Sample records for advanced boiling water

  1. advanced boiling water: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  2. Study of Pu consumption in Advanced Light Water Reactors. Evaluation of GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Timely disposal of the weapons plutonium is of paramount importance to permanently safeguarding this material. GE`s 1300 MWe Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) has been designed to utilize fill] core loading of mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel. Because of its large core size, a single ABWR reactor is capable of disposing 100 metric tons of plutonium within 15 years of project inception in the spiking mode. The same amount of material could be disposed of in 25 years after the start of the project as spent fuel, again using a single reactor, while operating at 75 percent capacity factor. In either case, the design permits reuse of the stored spent fuel assemblies for electrical energy generation for the remaining life of the plant for another 40 years. Up to 40 percent of the initial plutonium can also be completely destroyed using ABWRS, without reprocessing, either by utilizing six ABWRs over 25 years or by expanding the disposition time to 60 years, the design life of the plants and using two ABWRS. More complete destruction would require the development and testing of a plutonium-base fuel with a non-fertile matrix for an ABWR or use of an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR). The ABWR, in addition, is fully capable of meeting the tritium target production goals with already developed target technology.

  3. Study of Pu consumption in advanced light water reactors: Evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants - compilation of Phase 1B task reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains an extensive evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants prepared for United State Department of Energy. The general areas covered in this report are: core and system performance; fuel cycle; infrastructure and deployment; and safety and environmental approval.

  4. Stability analysis of the boiling water reactor : methods and advanced designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Rui, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Density Wave Oscillations (DWOs) are known to be possible when a coolant undergoes considerable density reduction while passing through a heated channel. In the development of boiling water reactors (BWRs), there has been ...

  5. Study of plutonium disposition using existing GE advanced Boiling Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The end of the cold war and the resulting dismantlement of nuclear weapons has resulted in the need for the US to dispose of 50 to 100 metric tons of excess of plutonium in a safe and proliferation resistant manner. A number of studies, including the recently released National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study, have recommended conversion of plutonium into spent nuclear fuel with its high radiation barrier as the best means of providing permanent conversion and long-term diversion resistance to this material. The NAS study ``Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium identified Light Water Reactor spent fuel as the most readily achievable and proven form for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium. The study also stressed the need for a US disposition program which would enhance the prospects for a timely reciprocal program agreement with Russia. This summary provides the key findings of a GE study where plutonium is converted into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel and a typical 1155 MWe GE Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) is utilized to convert the plutonium to spent fuel. A companion study of the Advanced BWR has recently been submitted. The MOX core design work that was conducted for the ABWR enabled GE to apply comparable fuel design concepts and consequently achieve full MOX core loading which optimize plutonium throughput for existing BWRs.

  6. Study of plutonium disposition using the GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The end of the cold war and the resulting dismantlement of nuclear weapons has resulted in the need for the U.S. to disposition 50 to 100 metric tons of excess of plutonium in parallel with a similar program in Russia. A number of studies, including the recently released National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study, have recommended conversion of plutonium into spent nuclear fuel with its high radiation barrier as the best means of providing long-term diversion resistance to this material. The NAS study {open_quotes}Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium{close_quotes} identified light water reactor spent fuel as the most readily achievable and proven form for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium. The study also stressed the need for a U.S. disposition program which would enhance the prospects for a timely reciprocal program agreement with Russia. This summary provides the key findings of a GE study where plutonium is converted into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel and a 1350 MWe GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) is utilized to convert the plutonium to spent fuel. The ABWR represents the integration of over 30 years of experience gained worldwide in the design, construction and operation of BWRs. It incorporates advanced features to enhance reliability and safety, minimize waste and reduce worker exposure. For example, the core is never uncovered nor is any operator action required for 72 hours after any design basis accident. Phase 1 of this study was documented in a GE report dated May 13, 1993. DOE`s Phase 1 evaluations cited the ABWR as a proven technical approach for the disposition of plutonium. This Phase 2 study addresses specific areas which the DOE authorized as appropriate for more in-depth evaluations. A separate report addresses the findings relative to the use of existing BWRs to achieve the same goal.

  7. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the advanced boiling water reactor design. Volume 1: Main report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This safety evaluation report (SER) documents the technical review of the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the ABWR design was initially submitted by the General Electric Company, now GE Nuclear Energy (GE), in accordance with the procedures of Appendix O of Part 50 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 50). Later GE requested that its application be considered as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR {section} 52.45. The ABWR is a single-cycle, forced-circulation, boiling water reactor (BWR) with a rated power of 3,926 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 4,005 MWt. To the extent feasible and appropriate, the staff relied on earlier reviews for those ABWR design features that are substantially the same as those previously considered. Unique features of the ABWR design include internal recirculation pumps, fine-motion control rod drives, microprocessor-based digital logic and control systems, and digital safety systems. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that, subject to satisfactory resolution of the confirmatory items identified in Section 1.8 of this SER, GE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR standard design.

  8. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the advanced boiling water reactor design. Volume 2: Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This safety evaluation report (SER) documents the technical review of the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the ABWR design was initially submitted by the General Electric Company, now GE Nuclear Energy (GE), in accordance with the procedures of Appendix O of Part 50 of Title 10 of the code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 50). Later GE requested that its application be considered as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR {section} 52.45. The ABWR is a single-cycle, forced-circulation, boiling water reactor (BWR) with a rated power of 3,926 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 4,005 MWt. To the extent feasible and appropriate, the staff relied on earlier reviews for those ABWR design features that are substantially the same as those previously considered. Unique features of the ABWR design include internal recirculation pumps, fine-motion control rod drives, microprocessor-based digital logic and control systems, and digital safety systems. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that, subject to satisfactory resolution of the confirmatory items identified in Section 1.8 of this SER, GE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR standard design.

  9. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor design. Supplement 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report supplements the final safety evaluation report (FSER) for the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design. The FSER was issued by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff as NUREG-1503 in July 1994 to document the NRC staff`s review of the US ABWR design. The US ABWR design was submitted by GE Nuclear Energy (GE) in accordance with the procedures of Subpart B to Part 52 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations. This supplement documents the NRC staff`s review of the changes to the US ABWR design documentation since the issuance of the FSER. GE made these changes primarily as a result of first-of-a-kind-engineering (FOAKE) and as a result of the design certification rulemaking for the ABWR design. On the basis of its evaluations, the NRC staff concludes that the confirmatory issues in NUREG-1503 are resolved, that the changes to the ABWR design documentation are acceptable, and that GE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B to 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR design.

  10. Experimental and Thermalhydraulic Code Assessment of the Transient Behavior of the Passive Condenser System in an Advanced Boiling Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.T. Revankar; W. Zhou; Gavin Henderson

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of the project was to study analytically and experimentally the condensation heat transfer for the passive condenser system such as GE Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR). The effect of noncondensable gas in condenser tube and the reduction of secondary pool water level to the condensation heat transfer coefficient was the main focus in this research. The objectives of this research were to : 1) obtain experimental data on the local and tube averaged condensation heat transfer rates for the PCCS with non-condensable and with change in the secondary pool water, 2) assess the RELAP5 and TRACE computer code against the experimental data, and 3) develop mathematical model and ehat transfer correlation for the condensation phenomena for system code application. The project involves experimentation, theoretical model development and verification, and thermal- hydraulic codes assessment.

  11. abwr advanced boiling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  12. advanced boiling curve: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  13. Boiling water reactor control rod

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, J.F.; Doshi, P.K.

    1986-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a control rod for a boiling water type nuclear power reactor, the improvement comprising: (a) an elongated central stem defining a longitudinally extending internal central gas plenum; (b) blades connected to and extending along and radially outward from the stem, each blade including an elongated body portion extending along the stem and terminating in an end tip portion; (c) means defining a series of internal cavities in each of the blades, the cavities being arranged in columns and rows across the length and width of the body and tip portions of the blade; (d) pellets of neutron absorbing material, each disposed within one of the cavities with each of the cavities being oversized in relation to the size of the pellet disposed therein to allow extra space for swelling of the pellet. The cavities and the pellets disposed therein are arranged to define a longer, constant worth section generally coextensive with the body portion of the blade and a shorter, reduced worth section generally coextensive with the end tip portion of the blade; and (e) means defined within each blade communicating each of the cavities with the central gas plenum for allowing any gases generated by irradiation of the pellets to expand from the cavities into the plenum.

  14. automatic boiling water: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  15. Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

  16. Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, D.M.

    1996-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

  17. A study of boiling water flow regimes at low pressures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiori, Mario P.

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "A comprehensive experimental program to examine flow regimes at pressures below 100 psia for boiling of water in tubes was carried out. An electrical probe, which measures the resistance of the fluid between the centerline ...

  18. Burnout in forced convection nucleate boiling of water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds John Mitchell

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data are presented for burnout in forced coivection nucleate boiling of water at pressures above 500 psia. A dimensionless correlation is devised for. the M.I.T. data which is found to be valid for certain recent data ...

  19. Advanced nuclear reactor safety analysis: the simulation of a small break loss of coolant accident in the simplified boiling water reactor using RELAP5/MOD3.1.1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faust, Christophor Randall

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal hydraulic simulation code RELAP5/MOD3.1.1 was utilized to model General Electric's Simplified Boiling Water Reactor plant. The model of the plant was subjected to a small break loss of coolant accident occurring from a guillotine shear...

  20. Self-Sustaining Thorium Boiling Water Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganda, Francesco

    A thorium-fueled water-cooled reactor core design approach that features a radially uniform composition of fuel rods in stationary fuel assembly and is fuel-self-sustaining is described. This core design concept is similar ...

  1. Boiling water neutronic reactor incorporating a process inherent safety design

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1985-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A boiling-water reactor core is positioned within a prestressed concrete reactor vessel of a size which will hold a supply of coolant water sufficient to submerge and cool the reactor core by boiling for a period of at least one week after shutdown. Separate volumes of hot, clean (nonborated) water for cooling during normal operation and cool highly borated water for emergency cooling and reactor shutdown are separated by an insulated wall during normal reactor operation with contact between the two water volumes being maintained at interfaces near the top and bottom ends of the reactor vessel. Means are provided for balancing the pressure of the two water volumes at the lower interface zone during normal operation to prevent entry of the cool borated water into the reactor core region, for detecting the onset of excessive power to coolant flow conditions in the reactor core and for detecting low water levels of reactor coolant. Cool borated water is permitted to flow into the reactor core when low reactor coolant levels or excessive power to coolant flow conditions are encountered.

  2. Boiling water neutronic reactor incorporating a process inherent safety design

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W. (Kingston, TN)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A boiling-water reactor core is positioned within a prestressed concrete reactor vessel of a size which will hold a supply of coolant water sufficient to submerge and cool the reactor core by boiling for a period of at least one week after shutdown. Separate volumes of hot, clean (non-borated) water for cooling during normal operation and cool highly borated water for emergency cooling and reactor shutdown are separated by an insulated wall during normal reactor operation with contact between the two water volumes being maintained at interfaces near the top and bottom ends of the reactor vessel. Means are provided for balancing the pressure of the two volumes at the lower interface zone during normal operation to prevent entry of the cool borated water into the reactor core region, for detecting the onset of excessive power to coolant flow conditions in the reactor core and for detecting low water levels of reactor coolant. Cool borated water is permitted to flow into the reactor core when low reactor coolant levels or excessive power to coolant flow conditions are encountered.

  3. Feasibility study on the thorium fueled boiling water breeder reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PetrusTakaki, N. [Dept. of Applied Science, Tokai Univ., Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility of (Th,U)O 2 fueled, boiling water breeder reactor based on conventional BWR technology has been studied. In order to determine the potential use of water cooled thorium reactor as a competitive breeder, this study evaluated criticality, breeding and void reactivity coefficient in response to changes made in MFR and fissile enrichments. The result of the study shows that while using light water as moderator, low moderator to fuel volume ratio (MFR=0.5), it was possible to breed fissile fuel in negative void reactivity condition. However the burnup value was lower than the value of the current LWR. On the other hand, heavy water cooled reactor shows relatively wider feasible breeding region, which lead into possibility of designing a core having better neutronic and economic performance than light water with negative void reactivity coefficient. (authors)

  4. Enhancement of flow boiling of subcooled water on transverse ribbed surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujita, Yasunobu; Deguchi, Hironobu

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present work deals with enhancement of flow boiling heat transfer using transverse ribs of rectangular cross section attached on a flat heating surface. High flux cooling is envisioned in the field of the leading edge technology such as high power laser applications, advanced metallurgical processes, fusion reactors, integrated circuit chips and so forth. In such advanced cooling devices subcooled boiling of water at high velocity is expected as one of most efficient and convenient means for heat removal exceeding 10{sup 7}W/m{sup 2}. In the present experiment, a sheet of stainless-steel (10mm wide, 0.2mm thick and 80mm in heated length) was flush mounted on one wall of a vertical rectangular channel (a cross-section 20mm x 30 mm) and used as a heating surface by passing a direct current. Transverse-ribs made of plastic plate (0.5mm thick and 30mm in lateral length) were attached at an equal longitudinal spacing on the heating surface. Longitudinal spacing of ribs was varied from 2.5, 5, 10, 20mm to infinity (a flat surface without ribs), and the rib height was 2.5mm and 5.0mm. Experiments were conducted with water at a pressure of 0.12MPa in the range of mass velocity from 500kg/m{sup 2}s to 2,000kg/m{sup 2}s (water velocity from 0.5m/s to 2m/s) and subcooling from 20K to 50K. It was found that the ribbed structure strongly affects heat transfer both in the non-boiling and partial nucleate boiling regimes. Enhancement rate of heat transfer coefficient varied from 5% to 50% in excess compared with that for the flat heating plate. According to visual observation of boiling bubbles the circulating flow occurred in a space between each consecutive ribs and seemed to enhance heat transfer. For narrow rib spacing a large coalesced bubble filled up each rib space and impeded the exchange of vapor with liquid, leading to heat transfer deterioration. In the present experimental range of the ribs, a 50% increase of heat transfer coefficient was attained on the ribbed surface with 5mm height and a spacing of 10mm.

  5. Comparison of thorium-based fuels with different fissile components in existing boiling water reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazière, Christophe

    Comparison of thorium-based fuels with different fissile components in existing boiling water, SE-412 96 Göteborg, Sweden Keywords: Thorium BWR Neutronics a b s t r a c t With the aim of investigating the technical feasibility of fuelling a conventional BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) with thorium

  6. Nonlinear dynamics and chaos in boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    March-Leuba, J.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are currently 72 commercial boiling water reactors (BWRs) in operation or under construction in the western world, 37 of them in the United States. Consequently, a great effort has been devoted to the study of BWR systems under a wide range of plant operating conditions. This paper represents a contribution to this ongoing effort; its objective is to study the basic dynamic processes in BWR systems, with special emphasis on the physical interpretation of BWR dynamics. The main thrust in this work is the development of phenomenological BWR models suited for analytical studies performed in conjunction with numerical calculations. This approach leads to a deeper understanding of BWR dynamics and facilitates the interpretation of numerical results given by currently available sophisticated BWR codes. 6 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Determination of the boiling enhancement mechanism caused by surfactant addition to water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, C.N.; You, S.M. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present investigation, boiling heat transfer coefficients are measured for an electrically heated 390-{micro}m, platinum wire immersed in saturated water, and in water mixed with three different concentrations of sodium dodecyl sulfate (an anionic surfactant). The addition of a surfactant to water is known to enhance boiling heat transfer. A recently developed photographic/laser Doppler anemometry measurement technique is used to quantify the vapor volumetric flowrate departing from the wire during the boiling process. The volumetric flowrate data are combined with results from additional analyses to determine the overall contributions to the total heat flux from three nucleate boiling heat transfer mechanisms. Comparisons are made to determine which heat transfer mechanisms are affected by the surfactant addition, and thus, which mechanisms promote boiling enhancement.

  8. CORQUENCH: A model for gas sparging-enhanced melt-water, film boiling heat transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M.T.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A phenomenological model (CORQUENCH) has been developed to describe the gas-sparging enhanced film boiling heat transfer between a molten pool of corium and an overlying water layer. The model accounts for thermal radiation across the vapor film, bulk liquid subcooling, interfacial area enhancement due to sparging gas, and melt entrainment into the overlying water layer. In this paper, the modeling approach is described, and a comparison with the lead-Freon 11 and lead-water film boiling experiment data of Greene is made. Predictions are then made for the case of film boiling over corium in the presence of sparging concrete decomposition gases. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Experimental investigation of nucleate boiling heat transfer mechanisms for cylinders in water and FC-72

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, C.N.; You, S.M.; Hong, Y.S. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently developed photographic method is used to quantify vapor volumetric flow rate above a boiling wire. The volumetric flow rate is combined with additional analyses to determine the overall contributions to the total heat flux from four nucleate boiling heat transfer mechanisms (latent heat, natural convection, Marangoni flow, and micro-convection). This technique is used to quantify the boiling heat transfer mechanisms versus heat flux for a 510-{micro}m wire immersed in saturated water and in water with a small amount of liquid soap added. These data are compared with similar data taken for a 75-{micro}m wire boiling in saturated FC-72. For all cases, latent heat is the dominant heat transfer mechanism in the fully developed nucleate boiling regime. In addition, the latent heat component is significantly increased by the addition of small amounts of soap (surfactant).

  10. Camera Inspection Arm for Boiling Water Reactors - 13330

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Scott; Rood, Marc [S.A. Technology, 3985 S. Lincoln Ave, Loveland, CO 80537 (United States)] [S.A. Technology, 3985 S. Lincoln Ave, Loveland, CO 80537 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) outage maintenance tasks can be time-consuming and hazardous. Reactor facilities are continuously looking for quicker, safer, and more effective methods of performing routine inspection during these outages. In 2011, S.A. Technology (SAT) was approached by Energy Northwest to provide a remote system capable of increasing efficiencies related to Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) internal inspection activities. The specific intent of the system discussed was to inspect recirculation jet pumps in a manner that did not require manual tooling, and could be performed independently of other ongoing inspection activities. In 2012, SAT developed a compact, remote, camera inspection arm to create a safer, more efficient outage environment. This arm incorporates a compact and lightweight design along with the innovative use of bi-stable composite tubes to provide a six-degree of freedom inspection tool capable of reducing dose uptake, reducing crew size, and reducing the overall critical path for jet pump inspections. The prototype camera inspection arm unit is scheduled for final testing in early 2013 in preparation for the Columbia Generating Station refueling outage in the spring of 2013. (authors)

  11. Multi-cycle boiling water reactor fuel cycle optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ottinger, K.; Maldonado, G.I. [University of Tennessee, 311 Pasqua Engineering Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work a new computer code, BWROPT (Boiling Water Reactor Optimization), is presented. BWROPT uses the Parallel Simulated Annealing (PSA) algorithm to solve the out-of-core optimization problem coupled with an in-core optimization that determines the optimum fuel loading pattern. However it uses a Haling power profile for the depletion instead of optimizing the operating strategy. The result of this optimization is the optimum new fuel inventory and the core loading pattern for the first cycle considered in the optimization. Several changes were made to the optimization algorithm with respect to other nuclear fuel cycle optimization codes that use PSA. Instead of using constant sampling probabilities for the solution perturbation types throughout the optimization as is usually done in PSA optimizations the sampling probabilities are varied to get a better solution and/or decrease runtime. The new fuel types available for use can be sorted into an array based on any number of parameters so that each parameter can be incremented or decremented, which allows for more precise fuel type selection compared to random sampling. Also, the results are sorted by the new fuel inventory of the first cycle for ease of comparing alternative solutions. (authors)

  12. Generic risk insights for General Electric boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Travis, R.; Taylor, J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Chung, J. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (USA). Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation)

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A methodology has been developed to extract generic risk-based information from probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) of General Electric boiling water rectors and applying the insights gained to plants that have not been subjected to a PRA. The available risk assessments (six plants) were examined to identify the most probable, i.e., dominant accident sequences at each plants. The goal was to include all sequences which represented at least 80% of core damage frequency. If the same plant specific dominant accident sequence appeared within this boundary in at least two plant PRAs, the sequence was considered to be a representative sequence. Eight sequences met this definition. From these sequences, the most important component failures and human error that contributed to each sequence have been prioritized. Guidance is provided to prioritize the representative sequences and modify selected basic events that have been shown to be sensitive to the plant specific design or operating variations of the contributing PRAs. This risk-based guidance can be used for utility and NRC activities including operator training, maintenance, design review, and inspections. 13 refs., 6 tabs.

  13. Aging study of boiling water reactor high pressure injection systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conley, D.A.; Edson, J.L.; Fineman, C.F. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of high pressure injection systems is to maintain an adequate coolant level in reactor pressure vessels, so that the fuel cladding temperature does not exceed 1,200{degrees}C (2,200{degrees}F), and to permit plant shutdown during a variety of design basis loss-of-coolant accidents. This report presents the results of a study on aging performed for high pressure injection systems of boiling water reactor plants in the United States. The purpose of the study was to identify and evaluate the effects of aging and the effectiveness of testing and maintenance in detecting and mitigating aging degradation. Guidelines from the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program were used in performing the aging study. Review and analysis of the failures reported in databases such as Nuclear Power Experience, Licensee Event Reports, and the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, along with plant-specific maintenance records databases, are included in this report to provide the information required to identify aging stressors, failure modes, and failure causes. Several probabilistic risk assessments were reviewed to identify risk-significant components in high pressure injection systems. Testing, maintenance, specific safety issues, and codes and standards are also discussed.

  14. Conceptual design of an annular-fueled superheat boiling water reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Yu-Chih, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conceptual design of an annular-fueled superheat boiling water reactor (ASBWR) is outlined. The proposed design, ASBWR, combines the boiler and superheater regions into one fuel assembly. This ensures good neutron ...

  15. advanced water reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  16. "Hot Water" in Lassen Volcanic National Park--Fumaroles, Steaming Ground, and Boiling Mudpots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    "Hot Water" in Lassen Volcanic National Park-- Fumaroles, Steaming Ground, and Boiling Mudpots U, ydrothermal (hot water) and steaming ground. These features are re- lated to active volcanism, the largest fumarole (steam and volcanic-gas vent) in the park. The temperature of the high-velocity steam

  17. CASL-U-2015-0040-000 Initial Boiling Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r k C o . CL25-0006-000 Design of a

  18. Advanced Hybrid Water Heater using Electrochemical Compressor...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Advanced Hybrid Water Heater using Electrochemical Compressor Advanced Hybrid Water Heater using Electrochemical Compressor Xergy is using its Electro Chemical Compression (ECC)...

  19. Copyright Awwa Research Foundation 2006 Advanced Water Treatment Impacts onAdvanced Water Treatment Impacts on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    , brackish groundwater, produced water, etc.produced water, etc. Advanced treatmentAdvanced treatment Water© Copyright Awwa Research Foundation 2006 Advanced Water Treatment Impacts onAdvanced Water Treatment Impacts on EnergyEnergy--Water LinkagesWater Linkages (The Water Utility Perspective)(The Water

  20. Study of bubble growth in water pool boiling through synchronized, infrared thermometry and high-speed video

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerardi, Craig

    High-speed video and infrared thermometry were used to obtain time- and space-resolved information on bubble nucleation and heat transfer in pool boiling of water. The bubble departure diameter and frequency, growth and ...

  1. Subcooled flow boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux in water-based nanofluids at low pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sung Joong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nanofluid is a colloidal suspension of nano-scale particles in water, or other base fluids. Previous pool boiling studies have shown that nanofluids can improve the critical heat flux (CHF) by as much as 200%. In this ...

  2. Analysis of the magnetic corrosion product deposits on a boiling water reactor cladding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orlov, Andrey [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Degueldre, Claude, E-mail: claude.degueldre@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Kaufmann, Wilfried [Kernkraftwerk Leibstadt, Leibstadt (Switzerland)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The buildup of corrosion product deposits (CRUD) on the fuel cladding of the boiling water reactor (BWR) before and after zinc injection has been investigated by applying local experimental analytical techniques. Under the BWR water chemistry conditions, Zn addition together with the presence of Ni and Mn induce the formation of (Zn,Ni,Mn)[Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}] spinel solid solutions. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) revealed inversion ratios of cation distribution in spinels deposited from the solid solution. Based on this information, a two-site ferrite spinel solid solution model is proposed. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) findings suggest the zinc-rich ferrite spinels formation on BWR fuel cladding mainly at lower pin. - Graphical Abstract: Analysis of spinels in corrosion product deposits on boiling water reactor fuel rod. Combining EPMA and XAFS results: schematic representation of the ferrite spinels in terms of the end members and their extent of inversion. Note that the ferrites are represented as a surface between the normal (upper plane, M[Fe{sub 2}]O{sub 4}) and the inverse (lower plane, Fe[MFe]O{sub 4}). Actual compositions red Black-Small-Square for the specimen at low elevation (810 mm), blue Black-Small-Square for the specimen at mid elevation (1800 mm). The results have an impact on the properties of the CRUD material. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Buildup of corrosion product deposits on fuel claddings of a boiling water reactor (BWR) are investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Under BWR water conditions, Zn addition with Ni and Mn induced formation of (Zn,Ni,Mn)[Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}]. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-Ray Adsorption Spectroscopy (XAS) revealed inversion of cations in spinel solid solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc-rich ferrite spinels are formed on BWR fuel cladding mainly at lower pin elevations.

  3. Pressure drop, heat transfer, critical heat flux, and flow stability of two-phase flow boiling of water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures - final report for project "Efficent cooling in engines with nucleate boiling."

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, W.; France, D. M.; Routbort, J. L. (Energy Systems)

    2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of its order-of-magnitude higher heat transfer rates, there is interest in using controllable two-phase nucleate boiling instead of conventional single-phase forced convection in vehicular cooling systems to remove ever increasing heat loads and to eliminate potential hot spots in engines. However, the fundamental understanding of flow boiling mechanisms of a 50/50 ethylene glycol/water mixture under engineering application conditions is still limited. In addition, it is impractical to precisely maintain the volume concentration ratio of the ethylene glycol/water mixture coolant at 50/50. Therefore, any investigation into engine coolant characteristics should include a range of volume concentration ratios around the nominal 50/50 mark. In this study, the forced convective boiling heat transfer of distilled water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures with volume concentration ratios of 40/60, 50/50, and 60/40 in a 2.98-mm-inner-diameter circular tube has been investigated in both the horizontal flow and the vertical flow. The two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux of the test fluids were determined experimentally over a range of the mass flux, the vapor mass quality, and the inlet subcooling through a new boiling data reduction procedure that allowed the analytical calculation of the fluid boiling temperatures along the experimental test section by applying the ideal mixture assumption and the equilibrium assumption along with Raoult's law. Based on the experimental data, predictive methods for the two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux under engine application conditions were developed. The results summarized in this final project report provide the necessary information for designing and implementing nucleate-boiling vehicular cooling systems.

  4. Boiling Water at Hot Creek--The Dangerous and Dynamic Thermal Springs in California's Long Valley Caldera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    ). Conditions in Hot Creek can change very quickly. These fish--caught in a burst of high-temperature water" or intermittently spurting very hot, sediment-laden water as high as 6 feet (2 m) above the stream surface. At timesBoiling Water at Hot Creek--The Dangerous and Dynamic Thermal Springs in California's Long Valley

  5. Factors influencing the precoat filtration of boiling water reactor water streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hermansson, H.P. (Studsvik Material AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)); Persson, G. (Forsmark Nuclear Power Plant, Oesthammar (Sweden)); Reinvall, A. (Industrial Power Co. Ltd., Olkiluoto (Finland))

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of studies on precoat filtration were carried out on condensate and preheater drains in the Swedish and Finnish boiling water reactors (BWRs). The goal was to increase knowledge about the precoat filtration process and to find physical and chemical means to improve the performance of the precoat filters in the condensate polishing plants. To achieve this goal a number of parameters, such as type of resin, bed depth, pH, oxygen and organic contaminant concentrations (measured total organic carbon), and corrosion product particle characteristics, were selected for the study. The work was mainly carried out in the power plants using an experimental facility fed with on-line sampled condensates and drains taken from the plant sampling lines. The main results are that there is a varying influence on precoat filtration from all the aforementioned parameters. The oxygen concentration, the concentration of organic contaminants, and the type of corrosion products are, however, the factors that have the strongest influence within the parameter ranges that are representative for BWR operation. The results are rather similar when the different units are compared. There are, however, some differences that could be mainly attributed to deviations in operation parameters and the subsequent differences in the corrosion product spectra. The mechanism for precoat filtration of corrosion products in BWR condensate is complex. The filtration behavior is to a large extent governed by competition between depth filtration and electrostatic interactions. During the early stages of the filtration cycle, electrostatic interaction is of great importance, whereas depth filtration becomes more important with increasing operating time. Rapid pressure drop buildup rates have been demonstrated to be caused by the presence of amorphous corrosion products. An effect from the presence of organic contaminants has been found, although this should be of little significance.

  6. CORQUENCH: A model for gas sparging-enhanced, melt-water, film-boiling heat transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M.T.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In evaluation of severe-accident sequences for water-cooled nuclear reactors, molten core materials may be postulated to be released into the containment and accumulate on concrete. The heatup and decomposition of concrete is accompanied by the release of water vapor and carbon dioxide gases. Gases flowing through the melt upper surface can influence the rates of heat transfer to water overlying the melt. In particular, the gas flow through the interface can be envisioned to enhance the heat removal from the melt. A mechanistic model (CORQUENCH) has been developed to describe film-boiling heat transfer between a molten pool and an overlying coolant layer in the presence of sparging gas. The model favorably predicts the lead-Feron 11 data of Greene and Greene et al. for which the calculations indicate that area enhancement in the conduction heat transfer across the film is the predominant mechanism leading to augmentation in the heat flux as the gas velocity increases. Predictions for oxidic corium indicate a rapid increase in film-boiling heat flux as the gas velocity rises. The predominant mode of heat transfer for this case is radiation, and the increase in heat flux with gas velocity is primarily a result of interfacial area enhancement of the radiation component of the overall heat transfer coefficient. The CORQUENCH model has been incorporated into the MELTSPREAD-1 computer code{sup 6} for the analysis of transient spreading in containments.

  7. Performance of Charcoal Cookstoves for Haiti Part 1: Results from the Water Boiling Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booker, Kayje; Han, Tae Won; Granderson, Jessica; Jones, Jennifer; Lsk, Kathleen; Yang, Nina; Gadgil, Ashok

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In April 2010, a team of scientists and engineers from Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) and UC Berkeley, with support from the Darfur Stoves Project (DSP), undertook a fact-finding mission to Haiti in order to assess needs and opportunities for cookstove intervention. Based on data collected from informal interviews with Haitians and NGOs, the team, Scott Sadlon, Robert Cheng, and Kayje Booker, identified and recommended stove testing and comparison as a high priority need that could be filled by LBNL. In response to that recommendation, five charcoal stoves were tested at the LBNL stove testing facility using a modified form of version 3 of the Shell Foundation Household Energy Project Water Boiling Test (WBT). The original protocol is available online. Stoves were tested for time to boil, thermal efficiency, specific fuel consumption, and emissions of CO, CO{sub 2}, and the ratio of CO/CO{sub 2}. In addition, Haitian user feedback and field observations over a subset of the stoves were combined with the experiences of the laboratory testing technicians to evaluate the usability of the stoves and their appropriateness for Haitian cooking. The laboratory results from emissions and efficiency testing and conclusions regarding usability of the stoves are presented in this report.

  8. advanced water-cooled reactors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  9. advanced light-water reactors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  10. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Boiling-Water Reactors (BWR) (NUREG-1123) provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators (ROs) and senior reactor operators (SROs). The examinations developed using the BWR Catalog and Examiners' Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Examinations (NUREG-1121) will cover those topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55. The BWR Catalog contains approximately 7000 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for ROs and SROs at boiling water reactors. Each K/A statement has been rated for its importance to the safe operation of the plant in a manner ensuring personnel and public health and safety. The BWR K/A Catalog is organized into five major sections: Plant-wide Generic Knowledge and Ability Statements, Plant Systems grouped by Safety Function, Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions, Components, and Theory. The BWR Catalog represents a modification of the form and content of the K/A Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Pressurized Water Reactors (NUREG-1122). First, categories of knowledge and ability statements have been redefined. Second, the scope of the definition of emergency and abnormal plant evolutions has been revised in line with a symptom-based approach. Third, K/As related to the operational applications of theory have been incorporated into the delineations for both plant systems and emergency and abnormal plant evolutions, while K/As pertaining to theory fundamental to plant operation have been delineated in a separate theory section. Finally, the components section has been revised.

