National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for advanced beam dynamics

  1. Beam Dynamics for ARIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekdahl, Carl August Jr. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-10-14

    Beam dynamics issues are assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator being designed for flash radiography of large explosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. Special attention is paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. It is concluded that a radiographic quality beam will be produced possible if engineering standards and construction details are equivalent to those on the present radiography accelerators at Los Alamos.

  2. ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben-Zvi I.; Kuczewski A.; Altinbas, Z.; Beavis, D.; Belomestnykh,; Dai, J. et al

    2012-07-01

    The Collider-Accelerator Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory is building a high-brightness 500 mA capable Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) as one of its main R&D thrusts towards eRHIC, the polarized electron - hadron collider as an upgrade of the operating RHIC facility. The ERL is in final assembly stages, with injection commisioning starting in October 2012. The objective of this ERL is to serve as a platform for R&D into high current ERL, in particular issues of halo generation and control, Higher-Order Mode (HOM) issues, coherent emissions for the beam and high-brightness, high-power beam generation and preservation. The R&D ERL features a superconducting laser-photocathode RF gun with a high quantum efficiency photoccathode served with a load-lock cathode delivery system, a highly damped 5-cell accelerating cavity, a highly flexible single-pass loop and a comprehensive system of beam instrumentation. In this ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter article we will describe the ERL in a degree of detail that is not usually found in regular publications. We will discuss the various systems of the ERL, following the electrons from the photocathode to the beam dump, cover the control system, machine protection etc and summarize with the status of the ERL systems.

  3. The effects of betatron phase advances on beam-beam and its compensation in RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; Gu, X.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.

    2011-03-28

    In this article we perform simulation studies to investigate the effects of betatron phase advances between the beam-beam interaction points on half-integer resonance driving term, second order chromaticty and dynamic aperture in RHIC. The betatron phase advances are adjusted with artificial matrices inserted in the middle of arcs. The lattices for the 2011 RHIC polarized proton (p-p) run and 2010 RHIC Au-Au runs are used in this study. We also scan the betatron phase advances between IP8 and the electron lens for the proposed Blue ring lattice with head-on beam-beam compensation.

  4. Recent advances of strong-strong beam-beam simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiang, Ji; Furman, Miguel A.; Ryne, Robert D.; Fischer, Wolfram; Ohmi,Kazuhito

    2004-09-15

    In this paper, we report on recent advances in strong-strong beam-beam simulation. Numerical methods used in the calculation of the beam-beam forces are reviewed. A new computational method to solve the Poisson equation on nonuniform grid is presented. This method reduces the computational cost by a half compared with the standard FFT based method on uniform grid. It is also more accurate than the standard method for a colliding beam with low transverse aspect ratio. In applications, we present the study of coherent modes with multi-bunch, multi-collision beam-beam interactions at RHIC. We also present the strong-strong simulation of the luminosity evolution at KEKB with and without finite crossing angle.

  5. Ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, N.W.; Marwick, A.D.; Roberto, J.B. (eds.) (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA); International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY (USA). Thomas J. Watson Research Center; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-01-01

    This report contains research programs discussed at the materials research society symposia on ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials. Major topics include: shallow implantation and solid-phase epitaxy; damage effects; focused ion beams; MeV implantation; high-dose implantation; implantation in III-V materials and multilayers; and implantation in electronic materials. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  6. Emittance and Phase Space Exchange for Advanced Beam Manipulation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Emittance and Phase Space Exchange for Advanced Beam Manipulation and Diagnostics Alternative chicane-type beam lines are proposed for exact emittance exchange between...

  7. Accelerator dynamics and beam aperture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsa, Z.

    1986-10-01

    We present an analytical method for analyzing accelerator dynamics, including higher order effects of multipoles on the beam. This formalism provides a faster alternative to particle tracking. Simplectic expressions for the emittance and phase describing the dynamical behavior of a particle in a circular accelerator are derived using second order perturbation theory (in the presence of nonlinear elements, e.g., sextupoles, octupoles). These expressions are successfully used to calculate the emittance growth, smear and linear aperture. Our findings compare well with results obtained from tracking programs. In addition perturbation to betatron tune; resonance strengths; stop bandwidth; fixed points; island width; and Chirikov criteria are calculated.

  8. Advanced Light Source Beam Position Monitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinkson, J.

    2011-01-01

    diagnostic ports, EPM pickups, photon stops, vacuum pumps, and the electron beamElectron beam position monitors (BPM) are installed throughout the accelerator and constitute the major part of accelerator beam diagnostics.

  9. Online optimization of storage ring nonlinear beam dynamics ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Online optimization of storage ring nonlinear beam dynamics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Online optimization of storage ring nonlinear beam dynamics Authors: Huang,...

  10. Online optimization of storage ring nonlinear beam dynamics ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Online optimization of storage ring nonlinear beam dynamics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Online optimization of storage ring nonlinear beam dynamics You are...

  11. Quantum fluctuations in beam dynamics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, K.-J.

    1998-06-04

    Quantum effects could become important for particle and photon beams used in high-luminosity and high brightness applications in the current and next generation accelerators and radiation sources. This paper is a review of some of these effects.

  12. Injected Beam Dynamics in SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbett, Jeff; Fisher, Alan; Huang, Xiaobiao; Safranek, James; Westerman, Stuart; Cheng, Weixing; Mok, Walter; /Unlisted

    2012-06-21

    For the top-off operation it is important to understand the time evolution of charge injected into the storage ring. The large-amplitude horizontal oscillation quickly filaments and decoheres, and in some cases exhibits non-linear x-y coupling before damping to the stored orbit. Similarly, in the longitudinal dimension, any mismatch in beam arrival time, beam energy or phase-space results in damped, non-linear synchrotron oscillations. In this paper we report on measurements of injection beam dynamics in the transverse and longitudinal planes using turn-by-turn BPMs, a fast-gated, image-intensified CCD camera and a Hamamatsu C5680 streak camera.

  13. TRACKING CODE DEVELOPMENT FOR BEAM DYNAMICS OPTIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, L.

    2011-03-28

    Dynamic aperture (DA) optimization with direct particle tracking is a straight forward approach when the computing power is permitted. It can have various realistic errors included and is more close than theoretical estimations. In this approach, a fast and parallel tracking code could be very helpful. In this presentation, we describe an implementation of storage ring particle tracking code TESLA for beam dynamics optimization. It supports MPI based parallel computing and is robust as DA calculation engine. This code has been used in the NSLS-II dynamics optimizations and obtained promising performance.

  14. Title of Dissertation: LONGITUDINAL DYNAMICS OF AN INTENSE ELECTRON BEAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    ABSTRACT Title of Dissertation: LONGITUDINAL DYNAMICS OF AN INTENSE ELECTRON BEAM John Richardson fusion, spallation neutron sources, free-electron lasers, and other applications. In addition, all beams beams. #12;LONGITUDINAL DYNAMICS OF AN INTENSE ELECTRON BEAM By John Richardson Harris. Dissertation

  15. Electron beam dynamics for the ISIS bremsstrahlung beam generation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Block, Robert E. (Robert Edward)

    2011-01-01

    An electron beam transport system was designed for use in the Bremsstrahlung Beam Generation System of the Integrated Stand-off Inspection System (ISIS). The purpose of this electron transport system was to provide for ...

  16. COMPUTATIONAL STUDIES OF BEAM DYNAMICS IN THE ETA GUN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    OF BEAM DYNAMICS IN THE ETA GUN Arthur C. Paul, V. Kelvin10 cm at the end of the gun. A field equalizing electrode (

  17. Studies of beam dynamics in relativistic klystron two-beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lidia, Steven M.

