. This report contains both a history of the process development and a report of technical progress made since the beginning of the Clean Coal 1 cooperative agreement.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Diffusion Coatings for Corrosion-Resistant Components in Coal Gasification Systems  

SciTech Connect

Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high-temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low-cost alloy may improve its resistance to such sulfidation attack, and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. During this period, we analyzed several coated and exposed samples of 409 steel by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX), and report on the findings of four samples: (1) Analysis of two porous coupons after exposure to the porous metal particulate filter of the coal gasification power plant at 370 C for 2140 hours revealed that corrosion takes place in the bulk of the sample while the most external zone surface survived the test. (2) Coating and characterization of several porous 409 steel coupons after being coated with nitrides of Ti, Al and/or Si showed that adjusting experimental conditions results in thicker coatings in the bulk of the sample. (3) Analysis of coupons exposed to simulated coal gas at 370 C for 300 hours showed that a better corrosion resistance is achieved by improving the coatings in the bulk of the samples.

Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Esperanza Alvarez; Kai-Hung Lau; Jordi Perez-Mariano; Angel Sanjurjo

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

Storing syngas lowers the carbon price for profitable coal gasification  

SciTech Connect

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generation systems with carbon capture and sequestration have desirable environmental qualities but are not profitable when the carbon dioxide price is less than approximately $50 per metric ton. We examine whether an IGCC facility that operates its gasifier continuously but stores the syngas and produces electricity only when daily prices are high may be profitable at significantly lower CO{sub 2} prices. Using a probabilistic analysis, we have calculated the plant-level return on investment (ROI) and the value of syngas storage for IGCC facilities located in the U.S. Midwest using a range of storage configurations. Adding a second turbine to use the stored syngas to generate electricity at peak hours and implementing 12 h of above-ground high-pressure syngas storage significantly increases the ROI and net present value. Storage lowers the carbon price at which IGCC enters the U.S. generation mix by approximately 25%. 36 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Adam Newcomer; Jay Apt [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

Impact of Advanced Turbine Systems on coal-based power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The advanced power-generation products currently under development in our program show great promise for ultimate commercial use. Four of these products are referred to in this paper: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC), Externally Fired Combined Cycle (EFCC), and Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell (IGFC). Three of these products, IGCC, PFBC, and EFCC, rely on advanced gas turbines as a key enabling technology and the foundation for efficiencies in the range of 52 to 55 percent. DOE is funding the development of advanced gas turbines in the newly instituted Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program, one of DOE`s highest priority natural gas initiatives. The turbines, which will have natural gas efficiencies of 60 percent, are being evaluated for coal gas compatibility as part of that program.

Bechtel, T.F.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

Low/medium-Btu coal-gasification assessment program for specific sites of two New York utilities  

SciTech Connect

The scope of this study is to investigate the technical and economic aspects of coal gasification to supply low- or medium-Btu gas to the two power plant boilers selected for study. This includes the following major studies (and others described in the text): investigate coals from different regions of the country, select a coal based on its availability, mode of transportation and delivered cost to each power plant site; investigate the effects of burning low- and medium-Btu gas in the selected power plant boilers based on efficiency, rating and cost of modifications and make recommendations for each; and review the technical feasibility of converting the power plant boilers to coal-derived gas. The following two coal gasification processes have been used as the basis for this Study: the Combustion Engineering coal gasification process produces a low-Btu gas at approximately 100 Btu/scf at near atmospheric pressure; and the Texaco coal gasification process produces a medium-Btu gas at 292 Btu/scf at 800 psig. The engineering design and economics of both plants are described. Both plants meet the federal, state, and local environmental requirements for air quality, wastewater, liquid disposal, and ground level disposal of byproduct solids. All of the synthetic gas alternatives result in bus bar cost savings on a yearly basis within a few years of start-up because the cost of gas is assumed to escalate at a lower rate than that of fuel oil, approximately 4 to 5%.

Not Available

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Diffusion Coatings for Corrosion-Resistant Components in Coal Gasification Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low-cost alloy may improve its resistance to such sulfidation attack, and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. The primary activity this period was preparation and presentation of the findings on this project at the Twenty-Third annual Pittsburgh Coal Conference. Dr. Malhotra attended this conference and presented a paper. A copy of his presentation constitutes this quarterly report.

Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Esperanza Alvarez; Kai-Hung Lau; Jordi Perez Mariano; Angel Sanjurjo

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced coal gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasifier: Commercial Gasifiers Gasifier: Commercial Gasifiers Gasifiers and Impact of Coal Rank and Coal Properties The available commercial gasification technologies are often optimized for a particular rank of coal or coal properties, and in some cases, certain ranks of coal might be unsuitable for utilization in a given gasification technology. On the other hand, there is considerable flexibility in most of the common gasifiers; this is highlighted by the following table, which provides an overview of the level of experience for the various commercially available gasifiers by manufacturer for each coal type. This experience will only continue to expand as more gasification facilities come online and more demonstrations are completed. SOLID FUEL GASIFICATION EXPERIENCE1 High Ash Coals

322

A Physicochemical Evaluation of the HQ-1 Core from the Pricetown I, Underground Coal Gasification Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Core samples of coal and rock were obtained from the HQ-1 environmental test well at the Pricetown I, Underground Coal Gasification Test Site. A comprehensive analytical program was performed to characterize the coal samples. The rocks associated with the coals are composed of clay size material containing low amounts of organic matter and hydrocarbon gas relative to the coal seams. The fine grained sediment above and below the coal seams appear to be an effective gas seal. The coals were encountered in two intervals of 1 foot and 6 feet thickness separated by 2 feet of shale. The coals are classified as high volatile A or B bituminous based on vitrinite reflectance, fixed carbon, and calorific value. Coal maceral analysis shows that the coal is heterogeneous in petrographic properties. The vitrinite group is the predominant maceral constituent. Fusinite, semi-fusinite, massive micrinite, and sporinite are present in varying amounts. The distribution of porous fusinite layers within the coal seams may be important in the reverse linkage stage of the gasification process. The coal in the bottom seam contains an average of 45.6 standard cubic feet of free methane per ton of coal. This methane may assist in initiating the gasification process. Thermal Conductivity and Laser Thermal Diffusivity experiments were also performed on selected coal samples as well as on samples of the grout used in the instrumentation wells. While the thermal conductivity values were influenced by the tars and oils generated during the heating of the coal, the laser thermal diffusivity values were obtained at sufficiently low temperatures to minimize the influence of the tars and oils.

Zielinski, R. E.; Larson, R. J.

1978-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

323

NETL: News Release - Advanced Coal Dryer Boosts Power Plant Performanc...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Release Date: May 24, 2006 Advanced Coal Dryer Boosts Power Plant Performance Latest Project in President's Clean Coal Power Initiative Begins Operations in North Dakota...

324

NETL: Advanced Research - Coal Utilization Sciences/Sensors ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of pulverized coal with laser diagnostics. NETL's Advanced Research Coal Utilization Science (CUS) Program is a crosscutting research and development effort whose goal is to...

325

NETL: CCPI - Demonstration of a Coal-Based Transport Gasifier...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Initiative (CCPI) - Round 2 Advanced Electric Power Generation - Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration of a Coal-Based Transport Gasifier (Active) Project Brief...

326

Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control With Monolith Traps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Technologies Gasification Technologies CONTACTS Jenny Tennant Technology/Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4830 jenny.tennant@netl.doe.gov Michael Swanson Principal Investigator University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center 15 North 23rd Street Grand Forks, ND 58202 701-777-5239 MSwanson@undeerc.org PARTNERS Corning, Inc. PROJECT DURATION

327

Hydrogen separation by ceramic membranes in coal gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project Objectives are to develop hydrogen-permselective ceramic membranes for water-gas shift membrane-reactor suitable for hydrogen production from coal gas and evaluate the technical and economic potential of the membrane-reactor. During the reporting period exploratory experiments begun on a membrane preparation technique aimed at providing higher membrane permeance. The new preparation technique involves two stages. The first stage is the formation of a layer of silica gel by a two-phase interfacial reaction within the pores of the substrate. The gel is then dried and calcined yielding a microporous (pore diameter below 10 [Angstrom]) silica layer within the pores of the substrate tube. The second stage involves one-sided chemical vapor deposition using the SiCl[sub 4]-H[sub 2]O reaction to close up the micropores of the gel layer and produce the final hydrogen permselective membrane. Chemical reactions involved are described.

Gavalas, G.R.

1992-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

328

Economics of the Great Plains coal gasification project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

the Great Plains project will be the Nation's first commercial-scale plant producing synthetic gas from coal. The project's first annual economic report, released in March 1983, was much less optimistic than a similar analysis prepared in January 1982 to justify construction. GAO found that: the main reason for the changed economic outlook was that the assumed synthetic gas prices used in the March analysis were significantly lower than those used previously. Great Plains did not, nor was it required to, consider tax implications to the parent companies of the project's partners. If these implications are considered, the economics could be more optimistic than the March 1983 report indicates. Should the partners end their participation, some tax benefits would have to be repaid. Although the project is a potentially attractive investment, its financial viability is extremely sensitive to the future prices of synthetic gas. Even a small deviation in prices could significantly affect its economics.

Not Available

1983-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

329

Hydrogen separation by ceramic membranes in coal gasification. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The general objective of this project was to develop hydrogen permselective membranes for hydrogen production from coal gas. The project consisted of the following tasks: (i) membrane preparation and characterization, (ii) membrane stability testing, and (iii) analysis and economic evaluation of a membrane-assisted ammonia from coal process. Several oxides (SiO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in dense (or nonporous) form were identified to be permselective to hydrogen at elevated temperatures. To obtain reasonable permeance it is necessary that the membrane consists of a thin selective layer of the dense oxide supported on or within the pores of a porous support tube (or plate). Early in the project we chose porous Vycor tubes (5mm ID, 7 mm OD, 40 {Angstrom} mean pore diameter) supplied by Corning Inc. as the membrane support. To form the permselective layer (SiO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}) we employed chemical vapor deposition using the reaction of the chloride (SiCl{sub 4}, etc.) vapor and water vapor at high temperatures. Deposition of the selective layer was carried out in a simple concentric tube reactor comprising the porous support tube surrounded by a wider concentric quartz tube and placed in an electrically heated split tube furnace. In one deposition geometry (the opposing reactants or two-sided geometry) the chloride vapor in nitrogen carrier was passed through the inner tube while the water vapor also in nitrogen carrier was passed in the same direction through the annulus between the two tubes. In the other (two-sided) geometry the chloride-containing stream and the water-containing stream were both passed through the inner tube or both through the annulus.