  11. Operational experience with and post-irradiation examinations on boiling water reactor control rods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eickelpash, N.; Mullauer, J.; Seepolt, R.W.; Spalthoff, W.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The control rods of the KRB-I 250-MW (electric) boiling water reactor contain Vipac B/sub 4/C powder in Type 304 stainless steel tubes as a neutron-absorbing material. Because of an increase in the reactor coolant /sup 3/H activity, defective control rods were suspected. The hot cell examination of a highly exposed control rod revealed B/sub 4/C losses. The mechanism of failure was shown to be B/sub 4/C swelling and stress corrosion cracking of the absorber tubes, followed by B/sub 4/C washout. The B/sub 4/C volume swelling is given. The tube cracking starts at 30 to 35% and the B/sub 4/C washout at 50 to 55% local /sup 10/B burnup in the tubes.

  12. Boiling water reactor control rod programming using heuristic and mathematical methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayase, T.; Motoda, H.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OPROD, a computer code for automatic generation of control rod programming that has successfully been applied to an older boiling water reactor (BWR), has experienced some difficulties when applied to a BWR of larger power density and stronger heterogeneity. To improve the performance, a heuristic algorithm that is derived from accumulated experience has been introduced to search for a feasible rod pattern that satisfies all constraints. Application of this algorithm to an initial cycle of an 800-MW(e) BWR of high heterogeneity has been very successful. It has been demonstrated that the proposed algorithm is capable of finding a feasible rod pattern, even starting from an all-rods-out pattern. Some improvement was also made in the method of approximation programming (MAP) algorithm. The temporal constraint relaxation method is shown to be effective in finding an optimal control rod pattern in MAP starting from a guess pattern that is not feasible.

  13. Passive containment cooling system with drywell pressure regulation for boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, P.R.

    1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A boiling water reactor is described having a regulating valve for placing the wetwell in flow communication with an intake duct of the passive containment cooling system. This subsystem can be adjusted to maintain the drywell pressure at (or slightly below or above) wetwell pressure after the initial reactor blowdown transient is over. This addition to the PCCS design has the benefit of eliminating or minimizing steam leakage from the drywell to the wetwell in the longer-term post-LOCA time period and also minimizes the temperature difference between drywell and wetwell. This in turn reduces the rate of long-term pressure buildup of the containment, thereby extending the time to reach the design pressure limit. 4 figures.

  14. Passive containment cooling system with drywell pressure regulation for boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, Paul R. (Tucson, AZ)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A boiling water reactor having a regulating valve for placing the wetwell in flow communication with an intake duct of the passive containment cooling system. This subsystem can be adjusted to maintain the drywell pressure at (or slightly below or above) wetwell pressure after the initial reactor blowdown transient is over. This addition to the PCCS design has the benefit of eliminating or minimizing steam leakage from the drywell to the wetwell in the longer-term post-LOCA time period and also minimizes the temperature difference between drywell and wetwell. This in turn reduces the rate of long-term pressure buildup of the containment, thereby extending the time to reach the design pressure limit.

  15. Flow boiling of water in a circular staggered micro-pin fin heat sink Santosh Krishnamurthy, Yoav Peles *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peles, Yoav

    across a bank of heated tube bundles, have shown that the local two-phase heat transfer coefficient across a tube bundle and determined the void fraction, the frictional pressure drop, and the local heatFlow boiling of water in a circular staggered micro-pin fin heat sink Santosh Krishnamurthy, Yoav

  16. Importance of Delayed Neutrons on the Coupled Neutronic-Thermohydraulic Stability of a Natural Circulation Heavy Water-Moderated Boiling Light Water-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nayak, A.K. [Bhaha Atomic Research Centre (India); Aritomi, M. [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Raj, V. Venkat [Bhaha Atomic Research Centre (India)

    2001-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The coupled neutronic-thermohydraulic stability characteristics of a natural circulation heavy water-moderated boiling light water-cooled reactor was investigated analytically considering the effects of prompt and delayed neutrons. For this purpose, the reactor considered is the Indian Advanced Heavy Water Reactor. The analytical model considers a point kinetics model for the neutron dynamics, a homogeneous two-phase flow model for the coolant thermal hydraulics, and a lumped heat transfer model for the fuel thermal dynamics. A higher mode of oscillation having a frequency much greater than the density-wave oscillation frequency was observed if prompt neutrons alone were considered. The occurrence of a higher mode of oscillation was found to be dependent on the concentration of delayed neutrons, the void reactivity coefficient, and the fuel time constant. The core inlet subcooling is found to have different effects on the decay ratio of the fundamental and higher modes of oscillations. The influences of void reactivity coefficient and fuel time constant on the fundamental and higher modes of oscillations were also found to be opposite in nature.

  17. Sandia Energy - Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) Home Stationary Power Nuclear Fuel Cycle Advanced Nuclear Energy Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water...

  18. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Boiling water reactors, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Boiling-Water Reactors (BWRs) (NUREG-1123, Revision 1) provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators (ROs) and senior reactor operators (SROs). The examinations developed using the BWR Catalog along with the Operator Licensing Examiner Standards (NUREG-1021) and the Examiner`s Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Written Examinations (NUREG/BR-0122), will cover the topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55 (10 CFR 55). The BWR Catalog contains approximately 7,000 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for ROs and SROs at BWRs. The catalog is organized into six major sections: Organization of the Catalog, Generic Knowledge and Ability Statements, Plant Systems grouped by Safety Functions, Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions, Components, and Theory. Revision 1 to the BWR Catalog represents a modification in form and content of the original catalog. The K/As were linked to their applicable 10 CFR 55 item numbers. SRO level K/As were identified by 10 CFR 55.43 item numbers. The plant-wide generic and system generic K/As were combined in one section with approximately one hundred new K/As. Component Cooling Water and Instrument Air Systems were added to the Systems Section. Finally, High Containment Hydrogen Concentration and Plant Fire On Site evolutions added to the Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions section.

  19. Design of a boiling water reactor equilibrium core using thorium-uranium fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francois, J-L.; Nunez-Carrera, A.; Espinosa-Paredes, G.; Martin-del-Campo, C.

    2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the design of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) equilibrium core using thorium is presented; a heterogeneous blanket-seed core arrangement concept was adopted. The design was developed in three steps: in the first step two different assemblies were designed based on the integrated blanket-seed concept, they are the blanket-dummy assembly and the blanket-seed assembly. The integrated blanketseed concept comes from the fact that the blanket and the seed rods are located in the same assembly, and are burned-out in a once-through cycle. In the second step, a core design was developed to achieve an equilibrium cycle of 365 effective full power days in a standard BWR with a reload of 104 fuel assemblies designed with an average 235U enrichment of 7.5 w/o in the seed sub-lattice. The main operating parameters, like power, linear heat generation rate and void distributions were obtained as well as the shutdown margin. It was observed that the analyzed parameters behave like those obtained in a standard BWR. The shutdown margin design criterion was fulfilled by addition of a burnable poison region in the assembly. In the third step an in-house code was developed to evaluate the thorium equilibrium core under transient conditions. A stability analysis was also performed. Regarding the stability analysis, five operational states were analyzed; four of them define the traditional instability region corner of the power-flow map and the fifth one is the operational state for the full power condition. The frequency and the boiling length were calculated for each operational state. The frequency of the analyzed operational states was similar to that reported for BWRs; these are close to the unstable region that occurs due to the density wave oscillation phenomena in some nuclear power plants. Four transient analyses were also performed: manual SCRAM, recirculation pumps trip, main steam isolation valves closure and loss of feed water. The results of these transients are similar to those obtained with the traditional UO2 nuclear fuel.

  20. Operational experience with and postirradiation examinations on boiling water reactor control rods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eickelpasch, N.; Seepolt, R.W.; Muellauer, J.; Spalthoff, W.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The control rods of the KRBI-I 250-MW(electric) boiling water reactor contain Vipac B/sub 4/C powder in Type 304 stainless steel tubes as a neutron-absorbing material. Because of an increase in the reactor coolant /sup 3/H activity, defective control rods were suspected. The hot cell examination of a highly exposed control rod revealed B/sub 4/C losses. The mechanism of failure was shown to be B/sub 4/C swelling and stress corrosion cracking of the absorber tubes, followed by B/sub 4/C washout. The B/sub 4/C volume swelling is ..delta..V(%) = 0.851x + 0.0449x/sup 2/ (x = /sup 10/B decays in 10/sup 21/(n,..cap alpha..)/cm/sup 3/). The tube cracking starts at 30 to 35% and the B/sub 4/C washout at 50 to 55% local /sup 10/B burnup in the tubes.

  1. Results of the DF-4 BWR (boiling water reactor) control blade-channel box test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauntt, R.O.; Gasser, R.D.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DF-4 in-pile fuel damage experiment investigated the behavior of boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel canisters and control blades in the high temperature environment of an unrecovered reactor accident. This experiment, which was carried out in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories, was performed under the USNRC's internationally sponsored severe fuel damage (SFD) program. The DF-4 test is described herein and results from the experiment are presented. Important findings from the DF-4 test include the low temperature melting of the stainless steel control blade caused by reaction with the B{sub 4}C, and the subsequent low temperature attack of the Zr-4 channel box by the relocating molten blade components. Hydrogen generation was found to continue throughout the experiment, diminishing slightly following the relocation of molten oxidizing zircaloy to the lower extreme of the test bundle. A large blockage which was formed from this material continued to oxidize while steam was being fed into the the test bundle. The results of this test have provided information on the initial stages of core melt progression in BWR geometry involving the heatup and cladding oxidation stages of a severe accident and terminating at the point of melting and relocation of the metallic core components. The information is useful in modeling melt progression in BWR core geometry, and provides engineering insight into the key phenomena controlling these processes. 12 refs., 12 figs.

  2. Wavelet-Based Method for Instability Analysis in Boiling Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Espinosa-Paredes, Gilberto; Prieto-Guerrero, Alfonso; Nunez-Carrera, Alejandro; Amador-Garcia, Rodolfo

    2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper introduces a wavelet-based method to analyze instability events in a boiling water reactor (BWR) during transient phenomena. The methodology to analyze BWR signals includes the following: (a) the short-time Fourier transform (STFT) analysis, (b) decomposition using the continuous wavelet transform (CWT), and (c) application of multiresolution analysis (MRA) using discrete wavelet transform (DWT). STFT analysis permits the study, in time, of the spectral content of analyzed signals. The CWT provides information about ruptures, discontinuities, and fractal behavior. To detect these important features in the signal, a mother wavelet has to be chosen and applied at several scales to obtain optimum results. MRA allows fast implementation of the DWT. Features like important frequencies, discontinuities, and transients can be detected with analysis at different levels of detail coefficients. The STFT was used to provide a comparison between a classic method and the wavelet-based method. The damping ratio, which is an important stability parameter, was calculated as a function of time. The transient behavior can be detected by analyzing the maximum contained in detail coefficients at different levels in the signal decomposition. This method allows analysis of both stationary signals and highly nonstationary signals in the timescale plane. This methodology has been tested with the benchmark power instability event of Laguna Verde nuclear power plant (NPP) Unit 1, which is a BWR-5 NPP.

  3. The Neutronics Design and Analysis of a 200-MW(electric) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor Core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tinkler, Daniel R.; Downar, Thomas J. [Purdue University (United States)

    2003-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A 200-MW(electric) simplified boiling water reactor (SBWR) was designed and analyzed under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Research Initiative program. The compact size of a 200-MW(electric) reactor makes it attractive for countries with a less well developed engineering infrastructure, as well as for developed countries seeking to tailor generation capacity more closely to the growth of their electricity demand. The 200-MW(electric) core design reported here is based on the 600-MW(electric) General Electric SBWR core, which was first analyzed in the work performed here in order to qualify the computer codes used in the analysis. Cross sections for the 8 x 8 fuel assembly design were generated with the HELIOS lattice physics code, and core simulation was performed with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission codes RELAP5/PARCS. In order to predict the critical heat flux, the Hench-Gillis correlation was implemented in the RELAP5 code. An equilibrium cycle was designed for the 200-MW(electric) core, which provided a cycle length of more than 2 yr and satisfied the minimum critical power ratio throughout the core life.

  4. FORMOSA-B: A Boiling Water Reactor In-Core Fuel Management Optimization Package II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karve, Atul A.; Turinsky, Paul J. [North Carolina State University (United States)

    2000-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the continuing development of the boiling water reactor in-core fuel management optimization code FORMOSA-B, the fidelity of the core simulator has been improved and a control rod pattern (CRP) sampling capability has been added. The robustness of the core simulator is first demonstrated by benchmarking against core load-follow depletion predictions of both SIMULATE-3 and MICROBURN-B2 codes. The CRP sampling capability, based on heuristic rules, is next successfully tested on a fixed fuel loading pattern (LP) to yield a feasible CRP that removes the thermal margin and critical flow constraint violations. Its performance in facilitating a spectral shift flow operation is also demonstrated, and then its significant influence on the cost of thermal margin is presented. Finally, the heuristic CRP sampling capability is coupled with the stochastic LP optimization capability in FORMOSA-B - based on simulated annealing (SA) - to solve the combined CRP-LP optimization problem. Effectiveness of the sampling in improving the efficiency of the SA adaptive algorithm is shown by comparing the results to those obtained with the sampling turned off (i.e., only LP optimization is carried out for the fixed reference CRP). The results presented clearly indicate the successful implementation of the CRP sampling algorithm and demonstrate FORMOSA-B's enhanced optimization features, which facilitate the code's usage for broader optimization studies.

  5. Protective coatings for radiation control in boiling water nuclear power reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, T.V.; Vook, R.W.; Meyer, W.; Wittwer, C.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stainless-steel surfaces (316 nuclear grade) develop /sup 60/Co-embedded oxide scales when exposed to a boiling water reactor (BWR) environment. Thin films such as Pd, Ni, Au, and Cr were found to drastically reduce the radioactive buildup. The films were prepared by vacuum evaporation and electroless deposition. The electroless coating consisted of a thin cathodically treated layer, followed by a nickel strike (--1 ..mu..m) and an electroless layer (--600 A). The present paper describes the results obtained from a transmission electron microscope replica study of the radioactive growths that formed on uncoated and thin-film-coated stainless-steel rods. The coated rods, when exposed to a simulated BWR environment, exhibited corrosion film growths ranging from large faceted grains (uncoated) and isolated islands of similar crystallites (Au coated) to extremely small nucleated growths (Pd, Ni coated). Also, it was found that chromium oxide films, which generally form a protective oxide on stainless steel, do not completely stop either the corrosion film growth or the associated radioactive buildup. The morphologies of the corrosion film growth were correlated with the relative /sup 60/Co activity, and the substrate topography. The best coating to date was found to be a Pd thin film, 1000 A thick, which reduced the radioactive buildup by a factor of --13.

  6. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a Reference Boiling Water Reactor Power Station. Main report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWe.

  7. ADVANCED MATERIALS Membranes for Clean Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ADVANCED MATERIALS Membranes for Clean Water Objective This project provides measurement solutions that probe the surface and internal structure of polymer membranes used in water purification, and correlate that structure to the transport of water and other species through the membrane. Our methods are focused

  8. MODULAR AND FULL SIZE SIMPLIFIED BOILING WATER REACTOR DESIGN WITH FULLY PASSIVE SAFETY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Ishii; S. T. Revankar; T. Downar; Y. Xu, H. J. Yoon; D. Tinkler; U. S. Rohatgi

    2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK B204 The overall goal of this three-year research project was to develop a new scientific design of a compact modular 200 MWe and a full size 1200 MWe simplified boiling water reactors (SBWR). Specific objectives of this research were: (1) to perform scientific designs of the core neutronics and core thermal-hydraulics for a small capacity and full size simplified boiling water reactor, (2) to develop a passive safety system design, (3) improve and validate safety analysis code, (4) demonstrate experimentally and analytically all design functions of the safety systems for the design basis accidents (DBA) and (5) to develop the final scientific design of both SBWR systems, 200 MWe (SBWR-200) and 1200 MWe (SBWR-1200). The SBWR combines the advantages of design simplicity and completely passive safety systems. These advantages fit well within the objectives of NERI and the Department of Energy's focus on the development of Generation III and IV nuclear power. The 3-year research program was structured around seven tasks. Task 1 was to perform the preliminary thermal-hydraulic design. Task 2 was to perform the core neutronic design analysis. Task 3 was to perform a detailed scaling study and obtain corresponding PUMA conditions from an integral test. Task 4 was to perform integral tests and code evaluation for the DBA. Task 5 was to perform a safety analysis for the DBA. Task 6 was to perform a BWR stability analysis. Task 7 was to perform a final scientific design of the compact modular SBWR-200 and the full size SBWR-1200. A no cost extension for the third year was requested and the request was granted and all the project tasks were completed by April 2003. The design activities in tasks 1, 2, and 3 were completed as planned. The existing thermal-hydraulic information, core physics, and fuel lattice information was collected on the existing design of the simplified boiling water reactor. The thermal-hydraulic design were developed. Based on a detailed integral system scaling analysis, design parameters were obtained and designs of the compact modular 200 MWe SBWR and the full size 1200 MWe SBWR were developed. These reactors are provided with passive safety systems. A new passive vacuum breaker check valve was designed to replace the mechanical vacuum beaker check valve. The new vacuum breaker check valve was based on a hydrostatic head, and was fail safe. The performance of this new valve was evaluated both by the thermal-hydraulic code RELAP5 and by the experiments in a scaled SBWR facility, PUMA. In the core neutronic design a core depletion model was implemented to PARCS code. A lattice design for the SBWR fuel assemblies was performed. Design improvements were made to the neutronics/thermal-hydraulics models of SBWR-200 and SBWR-1200, and design analyses of these reactors were performed. The design base accident analysis and evaluation of all the passive safety systems were completed as scheduled in tasks 4 and 5. Initial conditions for the small break loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) and large break LOCA using REALP5 code were obtained. Small and large break LOCA tests were performed and the data was analyzed. An anticipated transient with scram was simulated using the RELAP5 code for SBWR-200. The transient considered was an accidental closure of the main steam isolation valve (MSIV), which was considered to be the most significant transient. The evaluation of the RELAP5 code against experimental data for SBWR-1200 was completed. In task 6, the instability analysis for the three SBWR designs (SBWR-1200, SBWR-600 and SBWR-200) were simulated for start-up transients and the results were similar. Neither the geysering instability, nor the loop type instability was predicted by RAMONA-4B in the startup simulation following the recommended procedure by GE. The density wave oscillation was not observed at all because the power level used in the simulation was not high enough. A study was made of the potential instabilities by imposing an unrealistically high power ramp in a short time period, as suggested by GE. RAMON

  9. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Support and Modeling for the Boiling Water Reactor Station Black Out Case Study Using RELAP and RAVEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diego Mandelli; Curtis Smith; Thomas Riley; John Schroeder; Cristian Rabiti; Aldrea Alfonsi; Joe Nielsen; Dan Maljovec; Bie Wang; Valerio Pascucci

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The existing fleet of nuclear power plants is in the process of extending its lifetime and increasing the power generated. In order to evaluate the impact of these two factors on the safety of the plant, the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) project aims to provide insight to decision makers through a series of simulations of the plant dynamics for different initial conditions (e.g., probabilistic analysis and uncertainty quantification). This report focuses, in particular, on the impact of power uprate on the safety of a boiled water reactor system. The case study considered is a loss of off-site power followed by the loss of diesel generators, i.e., a station black out (SBO) event. Analysis is performed by using a thermo-hydraulic code, i.e. RELAP-5, and a stochastic analysis tool currently under development at INL, i.e. RAVEN. Starting from the event tree models contained in SAPHIRE, we built the input file for RELAP-5 that models in great detail system dynamics under SBO conditions. We also interfaced RAVEN with RELAP-5 so that it would be possible to run multiple RELAP-5 simulation runs by changing specific keywords of the input file. We both employed classical statistical tools, i.e. Monte-Carlo, and more advanced machine learning based algorithms to perform uncertainty quantification in order to quantify changes in system performance and limitations as a consequence of power uprate. We also employed advanced data analysis and visualization tools that helped us to correlate simulation outcome such as maximum core temperature with a set of input uncertain parameters. Results obtained gave a detailed overview of the issues associated to power uprate for a SBO accident scenario. We were able to quantify how timing of safety related events were impacted by a higher reactor core power. Such insights can provide useful material to the decision makers to perform risk-infomed safety margins management.

  10. Source term attenuation by water in the Mark I boiling water reactor drywell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, D.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mechanistic models of aerosol decontamination by an overlying water pool during core debris/concrete interactions and spray removal of aerosols from a Mark I drywell atmosphere are developed. Eighteen uncertain features of the pool decontamination model and 19 uncertain features of the model for the rate coefficient of spray removal of aerosols are identified. Ranges for values of parameters that characterize these uncertain features of the models are established. Probability density functions for values within these ranges are assigned according to a set of rules. A Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis of the decontamination factor produced by water pools 30 and 50 cm deep and subcooled 0--70 K is performed. An uncertainty analysis for the rate constant of spray removal of aerosols is done for water fluxes of 0.25, 0.01, and 0.001 cm{sup 3} H{sub 2}O/cm{sup 2}-s and decontamination factors of 1.1, 2, 3.3, 10, 100, and 1000.

  11. Modeling Interfacial Glass-Water Reactions: Recent Advances and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling Interfacial Glass-Water Reactions: Recent Advances and Current Limitations. Modeling Interfacial Glass-Water Reactions: Recent Advances and Current Limitations. Abstract:...

  12. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF VAPOR BUBBLE GROWTH AND WALL HEAT TRANSFER DURING FLOW BOILING OF WATER IN A MICROCHANNEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandlikar, Satish

    . (2004) developed three- zone flow boiling heat transfer model to describe evaporation of elongated

  13. advanced heavy water: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How does the use of advanced waterHow does the use of advanced water treatment affect energy Keller, Arturo A. 3 Natural Gas-optimized Advanced Heavy-duty Engine Energy Storage,...

  14. Results and phenomena observed from the DF-4 BWR (boiling water reactor) control blade-channel box test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauntt, R.O.; Gasser, R.D.; Fryer, C.P.; Walker, J.V.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DF-4 in-pile fuel damage experiment, one of a series of tests performed as part of the USNRC's internationally sponsored severe fuel damage (SFD) program, and carried out at Sandia National Laboratories, addressed the behavior of boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel canisters and control blades in the high temperature environment of an unrecovered loss of coolant accident. The DF-4 test is described in some detail herein and results from the experiment are presented. Significant results from prior experiments in the series are also summarized. Important findings from the DF-4 test include the low temperature melting of the stainless steel control blade caused by reaction with the B/sub 4/C, and the subsequent low temperature attack of the Zr-4 channel box by the relocating molten blade components. This early melt and relocation phenomena could significantly influence the progression of meltdown in BWRs and should be considered in SFD accident analyses. 14 refs., 9 figs.

  15. Summary and bibliography of safety-related events at boiling-water nuclear power plants as reported in 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormack, K.E.; Gallaher, R.B.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents a bibliography that contains 100-word abstracts of event reports submitted to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission concerning operational events that occurred at boiling-water-reactor nuclear power plants in 1980. The 1547 abstracts included on microfiche in this bibliography describe incidents, failures, and design or construction deficiencies that were experienced at the facilities. These abstracts are arranged alphabetically by reactor name and then chronologically for each reactor. Full-size keyword and permuted-title indexes to facilitate location of individual abstracts are provided following the text. Tables that summarize the information contained in the bibliography are also provided. The information in the tables includes a listing of the equipment items involved in the reported events and the associated number of reports for each item. Similar information is given for the various kinds of instrumentation and systems, causes of failures, deficiencies noted, and the time of occurrence (i.e., during refueling, operation, testing, or construction).

  16. advanced alkaline water: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How does the use of advanced waterHow does the use of advanced water treatment affect energy Keller, Arturo A. 4 Development of conductometric biosensors based on alkaline...

  17. actual coolant boiling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  18. Thermal-hydraulic instabilities in pressure tube graphite-moderated boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsiklauri, G.; Schmitt, B.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermally induced two-phase instabilities in non-uniformly heated boiling charmers in RBMK-1000 reactor have been analyzed using RELAP5/MOD3 code. The RELAP5 model of a RBMK-1000 reactor was developed to investigate low flow in a distribution group header (DGH) supplying 44 fuel pressure tubes. The model was evaluated against experimental data. The results of the calculations indicate that the period of oscillation for the high power tube varied from 3.1s to 2.6s, over the power range of 2.0 MW to 3.0 MW, respectively. The amplitude of the flow oscillation for the high powered tube varied from +100% to {minus}150% of the tube average flow. Reverse flow did not occur in the lower power tubes. The amplitude of oscillation in the subcooled region at the inlet to the fuel region is higher than in the saturated region at the outlet. In the upper fuel region and outlet connectors the flow oscillations are dissipated. The threshold of flow instability for the high powered tubes of a RBMK reactor is compared to Japanese data and appears to be in good agreement.

  19. Development of Mechanistic Modeling Capabilities for Local Neutronically-Coupled Flow-Induced Instabilities in Advanced Water-Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Podowski

    2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The major research objectives of this project included the formulation of flow and heat transfer modeling framework for the analysis of flow-induced instabilities in advanced light water nuclear reactors such as boiling water reactors. General multifield model of two-phase flow, including the necessary closure laws. Development of neurton kinetics models compatible with the proposed models of heated channel dynamics. Formulation and encoding of complete coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics models for the analysis of spatially-dependent local core instabilities. Computer simulations aimed at testing and validating the new models of reactor dynamics.

  20. Performance of Charcoal Cookstoves for Haiti, Part 1: Results from the Water Boiling Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 LBNL5021E Performance of Charcoal Cookstoves for Haiti, Part 1: Results from the Water typicallylastonlysixmonthstooneyear. #12; 4 B. EcoRecho:AmetalstovewithaceramiclinermadeinHaiti

  1. Feasibility of breeding in hard spectrum boiling water reactors with oxide and nitride fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Bo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study assesses the neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and fuel performance aspects of using nitride fuel in place of oxides in Pu-based high conversion light water reactor designs. Using the higher density nitride fuel ...

  2. Load follow simulation of three-dimensional boiling water reactor core by PACS-32 parallel microprocessor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoshino, T.; Shirakawa, T.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The three-dimensional boiling water reactor (BWR) core following the daily load was simulated by the use of the processor array for continuum simulation (PACS-32), a newly developed parallel microprocessor system. The PACS system consists of 32 processing units (PUs) (microprocessors) and has a multiinstruction, multidata type architecture, being optimum to the numerical simulation of the partial differential equations. The BWR core model includes the modified twogroup finite difference, coarse-mesh model for neutronics, steady-state model for thermohydraulics, criticality control by core coolant flow, and the time-dependent solution of iodine-xenon dynamics with constant flux level. The analysis of the parallel processing program revealed that the overhead is independent from the number of PUs and that the efficiency of PUs, i.e., the ratio of effective calculation over total, amounts to 75%, even up to 90% if it is limited to the core part. Simulation was made on the daily load follow for 144 h including the weekend, which took 1.3 central processing unit hours by the PACS system. The PACS system demonstrated a computation speed nearly one-tenth that of the large-scale high-speed general purpose computer, with a 25 times better cost performance ratio and showed that the system could be used as the pratical BWR core simulator with more complicated core models.

  3. Simulation of in-core neutron noise measurements for axial void profile reconstruction in boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykin, V.; Pazsit, I. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Div. of Nuclear Engineering, Dept. of Applied Physics, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A possibility to reconstruct the axial void profile from the simulated in-core neutron noise which is caused by density fluctuations in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) heated channel is considered. For this purpose, a self-contained model of the two-phase flow regime is constructed which has quantitatively and qualitatively similar properties to those observed in real BWRs. The model is subsequently used to simulate the signals of neutron detectors induced by the corresponding perturbations in the flow density. The bubbles are generated randomly in both space and time using Monte-Carlo techniques. The axial distribution of the bubble production is chosen such that the mean axial void fraction and void velocity follow the actual values of BWRs. The induced neutron noise signals are calculated and then processed by the standard signal analysis methods such as Auto-Power Spectral Density (APSD) and Cross-Power Spectral Density (CPSD). Two methods for axial void and velocity profiles reconstruction are discussed: the first one is based on the change of the break frequency of the neutron auto-power spectrum with axial core elevation, while the second refers to the estimation of transit times of propagating steam fluctuations between different axial detector positions. This paper summarizes the principles of the model and presents a numerical testing of the qualitative applicability to estimate the required parameters for the reconstruction of the void fraction profile from the neutron noise measurements. (authors)

  4. Preliminary design study of small long life boiling water reactor (BWR) with tight lattice thorium nitride fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trianti, Nuri, E-mail: nuri.trianti@gmail.com, E-mail: szaki@fi.itba.c.id; Su'ud, Zaki, E-mail: nuri.trianti@gmail.com, E-mail: szaki@fi.itba.c.id; Arif, Idam, E-mail: nuri.trianti@gmail.com, E-mail: szaki@fi.itba.c.id [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Bandung Institute of Technology (Ganesha 10 Bandung, Indonesia) (Indonesia); Riyana, EkaSapta [Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN) (Indonesia)

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutronic performance of small long-life boiling water reactors (BWR) with thorium nitride based fuel has been performed. A recent study conducted on BWR in tight lattice environments (with a lower moderator percentage) produces small power reactor which has some specifications, i.e. 10 years operation time, power density of 19.1 watt/cc and maximum excess reactivity of about 4%. This excess reactivity value is smaller than standard reactivity of conventional BWR. The use of hexagonal geometry on the fuel cell of BWR provides a substantial effect on the criticality of the reactor to obtain a longer operating time. Supported by a tight concept lattice where the volume fraction of the fuel is greater than the moderator and fuel, Thorium Nitride give good results for fuel cell design on small long life BWR. The excess reactivity of the reactor can be reduced with the addition of gadolinium as burnable poisons. Therefore the hexagonal tight lattice fuel cell design of small long life BWR that has a criticality more than 20 years of operating time has been obtained.

  5. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 1. Main report. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE.

  6. Advanced ceramic cladding for water reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feinroth, H.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the US Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiatives (NERI) program, continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCCs) are being developed as cladding for water reactor fuel elements. The purpose is to substantially increase the passive safety of water reactors. A development effort was initiated in 1991 to fabricate CFCC-clad tubes using commercially available fibers and a sol-gel process developed by McDermott Technologies. Two small-diameter CFCC tubes were fabricated using pure alumina and alumina-zirconia fibers in an alumina matrix. Densities of {approximately}60% of theoretical were achieved. Higher densities are required to guarantee fission gas containment. This NERI work has just begun, and only preliminary results are presented herein. Should the work prove successful, further development is required to evaluate CFCC cladding and performance, including in-pile tests containing fuel and exploring a marriage of CFCC cladding materials with suitable advanced fuel and core designs. The possibility of much higher temperature core designs, possibly cooled with supercritical water, and achievement of plant efficiencies {ge}50% would be examined.

  7. Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing and Design Optimization Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing and Design Optimization Part of a 100 million fuel cell award...

  8. Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing, and Design Optimization Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design Optimization This presentation, which focuses on...

  9. Advances in the Research of Heat Pump Water Heaters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shan, S.; Wang, D.; Wang, R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the progress of many recently correlative research works on the heat pump water heater (HPWH) and on solar-assisted heat pump water heaters. The advances in the research on compressor development, alternative refrigerant...