    1999-11-01

    Two-beam accelerators (TBAs) based upon free-electron lasers (FELs) or relativistic klystrons (RK-TBAs) have been proposed as efficient power sources for next generation high-energy linear colliders. Studies have demonstrated the possibility of building TBAs from X-band ({approximately}8-12 GHz) through Ka band ({approximately} 30-35 GHz) frequency regions. Provided that further prototyping shows stable beam propagation with minimal current loss and production of good quality, high-power rf fields, this technology is compatible with current schemes for electron-positron colliders in the multi-TeV center-of-mass scale. A new method of simulating the beam dynamics in accelerators of this type has been developed in this dissertation. There are three main components to this simulation. The first is a tracking algorithm to generate nonlinear transfer maps for pushing noninteracting particles through the external fields. The second component is a 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) algorithm that solves a set of Helmholtz equations for the self-fields, including the conducting boundary condition, and generates impulses that are interleaved with the nonlinear maps by means of a split-operation algorithm. The Helmholtz equations are solved by a multi-grid algorithm. The third component is an equivalent circuit equation solver that advances the modal rf cavity fields in time due to excitation by the modulated beam. The RTA project is described, and the simulation code is used to design the latter portions of the experiment. Detailed calculations of the beam dynamics and of the rf cavity output are presented and discussed. A beamline design is presented that will generate nearly 1.2 GW of power from 40 input, gain, and output rv cavities over a 10 m distance. The simulations show that beam current losses are acceptable, and that longitudinal and transverse focusing techniques are sufficient capable of maintaining a high degree of beam quality along the entire beamline. Additional experimental efforts are also described.

  18. X-Band Photoinjector Beam Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Feng; Adolphsen, Chris; Ding, Yuantao; Li, Zenghai; Vlieks, Arnold; /SLAC

    2011-12-13

    SLAC is studying the feasibility of using an X-band RF photocathode gun to produce low emittance bunches for applications such as a mono-energetic MeV {gamma} ray source (in collaboration with LLNL) and a photoinjector for a compact FEL. Beam dynamics studies are being done for a configuration consisting of a 5.5-cell X-band gun followed by several 53-cell high-gradient X-band accelerator structures. A fully 3D program, ImpactT, is used to track particles taking into account space charge forces, short-range longitudinal and transverse wakefields, and the 3D rf fields in the structures, including the quadrupole component of the couplers. The effect of misalignments of the various elements, including the drive-laser, gun, solenoid and accelerator structures, are evaluated. This paper presents these results and estimates of the expected bunch emittance vs cathode gradient, and the effects of mixing between the fundamental and off-frequency longitudinal modes. An X-band gun at SLAC has been shown to operate reliably with a 200 MV/m acceleration gradient at the cathode, which is nearly twice the 115 MV/m acceleration gradient in the LCLS gun. The higher gradient should roughly balance the space charge related transverse emittance growth for the same bunch charge but provide a 3-4 times shorter bunch length. The shorter length would make the subsequent bunch compression easier and allow for a more effective use of emittance exchange. Such a gun can also be used with an X-band linac to produce a compact FEL or g ray source that would require rf sources of only one frequency for beam generation and acceleration. The feasibility of using an X-band rf photocathode gun and accelerator structures to generate high quality electron beams for compact FELs and g ray sources is being studied at SLAC. Results from the X-band photoinjector beam dynamics studies are reported in this paper.

  19. Electron Beam Transport in Advanced Plasma Wave Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Ronald L

    2013-01-31

    The primary goal of this grant was to develop a diagnostic for relativistic plasma wave accelerators based on injecting a low energy electron beam (5-50keV) perpendicular to the plasma wave and observing the distortion of the electron beam's cross section due to the plasma wave's electrostatic fields. The amount of distortion would be proportional to the plasma wave amplitude, and is the basis for the diagnostic. The beat-wave scheme for producing plasma waves, using two CO2 laser beam, was modeled using a leap-frog integration scheme to solve the equations of motion. Single electron trajectories and corresponding phase space diagrams were generated in order to study and understand the details of the interaction dynamics. The electron beam was simulated by combining thousands of single electrons, whose initial positions and momenta were selected by random number generators. The model was extended by including the interactions of the electrons with the CO2 laser fields of the beat wave, superimposed with the plasma wave fields. The results of the model were used to guide the design and construction of a small laboratory experiment that may be used to test the diagnostic idea.

  20. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Y.T. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  1. ADVANCED ELECTRON BEAM TECHNIQUES FOR METALLIC AND CERAMIC PROTECTIVE COATING SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boone, Donald H.

    2013-01-01

    78848, 1978, ( 3) R. Kamo, 11 Ceramics for Diesel Engines,"Proceedings of Workshop on Ceramics for Advanced HeatBEAM TECHNIQUES FOR METALLIC AND CERAMIC PROTECTIVE COATING

  2. Applications and advances of positron beam spectroscopy: appendix a

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, R. H., LLNL

    1997-11-05

    Over 50 scientists from DOE-DP, DOE-ER, the national laboratories, academia and industry attended a workshop held on November 5-7, 1997 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory jointly sponsored by the DOE-Division of Materials Science, The Materials Research Institute at LLNL and the University of California Presidents Office. Workshop participants were charged to address two questions: Is there a need for a national center for materials analysis using positron techniques and can the capabilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory serve this need. To demonstrate the need for a national center the workshop participants discussed the technical advantages enabled by high positron currents and advanced measurement techniques, the role that these techniques will play in materials analysis and the demand for the data. There were general discussions lead by review talks on positron analysis techniques, and their applications to problems in semiconductors, polymers and composites, metals and engineering materials, surface analysis and advanced techniques. These were followed by focus sessions on positron analysis opportunities in these same areas. Livermore now leads the world in materials analysis capabilities by positrons due to developments in response to demands of science based stockpile stewardship. There was a detailed discussion of the LLNL capabilities and a tour of the facilities. The Livermore facilities now include the worlds highest current beam of keV positrons, a scanning pulsed positron microprobe under development capable of three dimensional maps of defect size and concentration, an MeV positron beam for defect analysis of large samples, and electron momentum spectroscopy by positrons. This document is a supplement to the written summary report. It contains a complete schedule, list of attendees and the vuegraphs for the presentations in the review and focus sessions.

  3. BEAM DYNAMICS IN NS-FFAG EMMAWITH DYNAMICAL MAPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giboudot, Y; Edgecock, R; Wolski, A

    2010-01-01

    The Non Scal­ing Fixed Field Al­ter­nat­ing Gra­di­ent EMMA has a com­pact lin­ear lat­tice. Ef­fect of Fringe Field on the beam has to be stud­ied care­ful­ly. A nu­mer­i­cal mag­net­ic field map is gen­er­at­ed by mag­net mea­sure­ments or mag­net de­sign soft­wares. We de­vel­oped a tech­nique that pro­duces from the nu­mer­i­cal field map, a dy­nam­i­cal map for a par­ti­cle trav­el­ling in the en­tire EMMA cell for a ref­er­ence en­er­gy with­out ac­cel­er­a­tion. Since the beam dy­nam­ics change with en­er­gy, a set of maps have been pro­duce with dif­fer­ent ref­er­ence en­er­gies be­tween 10 and 20MeV. For each ref­er­ence en­er­gy, sim­u­lat­ed tune and time of flight (TOF) have been com­pared with re­sults in Zgoubi - track­ing di­rect­ly through nu­mer­i­cal field map. The range of va­lid­i­ty of a sin­gle map has been in­ves­ti­gat­ed by track­ing par­ti­cle with large en­er­gy de­vi­a­tion. From that, a ...

  4. Progress on Optimization of the Nonlinear Beam Dynamics in the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in the MEIC Collider Rings Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Progress on Optimization of the Nonlinear Beam Dynamics in the MEIC Collider Rings One of the key...

  5. Study of the Electron Beam Dynamics in the FERMI @ ELETTRA Linac

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    STUDY OF THE ELECTRON BEAM DYNAMICS IN THE FERMI @ ELETTRAAbstract A study of the electron beam dynamics in the linacused to direct the electron beam into one of two undulator

  6. Beam manipulation techniques, nonlinear beam dynamics, and space charge effect in high energy high power accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S. Y.

    2014-04-07

    We had carried out a design of an ultimate storage ring with beam emittance less than 10 picometer for the feasibility of coherent light source at X-ray wavelength. The accelerator has an inherent small dynamic aperture. We study method to improve the dynamic aperture and collective instability for an ultimate storage ring. Beam measurement and accelerator modeling are an integral part of accelerator physics. We develop the independent component analysis (ICA) and the orbit response matrix method for improving accelerator reliability and performance. In collaboration with scientists in National Laboratories, we also carry out experimental and theoretical studies on beam dynamics. Our proposed research topics are relevant to nuclear and particle physics using high brightness particle and photon beams.