Gavalas, G.R.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Houston Lighting and Power Company's evaluation of coal gasification coproduction energy facilities  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to reduce the cost of electricity from Integral ed Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plants, the Electric Power Research Institute has embarked on a program to evaluate and potentially demonstrate a coal gasification-based coproduction energy facility. Houston Lighting Power Company (HL P) responded with a proposal in its ongoing effort to study emerging technologies for electricity production. HL P recognized the opportunities available to them in coproduction because of their close proximity to the world's largest petrochemical complex located on the Houston Ship Channel. Coparticipant utilities with HL P were Central and South West Services and TU Electric. Two sites were selected for study, a Houston Ship Channel site, utilizing barge-delivered Illinois No. 6 coal blended with petroleum coke, and to satisfy C SWS and TU needs, a central Texas site utilizing Texas lignite. Stone Webster Engineering and InterFact, Inc. were engineers and consulting partners in the study.Eight cases were developed to cover the various possibilities for coproduction. Four cases involved utilizing Texas lignite and four cases involved utilizing Illinois No. 6 as fuel blended with petroleum coke. The eight cases are described. Each of the cases utilized the Shell coal gasification process and were evaluated for either base load operation using two G.E. 7F gas turbines and a spare gasifier for chemicals production or for cyclic operationusing four G.E. 7EA gas turbines and no spare gasifier. The sum of the coproducts produced over all eight cases were electricity, methanol, ammonia, and urea, depending on location and economics.

Kern, E.E.; Havemann, S.D.; Chmielewski, R.G. (Houston Lighting and Power Co., TX (United States)); Baumann, P. (InterFact, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)); Goelzer, A.R.; Karayel, R.; Keady, G.S.; Chernoff, B. (Stone and Webster Engineering Corp., Houston, TX (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Sulfur emissions reduction at the Great Plains coal gasification facility: Technical and economic evaluations  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an in-depth technical and economic review of over 40 sulfur control technologies that were considered for use at the Great Plains coal gasification facility in Beulah, North Dakota. The review was based on the production of substitute natural gas at rates of 152.5 {times} 10{sup 6} and 160 {times} 10{sup 6} scf/d from lignite containing 1.7% sulfur. The factors considered in evaluating each technology included the reduction of SO{sub 2} emissions, capital and operating costs, incremental cost per unit of produced gas, cost-effectiveness, and probability of success. 21 figs., 37 tabs.

Doctor, R.D.; Wilzbach, K.E. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA). Energy Systems Div.); Joseph, T.W. (USDOE Chicago Operations Office, Argonne, IL (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Estimates of the value of carbon dioxide from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report develops a framework and methodology for estimating the value of carbon dioxide produced by the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant. The petroleum industry could use this CO/sub 2/ as a solvent for enhanced oil recovery. The value of CO/sub 2/ is found to be a function of the geological characteristics of the petroleum reservoirs being flooded, the cost of transporting the CO/sub 2/, and the presence or absence of competitors selling CO/sub 2/. Carbon dioxide demand curves for oil fields in Montana and North Dakota are developed for various economic conditions, and sensitivity analyses are performed. 22 refs., 4 figs., 21 tabs.

Wolsky, A.M.; Nelson, S.H.; Jankowski, D.J.

1985-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

333

(Great Plains Coal Gasification Associates). Quarterly technical progress report. [Lurgi Process  

SciTech Connect

The operations of the Great Plains Gasification plant are reported for the first quarter of 1986. Contents include the following: (1) lignite coal production; (2) SNG production; (3) SNG gas quality; (4) by-products production and inventories; (5) on-stream factors; (6) raw material, product and by-product consumption and energy consumption for plant operations; (7) plant modifications-1986 budget; (8) plant maintenance; (9) safety; (10) industrial hygiene; (11) medical services; (12) environmental executive summary; and (13) quality assurance/quality control activities.

Not Available

1986-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

334

Low-rank coal research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work is a compilation of reports on ongoing research at the University of North Dakota. Topics include: Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research (SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control, waste management), Advanced Research and Technology Development (turbine combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation, coal/char reactivity, liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, fine particulate emissions), Combustion Research (fluidized bed combustion, beneficiation of low-rank coals, combustion characterization of low-rank coal fuels, diesel utilization of low-rank coals), Liquefaction Research (low-rank coal direct liquefaction), and Gasification Research (hydrogen production from low-rank coals, advanced wastewater treatment, mild gasification, color and residual COD removal from Synfuel wastewaters, Great Plains Gasification Plant, gasifier optimization).

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Energy, Environmental, and Economic Analyses of Design Concepts for the Co-Production of Fuels and Chemicals with Electricity via Co-Gasification of Coal and Biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to quantify the energy, environmental, and economic performance of industrial facilities that would coproduce electricity and transportation fuels or chemicals from a mixture of coal and biomass via co-gasification in a single pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier, with capture and storage of CO{sub 2} (CCS). The work sought to identify plant designs with promising (Nth plant) economics, superior environmental footprints, and the potential to be deployed at scale as a means for simultaneously achieving enhanced energy security and deep reductions in U.S. GHG emissions in the coming decades. Designs included systems using primarily already-commercialized component technologies, which may have the potential for near-term deployment at scale, as well as systems incorporating some advanced technologies at various stages of R&D. All of the coproduction designs have the common attribute of producing some electricity and also of capturing CO{sub 2} for storage. For each of the co-product pairs detailed process mass and energy simulations (using Aspen Plus software) were developed for a set of alternative process configurations, on the basis of which lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions, Nth plant economic performance, and other characteristics were evaluated for each configuration. In developing each set of process configurations, focused attention was given to understanding the influence of biomass input fraction and electricity output fraction. Self-consistent evaluations were also carried out for gasification-based reference systems producing only electricity from coal, including integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification solid-oxide fuel cell (IGFC) systems. The reason biomass is considered as a co-feed with coal in cases when gasoline or olefins are co-produced with electricity is to help reduce lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for these systems. Storing biomass-derived CO{sub 2} underground represents negative CO{sub 2} emissions if the biomass is grown sustainably (i.e., if one ton of new biomass growth replaces each ton consumed), and this offsets positive CO{sub 2} emissions associated with the coal used in these systems. Different coal:biomass input ratios will produce different net lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for these systems, which is the reason that attention in our analysis was given to the impact of the biomass input fraction. In the case of systems that produce only products with no carbon content, namely electricity, ammonia and hydrogen, only coal was considered as a feedstock because it is possible in theory to essentially fully decarbonize such products by capturing all of the coal-derived CO{sub 2} during the production process.

Eric Larson; Robert Williams; Thomas Kreutz; Ilkka Hannula; Andrea Lanzini; Guangjian Liu

2012-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

336

University Advanced Coal Generation Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2012, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) was a sponsor of projects conducted under the auspices of two consortia that support university research for coal-based power generation: the Biomass and Fossil Fuel Research Alliance (BF2RA) in the United Kingdom and the University Turbine System Research (UTSR) program of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). This technical update report describes the progress made in both of those ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

337

Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant start-up and modification report. [Lurgi Process  

SciTech Connect

This report will help in designing future coal conversion plants by documenting the areas which need additional research to obtain more reliable process data, more careful planning and equipment selection. The scope of this report is to: describe the problem with the particular process or item of equipment; identify the modification that was implemented to correct the problem; evaluate the impacts of the modification; and document the cost of the modification. Contents include the following: (1) process modifications (coal, oxygen and steam, gasification and gas processing, sulfur recovery, flare system, liquid processing, ash handling and solids disposal, other systems); (2) start-up schedule; (3) SNG production; (4) environmental data; and (5) cost data.

Miller, W.R.; Honea, F.I.; Lang, R.A.; Berty, T.E.; Delaney, R.C.; Hospodarec, R.W.; Mako, P.F.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Great Plains Coal Gasification Project will make 17. 5 tons/day of methanol  

SciTech Connect

The Great Plains Coal Gasification Project will make 17.5 tons/day of methanol in addition to 125 million cu ft/day of pipeline-quality substitute natural gas (SNG), making the facility the first commercial producer of methanol-from-coal in the United States, according to the consortium building the $1.5 billion facility in Beulah, North Dakota. As originally conceived, the plant would have used 17 tons/day of purchased methanol to clean the raw-gas product stream of impurities, primarily sulfur. But based on the cost of transporting methanol to the plant site and storing it for use, the consortium decided it was more economical to produce its own methanol from lignite. The construction started in July 1980, and the facility is to come on stream in 1984.

Not Available

1980-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

339

Future Impacts of Coal Distribution Constraints on Coal Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coal (PC) or integrated gasification combined cycle ( IGCC)coal (PC) or integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC)will be integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) (Same

McCollum, David L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

ADVANCED GASIFICATION NETL Team Technical Coordinator: James Bennett  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GASIFICATION NETL Team Technical Coordinator: James Bennett GASIFICATION NETL Team Technical Coordinator: James Bennett Name Project Role Affiliation University Project Title Bhattacharyya, Debangsu CO-PI WVU Turton, Richard CO-PI WVU Jones, Dustin Grad Student WVU Weiland, Nathan PI WVU C3M Kinetic Development Baseline Co-Gasification Kinetics Support Turton, Richard PI WVU Chaudhari, Kiran Grad Student WVU Pisupati, Sarma PI PSU Devolatilization and Char Kinetics Support Song, Xueyan PI WVU Different Gasifier Liner Wear Support Song, Xueyan PI WVU High Vanadium Oxide Study Support Musser, Jordan PI WVU Implement Heat & Mass Transfer to MFIX-PIC Support Dietiker, Jean- Francois PI WVU MFIX Development Verification and Validation Support Kuhlman, John PI WVU Model Development Support Weiland, Nathan PI WVU Bedick, Clinton Researcher

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced coal gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

NETL: Gasification Project Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Information Project Information Gasification Systems Reference Shelf - Project Information Active Projects | Archived Projects | All NETL Fact Sheets Feed Systems A Cost-Effective Oxygen Separation System Based on Open Gradient Magnetic Field by Polymer Beads [SC0010151] Development of ITM Oxygen Technology for Low-cost and Low-emission Gasification and Other Industrial Applications [FE0012065] Dry Solids Pump Coal Feed Technology [FE0012062] Coal-CO2 Slurry Feeding System for Pressurized Gasifiers [FE0012500] National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility [FE0000749] Modification of the Developmental Pressure Decoupled Advanced Coal (PDAC) Feeder [NT0000749] Recovery Act: Development of Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Technology for Integration in IGCC and Other Advanced Power Generation Systems [DE-FC26-98FT40343]

342

Method and apparatus for the selective separation of gaseous coal gasification products by pressure swing adsorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Bulk separation of the gaseous components of multi-component gases provided by the gasification of coal including hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, and acid gases (carbon dioxide plus hydrogen sulfide) are selectively adsorbed by a pressure swing adsorption technique using activated carbon zeolite or a combination thereof as the adsorbent. By charging a column containing the adsorbent with a gas mixture and pressurizing the column to a pressure sufficient to cause the adsorption of the gases and then reducing the partial pressure of the contents of the column, the gases are selectively and sequentially desorbed. Hydrogen, the least absorbable gas of the gaseous mixture, is the first gas to be desorbed and is removed from the column in a co-current direction followed by the carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane. With the pressure in the column reduced to about atmospheric pressure the column is evacuated in a countercurrent direction to remove the acid gases from the column. The present invention is particularly advantageous as a producer of high purity hydrogen from gaseous products of coal gasification and as an acid gas scrubber. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Ghate, M.R.; Yang, R.T.