  10. Advances in the Research of Heat Pump Water Heaters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shan, S.; Wang, D.; Wang, R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the progress of many recently correlative research works on the heat pump water heater (HPWH) and on solar-assisted heat pump water heaters. The advances in the research on compressor development, alternative refrigerant...

  11. A high converter concept for fuel management with blanket fuel assemblies in boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez-Frances, N.; Timm, W.; Rossbach, D. [AREVA, AREVA NP, Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies on the natural Uranium saving and waste reduction potential of a multiple-plant BWR system were performed. The BWR High Converter system should enable a multiple recycling of MOX fuel in current BWR plants by introducing blanket fuel assemblies and burning Uranium and MOX fuel separately. The feasibility of Uranium cores with blankets and full-MOX cores with Plutonium qualities as low as 40% were studied. The power concentration due to blanket insertion is manageable with modern fuel and acceptable values for the thermal limits and reactivity coefficients were obtained. While challenges remain, full-MOX cores also complied with the main design criteria. The combination of Uranium and Plutonium burners in appropriate proportions could enable obtaining as much as 40% more energy out of Uranium ore. Moreover, a proper adjustment of blanket average stay and Plutonium qualities could lead to a system with nearly no Plutonium left for final disposal. The achievement of such goals with current light water technology makes the BWR HC concept an attractive option to improve the fuel cycle until Gen-IV designs are mature. (authors)

  12. Boiling and condensation in a liquid-filled enclosure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bar-Cohen Avram

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined experimental and analytical investigation of boiling and condensation in a liquid-filled enclosure, with water and Freon- 113 as the working fluids, is described. The operating characteristics of a boiling system, ...

  13. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 2. Appendices. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE. This volume contains the appendices.

  14. Nanoscale modification of key surface parameters to augment pool boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux in water and dielectric fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, Eric Christopher

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface effects on pool boiling heat transfer and the critical heat flux are well documented but poorly understood. This study investigates the pool boiling characteristics of various fluids, and demonstrates that surface ...

  15. Nucleate boiling bubble growth and departure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staniszewski, Bogumil E.

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vapor bubble formation on the heating surface during pool boiling has been studied experimentally. Experiments were made at the atmospheric pressure 28 psi and 40 psi, using degassed distilled water and ethanol. The ...

  16. Pool boiling heat transfer characteristics of nanofluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sung Joong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanofluids are engineered colloidal suspensions of nanoparticles in water, and exhibit a very significant enhancement (up to 200%) of the boiling Critical Heat Flux (CHF) at modest nanoparticle concentrations (50.1% by ...

  17. Advanced Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sean Emerson; Thomas Vanderspurt; Susanne Opalka; Rakesh Radhakrishnan; Rhonda Willigan

    2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objectives for this project were: (1) to identify a suitable PdCu tri-metallic alloy membrane with high stability and commercially relevant hydrogen permeation in the presence of trace amounts of carbon monoxide and sulfur; and (2) to identify and synthesize a water gas shift catalyst with a high operating life that is sulfur and chlorine tolerant at low concentrations of these impurities. This work successfully achieved the first project objective to identify a suitable PdCu tri-metallic alloy membrane composition, Pd{sub 0.47}Cu{sub 0.52}G5{sub 0.01}, that was selected based on atomistic and thermodynamic modeling alone. The second objective was partially successful in that catalysts were identified and evaluated that can withstand sulfur in high concentrations and at high pressures, but a long operating life was not achieved at the end of the project. From the limited durability testing it appears that the best catalyst, Pt-Re/Ce{sub 0.333}Zr{sub 0.333}E4{sub 0.333}O{sub 2}, is unable to maintain a long operating life at space velocities of 200,000 h{sup -1}. The reasons for the low durability do not appear to be related to the high concentrations of H{sub 2}S, but rather due to the high operating pressure and the influence the pressure has on the WGS reaction at this space velocity.

  18. Mechanism of nucleate pool boiling heat transfer to sodium and the criterion for stable boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shai, Isaac

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparison between liquid metals and other common fluids, like water, is made as regards to the various stages of nucleate pool boiling. It is suggested that for liquid metals the stage of building the thermal layer plays ...

  19. advanced reactors advanced: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  20. advanced ceramics advanced: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  1. The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronaldo Szilard; Hongbin Zhang; Doug Kothe; Paul Turinsky

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub for modeling and simulation of nuclear reactors. It brings together an exceptionally capable team from national labs, industry and academia that will apply existing modeling and simulation capabilities and develop advanced capabilities to create a usable environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors (LWRs). This environment, designated as the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA), will incorporate science-based models, state-of-the-art numerical methods, modern computational science and engineering practices, and uncertainty quantification (UQ) and validation against data from operating pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It will couple state-of-the-art fuel performance, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics (T-H), and structural models with existing tools for systems and safety analysis and will be designed for implementation on both today's leadership-class computers and the advanced architecture platforms now under development by the DOE. CASL focuses on a set of challenge problems such as CRUD induced power shift and localized corrosion, grid-to-rod fretting fuel failures, pellet clad interaction, fuel assembly distortion, etc. that encompass the key phenomena limiting the performance of PWRs. It is expected that much of the capability developed will be applicable to other types of reactors. CASL's mission is to develop and apply modeling and simulation capabilities to address three critical areas of performance for nuclear power plants: (1) reduce capital and operating costs per unit energy by enabling power uprates and plant lifetime extension, (2) reduce nuclear waste volume generated by enabling higher fuel burnup, and (3) enhance nuclear safety by enabling high-fidelity predictive capability for component performance.

  2. The DF-4 fuel damage experiment in ACRR (Annual Core Research Reactor) with a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) control blade and channel box

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauntt, R.O.; Gasser, R.D.; Ott, L.J. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DF-4 test was an experimental investigation into the melt progression behavior of boiling water reactor (BWR) core components under high temperature severe core damage conditions. In this study 14 zircaloy clad UO{sub 2} fuel rods, and representations of the zircaloy fuel canister and stainless steel/B{sub 4}C control blade were assembled into a 0.5 m long test bundle. The test bundle was fission heated in a flowing steam environment, using the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia Laboratories, simulating the environmental conditions of an uncovered BWR core experiencing high temperature damage as a result residual fission product decay heating. The experimental results provide information on the thermal response of the test bundle components, the rapid exothermic oxidation of the zircaloy fuel cladding and canister, the production of hydrogen from metal-steam oxidation, and the failure behavior of the progressively melting bundle components. This information is provided in the form of thermocouple data, steam and hydrogen flow rate data, test bundle fission power data and visual observation of the damage progression. In addition to BWR background information, this document contains a description of the experimental hardware with details on how the experiment was instrumented and diagnosed, a description of the test progression, and a presentation of the on-line measurements. Also in this report are the results of a thermal analysis of the fueled test section of the fueled test section of the experiment demonstrating an overall consistency in the measurable quantities from the test. A discussion of the results is provided. 38 refs., 72 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. The impact of passive safety systems on desirability of advanced light water reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eul, Ryan C

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work investigates whether the advanced light water reactor designs with passive safety systems are more desirable than advanced reactor designs with active safety systems from the point of view of uncertainty in the ...

  4. Pressure drop with surface boiling in small-diameter tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dr?mer, Thomas

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pressure drop for water flowing in small-diameter tubes under isothermal, nonboiling, and surface-boiling conditions was investigated. Experimental results for local pressure gradient and heattransfer coefficients are ...

  5. Infrared thermometry study of nanofluid pool boiling phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerardi, Craig

    Abstract Infrared thermometry was used to obtain first-of-a-kind, time- and space-resolved data for pool boiling phenomena in water-based nanofluids with diamond and silica nanoparticles at low concentration (<0.1 vol.%). ...

  6. Determination of pool boiling Critical Heat Flux enhancement in nanofluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong, Bao H. (Bao Hoai)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanofluids are engineered colloids composed of nano-size particles dispersed in common fluids such as water or refrigerants. Using an electrically controlled wire heater, pool boiling Critical Heat Flux (CHF) of Alumina ...

  7. The correlation of nucleate boiling burn-out data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffith, P.

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dimensionless correlation is developed for nucleate boiling buzrnout data including the following ranges of variables. Fluids - Water Bensene n - Heptane n - Pentane Ethanol Pressure - 0.0045 to 0.96 of critical pressure ...

  8. Hydrogen production from water: Recent advances in photosynthesis research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The great potential of hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting is predicated on quantitative measurement of the algae`s hydrogen-producing capability, which is based on the following: (1) the photosynthetic unit size of hydrogen production; (2) the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production; (3) thermodynamic efficiencies of conversion of light energy into the Gibbs free energy of molecular hydrogen; (4) photosynthetic hydrogen production from sea water using marine algae; (5) the potential for research advances using modern methods of molecular biology and genetic engineering to maximize hydrogen production. ORNL has shown that sustained simultaneous photoevolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen can be performed with mutants of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that lack a detectable level of the Photosystem I light reaction. This result is surprising in view of the standard two-light reaction model of photosynthesis and has interesting scientific and technological implications. This ORNL discovery also has potentially important implications for maximum thermodynamic conversion efficiency of light energy into chemical energy by green plant photosynthesis. Hydrogen production performed by a single light reaction, as opposed to two, implies a doubling of the theoretically maximum thermodynamic conversion efficiency from {approx}10% to {approx}20%.

  9. Water cooled metal optics for the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinney, W.R.; Irick, S.C. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Lunt, D.L.J. [Tucson Optical Research Corp., AZ (United States)

    1991-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The program for providing water cooled metal optics for the Advanced Light Source at Berkeley is reviewed with respect to fabrication and metrology of the surfaces. Materials choices, surface figure and smoothness specifications, and metrology systems for measuring the plated metal surfaces are discussed. Results from prototype mirrors and grating blanks will be presented, which show exceptionally low microroughness and mid-period error. We will briefly describe out improved version of the Long Trace Profiler, and its importance to out metrology program. We have completely redesigned the mechanical, optical and computational parts of the profiler system with the cooperation of Peter Takacs of Brookhaven, Continental Optical, and Baker Manufacturing. Most important is that one of our profilers is in use at the vendor to allow testing during fabrication. Metrology from the first water cooled mirror for an ALS beamline is presented as an example. The preplating processing and grinding and polishing were done by Tucson Optical. We will show significantly better surface microroughness on electroless nickel, over large areas, than has been reported previously.

  10. New Advanced System Utilizes Industrial Waste Heat to Power Water...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    is crucial to ensuring their status as global competitors. Currently, most industries treat water to meet standards for direct discharge to surface water. The process includes a...

  11. advanced pressurized water: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    V (NDE). These now cover most aspects of advanced ultrasonic inspection (adding in TOFD), and are specifically aimed at boiler and piping inspections. The three new AUT...

  12. Multi-scale Control and Enhancement of Reactor Boiling Heat Flux by Reagents and Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manglik, R M; Athavale, A; Kalaikadal, D S; Deodhar, A; Verma, U

    2011-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The phenomenological characterization of the use of non-invasive and passive techniques to enhance the boiling heat transfer in water has been carried out in this extended study. It provides fundamental enhanced heat transfer data for nucleate boiling and discusses the associated physics with the aim of addressing future and next-generation reactor thermal-hydraulic management. It essentially addresses the hypothesis that in phase-change processes during boiling, the primary mechanisms can be related to the liquid-vapor interfacial tension and surface wetting at the solidliquid interface. These interfacial characteristics can be significantly altered and decoupled by introducing small quantities of additives in water, such as surface-active polymers, surfactants, and nanoparticles. The changes are fundamentally caused at a molecular-scale by the relative bulk molecular dynamics and adsorption-desorption of the additive at the liquid-vapor interface, and its physisorption and electrokinetics at the liquid-solid interface. At the micro-scale, the transient transport mechanisms at the solid-liquid-vapor interface during nucleation and bubblegrowth can be attributed to thin-film spreading, surface-micro-cavity activation, and micro-layer evaporation. Furthermore at the macro-scale, the heat transport is in turn governed by the bubble growth and distribution, macro-layer heat transfer, bubble dynamics (bubble coalescence, collapse, break-up, and translation), and liquid rheology. Some of these behaviors and processes are measured and characterized in this study, the outcomes of which advance the concomitant fundamental physics, as well as provide insights for developing control strategies for the molecular-scale manipulation of interfacial tension and surface wetting in boiling by means of polymeric reagents, surfactants, and other soluble surface-active additives.

  13. A Joint Workshop of the Canberra College of Advanced Education The Australian Water and Wastewater Association

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canberra, University of

    challengefacing Australian water authorities is effec- tive operation in an environment of scarce resources~ » A Joint Workshop of the Canberra College of Advanced Education and The Australian Water in operation and those envisaged for the future. Although the primary emphasiswas on water allocation

  14. A network that responds to water resource issues by advancing knowledge through

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Wells and Septic Systems · Animal Agriculture: Production and Manure Management The informationThe Land-Grant University System A network that responds to water resource issues by advancing knowledge through research, education and extension projects. Applying knowledge to improve water quality

  15. A Review Of Recent Progress On Nano/micro Scale Nucleate Boiling Fundamentals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, J. N.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent research progress in the area of nano/micro scale nucleate boiling is reviewed and an up-to-date summary is provided with a focus on the advances of fundamental boiling physics. This review examines nano/micro scale ...

  16. A study of electrowetting-assisted boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bralower, Harrison L. (Harrison Louis)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The classical theory of boiling heat transfer based on bubble dynamics is explained and includes a full derivation of the Rohsenow boiling correlation. An alternative, more accurate correlation for determining boiling heat ...

  17. advanced water treatment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    system will help keep your water safe. For more information, visit the Virginia Household Water Quality Program website at www.wellwater.bse. vt.edu. unknown authors 34...

  18. advanced 3d power: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  19. aicd advanced: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  20. advanced quantra fticr: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  1. advanced power plant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  2. advanced nuclear reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  3. advanced nuclear plant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  4. advanced electronic applications: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  5. advanced safety modeling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  6. advanced nuclear power: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  7. advanced computational model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  8. advanced pressurized reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  9. advanced metal-membrane technology-commercialization: Topics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  10. advanced thermal reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  11. advanced dynamic models: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  12. advanced power group: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  13. advanced power converters: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  14. advanced reactor analyses: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  15. advanced modeling technology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  16. advanced applications singapore: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  17. advanced burner reactors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  18. advanced application examples: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  19. advanced power train: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  20. advanced fast reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  1. applying advanced model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  2. advanced accelerator applications: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  3. areva advanced mox: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  4. advanced nuclear plants: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  5. advanced integrated modeling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  6. advanced integral reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  7. advanced cervix carcinoma: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  8. advanced reactor study: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  9. advanced power systems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  10. advanced development model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  11. advanced burner reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  12. advanced tca backplane: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  13. advanced manufacturing applications: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  14. advanced modeling tool: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  15. advanced oropharyngeal carcinoma: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  16. advanced unresectable rectal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  17. advanced diffusion model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  18. advanced steam plant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  19. advanced model based: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  20. advanced reactors coupled: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  1. advanced reactor instrumentation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  2. advanced vulvar carcinomas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  3. advanced maxillary sinus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  4. advanced epidermoid carcinoma: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  5. advanced nsclc patients: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  6. advanced hypopharyngeal carcinoma: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  7. advanced reactor mixed: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  8. advanced utility simulation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  9. advanced intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  10. advanced power sources: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  11. advanced vehicle applications: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  12. advanced large power: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  13. advanced reactors transition: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  14. advanced radioisotope power: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  15. advanced steam plants: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  16. advanced hanaro reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  17. advanced candu reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  18. advanced vectorial simulation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  19. advanced power production: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  20. advanced power reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  1. advanced melanoma results: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  2. advanced reactor development: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  3. advanced passive plant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  4. analysis advanced simulation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  5. advanced hippotherapy simulator: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  6. advanced power plants: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  7. advanced technology applications: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  8. advanced model approaches: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  9. advanced nuclear reactors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  10. advanced applications kyoto: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  11. advanced astroculture plant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  12. advanced orthotopic hepatocellular: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  13. advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  14. advanced thermal reactor fugen: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  15. advanced coolside sorbent: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  16. advanced power system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  17. advanced computational modeling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  18. advanced fimbrial ectopic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  19. advanced mixing models: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  20. aries advanced power: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  1. Study of Pu consumption in light water reactors: Evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants, compilation of Phase 1C task reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the evaluations conducted during Phase 1C of the Pu Disposition Study have provided further results which reinforce the conclusions reached during Phase 1A & 1B: These conclusions clearly establish the benefits of the fission option and the use of the ABWR as a reliable, proven, well-defined and cost-effective means available to disposition the weapons Pu. This project could be implemented in the near-term at a cost and on a schedule being validated by reactor plants currently under construction in Japan and by cost and schedule history and validated plans for MOX plants in Europe. Evaluations conducted during this phase have established that (1) the MOX fuel is licensable based on existing criteria for new fuel with limited lead fuel rod testing, (2) that the applicable requirements for transport, handling and repository storage can be met, and (3) that all the applicable safeguards criteria can be met.

  2. advanced water cooled: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    your Cooling Water System Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: characteristics limit savings. Figure 1. Predicted Performance Curve PD-3274 HISTORY Colder temperatures allow...

  3. Water-Like Properties of Soft Nanoparticle Suspensions | Advanced...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Water-Like Properties of Soft Nanoparticle Suspensions November 25, 2013 Bookmark and Share...

  4. Comments on: Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i tCollaboration

  5. Cite this: RSC Advances, 2013, 3, Water-triggered shape memory of multiblock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    Cite this: RSC Advances, 2013, 3, 15783 Water-triggered shape memory of multiblock thermoplastic of a water-triggered shape memory polymer (SMP) family, PCL­PEG based thermoplastic polyurethanes (TPUs and recovery ratios were substantially improved using this new shape memory programming method, the mechanism

  6. Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization J. Vernon Cole and Ashok Gidwani CFDRC Prepared for: DOE Hydrogen Fuel Cell Kickoff MeetingWater Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design fuel cell design and operation; Demonstrate improvements in water management resulting in improved

  7. A phenomenological model of the thermal hydraulics of convective boiling during the quenching of hot rod bundles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, R.A.; Unal, C.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a phenomenological model of the thermal hydraulics of convective boiling in the post-critical-heat-flux (post-CHF) regime is developed and discussed. The model was implemented in the TRAC-PF1/MOD2 computer code (an advanced best-estimate computer program written for the analysis of pressurized water reactor systems). The model was built around the determination of flow regimes downstream of the quench front. The regimes were determined from the flow-regime map suggested by Ishii and his coworkers. Heat transfer in the transition boiling region was formulated as a position-dependent model. The propagation of the CHF point was strongly dependent on the length of the transition boiling region. Wall-to-fluid film boiling heat transfer was considered to consist of two components: first, a wall-to-vapor convective heat-transfer portion and, second, a wall-to-liquid heat transfer representing near-wall effects. Each contribution was considered separately in each of the inverted annular flow (IAF) regimes. The interfacial heat transfer was also formulated as flow-regime dependent. The interfacial drag coefficient model upstream of the CHF point was considered to be similar to flow through a roughened pipe. A free-stream contribution was calculated using Ishii's bubbly flow model for either fully developed subcooled or saturated nucleate boiling. For the drag in the smooth IAF region, a simple smooth-tube correlation for the interfacial friction factor was used. The drag coefficient for the rough-wavy IAF was formulated in the same way as for the smooth IAF model except that the roughness parameter was assumed to be proportional to liquid droplet diameter entrained from the wavy interface. The drag coefficient in the highly dispersed flow regime considered the combined effects of the liquid droplets within the channel and a liquid film on wet unheated walls. 431 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Some Specific CASL Requirements for Advanced Multiphase Flow Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Berry

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of the diversity of physical phenomena occuring in boiling, flashing, and bubble collapse, and of the length and time scales of LWR systems, it is imperative that the models have the following features: • Both vapor and liquid phases (and noncondensible phases, if present) must be treated as compressible. • Models must be mathematically and numerically well-posed. • The models methodology must be multi-scale. A fundamental derivation of the multiphase governing equation system, that should be used as a basis for advanced multiphase modeling in LWR coolant systems, is given in the Appendix using the ensemble averaging method. The remainder of this work focuses specifically on the compressible, well-posed, and multi-scale requirements of advanced simulation methods for these LWR coolant systems, because without these are the most fundamental aspects, without which widespread advancement cannot be claimed. Because of the expense of developing multiple special-purpose codes and the inherent inability to couple information from the multiple, separate length- and time-scales, efforts within CASL should be focused toward development of a multi-scale approaches to solve those multiphase flow problems relevant to LWR design and safety analysis. Efforts should be aimed at developing well-designed unified physical/mathematical and high-resolution numerical models for compressible, all-speed multiphase flows spanning: (1) Well-posed general mixture level (true multiphase) models for fast transient situations and safety analysis, (2) DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation)-like models to resolve interface level phenmena like flashing and boiling flows, and critical heat flux determination (necessarily including conjugate heat transfer), and (3) Multi-scale methods to resolve both (1) and (2) automatically, depending upon specified mesh resolution, and to couple different flow models (single-phase, multiphase with several velocities and pressures, multiphase with single velocity and pressure, etc.) A unified, multi-scale approach is advocated to extend the necessary foundations and build the capability to simultaneously solve the fluid dynamic interface problems (interface resolution) as well as multiphase mixtures (homogenization).

  9. Watts nickel and rinse water recovery via an advanced reverse osmosis system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, C.; White, I.E.; Ludwig, R.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report summarizes the results of an eight month test program conducted at the Hewlett Packard Printed Circuit Board Production Plant, Sunnyvale, CA (H.P.) to assess the effectiveness of an advanced reverse osmosis system (AROS). The AROS unit, manufactured by Water Technologies, Inc. (WTI) of Minneapolis, MN, incorporates membrane materials and system components designed to treat metal plating rinse water and produce two product streams; (1) a concentrated metal solution suitable for the plating bath, and (2) rinse water suitable for reuse as final rinse. Waste water discharge can be virtually eliminated and significant reductions realized in the need for new plating bath solution and rinse water.

  10. Subcooled flow boiling of fluorocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Richard Walter

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was conducted of heat transfer and hydrodynamic behavior for subcooled flow boiling of Freon-113, one of a group of fluorocarbons suitable for use in cooling of high-power-density electronic components. Problems ...

  11. 0-7803-XXXX-X/06/$20.00 2009 IEEE 25th IEEE SEMI-THERM Symposium Sub-Atmospheric Pressure Pool Boiling of Water on a Screen-Laminate Enhanced Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirtz, Richard A.

    structures having wide ranging porosity and pore size. When deployed as a surface enhancement in a boiling pool-boiling experiments at one atmosphere and sub-atmospheric pressure assess the utility of fine factor of lamination [dimensionless] CHF = critical heat flux [W/cm2 ] Dh = pore hydraulic diameter [µm

  12. Boiling heat transfer in a hydrofoil-based micro pin fin heat sink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peles, Yoav

    transfer in a horizontal tube bundle and reported an increase in local heat transfer coefficient boiling heat transfer of water in small horizontal tube bundles at low velocities. How- ever, the dataBoiling heat transfer in a hydrofoil-based micro pin fin heat sink Ali Kosßar, Yoav Peles

  13. Meeting Summary Advanced Light Water Reactor Fuels Industry Meeting Washington DC October 27 - 28, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Listed

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced LWR Fuel Working Group first met in November of 2010 with the objective of looking 20 years ahead to the role that advanced fuels could play in improving light water reactor technology, such as waste reduction and economics. When the group met again in March 2011, the Fukushima incident was still unfolding. After the March meeting, the focus of the program changed to determining what we could do in the near term to improve fuel accident tolerance. Any discussion of fuels with enhanced accident tolerance will likely need to consider an advanced light water reactor with enhanced accident tolerance, along with the fuel. The Advanced LWR Fuel Working Group met in Washington D.C. on October 72-18, 2011 to continue discussions on this important topic.

  14. Advanced Water Removal via Membrane Solvent Extraction | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is alwaysISO 50001EnergyNewsletter Advanced

  15. advanced waste water: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    waste water First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Combined adsorption and oxidation technique...

  16. Evolutionary/advanced light water reactor data report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE Office of Fissile Material Disposition is examining options for placing fissile materials that were produced for fabrication of weapons, and now are deemed to be surplus, into a condition that is substantially irreversible and makes its use in weapons inherently more difficult. The principal fissile materials subject to this disposition activity are plutonium and uranium containing substantial fractions of plutonium-239 uranium-235. The data in this report, prepared as technical input to the fissile material disposition Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) deal only with the disposition of plutonium that contains well over 80% plutonium-239. In fact, the data were developed on the basis of weapon-grade plutonium which contains, typically, 93.6% plutonium-239 and 5.9% plutonium-240 as the principal isotopes. One of the options for disposition of weapon-grade plutonium being considered is the power reactor alternative. Plutonium would be fabricated into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and fissioned (``burned``) in a reactor to produce electric power. The MOX fuel will contain dioxides of uranium and plutonium with less than 7% weapon-grade plutonium and uranium that has about 0.2% uranium-235. The disposition mission could, for example, be carried out in existing power reactors, of which there are over 100 in the United States. Alternatively, new LWRs could be constructed especially for disposition of plutonium. These would be of the latest US design(s) incorporating numerous design simplifications and safety enhancements. These ``evolutionary`` or ``advanced`` designs would offer not only technological advances, but also flexibility in siting and the option of either government or private (e.g., utility) ownership. The new reactor designs can accommodate somewhat higher plutonium throughputs. This data report deals solely with the ``evolutionary`` LWR alternative.

  17. BOILING CRISIS:THEORY,SIMULATION,AND EXPERIMENTSBOILING CRISIS: THEORY, SIMULATION, AND EXPERIMENTS Boiling is a very efficient way to transfer heat from a heater to the liquid heat carrier. We discuss the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolayev, Vadim S.

    that separates the liquid from the heater. Film boiling can be also observed in the kitchen by sprinkling water onto a hot frying pan. In spite of the large temperature of the heater (the pan) the water drops Boiling is a very efficient way to transfer heat from a heater to the liquid heat carrier. We discuss

  18. OTEC Advanced Composite Cold Water Pipe: Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Alan Miller; Matthew Ascari

    2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion can exploit natural temperature gradients in the oceans to generate usable forms of energy (for example, cost-competitive baseload electricity in tropical regions such as Hawaii) free from fossil fuel consumption and global warming emissions.The No.1 acknowledged challenge of constructing an OTEC plant is the Cold Water Pipe (CWP), which draws cold water from 1000m depths up to the surface, to serve as the coolant for the OTEC Rankine cycle. For a commercial-scale plant, the CWP is on the order of 10m in diameter.This report describes work done by LMSSC developing the CWP for LM MS2 New Ventures emerging OTEC business. The work started in early 2008 deciding on the minimum-cost CWP architecture, materials, and fabrication process. In order to eliminate what in previous OTEC work had been a very large assembly/deployment risk, we took the innovative approach of building an integral CWP directly from theOTEC platform and down into the water. During the latter half of 2008, we proceeded to a successful small-scale Proof-of-Principles validation of the new fabrication process, at the Engineering Development Lab in Sunnyvale. During 2009-10, under the Cooperative Agreement with the US Dept. of Energy, we have now successfully validated key elements of the process and apparatus at a 4m diameter scale suitable for a future OTEC Pilot Plant. The validations include: (1) Assembly of sandwich core rings from pre-pultruded hollow 'planks,' holding final dimensions accurately; (2) Machine-based dispensing of overlapping strips of thick fiberglass fabric to form the lengthwise-continuous face sheets, holding accurate overlap dimensions; (3) Initial testing of the fabric architecture, showing that the overlap splices develop adequate mechanical strength (work done under a parallel US Naval Facilities Command program); and (4) Successful resin infusion/cure of 4m diameter workpieces, obtaining full wet-out and a non-discernable knitline between successive stepwise infusions.

  19. Advanced water-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This program was conducted to improve the performance and minimize the cost of existing water-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell stacks for electric utility and on-site applications. The goals for the electric utility stack technology were a power density of at least 175 watts per square foot over a 40,000-hour useful life and a projected one-of-a-kind, full-scale manufactured cost of less than $400 per kilowatt. The program adapted the existing on-site Configuration-B cell design to electric utility operating conditions and introduced additional new design features. Task 1 consisted of the conceptual design of a full-scale electric utility cell stack that meets program objectives. The conceptual design was updated to incorporate the results of material and process developments in Tasks 2 and 3, as well as results of stack tests conducted in Task 6. Tasks 2 and 3 developed the materials and processes required to fabricate the components that meet the program objectives. The design of the small area and 10-ft{sup 2} stacks was conducted in Task 4. Fabrication and assembly of the short stacks were conducted in Task 5 and subsequent tests were conducted in Task 6. The management and reporting functions of Task 7 provided DOE/METC with program visibility through required documentation and program reviews. This report describes the cell design and development effort that was conducted to demonstrate, by subscale stack test, the technical achievements made toward the above program objectives.

  20. Report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Piping Review Committee. Volume 1. Investigation and evaluation of stress corrosion cracking in piping of boiling water reactor plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IGSCC in BWR piping is occurring owing to a combination of material, environment, and stress factors, each of which can affect both the initiation of a stress-corrosion crack and the rate of its subsequent propagation. In evaluating long-term solutions to the problem, one needs to consider the effects of each of the proposed remedial actions. Mitigating actions to control IGSCC in BWR piping must be designed to alleviate one or more of the three synergistic factors: sensitized material, the convention BWR environment, and high tensile stresses. Because mitigating actions addressing each of these factors may not be fully effective under all anticipated operating conditions, mitigating actions should address two and preferably all three of the causative factors; e.g., material plus some control of water chemistry, or stress reversal plus controlled water chemistry.

  1. A study of system-induced instabilities in forced-convection flows with subcooled boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maulbetsch, John S.

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined analytical and experimental program was carried out to investigate the problem of hydrodynamic stability of forcedconvection flows with boiling. The study was restricted to the flow of water in small channels ...

  2. Pool boiling on nano-finned surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sriraman, Sharan Ram

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of nano-structured surfaces on pool boiling heat transfer is explored in this study. Experiments are conducted in a cubical test chamber containing fluoroinert coolant (PF5060, Manufacturer: 3M Co.) as the working fluid. Pool boiling...

  3. advanced gas-cooled reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  4. advanced coal-based power: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  5. advanced test-analysis model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  6. advanced self-shielding models: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  7. advanced t-stage nasopharyngeal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  8. advanced glass-mat thermoplastic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  9. advanced coal-fired low-emission: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  10. advanced liquid-cooling garment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  11. advanced beam-dynamics simulation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  12. advanced in-duct sorbent: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  13. advanced coal-fueled gas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  14. advanced physics-based modeling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  15. advanced unresectable non-small: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  16. advanced gas-cooled reactors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  17. Development of a general purpose subgrid wall boiling model from improved physical understanding for use in computational fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilman, Lindsey Anne

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced modeling capabilities were developed for application to subcooled flow boiling through this work. The target was to introduce, and demonstrate, all necessary mechanisms required to accurately predict the temperature ...

  18. Chemical drinking water quality in Ghana: Water costs and scope for advanced treatment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossiter, Helfrid M.A.; Owusu, Peter A; Awuah, Esi; MacDonald, Alan M; Schäfer, Andrea

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To reduce child mortality and improve health in Ghana boreholes and wells are being installed across the country by the private sector, NGOs and the Ghanaian government. Water quality is not generally monitored once a ...

  19. Investigation of boiling heat transfer at a surface with a system of cylindrical cavities under conditions of free motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danilova, G.N.; Reznikov, V.I.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors propose a mathematical model for the intensification of boiling heat transfer and the subsequent increase in thermal efficiency of the cylindrical heat transfer surfaces in an evaporative cooling system. The boiling curves for water, ethanol, and freon 113 are calculated for a surface with artificial nucleation sites. The model incorporates such coolant properties as surface tension, specific heat, and vaporization heat.