  7. Beam dynamics studies for transverse electromagnetic mode type rf deflectors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ahmed, Shahid; Krafft, Geoffrey A.; Deitrick, Kirsten; De Silva, Subashini U.; Delayen, Jean R.; Spata, Mike; Tiefenback, Michael; Hofler, Alicia; Beard, Kevin

    2012-02-01

    We have performed three-dimensional simulations of beam dynamics for transverse electromagnetic mode (TEM) type rf deflectors: normal and superconducting. The compact size of these cavities as compared to the conventional TM110 type structures is more attractive particularly at low frequency. Highly concentrated electromagnetic fields between the parallel bars provide strong electrical stability to the beam for any mechanical disturbance. An array of six 2-cell normal conducting cavities or a single cell superconducting structure is enough to produce the required vertical displacement at the target point. Both the normal and superconducting structures show very small emittance dilution due to the verticalmore »kick of the beam.« less

  8. Beam dynamics studies for transverse electromagnetic mode type rf deflectors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ahmed, Shahid; Krafft, Geoffrey A.; Deitrick, Kirsten; De Silva, Subashini U.; Delayen, Jean R.; Spata, Mike; Tiefenback, Michael; Hofler, Alicia; Beard, Kevin

    2012-02-01

    We have performed three-dimensional simulations of beam dynamics for transverse electromagnetic mode (TEM) type rf deflectors: normal and superconducting. The compact size of these cavities as compared to the conventional TM110 type structures is more attractive particularly at low frequency. Highly concentrated electromagnetic fields between the parallel bars provide strong electrical stability to the beam for any mechanical disturbance. An array of six 2-cell normal conducting cavities or a single cell superconducting structure is enough to produce the required vertical displacement at the target point. Both the normal and superconducting structures show very small emittance dilution due to the vertical kick of the beam.

  9. AFDM: An Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohl, W.R.; Parker, F.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Wilhelm, D. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik); Berthier, J. (CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38 (France)); Goutagny, L. (CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire); Ninokata,

    1990-09-01

    AFDM, or the Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model, is a computer code that investigates new approaches simulating the multiphase-flow fluid-dynamics aspects of severe accidents in fast reactors. The AFDM formalism starts with differential equations similar to those in the SIMMER-II code. These equations are modified to treat three velocity fields and supplemented with a variety of new models. The AFDM code has 12 topologies describing what material contacts are possible depending on the presence or absence of a given material in a computational cell, on the dominant liquid, and on the continuous phase. Single-phase, bubbly, churn-turbulent, cellular, and dispersed flow regimes are permitted for the pool situations modeled. Virtual mass terms are included for vapor in liquid-continuous flow. Interfacial areas between the continuous and discontinuous phases are convected to allow some tracking of phenomenological histories. Interfacial areas are also modified by models of nucleation, dynamic forces, turbulence, flashing, coalescence, and mass transfer. Heat transfer is generally treated using engineering correlations. Liquid-vapor phase transitions are handled with the nonequilibrium, heat-transfer-limited model, whereas melting and freezing processes are based on equilibrium considerations. Convection is treated using a fractional-step method of time integration, including a semi-implicit pressure iteration. A higher-order differencing option is provided to control numerical diffusion. The Los Alamos SESAME equation-of-state has been implemented using densities and temperatures as the independent variables. AFDM programming has vectorized all computational loops consistent with the objective of producing an exportable code. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  10. High Dynamic Range Beam Imaging with Two Simultaneously Sampling CCDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evtushenko, Pavel [JLAB; Douglas, David R. [JLAB; Legg, Robert A. [JLAB; Tennant, Christopher D. [JLAB

    2013-05-01

    Transverse beam profile measurement with sufficiently high dynamic range (HDR) is a key diagnostic to measure the beam halo, understand its sources and evolution. In this contribution we describe our initial experience with the HDR imaging of the electron beam at the JLab FEL. On contrary to HDR measurements made with wire scanners in counting mode, which provide only two or three 1D projections of transverse beam distribution, imaging allows to measure the distribution itself. That is especially important for non-equilibrium beams in the LINACs. The measurements were made by means of simultaneous imaging with two CCD sensors with different exposure time. Two images are combined then numerically in to one HDR image. The system works as an online tool providing HDR images at 4 Hz. An optically polished YAG:Ce crystal with the thickness of 100 {micro}m was used for the measurements. When tested with a laser beam images with the DR of about 10{sup 5} were obtained. With the electron beam the DR was somewhat smaller due to the limitations in the time structure of the tune-up beam macro pulse.

  11. High Dynamic Range Beam Imaging with Two Simultaneously Sampling CCDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evtushenko, Pavel E. [JLAB; Douglas, David R. [JLAB

    2013-06-01

    Transverse beam profile measurement with sufficiently high dynamic range (HDR) is a key diagnostic to measure the beam halo, understand its sources and evolution. In this contribution we describe our initial experience with the HDR imaging of the electron beam at the JLab FEL. On contrary to HDR measurements made with wire scanners in counting mode, which provide only two or three 1D projections of transverse beam distribution, imaging allows to measure the distribution itself. That is especially important for non-equilibrium beams in the LINACs. The measurements were made by means of simultaneous imaging with two CCD sensors with different exposure time. Two images are combined then numerically in to one HDR image. The system works as an online tool providing HDR images at 4 Hz. An optically polished YAG:Ce crystal with the thickness of 100 {micro}m was used for the measurements. When tested with a laser beam images with the DR of about 10{sup 5} were obtained. With the electron beam the DR was somewhat smaller due to the limitations in the time structure of the tune-up beam macro pulse.

  12. Longitudinal beam dynamics with rf noise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shih, H.J.; Ellison, J.A.; Cogburn, R.; Newberger, B.S.

    1993-06-01

    The Dome-Krinsky-Wang (DKW) diffusion-inaction theory for rf-noise-induced emittance dilution is reviewed and related to recent work on the approximation of stochastic processes by Markov processes. An accurate and efficient numerical procedure is developed to integrate the diffusion equation of the DKW theory. Tracking simulations are undertaken to check the validity of the theory in the parameter range of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) and to provide additional information. The study of effects of rf noise is applied to two problems of interest at the SSC: (1) determination of noise tolerance levels in the rf system, and (2) feasibility of beam extraction using crystal channeling.

  13. Particle beam dynamics | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O StreamsParticipants ParticipantsParticipantsParticle beam

  14. 13.811 Advanced Structural Dynamics and Acoustics, Spring 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Henrik

    Foundations of 3D elasticity. Fluid and elastic wave equations. Elastic and plastic waves in rods and beams. Waves in plates. Interaction with an acoustic fluid. Dynamics and acoustics of cylindrical shells. Radiation and ...

  15. Beam Dynamical Evolutions in a Solenoid Channel: A Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. F. Kisoglu; M. Yilmaz

    2014-09-15

    Today a linear particle accelerator (linac), in which electric and magnetic fields are of vital importance, is one of the popular energy generation sources like Accelerator Driven System (ADS). A multipurpose, including primarily ADS, proton linac with energy of ~2 GeV is planned to constitute within the Turkish Accelerator Center (TAC) project collaborated by more than 10 Turkish universities. A Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) channel with two solenoids is a subcomponent of this linac. This solenoid channel transports the proton beam ejected by a proton source, and matches it with the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) that is a subcomponent just after the LEBT. These solenoid magnets are used as focusing element to get the beam divergence and emittance growth under control. This paper includes settings of the LEBT solenoids with regard to beam dynamics, which investigates the beam particles motion in particle accelerators, for TAC proton linac done by using a beam dynamics simulation code PATH MANAGER. Furthermore, the simulation results have been interpreted analytically.