1985-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

343

Method and apparatus for the selective separation of gaseous coal gasification products by pressure swing adsorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Bulk separation of the gaseous components of multi-component gases provided by the gasification of coal including hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, and acid gases (carbon dioxide plus hydrogen sulfide) are selectively adsorbed by a pressure swing adsorption technique using activated carbon, zeolite or a combination thereof as the adsorbent. By charging a column containing the adsorbent with a gas mixture and pressurizing the column to a pressure sufficient to cause the adsorption of the gases and then reducing the partial pressure of the contents of the column, the gases are selectively and sequentially desorbed. Hydrogen, the least absorbable gas of the gaseous mixture, is the first gas to be desorbed and is removed from the column in a co-current direction followed by the carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane. With the pressure in the column reduced to about atmospheric pressure the column is evacuated in a countercurrent direction to remove the acid gases from the column. The present invention is particularly advantageous as a producer of high parity hydrogen from gaseous products of coal gasification and as an acid gas scrubber.

Ghate, Madhav R. (Morgantown, WV); Yang, Ralph T. (Williamsville, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Synthetic fuels. Status of the Great Plains Coal Gasification Project, August 1, 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In December 1984, the Great Plains Gasification Associates had essentially finished constructing the nation's first commercial-scale coal gasification plant. As of July 31, 1985, Great Plains had contributed about $537 million in equity to the project and had borrowed $1.54 billion against a federal load guarantee made available by the Department of Energy (DOE). Since 1984 the project has faced deteriorating financial projections in the wake of declining energy prices. This is GAO's eighth semiannual report on Great Plains and covers the project's progress from January through August 1, 1985. GAO's objectives were to report on (1) the status of Great Plains' attempt to obtain additional federal financial assistance and (2) the status of the project's operational startup activities as of August 1, 1985. The Department of Energy Act of 1978 requires GAO to report on the status of the loan guarantee. Even though the Synthetic Fuels Corporation approved price guarantees in principle for Great Plains, DOE announced, on July 30, 1985, that it would not agree to restructuring its guaranteed loan. DOE rejected the proposed agreement, saying that it would not assure long-term plant operation at a reasonable cost to the taxpayers. The Great Plains sponsors then terminated their participation in the project on August 1, 1985, and defaulted on the $1.54 billion DOE-guaranteed loan. DOE directed the project administrator, ANG Coal Gasification Company, to continue plant operations pending a DOE decision about the project's future. DOE is assessing options including operating, leasing, selling, shutting down, mothballing, and scrapping the plant.

Bowsher, C.A.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

CoalFleet Guideline for Advanced Pulverized Coal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of state-of-the-art and emerging technologies for pulverized coal (PC) fired generating units along with lessons learned from current plants worldwide. The report is designed to facilitate the timely deployment of reliable, next-generation units that incorporate higher steam conditions that improve efficiency and thereby decrease fuel consumption, CO2 emissions, and other environmental impacts; advanced environmental controls that reduce emissions and discharges of solid ...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

346

CoalFleet Guideline for Advanced Pulverized Coal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of state-of-the-art and emerging technologies for pulverized coal (PC-) fired generating units along with lessons learned from current plants worldwide. The report is designed to facilitate the timely deployment of reliable, next-generation units that incorporate higher steam conditions that improve efficiency and thereby decrease fuel consumption, CO2 emissions, and other environmental impacts; advanced environmental controls that reduce emissions and discharges of solid...

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

347

CoalFleet Guideline for Advanced Pulverized Coal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of state-of-the-art and emerging technologies for pulverized coal (PC) fired generating units along with lessons learned from current plants worldwide. The report also facilitates the timely deployment of reliable, next-generation units that incorporate: Higher steam conditions for improved efficiency and reduced pollutants and CO2 Advanced environmental controls for reduced emissions and environmental impacts Techniques for CO2 capture, or for future retrofit of CO2 capt...

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

348

Performance of solid oxide fuel cells operaated with coal syngas provided directly from a gasification process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are being developed for integrated gasification power plants that generate electricity from coal at 50% efficiency. The interaction of trace metals in coal syngas with Ni-based SOFC anodes is being investigated through thermodynamic analyses and in laboratory experiments, but test data from direct coal syngas exposure are sparsely available. This effort evaluates the significance of performance losses associated with exposure to direct coal syngas. Specimen are operated in a unique mobile test skid that is deployed to the research gasifier at NCCC in Wilsonville, AL. The test skid interfaces with a gasifier slipstream to deliver hot syngas to a parallel array of twelve SOFCs. During the 500 h test period, all twelve cells are monitored for performance at four current densities. Degradation is attributed to syngas exposure and trace material attack on the anode structure that is accelerated at increasing current densities. Cells that are operated at 0 and 125 mA cm{sup 2} degrade at 9.1 and 10.7% per 1000 h, respectively, while cells operated at 250 and 375 mA cm{sup 2} degrade at 18.9 and 16.2% per 1000 h, respectively. Spectroscopic analysis of the anodes showed carbon, sulfur, and phosphorus deposits; no secondary Ni-metal phases were found.

Hackett, G.; Gerdes, K.; Song, X.; Chen, Y.; Shutthanandan, V.; Englehard, M.; Zhu, Z.; Thevuthasan, S.; Gemmen, R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

2007 gasification technologies workshop papers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topics covered in this workshop are fundamentals of gasification, carbon capture, reviews of financial and regulatory incentives, coal to liquids, and focus on gasification in the Western US.

NONE

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

Gasification Systems Projects National Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Systems Gasification Systems Projects National Map Click on a number to go to the project page. Hybrid Solar Coal Gasifier ITM Oxygen Technology for Integration in...

351

The Physical and Chemical Properties of Fly Ash from Coal Gasification and Study on Its Recycling Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aiming at the difficulties in utilization of fly ash from coal gasification, the physical and chemical properties of fly ash were investigated. This research studied recycling utilization on using fly ash as one of cement raw materials for cement clinker. ... Keywords: fly ash, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), recycling utilization

Guohua Qiu; Weiqiang Zeng; Zhenglun Shi; Mengxiang Fang; Zhongyang Luo

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Feasibility study for underground coal gasification at the Krabi coal mine site, Thailand: Volume 1. Progress report, December 1--31, 1995; Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

The report, conducted by Energy and Environmental Research Center, was funded by the US Trade and Development Agency. The objective of this report was to determine the technical, environmental and economic feasibility of developing, demonstrating, and commercializing underground coal gasification (UCG) at the Krabi coal mine site in Southern Thailand. This is Volume 1, the Progress Report for the period December 1, 1995, through December 31, 1995.

Young, B.C.; Schmit, C.R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Advances in pulverized coal combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combustion system has been developed to operate cost effectively in the difficult regulatory and economic climate of the 1980's. The system is designed to reduce auxiliary fuel oil comsumption by at least 30% while meeting all relevant emissions limits. This is achieved with the fewest components consistent with practical reliable design criteria. The Controlled Flow Split/Flame low NO/sub x/ burner, MBF pulverizer and Two-Stage ignition system are integrated into a mutually supporting system which is applicable to both new steam generators and, on a retrofit basis, to existing units. In the future, a pulverized coal ignition system will be available to eliminate fuel oil use within the boiler.

Vatsky, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

NETL: Gasification Systems Video, Images & Photos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Video, Images, Photos Video, Images, Photos Gasification Systems Reference Shelf - Video, Images & Photos The following was established to show a variety of Gasification Technologies: Gasfication powerplant photo Gasification: A Cornerstone Technology (Mar 2008) Movie Icon Windows Media Video (WMV-26MB) [ view | download ] NETL is a leader in the science and technology of gasification - a process for the conversion of carbon-based materials such as coal into synthesis gas (syngas) that can be used to produce clean electrical energy, transportation fuels, and chemicals efficiently and cost-effectively using domestic fuel resources. Gasification is a cornerstone technology of 21st century zero emissions powerplants. Proposed APS Advanced Hydrogasification Process Proposed APS Advanced Hydrogasification Process* TRDU and Hot-Gas Vessel in the EERC Gasification Tower Transport reactor development unit

355

Task 4 -- Conversion to a coal-fueled advanced turbine system (CFATS)  

SciTech Connect

Solar is developing the technologies for a highly efficient, recuperated, Advanced Turbine System (ATS) that is aimed at the dispersed power generation market. With ultra-low-emissions in mind the primary fuel selected for this engine system is natural gas. Although this gas fired ATS (GFATS) will primarily employ natural gas the use of other fuels particular those derived from coal and renewable resources cannot be overlooked. The enabling technologies necessary to direct fire coal in gas turbines were developed during the 1980`s. This Solar development co-sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) resulted in the testing of a full size coal-water-slurry fired combustion system. In parallel with this program the DOE funded the development of integrated gasification combined cycle systems (IGCC). This report describes the limitations of the Solar ATs (recuperated engine) and how these lead to a recommended series of modifications that will allow the use of these alternate fuels. Three approaches have been considered: direct-fired combustion using either a slagging combustor, or a pressurized fluidized bed (PFBC), externally or indirectly fired approaches using pulverized fuel, and external gasification of the fuel with subsequent direct combustion of the secondary fuel. Each of these approaches requires substantial hardware and system modifications for efficient fuel utilization. The integration issues are discussed in the sections below and a recommended approach for gasification is presented.