  20. Flow instabilities in the core and the coolant circuit of advances low-boiling light water reacto: classification of causes and development of simulator for the future analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rezvyi, Aleksey

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . 1. 3. Analysis method determination. 2. THEORETICAL ASPECTS OF DIFFERENT TYPES OF THE THERMO-HYDRAULIC INSTABILITIES. . 2. 1. Static instability of loading charactenstic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. 2. Resonance instability... in the 1C L-BWR during heat-up process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Diagram of components hierarchy of the Thermo-Hydraulic instabilities phenomenon. . The steam generating heating channels instability area, mass flow vs...

  1. Enhanced convective and film boiling heat transfer by surface gas injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duignan, M.R.; Greene, G.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Irvine, T.F., Jr. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat transfer measurements were made for stable film boiling of water over a horizontal, flat stainless steel plate from the minimum film boiling point temperature, T{sub SURFACE} {approximately}500K, to T{sub SURFACE} {approximately}950K. The pressure at the plate was approximately 1 atmosphere and the temperature of the water pool was maintained at saturation. The data were compared to the Berenson film-boiling model, which was developed for minimum film-boiling-point conditions. The model accurately represented the data near the minimum film-boiling point and at the highest temperatures measured, as long it was corrected for the heat transferred by radiation. On the average, the experimental data lay within {plus_minus}7% of the model. Measurements of heat transfer were made without film boiling for nitrogen jetting into an overlying pool of water from nine 1-mm- diameter holes, drilled in the heat transfer plate. The heat flux was maintained constant at approximately 26.4 kW/m{sup 2}. For water-pool heights of less than 6cm the heat transfer coefficient deceased linearly with a decrease in heights. Above 6cm the heat transfer coefficient was unaffected. For the entire range of gas velocities measured [0 to 8.5 cm/s], the magnitude of the magnitude of the heat transfer coefficient only changed by approximately 20%. The heat transfer data bound the Konsetov model for turbulent pool heat transfer which was developed for vertical heat transfer surfaces. This agreement suggests that surface orientation may not be important when the gas jets do not locally affect the surface heat transfer. Finally, a database was developed for heat transfer from the plate with both film boiling and gas jetting occurring simultaneously, in a pool of water maintained at its saturation temperature. The effect of passing nitrogen through established film boiling is to increase the heat transfer from that surface. 60 refs.

  2. Enhanced convective and film boiling heat transfer by surface gas injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duignan, M.R.; Greene, G.A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Irvine, T.F., Jr. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat transfer measurements were made for stable film boiling of water over a horizontal, flat stainless steel plate from the minimum film boiling point temperature, T{sub SURFACE} {approximately}500K, to T{sub SURFACE} {approximately}950K. The pressure at the plate was approximately 1 atmosphere and the temperature of the water pool was maintained at saturation. The data were compared to the Berenson film-boiling model, which was developed for minimum film-boiling-point conditions. The model accurately represented the data near the minimum film-boiling point and at the highest temperatures measured, as long it was corrected for the heat transferred by radiation. On the average, the experimental data lay within {plus minus}7% of the model. Measurements of heat transfer were made without film boiling for nitrogen jetting into an overlying pool of water from nine 1-mm- diameter holes, drilled in the heat transfer plate. The heat flux was maintained constant at approximately 26.4 kW/m{sup 2}. For water-pool heights of less than 6cm the heat transfer coefficient deceased linearly with a decrease in heights. Above 6cm the heat transfer coefficient was unaffected. For the entire range of gas velocities measured (0 to 8.5 cm/s), the magnitude of the magnitude of the heat transfer coefficient only changed by approximately 20%. The heat transfer data bound the Konsetov model for turbulent pool heat transfer which was developed for vertical heat transfer surfaces. This agreement suggests that surface orientation may not be important when the gas jets do not locally affect the surface heat transfer. Finally, a database was developed for heat transfer from the plate with both film boiling and gas jetting occurring simultaneously, in a pool of water maintained at its saturation temperature. The effect of passing nitrogen through established film boiling is to increase the heat transfer from that surface. 60 refs.

  3. Efficient Cooling in Engines with Nucleate Boiling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with Nucleate Boiling Principal Investigator: Wenhua Yu Coworkers: D. France and R. Smith Energy Systems Division Argonne National Laboratory OVT Merit Review February 28, 2008...

  4. Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Zr Alloys for High Burnup and Generation IV Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arthur Motta; Yong Hwan Jeong; R.J. Comstock; G.S. Was; Y.S. Kim

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this collaboration between four institutions in the US and Korea is to demonstrate a technical basis for the improvement of the corrosion resistance of zirconium-based alloys in more extreme operating environments (such as those present in severe fuel duty,cycles (high burnup, boiling, aggressive chemistry) andto investigate the feasibility (from the point of view of corrosion rate) of using advanced zirconium-based alloys in a supercritical water environment.

  5. 2005 Borchardt Conference: A Seminar on Advances in Water and Wastewater Treatment February 23-25, Ann Arbor, MI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nerenberg, Robert

    -25, Ann Arbor, MI Conference Proceedings 1 Membrane Biofilm Reactors for Water and Wastewater Treatment and Wastewater Treatment February 23-25, Ann Arbor, MI Conference Proceedings 2 (sparging) to replenish oxygen: A Seminar on Advances in Water and Wastewater Treatment February 23-25, Ann Arbor, MI Conference Proceedings

  6. Enhancement of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer in Confined Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Chia-Hsiang

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Pool boiling is an effective method used in many technical applications for a long time. Its highly efficient heat transfer performance results from not only the convection effect but also the phase change process in pool boiling. Pool boiling...

  7. Advances

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1BP-14Scripting for Advanced Workflows Jack

  8. Experimental investigation of subcooled flow boiling using synchronized high speed video, infrared thermography, and particle image velocimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Bren Andrew

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subcooled flow boiling of water was experimentally investigated using high-speed video (HSV), infrared (IR) thermography, and particle image velocimetry (PIV) to generate a unique database of synchronized data. HSV allowed ...

  9. Boiling of the Interface between Two Immiscible Liquids below the Bulk Boiling Temperatures of Both Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anastasiya V. Pimenova; Denis S. Goldobin

    2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the problem of boiling of the direct contact of two immiscible liquids. An intense vapour formation at such a direct contact is possible below the bulk boiling points of both components, meaning an effective decrease of the boiling temperature of the system. Although the phenomenon is known in science and widely employed in technology, the direct contact boiling process was thoroughly studied (both experimentally and theoretically) only for the case where one of liquids is becoming heated above its bulk boiling point. On the contrary, we address the case where both liquids remain below their bulk boiling points. In this paper we construct the theoretical description of the boiling process and discuss the actualisation of the case we consider for real systems.

  10. PACCAR CRADA: Experimental Investigation in Coolant Boiling in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PACCAR CRADA: Experimental Investigation in Coolant Boiling in a Half-Heated Circular Tube PACCAR CRADA: Experimental Investigation in Coolant Boiling in a Half-Heated Circular...

  11. CRADA with PACCAR Experimental Investigation in Coolant Boiling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PACCAR Experimental Investigation in Coolant Boiling in a Half-Heated Circular Tube CRADA with PACCAR Experimental Investigation in Coolant Boiling in a Half-Heated Circular Tube...

  12. Development of Advanced Accident Tolerant Fuels for Commercial Light Water Reactors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The safe, reliable and economic operation of the nation’s nuclear power reactor fleet has always been a top priority for the United States’ nuclear industry. Continual improvement of technology, including advanced materials and nuclear fuels remains central to industry’s success. Decades of research combined with continual operation have produced steady advancements in technology and yielded an extensive base of data, experience, and knowledge on light water reactor (LWR) fuel performance under both normal and accident conditions. Thanks to efforts by both the U.S. government and private companies, nuclear technologies have advanced over time to optimize economic operations in nuclear utilitiesmore »while ensuring safety. One of the missions of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) is to develop nuclear fuels and claddings with enhanced accident tolerance. In 2011, following the Great East Japan Earthquake, resulting tsunami, and subsequent damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant complex, enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs became a topic of serious discussion. As a result of direction from the U.S. Congress, DOE-NE initiated Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) development as a primary component of the Fuel Cycle Research & Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC). Prior to the unfortunate events at Fukushima, the emphasis for advanced LWR fuel development was on improving nuclear fuel performance in terms of increased burnup for waste minimization, increased power density for power upgrades, and increased fuel reliability. Fukushima highlighted some undesirable performance characteristics of the standard fuel system during severe accidents, including accelerated hydrogen production under certain circumstances. Thus, fuel system behavior under design basis accident and severe accident conditions became the primary focus for advanced fuels while still striving for improved performance under normal operating conditions to ensure that proposed new fuels will be economically viable. The goal of the ATF development effort is to demonstrate performance with a lead test assembly or lead test rod (LTR) or lead test assembly (LTA) irradiation in a commercial power reactor by 2022. Research and development activities are being conducted at multiple DOE national laboratories, universities and within industry with support from the DOE program. A brief program overview and status are provided.« less

  13. Development of Advanced Accident Tolerant Fuels for Commercial Light Water Reactors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The safe, reliable and economic operation of the nation’s nuclear power reactor fleet has always been a top priority for the United States’ nuclear industry. Continual improvement of technology, including advanced materials and nuclear fuels remains central to industry’s success. Decades of research combined with continual operation have produced steady advancements in technology and yielded an extensive base of data, experience, and knowledge on light water reactor (LWR) fuel performance under both normal and accident conditions. Thanks to efforts by both the U.S. government and private companies, nuclear technologies have advanced over time to optimize economic operations in nuclear utilities while ensuring safety. One of the missions of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) is to develop nuclear fuels and claddings with enhanced accident tolerance. In 2011, following the Great East Japan Earthquake, resulting tsunami, and subsequent damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant complex, enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs became a topic of serious discussion. As a result of direction from the U.S. Congress, DOE-NE initiated Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) development as a primary component of the Fuel Cycle Research & Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC). Prior to the unfortunate events at Fukushima, the emphasis for advanced LWR fuel development was on improving nuclear fuel performance in terms of increased burnup for waste minimization, increased power density for power upgrades, and increased fuel reliability. Fukushima highlighted some undesirable performance characteristics of the standard fuel system during severe accidents, including accelerated hydrogen production under certain circumstances. Thus, fuel system behavior under design basis accident and severe accident conditions became the primary focus for advanced fuels while still striving for improved performance under normal operating conditions to ensure that proposed new fuels will be economically viable. The goal of the ATF development effort is to demonstrate performance with a lead test assembly or lead test rod (LTR) or lead test assembly (LTA) irradiation in a commercial power reactor by 2022. Research and development activities are being conducted at multiple DOE national laboratories, universities and within industry with support from the DOE program. A brief program overview and status are provided.

  14. QSPR models of boiling point, octanolwater partition coefficient and retention time index of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

    QSPR models of boiling point, octanol­water partition coefficient and retention time index Structure­Property Relationship (QSPR) analysis and study of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs (bp), octanol­ water partition coefficient ðlog KowÞ and retention time index (RI) for reversed

  15. Investigation of the pool boiling heat transfer enhancement of nano-engineered fluids by means of high-speed infrared thermography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerardi, Craig Douglas

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-speed video and infrared thermography based technique has been used to obtain detailed and fundamental time- and space-resolved information on pool boiling heat transfer. The work is enabled by recent advances in ...

  16. Acoustically Enhanced Boiling Heat Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. W. Douglas; M. K. Smith; A. Glezer

    2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An acoustic field is used to increase the critical heat flux (CHF) of a flat-boiling-heat-transfer surface. The increase is a result of the acoustic effects on the vapor bubbles. Experiments are performed to explore the effects of an acoustic field on vapor bubbles in the vicinity of a rigid-heated wall. Work includes the construction of a novel heater used to produce a single vapor bubble of a prescribed size and at a prescribed location on a flatboiling surface for better study of an individual vapor bubble's reaction to the acoustic field. Work also includes application of the results from the single-bubble heater to a calibrated-copper heater used for quantifying the improvements in CHF.

  17. Advances in the development of energy efficient technologies: Sea Water Air Conditioning (SWAC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coony, J.E. [Boston Pacific Co., Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sea water air conditioning (SWAC) is a cost effective and environmentally friendly alternative to and/or enhancement of air conditioning from mechanical chillers. SWAC pumps cold sea water from the appropriate ocean depths (50 to 3,000 feet depending on the climate and local characteristics) to the shore where it replaces (by direct cooling) or enhances (through use as condenser water) large mechanical chillers found in coastal facilities. SWAC direct cooling uses less than twenty per cent of the electricity of a mechanical chiller and uses no refrigerants whatsoever. Indirect cooling also offers substantial energy savings. Both systems dispense with the need for a cooling tower. Technical advances over the last twenty years in corrosion resistant alloys (titanium or aluminum), bio-fouling deterrence, and deep ocean pipeline deployment allow SWAC installations to use reliable, off-the-shelf technology. SWAC works in a variety of climates (existing installations are in Hawaii and Halifax, Nova Scotia), giving it significant domestic and international potential. Economy-of-scale advantages make it attractive to district cooling schemes.

  18. Measurement of Key Pool BOiling Parameters in nanofluids for Nuclerar Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bang, In C [ORNL; Buongiorno, Jdacopo [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Hu, Lin-wen [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Wang, Hsin [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanofluids, colloidal dispersions of nanoparticles in a base fluid such as water, can afford very significant Critical Heat Flux (CHF) enhancement. Such engineered fluids potentially could be employed in reactors as advanced coolants in safety systems with significant safety and economic advantages. However, a satisfactory explanation of the CHF enhancement mechanism in nanofluids is lacking. To close this gap, we have identified the important boiling parameters to be measured. These are the properties (e.g., density, viscosity, thermal conductivity, specific heat, vaporization enthalpy, surface tension), hydrodynamic parameters (i.e., bubble size, bubble velocity, departure frequency, hot/dry spot dynamics) and surface conditions (i.e., contact angle, nucleation site density). We have also deployed a pool boiling facility in which many such parameters can be measured. The facility is equipped with a thin indium-tin-oxide heater deposited over a sapphire substrate. An infra-red high-speed camera and an optical probe are used to measure the temperature distribution on the heater and the hydrodynamics above the heater, respectively. The first data generated with this facility already provide some clue on the CHF enhancement mechanism in nanofluids. Specifically, the progression to burnout in a pure fluid (ethanol in this case) is characterized by a smoothly-shaped and steadily-expanding hot spot. By contrast, in the ethanol-based nanofluid the hot spot pulsates and the progression to burnout lasts longer, although the nanofluid CHF is higher than the pure fluid CHF. The presence of a nanoparticle deposition layer on the heater surface seems to enhance wettability and aid hot spot dissipation, thus delaying burnout.

  19. Advanced Energy and Water Recovery Technology from Low Grade Waste Heat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dexin Wang

    2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The project has developed a nanoporous membrane based water vapor separation technology that can be used for recovering energy and water from low-temperature industrial waste gas streams with high moisture contents. This kind of exhaust stream is widely present in many industrial processes including the forest products and paper industry, food industry, chemical industry, cement industry, metal industry, and petroleum industry. The technology can recover not only the sensible heat but also high-purity water along with its considerable latent heat. Waste heats from such streams are considered very difficult to recover by conventional technology because of poor heat transfer performance of heat-exchanger type equipment at low temperature and moisture-related corrosion issues. During the one-year Concept Definition stage of the project, the goal was to prove the concept and technology in the laboratory and identify any issues that need to be addressed in future development of this technology. In this project, computational modeling and simulation have been conducted to investigate the performance of a nanoporous material based technology, transport membrane condenser (TMC), for waste heat and water recovery from low grade industrial flue gases. A series of theoretical and computational analyses have provided insight and support in advanced TMC design and experiments. Experimental study revealed condensation and convection through the porous membrane bundle was greatly improved over an impermeable tube bundle, because of the membrane capillary condensation mechanism and the continuous evacuation of the condensate film or droplets through the membrane pores. Convection Nusselt number in flue gas side for the porous membrane tube bundle is 50% to 80% higher than those for the impermeable stainless steel tube bundle. The condensation rates for the porous membrane tube bundle also increase 60% to 80%. Parametric study for the porous membrane tube bundle heat transfer performance was also done, which shows this heat transfer enhancement approach works well in a wide parameters range for typical flue gas conditions. Better understanding of condensing heat transfer mechanism for porous membrane heat transfer surfaces, shows higher condensation and heat transfer rates than non-permeable tubes, due to existence of the porous membrane walls. Laboratory testing has documented increased TMC performance with increased exhaust gas moisture content levels, which has exponentially increased potential markets for the product. The TMC technology can uniquely enhance waste heat recovery in tandem with water vapor recovery for many other industrial processes such as drying, wet and dry scrubber exhaust gases, dewatering, and water chilling. A new metallic substrate membrane tube development and molded TMC part fabrication method, provides an economical way to expand this technology for scaled up applications with less than 3 year payback expectation. A detailed market study shows a broad application area for this advanced waste heat and water recovery technology. A commercialization partner has been lined up to expand this technology to this big market. This research work led to new findings on the TMC working mechanism to improve its performance, better scale up design approaches, and economical part fabrication methods. Field evaluation work needs to be done to verify the TMC real world performance, and get acceptance from the industry, and pave the way for our commercial partner to put it into a much larger waste heat and waste water recovery market. This project is addressing the priority areas specified for DOE Industrial Technologies Program's (ITP's): Energy Intensive Processes (EIP) Portfolio - Waste Heat Minimization and Recovery platform.

  20. Film boiling on spheres in single- and two-phase flows.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, C.; Theofanous, T. G.

    2000-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Film boiling on spheres in single- and two-phase flows was studied experimentally and theoretically with an emphasis on establishing the film boiling heat transfer closure law, which is useful in the analysis of nuclear reactor core melt accidents. Systematic experimentation of film boiling on spheres in single-phase water flows was carried out to investigate the effects of liquid subcooling (from 0 to 40 C), liquid velocity (from 0 to 2 m/s), sphere superheat (from 200 to 900 C), sphere diameter (from 6 to 19 mm), and sphere material (stainless steel and brass) on film boiling heat transfer. Based on the experimental data a general film boiling heat transfer correlation is developed. Utilizing a two-phase laminar boundary-layer model for the unseparated front film region and a turbulent eddy model for the separated rear region, a theoretical model was developed to predict the film boiling heat transfer in all single-phase regimes. The film boiling from a sphere in two-phase flows was investigated both in upward two-phase flows (with void fraction from 0.2 to 0.65, water velocity from 0.6 to 3.2 m/s, and steam velocity from 3.0 to 9.0 m/s) and in downward two-phase flows (with void fraction from 0.7 to 0.95, water velocity from 1.9 to 6.5 m/s, and steam velocity from 1.1 to 9.0 m/s). The saturated single-phase heat transfer correlation was found to be applicable to the two-phase film boiling data by making use of the actual water velocity (water phase velocity), and an adjustment factor of (1 - {alpha}){sup 1/4} (with a being the void fraction) for downward flow case only. Slight adjustments of the Reynolds number exponents in the correlation provided an even better interpretation of the two-phase data. Preliminary experiments were also conducted to address the influences of multi-sphere structure on the film boiling heat transfer in single- and two-phase flows.

  1. Void volumes in subcooled boiling systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffith, P.

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction: Knowledge of the pressure drop in a channel and the resulting flow redistribution is essential in predicting the performance of a nuclear reactor. The pressure drop in a channel which is experiencing boiling ...

  2. Modeling Interfacial Glass-Water Reactions: Recent Advances and Current Limitations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Eric M.; Frugier, Pierre; Criscenti, Louise J.; Kwon, K. D.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2014-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The altered layer (i.e., amorphous hydrated surface layer and crystalline reaction products)represents a complex region, both physically and chemically, sandwiched between two distinct boundaries - pristine glass surface at the inner most interface and aqueous solution at the outer most. The physico-chemical processes that control the development of this region have a significant impact on the long-term glass-water reaction. Computational models, spanning different length and time-scales, are currently being developed to improve our understanding of this complex and dynamic process with the goal of accurately describing the pore-scale changes that occur as the system evolves. These modeling approaches include Geochemical Reaction Path simulations, Glass Reactivity in Allowance for Alteration Layer simulations, Monte Carlo simulations, and Molecular Dynamics methods. Discussed in this manuscript are the advances and limitations of each modeling approach placed in the context of the glass water reaction and how collectively these approaches provide insights into the mechanisms that control the formation and evolution of altered layers; thus providing the fundamental data needed to develop pore-scale equations that enable more accurate predictions of nuclear waste glass corrosion in a geologic repository.

  3. Modeling Interfacial Glass-Water Reactions: Recent Advances and Current Limitations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Eric M [ORNL; Frugier, Pierre [CEA Marcoule DEN Laboratoire d’Étude du Comportement à Long Terme (France); Criscenti, Louise J [Sandia National Laboratory (SNL); Kwon, Kideok [Sandia National Laboratory (SNL); Kerisit, Sebastien [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Describing the reactions that occur at the glass-water interface and control the development of the altered layer constitutes one of the main scientific challenges impeding existing models from providing accurate radionuclide release estimates. Radionuclide release estimates are a critical component of the safety basis for geologic repositories. The altered layer (i.e., amorphous hydrated surface layer and crystalline reaction products) represents a complex region, both physically and chemically, sandwiched between two distinct boundaries pristine glass surface at the inner most interface and aqueous solution at the outer most interface. Computational models, spanning different length and time-scales, are currently being developed to improve our understanding of this complex and dynamic process with the goal of accurately describing the pore-scale changes that occur as the system evolves. These modeling approaches include geochemical simulations [i.e., classical reaction path simulations and glass reactivity in allowance for alteration layer (GRAAL) simulations], Monte Carlo simulations, and Molecular Dynamics methods. Discussed in this manuscript are the advances and limitations of each modeling approach placed in the context of the glass-water reaction and how collectively these approaches provide insights into the mechanisms that control the formation and evolution of altered layers.

  4. advanced fissile fuel: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    material. Currently, the International... Lafleur, Adrienne 2011-10-21 2 Comparison of thorium-based fuels with different fissile components in existing boiling water reactors...

  5. Pool boiling on nano-finned surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sriraman, Sharan Ram

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    is explored in this study. Experiments are conducted in a cubical test chamber containing fluoroinert coolant (PF5060, Manufacturer: 3M Co.) as the working fluid. Pool boiling experiments are conducted for saturation and subcooled conditions. Three...). .................................................................................................68 Fig. 19. Plots comparing the heat flux through the enhanced test surfaces (qw”) with the heat flux through the bare test surface (qb”) under 10 °C sub-cooling condition for both nulceate and film boiling regimes. Heat flux data...

  6. Advanced Fuels Campaign Light Water Reactor Accident Tolerant Fuel Performance Metrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brad Merrill; Melissa Teague; Robert Youngblood; Larry Ott; Kevin Robb; Michael Todosow; Chris Stanek; Mitchell Farmer; Michael Billone; Robert Montgomery; Nicholas Brown; Shannon Bragg-Sitton

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The safe, reliable and economic operation of the nation’s nuclear power reactor fleet has always been a top priority for the United States’ nuclear industry. As a result, continual improvement of technology, including advanced materials and nuclear fuels, remains central to industry’s success. Decades of research combined with continual operation have produced steady advancements in technology and yielded an extensive base of data, experience, and knowledge on light water reactor (LWR) fuel performance under both normal and accident conditions. In 2011, following the Great East Japan Earthquake, resulting tsunami, and subsequent damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant complex, enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs became a topic of serious discussion. As a result of direction from the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) initiated an Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) Development program. The complex multiphysics behavior of LWR nuclear fuel makes defining specific material or design improvements difficult; as such, establishing qualitative attributes is critical to guide the design and development of fuels and cladding with enhanced accident tolerance. This report summarizes a common set of technical evaluation metrics to aid in the optimization and down selection of candidate designs. As used herein, “metrics” describe a set of technical bases by which multiple concepts can be fairly evaluated against a common baseline and against one another. Furthermore, this report describes a proposed technical evaluation methodology that can be applied to assess the ability of each concept to meet performance and safety goals relative to the current UO2 – zirconium alloy system and relative to one another. The resultant ranked evaluation can then inform concept down-selection, such that the most promising accident tolerant fuel design option(s) can continue to be developed for lead test rod or lead test assembly insertion into a commercial reactor within the desired timeframe (by 2022).

  7. Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. E. Shropshire

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

  8. NREL and Industry Advance Low-Cost Solar Water Heating R&D (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL and Rhotech develop cost-effective solar water heating prototype to rival natural gas water heater market.

  9. Advanced Fuels Campaign Light Water Reactor Accident Tolerant Fuel Performance Metrics Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shannon Bragg-Sitton

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research and development (R&D) activities on advanced, higher performance Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels have been ongoing for the last few years. Following the unfortunate March 2011 events at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in Japan, the R&D shifted toward enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs. Qualitative attributes for fuels with enhanced accident tolerance, such as improved reaction kinetics with steam resulting in slower hydrogen generation rate, provide guidance for the design and development of fuels and cladding with enhanced accident tolerance. A common set of technical metrics should be established to aid in the optimization and down selection of candidate designs on a more quantitative basis. “Metrics” describe a set of technical bases by which multiple concepts can be fairly evaluated against a common baseline and against one another. This report describes a proposed technical evaluation methodology that can be applied to evaluate the ability of each concept to meet performance and safety goals relative to the current UO2 – zirconium alloy system and relative to one another. The resultant ranked evaluation can then inform concept down-selection, such that the most promising accident tolerant fuel design option(s) can continue to be developed toward qualification.

  10. Gas bubbling-enhanced film boiling of Freon-11 on liquid metal pools. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, G.A.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the analysis of severe core damage accidents in LWRs, a major driving force which must be considered in evaluating containment loading and fission product transport is the ex-vessel interaction between molten core debris and structural concrete. Two computer codes have been developed for this purpose, the CORCON-MOD2 model of ex-vessel, core concrete interactions and the VANESA model for aerosol generation and fission product release as a result of molten core-concrete interactions. Under a wide spectrum of reactor designs and accident sequences, it is possible for water to come into contact with the molten core debris and form a coolant pool overlying the core debris which is attacking the concrete. As the concrete decomposes, noncondensable gases are released, which bubble through the melt and across the boiling interface, affecting the liquid-liquid boiling process. Currently, the CORCON code includes the classical Berenson model for film boiling over a horizontal flat plate for this phenomenon. The objectives of this activity are to investigate the influence of transverse noncondensable gas flux on the magnitude of the stable liquid-liquid film boiling heat flux and develop a gas flux-enhanced, liquid-liquid film boiling model for incorporation into the CORCON-MOD2 computer code to replace or modify the Berenson model.

  11. Hydrodynamics and heat transfer during flow boiling instabilities in a single microchannel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aussillous, Pascale

    Hydrodynamics and heat transfer during flow boiling instabilities in a single microchannel July 2008 Keywords: Boiling Microchannels Visualisation Flow boiling instabilities Heat transfer a b intensification heat removal. Flow boiling heat transfer in microchannel geometry and the associated flow

  12. Synchronized High-Speed Video, Infrared Thermometry, and Particle Image Velocimetry Data for Validation of Interface-Tracking Simulations of Nucleate Boiling Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duan, Xiaoman

    Nucleation, growth, and detachment of steam bubbles during nucleate boiling of a water pool at atmospheric pressure is experimentally investigated using a combination of synchronized high-speed video, infrared thermography, ...

  13. Transition boiling heat transfer from a horizontal surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berenson Paul Jerome

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experiment, utilising a condensing fluid as the heat source, was performed to determine the heat flux vs. temperature difference curve for transition pool boiling from a horisontal surface. The boiling cure was determined ...

  14. PNNL Enhanced Pool-Boiling Heat Transfer Using Nanostructured Surfaces

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Close-up video of boiling taking place on a nanostructured surface in a controlled laboratory experiment.

  15. Boiling Heat Transfer on Superhydrophilic, Superhydrophobic, and Superbiphilic Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betz, Amy Rachel; Kim, Chang-Jin 'CJ'; Attinger, Daniel

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With recent advances in micro- and nanofabrication, superhydrophilic and superhydrophobic surfaces have been developed. The statics and dynamics of fluids on these surfaces have been well characterized. However, few investigations have been made into the potential of these surfaces to control and enhance other transport phenomena. In this article, we characterize pool boiling on surfaces with wettabilities varied from superhydrophobic to superhydrophilic, and provide nucleation measurements. The most interesting result of our measurements is that the largest heat transfer coefficients are reached not on surfaces with spatially uniform wettability, but on biphilic surfaces, which juxtapose hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. We develop an analytical model that describes how biphilic surfaces effectively manage the vapor and liquid transport, delaying critical heat flux and maximizing the heat transfer coefficient. Finally, we manufacture and test the first superbiphilic surfaces (juxtaposing superhydrophobic ...

  16. Boiling of nuclear liquid in the micro-canonical ensemble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy and the critical temperature of 1 #12;Boiling of nuclear liquid in the microBoiling of nuclear liquid in the micro-canonical ensemble K. Miyazaki E-mail: miyazakiro@rio.odn.ne.jp Abstract New calculus of the liquid-gas phase transition is developed for the boiling of nuclear liquid

  17. Transition from film boiling to nucleate boiling in forced convection vertical flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iloeje, Onwuamaeze C.

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanism of collapse of forced cnnvection annular vertical flow film boiling, with liquid core, is investigated using liquid nitrogen at low pressures. The report includes the effect of heat flux from the buss bar. ...

  18. Membrane contactor/separator for an advanced ozone membrane reactor for treatment of recalcitrant organic pollutants in water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, Wai Kit, E-mail: kekyeung@ust.hk [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Joueet, Justine; Heng, Samuel; Yeung, King Lun [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Schrotter, Jean-Christophe [Water Research Center of Veolia, Anjou Recherche, Chemin de la Digue, BP 76. 78603, Maisons Laffitte, Cedex (France)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced ozone membrane reactor that synergistically combines membrane distributor for ozone gas, membrane contactor for pollutant adsorption and reaction, and membrane separator for clean water production is described. The membrane reactor represents an order of magnitude improvement over traditional semibatch reactor design and is capable of complete conversion of recalcitrant endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in water at less than three minutes residence time. Coating the membrane contactor with alumina and hydrotalcite (Mg/Al=3) adsorbs and traps the organics in the reaction zone resulting in 30% increase of total organic carbon (TOC) removal. Large surface area coating that diffuses surface charges from adsorbed polar organic molecules is preferred as it reduces membrane polarization that is detrimental to separation. - Graphical abstract: Advanced ozone membrane reactor synergistically combines membrane distributor for ozone, membrane contactor for sorption and reaction and membrane separator for clean water production to achieve an order of magnitude enhancement in treatment performance compared to traditional ozone reactor. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Novel reactor using membranes for ozone distributor, reaction contactor and water separator. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Designed to achieve an order of magnitude enhancement over traditional reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and hydrotalcite coatings capture and trap pollutants giving additional 30% TOC removal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High surface area coating prevents polarization and improves membrane separation and life.

  19. Boiling heat transfer in a vertical microchannel: Local estimation during flow boiling with a non intrusive method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boiling heat transfer in a vertical microchannel: Local estimation during flow boiling with a non the results of experimental and numerical studies concerning boiling heat transfer inside vertical in minichannels for several gravity levels (µg, 1g, 2g). To fully understand the high heat transfer potential

  20. Advanced Analysis of the Responses of Cotton Genotypes Growing Under Water Stress 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maeda, Murilo Minekawa 1985-

    2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The ever-growing world population raises the concern and necessity of rational use and distribution of limited water resources. Water deficit is the single most dominant abiotic factor limiting cotton (Gossypium hirsutum ...

  1. Results from an advanced power plant cooling demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartz, J.A.; Allemann, R.T.; Laverman, R.J.; Fricke, H.D.; Van Laar, J.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of four years of operation and testing of a 17 MW(th) advanced water-conserving cooling demonstration are presented. Component performance data on four heat exchange systems are reported. These consist of an air-cooled ammonia condenser augmented by an evaporative cooler, an air-cooled ammonia condenser augmented by water deluge, a condenser/reboiler with steam condensing and ammonia porous boiling enhancements, and a capacitive cooling system that provides supplemental cooling without evaporating water. Comparisons of component performance at bench and pilot scale are made with the field tests. A discussion of measurement techniques, systems safety, control, reliability and practicality in a power plant environment, and avoidance of two-phase flow instabilities is included.