  16. Radio Frequency Station - Beam Dynamics Interaction in Circular Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mastoridis, Themistoklis; /Stanford U., Elect. Eng. Dept. /SLAC

    2011-03-01

    The longitudinal beam dynamics in circular accelerators is mainly defined by the interaction of the beam current with the accelerating Radio Frequency (RF) stations. For stable operation, Low Level RF (LLRF) feedback systems are employed to reduce coherent instabilities and regulate the accelerating voltage. The LLRF system design has implications for the dynamics and stability of the closed-loop RF systems as well as for the particle beam, and is very sensitive to the operating range of accelerator currents and energies. Stability of the RF loop and the beam are necessary conditions for reliable machine operation. This dissertation describes theoretical formalisms and models that determine the longitudinal beam dynamics based on the LLRF implementation, time domain simulations that capture the dynamic behavior of the RF station-beam interaction, and measurements from the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) that validate the models and simulations. These models and simulations are structured to capture the technical characteristics of the system (noise contributions, non-linear elements, and more). As such, they provide useful results and insight for the development and design of future LLRF feedback systems. They also provide the opportunity to study diverse longitudinal beam dynamics effects such as coupled-bunch impedance driven instabilities and single bunch longitudinal emittance growth. Coupled-bunch instabilities and RF station power were the performance limiting effects for PEP-II. The sensitivity of the instabilities to individual LLRF parameters, the effectiveness of alternative operational algorithms, and the possible tradeoffs between RF loop and beam stability were studied. New algorithms were implemented, with significant performance improvement leading to a world record current during the last PEP-II run of 3212 mA for the Low Energy Ring. Longitudinal beam emittance growth due to RF noise is a major concern for LHC. Simulations studies and measurements were conducted that clearly show the correlation between RF noise and longitudinal bunch emittance, identify the major LLRF noise contributions, and determine the RF component dominating this effect. With these results, LHC upgrades and alternative algorithms are evaluated to reduce longitudinal emittance growth during operations. The applications of this work are described with regard to future machines and analysis of new technical implementations, as well as to possible future work which would continue the directions of this dissertation.

  17. An inverse dynamical problem for connected beams A. Morassi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ikegami, Takashi

    place between longitudinal and bending motions. In this paper, we neglect bending motions and we only Abstract This paper deals with a dynamical inverse problem for a composite beam formed by two connected In this paper we address the following problem of nondestructive testing: To determine, in a steel

  18. Transverse dynamics of a relativistic electron beam in an underdense plasma channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transverse dynamics of a relativistic electron beam in an underdense plasma channel Andrew A electron beam in a plasma less dense than the beam is analyzed, with particular attention to the electronV electron beam in a 1.5 m plasma cell, with the amplification of beam-centroid offsets on the order of 100

  19. AFDM: An Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berthier, J. (CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38 (France)); Wilhelm, D. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik); Bohl, W.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1990-09-01

    This report consists of three parts. First, for the standard Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model (AFDM), heat-transfer coefficients between components are worked out, depending on the different possible topologies. Conduction, convection, and radiative heat-transfer mechanisms are modeled. For solid particles, discontinuous phases that obey a rigid'' model, and components lacking relative motion, heat transfer is by conduction. Convection is represented for fluids in motion inside circulating'' bubbles and/or droplets. Radiation is considered between droplets in vapor continuous flow. In addition, a film-boiling model has been formulated, where radiation provides the lower limit on the fuel-to-coolant heat-transfer coefficient. Second, the momentum-exchange coefficients are defined for the standard AFDM. Between a continuous and discontinuous phase, the model consists of both laminar and turbulent terms. The most important feature is the drag coefficient in the turbulent term. It is calculated by a drag similarity hypothesis with limits for large Reynolds numbers, distorted particles,'' and churn-turbulent flow. A unique hysteresis algorithm exists to treat the liquid continuous to vapor continuous transition. Two discontinuous components are coupled using a turbulent term with an input drag coefficient. Fluid- structure momentum exchange is represented with a standard friction-factor correlation. Third, the formulas used for the AFDM simplified Step 1 models are discussed. These include the heat-transfer coefficients, the momentum-exchange functions, and the manner in which interfacial areas are determined from input length scales. The simplified modeling uses steady-state engineering correlations, as in SIMMER-II.

  20. ADVANCED METHODS FOR THE COMPUTATION OF PARTICLE BEAM TRANSPORT AND THE COMPUTATION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS AND MULTIPARTICLE PHENOMENA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alex J. Dragt

    2012-08-31

    Since 1980, under the grant DEFG02-96ER40949, the Department of Energy has supported the educational and research work of the University of Maryland Dynamical Systems and Accelerator Theory (DSAT) Group. The primary focus of this educational/research group has been on the computation and analysis of charged-particle beam transport using Lie algebraic methods, and on advanced methods for the computation of electromagnetic fields and multiparticle phenomena. This Final Report summarizes the accomplishments of the DSAT Group from its inception in 1980 through its end in 2011.

  1. Beam Dynamics Studies of Parallel-Bar Deflecting Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Ahmed, G. Krafft, K. Detrick, S. Silva, J. Delayen, M. Spata ,M. Tiefenback, A. Hofler ,K. Beard

    2011-03-01

    We have performed three-dimensional simulations of beam dynamics for parallel-bar transverse electromagnetic mode (TEM) type RF separators: normal- and super-conducting. The compact size of these cavities as compared to conventional TM$_{110}$ type structures is more attractive particularly at low frequency. Highly concentrated electromagnetic fields between the parallel bars provide strong electrical stability to the beam for any mechanical disturbance. An array of six 2-cell normal conducting cavities or a one- or two-cell superconducting structure are enough to produce the required vertical displacement at the Lambertson magnet. Both the normal and super-conducting structures show very small emittance dilution due to the vertical kick of the beam.

  2. Stability of an Euler-Bernoulli beam with a nonlinear dynamic feedback system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Anton

    Stability of an Euler-Bernoulli beam with a nonlinear dynamic feedback system M. Mileti´ca , D. St to a nonlinear dynamic feedback system. This setup comprises nonlinear dynamic boundary controllers satisfying with the interaction of the Euler-Bernoulli beam (1.1) - (1.3) with a dynamic nonlinear feedback system. In particular

  3. Chaotic dynamics of flexible Euler-Bernoulli beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Awrejcewicz, J., E-mail: awrejcew@p.lodz.pl [Department of Automation, Biomechanics and Mechatronics, Lodz University of Technology, 1/15 Stefanowski St., 90-924 Lodz, Poland and Department of Vehicles, Warsaw University of Technology, 84 Narbutta St., 02-524 Warsaw (Poland); Krysko, A. V., E-mail: anton.krysko@gmail.com [Department of Applied Mathematics and Systems Analysis, Saratov State Technical University, Politehnicheskaya 77, 410054 Saratov (Russian Federation); Kutepov, I. E., E-mail: iekutepov@gmail.com; Zagniboroda, N. A., E-mail: tssrat@mail.ru; Dobriyan, V., E-mail: Dobriy88@yandex.ru; Krysko, V. A., E-mail: tak@san.ru [Department of Mathematics and Modeling, Saratov State Technical University, Politehnicheskaya 77, 410054 Saratov (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15

    Mathematical modeling and analysis of spatio-temporal chaotic dynamics of flexible simple and curved Euler-Bernoulli beams are carried out. The Kármán-type geometric non-linearity is considered. Algorithms reducing partial differential equations which govern the dynamics of studied objects and associated boundary value problems are reduced to the Cauchy problem through both Finite Difference Method with the approximation of O(c{sup 2}) and Finite Element Method. The obtained Cauchy problem is solved via the fourth and sixth-order Runge-Kutta methods. Validity and reliability of the results are rigorously discussed. Analysis of the chaotic dynamics of flexible Euler-Bernoulli beams for a series of boundary conditions is carried out with the help of the qualitative theory of differential equations. We analyze time histories, phase and modal portraits, autocorrelation functions, the Poincaré and pseudo-Poincaré maps, signs of the first four Lyapunov exponents, as well as the compression factor of the phase volume of an attractor. A novel scenario of transition from periodicity to chaos is obtained, and a transition from chaos to hyper-chaos is illustrated. In particular, we study and explain the phenomenon of transition from symmetric to asymmetric vibrations. Vibration-type charts are given regarding two control parameters: amplitude q{sub 0} and frequency ?{sub p} of the uniformly distributed periodic excitation. Furthermore, we detected and illustrated how the so called temporal-space chaos is developed following the transition from regular to chaotic system dynamics.