1996-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

356

Analysis of industrial markets for low and medium Btu coal gasification. [Forecasting  

SciTech Connect

Low- and medium-Btu gases (LBG and MBG) can be produced from coal with a variety of 13 existing and 25 emerging processes. Historical experience and previous studies indicate a large potential market for LBG and MBG coal gasification in the manufacturing industries for fuel and feedstocks. However, present use in the US is limited, and industry has not been making substantial moves to invest in the technology. Near-term (1979-1985) market activity for LBG and MBG is highly uncertain and is complicated by a myriad of pressures on industry for energy-related investments. To assist in planning its program to accelerate the commercialization of LBG and MBG, the Department of Energy (DOE) contracted with Booz, Allen and Hamilton to characterize and forecast the 1985 industrial market for LBG and MBG coal gasification. The study draws five major conclusions: (1) There is a large technically feasible market potential in industry for commercially available equipment - exceeding 3 quadrillion Btu per year. (2) Early adopters will be principally steel, chemical, and brick companies in described areas. (3) With no additional Federal initiatives, industry commitments to LBG and MBG will increase only moderately. (4) The major barriers to further market penetration are lack of economic advantage, absence of significant operating experience in the US, uncertainty on government environmental policy, and limited credible engineering data for retrofitting industrial plants. (5) Within the context of generally accepted energy supply and price forecasts, selected government action can be a principal factor in accelerating market penetration. Each major conclusion is discussed briefly and key implications for DOE planning are identified.

1979-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

357

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prices in 2007 real $ Coal Prices Coal prices have been farprices. Factors like coal prices and EOR revenues affect theCoal Prices..

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Kinetics of catalyzed steam gasification of low-rank coals to produce hydrogen. Final report for the period ending March 31, 1986  

SciTech Connect

The principal goal of coal char-steam gasification research at the University of North Dakota Energy Research Center (UNDERC) is to establish the feasibility of low-rank coal gasification for hydrogen production. The program has focused on determining reaction conditions for maximum product gas hydrogen content and on evaluating process kinetics with and without catalyst addition. The high inherent reactivity of lignites and subbituminous coals, compared to coals of higher rank, make them the probable choice for use in steam gasification. An extensive matrix of char-steam gasification tests was performed in a laboratory-scale thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) at temperatures of 700/sup 0/, 750/sup 0/, and 800/sup 0/C. Four low-rank coals and one bituminous coal were included in the TGA test matrix. Catalysts screened in the study included K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, trona, nahcolite, sunflower hull ash, and lignite ash. Results showed uncatalyzed North Dakota and Texas lignites to be slightly more reactive than a Wyoming subbituminous coal, and 8 to 10 times more reactive than an Illinois bituminous coal. Several catalysts that substantially improved low-rank coal steam gasification rates included pure and mineral (trona and nahcolite) alkali carbonates. The reactivity observed when using trona and nahcolite to catalyze the steam gasification was the highest, at nearly 3.5 times that without catalysts. The use of these inexpensive, naturally-occurring alkalis as gasification catalysts may result in elimination of the need for catalyst recovery in the hydrogen-from-coal process, thereby simplifying operation and improving process economics. The study included evaluations of temperature and catalyst loading effects, coal and catalyst screening, and determinations of the apparent activation energies of the steam gasification reaction. 11 refs., 23 figs., 9 tabs.

Galegher, S.J.; Timpe, R.C.; Willson, W.G.; Farnum, S.A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

2007 gasification technologies conference papers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sessions covered: gasification industry roundtable; the gasification market in China; gasification for power generation; the gasification challenge: carbon capture and use storage; industrial and polygeneration applications; gasification advantage in refinery applications; addressing plant performance; reliability and availability; gasification's contribution to supplementing gaseous and liquid fuels supplies; biomass gasification for fuel and power markets; and advances in technology-research and development

NONE

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Eight Advanced Coal Projects Chosen for Further Development by DOE's  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Eight Advanced Coal Projects Chosen for Further Development by Eight Advanced Coal Projects Chosen for Further Development by DOE's University Coal Research Program Eight Advanced Coal Projects Chosen for Further Development by DOE's University Coal Research Program July 5, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Department of Energy has selected eight new projects to further advanced coal research under the University Coal Research Program. The selected projects will improve coal conversion and use and will help propel technologies for future advanced coal power systems. The selections will conduct investigations in three topic areas -- computational energy sciences, material science, and sensors and controls -- and will be funded at a maximum of $300,000 for 36 months. The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) will manage

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced coal gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume I, Part 1. Final report, September 1986--September 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this program was the development of a predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. The foundation to describe coal specific conversion behavior was AFR`s Functional Group and Devolatilization, Vaporization and Crosslinking (DVC) models, which had been previously developed. The combined FG-DVC model was integrated with BYU`s comprehensive two-dimensional reactor model for combustion and coal gasification, PCGC-2, and a one-dimensional model for fixed-bed gasifiers, FBED-1. Progress utilizing these models is described.

Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Seven Projects Aimed at Advancing Coal Research Selected for DOE's  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seven Projects Aimed at Advancing Coal Research Selected for DOE's Seven Projects Aimed at Advancing Coal Research Selected for DOE's University Coal Research Program Seven Projects Aimed at Advancing Coal Research Selected for DOE's University Coal Research Program May 13, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- Seven projects aimed at advancing coal research and development while providing research exposure to a new generation of scientists and engineers have been selected to participate in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) University Coal Research (UCR) program. The projects aim to improve the basic understanding of the chemical and physical processes that govern coal conversion and utilization, by-product utilization, and technological development for advanced energy systems. These advanced systems -- efficient, ultra-clean energy plants -- are

363

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal: Alternatives/Supplements to Coal - Feedstock Flexibility Coal: Alternatives/Supplements to Coal - Feedstock Flexibility As important as coal is as a primary gasification feedstock, gasification technology offers the important ability to take a wide range of feedstocks and process them into syngas, from which a similarly diverse number of end products are possible. Gasifiers have been developed to suit all different ranks of coal, and other fossil fuels, petcoke and refinery streams, biomass including agricultural waste, and industrial and municipal waste. The flexibility stems from the ability of gasification to take any carbon and hydrogen containing feedstock and then thermochemically break down the feedstock to a gas containing simple compounds which are easy to process into several marketable products.

364

Evaluation of cooling tower and wastewater treatment operations at the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to provide a technical assessment of the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant Wastewater Treatment System. This Scope of Work consisted of five primary tasks described as follows: Task 1 - Determine the quantity of hydantoins in the stripped gas liquor (SGL), their precursors, and the kinetics of their formation in condensed liquor for the Great Plains Gasification Associates (GPGA) gasification facility. The University of North Dakota Energy Research Center (UNDERC) has measured a high concentration of hydantoins in the gas liquor from their slagging gasifier. UNDERC has tested the use of SGL in a pilot cooling tower and they witnessed some adverse effects in the cooling tower and heat exchanger systems. Task 2 - Investigate the adverse Department of Energy (DOE) findings at UNDERC with regard to corrosion, foaming, biological and organic fouling, chemical attack on concrete and organic emissions resulting from the use of SGL in a pilot plant cooling tower. Task 3 - Validate the heat load on the cooling tower for both summer and winter operation and determine the adequacy of the surge pond to store the maximum predicted amount of excess water accumulated during winter operation. Task 4 - Assess potential fouling, foaming and organic carry-over problems associated with operability of the multiple-effect evaporator and develop recommendations on possible alternate use of evaporator condensate to alleviate possible problems in disposing of excess wastewater. Task 5 - Provide DOE with recommendations on the wastewater treatment backup design and test program already committed to by GPGA. This paper presents Fluor's findings regarding the five primary tasks. 12 refs., 4 figs., 15 tabs.

Lang, R.A.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory underground coal gasification data base. [US DOE-supported field tests; data  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy has sponsored a number of field projects to determine the feasibility of converting the nation's vast coal reserves into a clean efficient energy source via underground coal gasification (UCG). Due to these tests, a significant data base of process information has developed covering a range of coal seams (flat subbituminous, deep flat bituminous and steeply dipping subbituminous) and processing techniques. A summary of all DOE-sponsored tests to data is shown. The development of UCG on a commercial scale requires involvement from both the public and private sectors. However, without detailed process information, accurate assessments of the commercial viability of UCG cannot be determined. To help overcome this problem the DOE has directed the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to develop a UCG data base containing raw and reduced process data from all DOE-sponsored field tests. It is our intent to make the data base available upon request to interested parties, to help them assess the true potential of UCG.

Cena, R. J.; Thorsness, C. B.

1981-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

366

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology jointly sponsored research  

SciTech Connect

Accomplishments for the quarter are presented for the following areas of research: oil shale, tar sand, coal, advanced exploratory process technology, and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research includes; oil shale process studies, environmental base studies for oil shale, and miscellaneous basic concept studies. Tar sand research covers process development. Coal research includes; underground coal gasification, coal combustion, integrated coal processing concepts, and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes; advanced process concepts, advanced mitigation concepts, and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesa Verde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced recovery techniques; and menu driven access to the WDEQ Hydrologic Data Management Systems.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Value Operating Flexibility in Advanced Coal Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a preliminary study of the potential value of the operating flexibility available from advanced coal plant designs and carbon capture and storage (CCS) systems. Assessing value requires new analytical approaches capable of examining plant outputs (e.g., syngas, air products, electricity, emissions) in the context of varying power market conditions and significant climate policy and fuel price uncertainties. Accounting for flexibility options in capacity planning may create opportuni...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

368

Wabash River Coal Gasification Combined Cycle Repowering Project: Clean Coal Technology Program. Environmental Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proposed project would result in a combined-cycle power plant with lower emissions and higher efficiency than most existing coal-fired power plants of comparable size. The net plant heat rate (energy content of the fuel input per useable electrical generation output; i.e., Btu/kilowatt hour) for the new repowered unit would be a 21% improvement over the existing unit, while reducing SO{sub 2} emissions by greater than 90% and limiting NO{sub x} emissions by greater than 85% over that produced by conventional coal-fired boilers. The technology, which relies on gasified coal, is capable of producing as much as 25% more electricity from a given amount of coal than today`s conventional coal-burning methods. Besides having the positive environmental benefit of producing less pollutants per unit of power generated, the higher overall efficiency of the proposed CGCC project encourages greater utilization to meet base load requirements in order to realize the associated economic benefits. This greater utilization (i.e., increased capacity factor) of a cleaner operating plant has global environmental benefits in that it is likely that such power would replace power currently being produced by less efficient plants emitting a greater volume of pollutants per unit of power generated.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

DOEIJEA-1219 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT HOE CREEK UNDERGROUND COAL GASIFICATION TEST SITE REMEDIATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOEIJEA-1219 DOEIJEA-1219 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT HOE CREEK UNDERGROUND COAL GASIFICATION TEST SITE REMEDIATION CAMPBELL COUNTY, WYOMING October 1997 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FEDERAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY CENTER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or use- fulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any spe- cific commercial product, process. or service by trade name, trademark, manufac-

370

DOE/NETL-2002/1164 Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project: A DOE Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project: A DOE Assessment January 2002 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 and P.O. Box 10940, 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 website: www.netl.doe.gov 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference

371

Status of the Great Plains coal gasification project, May 31, 1984. [Mercer County, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The Great Plains coal gasification project in North Dakota was 99 percent complete and essentially on schedule on May 31, 1984. Cumulative project costs were $164 million less than originally estimated for this date, primarily due to reduced material, interest, and subcontractor costs. On the basis of reduced energy price forecasts, Great Plains in September 1983 projected large after-tax losses and negative cash flows from plant operations. To alleviate these losses, Great Plains applied to the US Synthetic Fuels Corporation for additional financial assistance. On April 26, 1984, the Corporation outlined its intentions to award Great Plains up to $790 million in assistance. As of August 10, 1984, the Corporation had not finalized the Great Plains assistance agreement.