  2. Advanced Membrane Filtration Technology for Cost Effective Recovery of Fresh Water from Oil & Gas Produced Brine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Burnett

    2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Produced water is a major waste generated at the oil and natural gas wells in the state of Texas. This water could be a possible source of new fresh water to meet the growing demands of the state after treatment and purification. Treatment of brine generated in oil fields or produced water with an ultrafiltration membranes were the subject of this thesis. The characterization of ultrafiltration membranes for oil and suspended solids removal of produced water, coupled with the reverse osmosis (RO) desalination of brine were studied on lab size membrane testing equipment and a field size testing unit to test whether a viable membrane system could be used to treat produced water. Oil and suspended solids were evaluated using turbidity and oil in water measurements taken periodically. The research considered the effect of pressure and flow rate on membrane performance of produced water treatment of three commercially available membranes for oily water. The study also analyzed the flux through the membrane and any effect it had on membrane performance. The research showed that an ultrafiltration membrane provided turbidity removal of over 99% and oil removal of 78% for the produced water samples. The results indicated that the ultrafiltration membranes would be asset as one of the first steps in purifying the water. Further results on selected RO membranes showed that salt rejection of greater than 97% could be achieved with satisfactory flux and at reasonable operating cost.

  3. CONSORTIUM FOR ADVANCED SIMULATION OF LIGHT WATER REACTORS (CASL) Meeting Notes Â… September 9, 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r kiVP-^"^^?CONCEPTUALor.

  4. CONSORTIUM FOR ADVANCED SIMULATION OF LIGHT WATER REACTORS (CASL) Meeting Notes Â… September 9, 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r kiVP-^"^^?CONCEPTUALor. 1 CASL

  5. CONSORTIUM FOR ADVANCED SIMULATION OF LIGHT WATER REACTORS (CASL) Meeting Notes Â… September 9, 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r kiVP-^"^^?CONCEPTUALor. 1

  6. CONSORTIUM FOR ADVANCED SIMULATION OF LIGHT WATER REACTORS (CASL) Meeting Notes Â… September 9, 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r kiVP-^"^^?CONCEPTUALor. 1Meeting

  7. CONSORTIUM FOR ADVANCED SIMULATION OF LIGHT WATER REACTORS (CASL) Meeting Notes Â… September 9, 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r kiVP-^"^^?CONCEPTUALor.

  8. Advanced Fuel Performance: Modeling and Simulation Light Water Reactor Fuel Performance:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1BP-14 Power andAdvanced ComponentsenzymeAdvanced Fossil

  9. Implementation of an advanced BWR design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sofer, G.A.; Collingham, R.E.; Walters, K.V.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past several years, Advanced Nuclear Fuels (ANF) Corporation has devoted substantial development and design effort to the implementation of an advanced 9 x 9 array fuel design for boiling water reactors (BWRs). This advanced 9 x 9 design, designated AND-95, which has increased interior moderation through the use of five water rods, is capable of higher burnup than 8 x 8 fuel because of its lower linear heat generation rate (LHGR) and promises to allow unrestricted power maneuvering and load follow without the extra cost of introducing a zirconium liner. The first fuel reload incorporating this design is under fabrication and is expected to be in operation in a 47 kW/l power density BWR during the summer of 1988. Key design features of this fuel are given and are compared to a late-model 8 x 8 fuel. The paper discusses increased neutron economy, improved burnup capability, improved emergency core cooling system, improved critical heat flux capability, load-follow capability, and fuel cycle costs.

  10. POOL BOILING OF HIGH-FREQUENCY CONDUCTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, S. E. (Spencer E.); Konecni, S. (Snezana); Ammerman, C. N. (Curtt N.); Sims, J. R. (James R.)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents development of a unique, powerful method for cooling high-frequency, AC conductors that can benefit end users of transformer windings, electrical machine windings, and magnet coils. This method of heat removal involves boiling a dielectric, fluorinert refrigerant that is in direct contact with litz wire conductors. A pool boiling test vessel is constructed, which provides for temperature control of the pool of fluorinert liquid. The test vessel is fitted with viewing ports so that the experiments are observed and studied with the aid of high-speed photography. Tests are performed on a variety of litz wire conductors. The boiling heat transfer coefficient is dependent on the conductor surface roughness. The size of the features on the conductor surface depends on the single-strand wire gage from which the conductor is constructed. All tests are performed with the conductors mounted horizontally. These tests are performed using a DC power supply. The results of these experiments will aid in the design of future cooling systems.

  11. Flow boiling test of GDP replacement coolants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, S.H. [comp.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The tests were part of the CFC replacement program to identify and test alternate coolants to replace CFC-114 being used in the uranium enrichment plants at Paducah and Portsmouth. The coolants tested, C{sub 4}F{sub 10} and C{sub 4}F{sub 8}, were selected based on their compatibility with the uranium hexafluoride process gas and how well the boiling temperature and vapor pressure matched that of CFC-114. However, the heat of vaporization of both coolants is lower than that of CFC-114 requiring larger coolant mass flow than CFC-114 to remove the same amount of heat. The vapor pressure of these coolants is higher than CFC-114 within the cascade operational range, and each coolant can be used as a replacement coolant with some limitation at 3,300 hp operation. The results of the CFC-114/C{sub 4}F{sub 10} mixture tests show boiling heat transfer coefficient degraded to a minimum value with about 25% C{sub 4}F{sub 10} weight mixture in CFC-114 and the degree of degradation is about 20% from that of CFC-114 boiling heat transfer coefficient. This report consists of the final reports from Cudo Technologies, Ltd.

  12. Comparison of Advanced Residential Water Heating Technologies in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, J.; Fang, X.; Wilson, E.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage, gas tankless, condensing, electric storage, heat pump, and solar water heaters were simulated in several different climates across the US installed in both conditioned and unconditioned space and subjected to several different draw profiles. While many preexisting models were used, new models of condensing and heat pump water heaters were created specifically for this work.

  13. WaterTransport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing and Design Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Vernon Cole; Abhra Roy; Ashok Damle; Hari Dahr; Sanjiv Kumar; Kunal Jain; Ned Djilai

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Water management in Proton Exchange Membrane, PEM, Fuel Cells is challenging because of the inherent conflicts between the requirements for efficient low and high power operation. Particularly at low powers, adequate water must be supplied to sufficiently humidify the membrane or protons will not move through it adequately and resistance losses will decrease the cell efficiency. At high power density operation, more water is produced at the cathode than is necessary for membrane hydration. This excess water must be removed effectively or it will accumulate in the Gas Diffusion Layers, GDLs, between the gas channels and catalysts, blocking diffusion paths for reactants to reach the catalysts and potentially flooding the electrode. As power density of the cells is increased, the challenges arising from water management are expected to become more difficult to overcome simply due to the increased rate of liquid water generation relative to fuel cell volume. Thus, effectively addressing water management based issues is a key challenge in successful application of PEMFC systems. In this project, CFDRC and our partners used a combination of experimental characterization, controlled experimental studies of important processes governing how water moves through the fuel cell materials, and detailed models and simulations to improve understanding of water management in operating hydrogen PEM fuel cells. The characterization studies provided key data that is used as inputs to all state-of-the-art models for commercially important GDL materials. Experimental studies and microscopic scale models of how water moves through the GDLs showed that the water follows preferential paths, not branching like a river, as it moves toward the surface of the material. Experimental studies and detailed models of water and airflow in fuel cells channels demonstrated that such models can be used as an effective design tool to reduce operating pressure drop in the channels and the associated costs and weight of blowers and pumps to force air and hydrogen gas through the fuel cell. Promising improvements to materials structure and surface treatments that can potentially aid in managing the distribution and removal of liquid water were developed; and improved steady-state and freeze-thaw performance was demonstrated for a fuel cell stack under the self-humidified operating conditions that are promising for stationary power generation with reduced operating costs.

  14. Silicon carbide performance as cladding for advanced uranium and thorium fuels for light water reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukjai, Yanin

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been an ongoing interest in replacing the fuel cladding zirconium-based alloys by other materials to reduce if not eliminate the autocatalytic and exothermic chemical reaction with water and steam at above 1,200 ...

  15. A Synergistic Combination of Advanced Separation and Chemical Scale Inhibitor Technologies for Efficient Use of Imparied Water As Cooling Water in Coal-based Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jasbir Gill

    2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Nalco Company is partnering with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in this project to jointly develop advanced scale control technologies that will provide cost-effective solutions for coal-based power plants to operate recirculating cooling water systems at high cycles using impaired waters. The overall approach is to use combinations of novel membrane separations and scale inhibitor technologies that will work synergistically, with membrane separations reducing the scaling potential of the cooling water and scale inhibitors extending the safe operating range of the cooling water system. The project started on March 31, 2006 and ended in August 30, 2010. The project was a multiyear, multi-phase project with laboratory research and development as well as a small pilot-scale field demonstration. In Phase 1 (Technical Targets and Proof of Concept), the objectives were to establish quantitative technical targets and develop calcite and silica scale inhibitor chemistries for high stress conditions. Additional Phase I work included bench-scale testing to determine the feasibility of two membrane separation technologies (electrodialysis ED and electrode-ionization EDI) for scale minimization. In Phase 2 (Technology Development and Integration), the objectives were to develop additional novel scale inhibitor chemistries, develop selected separation processes, and optimize the integration of the technology components at the laboratory scale. Phase 3 (Technology Validation) validated the integrated system's performance with a pilot-scale demonstration. During Phase 1, Initial evaluations of impaired water characteristics focused on produced waters and reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents. Literature and new data were collected and evaluated. Characteristics of produced waters vary significantly from one site to another, whereas reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents have relatively more uniform characteristics. Assessment to date confirmed that calcite and silica/silicate are two common potential cycle-limiting minerals for using impaired waters. For produced waters, barium sulfate and calcium sulfate are two additional potential cycle-limiting minerals. For reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents, calcium phosphate scaling can be an issue, especially in the co-presence of high silica. Computational assessment, using a vast amount of Nalco's field data from coal fired power plants, showed that the limited use and reuse of impaired waters is due to the formation of deposit caused by the presence of iron, high hardness, high silica and high alkalinity in the water. Appropriate and cost-effective inhibitors were identified and developed - LL99B0 for calcite and gypsum inhibition and TX-15060 for silica inhibition. Nalco's existing dispersants HSP-1 and HSP-2 has excellent efficacy for dispersing Fe and Mn. ED and EDI were bench-scale tested by the CRADA partner Argonne National Laboratory for hardness, alkalinity and silica removal from synthetic make-up water and then cycled cooling water. Both systems showed low power consumption and 98-99% salt removal, however, the EDI system required 25-30% less power for silica removal. For Phase 2, the EDI system's performance was optimized and the length of time between clean-in-place (CIP) increased by varying the wafer composition and membrane configuration. The enhanced EDI system could remove 88% of the hardness and 99% of the alkalinity with a processing flux of 19.2 gal/hr/m{sup 2} and a power consumption of 0.54 kWh/100 gal water. Bench tests to screen alternative silica/silicate scale inhibitor chemistries have begun. The silica/silicate control approaches using chemical inhibitors include inhibition of silicic acid polymerization and dispersion of silica/silicate crystals. Tests were conducted with an initial silica concentration of 290-300 mg/L as SiO{sub 2} at pH 7 and room temperature. A proprietary new chemistry was found to be promising, compared with a current commercial product commonly used for silica/silicate control. Additional pilot cooling tower testing confirmed

  16. Cooling Boiling in Head Region - PACCAR Integrated Underhood...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integrated External Aerodynamic and Underhood Thermal Analysis for Heavy Vehicles CRADA with PACCAR Experimental Investigation in Coolant Boiling in a Half-Heated Circular...

  17. Advanced Metering Plan for Monitoring Energy and Potable Water Use in PNNL EMS4 Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pope, Jason E.; Olson, Norman J.; Berman, Marc J.; Schielke, Dale R.

    2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This updated Advanced Metering Plan for monitoring whole building energy use in Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) EMS4 buildings on the PNNL campus has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), Section 103, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 430.2B, and Metering Best Practices, A Guide to Achieving Utility Resource Efficiency, Federal Energy Management Program, October 2007 (Sullivan et al. 2007). The initial PNNL plan was developed in July 2007 (Olson 2007), updated in September 2008 (Olson et al. 2008), updated in September 2009 (Olson et al. 2009), and updated again in August 2010 (Olson et al. 2010).

  18. Advanced, Energy-Efficient Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial Water Reuse

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of2Partners in the SpotlightEnergyEleanorAdvanced,

  19. Advanced, Energy-Efficient Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial Water Reuse

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCOSystemsProgram Overview 20151SolicitationAdvancedDepartment ofLora Toy

  20. Advanced, Energy-Efficient Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial Water Reuse

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCOSystemsProgram Overview 20151SolicitationAdvancedDepartment ofLora ToyLora

  1. New Advances in Shale Gas Reservoir Analysis Using Water Flowback Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alkouh, Ahmad

    2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    ............................................................................................................ 91  7.2 Four Well Pads ....................................................................................................... 91  7.3 Five Well Pads... to be created instead and water flow have the normal high slope of higher than 1. .............................................................................. 90 Fig. 64. A map of all wells in the four wells pad. The production of the well FF-18 is divided...

  2. Engineers, are focused on advanced water quality modeling on the Cumberland River in Kentucky and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    hydropower dams in the Columbia River Basin to protect aquatic life. ORNL is providing an assessment of the effects of climate change on water availability for federal hydropower and on marketing of hydropower by increased understanding the role of climate variability and change. Collaborating with the Hydropower

  3. Effect of Fuel Wobbe Number on Pollutant Emissions from Advanced Technology Residential Water Heaters: Results of Controlled Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rapp, VH

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    testing storage water heaters, water was drawn either prioris located behind the water heater and samples before thelocated behind the water heater and sample emissions prior

  4. Conversion of direct process high-boiling residue to monosilanes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brinson, Jonathan Ashley (Vale of Glamorgan, GB); Crum, Bruce Robert (Madison, IN); Jarvis, Jr., Robert Frank (Midland, MI)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the production of monosilanes from the high-boiling residue resulting from the reaction of hydrogen chloride with silicon metalloid in a process typically referred to as the "direct process." The process comprises contacting a high-boiling residue resulting from the reaction of hydrogen chloride and silicon metalloid, with hydrogen gas in the presence of a catalytic amount of aluminum trichloride effective in promoting conversion of the high-boiling residue to monosilanes. The present process results in conversion of the high-boiling residue to monosilanes. At least a portion of the aluminum trichloride catalyst required for conduct of the process may be formed in situ during conduct of the direct process and isolation of the high-boiling residue.

  5. Final Report - Energy Reduction and Advanced Water Removal via Membrane Solvent Extraction Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, John; Fanselow, Dan; Abbas, Charles; Sammons, Rhea; Kinchin, Christopher

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    3M and Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) collaborated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and demonstrate a novel membrane solvent extraction (MSE) process that can substantially reduce energy and water consumption in ethanol production, and accelerate the fermentation process. A cross-flow membrane module was developed, using porous membrane manufactured by 3M. A pilot process was developed that integrates fermentation, MSE and vacuum distillation. Extended experiments of 48-72 hours each were conducted to develop the process, verify its performance and begin establishing commercial viability.

  6. Advanced Computational Thermal Fluid Physics (CTFP) and Its Assessment for Light Water Reactors and Supercritical Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.M. McEligot; K. G. Condie; G. E. McCreery; H. M. McIlroy; R. J. Pink; L.E. Hochreiter; J.D. Jackson; R.H. Pletcher; B.L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J.M. Wallace; J.Y. Yoo; J.S. Lee; S.T. Ro; S.O. Park

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of Generation IV reactor systems such as supercritical water reactors (SCWR) for higher efficiency, improved performance and operation, design simplification, enhanced safety and reduced waste and cost. The objective of this Korean / US / laboratory / university collaboration of coupled fundamental computational and experimental studies is to develop the supporting knowledge needed for improved predictive techniques for use in the technology development of Generation IV reactor concepts and their passive safety systems. The present study emphasizes SCWR concepts in the Generation IV program.

  7. Advanced light water reactor plants system 80+{trademark} design certification program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80{sup +}{trademark} during the U.S. government`s 1994 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MW (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design covers an essentially complete plant. It is based on EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD) improvements to the Standardized System 80 Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2 and 3. The NSSS is a traditional two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs, each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard design houses the NSSS in a spherical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual barrier to radioactivity release. Other major features include an all-digital, human-factors-engineered control room, an alternate electrical AC power source, an In-Containment Refueling Water Storage Tank (IRWST), and plant arrangements providing complete separation of redundant trains in safety systems. Some design enhancements incorporated in the System 80+ design are included in the four units currently under construction in the Republic of Korea. These units and the System 80+ design form the basis of the Korean standardization program. The Nuclear Island portion of the System 80+ standard design has also been offered to the Republic of China, in response to their bid specification for an ALWR. The ABB-CE Standard Safety Analysis Report (CESSAR-DC) was docketed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in May 1991 and a Draft Safety Evaluation Report (DSER) was issued in October 1992.

  8. Proceedings of the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting: Volume 1, Plenary session; Advanced reactor research; advanced control system technology; advanced instrumentation and control hardware; human factors research; probabilistic risk assessment topics; thermal hydraulics; thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monteleone, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [comp.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25--27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. This document, Volume 1 covers the following topics: Advanced Reactor Research; Advanced Instrumentation and Control Hardware; Advanced Control System Technology; Human Factors Research; Probabilistic Risk Assessment Topics; Thermal Hydraulics; and Thermal Hydraulic Research for Advanced Passive Light Water Reactors.

  9. Advanced dry head-end reprocessing of light water reactor spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, Emory D.; Delcul, Guillermo D.; Hunt, Rodney D.; Johnson, Jared A.; Spencer, Barry B.

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from a light water reactor includes the step of reacting spent nuclear fuel in a voloxidation vessel with an oxidizing gas having nitrogen dioxide and oxygen for a period sufficient to generate a solid oxidation product of the spent nuclear fuel. The reacting step includes the step of reacting, in a first zone of the voloxidation vessel, spent nuclear fuel with the oxidizing gas at a temperature ranging from 200-450.degree. C. to form an oxidized reaction product, and regenerating nitrogen dioxide, in a second zone of the voloxidation vessel, by reacting oxidizing gas comprising nitrogen monoxide and oxygen at a temperature ranging from 0-80.degree. C. The first zone and the second zone can be separate. A voloxidation system is also disclosed.

  10. Advanced dry head-end reprocessing of light water reactor spent nuclear fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Collins, Emory D; Delcul, Guillermo D; Hunt, Rodney D; Johnson, Jared A; Spencer, Barry B

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from a light water reactor includes the step of reacting spent nuclear fuel in a voloxidation vessel with an oxidizing gas having nitrogen dioxide and oxygen for a period sufficient to generate a solid oxidation product of the spent nuclear fuel. The reacting step includes the step of reacting, in a first zone of the voloxidation vessel, spent nuclear fuel with the oxidizing gas at a temperature ranging from 200-450.degree. C. to form an oxidized reaction product, and regenerating nitrogen dioxide, in a second zone of the voloxidation vessel, by reacting oxidizing gas comprising nitrogen monoxide and oxygen at a temperature ranging from 0-80.degree. C. The first zone and the second zone can be separate. A voloxidation system is also disclosed.

  11. The Effect of Water Vapor on Cr Depletion in Advanced Recuperator Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pint, Bruce A [ORNL

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Durable alloy foils are needed for gas turbine recuperators operating at 650--700 C. It has been established that water vapor in the exhaust gas causes more rapid consumption of Cr in austenitic stainless steels leading to a reduction in operating lifetime of these thin-walled components. Laboratory testing at 650--800 C of commercial and model alloys is being used to develop a better understanding of the long-term rate of Cr consumption in these environments. Results are presented for commercial alloys 709, 120 and 625. After 10,000h exposures at 650 C and 700 C in humid air, grain boundary Cr depletion was observed near the surface of all these materials. In the Fe-base alloys, 709 and 120, this depletion led to localized Fe-rich nodule formation. This information then can be used to develop low-cost alternatives to currently available candidate materials.

  12. Stress corrosion cracking and crack tip characterization of Alloy X-750 in light water reactor environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbs, Jonathan Paul

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of Inconel Alloy X-750 in the HTH condition has been evaluated in high purity water at 93 and 288°C under Boiling Water Reactor Normal Water Chemistry (NWC) and Hydrogen Water ...

  13. Stress Corrosion Cracking and Crack Tip Characterization of Alloy X-750 in Light Water Reactor Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbs, Jonathan Paul

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of Inconel Alloy X-750 in the HTH condition has been evaluated in high purity water at 93 and 288°C under Boiling Water Reactor Normal Water Chemistry (NWC) and Hydrogen Water ...

  14. Advanced nuclear reactor safety analysis: the simulation of a small break loss of coolant accident in the simplified boiling water reactor using RELAP5/MOD3.1.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faust, Christophor Randall

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric (GE) in their Standard Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the term of investigation (I 5,500 real time seconds). While no safety related parameters were exceeded, certain trends appearing near the end of the calculation suggest the need for further...

  15. An Advanced Computational Scheme for the Optimization of 2D Radial Reflectors in Pressurized Water Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Clerc; Alain Hébert; Hadrien Leroyer; Jean-Philippe Argaud; Bertrand Bouriquet; Agélique Ponçot

    2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a computational scheme for the determination of equivalent 2D multi-group heterogeneous reflectors in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The proposed strategy is to define a full-core calculation consistent with a reference lattice code calculation such as the Method Of Characteristics (MOC) as implemented in APOLLO2 lattice code. The computational scheme presented here relies on the data assimilation module known as "Assimilation de donn\\'{e}es et Aide \\`{a} l'Optimisation (ADAO)" of the SALOME platform developed at \\'{E}lectricit\\'{e} De France (EDF), coupled with the full-core code COCAGNE and with the lattice code APOLLO2. A first validation of the computational scheme is made using the OPTEX reflector model developed at \\'{E}cole Polytechnique de Montr\\'{e}al (EPM). As a result, we obtain 2D multi-group, spatially heterogeneous 2D reflectors, using both diffusion or $\\text{SP}_{\\text{N}}$ operators. We observe important improvements of the power discrepancies distribution over the core when using reflectors computed with the proposed computational scheme, and the $\\text{SP}_{\\text{N}}$ operator enables additional improvements.

  16. Advanced water-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell development. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This program was conducted to improve the performance and minimize the cost of existing water-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell stacks for electric utility and on-site applications. The goals for the electric utility stack technology were a power density of at least 175 watts per square foot over a 40,000-hour useful life and a projected one-of-a-kind, full-scale manufactured cost of less than $400 per kilowatt. The program adapted the existing on-site Configuration-B cell design to electric utility operating conditions and introduced additional new design features. Task 1 consisted of the conceptual design of a full-scale electric utility cell stack that meets program objectives. The conceptual design was updated to incorporate the results of material and process developments in Tasks 2 and 3, as well as results of stack tests conducted in Task 6. Tasks 2 and 3 developed the materials and processes required to fabricate the components that meet the program objectives. The design of the small area and 10-ft{sup 2} stacks was conducted in Task 4. Fabrication and assembly of the short stacks were conducted in Task 5 and subsequent tests were conducted in Task 6. The management and reporting functions of Task 7 provided DOE/METC with program visibility through required documentation and program reviews. This report describes the cell design and development effort that was conducted to demonstrate, by subscale stack test, the technical achievements made toward the above program objectives.

  17. An Advanced Computational Scheme for the Optimization of 2D Radial Reflectors in Pressurized Water Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clerc, Thomas; Leroyer, Hadrien; Argaud, Jean-Philippe; Bouriquet, Bertrand; Ponçot, Agélique

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a computational scheme for the determination of equivalent 2D multi-group heterogeneous reflectors in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The proposed strategy is to define a full-core calculation consistent with a reference lattice code calculation such as the Method Of Characteristics (MOC) as implemented in APOLLO2 lattice code. The computational scheme presented here relies on the data assimilation module known as "Assimilation de donn\\'{e}es et Aide \\`{a} l'Optimisation (ADAO)" of the SALOME platform developed at \\'{E}lectricit\\'{e} De France (EDF), coupled with the full-core code COCAGNE and with the lattice code APOLLO2. A first validation of the computational scheme is made using the OPTEX reflector model developed at \\'{E}cole Polytechnique de Montr\\'{e}al (EPM). As a result, we obtain 2D multi-group, spatially heterogeneous 2D reflectors, using both diffusion or $\\text{SP}_{\\text{N}}$ operators. We observe important improvements of the power discrepancies distribution over the cor...

  18. Effect of Fuel Wobbe Number on Pollutant Emissions from Advanced Technology Residential Water Heaters: Results of Controlled Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rapp, VH

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emissions from Residential Water Heaters Table of Contents46 Table 10. Storage water heaters evaluated experimentally50 Table 11. Published information for water heater

  19. A mathematical method for boiling water reactor control rod programming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokumasu, S.; Hiranuma, H.; Ozawa, M.; Yokomi, M.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new mathematical programming method has been developed and utilized in OPROD, an existing computer code for automatic generation of control rod programs as an alternative inner-loop routine for the method of approximate programming. The new routine is constructed of a dual feasible direction algorithm, and consists essentially of two stages of iterative optimization procedures Optimization Procedures I and II. Both follow almost the same algorithm; Optimization Procedure I searches for feasible solutions and Optimization Procedure II optimizes the objective function. Optimization theory and computer simulations have demonstrated that the new routine could find optimum solutions, even if deteriorated initial control rod patterns were given.

  20. Pressure suppression containment system for boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, D.M.; Nesbitt, L.B.

    1997-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is disclosed for suppressing the pressure inside the containment of a BWR following a postulated accident. A piping subsystem is provided which features a main process pipe that communicates the wetwell airspace to a connection point downstream of the guard charcoal bed in an offgas system and upstream of the main bank of delay charcoal beds which give extensive holdup to offgases. The main process pipe is fitted with both inboard and outboard containment isolation valves. Also incorporated in the main process pipe is a low-differential-pressure rupture disk which prevents any gas outflow in this piping whatsoever until or unless rupture occurs by virtue of pressure inside this main process pipe on the wetwell airspace side of the disk exceeding the design opening (rupture) pressure differential. The charcoal holds up the radioactive species in the noncondensable gas from the wetwell plenum by adsorption, allowing time for radioactive decay before the gas is vented to the environs. 3 figs.

  1. Pressure suppression containment system for boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Nesbitt, Loyd B. (San Jose, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for suppressing the pressure inside the containment of a BWR following a postulated accident. A piping subsystem is provided which features a main process pipe that communicates the wetwell airspace to a connection point downstream of the guard charcoal bed in an offgas system and upstream of the main bank of delay charcoal beds which give extensive holdup to offgases. The main process pipe is fitted with both inboard and outboard containment isolation valves. Also incorporated in the main process pipe is a low-differential-pressure rupture disk which prevents any gas outflow in this piping whatsoever until or unless rupture occurs by virtue of pressure inside this main process pipe on the wetwell airspace side of the disk exceeding the design opening (rupture) pressure differential. The charcoal holds up the radioactive species in the noncondensable gas from the wetwell plenum by adsorption, allowing time for radioactive decay before the gas is vented to the environs.

  2. Advanced Scintillator Detector Concept (ASDC): A Concept Paper on the Physics Potential of Water-Based Liquid Scintillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alonso, J R; Bergevin, M; Bernstein, A; Bignell, L; Blucher, E; Calaprice, F; Conrad, J M; Descamps, F B; Diwan, M V; Dwyer, D A; Dye, S T; Elagin, A; Feng, P; Grant, C; Grullon, S; Hans, S; Jaffe, D E; Kettell, S H; Klein, J R; Lande, K; Learned, J G; Luk, K B; Maricic, J; Marleau, P; Mastbaum, A; McDonough, W F; Oberauer, L; Gann, G D Orebi; Rosero, R; Rountree, S D; Sanchez, M C; Shaevitz, M H; Shokair, T M; Smy, M B; Strait, M; Svoboda, R; Tolich, N; Vagins, M R; van Bibber, K A; Viren, B; Vogelaar, R B; Wetstein, M J; Winslow, L; Wonsak, B; Worcester, E T; Wurm, M; Yeh, M; Zhang, C

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent development of Water-based Liquid Scintillator (WbLS), and the concurrent development of high-efficiency and high-precision-timing light sensors, has opened up the possibility for a new kind of large-scale detector capable of a very broad program of physics. The program would include determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy and observation of CP violation with long-baseline neutrinos, searches for proton decay, ultra-precise solar neutrino measurements, geo- and supernova neutrinos including diff?use supernova antineutrinos, and neutrinoless double beta decay. We outline here the basic requirements of the Advanced Scintillation Detector Concept (ASDC), which combines the use of WbLS, doping with a number of potential isotopes for a range of physics goals, high efficiency and ultra-fast timing photosensors, and a deep underground location. We are considering such a detector at the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) far site, where the ASDC could operate in conjunction with the liquid argon t...

  3. Advanced Scintillator Detector Concept (ASDC): A Concept Paper on the Physics Potential of Water-Based Liquid Scintillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Alonso; N. Barros; M. Bergevin; A. Bernstein; L. Bignell; E. Blucher; F. Calaprice; J. M. Conrad; F. B. Descamps; M. V. Diwan; D. A. Dwyer; S. T. Dye; A. Elagin; P. Feng; C. Grant; S. Grullon; S. Hans; D. E. Jaffe; S. H. Kettell; J. R. Klein; K. Lande; J. G. Learned; K. B. Luk; J. Maricic; P. Marleau; A. Mastbaum; W. F. McDonough; L. Oberauer; G. D. Orebi Gann; R. Rosero; S. D. Rountree; M. C. Sanchez; M. H. Shaevitz; T. M. Shokair; M. B. Smy; A. Stahl; M. Strait; R. Svoboda; N. Tolich; M. R. Vagins; K. A. van Bibber; B. Viren; R. B. Vogelaar; M. J. Wetstein; L. Winslow; B. Wonsak; E. T. Worcester; M. Wurm; M. Yeh; C. Zhang

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent development of Water-based Liquid Scintillator (WbLS), and the concurrent development of high-efficiency and high-precision-timing light sensors, has opened up the possibility for a new kind of large-scale detector capable of a very broad program of physics. The program would include determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy and observation of CP violation with long-baseline neutrinos, searches for proton decay, ultra-precise solar neutrino measurements, geo- and supernova neutrinos including diffuse supernova antineutrinos, and neutrinoless double beta decay. We outline here the basic requirements of the Advanced Scintillation Detector Concept (ASDC), which combines the use of WbLS, doping with a number of potential isotopes for a range of physics goals, high efficiency and ultra-fast timing photosensors, and a deep underground location. We are considering such a detector at the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) far site, where the ASDC could operate in conjunction with the liquid argon tracking detector proposed by the LBNE collaboration. The goal is the deployment of a 30-100 kiloton-scale detector, the basic elements of which are being developed now in experiments such as WATCHMAN, ANNIE, SNO+, and EGADS.

  4. Film Boiling on Downward Quenching Hemisphere of Varying Sizes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan S. Kim; Kune Y. Suh; Joy L. Rempe; Fan-Bill Cheung; Sang B. Kim

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Film boiling heat transfer coefficients for a downward-facing hemispherical surface are measured from the quenching tests in DELTA (Downward-boiling Experimental Laminar Transition Apparatus). Two test sections are made of copper to maintain low Biot numbers. The outer diameters of the hemispheres are 120 mm and 294 mm, respectively. The thickness of all the test sections is 30 mm. The effect of diameter on film boiling heat transfer is quantified utilizing results obtained from the test sections. The measured data are compared with the numerical predictions from laminar film boiling analysis. The measured heat transfer coefficients are found to be greater than those predicted by the conventional laminar flow theory on account of the interfacial wavy motion incurred by the Helmholtz instability. Incorporation of the wavy motion model considerably improves the agreement between the experimental and numerical results in terms of heat transfer coefficient. In addition, the interfacial wavy motion and the quenching process are visualized through a digital camera.