  4. Collective Dynamics and Coherent Diagnostics of Microbunched Relativistic Electron Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marinelli, Agostino

    2012-01-01

    Brightness Relativistic Electron Beams for Free-Electrona Thermal Relativistic Electron Beam: Eigenvalue/Eigenmodemicrobunching in the electron beam. The microbunched

  5. Crossed-beam studies of the dynamics of radical reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The objective of this program is to characterize the detailed dynamics of elementary radical reactions and to provide a better understanding of radical reactivity in general. The radical beam is typically generated by a laser photolysis method. After colliding with the reacting molecule in a crossed-beam apparatus, the reaction product state distribution is interrogated by laser spectroscopic techniques. Several radicals of combustion significance, such as O, CH, OH, CN and NCO have been successfully generated and their collisional behavior at the state-to-state integral cross section level of detail has been studied in this manner. During the past year, the detection system has been converted from LIF to REMPI schemes, and the emphasis of this program shifted to investigate the product angular distributions. Both inelastic and reactive processes have been studied.

  6. Accessing defect dynamics using intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Persaud, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Guo, H.; Hosemann, P.; Lidia, S.; Minor, A. M.; Seidl, P. A.; Schenkel, T.

    2015-06-18

    Gaining in-situ access to relaxation dynamics of radiation induced defects will lead to a better understanding of materials and is important for the verification of theoretical models and simulations. We show preliminary results from experiments at the new Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory that will enable in-situ access to defect dynamics through pump-probe experiments. Here, the unique capabilities of the NDCX-II accelerator to generate intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams are utilized. Preliminary data of channeling experiments using lithium and potassium ions and silicon membranes are shown. We compare these data to simulation results using Crystalmore »Trim. Furthermore, we discuss the improvements to the accelerator to higher performance levels and the new diagnostics tools that are being incorporated.« less

  7. Accessing defect dynamics using intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Persaud, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Barnard, J. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Guo, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hosemann, P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lidia, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Minor, A. M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Seidl, P. A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Schenkel, T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Gaining in-situ access to relaxation dynamics of radiation induced defects will lead to a better understanding of materials and is important for the verification of theoretical models and simulations. We show preliminary results from experiments at the new Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory that will enable in-situ access to defect dynamics through pump-probe experiments. Here, the unique capabilities of the NDCX-II accelerator to generate intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams are utilized. Preliminary data of channeling experiments using lithium and potassium ions and silicon membranes are shown. We compare these data to simulation results using Crystal Trim. Furthermore, we discuss the improvements to the accelerator to higher performance levels and the new diagnostics tools that are being incorporated.

  8. Mechanical Design of a High Energy Beam Absorber for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baffes, C.; Church, M.; Leibfritz, J.; Oplt, S.; Rakhno, I.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-10

    A high energy beam absorber has been built for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab. In the facility's initial configuration, an electron beam will be accelerated through 3 TTF-type or ILC-type SRF cryomodules to an energy of 750MeV. The electron beam will be directed to one of multiple downstream experimental and diagnostic beam lines and then deposited in one of two beam absorbers. The facility is designed to accommodate up to 6 cryomodules, which would produce a 75kW beam at 1.5GeV; this is the driving design condition for the beam absorbers. The beam absorbers consist of water-cooled graphite, aluminum and copper layers contained in a helium-filled enclosure. This paper describes the mechanical implementation of the beam absorbers, with a focus on thermal design and analysis. The potential for radiation-induced degradation of the graphite is discussed.

  9. Studies of beam dynamics in relativistic klystron two-beam accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lidia, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    Yu. Lett, Relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator. Phys.S.M. Lidia et al. Relativistic klystron two-beam acceleratorPlasma Set. , Relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator. [

  10. Collective Dynamics and Coherent Diagnostics of Microbunched Relativistic Electron Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marinelli, Agostino

    2012-01-01

    in the diagnostic of compressed electron beams and free-imaging and diagnostics of high-brightness electron beamsfor the diagnostics of compressed electron beams, such as

  11. DYNAMICS OF TARGET PLASMA HEATED BY NEUTRAL BEAMS IN A MIRROR Andrey A. Kabantsev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taskaev, Sergey Yur'evich

    DYNAMICS OF TARGET PLASMA HEATED BY NEUTRAL BEAMS IN A MIRROR Andrey A. Kabantsev Budker Institute(3832)359121 taskaev@inp.nsk.su ABSTRACT Target plasma behavior in a mirror when heated by neutral beams was studied. Considerable changes of target plasma density depending on target quality were found. Neutral beam injection

  12. A knowledge-based cone-beam x-ray CT algorithm for dynamic volumetric cardiac imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ge

    A knowledge-based cone-beam x-ray CT algorithm for dynamic volumetric cardiac imaging Ge Wanga, and wider coverage with multislice/cone- beam CT indicate a great potential for dynamic volumetric imaging/ helical multislice/cone-beam CT approach for dynamic volumetric cardiac imaging. This approach assumes

  13. Beam dynamics at the main LEBT of RAON accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Hyunchang

    2015-01-01

    The high-intensity rare-isotope accelerator (RAON) of the Rare Isotope Science Project (RISP) in Daejeon, Korea, has been designed to accelerate multiple-charge-state beams. The ion beams, which are generated by Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECR-IS), will be transported through the main Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) system to the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). While passing the beams through LEBT, we should keep the transverse beam size and longitudinal emittance small. Furthermore, the matching of required twiss parameter at the RFQ entrance will be performed by using electro-static quadrupoles at the main LEBT matching section which is from the multi-harmonic buncher (MHB) to the entrance of RFQ. We will briefly review the new aspects of main LEBT lattice and the beam matching at the main LEBT matching section will be presented. In addition, the effects of various errors on the beam orbit and the correction of distorted orbit will be discussed.

  14. On the Use of a Driven Wedge Test to Acquire Dynamic Fracture Energies of Bonded Beam Specimens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillard, David A. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Pohilt, David [Engineering Science and Mechanics Department, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, USA; Jacob, George Chennakattu [ORNL; Starbuck, Michael [Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA; Rakesh, Kapania [Aerospace and Ocean Engineering Department, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, USA

    2011-01-01

    A driven wedge test is used to characterize the mode I fracture resistance of adhesively bonded composite beam specimens over a range of crosshead rates up to 1 m/s. The shorter moment arms (between wedge contact and crack tip) significantly reduce inertial effects and stored energy in the debonded adherends, when compared with conventional means of testing double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens. This permitted collecting an order of magnitude more crack initiation events per specimen than could be obtained with end-loaded DCB specimens bonded with an epoxy exhibiting significant stick-slip behavior. The localized contact of the wedge with the adherends limits the amount of both elastic and kinetic energy, significantly reduces crack advance during slip events, and facilitates higher resolution imaging of the fracture zone with high speed imaging. The method appears to work well under both quasi-static and high rate loading, consistently providing substantially more discrete fracture events for specimens exhibiting pronounced stick-slip failures. Deflections associated with beam transverse shear and root rotation for the shorter beams were not negligible, so simple beam theory was inadequate for obtaining qualitative fracture energies. Finite element analysis of the specimens, however, showed that fracture energies were in good agreement with values obtained from traditional DCB tests. The method holds promise for use in dynamic testing and for characterizing bonded or laminated materials exhibiting significant stick slip behavior, reducing the number of specimens required to characterize a sufficient number of fracture events.