Not Available

1984-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

372

Analysis of pipe failure at the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant  

SciTech Connect

The rupture of a carbon steel elbow in the methanation area of the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant resulted in a fire and plant shutdown. Failure studies consisted of an on-site inspection and an extensive laboratory examination that included light metallography, X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, chemical analyses, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. It was concluded that operation of a heat exchanger under off-specification conditions contributed to higher than design temperatures, lower than design pressures, and higher than design concentrations of carbon dioxide and water in the exit line from a condensate separator. Together, these conditions produced high levels of carbonic acid and higher than design velocities resulting in severe corrosion of the carbon steel.

Keiser, J.R.; Mayotte, J.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Dias, O.C. (Amoco Oil Co., Texas City, TX (United States))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Using rotating biological contactors for the treatment of coal gasification wastewaters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to determine the treatability of University of North Dakota Energy Research Centers (UNDERC's) and Great Plains' coal gasification wastewaters using a bench scale four stage rotating biological contactor (RBC). The treatability testing included an evaluation of organic removal rates in the first stage and the overall rates in the last three stages using the Stover-Kincannon model. Nitrification was evaluated at various loading rates. Stage 1 accounted for most of the removal of alcohols, fatty acids, phenol, and thiocyanate from both UNDERC stripped gas liquor (SGL) and for alcohols and fatty acid removal from the Great Plains (GP) SGL. The 2, 3 and 4 stages accomplished very little additional organic removal in either system. Biodegradable organic removals remained high in the first stage of the GP SGL test run despite anaerobic conditions in the first stage. 5 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs.

Turner, C.D.; Wernberg, K.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Analysis of pipe failure for the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rupture of a carbon steel elbow in the methanation area of the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant resulted in a fire and plant shutdown. The failure was investigated by personnel from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and ANG Associates, the plant operators. These studies consisted of an on-site inspection and extensive laboratory examination that included optical metallography, x-ray fluorescence, x-ray diffraction, chemical analyses, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA). It was concluded that operation of a heat exchanger under off-specification conditions contributed to higher than design temperatures, lower than design pressures, and higher than design concentrations of carbon dioxide and water in the exit line from a condensate separator. Together, these conditions produced high levels of carbonic acid and higher than design velocities resulting in severe corrosion of the carbon steel. 9 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Keiser, J.R.; Mayotte, J.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Dias, O.C. (Amoco Research Center, Naperville, IL (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Product Characterization for Entrained Flow Coal/Biomass Co-Gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GEâ??s bench-scale test facility provided the bulk of high-fidelity quantitative data under temperature, heating rate, and residence time conditions closely matching those of commercial oxygen-blown entrained flow gasifiers. Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) pilot-scale test facility provided focused high temperature and pressure tests at entrained flow gasifier conditions. Accurate matching of syngas time-temperature history during cooling ensured that complex species interactions including homogeneous and heterogeneous processes such as particle nucleation, coagulation, surface condensation, and gas-phase reactions were properly reproduced and lead to representative syngas composition at the syngas cooler outlet. The experimental work leveraged other ongoing GE R&D efforts such as biomass gasification and dry feeding systems projects. Experimental data obtained under this project were used to provide guidance on the appropriate clean-up system(s) and operating parameters to coal and biomass combinations beyond those evaluated under this project.

Shawn Maghzi; Ramanathan Subramanian; George Rizeq; Surinder Singh; John McDermott; Boris Eiteneer; David Ladd; Arturo Vazquez; Denise Anderson; Noel Bates

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

376

Product Characterization for Entrained Flow Coal/Biomass Co-Gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GE‘s bench-scale test facility provided the bulk of high-fidelity quantitative data under temperature, heating rate, and residence time conditions closely matching those of commercial oxygen-blown entrained flow gasifiers. Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) pilot-scale test facility provided focused high temperature and pressure tests at entrained flow gasifier conditions. Accurate matching of syngas time-temperature history during cooling ensured that complex species interactions including homogeneous and heterogeneous processes such as particle nucleation, coagulation, surface condensation, and gas-phase reactions were properly reproduced and lead to representative syngas composition at the syngas cooler outlet. The experimental work leveraged other ongoing GE R&D efforts such as biomass gasification and dry feeding systems projects. Experimental data obtained under this project were used to provide guidance on the appropriate clean-up system(s) and operating parameters to coal and biomass combinations beyond those evaluated under this project.

Maghzi, Shawn; Subramanian, Ramanathan; Rizeq, George; Singh, Surinder; McDermott, John; Eiteneer, Boris; Ladd, David; Vazquez, Arturo; Anderson, Denise; Bates, Noel

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

377

Higgins coal gasification/repowering study, feasibility study for alternate fuels. Vol. 1. Executive summary  

SciTech Connect

Florida Power has completed a study to determine the feasibility of repowering 138 MW gross of oil-fired steam-generating capacity at its A.W. Higgins power station (Pinellas Co., Fla.) by utilizing coal-gasification combined-cycle (CGCC) technology. The repowering would add approximately 320 MW of gross electrical generation to the Higgins station through the use of combustion turbines and heat recovery equipment. This study provided Florida Power with the technical, environmental, and economic information necessary to determine the viability of using CGCC at the Higgins station. The plant would use BGC/Lurgi slagging gasifiers and the Selexol acid-gas removal system. Although this new technology represents an acceptable level of risk for the proposed project to be considered technically feasible, the capital-cost estimates were much higher than expected. Florida Power plans to continue further economic evaluations of this CGCC repowering option.

Not Available

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Environmental assessment for the Hoe Creek underground, Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this EA to assess environmental and human health Issues and to determine potential impacts associated with the proposed Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation that would be performed at the Hoe Creek site in Campbell County, Wyoming. The Hoe Creek site is located south-southwest of the town of Gillette, Wyoming, and encompasses 71 acres of public land under the stewardship of the Bureau of Land Management. The proposed action identified in the EA is for the DOE to perform air sparging with bioremediation at the Hoe Creek site to remove contaminants resulting from underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments performed there by the DOE in the late 1970s. The proposed action would involve drilling additional wells at two of the UCG test sites to apply oxygen or hydrogen peroxide to the subsurface to volatilize benzene dissolved in the groundwater and enhance bioremediation of non-aqueous phase liquids present in the subsurface. Other alternatives considered are site excavation to remove contaminants, continuation of the annual pump and treat actions that have been used at the site over the last ten years to limit contaminant migration, and the no action alternative. Issues examined in detail in the EA are air quality, geology, human health and safety, noise, soils, solid and hazardous waste, threatened and endangered species, vegetation, water resources, and wildlife. Details of mitigative measures that could be used to limit any detrimental effects resulting from the proposed action or any of the alternatives are discussed, and information on anticipated effects identified by other government agencies is provided.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two dimensional, steady-state model for describing a variety of reactive and nonreactive flows, including pulverized coal combustion and gasification, is presented. The model, referred to as 93-PCGC-2 is applicable to cylindrical, axi-symmetric systems. Turbulence is accounted for in both the fluid mechanics equations and the combustion scheme. Radiation from gases, walls, and particles is taken into account using a discrete ordinates method. The particle phase is modeled in a lagrangian framework, such that mean paths of particle groups are followed. A new coal-general devolatilization submodel (FG-DVC) with coal swelling and char reactivity submodels has been added.

Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Performance of solid oxide fuel cells operated with coal syngas provided directly from a gasification process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are presently being developed for gasification integrated power plants that generate electricity from coal at 50+% efficiency. The interaction of trace metals in coal syngas with the Ni-based SOFC anodes is being investigated through thermodynamic analyses and in laboratory experiments, but direct test data from coal syngas exposure are sparsely available. This research effort evaluates the significance of SOFC performance losses associated with exposure of a SOFC anode to direct coal syngas. SOFC specimen of industrially relevant composition are operated in a unique mobile test skid that was deployed to the research gasifier at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) in Wilsonville, AL. The mobile test skid interfaces with a gasifier slipstream to deliver hot syngas (up to 300°C) directly to a parallel array of 12 button cell specimen, each of which possesses an active area of approximately 2 cm2. During the 500 hour test period, all twelve cells were monitored for performance at four discrete operating current densities, and all cells maintained contact with a data acquisition system. Of these twelve, nine demonstrated good performance throughout the test, while three of the cells were partially compromised. Degradation associated with the properly functioning cells was attributed to syngas exposure and trace material attack on the anode structure that was accelerated at increasing current densities. Cells that were operated at 0 and 125 mA/cm² degraded at 9.1 and 10.7% per 1000 hours, respectively, while cells operated at 250 and 375 mA/cm² degraded at 18.9 and 16.2% per 1000 hours, respectively. Post-trial spectroscopic analysis of the anodes showed carbon, sulfur, and phosphorus deposits; no secondary Ni-metal phases were found.

Hackett, Gregory A.; Gerdes, Kirk R.; Song, Xueyan; Chen, Yun; Shutthanandan, V.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhu, Zihua; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Gemmen, Randall

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced coal gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Diffusion Coatings for Corrosion-Resistant Components in Coal Gasification Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high-temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low-cost alloy may improve its resistance to such sulfidation attack, and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. During this period, we analyzed several coated and exposed samples of 409 steel by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX). We report here on findings of this analysis: (1) A SS409 coupon that was coated with multilayered combined nitrides of Ti, Al, and Si showed adherent coatings on the surface; (2) A similarly coated coupon, after exposure to simulated coal gas at 900 C for 300 h, revealed that the coating has cracked during the exposure; (3) An SS409 coupon that was coated with nitrides of Ti and Si with a barrier layer of tungsten in between to improve the adhesion of the coating and to prevent outward diffusion of iron to the surface. (4) A porous coupon was coated with nitrides of Ti and Al and examination of the coupon revealed deposition of Ti at the interior surfaces. A similarly prepared coupon was exposed to simulated coal gas at 370 C for 300 h, and it showed no corrosion.

Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Esperanza Alvarez; Kai-Hung Lau; Jordi Perez-Mariano; Angel Sanjurjo

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

382

Diffusion Coatings for Corrosion-Resistant Components in Coal Gasification Systems  

SciTech Connect

Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the hightemperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low-cost alloy may improve its resistance to such sulfidation attack, and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. During this period, we analyzed several 409 low alloy steel samples after coating them in our fluidized bed reactor and also after exposing them to our corrosion test. We report the following findings: 1. A protective coating was deposited inside a porous 409 steel sample to protect it from sulfidation attack. The coating was based on a combination of Si diffusion layer, Nb interlayer and nitrides of titanium and silicon. 2. Analysis of solid coupons exposed to simulated coal gas at 900 C for 300 h showed that multilayer metal/ceramic coatings provide a better protection than ceramic coatings. 3. Deposition of several ceramic/metal multilayer coatings showed that coatings with niobium and tantalum interlayers have good adhesion. However, coatings with a tungsten interlayer suffered localized delaminating and coatings with Zr interlayers showed poor adhesion. 4. Analysis of solid coupons, coated with the above-mentioned multilayer films, after exposure to simulated coal gas at 900 C for 300 h showed that niobium is the best candidate for interlayer material.

Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Esperanza Alvarez; Kai-Hung Lau; Jordi Perez-Mariano; Angel Sanjurjo

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

DOE Selects Nine New University Coal Research Projects to Advance Coal-Based Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Selects Nine New University Coal Research Projects to Advance Coal-Based Power Selects Nine New University Coal Research Projects to Advance Coal-Based Power Systems Nine new projects selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the University Coal Research program will seek long-term solutions for the clean and efficient use of our nation's abundant coal resources. The announcement today of the selections marks the 34 th round of the Department's longest-running coal program, which began in 1979. This research continues DOE efforts to improve the understanding of the chemical and physical processes governing coal conversion and utilization, and support the technological development of the advanced coal power systems of the future. These advanced systems include ultra-clean

384

Proceedings: Conference on Coal Gasification Systems and Synthetic Fuels for Power Generation, Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The international effort to develop synthetic fuels and advanced power systems for the commercial generation of electric power from coal, oil shale, and tar sands has been an outstanding technical success. This conference highlighted the work that brought new fuels and power generation systems to reality.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 2. The Hanna I field test  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project, and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Based on the recommendations of A.D. Little, Inc. in a 1971 report prepared for the US Bureau of Mines, the Hanna I test represented the first field test in reestablishing a field program by the US Bureau of Mines. The test was directed toward comparing results from a thick subbitiminous coal seam with those obtained during the field test series conducted at Gorgas, AL, in the 1940's and 1950's. Hanna I was conducted from March 1973 through February 1974. This report covers: (1) site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facility description; (4) pre-operation tests; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 9 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Diffusion Coatings for Corrosion-Resistant Components in Coal Gasification Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high-temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low-cost alloy may improve its resistance to such sulfidation attack, and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. In previous tests, we had frequently encountered problems with our steam generator that were exacerbated by the very low flow rates that we needed. During this period we installed a new computer-controlled system for injecting water into the steam generator that eliminated this problem. We also tested alloy coupons coated by using the improved procedures described in our last quarterly report. Most of these coatings were nitrided Ti and Ta coatings, either by themselves, or sometimes with barrier layers of Al and Si nitrides. The samples were tested for 300 h at 900 C in a gas stream designed to mimic the environment in the high temperature heat recovery unit (HTHRU). Three samples that showed least corrosion were exposed for an additional 100 h.

Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Esperanza Alvarez; Kai-Hung Lau; Angel Sanjurjo

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Diffusion Coatings for Corrosion-Resistant Components in Coal Gasification Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high-temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low-cost alloy may improve its resistance to such sulfidation attack, and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. During this period, we conducted two 300-hour tests. In the first test, we exposed samples at 900 C under conditions simulating the high-temperature heat recovery unit (HTHRU). The second test was at 370 C, corresponding to the filter units following the HTHRU. The tests were showed the resilience of silicon nitride as a coating component, and the new coating procedures better penetrated the pores in sintered metal filter samples. Finally, we also received samples that were exposed in the Wabash River plant. Unfortunately, all these samples, that were prepared last year, were severely eroded and/or corroded.

Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Esperanza Alvarez; Kai-Hung Lau; Jordi Perez-Mariano; Angel Sanjurjo

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Status of the Great Plains Coal Gasification Project, December 31, 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored construction of the Great Plains coal gasification project - designed to produce synthetic natural gas from coal in North Dakota - was completed in December 1984 on schedule. However, technical problems prevented Great Plains from meeting the inservice (commercial operation) target date of December 1, 1984. DOE believes the in-service date could occur in June 1985. Faced with deteriorating financial projections in the wake of declining energy prices, Great Plains applied to the US Synthetic Fuels Corporation (SFC) for additional assistance. In April 1984 SFC tentatively agreed to provide Great Plains up to $790 million in price guarantee assistance. In return, the Great Plains partners would contribute more equity, and Great Plains would repay the DOE-guaranteed loan faster and make profit-sharing payments to SFC. However, since SFC's tentative agreement for price guarantees, several events that could affect the project's financial outlook have occurred. For example, SFC and DOE have revised their energy price forecasts downward. In addition, Great Plains and SFC are negotiating a final agreement that could change some conditions of the tentative agreement.

Bowsher, C.A.

1985-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

389

Novel hydrogen separation device development for coal gasification system applications. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was undertaken for the development of a novel Electrochemical Hydrogen Separator (EHS) technology for low-cost hydrogen separation from coal derived gases. Design and operating parameter testing was performed using subscale cells (25 cm{sup 2}). High H{sub 2} purity, >99% is one of the main features of the EHS. It was found that N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} behave as equivalent inerts; EHS performance is not affected by the balance of feed gas containing these components. This product purity level is not sacrificed by increased H{sub 2} recovery. CO, however, does adversely affect EHS performance and therefore feed stream pretreatment is recommended. Low levels of H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} were added to the feed gas stream and it was verified that these impurities did not affect EHS performance. Task 2 demonstrated the scale-up to full size multi-cell module operation while maintaining a stable energy requirement. A 10-cell full-size module (1050 cm{sup 2} cell active area) was operated for over 3,800 hours and gave a stable baseline performance. Several applications for the EHS were investigated. The most economically attractive systems incorporating an EHS contain low pressure, dilute hydrogen streams, such as coal gasification carbonate fuel cell systems, hydrogen plant purification and fluid catalytic cracker units. In addition, secondary hydrogen recovery from PSA or membrane tailstreams using an EHS may increase overall system efficiency.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 Syngas (H2 + CO + CO2) Coal Gasifier coal Fuel Production/2 Syngas (H2 + CO + CO2) Coal Gasifier coal Fuel Production/this operational mode, the gasifiers and other parts of the

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Development of an advanced continuous mild gasification process for the production of coproducts: Task 4. 6, Technical and economic evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of DOE has sponsored, and continues to sponsor, programs for the development of technology and market strategies which will lead to the commercialization of processes for the production of coproducts from mild gasification of coal. It has been recognized by DOE and industry that mild gasification is a promising technology with potential to economically convert coal into marketable products, thereby increasing domestic coal utilization. In this process, coal is devolatilized under non- oxidizing conditions at mild temperature (900--1100{degrees}F) and pressure (1--15psig). Condensation of the vapor will yield a liquid product that can be upgraded to a petroleum substitute, and the remaining gas can provide the fuel for the process. The residual char can be burned in a power plant. Thus, in a long-term national scenario, implementation of this process will result in significant decrease of imported oil and increase in coal utilization.

Hogsett, R.F.; Jha, M.C.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Advanced Turbine Systems Program and coal applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a program to develop ultra high-efficiency, cost-effective, environmentally benign gas turbine systems for industrial and utility applications. The Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program, jointly managed by the DOE's Office of Fossil Energy (DOE/FE) and Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy (DOE/CE), will lead to the commercial offering by industry of systems meeting full program goals by the years 2000--2002. It is expected that some advanced technology will already have been commercialized in intermediate systems before that time. Teams, led by US turbine manufacturers, will conduct most of the development work in the ATS Program. However, a substantial technology base element of the program see universities and others conduct significant research and development (R D) on generic technology issues relevant to the program. The program is primarily aimed at developing natural gas-fired turbine systems. Although the conversion of ATS to firing with coal or biomass fuels will be addressed in the analysis of ATS, tests will not be conducted in the program to verify conversion to alternate fuel firing. The program will however, include work to transfer advanced technology to the coal- and biomass-fueled systems being developed in other DOE programs.

Webb, H.A. Jr.; Bajura, R.A.; Parsons, E.L. Jr.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Advanced Turbine Systems Program and coal applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a program to develop ultra high-efficiency, cost-effective, environmentally benign gas turbine systems for industrial and utility applications. The Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program, jointly managed by the DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy (DOE/FE) and Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy (DOE/CE), will lead to the commercial offering by industry of systems meeting full program goals by the years 2000--2002. It is expected that some advanced technology will already have been commercialized in intermediate systems before that time. Teams, led by US turbine manufacturers, will conduct most of the development work in the ATS Program. However, a substantial technology base element of the program see universities and others conduct significant research and development (R&D) on generic technology issues relevant to the program. The program is primarily aimed at developing natural gas-fired turbine systems. Although the conversion of ATS to firing with coal or biomass fuels will be addressed in the analysis of ATS, tests will not be conducted in the program to verify conversion to alternate fuel firing. The program will however, include work to transfer advanced technology to the coal- and biomass-fueled systems being developed in other DOE programs.

Webb, H.A. Jr.; Bajura, R.A.; Parsons, E.L. Jr.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Great Plains Coal Gasification Project. Technical quarterly report, 1st quarter, 1984. [Great Plains, Mercer County, North Dakota  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activities remain on schedule to meet the Great Plains Coal Gasification project's full gas production date. Detailed engineering is complete for the gasification plant. The remaining engineering tasks, which include field support activities and special projects, will be performed by the Contractors' Field Engineering Group. A substantial amount of construction progress was achieved during the first quarter. It is currently projected that construction will be complete at the end of September, 1984. Start-Up operations are continuing at a rapid pace. Commissioning activities are proceeding very well. The only remaining plant permit is the Permit to Operate, which will be issued in late 1985. Quality Assurance/Quality Control activities included the development of welding procedures for Operations personnel, safety relief valve testing, and equipment turnover inspections. Mine development activities remain on schedule. Initial coal deliveries to GPGA commenced this quarter.