  5. Suppression and Enhancement of Boiling Associated with Multiple Droplet Impingement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yuxuan

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are at play simultaneously. Furthermore, experiments with single streams of droplets have not been able to elucidate the effects of the onset of boiling (ONB) during the droplet impingement process. Therefore, efforts have been undertaken to consider...

  6. Pool boiling studies on nanotextured surfaces under highly subcooled conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathyamurthi, Vijaykumar

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Subcooled pool boiling on nanotextured surfaces is explored in this study. The experiments are performed in an enclosed viewing chamber. Two silicon wafers are coated with Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT), 9 microns (Type-A) and 25 microns (Type...

  7. Thermal boundary layer development in dispersed flow film boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hull, Lawrence M.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dispersed flow film boiling consists of a dispersion of droplets which are carried over a very hot surface by their vapor. This process occurs in cryogenic equipment and wet steam turbines. It is also of interest in the ...

  8. Dryout droplet distribution and dispersed flow film boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Wayne S.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dispersed flow film boiling is characterized by liquid-phase droplets entrained in a continuous vapor-phase flow. In a previous work at MIT, a model of dispersed flow heat transfer was developed, called the Local Conditions ...

  9. The effects of surface conditions on boiling characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenz, J. J.

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A unified model relating surface variables to the nucleate pool boiling characteristics was developed. A simple vapor trapping mechanism was postulated and a geometrical model constructed for idealized conical cavities ...

  10. Forced-convection, dispersed-flow film boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hynek, Scott Josef

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the latest results of an investigation of the characteristics of dispersed flow film boiling. Heat transfer data are presented for vertical upflow of nitrogen in an electrically heated tube, 0.4 in. ...

  11. Hydrodynamics, heat transfer and flow boiling instabilities in microchannels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barber, Jacqueline Claire

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Boiling in microchannels is a very efficient mode of heat transfer with high heat and mass transfer coefficients achieved. Less pumping power is required for two-phase flows than for single-phase liquid flows to achieve ...

  12. Effects of surface parameters on boiling heat transfer phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong, Bao H. (Bao Hoai)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanofluids, engineered colloidal dispersions of nanoparticles in fluid, have been shown to enhance pool and flow boiling CHF. The CHF enhancement was due to nanoparticle deposited on the heater surface, which was verified ...

  13. Boiling heat transfer on superhydrophilic, superhydrophobic, and superbiphilic surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attinger, Daniel

    Boiling heat transfer on superhydrophilic, superhydrophobic, and superbiphilic surfaces Amy Rachel in revised form 30 October 2012 Accepted 31 October 2012 Keywords: Superhydrophobic Superhydrophilic Biphilic- and nanofabrication, superhydrophilic and superhydrophobic surfaces have been developed. The statics and dynamics

  14. Experimental design for study of nucleate boiling in porous structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Mitchell Joseph

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The superheat required to initiate nucleate boiling inside porous wicks is not well understood in practice. This thesis reports the design of an experimental setup for investigating the onset of vapor nucleation in sintered ...

  15. RELAP5/MOD3 subcooled boiling model assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devkin, A.S.; Podosenov, A.S. [Russian Research Center, Moscow (Russian Federation). Nuclear Safety Inst.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the assessment of the RELAP5/Mod3 (5m5 version) code subcooled boiling process model which is based on a variety of experiments. The accuracy of the model is confirmed for a wide range of regime parameters for the case of uniform heating along the channel. The condensation rate is rather underpredicted, which may lead to considerable errors in void fraction behavior prediction in subcooled boiling regimes for nonuniformly or unheated channels.

  16. Experimental Investigation on the Effects of Coolant Concentration on Sub-Cooled Boiling and Crud Deposition on Reactor Cladding at Prototypical PWR Operating Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultis, J., Kenneth; Fenton, Donald, L.

    2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing demand for energy necessitates nuclear power units to increase power limits. This implies significant changes in the design of the core of the nuclear power units, therefore providing better performance and safety in operations. A major hindrance to the increase of nuclear reactor performance especially in Pressurized Deionized water Reactors (PWR) is Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA)--the unexpected change in the core axial power distribution during operation from the predicted distribution. This problem is thought to be occur because of precipitation and deposition of lithiated compounds like boric acid (H{sub 2}BO{sub 3}) and lithium metaborate (LiBO{sub 2}) on the fuel rod cladding. Deposited boron absorbs neutrons thereby affecting the total power distribution inside the reactor. AOA is thought to occur when there is sufficient build-up of crud deposits on the cladding during subcooled nucleate boiling. Predicting AOA is difficult as there is very little information regarding the heat and mass transfer during subcooled nucleate boiling. An experimental investigation was conducted to study the heat transfer characteristics during subcooled nucleate boiling at prototypical PWR conditions. Pool boiling tests were conducted with varying concentrations of lithium metaborate (LiBO{sub 2}) and boric acid (H{sub 2}BO{sub 3}) solutions in deionized water. The experimental data collected includes the effect of coolant concentration, subcooling, system pressure and heat flux on pool the boiling heat transfer coefficient. The analysis of particulate deposits formed on the fuel cladding surface during subcooled nucleate boiling was also performed. The results indicate that the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient degrades in the presence of boric acid and lithium metaborate compared to pure deionized water due to lesser nucleation. The pool boiling heat transfer coefficients decreased by about 24% for 5000 ppm concentrated boric acid solution and by 27% for 5000 ppm lithium metaborate solution respectively at the saturation temperature for 1000 psi (68.9 bar) coolant pressure. Boiling tests also revealed the formation of fine deposits of boron and lithium on the cladding surface which degraded the heat transfer rates. The boron and lithium metaborate precipitates after a 5 day test at 5000 ppm concentration and 1000 psi (68.9 bar) operating pressure reduced the heat transfer rate 21% and 30%, respectively for the two solutions.

  17. Cross section generation strategy for high conversion light water reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herman, Bryan R. (Bryan Robert)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High conversion water reactors (HCWR), such as the Resource-renewable Boiling Water Reactor (RBWR), are being designed with axial heterogeneity of alternating fissile and blanket zones to achieve a conversion ratio of ...

  18. Effect of Fuel Wobbe Number on Pollutant Emissions from Advanced Technology Residential Water Heaters: Results of Controlled Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rapp, VH

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water Heaters 7.0 Glossary of Abbreviations AGA American Gas Association ANSI American National Standards

  19. Flow boiling enhancement on a horizontal heater using carbon nanotube coatings N. Singh, V. Sathyamurthy, W. Peterson, J. Arendt, D. Banerjee *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Debjyoti

    with embedded cartridge heaters and K-type thermocouples. De-ion- ized (DI) water was used as the test fluidFlow boiling enhancement on a horizontal heater using carbon nanotube coatings N. Singh, V flux on a horizontal heater that is heated from below. The horizontal heater consists of either a bare

  20. Enhanced boiling heat transfer in horizontal test bundles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trewin, R.R.; Jensen, M.K.; Bergles, A.E.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-phase flow boiling from bundles of horizontal tubes with smooth and enhanced surfaces has been investigated. Experiments were conducted in pure refrigerant R-113, pure R-11, and mixtures of R-11 and R-113 of approximately 25, 50, and 75% of R-113 by mass. Tests were conducted in two staggered tube bundles consisting of fifteen rows and five columns laid out in equilateral triangular arrays with pitch-to-diameter ratios of 1.17 and 1.5. The enhanced surfaces tested included a knurled surface (Wolverine`s Turbo-B) and a porous surface (Linde`s High Flux). Pool boiling tests were conducted for each surface so that reference values of the heat transfer coefficient could be obtained. Boiling heat transfer experiments in the tube bundles were conducted at pressures of 2 and 6 bar, heat flux values from 5 to 80 kW/m{sup 2}s, and qualities from 0% to 80%, Values of the heat transfer coefficients for the enhanced surfaces were significantly larger than for the smooth tubes and were comparable to the values obtained in pool boiling. It was found that the performance of the enhanced tubes could be predicted using the pool boiling results. The degradation in the smooth tube heat transfer coefficients obtained in fluid mixtures was found to depend on the difference between the molar concentration in the liquid and vapor.

  1. Simulation and performance analysis of basic GAX and advanced GAX cycles with ammonia/water and ammonia/water/LiBr absorption fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaltash, A.; Grossman, G.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) and branched GAX cycles are generally considered with NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O as their working fluid. The potential consequences of using a ternary mixture of NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O/LiBr (advanced fluids) in the GAX and Branched GAX (advanced cycles) are discussed in this study. A modular steady state absorption simulation model(ABSIM) was used to investigate the potential of combining the above advanced cycles with the advanced fluids. ABSIM is capable of modeling varying cycle configurations with different working fluids. Performance parameters of the cycles, including coefficient of performance (COP) and heat duties, were investigated as functions of different operating parameters in the cooling mode for both the NH {sub 3}/H{sub 2}O binary and the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O/LiBr ternary mixtures. High performance potential of GAX and branched GAX cycles using the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O/LiBr ternary fluid mixture was achieved especially at the high range of firing temperatures exceeding 400{degrees}F. The cooling COP`s have been improved by approximately 21% over the COP achieved with the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O binary mixtures. These results show the potential of using advanced cycles with advanced fluid mixtures (ternary or quaternary fluid mixtures).

  2. Design, fabrication, packaging and testing of thin film thermocouples for boiling studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinha, Nipun

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Boiling is the most efficient form of heat transfer. Thermo-fluidic transport mechanisms at different length and time scales govern the nature of boiling. This study was conducted to enhance the understanding of the surface temperature variations...

  3. Mechanism and behavior of nucleate boiling heat transfer to the alkalai liquid metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deane, Charles William

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model of boiling heat transfer to the alkali liquid metals is postulated from an examination of the events and phases of the nucleate boiling cycle. The model includes the important effect of microlayer evaporation which ...

  4. Forced-convection surface-boiling heat transfer and burnout in tubes of small diameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergles A. E.

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A basic heat-transfer apparatus was designed and constructed for the study of forced-convection boiling in small channels. The various regions of forced-convection surface boiling were studied experimentally and analytically. ...

  5. Alumina Nanoparticle Pre-coated Tubing Ehancing Subcooled Flow Boiling Cricital Heat Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong, Bao H.

    Nanofluids are engineered colloidal dispersions of nano-sized particle in common base fluids. Previous pool boiling studies have shown that nanofluids can improve critical heat flux (CHF) up to 200% for pool boiling and ...

  6. Acoustic emission feedback control for control of boiling in a microwave oven

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    White, Terry L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An acoustic emission based feedback system for controlling the boiling level of a liquid medium in a microwave oven is provided. The acoustic emissions from the medium correlated with surface boiling is used to generate a feedback control signal proportional to the level of boiling of the medium. This signal is applied to a power controller to automatically and continuoulsly vary the power applied to the oven to control the boiling at a selected level.

  7. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF POOL BOILING FOR STEADY STATE AND TRANSIENT HEATING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    1 NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF POOL BOILING FOR STEADY STATE AND TRANSIENT HEATING Ying He, Masahiro role in nucleate and transition boiling heat transfer at high heat flux. Many experiments have been in the numerical simulation of boiling heat transfer. In this study, based on the macrolayer evaporation model

  8. ECI International Conference on Boiling Heat Transfer Florianpolis-SC-Brazil, 3-7 May 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikoglu, Berrin

    . Recently the study of heat transfer in micro pin fin heat sinks has been extended to flow boiling by Koar and Peles (2006c), who studied boiling heat transfer in a hydrofoil-based micro pin fin heat sinkECI International Conference on Boiling Heat Transfer Florianópolis-SC-Brazil, 3-7 May 2009

  9. Flow Boiling Heat Transfer Coefficient In Minichannels Correlation and Trends Satish G. Kandlikar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandlikar, Satish

    Flow Boiling Heat Transfer Coefficient In Minichannels ­ Correlation and Trends Satish G. Kandlikar York 14623, USA The flow boiling heat transfer in small diameter passages is being applied in many boiling heat transfer coefficient with the correlations developed for conventional channels. It is found

  10. Numerical study of high heat ux pool boiling heat transfer Ying He a,*, Masahiro Shoji b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Numerical study of high heat ¯ux pool boiling heat transfer Ying He a,*, Masahiro Shoji b , Shigeo simulation model of boiling heat transfer is proposed based on a numerical macrolayer model [S. Maruyama, M. Shoji, S. Shimizu, A numerical simulation of transition boiling heat transfer, in: Proceedings

  11. Enhancement of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer in Confined Space 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Chia-Hsiang

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    on pool boiling. In the study, confinement was achieved by placing a flat plate over heated surface. The flat plate has a hole in the middle, and there is a gap between the flat plate and the heater. The diameters of hole are 2 mm, 3 mm, and 4 mm; the gap...

  12. Jet Flows Around Microbubbles In Subcooled Boiling , Xiaofeng Pengb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihm, IconKenneth David

    Jet Flows Around Microbubbles In Subcooled Boiling Hao Wanga , Xiaofeng Pengb , David M Strong jet flows were observed emanating from micro bubbles on a 100 µm diameter wire during subcooled analysis. The bubble-top jet flows were characterized by a single jet at the bubble top. Both experiments

  13. advancing translational research: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    con Rubin, Daniel L. 89 Copyright Awwa Research Foundation 2006 Advanced Water Treatment Impacts onAdvanced Water Treatment Impacts on Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

  14. advance translational research: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    con Rubin, Daniel L. 89 Copyright Awwa Research Foundation 2006 Advanced Water Treatment Impacts onAdvanced Water Treatment Impacts on Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

  15. Advanced, Energy-Efficient Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advanced, Energy-Efficient Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial Water Reuse Advanced, Energy-Efficient Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial Water Reuse hybridmembranesystemsfa...

  16. Application of Pulsed Electrical Fields for Advanced Cooling and Water Recovery in Coal-Fired Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young Cho; Alexander Fridman

    2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the present work was to develop technologies to reduce freshwater consumption in a cooling tower of coal-based power plant so that one could significantly reduce the need of make-up water. The specific goal was to develop a scale prevention technology based an integrated system of physical water treatment (PWT) and a novel filtration method so that one could reduce the need for the water blowdown, which accounts approximately 30% of water loss in a cooling tower. The present study investigated if a pulsed spark discharge in water could be used to remove deposits from the filter membrane. The test setup included a circulating water loop and a pulsed power system. The present experiments used artificially hardened water with hardness of 1,000 mg/L of CaCO{sub 3} made from a mixture of calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}) and sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) in order to produce calcium carbonate deposits on the filter membrane. Spark discharge in water was found to produce strong shockwaves in water, and the efficiency of the spark discharge in cleaning filter surface was evaluated by measuring the pressure drop across the filter over time. Results showed that the pressure drop could be reduced to the value corresponding to the initial clean state and after that the filter could be maintained at the initial state almost indefinitely, confirming the validity of the present concept of pulsed spark discharge in water to clean dirty filter. The present study also investigated the effect of a plasma-assisted self-cleaning filter on the performance of physical water treatment (PWT) solenoid coil for the mitigation of mineral fouling in a concentric counterflow heat exchanger. The self-cleaning filter utilized shockwaves produced by pulse-spark discharges in water to continuously remove scale deposits from the surface of the filter, thus keeping the pressure drop across the filter at a relatively low value. Artificial hard water was used in the present fouling experiments for three different cases: no treatment, PWT coil only, and PWT coil plus self-cleaning filter. Fouling resistances decreased by 59-72% for the combined case of PWT coil plus filter compared with the values for no-treatment cases. SEM photographs showed much smaller particle sizes for the combined case of PWT coil plus filter as larger particles were continuously removed from circulating water by the filter. The x-ray diffraction data showed calcite crystal structures for all three cases.

  17. The role of science, stakeholder engagement, and decision making process design in advancing innovation around water management in Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corson-Rikert, Tyler Andrew

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sustainable Water Management Initiative is a multi-stakeholder process that the Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs convened in early 2010 to seek advice on how to more sustainably manage ...

  18. Investigation of the use of nanofluids to enhance the In-Vessel Retention capabilities of Advanced Light Water Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hannink, Ryan Christopher

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanofluids at very low concentrations experimentally exhibit a substantial increase in Critical Heat Flux (CHF) compared to water. The use of a nanofluid in the In-Vessel Retention (IVR) severe accident management strategy, ...

  19. First Western Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    ­ boils down to economics. Water drives technology and price of energy." "Looking to move to dry or hybridFirst Western Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability University of California, Santa Barbara John R,000 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 Year gal/MWh Trend in U.S. Thermoelectric Power Water Withdrawal

  20. RECENT ADVANCES IN HEAT TRANSFER TO HELIUM 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    509 RECENT ADVANCES IN HEAT TRANSFER TO HELIUM 1 C. JOHANNES Service de Recherches Appliquées, L'hélium hypercritique. Abstract. - Conditions of thermal exchange in helium 1 are reviewed. Pool boiling thermosi- phon are given. Use of hypercritical helium. REVUE DE PHYSIQUE APPLIQU�E TOME 6, D�CEMBRE 1971, PAGE Introduction

  1. Review of the proposed materials of construction for the SBWR and AP600 advanced reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diercks, D.R.; Shack, W.J.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two advanced light water reactor (LWR) concepts, namely the General Electric Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) and the Westinghouse Advanced Passive 600 MWe Reactor (AP600), were reviewed in detail by Argonne National Laboratory. The objectives of these reviews were to (a) evaluate proposed advanced-reactor designs and the materials of construction for the safety systems, (b) identify all aging and environmentally related degradation mechanisms for the materials of construction, and (c) evaluate from the safety viewpoint the suitability of the proposed materials for the design application. Safety-related systems selected for review for these two LWRs included (a) reactor pressure vessel, (b) control rod drive system and reactor internals, (c) coolant pressure boundary, (d) engineered safety systems, (e) steam generators (AP600 only), (f) turbines, and (g) fuel storage and handling system. In addition, the use of cobalt-based alloys in these plants was reviewed. The selected materials for both reactors were generally sound, and no major selection errors were found. It was apparent that considerable thought had been given to the materials selection process, making use of lessons learned from previous LWR experience. The review resulted in the suggestion of alternate an possibly better materials choices in a number of cases, and several potential problem areas have been cited.

  2. Chemical analyses and preliminary interpretation of waters collected...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    boiling alkaline-chloride waters do not reach the surface. Authors Fournier, R. O.; Thompson, J. M.; Austin and C. F. Published DOE Information Bridge, 111978 DOI 10.2172...

  3. Effect of Fuel Wobbe Number on Pollutant Emissions from Advanced Technology Residential Water Heaters: Results of Controlled Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapp, VH; Singer, BC

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research summarized in this report is part of a larger effort to evaluate the potential air quality impacts of using liquefied natural gas in California. A difference of potential importance between many liquefied natural gas blends and the natural gas blends that have been distributed in California in recent years is the higher Wobbe number of liquefied natural gas. Wobbe number is a measure of the energy delivery rate for appliances that use orifice- or pressure-based fuel metering. The effect of Wobbe number on pollutant emissions from residential water heaters was evaluated in controlled experiments. Experiments were conducted on eight storage water heaters, including five with “ultra low-NO{sub X}” burners, and four on-demand (tankless) water heaters, all of which featured ultra low-NO{sub X} burners. Pollutant emissions were quantified as air-free concentrations in the appliance flue and fuel-based emission factors in units of nanogram of pollutant emitter per joule of fuel energy consumed. Emissions were measured for carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub X}), nitrogen oxide (NO), formaldehyde and acetaldehyde as the water heaters were operated through defined operating cycles using fuels with varying Wobbe number. The reference fuel was Northern California line gas with Wobbe number ranging from 1344 to 1365. Test fuels had Wobbe numbers of 1360, 1390 and 1420. The most prominent finding was an increase in NO{sub X} emissions with increasing Wobbe number: all five of the ultra low-NO{sub X} storage water heaters and two of the four ultra low-NO{sub X} on-demand water heaters had statistically discernible (p<0.10) increases in NO{sub X} with fuel Wobbe number. The largest percentage increases occurred for the ultra low-NO{sub X} water heaters. There was a discernible change in CO emissions with Wobbe number for all four of the on-demand devices tested. The on-demand water heater with the highest CO emissions also had the largest CO increase with increasing fuel Wobbe number.

  4. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; David Schwieder; Cherie Phelan; Anh Bui; Paul Bayless

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced “RISMC toolkit” that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. This report describes the RISMC methodology demonstration where the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was used as a test-bed for purposes of determining safety margins. As part of the demonstration, we describe how both the thermal-hydraulics and probabilistic safety calculations are integrated and used to quantify margin management strategies.

  5. LIGHT WATER REACTOR SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM ADVANCED INSTRUMENTATION, INFORMATION, AND CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGIES TECHNICAL PROGRAM PLAN FOR 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallbert, Bruce; Thomas, Ken

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliable instrumentation, information, and control (II&C) systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration.

  6. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapter 1, project number 669

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume 1, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

  7. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapters 2-13, project number 669

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume I, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

  8. Making Drinking Water Safer from Bacterial Contamination in Emergency Situations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Avoid water having a dark color, an odor or containing floating materials since such things may indicate or floating matter. 2. Boil the water vigorously for at least 10 minutes. 3. After it cools, the waterMaking Drinking Water Safer from Bacterial Contamination in Emergency Situations Monty C. Dozier

  9. Thermal stability of a spherical shell heated by convection and cooled by boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qaim-Maqami, Hassan

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    such high heat transfer rates by forced convection would require extremely high veloc- ities with subsequent high pressure dropsy With nuclee, boiling, however, such high heat transfe. rates an be obtained at much smaller velocities. Boiling heat...THERMAL STABILITY OF A. SPHERICAL SHELL HEATED BY CONVECTION AND COOLED BY BOILING A Thesis HASSAN @AIM-MAQAMI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER...

  10. Report from the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems and Human-System Interface Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce P. Hallbert; J. J. Persensky; Carol Smidts; Tunc Aldemir; Joseph Naser

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The program is operated in close collaboration with industry R&D programs to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of Nuclear Power Plants that are currently in operation. The LWRS Program focus is on longer-term and higher-risk/reward research that contributes to the national policy objectives of energy and environmental security. Advanced instruments and control (I&C) technologies are needed to support the safe and reliable production of power from nuclear energy systems during sustained periods of operation up to and beyond their expected licensed lifetime. This requires that new capabilities to achieve process control be developed and eventually implemented in existing nuclear assets. It also requires that approaches be developed and proven to achieve sustainability of I&C systems throughout the period of extended operation. The strategic objective of the LWRS Program Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technology R&D pathway is to establish a technical basis for new technologies needed to achieve safety and reliability of operating nuclear assets and to implement new technologies in nuclear energy systems. This will be achieved by carrying out a program of R&D to develop scientific knowledge in the areas of: • Sensors, diagnostics, and prognostics to support characterization and prediction of the effects of aging and degradation phenomena effects on critical systems, structures, and components (SSCs) • Online monitoring of SSCs and active components, generation of information, and methods to analyze and employ online monitoring information • New methods for visualization, integration, and information use to enhance state awareness and leverage expertise to achieve safer, more readily available electricity generation. As an initial step in accomplishing this effort, the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems and Human-System Interface Technologies was held March 20–21, 2009, in Columbus, Ohio, to enable industry stakeholders and researchers in identification of the nuclear industry’s needs in the areas of future I&C technologies and corresponding technology gaps and research capabilities. Approaches for collaboration to bridge or fill the technology gaps were presented and R&D activities and priorities recommended. This report documents the presentations and discussions of the workshop and is intended to serve as a basis for the plan under development to achieve the goals of the I&C research pathway.

  11. TRAC-PF1/MOD1: an advanced best-estimate computer program for pressurized water reactor thermal-hydraulic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liles, D.R.; Mahaffy, J.H.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in light-water reactors. The TRAC-PF1/MOD1 program provides this capability for pressurized water reactors and for many thermal-hydraulic test facilities. The code features either a one- or a three-dimensional treatment of the pressure vessel and its associated internals, a two-fluid nonequilibrium hydrodynamics model with a noncondensable gas field and solute tracking, flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment, optional reflood tracking capability for bottom-flood and falling-film quench fronts, and consistent treatment of entire accident sequences including the generation of consistent initial conditions. The stability-enhancing two-step (SETS) numerical algorithm is used in the one-dimensional hydrodynamics and permits this portion of the fluid dynamics to violate the material Courant condition. This technique permits large time steps and, hence, reduced running time for slow transients.

  12. The qualification of advanced composite pipe for use in fire water deluge systems on open type offshore oil platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lea, R.H. [Specialty Plastics, Inc., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Stubblefield, M.A.; Pang, S.S. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Different types of FIBERBOND{reg_sign} pipe in the dry condition and with a butt and strap joint were subjected to a controlled fire for fire endurance evaluation. Testing adheres to a modification of the ASTM 1173-95 guideline, which simulates the development of an actual hydrocarbon fire. For a fire water deluge system, the pipe is in the dry condition approximately one to three minutes during an actual hydrocarbon fire. Preliminary testing shows that composite pipe is able to withstand this exposure to fire for the five minute duration of the test. This is achieved with modifying the chemical composition of the composite pipe and in some cases, adding an additional structural component to the overall pipe. Therefore, composite pipe could be used for the deluge fire system of an offshore oil platform.

  13. Great Boiling Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska: EnergyGratingsGreat BasinGreat Boiling

  14. Efficient Cooling in Engines with Nucleate Boiling | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisory BoardNucleate Boiling Efficient Cooling in Engines with Nucleate

  15. Efficient Cooling in Engines with Nucleated Boiling | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisory BoardNucleate Boiling Efficient Cooling in Engines with

  16. Chimney for enhancing flow of coolant water in natural circulation boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oosterkamp, W.J.; Marquino, W.

    1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A chimney which can be reconfigured or removed during refueling to allow vertical removal of the fuel assemblies is disclosed. The chimney is designed to be collapsed or dismantled. Collapse or dismantlement of the chimney reduces the volume required for chimney storage during the refueling operation. Alternatively, the chimney has movable parts which allow reconfiguration of its structure. In a first configuration suitable for normal reactor operation, the chimney is radially constricted such that the chimney obstructs vertical removal of the fuel assemblies. In a second configuration suitable for refueling or maintenance of the fuel core, the parts of the chimney which obstruct access to the fuel assemblies are moved radially outward to positions whereas access to the fuel assemblies is not obstructed. 11 figs.

  17. Chimney for enhancing flow of coolant water in natural circulation boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oosterkamp, Willem Jan (Oosterbeek, NL); Marquino, Wayne (San Jose, CA)

    1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A chimney which can be reconfigured or removed during refueling to allow vertical removal of the fuel assemblies. The chimney is designed to be collapsed or dismantled. Collapse or dismantlement of the chimney reduces the volume required for chimney storage during the refueling operation. Alternatively, the chimney has movable parts which allow reconfiguration of its structure. In a first configuration suitable for normal reactor operation, the chimney is radially constricted such that the chimney obstructs vertical removal of the fuel assemblies. In a second configuration suitable for refueling or maintenance of the fuel core, the parts of the chimney which obstruct access to the fuel assemblies are moved radially outward to positions whereat access to the fuel assemblies is not obstructed.

  18. Validation and Calibration of Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics Multiscale Multiphysics Models - Subcooled Flow Boiling Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anh Bui; Nam Dinh; Brian Williams

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In addition to validation data plan, development of advanced techniques for calibration and validation of complex multiscale, multiphysics nuclear reactor simulation codes are a main objective of the CASL VUQ plan. Advanced modeling of LWR systems normally involves a range of physico-chemical models describing multiple interacting phenomena, such as thermal hydraulics, reactor physics, coolant chemistry, etc., which occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. To a large extent, the accuracy of (and uncertainty in) overall model predictions is determined by the correctness of various sub-models, which are not conservation-laws based, but empirically derived from measurement data. Such sub-models normally require extensive calibration before the models can be applied to analysis of real reactor problems. This work demonstrates a case study of calibration of a common model of subcooled flow boiling, which is an important multiscale, multiphysics phenomenon in LWR thermal hydraulics. The calibration process is based on a new strategy of model-data integration, in which, all sub-models are simultaneously analyzed and calibrated using multiple sets of data of different types. Specifically, both data on large-scale distributions of void fraction and fluid temperature and data on small-scale physics of wall evaporation were simultaneously used in this work’s calibration. In a departure from traditional (or common-sense) practice of tuning/calibrating complex models, a modern calibration technique based on statistical modeling and Bayesian inference was employed, which allowed simultaneous calibration of multiple sub-models (and related parameters) using different datasets. Quality of data (relevancy, scalability, and uncertainty) could be taken into consideration in the calibration process. This work presents a step forward in the development and realization of the “CIPS Validation Data Plan” at the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs to enable quantitative assessment of the CASL modeling of Crud-Induced Power Shift (CIPS) phenomenon, in particular, and the CASL advanced predictive capabilities, in general. This report is prepared for the Department of Energy’s Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs program’s VUQ Focus Area.

  19. INVESTIGATING THE EFFECT OF HEATING METHOD ON POOL BOILING HEAT TRANSFER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandlikar, Satish

    INVESTIGATING THE EFFECT OF HEATING METHOD ON POOL BOILING HEAT TRANSFER Satish G. Kandlikar Department Rochester Institute of Technology Rochester, NY, USA Phone: (716) 475-6728; Fax: (716) 475-7710 E-mail: SGKEME@RIT.EDU ABSTRACT Pool boiling experiments are generally conducted with electrically heated

  20. Effect of surface conditions on boiling heat transfer of refrigerants in shell-and-tube evaporators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danilova, G.N.; Dyundin, V.A.; Borishanskaya, A.V.; Soloviyov, A.G.; Vol'nykh, Y.A.; Kozyrev, A.A.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results are presented for the boiling heat transfer performance of R 22 and R 717 on surfaces with porous metallized coatings. A calculational-theoretical model is given for predicting the heat transfer of refrigerants boiling on a bundle of finned tubes.

  1. Vapor pressure and boiling point elevation of slash pine black liquors: Predictive models with statistical approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaman, A.A.; McNally, T.W.; Fricke, A.L. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor-liquid equilibria and boiling point elevation of slash pine kraft black liquors over a wide range of solid concentrations (up to 85% solids) has been studied. The liquors are from a statistically designed pulping experiment for pulping slash pine in a pilot scale digester with four cooking variables of effective alkali, sulfidity, cooking time, and cooking temperature. It was found that boiling point elevation of black liquors is pressure dependent, and this dependency is more significant at higher solids concentrations. The boiling point elevation data at different solids contents (at a fixed pressure) were correlated to the dissolved solids (S/(1 {minus} S)) in black liquor. Due to the solubility limit of some of the salts in black liquor, a change in the slope of the boiling point elevation as a function of the dissolved solids was observed at a concentration of around 65% solids. An empirical method was developed to describe the boiling point elevation of each liquor as a function of pressure and solids mass fraction. The boiling point elevation of slash pine black liquors was correlated quantitatively to the pulping variables, using different statistical procedures. These predictive models can be applied to determine the boiling point rise (and boiling point) of slash pine black liquors at processing conditions from the knowledge of pulping variables. The results are presented, and their utility is discussed.

  2. Boiling Crisis as a Non-Equilibrium Drying V. S. Nikolayev, D. A. Beysens, J. Hegseth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolayev, Vadim S.

    crisis is the formation of a vapor film between the heater and the liquid when the heat supply exceeds in the coordinates heat supply ­ heater temperature is sketched in Fig. 1 for the case of stationary boiling experiment, the so called "pool boiling". When the heat supply to the fluid pool is small, only a fluid

  3. Effects of Carbon Nanotube Coating on Bubble Departure Diameter and Frequency in Pool Boiling on a Flat, Horizontal Heater 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glenn, Stephen T.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of a carbon nanotube (CNT) coating on bubble departure diameter and frequency in pool boiling experiments was investigated and compared to those on a bare silicon wafer. The pool boiling experiments were performed at liquid subcooling...