  15. A cracked beam finite element for rotating shaft dynamics and stability analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A cracked beam finite element for rotating shaft dynamics and stability analysis Saber El Arem Palaiseau, France Abstract In this paper, a method for the construction of a cracked beam finite element is presented. The additional flexibility due to the cracks is identified from three- dimensional finite element

  16. Beam dynamics in a long-pulse linear induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekdahl, Carl; Abeyta, Epifanio O; Aragon, Paul; Archuleta, Rita; Cook, Gerald; Dalmas, Dale; Esquibel, Kevin; Gallegos, Robert A; Garnett, Robert; Harrison, James F; Johnson, Jeffrey B; Jacquez, Edward B; Mc Cuistian, Brian T; Montoya, Nicholas A; Nath, Subrato; Nielsen, Kurt; Oro, David; Prichard, Benjamin; Rose, Chris R; Sanchez, Manolito; Schauer, Martin M; Seitz, Gerald; Schulze, Martin; Bender, Howard A; Broste, William B; Carlson, Carl A; Frayer, Daniel K; Johnson, Douglas E; Tom, C Y; Trainham, C; Williams, John; Scarpetti, Raymond; Genoni, Thomas; Hughes, Thomas; Toma, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    The second axis of the Dual Axis Radiography of Hydrodynamic Testing (DARHT) facility produces up to four radiographs within an interval of 1.6 microseconds. It accomplishes this by slicing four micro-pulses out of a long 1.8-kA, 16.5-MeV electron beam pulse and focusing them onto a bremsstrahlung converter target. The long beam pulse is created by a dispenser cathode diode and accelerated by the unique DARHT Axis-II linear induction accelerator (LIA). Beam motion in the accelerator would be a problem for radiography. High frequency motion, such as from beam breakup instability, would blur the individual spots. Low frequency motion, such as produced by pulsed power variation, would produce spot to spot differences. In this article, we describe these sources of beam motion, and the measures we have taken to minimize it.

  17. Detailed dynamics of electron beams self-trapped and accelerated in a self-modulated laser wakefield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald

    Detailed dynamics of electron beams self-trapped and accelerated in a self-modulated laser 1999 The electron beam generated in a self-modulated laser-wakefield accelerator is characterized, was measured for 2 MeV electrons. The electron beam was observed to have a multicomponent beam profile

  18. Analysis of Longitudinal Beam Dynamics Behavior and RF System Operative Limits at High Beam Currents in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mastorides, T; Rivetta, C.; Fox, J.D.; Winkle, D.Van; /SLAC; Tytelman, D.; /Dimtel, Redwood City

    2008-07-07

    A dynamics simulation model is used to estimate limits of performance of the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II). The simulation captures the dynamics and technical limitations of the Low Level Radio Frequency (LLRF) system, the high-power RF components and the low-order mode coupled bunch longitudinal beam dynamics. Simulation results showing the effect of non-linearities on the LLRF loops, and studies of the effectiveness of technical component upgrades are reported, as well as a comparison of these results with PEP-II measurements. These studies have led to the estimation of limits and determining factors in the maximum stored current that the Low Energy Ring/High Energy Ring (LER/HER) can achieve, based on system stability for different RF station configurations and upgrades. In particular, the feasibility of the PEP-II plans to achieve the final goal in luminosity, which required an increase of the beam currents to 4A for LER and 2.2A for HER, is studied. These currents are challenging in part because they would push the longitudinal low-order beam mode stability to the limit, and the klystron forward power past a level of satisfactory margin. An acceptable margin is defined in this paper, which in turn determines the corresponding klystron forward power limitation.

  19. Formation and nonlinear dynamics of the squeezed state of a helical electron beam with additional deceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egorov, E. N. Koronovskii, A. A.; Kurkin, S. A.; Hramov, A. E.

    2013-11-15

    Results of numerical simulations and analysis of the formation and nonlinear dynamics of the squeezed state of a helical electron beam in a vircator with a magnetron injection gun as an electron source and with additional electron deceleration are presented. The ranges of control parameters where the squeezed state can form in such a system are revealed, and specific features of the system dynamics are analyzed. It is shown that the formation of a squeezed state of a nonrelativistic helical electron beam in a system with electron deceleration is accompanied by low-frequency longitudinal dynamics of the space charge.

  20. TRACE3D. Interactive Beam-Dynamics Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singleton, L.; Yao, C.Y.

    1993-12-01

    TRACE3D is an interactive program that calculates the envelopes of a bunched beam, including linear space-charge forces, through a user-defined system. The transport system may consist of the following elements: drift, thin lens, quadrupole, permanent magnet quadrupole, solenoid, doublet, triplet, bending magnet, edge angle (for bend), RF gap, radio-frequency-quadrupole cell, RF cavity, coupled-cavity tank, user-desired element, coordinate rotation, and identical element. The beam is represented by a 6X6 matrix defining a hyper-ellipsoid in six-dimensional phase space. The projection of this hyperellipsoid on any two-dimensional plane is an ellipse that defines the boundary of the beam in that plane.

  1. Beam dynamics of the superconducting wiggler on the SSRF storage ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Qinglei; Jiang, Bocheng; Xu, Jieping; Zhao, Zhentang

    2015-01-01

    In the SSRF Phase-II beamline project, a Superconducting Wiggler (SW) will be installed in the electron storage ring. It may greatly impact on the beam dynamics due to the very high magnetic field. The emittance growth becomes a main problem, even after a well correction of the beam optics. A local achromatic lattice is studied, in order to combat the emittance growth and keep the good performance of the SSRF storage ring, as well as possible. Other effects of the SW are simulated and optimized as well, including the beta beating, the tune shift, the dynamic aperture, and the field error effects.

  2. Multiphase flow in the advanced fluid dynamics model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohl, W.R.; Wilhelm, D.; Berthier, J.; Parker, F.P.; Ichikawa, S.; Goutagny, L.; Ninokata, H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the modeling used in the Advanced Fluid Dynamics Model (AFDM), a computer code to investigate new approaches to simulating severe accidents in fast reactors. The AFDM code has 12 topologies describing what material contacts are possible depending on the presence or absence of a given material in a computational cell, the dominant liquid, and the continuous phase. Single-phase, bubbly, churn-turbulent, cellular, and dispersed flow are permitted for the pool situations modeled. Interfacial areas between the continuous and discontinuous phases are convected to allow some tracking of phenomenological histories. Interfacial areas also are modified by models of nucleation, dynamic forces, turbulence, flashing, coalescence, and mass transfer. Heat transfer generally is treated using engineering correlations. Liquid/vapor phase transitions are handled with a nonequililbrium heat-transfer-limited model, whereas melting and freezing processes are based on equilibrium considerations. The Los Alamos SESAME equation of state (EOS) has been inplemented using densities and temperatures as the independent variables. A summary description of the AFDM numerical algorithm is provided. The AFDM code currently is being debugged and checked out. Two sample three-field calculations also are presented. The first is a three-phase bubble column mixing experiment performed at Argonne National Laboratory; the second is a liquid-liquid mixing experiment performed at Kernforschungszentrum, Karlsruhe, that resulted in rapid vapor production. We conclude that only qualitative comparisons currently are possible for complex multiphase situations. Many further model developments can be pursued, but there are limits because of the lack of a comprehensive theory, the lack of detailed multicomponent experimental data, and the difficulties in keeping the resulting model complexities tractable.

  3. Simulations of beam envelope dynamics in circular accelerators

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chao, Hung-Chun; Lee, S.?Y.

    2015-02-01

    The envelope instability of high intensity beams in circular accelerators is studied via multiparticle simulations. The space charge kicks are derived from a Gaussian potential model for an efficient tracking. The evolution of the envelope phase space coordinates are derived from the bunch distribution. We found that the envelope stop band played an important role in emittance growth. Correction schemes of the envelope stop bands are studied. Because the space charge force pushes the envelope tunes downward, harmonics less than twice the betatron tunes are also important on emittance growth. Our code is efficient and fast, it can be usedmore »to study the effect of space charge force on high power accelerators.« less

  4. Design Study of Longitudinal Dynamics of the Drive Beam in a Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, H.

    2008-01-01

    Westenskow, "Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator As AA. Westenskow, "Relativistic Klystron Research for Two-Beamin a Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator", Proc. 16

  5. A New and Unifying Approach to Spin Dynamics and Beam Polarization in Storage Rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klaus Heinemann; James A. Ellison; Desmond P. Barber; Mathias Vogt

    2014-12-12

    With this paper we extend our studies [1] on polarized beams by distilling tools from the theory of principal bundles. Four major theorems are presented, one which ties invariant fields with the notion of normal form, one which allows one to compare different invariant fields, and two that relate the existence of invariant fields to the existence of certain invariant sets and relations between them. We then apply the theory to the dynamics of spin-1/2 and spin-1 particles and their density matrices describing statistically the particle-spin content of bunches. Our approach thus unifies the spin-vector dynamics from the T-BMT equation with the spin-tensor dynamics and other dynamics. This unifying aspect of our approach relates the examples elegantly and uncovers relations between the various underlying dynamical systems in a transparent way.