Not Available

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

DOE's Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Program to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE's Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration DOE's Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Program to Develop Low-carbon Emission Coal Technologies DOE's Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Program to Develop Low-carbon Emission Coal Technologies March 11, 2009 - 3:18pm Addthis Statement of Victor K. Der, Acting Assistant Secretary, Office of Fossil Energy before the Subcommittee on Energy and Environment, Committee on Science and Technology, U.S. House of Representatives. Thank you, Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee. I appreciate this opportunity to provide testimony on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced coal research, development, and demonstration program to develop low-carbon emission coal technologies. Introduction Fossil fuel resources represent a tremendous national asset. An abundance

396

DOE's Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Program to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Program to Develop Low-carbon Emission Coal Technologies DOE's Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Program to Develop Low-carbon Emission Coal Technologies March 11, 2009 - 3:18pm Addthis Statement of Victor K. Der, Acting Assistant Secretary, Office of Fossil Energy before the Subcommittee on Energy and Environment, Committee on Science and Technology, U.S. House of Representatives. Thank you, Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee. I appreciate this opportunity to provide testimony on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced coal research, development, and demonstration program to develop low-carbon emission coal technologies. Introduction Fossil fuel resources represent a tremendous national asset. An abundance

397

Friction Stir Welding and Processing of Advanced Materials for Coal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Friction Stir Welding and Processing of Advanced Materials for Coal and Nuclear Power Applications. Author(s), Glenn J. Grant, Scott Weil, ...

398

Optical Gas Sensors for Advanced Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Optical Gas Sensors for Advanced Coal-Fired Power Plants. Author(s), Paul Ohodnicki, Congjun Wang, Douglas Kauffman, Kristi Kauffman, ...

399

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Westinghouse's Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine System Program (DE-AC2l-86MC23167) was originally split into two major phases - a Basic Program and an Option. The Basic Program also contained two phases. The development of a 6 atm, 7 lb/s, 12 MMBtu/hr slagging combustor with an extended period of testing of the subscale combustor, was the first part of the Basic Program. In the second phase of the Basic Program, the combustor was to be operated over a 3-month period with a stationary cascade to study the effect of deposition, erosion and corrosion on combustion turbine components. The testing of the concept, in subscale, has demonstrated its ability to handle high- and low-sulfur bituminous coals, and low-sulfur subbituminous coal. Feeding the fuel in the form of PC has proven to be superior to CWM type feed. The program objectives relative to combustion efficiency, combustor exit temperature, NO[sub x] emissions, carbon burnout, and slag rejection have been met. Objectives for alkali, particulate, and SO[sub x] levels leaving the combustor were not met by the conclusion of testing at Textron. It is planned to continue this testing, to achieve all desired emission levels, as part of the W/NSP program to commercialize the slagging combustor technology.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

NETL: Gasification Archived Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Gasification Systems > Reference Shelf > Archived Projects Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Gasification Systems > Reference Shelf > Archived Projects Gasification Systems Reference Shelf - Archived Projects Archived Projects | Active Projects | All NETL Fact Sheets Feed Systems Reaction-Driven Ion Transport Membranes Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems Coal/Biomass Gasification at Colorado School of Mines Co-Production of Electricity and Hydrogen Using a Novel Iron-Based Catalyst Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas/Electricity via Catalytic Coal Gasification Development of a Hydrogasification Process for Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) and Electric Power from Western Coals Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Coal Power Technology Development

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced coal gasification" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research  

SciTech Connect

Progress made in five research programs is described. The subtasks in oil shale study include oil shale process studies and unconventional applications and markets for western oil shale.The tar sand study is on recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction (ROPE) process. Four tasks are described in coal research: underground coal gasification; coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and sold waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research covers: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; NMR analysis of sample from the ocean drilling program; and menu driven access to the WDEQ hydrologic data management system.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

ADVANCED GASIFICATION-BASED FUEL CONVERSION AND ELECTRIC ENERGY PRODUCTION SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

Boise Paper Solutions and the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) are cooperating to develop, demonstrate and place in continuous operation an advanced biomass gasification-based power generation system suitable for near-term commercial deployment in the Forest Products Industry. The system will be used in conjunction with, rather than in place of, existing wood waste fired boilers and flue gas cleanup systems. The novel system will include three advanced technological components based on GTI's RENUGAS{reg_sign} and three-stage stoker combustion technologies, and a gas turbine-based power generation concept developed in DOE's High Performance Power System (HIPPS) program. The system has, as its objective, to avoid the major hurdles of high-pressure gasification, i.e., high-pressure fuel feeding and ash removal, and hot gas cleaning that are typical for conventional IGCC power generation. It aims to also minimize capital intensity and technology risks. The system is intended to meet the immediate needs of the forest products industry for highly efficient and environmentally friendly electricity and steam generation systems utilizing existing wood waste as fuel resources. The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate the commercial applicability of an advanced biomass gasification-based power generation system at Boise Paper Solutions' pulp and paper mill located at DeRidder, Louisiana.

Joseph Rabovitser; Bruce Bryan

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

ADVANCED GASIFICATION-BASED FUEL CONVERSION AND ELECTRIC ENERGY PRODUCTION SYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Boise Paper Solutions and the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) are cooperating to develop, demonstrate and place in continuous operation an advanced biomass gasification-based power generation system suitable for near-term commercial deployment in the Forest Products Industry. The system will be used in conjunction with, rather than in place of, existing wood waste fired boilers and flue gas cleanup systems. The novel system will include three advanced technological components based on GTI's RENUGAS{reg_sign} and three-stage stoker combustion technologies, and a gas turbine-based power generation concept developed in DOE's High Performance Power System (HIPPS) program. The system has, as its objective, to avoid the major hurdles of high-pressure gasification, i.e., high-pressure fuel feeding and ash removal, and hot gas cleaning that are typical for conventional IGCC power generation. It aims to also minimize capital intensity and technology risks. The system is intended to meet the immediate needs of the forest products industry for highly efficient and environmentally friendly electricity and steam generation systems utilizing existing wood waste as fuel resources. The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate the commercial applicability of an advanced biomass gasification-based power generation system at Boise Paper Solutions' pulp and paper mill located at DeRidder, Louisiana.

Joseph Rabovitser; Bruce Bryan

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

COMBUSTION OF COAL IN AN OPPOSED FLOW DIFFUSION BURNER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and N.M. Laurendeau, "Gasification of Pulverized Coal Withininformation on the gasification and combustion of coal with

Chin, W.K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal prices have been far less volatile than natural gas prices.Coal Prices Figure 9 is similar to Figure 8 except the natural gas pricesCoal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis interested in natural gas prices

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

NETL: News Release -Eight Advanced Coal Projects Chosen for Further  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, 2011 5, 2011 Eight Advanced Coal Projects Chosen for Further Development by DOE's University Coal Research Program Washington, D.C. - The Department of Energy has selected eight new projects to further advanced coal research under the University Coal Research Program. The selected projects will improve coal conversion and use and will help propel technologies for future advanced coal power systems. The selections will conduct investigations in three topic areas - computational energy sciences, material science, and sensors and controls - and will be funded at a maximum of $300,000 for 36 months. The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) will manage the projects, which include ultra-clean energy plants that could co-produce electric power, fuels, chemicals and other high-value products from coal with near-zero emissions and substantial increases in efficiency.

407

NETL: Gasification Systems - Gasifier Optimization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Optimization Small-Scale Coal-biomass to Liquids Production Using Highly Selective Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal...

408

Zero-order trace element distribution model for the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant: Topical report  

SciTech Connect

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center of the US DOE is developing a series for models of environmental systems. Both zero-order and detailed models are being developed. Detailed models are based on fundamental engineering principles and the use of detailed physical and chemical property data; reliance on empirical relationships and correlations is minimized. The key advantage of detailed models is their predictive capabilities and utility in performing valid comparative analyses. An important prerequisite to the development of detailed models in the availability of representative, long-term process and environmental data. These data are needed both to develop the models as well as to validate them. Zero-order models are less rigorous and have less predictive capability than detailed models since they are based on empirical estimates and simple correlations. However, they can be developed relatively quickly and are significantly less expensive to develop and use compared to detailed models. Zero-order models are useful in identifying potential environmental or control technology problems. As such, they can help direct future research and development efforts. They can provide useful information when comprehensive data are unavailable for detailed modeling, and can be used as a screening tool to identify process alternatives which appear to warrant more detailed modeling. This report describes a zero-order trace element distribution model for the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant located near Beulah, North Dakota. The model estimates how trace elements entering the plant in the feed coal are distributed to the plant's process and waste streams. Elements that may be introduced to the plant's waste streams from sorbents and/or catalysts (e.g., Vanadium in makeup Stretford solution) are not considered in the model. 13 refs.

Thomas, W.C.; Page, G.C.; Magee, R.A.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Diffusion Coatings for Corrosion-Resistant Components in Coal Gasification Systems  

SciTech Connect

Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high-temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low-cost alloy may improve its resistance to such sulfidation attack, and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. During this period we tested coated alloy coupons under conditions designed to mimic the conditions in the filter unit after the high-temperature heat recovery unit (HTHRU). The filter unit is another important area where corrosion has caused unscheduled downtime, and the remedy has been the use of sintered metal tubes made of expensive alloys such as inconel. The objective of our test was to determine if those coatings on 400-series steel that were not able to withstand the harsher conditions of the HTHRU, may be sufficiently resistant for use in the filter unit, at the reduced temperatures. Indeed, most of our coatings survived well; the exceptions were the coated porous samples of SS316. We continued making improvements to our coatings apparatus and the procedure began during the last quarter. As a result of these modifications, the coupons we are now producing are uniform. We describe the improved procedure for preparing diffusion coatings. Finally, because porous samples of steel in grades other than SS316 are not readily available, we also decided to procure SS409 powder and fabricate our own sintered porous coupons.

Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Esperanza Alvarez; Kai-Hung Lau; Angel Sanjurjo

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

NETL: News Release - Seven Projects Aimed at Advancing Coal Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 13, 2010 May 13, 2010 Seven Projects Aimed at Advancing Coal Research Selected for DOE's University Coal Research Program Department's Longest Running Student-Teacher Initiative Provides Research Exposure for Future Scientists and Engineers Washington, D.C. - Seven projects aimed at advancing coal research and development while providing research exposure to a new generation of scientists and engineers have been selected to participate in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) University Coal Research (UCR) program. The projects aim to improve the basic understanding of the chemical and physical processes that govern coal conversion and utilization, by-product utilization, and technological development for advanced energy systems. These advanced systems - efficient, ultra-clean energy plants - are envisioned to co-produce electric power, fuels, chemicals and other high-value products from coal with near-zero emissions, including greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide.