  4. Effects of Carbon Nanotube Coating on Bubble Departure Diameter and Frequency in Pool Boiling on a Flat, Horizontal Heater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glenn, Stephen T.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of a carbon nanotube (CNT) coating on bubble departure diameter and frequency in pool boiling experiments was investigated and compared to those on a bare silicon wafer. The pool boiling experiments were performed at liquid subcooling...

  5. Rod bundle film boiling and steam cooling data base and correlation evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoder, G.L.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Film boiling and steam cooling data from several rod bundle experiments have been compiled from fourteen references. Steam cooling data are presented for five references, while film boiling data are presented for ten references (two of these for tube geometry). The compilation includes experimental parameters necessary for characterization of the local rod heat transfer. These data have been compared to several commonly used film boiling and pure vapor heat transfer coefficients. Results show that the Dougall-Rohsenow correlation tends to overpredict film boiling heat transfer, while Condie-Bengston IV and the Groeneveld 5. series correlations do a reasonable job of predicting film boiling heat fluxes. Of the three vapor correlations examined, the Dittus-Boelter correlation is least conservative, and the Sozer correlation most conservative.

  6. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The annulus has a full-scale geometry, and in fat uses SRL dummy hardware for the inner annulus wall in the ribbed geometry. The materials aluminum. The annulus is uniformly heated in the axial direction, but the circumferential heat flux can be varied to provide ``power tilt`` or asymmetric heating of the inner and outer annulus walls. The test facility uses H{sub 2}O rather than D{sub 2}O, but it includes the effects of dissolved helium gas present in the reactor. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. This document consists of tables of temperature measurements.

  7. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The annulus has a full-scale geometry, and in fat uses SRL dummy hardware for the inner annulus wall in the ribbed geometry. The materials aluminum. The annulus is uniformly heated in the axial direction, but the circumferential heat flux can be varied to provide ``power tilt`` or asymmetric heating of the inner and outer annulus walls. The test facility uses H{sub 2}O rather than D{sub 2}O, but it includes the effects of dissolved helium gas present in the reactor. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. This document consists of a summary of temperature measurements to include recorded minima, maxima, averages and standard deviations.

  8. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The annulus has a full-scale geometry, and in fat uses SRL dummy hardware for the inner annulus wall in the ribbed geometry. The materials aluminum. The annulus is uniformly heated in the axial direction, but the circumferential heat flux can be varied to provide ``power tilt`` or asymmetric heating of the inner and outer annulus walls. The test facility uses H{sub 2}O rather than D{sub 2}O, but it includes the effects of dissolved helium gas present in the reactor. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. This document consists solely of tables of temperature measurements; minima, maxima, averages and standard deviations being measured.

  9. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Block, J.A.; Crowley, C.; Dolan, F.X.; Sam, R.G.; Stoedefalke, B.H.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The annulus has a full-scale geometry, and in fat uses SRL dummy hardware for the inner annulus wall in the ribbed geometry. The materials aluminum. The annulus is uniformly heated in the axial direction, but the circumferential heat flux can be varied to provide ``power tilt`` or asymmetric heating of the inner and outer annulus walls. The test facility uses H{sub 2}O rather than D{sub 2}O, but it includes the effects of dissolved helium gas present in the reactor. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. This document consists of data plots and summary files of temperature measurements.

  10. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Block, J.A.; Crowley, C.; Dolan, F.X.; Sam, R.G.; Stoedefalke, B.H.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The annulus has a full-scale geometry, and in fat uses SRL dummy hardware for the inner annulus wall in the ribbed geometry. The materials aluminum. The annulus is uniformly heated in the axial direction, but the circumferential heat flux can be varied to provide ``power tilt`` or asymmetric heating of the inner and outer annulus walls. The test facility uses H{sub 2}O rather than D{sub 2}O, but it includes the effects of dissolved helium gas present in the reactor. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. This document consists of data plots and summary files of temperature measurements.

  11. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Block, J.A.; Crowley, C.; Dolan, F.X.; Sam, R.G.; Stoedefalke, B.H.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The annulus has a full-scale geometry, and in fat uses SRL dummy hardware for the inner annulus wall in the ribbed geometry. The materials aluminum. The annulus is uniformly heated in the axial direction, but the circumferential heat flux can be varied to provide ``power tilt`` or asymmetric heating of the inner and outer annulus walls. The test facility uses H{sub 2}O rather than D{sub 2}O, but it includes the effects of dissolved helium gas present in the reactor. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. Nineteen test series and a total of 178 tests were performed. Testing addressed the effects of: Heat flux; pressure; helium gas; power tilt; ribs; asymmetric heat flux.

  12. Identification of pool boiling heat transfer mechanisms in FC-72 using a single-photo method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, C.N.; You, S.M.; Hong, Y.S. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A unique method to determine the vapor flow rate above a boiling cylinder utilizing a single photograph is developed and discussed. This method is applied to a 75-{micro}m wire immersed in a saturated, highly wetting liquid (FC-72) to determine bubble departure diameter, frequency, and nucleation site density. Using the experimental results, an analysis is performed to evaluate individual heat flux contributions of the four pool boiling mechanisms: latent heat, natural convection, Marangoni flow, and micro-convection. Latent heat is identified as the dominant mechanism throughout most of the nucleate boiling regime.

  13. New flow boiling heat transfer model for hydrocarbons evaporating inside horizontal tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, G. F.; Gong, M. Q.; Wu, J. F.; Zou, X. [Key Laboratory of Cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2711, 35, Beijing, 100190 (China); Wang, S. [Key Laboratory of Cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2711, 35, Beijing, 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Science, No. 19 YuQuan Road, Beijing, 100049 (China)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrocarbons have high thermodynamic performances, belong to the group of natural refrigerants, and they are the main components in mixture Joule-Thomson low temperature refrigerators (MJTR). New evaluations of nucleate boiling contribution and nucleate boiling suppression factor in flow boiling heat transfer have been proposed for hydrocarbons. A forced convection heat transfer enhancement factor correlation incorporating liquid velocity has also been proposed. In addition, the comparisons of the new model and other classic models were made to evaluate its accuracy in heat transfer prediction.

  14. Thorium, uranium and rare earth elements content in lanthanide concentrate (LC) and water leach purification (WLP) residue of Lynas advanced materials plant (LAMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AL-Areqi, Wadeeah M., E-mail: walareqi@yahoo.com; Majid, Amran Ab., E-mail: walareqi@yahoo.com; Sarmani, Sukiman, E-mail: walareqi@yahoo.com [Nuclear Science Programme, School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi (Malaysia)

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Lynas Advanced Materials Plant (LAMP) has been licensed to produce the rare earths elements since early 2013 in Malaysia. LAMP processes lanthanide concentrate (LC) to extract rare earth elements and subsequently produce large volumes of water leach purification (WLP) residue containing naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). This residue has been rising up the environmental issue because it was suspected to accumulate thorium with significant activity concentration and has been classified as radioactive residue. The aim of this study is to determine Th-232, U-238 and rare earth elements in lanthanide concentrate (LC) and water leach purification (WLP) residue collected from LAMP and to evaluate the potential radiological impacts of the WLP residue on the environment. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and ?-spectrometry were used for determination of Th, U and rare earth elements concentrations. The results of this study found that the concentration of Th in LC was 1289.7 ± 129 ppm (5274.9 ± 527.6Bq/kg) whereas the Th and U concentrations in WLP were determined to be 1952.9±17.6 ppm (7987.4 ± 71.9 Bq/kg) and 17.2 ± 2.4 ppm respectively. The concentrations of Th and U in LC and WLP samples determined by ?- spectrometry were 1156 ppm (4728 ± 22 Bq/kg) and 18.8 ppm and 1763.2 ppm (7211.4 Bq/kg) and 29.97 ppm respectively. This study showed that thorium concentrations were higher in WLP compare to LC. This study also indicate that WLP residue has high radioactivity of {sup 232}Th compared to Malaysian soil natural background (63 - 110 Bq/kg) and come under preview of Act 304 and regulations. In LC, the Ce and Nd concentrations determined by INAA were 13.2 ± 0.6% and 4.7 ± 0.1% respectively whereas the concentrations of La, Ce, Nd and Sm in WLP were 0.36 ± 0.04%, 1.6%, 0.22% and 0.06% respectively. This result showed that some amount of rare earth had not been extracted and remained in the WLP and may be considered to be reextracted.

  15. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Reactors for Electric Power Production, Progress Report for Work Through September 2003, 2nd Annual/8th Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philip E. MacDonald

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is one of the six reactor technologies selected for research and development under the Generation-IV program. SCWRs are promising advanced nuclear systems because of their high thermal efficiency (i.e., about 45% vs. about 33% efficiency for current Light Water Reactors, LWRs) and considerable plant simplification. SCWRs are basically LWRs operating at higher pressure and temperatures with a direct once-through cycle. Operation above the critical pressure eliminates coolant boiling, so the coolant remains single-phase throughout the system. Thus the need for recirculation and jet pumps, a pressurizer, steam generators, steam separators and dryers is eliminated. The main mission of the SCWR is generation of low-cost electricity. It is built upon two proven technologies, LWRs, which are the most commonly deployed power generating reactors in the world, and supercritical fossil-fired boilers, a large number of which is also in use around the world.

  16. Experimental Two-Phase Flow Characterization of Subcooled Boiling in a Rectangular Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estrada Perez, Carlos E.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    On the efforts to provide a reliable source of experimental information on turbulent subcooled boiling ow, time resolved Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) experiments were carried out using HFE-301 refrigerant ow through a vertical rectangular...

  17. Development of a model to predict flow oscillations in low-flow sodium boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Alan Edward

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental and analytical program has been carried out in order to better understand the cause and effect of flow oscillations in boiling sodium systems. These oscillations have been noted in previous experiments with ...

  18. Bubble behavior in subcooled flow boiling on surfaces of variable wettability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tow, Emily W

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow boiling is important in energy conversion and thermal management due to its potential for very high heat fluxes. By improving understanding of the conditions leading to bubble departure, surfaces can be designed that ...

  19. Visualization of flow boiling in an annular heat exchanger under reduced gravity conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westheimer, David Thomas

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work examines the effects of gravitational acceleration on the flow boiling process. A test facility focusing on an annular heat exchanger was designed, built out of borosilicate glass, and flown on NASA's KC-135 reduced gravity airplane...

  20. A visualization comparison of convective flow boiling heat transfer augmentation devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lundy, Brian Franklin

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The qualitative effects of inset-table heat transfer phics. augmentation devices on vertical in-tube convective flow boiling flow regimes, transition mechanisms, and heat transfer are presented in this study. Three twisted tapes with twist ratios...

  1. Experimental Observation and Measurements of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer using PIV, Shadowgraphy, RICM Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di, Yuan 1988-

    2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This present study seeks to contribute detailed visualization data on a pool boiling experiments using HFE-7000. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was used to measure the time resolved whole field liquid velocity. Bubble dynamic parameters...

  2. Experimental & Numerical Investigation of Pool Boiling on Engineered Surfaces with Integrated Thin-flim Temperature Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathyamurthi, Vijaykumar

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    of subcooling and micro/nano-scale surface texturing using MWCNT coatings on the dynamics of pool boiling is assessed. Dynamic invariants such as correlation dimensions and Lyapunov spectrum are evaluated for the reconstructed attractor. A non-linear noise...

  3. Prediction of departure from nucleate boiling in PWR fast power transients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenci, Giancarlo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment is conducted of the differences in predicted results between use of steady state versus transient Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB) models, for fast power transients under forced convective heat exchange ...

  4. Film boiling of saturated liquid flowing upward through a heated tube : high vapor quality range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laverty, W. F.

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Film boiling of saturated liquid flowing upward through a uniformly heated tube has been studied for the case in which pure saturated liquid enters the tube and nearly saturated vapor is discharged. Since a previous study ...

  5. Thermal non-equilibrium in dispersed flow film boiling in a vertical tube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forslund, Robert Paul

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The departure from thermal equilibrium between a dispersed liquid phase and its vapor at high quality during film boiling is investigated, The departure from equilibruim is manifested by the high resistance to heat transfer ...

  6. Experimental & Numerical Investigation of Pool Boiling on Engineered Surfaces with Integrated Thin-flim Temperature Sensors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathyamurthi, Vijaykumar

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this investigation is to measure and analyze surface temperature fluctuations in pool boiling. The surface temperature fluctuations were recorded on silicon surfaces with and without multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Novel Thin...

  7. Nano-engineering the boiling surface for optimal heat transfer rate and critical heat flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Bren Andrew

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects on pool boiling characteristics such as critical heat flux and the heat transfer coefficient of different surface characteristics such as surface wettability, roughness, morphology, and porosity are not well ...

  8. Densities and viscosities of ternary ammonia/water fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reiner, R.H.; Zaltash, A.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The densities, viscosities, and boiling points (at barometric pressure) of solutions formed by inorganic salts dissolved in an ammonia/water (NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O) solvent have been measured. These ternary solutions of ammonia/water/dissolved salt are being investigated to reduce rectification requirements and to expand the temperature range of ammonia/water in advanced absorption cycles. Densities and viscosities of these fluids were measured over the temperature range of 283.15 to 343.15 K (10.0 to 70.0{degrees}C). Observed densities and viscosities were expressed as empirical functions of temperature by means of the least-squares method. The dynamic viscosities of ternary fluids were found to be three to seven times greater than those of the binary system of NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O, which implies that a substantial decrease in the film heat and mass transfer coefficient is possible. However, because this quantitative linkage is not well understood, direct measurements of heat and mass transfer rates in a minisorber are recommended and planned.

  9. Advanced, Energy-Efficient Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (1 slide) Project Objective Develop and demonstrate advanced hybrid industrial water treatment system that will... Cost-effectively enable at least 50% water reuse...

  10. AECU-4439 PHYSICS AND MATHEMATICS HYDRODYNAMIC ASPECTS OF BOILING...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    - ? - . , . . . . 1 water 2 benzene 3 ethanol 4 pen- 5 pentam 6 heptane 7 Propans 8 propane 9 water 10 bornens FIGURE 111-3. QRELQTION OF DATA FOR VARIOUS LIQUXW AT THE...

  11. Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of research, development, and demonstration related to advanced non-light water reactor concepts. A goal of the program is to facilitate greater engagement between DOE and...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Research & Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Personnel Water Power in the News Geothermal Advanced Bit Development Geothermal Energy & Drilling Technology Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Materials & Components...

  13. The physics of liquid water Bernard Cabane1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    with extraordinary properties: it has unusually high melting and boiling temperatures, a huge heat capacity, oneThe physics of liquid water Bernard Cabane1 , Rodolphe Vuilleumier2 1 PMMH, ESPCI, 10 rue Vauquelin, France Abstract Liquid water is a liquid with extraordinary properties: it has a very high cohesion

  14. Boiling behavior of sodium-potassium alloy in a bench-scale solar receiver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno, J.B.; Andraka, C.E.; Moss, T.A.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1989-90, a 75-kW{sub t} sodium reflux pool-boiler solar receiver was successfully demonstrated at Sandia National Laboratories. Significant features of this receiver include (1) boiling sodium as the heat transfer medium and (2) electric-discharge-machined (EDM) cavities as artificial nucleation sites to stabilize boiling. Since this first demonstration, design of a second-generation pool-boiler receiver that will bring the concept closer to commercialization has begun. For long life, the new receiver uses Haynes Alloy 230. For increased safety factors against film boiling and flooding, it has a refined shape and somewhat larger dimensions. To eliminate the need for trace heating, the receiver will boil the sodium-potassium alloy NaK-78 instead of sodium. To reduce manufacturing costs, it will use one of a number of alternatives to EDM cavities for stabilization of boiling. To control incipient-boiling superheats, especially during hot restarts, it will contain a small amount of inert gas. Before the new receiver design could be finalized, bench-scale tests of some of the proposed changes were necessary. A series of bench-scale pool boilers were built from Haynes Alloy 230 and filled with NaK-78. Various boiling-stabilizer candidates were incorporated into them, including laser-drilled cavities and a number of different sintered-powder-metal coatings. These bench-scale pool boilers have been operated at temperatures up to 750{degree}C, heated by quartz lamps with incident radiant fluxes up to 95 W/cm{sup 2}. The effects of various orientations and added gases have been studied. results of these studies are presented. 15 refs.

  15. CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors A DOE Energy Innovation Hub for Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Reactors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r k C o

  16. SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jiuyong "John"

    SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse #12;' Our Mission The SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse aims to advance the science and technology of sustainable water management through fundamental and applied research. Our Vision To be Australia's leading research centre for water reuse

  17. Influences of electrical field on boiling-condensation heat transfer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Jiaxiang; Ding Lijian; Chi Xiaochun; Liu Ji [Harbin Inst. of Electrical Technology (China). Dept. of Electrical Materials Engineering; Yang He [Harbin Inst. of Tech. (China). Dept. of Thermal Energy Engineering

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the influences of electrical field on boiling-condensation heat transfer system have been investigated using a cylinder heat transfer model. Freon-11 is selected as working fluid. The condensation heat transfer coefficient, the boiling heat flux and the saturation pressure are measured in this investigation. According to the experimental results, it is found that the electrical field can influence heat transfer system. The boiling heat transfer is enhanced by the applied voltage, and the saturate vapor of working fluid is condensed on the high voltage electrode directly when the applied voltage is higher than 6 kv. The experimental results have been discussed, and it is considered that the high electrical field strength change the thermal properties of working fluid.

  18. Advanced Models of LWR Pressure Vessel Embrittlement for Low Flux-HighFluence Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odette, G. Robert; Yamamoto, Takuya

    2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is an unresolved issue for light water reactor life extension, especially since transition temperature shifts (TTS) must be predicted for high 80-year fluence levels up to approximately 1,020 n/cm{sup 2}, far beyond the current surveillance database. Unfortunately, TTS may accelerate at high fluence, and may be further amplified by the formation of late blooming phases that result in severe embrittlement even in low-copper (Cu) steels. Embrittlement by this mechanism is a potentially significant degradation phenomenon that is not predicted by current regulatory models. This project will focus on accurately predicting transition temperature shifts at high fluence using advanced physically based, empirically validated and calibrated models. A major challenge is to develop models that can adjust test reactor data to account for flux effects. Since transition temperature shifts depend on synergistic combinations of many variables, flux-effects cannot be treated in isolation. The best current models systematically and significantly under-predict transition temperature at high fluence, although predominantly for irradiations at much higher flux than actual RPV service. This project will integrate surveillance, test reactor and mechanism data with advanced models to address a number of outstanding RPV embrittlement issues. The effort will include developing new databases and preliminary models of flux effects for irradiation conditions ranging from very low (e.g., boiling water reactor) to high (e.g., accelerated test reactor). The team will also develop a database and physical models to help predict the conditions for the formation of Mn-Ni-Si late blooming phases and to guide future efforts to fully resolve this issue. Researchers will carry out other tasks on a best-effort basis, including prediction of transition temperature shift attenuation through the vessel wall, remediation of embrittlement by annealing, and fracture toughness master curve issues.

  19. Correlation of dynamic relative permeability frontal advance concepts and laboratory data for a system of water displacing oil from a multifluid saturated sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, George Ernest

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE CALCULATED VALUES HOWEVERS AT THE Hl GH GAS SATURAT ION RANGE & AS SEEN IN FIGURE 8& THE USE OF TH I S ASSUMPTION TO CALCULATE BREAKTHROUGH TIME DID NOT YIELD RESULTS AS WELL AS THE ASSUMPTION THAT THE GAS PRESENT AFFECTS NE I THER OIL OR WATER... AS WELL AS METHOD 2 WHERE IT WAS AS- SUMED THAT THE GAS PRESENT HAD NO AFFECT ON E I THER OIL OR WATER RELATIVE PERMEAB IL I T I ES, F I GORE 9 I S A TYP I CAL CURVE SHOW I NG THE VAR I AT I ON I N PRODUCING WATER ? OIL RATIO WITH CUMULATIVE RECOVERY...

  20. Enhancement of pool boiling heat transfer with electrohydrodynamics and its fundamental study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghupathi, Sri Laxmi Priya

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and 10kV. To conduct this study, an existing low pressure pool boiling apparatus was modified and another high pressure apparatus was designed and built. The fluids were tested on the smooth tube at operating temperatures of 4'C and 20'C, and 19 fins... TWl Tvvo Heat flux of EHD enhancement of boiling (W/m ) Total heat flux with EHD at 10kV (W/m ) Total heat flux with no EHD (W/m ) Minimum cavity mouth radius (m) Rayleigh number Fluid temperature ('C) Pool Saturation temperature ('C) Tube...

  1. The use of the probability distribution function to analyze surface temperature fluctuations in pool boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Chau Qui

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    accepted. 3. Mass-transfer model: As early as 1952, the possi- 1. 1 bi) ity of mass transfer across the bubble was visualized oy Snyder and presented at a conference in 1856 for the ca. , e of subcool ed nucleate boiling in forced convection l qf. He... heat transfer in forced convection, found negligible latent heat transport compared to the total heat transferred from the heated surface. Ruling out the latent heat transport as major factor, they attributed the high heat transfer in boiling...

  2. Advanced thyristor valve project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damsky, B.L.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    General Electrics's thyristor valve project incorporates the most advanced technologies available. With joint funding from the Electric Power Research Institute, commercial application of the separate light-triggered thyristor is now underway. The cesium vapor lamp source to trigger the light sensitive thyristors will reduce component complexity and cost. A unique thermal management feature relies on forced vaporization cooling with Freon-113, which equals the thermal performance of water without posing insulation reliability problems. 7 figures.

  3. Retrieval of Cloud Ice Water Content Profiles from Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-B Brightness Temperatures Near the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, E-K.; Liu, G.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program important goals is to develop and test radiation and cloud parameterizations of climate models using single column modeling (SCMs) (Randall et al. 1996). As forcing terms, SCMs need advection tendency of cloud condensates besides the tendencies of temperature, moisture and momentum. To compute the tendency terms of cloud condensates, 3D distribution of cloud condensates over a scale much larger than the climate model's grid scale is needed. Since they can cover a large area within a short time period, satellite measurements are useful utilities to provide advection tendency of cloud condensates for SCMs. However, so far, most satellite retrieval algorithms only retrieve vertically integrated quantities, for example, in the case of cloud ice, ice water path (IWP). To fulfill the requirement of 3D ice water content field for computing ice water advection, in this study, we develop an ice water content profile retrieval algorithm by combining the vertical distribution characteristics obtained from long-term surface radar observations and satellite high-frequency microwave observations that cover a large area. The algorithm is based on the Bayesian theorem using a priori database derived from analyzing cloud radar observations at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The end product of the algorithm is a 3D ice water content covering 10{sup o} x 10{sup o} surrounding the SGP site during the passage of the satellite. This 3D ice water content, together with wind field analysis, can be used to compute the advection tendency of ice water for SCMs.

  4. Optimization of boiling water reactor control rod patterns using linear search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiguchi, T.; Doi, K.; Fikuzaki, T.; Frogner, B.; Lin, C.; Long, A.B.

    1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer program for searching the optimal control rod pattern has been developed. The program is able to find a control rod pattern where the resulting power distribution is optimal in the sense that it is the closest to the desired power distribution, and it satisfies all operational constraints. The search procedure consists of iterative uses of two steps: sensitivity analyses of local power and thermal margins using a three-dimensional reactor simulator for a simplified prediction model; linear search for the optimal control rod pattern with the simplified model. The optimal control rod pattern is found along the direction where the performance index gradient is the steepest. This program has been verified to find the optimal control rod pattern through simulations using operational data from the Oyster Creek Reactor.

  5. Bottom head to shell junction assembly for a boiling water nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fife, Alex Blair (San Jose, CA); Ballas, Gary J. (San Jose, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bottom head to shell junction assembly which, in one embodiment, includes an annular forging having an integrally formed pump deck and shroud support is described. In the one embodiment, the annular forging also includes a top, cylindrical shaped end configured to be welded to one end of the pressure vessel cylindrical shell and a bottom, conical shaped end configured to be welded to the disk shaped bottom head. Reactor internal pump nozzles also are integrally formed in the annular forging. The nozzles do not include any internal or external projections. Stubs are formed in each nozzle opening to facilitate welding a pump housing to the forging. Also, an upper portion of each nozzle opening is configured to receive a portion of a diffuser coupled to a pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. Diffuser openings are formed in the integral pump deck to provide additional support for the pump impellers. The diffuser opening is sized so that a pump impeller can extend at least partially therethrough. The pump impeller is connected to the pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening.

  6. AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION ON FLOW BOILING OF ETHYLENE-GLYCOL/WATER MIXTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandlikar, Satish

    are used in cooling the engines in automotive applications. To avoid the two-phase flow in the engine coefficient values over a small circular aluminum heater surface, 9.5-mm in diameter, placed at the bottom-glycol mixtures is in automotive engine cooling. Although this mixture has been used for over several decades

  7. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Appendices. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Appendices are presented concerning the evaluations of decommissioning financing alternatives; reference site description; reference BWR facility description; radiation dose rate and concrete surface contamination data; radionuclide inventories; public radiation dose models and calculated maximum annual doses; decommissioning methods; generic decommissioning information; immediate dismantlement details; passive safe storage, continuing care, and deferred dismantlement details; entombment details; demolition and site restoration details; cost estimating bases; public radiological safety assessment details; and details of alternate study bases.

  8. Accident source terms for boiling water reactors with high burnup cores.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Powers, Dana Auburn; Leonard, Mark Thomas

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this report is to provide the technical basis for development of recommendations for updates to the NUREG-1465 Source Term for BWRs that will extend its applicability to accidents involving high burnup (HBU) cores. However, a secondary objective is to re-examine the fundamental characteristics of the prescription for fission product release to containment described by NUREG-1465. This secondary objective is motivated by an interest to understand the extent to which research into the release and behaviors of radionuclides under accident conditions has altered best-estimate calculations of the integral response of BWRs to severe core damage sequences and the resulting radiological source terms to containment. This report, therefore, documents specific results of fission product source term analyses that will form the basis for the HBU supplement to NUREG-1465. However, commentary is also provided on observed differences between the composite results of the source term calculations performed here and those reflected NUREG-1465 itself.

  9. Analysis of the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor using the code Ramona-4B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cuevas Vivas, Gabriel Francisco

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -contour inside the vessel and in a hundred eighty four parallel channels (including bypass) in the core. The tridimensional representation of the reactor core is accomplished through a proposed fuel load which was obtained from a selection of out of three fuel...

  10. Performance of Charcoal Cookstoves for Haiti Part 1: Results from the Water Boiling Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Booker, Kayje

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Charcoal Cookstoves for Haiti, Part 1 N N-1 (Sample Size) (of Charcoal Cookstoves for Haiti  Part 1: Results from the of Charcoal Cookstoves for Haiti, Part 1 DISCLAIMER This

  11. Water Conservation Checklist for the Home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Janie; Kellner, Bev

    2002-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    of water necessary to cook foods such as frozen vegetables and stews. You?ll preserve nutrients as well as save water. A tight-fitting lid on a pan saves water from boiling away and also cooks food faster, thereby using less energy. Plan more one-dish meals... Checklist for the Home DISHWASHING Cut down on the number of utensils used in food preparation, and on the plates and glassware used with meals. This will save on dishwashing water used to clean them. Wash only full loads of dishes in dishwasher. A...

  12. Simulation of subcooled boiling at low pressure conditions with RELAP5-3D computer program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reza, S.M. Mohsin

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulation of subcooled boiling was carried out using RELAP5 thermal hydraulic computer programs. Both one-dimensional and three-dimensional analyses were carried out with one-dimensional RELAP5/MOD3.2 and three-dimensional RELAP5-3D code...

  13. Development of a small-channel nucleate-boiling heat transfer correlation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasza, K.E.; Wambsganss, M.W.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of an improved semimechanistic-based set of correlation parameters for nucleation-dominant flow-boiling heat transfer in small channels is described. Formulation of these parameters is on the basis of a recently published open-literature model for vapor bubble growth at a heated surface. This work is part of a program directed at obtaining an understanding of the physical mechanisms that influence boiling in compact heat exchangers through the use of high-speed video and microscope optics to characterize bubble nucleation, growth, and interaction with the confining walls of small heat transfer passages. The correlation parameters presented here represent the first step in the development of an improved boiling correlation for geometrically confined small-channel flows. In such flows, the nucleating bubbles can become nominally the same size as the channel cross section, thereby invalidating existing correlations that are based on large-channel data. Initial efforts to correlate small-channel-boiling data obtained at Argonne National Laboratory from nontransparent electrically heated metal tube tests appear promising.

  14. 2007-No54-BoilingPoint Health and Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biomass and Fossil Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    2007-No54-BoilingPoint Theme Health and Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biomass and Fossil Fuel Energy of fossil-fuel energy systems. These scenarios are analysed for various environmental and health impacts from fossil fuels and other energy sources reported by IEA []. In all of these countries except Kenya

  15. Hydrodynamic cavitation and boiling in refrigerant (R-123) flow inside microchannels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peles, Yoav

    Hydrodynamic cavitation and boiling in refrigerant (R-123) flow inside microchannels Brandon cavitation has on heat transfer. The fluid medium is refrigerant R-123 flowing through 227 lm hydraulic diameter microchannels. The cavitation is instigated by the inlet orifice. Adiabatic tests were con- ducted

  16. Numerical simulation of boiling during the quenching process N. Kosseifi1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by computing the heat flux that arises from the different modes of boiling. They coupled the phase change to heat dissipation of the metal thanks to an interface coupling code. The heat transfer coefficient using a level set method. Surface tension is evaluated using the continuum surface force. The proposed

  17. Synchrotrons Explore Water's Molecular Mysteries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory's Advanced Light Source, scientists observed a surprisingly dense form of water that remained liquid well beyond its typical freezing point. Researchers applied a...

  18. STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS Advance Test Reactor Class Waiver

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advance Test Reactor Class Waiver W(C)-2008-004 The Advanced Test Reactor (A TR) is a pressurized water test reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) that operates at low...

  19. Upcoming Funding Opportunity to Advance Low-Impact Hydropower...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to Advance Low-Impact Hydropower Technologies Upcoming Funding Opportunity to Advance Low-Impact Hydropower Technologies March 18, 2015 - 11:27am Addthis On March 18, EERE's Water...

  20. Energy-Water Nexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horak, W.

    2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) energy and water are interconnected; (2) new energy sources will place increased demands on water supplies; (3) existing energy sources will be subjected to increasing restrictions on their water use; and (4) integrated decision support tools will need to be developed to help policy makers decide which policies and advanced technologies can address these issues.

  1. RELATIONSHIPS FOR MODELLING WATER FLOW IN GEOTECHNICAL CENTRIFUGE MODELS [abstract

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodings, Deborah

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    relationships between centrifuge model and prototype waterADVANCES IN GEOTECHNICAL CENTRIFUGE MODELING A symposium onAdvances in Geotechnical Centrifuge Modeling was held on

  2. Energy Efficiency Design Options for Residential Water Heaters: Economic Impacts on Consumers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    common water heating products on the market and determinedof advanced water heating technology into the U.S. market.

  3. Twenty-second water reactor safety information meeting. Volume 2: Severe accident research, thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs, high-burnup fuel behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monteleone, S. [comp.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty-Second Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 24-26, 1994. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from Finland, France, Italy, Japan, Russia, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting.

  4. Advanced Proliferation Resistant, Lower Cost, Uranium-Thorium Dioxide Fuels for Light Water Reactors (Progress report for work through June 2002, 12th quarterly report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this NERI project is to evaluate the potential advantages and disadvantages of an optimized thorium-uranium dioxide (ThO2/UO2) fuel design for light water reactors (LWRs). The project is led by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), with the collaboration of three universities, the University of Florida, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and Purdue University; Argonne National Laboratory; and all of the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel vendors in the United States (Framatome, Siemens, and Westinghouse). In addition, a number of researchers at the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute and Professor Kwangheon Park at Kyunghee University are active collaborators with Korean Ministry of Science and Technology funding. The project has been organized into five tasks: · Task 1 consists of fuel cycle neutronics and economics analysis to determine the economic viability of various ThO2/UO2 fuel designs in PWRs, · Task 2 will determine whether or not ThO2/UO2 fuel can be manufactured economically, · Task 3 will evaluate the behavior of ThO2/UO2 fuel during normal, off-normal, and accident conditions and compare the results with the results of previous UO2 fuel evaluations and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing standards, · Task 4 will determine the long-term stability of ThO2/UO2 high-level waste, and · Task 5 consists of the Korean work on core design, fuel performance analysis, and xenon diffusivity measurements.