  6. Characterization of beam dynamics in the APS injector rings using time-resolved imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, B.X.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Borland, M.

    1997-06-01

    Images taken with streak cameras and gated intensified cameras with both time (longitudinal) and spatial (transverse) resolution reveal a wealth of information about circular accelerators. The authors illustrate a novel technique by a sequence of dual-sweep streak camera images taken at a high dispersion location in the booster synchrotron, where the horizontal coordinate is strongly correlated with the particle energy and the {open_quotes}top-view{close_quotes} of the beam gives a good approximation to the particle density distribution in the longitudinal phase space. A sequence of top-view images taken fight after injection clearly shows the beam dynamics in the phase space. We report another example from the positron accumulator ring for the characterization of its beam compression bunching with the 12th harmonic rf.

  7. Signal quality of the LHC AC dipoles and its impact on beam dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyamoto, R.; Cattin, M.; Serrano, J.; Tomas, R.

    2010-05-23

    The adiabaticity of the AC dipole might be compromised by noise or unwanted frequency components in its signal. An effort has been put to characterize and optimize the signal quality of the LHC AC dipoles. The measured signal is used in realistic simulations in order to evaluate its impact on beam dynamics and to ultimately establish safe margins for the operation of the LHC AC dipoles.

  8. The Dynamical Dipole Mode in Fusion Reactions with Exotic Nuclear Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Baran; C. Rizzo; M. Colonna; M. Di Toro; D. Pierroutsakou

    2009-02-09

    We report the properties of the prompt dipole radiation, produced via a collective bremsstrahlung mechanism, in fusion reactions with exotic beams. We show that the gamma yield is sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy below/around saturation. Moreover we find that the angular distribution of the emitted photons from such fast collective mode can represent a sensitive probe of its excitation mechanism and of fusion dynamics in the entrance channel.

  9. ADVANCED ELECTRON BEAM TECHNIQUES FOR METALLIC AND CERAMIC PROTECTIVE COATING SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boone, Donald H.

    2013-01-01

    W. Fairbanks, "Advanced Gas Turbine Coatings for MinimallyResistance Coatings for Gas Turbine Airfoils, 11 Final1980. (11) R. C. Krutenat, Gas Turbine Materials Conference

  10. ADVANCED ELECTRON BEAM TECHNIQUES FOR METALLIC AND CERAMIC PROTECTIVE COATING SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boone, Donald H.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced Materials for Alternate Fuel Capable Directly Heatuse of lower grade and alternate fuels such as the coal andthe more econom- ical alternate fuel. For example, estimates

  11. ADVANCED ELECTRON BEAM TECHNIQUES FOR METALLIC AND CERAMIC PROTECTIVE COATING SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boone, Donald H.

    2013-01-01

    W. Fairbanks, "Advanced Gas Turbine Coatings for MinimallyResistance Coatings for Gas Turbine Airfoils, 11 Finaland current production gas turbine and diesel engines in an

  12. ADVANCED ELECTRON BEAM TECHNIQUES FOR METALLIC AND CERAMIC PROTECTIVE COATING SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boone, Donald H.

    2013-01-01

    Intermetallic Systems as Coatings for High TemperatureAdvanced Gas Turbine Coatings for Minimally Processed Coaland P. E. Hodge, "Thermal Barrier Coatings for Heat Engine

  13. A STEADY-STATE FEL: PARTICLE DYNAMICS IN THE FEL PORTION OF A TWO-BEAM ACCELERATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sternbach, E.

    2008-01-01

    September 8-13, 1985 A STEADY-STATE FEL: PARTICLE DYNAMICSIN THE FEL PORTION OF A TWO-BEAM ACCELERATOR E. SternbachLBL-19939 A STEADY-STATE FEL: PARTICLE DYNAMICS IN THE FEL

  14. Advancing understanding of affect labeling with dynamic causal modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torrisi, SJ; Lieberman, MD; Bookheimer, SY; Altshuler, LL

    2013-01-01

    K.J. , Harrison, L. , Penny, W.D. , 2003. Dynamic causalNeuroimage 22, 1157–1172. Penny, W.D. , Stephan, K.E. ,emotions. Emotion 12, 229–235. Penny, W.D. , 2012. Comparing

  15. ADVANCED ELECTRON BEAM TECHNIQUES FOR METALLIC AND CERAMIC PROTECTIVE COATING SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boone, Donald H.

    2013-01-01

    Gas Turbine Coatings for Minimally Processed Coal Derived Liquid Fuels," presented at the Conference on Advanced MaterialsCoatings for Gas Turbine Airfoils," AGARD LectureS es Publication, LS No. 106 Materials

  16. Designing and Testing Contols to Mitigate Dynamic Loads in the Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, A.D.; Stol, K.A.

    2008-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is designing, implementing, and testing advanced controls to maximize energy extraction and reduce structural dynamic loads of wind turbines. These control designs are based on a linear model of the turbine that is generated by specialized modeling software. In this paper, we show the design and simulation testing of a control algorithm to mitigate blade, tower, and drivetrain loads using advanced state-space control design methods.

  17. Dynamics of Longitudinal Phase-Space Modulations in an rf Compressor for Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-05-21

    Free Electron Lasers (FELs) operating in the UV or x-ray radiation spectrum require peak beam currents that are generally higher than those obtainable by present electron sources, thus making bunch compression necessary. Compression, however, may heighten the effects of collective forces and degrade the beam quality. In this paper they provide a framework for investigating some of these effects in rf compressors by focusing on the longitudinal dynamics of small-amplitude density perturbations, which have the potential to cause the disruptive appearance of the so-called microbunching instability. They develop a linear theory valid for low-to-moderate compression factors under the assumption of a 1D impedance model of longitudinal space charge and provide validation against macroparticle simulations.

  18. Synchronous digitization for high dynamic range lock-in amplification in beam-scanning microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, Ryan D.; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Oglesbee, Robert A.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2014-03-15

    Digital lock-in amplification (LIA) with synchronous digitization (SD) is shown to provide significant signal to noise (S/N) and linear dynamic range advantages in beam-scanning microscopy measurements using pulsed laser sources. Direct comparisons between SD-LIA and conventional LIA in homodyne second harmonic generation measurements resulted in S/N enhancements consistent with theoretical models. SD-LIA provided notably larger S/N enhancements in the limit of low light intensities, through the smooth transition between photon counting and signal averaging developed in previous work. Rapid beam scanning instrumentation with up to video rate acquisition speeds minimized photo-induced sample damage. The corresponding increased allowance for higher laser power without sample damage is advantageous for increasing the observed signal content.

  19. Modeling and Simulation of the Longitudinal Beam Dynamics - RF Station Interaction in the LHC Rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mastorides, T; Rivetta, C.; Fox, J.D.; Winkle, D.Van; /SLAC; Baudrenghien, P.; Tuckmantel, J.; /CERN

    2008-07-07

    A non-linear time-domain simulation has been developed to study the interaction between longitudinal beam dynamics and RF stations in the LHC rings. The motivation for this tool is to determine optimal LLRF configurations, to study system sensitivity on various parameters, and to define the operational and technology limits. It will be also used to study the effect of RF station noise, impedance, and perturbations on the beam life time and longitudinal emittance. It allows the study of alternative LLRF implementations and control algorithms. The insight and experience gained from our PEP-II simulation is important for this work. In this paper we discuss properties of the simulation tool that will be helpful in analyzing the LHC RF system and its initial results. Partial verification of the model with data taken during the LHC RF station commissioning is presented.

  20. Experimental investigation of the longitudinal beam dynamics in a photoinjector using a two-macroparticle bunch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piot, P.; Tikhoplav, R.; Mihalcea, D.; Barov, N.; /Northern Illinois U.

    2006-03-01

    We have developed a two-macroparticle bunch to explore the longitudinal beam dynamics through various components of the Fermilab/NICADD photoinjector. Such a two-macroparticle bunch is generated by splitting the ultraviolet pulse from the photocathode drive laser. The presented method allows the exploration of radiofrequency-induced compression in the 1.625 cell rf-gun and the booster cavity. It also allows a direct measurement of the momentum compaction of the magnetic bunch compressor. The measurements are compared with analytical and numerical models.