411

Changes in char structure during the gasification of a Victorian brown coal in steam and oxygen at 800{degree}C  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Char structure is an important factor influencing its reactivity during gasification. This study aims to investigate the changes in char structure during the gasification of brown coal. A Victorian brown coal was gasified in a fluidized-bed/fixed-bed reactor at 800{degree}C in atmospheres containing 15% H{sub 2}O, 2000 ppm O{sub 2}, or 15% H{sub 2}O and 2000 ppm O{sub 2}, respectively. Although the char gasification in 2000 ppm O{sub 2} was mainly rate-limited by the external diffusion of O{sub 2}, the char-H{sub 2}O reaction was mainly rate-limited by the chemical reactions. The structural features of char at different levels of char gasification conversion were examined with FT-Raman spectroscopy. Our results show that the chars from the gasification in the mixture of 2000 ppm O{sub 2} and 15% H{sub 2}O had almost the same features as the chars from the gasification in 15% H{sub 2}O alone when the same levels of char conversion were achieved. Both the thermal decomposition of char and the char gasification reactions could result in changes in char structure during gasification. 29 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Xin Guo; Hui Ling Tay; Shu Zhang; Chun-Zhu Li [Monash University, Vic. (Australia). Department of Chemical Engineering

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

Refractory Materials based on Magnesia-Alumina Spinel for Improved Performance in Coal Gasification Environments  

SciTech Connect

As part of a larger project to develop novel refractory systems and techniques to reduce energy consumption of refractory lined vessels, a team composed of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, refractory manufacturer Minteq International, Inc., and academic partner Missouri University of Science and Technology have developed new refractory materials and coating systems specifically for application in coal gasification environments. Materials were developed under this U.S. DOE funded project to address the need for innovative refractory compositions by developing MgO-Al2O3 spinel gunnable refractory compositions utilizing new aggregate materials, bond systems, protective coatings, and phase formation techniques. Work was conducted to develop and deploy these new materials and to develop and apply low cost coatings using a colloidal approach for protection against attack of the refractory brick by the serviced environment. Additionally, a light-weight back-up refractory system was developed to help offset the high thermal conductivity inherent in spinel materials. This paper discusses the efforts involved in the development of these materials, along with the laboratory testing and evaluation of these materials leading to relevant results achieved toward the reduction of chemical reactions and mechanical degradation by the service environment though compositional and processing modifications.

Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Rodrigues-Schroer, Angela [Minteq International, Inc.; Colavito, [Minteq International, Inc.; Smith, Jeffrey D [ORNL; O'Hara, Kelley [University of Missouri, Rolla

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

SPINEL-BASED REFRACTORIES FOR IMPROVED PERFORMANCE IN COAL GASIFICATION ENVIRONMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory, in collaboration with refractory manufacturer Minteq International, Inc., academic partner Missouri University of Science and Technology and refractory end users have developed novel refractory systems and techniques to reduce energy consumption of refractory lined vessels. The objective of this U.S. DOE funded project was to address the need for innovative refractory compositions by developing MgO-Al 2O3 spinel gunnable refractory compositions utilizing new aggregate materials, bond systems, protective coatings, and phase formation techniques. Materials have been developed specifically for coal gasification environments and work has been performed to develop and apply low cost coatings using a colloidal approach for protection against attack of the refractory brick by the service environment and to develop a light-weight back-up refractory system to help offset the high thermal conductivity inherent in spinel materials. This paper discusses the systematic development of these materials, laboratory testing and evaluation of these materials, and relevant results achieved toward the reduction of chemical reactions and mechanical degradation by the service environment though compositional and processing modifications.

Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Rodrigues-Schroer, Angela [Minteq International, Inc.; Colavito, [Minteq International, Inc.; Smith, Jeffrey D [ORNL; O'Hara, Kelley [University of Missouri, Rolla

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Modeling of the coal gasification processes in a hybrid plasma torch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The major advantages of plasma treatment systems are cost effectiveness and technical efficiency. A new efficient electrodeless 1-MW hybrid plasma torch for waste disposal and coal gasification is proposed. This product merges several solutions such as the known inductive-type plasma torch, innovative reverse-vortex (RV) reactor and the recently developed nonequilibrium plasma pilot and plasma chemical reactor. With the use of the computational-fluid-dynamics-computational method, preliminary 3-D calculations of heat exchange in a 1-MW plasma generator operating with direct vortex and RV have been conducted at the air flow rate of 100 g/s. For the investigated mode and designed parameters, reduction of the total wall heat transfer for the reverse scheme is about 65 kW, which corresponds to an increase of the plasma generator efficiency by approximately 6.5%. This new hybrid plasma torch operates as a multimode, high power plasma system with a wide range of plasma feedstock gases and turn down ratio, and offers convenient and simultaneous feeding of several additional reagents into the discharge zone.

Matveev, I.B.; Serbin, S.I. [Applied Plasma Technology, Mclean, VA (USA)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

High temperature electrochemical polishing of H{sub 2}S from coal gasification process streams. Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An advanced process for the separation of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasification product streams through an electrochemical membrane is being developed. H{sub 2}S is removed from the syn-gas stream, split into hydrogen, which enriches the exiting syn-gas, and sulfur, which is condensed from an inert sweep gas stream. The process allows removal of H{sub 2}S without cooling the gas stream and with negligible pressure loss through the separator. The process is made economically attractive by the lack of need for a Claus process for sulfur recovery. Membrane manufacturing coupled with full-cell experimentation was the primary focus this quarter. A tape-casted zirconia membrane was developed and utilized in one full-cell experiment (run 25); run 24 utilized a fabricated membrane purchased from Zircar Corporation. Results are discussed.

Winnick, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

416

Development of an advanced, continuous mild gasification process for the production of co-products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research continued on the production of co-products from mild gasification. This quarter, 10 mild gasification tests were conducted in the 8-inch-I.D. process research unit (PRU). Modifications to the PRU were made during this period to improve mixing and to overcome the caking tendency of the Illinois No. 6 coal. Six of the tests resulted in satisfactory operation at steady conditions for 2.25 to 3.25 hours. Samples of char, gas, water, and organic condensables were collected over a one-hour period from each of these successful tests and analyzed. The effects of process temperature over the range of 1025{degree} to 1390{degree} was studied during this quarter. Compositional effects on the oils and tars observed with increased temperature are increased light oil content, decreased pitch content, decreased oxygen content, increased nitrogen and sulfur content, and increasing aromaticity. Char upgrading studies continued during the quarter. Briquettes made in a laboratory press, using either a pitch binder or Illinois No. 6 coal to provide an in-situ binder, were calcined and tested for diametral compression strength. Char was also subjected to steam activation at a variety of conditions to determine the potential for use as a low-cost absorbent for water treatment. 2 refs., 15 figs., 11 tabs.

Knight, R.A.; Gissy, J.; Onischak, M.; Kline, S.; Babu, S.P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

A novel approach to highly dispersing catalytic materials in coal for gasification. First quarterly report, October 1, 1989--December 31, 1989  

SciTech Connect

This project seeks to develop a technique, based on coal surface properties, for highly dispersing catalysts in coal for gasification and to investigate the potential of using potassium carbonate and calcium acetate mixtures as catalysts for coal gasification. The lower cost and high catalytic activity of the latter compound will produce economic benefits by reducing the amount of K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} required for high coal char reactivities. The work is focused on the elucidation of coal-catalyst precursor interactions in solution and the variables which control the adsorption and dispersion of coal gasification metal catalysts. In order to optimize coal-metal ion interactions and hence maximize catalyst activity, the study examines the surface electrochemistry of a lignite, a subbituminous, and a bituminous coals and their demineralized and oxidized derivatives prior to loading with the catalytic materials. The surface electrical properties of the coals are investigated with the aid of electrophoresis, while the effects of the surface charge on the adsorption of K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} are studied by agitating the coals with aqueous solutions of potassium and calcium. A zeta meter, a tube furnace, and other equipment required for the investigation have been acquired and installed. Preliminary work shows that the lignite (Psoc 1482) is negatively charged between pH 1.8 and pH 11.0 and has an isoelectric point of pH 1.8.

Abotsi, G.M.K.; Bota, K.B.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

418

Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Program  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the original Request for Proposal was to establish the technological bases necessary for the subsequent commercial development and deployment of advanced coal-fueled gas turbine power systems by the private sector. The offeror was to identify the specific application or applications, toward which his development efforts would be directed; define and substantiate the technical, economic, and environmental criteria for the selected application; and conduct such component design, development, integration, and tests as deemed necessary to fulfill this objective. Specifically, the offeror was to choose a system through which ingenious methods of grouping subcomponents into integrated systems accomplishes the following: (1) Preserve the inherent power density and performance advantages of gas turbine systems. (2) System must be capable of meeting or exceeding existing and expected environmental regulations for the proposed application. (3) System must offer a considerable improvement over coal-fueled systems which are commercial, have been demonstrated, or are being demonstrated. (4) System proposed must be an integrated gas turbine concept, i.e., all fuel conditioning, all expansion gas conditioning, or post-expansion gas cleaning, must be integrated into the gas turbine system.

Horner, M.W.; Ekstedt, E.E.; Gal, E.; Jackson, M.R.; Kimura, S.G.; Lavigne, R.G.; Lucas, C.; Rairden, J.R.; Sabla, P.E.; Savelli, J.F.; Slaughter, D.M.; Spiro, C.L.; Staub, F.W.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

University Coal Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science & Innovation Clean Coal Crosscutting Research University Coal Research University Coal Research Clean Coal Turbines Gasification Fuel Cells Hydrogen from Coal Coal...

420

A Brief Review of Viscosity Models for Slag in Coal Gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many researchers have defined the phenomenon of 'slagging' as the deposition of ash in the radiative section of a boiler, while 'fouling' refers to the deposition of ash in the convective-pass region. Among the important parameters affecting ash deposition that need to be studied are ash chemistry, its transport, deposit growth, and strength development; removability of the ash deposit; heat transfer mechanisms; and the mode of operation for boilers. The heat transfer at the walls of a combustor depends on many parameters including ash deposition. This depends on the processes or parameters controlling the impact efficiency and the sticking efficiency. For a slagging combustor or furnace, however, the temperatures are so high that much of the coal particles are melted and the molten layer, in turn, captures more particles as it flows. The main problems with ash deposition are reduced heat transfer in the boiler and corrosion of the tubes. Common ways of dealing with these issues are soot blowing and wall blowing on a routine basis; however, unexpected or uncontrolled depositions can also complicate the situation, and there are always locations inaccessible to the use of such techniques. Studies have indicated that slag viscosity must be within a certain range of temperatures for tapping and the membrane wall to be accessible, for example, between 1300 C and 1500 C, the viscosity is approximately 25 Pa {center_dot} s. As the operating temperature decreases, the slag cools and solid crystals begin to form. In such cases the slag should be regarded as a non-Newtonian suspension, consisting of liquid silicate and crystals. A better understanding of the rheological properties of the slag, such as y