  5. Fast photo-switchable surfaces for boiling heat transfer applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, C. N.; Glavin, N. R.; Voevodin, A. A. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, 2941 Hobson Way, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); Turner, D. B.; Check, M. H. [Universal Technology Corporation, 1270 North Fairfield Road, Dayton, Ohio 45532 (United States); Jespersen, M. L.; Borton, P. T. [University of Dayton Research Institute, 300 College Park, Dayton, Ohio 45469 (United States)

    2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Several milligrams of the ruthenium-centered organometallic complex, ruthenium bis-4,4 Prime -di(thiomethyl)-2,2 Prime -bipyridine, mono-2 -(2-pyridyl)-1,3-oxathiane ([Ru{l_brace}(HS-CH{sub 2}){sub 2}-bpy{r_brace}{sub 2}{l_brace}pox{r_brace}](PF{sub 6}){sub 2}) were synthesized and used to produce a self assembled monolayer film on a gold substrate. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the film detected the presence of bound thiolate, which is an indication of a chemisorbed film. Water contact angle measurements were performed before and after 5 min of visible light irradiation using an ozone-free 1000 W Xe(Hg) arc source with a 425-680 nm long pass mirror. The contact angle changed from 52 Degree-Sign pre-irradiation (hydrophilic state) to 95 Degree-Sign post-irradiation (hydrophobic state).

  6. Development of models for the two-dimensional, two-fluid code for sodium boiling NATOF-2D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zielinski, R. G.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several features were incorporated into NATOF-2D, a twodimensional, two fluid code developed at M.I.T. for the purpose of analysis of sodium boiling transients under LMFBR conditions. They include improved interfacial mass, ...

  7. Multi-Scale Experiments in Turbulent Subcooled Boiling Flow Through a Square Channel with a Single Heated Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estrada Perez, Carlos Eduardo

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, visualization experimental techniques that provide whole-field and multi-scale measurements of the liquid turbulence parameters, liquid and heater wall temperatures, and gas phase local parameters, were used to study subcooled boiling...

  8. A four-equation two-phase flow model for sodium boiling simulation of LMFBR fuel assemblies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schor, Andrei L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A three-dimensional numerical model for the simulation of sodium boiling transients has been developed. The model uses mixture mass and energy equations, while employing a separate momentum equation for each phase. Thermal ...

  9. Film boiling on the inside of vertical tubes with upward flow of the fluid at low qualities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dougall, R. S.

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow regimes, local heat transfer coefficients, and temperature distributions along the wall have been studied for film boiling inside a vertical tube with upward flow of a saturated liquid. The area of interest has been ...

  10. Effect of combined nanoparticle and polymeric dispersions on critical heat flux, nucleate boiling heat transfer coefficient, and coating adhesion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Bronwyn K

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study was performed to determine thermal performance and adhesion effects of a combined nanoparticle and polymeric dispersion coating. The critical heat flux (CHF) values and nucleate boiling heat transfer ...

  11. Water, Vapor, and Salt Dynamics in a Hot Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahrami, Davood; Danko, George [Department of Mining Engineering, University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St., Reno, NV, 89557 (United States); Walton, John [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University, El Paso, TX, 79968 (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to report the results of a new model study examining the high temperature nuclear waste disposal concept at Yucca Mountain using MULTIFLUX, an integrated in-drift- and mountain-scale thermal-hydrologic model. The results show that a large amount of vapor flow into the drift is expected during the period of above-boiling temperatures. This phenomenon makes the emplacement drift a water/moisture attractor during the above-boiling temperature operation. The evaporation of the percolation water into the drift gives rise to salt accumulation in the rock wall, especially in the crown of the drift for about 1500 years in the example. The deposited salts over the drift footprint, almost entirely present in the fractures, may enter the drift either by rock fall or by water drippage. During the high temperature operation mode, the barometric pressure variation creates fluctuating relative humidity in the emplacement drift with a time period of approximately 10 days. Potentially wet and dry conditions and condensation on salt-laden drift wall sections may adversely affect the storage environment. Salt accumulations during the above-boiling temperature operation must be sufficiently addressed to fully understand the waste package environment during the thermal period. Until the questions are resolved, a below-boiling repository design is favored where the Alloy-22 will be less susceptible to localized corrosion. (authors)

  12. Advanced Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, Gordon R. [NETL

    2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  13. Two dimensional, two fluid model for sodium boiling in LMFBR fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granziera, M.R.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A two dimensional numerical model for the simulation of sodium boiling transient was developed using the two fluid set of conservation equations. A semiimplicit numerical differencing scheme capable of handling the problems associated with the ill-posedness implied by the complex characteristic roots of the two fluid problems was used, which took advantage of the dumping effect of the exchange terms. Of particular interest in the development of the model was the identification of the numerical problems caused by the strong disparity between the axial and radial dimensions of fuel assemblies. A solution to this problem was found which uses the particular geometry of fuel assemblies to accelerate the convergence of the iterative technique used in the model. Three sodium boiling experiments were simulated with the model, with good agreement between the experimental results and the model predictions.

  14. Horizontal Advanced Tensiometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2004-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An horizontal advanced tensiometer is described that allows the monitoring of the water pressure of soil positions, particularly beneath objects or materials that inhibit the use of previous monitoring wells. The tensiometer includes a porous cup, a pressure transducer (with an attached gasket device), an adaptive chamber, at least one outer guide tube which allows access to the desired horizontal position, a transducer wire, a data logger and preferably an inner guide tube and a specialized joint which provides pressure on the inner guide tube to maintain the seal between the gasket of the transducer and the adaptive chamber.

  15. Proposed and existing passive and inherent safety-related structures, systems, and components (building blocks) for advanced light-water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Moses, D.L.; Lewis, E.B.; Gibson, R.; Pearson, R.; Reich, W.J.; Murphy, G.A.; Staunton, R.H.; Kohn, W.E.

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear power plant is composed of many structures, systems, and components (SSCs). Examples include emergency core cooling systems, feedwater systems, and electrical systems. The design of a reactor consists of combining various SSCs (building blocks) into an integrated plant design. A new reactor design is the result of combining old SSCs in new ways or use of new SSCs. This report identifies, describes, and characterizes SSCs with passive and inherent features that can be used to assure safety in light-water reactors. Existing, proposed, and speculative technologies are described. The following approaches were used to identify the technologies: world technical literature searches, world patent searches, and discussions with universities, national laboratories and industrial vendors. 214 refs., 105 figs., 26 tabs.

  16. advanced fuel performance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for fuel cell 2 Silicon carbide performance as cladding for advanced uranium and thorium fuels for light water reactors MIT - DSpace Summary: There has been an ongoing...

  17. advanced high temperature: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John 3 Lake surface water temperature retrieval using advanced very high resolution radiometer and Geosciences Websites Summary: and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer...

  18. Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution in CO2- and Water-Based Geothermal Reservoirs Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last...

  19. New correlation accurately calculates water solubilities of aromatics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaws, C.L.; Bu, L.; Nijhawan, S. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States))

    1994-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A new correlation calculates reliable aromatics solubilities in water down to very low concentrations. The correlation, based on boiling point, can be used for initial engineering studies. The importance of hydrocarbon solubility in water is increasing because of health, safety, and environmental issues. The paper begins with a discussion of the importance of solubility, even at low concentrations. The new correlation is described, aromatics are compared with paraffins, and the new correlation is compared with the API correlation.

  20. Advanced Combustion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1BP-14 Power and TransmissionAdolphusAdvanced Energy

  1. Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low emission boil systems. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1993--December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The first test run of the Toroidal Vortex Combustor (TVC) was completed on December 6. Riley was unable to witness or set up independent sampling equipment for NO{sub x} and precursor measurement for this run. A second run which we witnessed, but did not sample, was completed December 17. This was conducted almost entirely near SR = 1.0 while Textron investigated temperature-load relationships to address concerns from Run 1. A third run was completed over the December holiday break on Dorchester coal to address concerns Textron had about the Illinois test coal. All subsequent tests will use the Illinois coal. Boiler, firing system design. Elevation drawings were developed for dry wall-fired, conventional U-fired slagging, and TVC fired slagging units. We are investigating the feasibility of modifying a conventional U-fired design for low-NOx operation as an alternative to the TVC. The approach taken to I date for NOx reduction in existing U-fired units is to retrofit with delayed-mixing burners with staging air at various places, similar to the approach with dry fired units. The concept of staged fuel addition or reburning for the U-fired system is being examined as a potential combustion NOx control approach. This concept has high potential due to the high temperature and long residence time available in the stagger. Some field trials with coke oven gas reburn produced very low NOx results. Modeling of this concept was identified as a priority task. The model development will include matching field data for air staging on slagging units to the predictions. Emissions control. Selection of an SO2 control process continues to be a high priority task. Sargent & Lundy completed a cost comparison of several regenerable processes, most of which have NOx control potential as well: Active coke, NOXSO, copper oxide, SNOX, ammonia (for SO only, ammonium sulfate byproduct), and a limestone scrubber for comparison.

  2. L3:THM.CLS.P7.09 Advancements on Wall Boiling Modeling in CFD: Leveraging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron beamJoin2015JustKateKent52 J.N.P6.03 ITM/DNSP7.079

  3. 2010 Water & Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dor Ben-Amotz

    2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Water covers more than two thirds of the surface of the Earth and about the same fraction of water forms the total mass of a human body. Since the early days of our civilization water has also been in the focus of technological developments, starting from converting it to wine to more modern achievements. The meeting will focus on recent advances in experimental, theoretical, and computational understanding of the behavior of the most important and fascinating liquid in a variety of situations and applications. The emphasis will be less on water properties per se than on water as a medium in which fundamental dynamic and reactive processes take place. In the following sessions, speakers will discuss the latest breakthroughs in unraveling these processes at the molecular level: Water in Solutions; Water in Motion I and II; Water in Biology I and II; Water in the Environment I and II; Water in Confined Geometries and Water in Discussion (keynote lecture and poster winners presentations).

  4. Advanced thermochemical hydrogen cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollabaugh, C.M.; Bowman, M.G.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this program is to contribute to the development of practical thermochemical cycles for the production of hydrogen from water. Specific goals are: investigate and evaluate the technical and economic viability of thermochemical cycles as an advanced technology for producing hydrogen from water; investigate and evaluate the engineering principles involved in interfacing individual thermochemical cycles with the different thermal energy sources (high temperature fission, solar, and fusion); and conduct a continuing research and development effort to evaluate the use of solid sulfates, oxides and other compounds as potentially advanced cycles and as alternates to H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ based cycles. Basic thermochemistry studies have been completed for two different steps in the decomposition of bismuth sulfate. Two different bismuth sulfate cycles have been defined for different sulfuric acid strengths. The eventual best cycle will depend on energy required to form sulfuric acid at different concentrations. A solids decomposition facility has been constructed and practical studies of solid decompositions are being conducted. The facility includes a rotary kiln system and a dual-particle fluidized bed system. Evaluation of different types of cycles for coupling with different heat sources is continuing.

  5. Cogeneration of Electricity and Potable Water Using The International Reactor Innovative And Secure (IRIS) Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ingersoll, D.T.; Binder, J.L.; Kostin, V.I.; Panov, Y.K.; Polunichev, V.; Ricotti, M.E.; Conti, D.; Alonso, G.

    2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The worldwide demand for potable water has been steadily growing and is projected to accelerate, driven by a continued population growth and industrialization of emerging countries. This growth is reflected in a recent market survey by the World Resources Institute, which shows a doubling in the installed capacity of seawater desalination plants every ten years. The production of desalinated water is energy intensive, requiring approximately 3-6 kWh/m3 of produced desalted water. At current U.S. water use rates, a dedicated 1000 MW power plant for every one million people would be required to meet our water needs with desalted water. Nuclear energy plants are attractive for large scale desalination application. The thermal energy produced in a nuclear plant can provide both electricity and desalted water without the production of greenhouse gases. A particularly attractive option for nuclear desalination is to couple a desalination plant with an advanced, modular, passively safe reactor design. The use of small-to-medium sized nuclear power plants allows for countries with smaller electrical grid needs and infrastructure to add new electrical and water capacity in more appropriate increments and allows countries to consider siting plants at a broader number of distributed locations. To meet these needs, a modified version of the International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) nuclear power plant design has been developed for the cogeneration of electricity and desalted water. The modular, passively safe features of IRIS make it especially well adapted for this application. Furthermore, several design features of the IRIS reactor will ensure a safe and reliable source of energy and water even for countries with limited nuclear power experience and infrastructure. The IRIS-D design utilizes low-quality steam extracted from the low-pressure turbine to boil seawater in a multi-effect distillation desalination plant. The desalination plant is based on the horizontal tube film evaporation design used successfully with the BN-350 nuclear plant in Aktau, Kazakhstan. Parametric studies have been performed to optimize the balance of plant design. Also, an economic analysis has been performed, which shows that IRIS-D should be able to provide electricity and clean water at highly competitive costs.

  6. Multibubble plasma production and solvent decomposition in water by slot-excited microwave discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishijima, T.; Hotta, H.; Sugai, H.; Sato, M. [Plasma Nanotechnology Research Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Honda Electronics Corporation, 20 Oyamazuka, Oiwa-cho, Toyohashi 441-3193 (Japan)

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Intense microwaves are injected from a slot antenna into water partly filling a metal vessel. When the vessel is evacuated to saturated vapor pressure ({approx}5x10{sup 3} Pa) of water, microwave breakdown gives rise to plasmas in many bubbles in the boiling water. Gas bubbling technique enables production of multibubble plasmas in water even at atmospheric pressure. Optical emissions from the exited species are investigated to identify radical species in water. In order to demonstrate application to purification of polluted water, methylene blue and trichlorethylene solution in 8 l water were observed to rapidly decrease with multibubble plasma treatment.

  7. The use of the probability distribution function to analyze surface temperature fluctuations in pool boiling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Chau Qui

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    par t of his t ime and labor to assist in the welding of thermocoupl-. junctions to the copper disk. And to all of those directly connected and to many others who helped by givino words of suggestion, there will always remain a debt o.... DEDICATION. AC (QU OWL EDGI"IENT S. TABLE OF CONTENTS. L1ST OF TABLES. LIST OF F IGUR ES. vi vii 1x CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION. CHAPTER II MECHANISMS OF NUCLEATE POOL BOILING. . . . . Bubble agitation model. Vapor-liquid exchange model. 3. M...

  8. Table 1. Connection of Criterion 8 CE Outcomes to CE Courses (required, design elective, advanced elective)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    treatment Biological wastewater treatment (d) Proficiency in Water Resources Engineering CE 3305 CE 3354 CE systems Design of advance water treatment systems Design of biological wastewater treatment systems (g ENVE 4391 ENVE 4399 Water, wastewater, air, solid waste Physical and chemical treatment Advanced water

  9. Magnetic thaw-down and boil-off due to magneto acceptors in 2DEG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaubet, C.; Raymond, A. [L2C UMR 5221, CNRS-Université Montpellier 2, Place E. Bataillon, 34090 Montpellier cedex 05 (France); Bisotto, I. [LNCMI, UPR 3228, CNRS-INSA-UJF-UPS, BP166, 38042 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Harmand, J. C. [LPN, CNRS, route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Kubisa, M. [Institute of Physics, Wroclaw University of Technology, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Zawadzki, W. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 02668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Quantum Hall Effect (QHE) and Shubnikov-de Haas effect are investigated experimentally using n type modulation-doped GaAs/GaAlAs quantum wells (QWs) additionally doped in the well with beryllium acceptor atoms. It is presently shown that the localized magneto-acceptor (MA) states which possess discrete energies above the corresponding Landau levels (LLs) lead to two observable effects in magneto-transport: magnetic thaw-down and magnetic boil-off of 2D electrons. Both effects are related to the fact that electrons occupying the localized MA states cannot conduct. Thus in the thaw-down effect the electrons fall down from the MA states to the free Landau states. This leads to a shift of the Hall plateau towards higher magnetic fields as a consequence of an increase of the 2D electron density N{sub S}. In the boil-off effect the electrons are pushed from the free Landau states to the empty MA states under high enough Hall electric field. This process has an avalanche character leading to a dramatic increase of magneto-resistance, consequence of a decrease of N{sub S}.

  10. Pool boiling of R-114/oil mixtures from single tubes and tube bundles. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, T.J.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus was designed, fabricated, and operated for the testing of horizontal tube bundles for boiling of R-114 with various concentrations of oil. Preliminary data were taken on the top tube in the bundle, with and without the other tubes in operation. Results showed up to a 37% increase in the boiling heat-transfer coefficient as a result of the favorable bundle effect. In a separate single-tube apparatus, three enhanced tubes were tested at a saturation temperature of 2.2 C with oil mass concentrations of 0, 1, 2, 3, 6 and 10%. The tubes were: 1) a finned tube with 1024 fins per meter, 2) a finned tube with 1575 fins per meter and 3) a Turbo-B tube. These tubes resulted in enhancement ratios in pure refrigerant of 2.8, 3.8 and 5.2, respectively, at a practical heat flux of 30 kW/sq. meter. With 3% oil, these ratios were decreased to 2.6, 3.5 and 5, while with 10% oil, these ratios were further reduced to 2.6, 3.2 and 4.7, respectively. Based on these results, the use of Turbo-B tubes is expected to result in significant savings in weight and size of evaporators over the finned tubes presently in use on board some naval vessels.

  11. Advanced thyristor valve project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flairty, C. (General Electric Co., Malvern, PA (USA))

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced thyristor value was developed HVDC conversion applications. New features incorporated in the design include: improved heat transfer from the thyristors, two phase cooling of components, and light firing required the development of both a separate light triggered thyristor with a full forward blocking voltage rating and a special flash lamp employing cesium vapor as the associated light source. A valve rated 133 kV and 2200 A bridge current was constructed and lab tested before shipment to the Sylmar Converter Station, which is the southern terminus of the Pacific DC Intertie. The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, which operates the Sylmar Station, installed the valve and operated it to gain experience. 36 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Geothermal: Advanced Search

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Search Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New Hot Docs News Related Links You...

  13. Advanced photoanodes for photoassisted water electrolysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engel, Johanna, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With continuously growing energy demands, alternative, emission-free solar energy solutions become ever more attractive. However, to achieve sustainability, efficient conversion and storage of solar energy is imperative. ...

  14. Advanced Water Technologies | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Become agovEducationWelcomestructures |Science

  15. Advanced Water Removal via Membrane Solvent Extraction

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1 AAcceleratedDepartmentDepartment2 DOE Hydrogen and

  16. A correlation for local coefficients of heat transfer in boiling of R12 and R22 refrigerants on multirow bundles of smooth tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebrov, P.N.; Bukin, V.G.; Danilova, G.N.

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results on the boiling of R12 and R22 on bundles of 30 to 50 vertically stacked rows of smooth tubes are presented and correlated. Engineering equations for determining the coefficients of heat transfer in the pool boiling of freons on such multirow bundles are derived.

  17. Turning Sun and Water Into Hydrogen Fuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In a key step towards advancing a clean energy economy, scientists have engineered a cheap, abundant way to make hydrogen fuel from sunlight and water.

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: Water Power Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Personnel Water Power in the News Geothermal Advanced Bit Development Geothermal Energy & Drilling Technology Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Materials & Components...

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Power Electronics...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    waste heat recovery devices for vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Thermal Control of Power Electronics of Electric Vehicles with Small Channel Coolant Boiling...

  20. Water by truck in Mexico City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pike, Jill (Jill Susan)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supply of water to urban households by tanker truck in developing and advanced developing countries is often associated with early stages of urbanization or with the private markets on which water vendors serve households ...

  1. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATIC CONTROL, VOL. AC-20, NO. 6, DECEMBER 1975 127 Acoustics, Stability, and Compensation in Boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwatny, Harry G.

    of steam pipe acoustics on the control of steam pressore in boiling waterreactors. A madel is developed forthe process which encompassesthe reactor vessel, the main steam piping, the bypasssystempiping in an increased steaming rate. The turbine admission valves would thenopen in responsetotheconsequent increase

  2. LIQUID PROPANE GAS (LPG) STORAGE AREA BOILING LIQUID EXPANDING VAPOR EXPLOSION (BLEVE) ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PACE, M.E.

    2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHA and the FHAs for the SWOC MDSA (HNF-14741) identified multiple accident scenarios in which vehicles powered by flammable gases (e.g., propane), or combustible or flammable liquids (e.g., gasoline, LPG) are involved in accidents that result in an unconfined vapor cloud explosion (UVCE) or in a boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion (BLEVE), respectively. These accident scenarios are binned in the Bridge document as FIR-9 scenarios. They are postulated to occur in any of the MDSA facilities. The LPG storage area will be in the southeast corner of CWC that is relatively remote from store distaged MAR. The location is approximately 30 feet south of MO-289 and 250 feet east of 2401-W by CWC Gate 10 in a large staging area for unused pallets and equipment.

  3. Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

  4. 8. Innovative Technologies: Two-Phase Heat Transfer in Water-Based Nanofluids for Nuclear Applications Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buongiorno, Jacopo; Hu, Lin-wen

    2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract Nanofluids are colloidal dispersions of nanoparticles in water. Many studies have reported very significant enhancement (up to 200%) of the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) in pool boiling of nanofluids (You et al. 2003, Vassallo et al. 2004, Bang and Chang 2005, Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2007). These observations have generated considerable interest in nanofluids as potential coolants for more compact and efficient thermal management systems. Potential Light Water Reactor applications include the primary coolant, safety systems and severe accident management strategies, as reported in other papers (Buongiorno et al. 2008 and 2009). However, the situation of interest in reactor applications is often flow boiling, for which no nanofluid data have been reported so far. In this project we investigated the potential of nanofluids to enhance CHF in flow boiling. Subcooled flow boiling heat transfer and CHF experiments were performed with low concentrations of alumina, zinc oxide, and diamond nanoparticles in water (? 0.1 % by volume) at atmospheric pressure. It was found that for comparable test conditions the values of the nanofluid and water heat transfer coefficient (HTC) are similar (within ?20%). The HTC increased with mass flux and heat flux for water and nanofluids alike, as expected in flow boiling. The CHF tests were conducted at 0.1 MPa and at three different mass fluxes (1500, 2000, 2500 kg/m2s) under subcooled conditions. The maximum CHF enhancement was 53%, 53% and 38% for alumina, zinc oxide and diamond, respectively, always obtained at the highest mass flux. A post-mortem analysis of the boiling surface reveals that its morphology is altered by deposition of the particles during nanofluids boiling. A confocal-microscopy-based examination of the test section revealed that nanoparticles deposition not only changes the number of micro-cavities on the surface, but also the surface wettability. A simple model was used to estimate the ensuing nucleation site density changes, but no definitive correlation between the nucleation site density and the heat transfer coefficient data could be found. Wettability of the surface was substantially increased for heater coupons boiled in alumina and zinc oxide nanofluids, and such wettability increase seems to correlate reasonably well with the observed marked CHF enhancement for the respective nanofluids. Interpretation of the experimental data was conducted in light of the governing surface parameters (surface area, contact angle, roughness, thermal conductivity) and existing models. It was found that no single parameter could explain the observed HTC or CHF phenomena.

  5. Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Fall 2010 Advanced Cooled Compressor Diaphragms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PENNSTATE Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Fall 2010 Advanced Cooled Compressor compressor that is cooled by circulating water through its diaphragm (isothermal compression instead of each ANSYS run included deflection and principle stresses Material for advanced compressor

  6. Schwarz, T. and Wells, S. (1999) "Storm Water Particle Removal using Cross-Flow Filtration and Sedimentation," in Advances in Filtration and Separation Technology, Volume 12, ed. by W. Leung, American Filtrations and Separations Society, pp.219-226.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Scott A.

    and Sedimentation," in Advances in Filtration and Separation Technology, Volume 12, ed. by W. Leung, American Filtrations and Separations Society, pp.219-226. CONTINUOUS DEFLECTION SEPARATION OF STORMWATER PARTICULATES

  7. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Ivan Maldonado; John M. Christenson; J.P. Renier; T.F. Marcille; J. Casal

    2010-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs).

  8. ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Gaul

    2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas combustion turbines are rapidly becoming the primary technology of choice for generating electricity. At least half of the new generating capacity added in the US over the next twenty years will be combustion turbine systems. The Department of Energy has cosponsored with Siemens Westinghouse, a program to maintain the technology lead in gas turbine systems. The very ambitious eight year program was designed to demonstrate a highly efficient and commercially acceptable power plant, with the ability to fire a wide range of fuels. The main goal of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program was to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost effective competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Performance targets were focused on natural gas as a fuel and included: System efficiency that exceeds 60% (lower heating value basis); Less than 10 ppmv NO{sub x} emissions without the use of post combustion controls; Busbar electricity that are less than 10% of state of the art systems; Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) equivalent to current systems; Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals; and Commercial systems by the year 2000. In a parallel effort, the program was to focus on adapting the ATS engine to coal-derived or biomass fuels. In Phase 1 of the ATS Program, preliminary investigators on different gas turbine cycles demonstrated that net plant LHV based efficiency greater than 60% was achievable. In Phase 2 the more promising cycles were evaluated in greater detail and the closed-loop steam-cooled combined cycle was selected for development because it offered the best solution with least risk for achieving the ATS Program goals for plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity and RAM. Phase 2 also involved conceptual ATS engine and plant design and technology developments in aerodynamics, sealing, combustion, cooling, materials, coatings and casting development. The market potential for the ATS gas turbine in the 2000-2014 timeframe was assessed for combined cycle, simple cycle and integrated gasification combined cycle, for three engine sizes. The total ATS market potential was forecasted to exceed 93 GW. Phase 3 and Phase 3 Extension involved further technology development, component testing and W501ATS engine detail design. The technology development efforts consisted of ultra low NO{sub x} combustion, catalytic combustion, sealing, heat transfer, advanced coating systems, advanced alloys, single crystal casting development and determining the effect of steam on turbine alloys. Included in this phase was full-load testing of the W501G engine at the McIntosh No. 5 site in Lakeland, Florida.

  9. Recent advances in the CONTAIN code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergeron, K.D.; Carroll, D.E.; Gelbard, F.; Murata, K.K.; Valdez, G.D.; Washington, K.E.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An update is given on very recent developments involving CONTAIN, the USNRC's principal mechanistic code for severe accident containment analysis. First, the features are outlined in two major new releases of CONTAIN. Revision 1.06 was released in February; the major improvements include full integration of the CORCON and VANESA models for debris concrete interactions and concomitant aerosol generation, more detailed and more flexible radiation heat transfer options, and a number of minor improvements. The most recent new version of the code is CONTAIN 1.1, which was released in October. The principal new features relate to the Boiling Water Reactor. In particular, working models are included for Pressure Suppression Pools and Safety Relief Valves. In addition, this version of the code has a much-improved treatment of fision product hosting, user-defined material property options, and a number of other improvements. A second major area of progress involves the aerosol models. Previously, numerical diffusion limited the accuracy of the calculation of the concentration of the smallest particles and, there was no accounting for the effects of soluble salts or surface tension on the equilibrium water vapor pressure. All of these problems have now been solved with a stand-alone aerosol modeling code which uses a suite of new numerical approaches. The new methods have been incorporated into CONTAIN. Example calculations are presented. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Institute for ADVANCED STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OF EVENTS 91 · REPORT OF THE INSTITUTE LIBRARIES 93 · INSTITUTE FOR ADVANCED STUDY/PARK CITY MATHEMATICS. The Institute for Advanced Study has sustained this founding principle for more than sixty-five years

  11. Institute Jor ADVANCED STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for advanced study HELENE L. KAPLAN Of Counsel Skiiddcn Arps Slate Meagher & Flam PETER R. KANN Chairman

  12. Italian Academy Advanced Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Ning

    The Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America at Columbia University Annual Report 2006­2007 The Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America at Columbia University Annual Report 2006­2007 #12;italian academy for advanced studies in america 1161 Amsterdam Avenue New York, NY 10027 tel: (212) 854-2306 fax

  13. Presented by CASL: The Consortium for Advanced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by enabling higher fuel burnups Enhance nuclear safety by enabling high-fidelity predictive capability integrity ­ Violation of safety limits · Reduces cost of electricity · Essentially expands existing nuclearPresented by Nuclear Energy CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

  14. The effects of orientation angle, subcooling, heat flux, mass flux, and pressure on bubble growth and detachment in subcooled flow boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sugrue, Rosemary M

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of orientation angle, subcooling, heat flux, mass flux, and pressure on bubble growth and detachment in subcooled flow boiling were studied using a high-speed video camera in conjunction with a two-phase flow ...

  15. An investigation of the physical and numerical foundations of two-fluid representation of sodium boiling with applications to LMFBR experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    No, Hee Cheon

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work involves the development of physical models for the constitutive relations of a two-fuid, three-dimensional sodium boiling code, THERMIT-6S. The code is equipped with a fluid conduction model, a fuel pin model, ...

  16. Advanced reactor safety research, quarterly report, October-December 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is presented concerning advanced reactor core phenomenology; light water reactor severe core damage phenomenology; core debris behavior; containment analysis; elevated temperature design assessment; LMFBR accident delineation; and test and facility technology.

  17. advance nuclear energy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management and Restoration Websites Summary: adVancing frontiers in energy and enVironMent 12;it is a transforMational tiMe in a new supplies of clean water and electricity....

  18. advanced nuclear energy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management and Restoration Websites Summary: adVancing frontiers in energy and enVironMent 12;it is a transforMational tiMe in a new supplies of clean water and electricity....

  19. Boiling heat transfer with three fluids in small circular and rectangular channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tran, T.N.; Wambsganss, M.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); France, D.M. [Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small circular and noncircular channels are representative of flow passages act evaporators and condensers. This report describes results of an ental study on heat transfer to the flow boiling of refrigerants (R-12) and refrigerant-134a (R-134a) in a small horizontal circular-cross-section tube. The tube diameter of 2.46 mm was chosen to approximate the hydraulic diameter of a 4.06 {times} 1.70 mm rectangular channel previously studied with R-12, and a 2.92-mm-diameter circular tube previously studied with R-113. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of channel geometry and fluid properties on the heat transfer coefficient and to obtain additional insights relative to the heat transfer mechanism(s). The current circular flow channel for the R-12 and R-134a tests was made of brass and had an overall length of 0.9 in. The channel wall was electrically heated, and thermocouples were installed on the channel wall and in the bulk fluid stream. Voltage taps were located at the same axial locations as the stream thermocouples to allow testing over an exit quality range to 0.94 and a large range of mass flux (58 to 832 kg/m{sup 2}s) and heat flux (3.6 to 59 kW/m{sup 2}). Saturation pressure was nearly constant, averaging 0.82 MPa for most of the testing, with some tests performed at a lower pressure of 0.4--0.5 MPa. Local heat transfer coefficients were determined experimentally as a function of quality along the length of the test section. Analysis of all data for three tubes and three fluids supported the conclusion that a nucleation mechanism dominates for flow boiling in small channels. Nevertheless, a convection-dominant region was obtained experimentally in this study at very low values of wall superheat (< {approx} 2.75{degrees}C). The circular and rectangular tube data for three fluids were successfully correlated in the nucleation-dominant region.

  20. Pool boiling heat transfer enhancement over cylindrical tubes with water at atmospheric pressure, Part I: Experimental results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandlikar, Satish

    tubes are generated by performing further pro- cesses on the finned tubes. They tested these surfaces and was fairly similar for all tubes. Huebner and Kuenstler [4] tested similar tubes with n-hexane and propane