  1. Beam-energy and system-size dependence of dynamical net charge fluctuations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moira, M. M.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Dictel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X. -H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Buren, G. Van; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, A. M. Vander; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.

    2009-01-01

    REVIEW C 79, 024906 (2009) Beam-energy and system-size dependence of dynamical net charge fluctuations B. I. Abelev,8 M. M. Aggarwal,30 Z. Ahammed,47 B. D. Anderson,18 D. Arkhipkin,12 G. S. Averichev,11 Y. Bai,27 J. Balewski,22 O. Barannikova,8 L. S.... Barnby,2 J. Baudot,16 S. Baumgart,52 D. R. Beavis,3 R. Bellwied,50 F. Benedosso,27 R. R. Betts,8 S. Bhardwaj,35 A. Bhasin,17 A. K. Bhati,30 H. Bichsel,49 J. Bielcik,10 J. Bielcikova,10 B. Biritz,6 L. C. Bland,3 M. Bombara,2 B. E. Bonner,36 M. Botje,27 J...

  2. Effect of Field Errors in Muon Collider IR Magnets on Beam Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Kapin, V.V.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    In order to achieve peak luminosity of a Muon Collider (MC) in the 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} range very small values of beta-function at the interaction point (IP) are necessary ({beta}* {le} 1 cm) while the distance from IP to the first quadrupole can not be made shorter than {approx}6 m as dictated by the necessity of detector protection from backgrounds. In the result the beta-function at the final focus quadrupoles can reach 100 km making beam dynamics very sensitive to all kind of errors. In the present report we consider the effects on momentum acceptance and dynamic aperture of multipole field errors in the body of IR dipoles as well as of fringe-fields in both dipoles and quadrupoles in the ase of 1.5 TeV (c.o.m.) MC. Analysis shows these effects to be strong but correctable with dedicated multipole correctors.

  3. Dynamic Non-Continuous Single Slot Advance Reservation over Wavelength Routed Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dynamic Non-Continuous Single Slot Advance Reservation over Wavelength Routed Networks Bharath H) requests in all- optical wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) networks. We propose a two-phase novel signaling in the network by reducing the average number of lightpath switches significantly and greatly

  4. High Resolution Simulation of Beam Dynamics in Electron Linacs for Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryne, R.D.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A.A.; Qiang, J.

    2009-01-05

    In this paper we report on large scale multi-physics simulation of beam dynamics in electron linacs for next generation free electron lasers (FELs). We describe key features of a parallel macroparticle simulation code including three-dimensional (3D) space-charge effects, short-range structure wake fields, longitudinal coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) wake fields, and treatment of radiofrequency (RF) accelerating cavities using maps obtained from axial field profiles. A macroparticle up-sampling scheme is described that reduces the shot noise from an initial distribution with a smaller number of macroparticles while maintaining the global properties of the original distribution. We present a study of the microbunching instability which is a critical issue for future FELs due to its impact on beam quality at the end of the linac. Using parameters of a planned FEL linac at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), we show that a large number of macroparticles (beyond 100 million) is needed to control numerical shot noise that drives the microbunching instability. We also explore the effect of the longitudinal grid on simulation results. We show that acceptable results are obtained with around 2048 longitudinal grid points, and we discuss this in view of the spectral growth rate predicted from linear theory. As an application, we present results from simulations using one billion macroparticles of the FEL linac under design at LBNL. We show that the final uncorrelated energy spread of the beam depends not only on the initial uncorrelated energy spread but also depends strongly on the shape of the initial current profile. By using a parabolic initial current profile, 5 keV initial uncorrelated energy spread at 40 MeV injection energy, and improved linac design, those simulations demonstrate that a reasonable beam quality can be achieved at the end of the linac, with the final distribution having about 100 keV energy spread, 2.4 GeV energy, and 1.2 kA peak current.

  5. Investigation of the Chaotic Dynamics of an Electron Beam with a Virtual Cathode in an External Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. N. Egorov; A. E. Hramov

    2006-06-27

    The effect of the strength of the focusing magnetic field on chaotic dynamic processes occurring inan electron beam with a virtual cathode, as well as on the processes whereby the structures form in the beamand interact with each other, is studied by means of two-dimensional numerical simulations based on solving a self-consistent set of Vlasov-Maxwell equations. It is shown that, as the focusing magnetic field is decreased,the dynamics of an electron beam with a virtual cathode becomes more complicated due to the formation andinteraction of spatio-temporal longitudinal and transverse structures in the interaction region of a vircator. The optimum efficiency of the interaction of an electron beam with the electromagnetic field of the vircator isachieved at a comparatively weak external magnetic field and is determined by the fundamentally two-dimensional nature of the motion of the beam electrons near the virtual cathode.

  6. Dynamics of CN+alkane reactions by crossed-beam dc slice imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang Cunshun; Li Wen; Estillore, Armando D.; Suits, Arthur G.

    2008-08-21

    The hydrogen atom abstraction reactions of CN (X {sup 2}{sigma}{sup +}) with alkanes have been studied using the crossed molecular beam technique with dc slice ion imaging at collision energies of 7.5 and 10.8 kcal/mol. The product alkyl radical images were obtained via single photon ionization at 157 nm for the reactions of CN (X {sup 2}{sigma}{sup +}) with n-butane, n-pentane, n-hexane, and cyclohexane. From analysis of the images, we obtained the center-of-mass frame product angular distributions and translational energy distributions directly. The results indicate that the products are largely backscattered and that most of the available energy ({approx}80%-85%) goes to the internal energy of the products. The reaction dynamics is discussed in light of recent kinetics data, theoretical calculations, and results for related halogen and oxygen atom reactions.

  7. Method of Linear Invariants for description of beam dynamics of FEL undulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Angelow; D. Trifonov; V. Angelov; H. Hristov

    2008-05-23

    We propose a new model for description of electrons beam dynamics in Free Electron Laser (FEL) undulator, based on the method of linear time-dependent invariants of quantum-mechanical charge particle. The magnetic field has periodic structure along the undulator. For this problem, described by time-dependent quadratic Hamiltonian, we obtain exact solution. The time-evolutions of the tree quantum fluctuations: covariance cov(q,p), var(q) and var(p) for the charge particle in this case are also determined. This research will help to optimize the FEL undulator: for example, using a 2.5 GeV linear electron accelerator it will be possible to emit radiation at 1.5 nm and shorter length. This method could be applicable also to any device with periodic structure of applied field (e.g. Tokamak, cyclic accelerators) for the case of charge non-relativistic quantum particles.

  8. Summary of dynamic analyses of the advanced neutron source reactor inner control rods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrich, W.R.

    1995-08-01

    A summary of the structural dynamic analyses that were instrumental in providing design guidance to the Advanced Neutron source (ANS) inner control element system is presented in this report. The structural analyses and the functional constraints that required certain performance parameters were combined to shape and guide the design effort toward a prediction of successful and reliable control and scram operation to be provided by these inner control rods.

  9. Electron beam dynamics in the long-pulse, high-current DARHT-II linear induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekdahl, Carl A; Abeyta, Epifanio O; Aragon, Paul; Archuleta, Rita; Cook, Gerald; Dalmas, Dale; Esquibel, Kevin; Gallegos, Robert A; Garnett, Robert; Harrison, James F; Johnson, Jeffrey B; Jacquez, Edward B; Mccuistian, Brian T; Montoya, Nicholas A; Nath, Subrato; Nielsen, Kurt; Oro, David; Prichard, Benjamin; Rowton, Lawrence; Sanchez, Manolito; Scarpetti, Raymond; Schauer, Martin M; Seitz, Gerald; Schulze, Martin; Bender, Howard A; Broste, William B; Carlson, Carl A; Frayer, Daniel K; Johnson, Douglas E; Tom, C Y; Williams, John; Hughes, Thomas; Anaya, Richard; Caporaso, George; Chambers, Frank; Chen, Yu - Jiuan; Falabella, Steve; Guethlein, Gary; Raymond, Brett; Richardson, Roger; Trainham, C; Weir, John; Genoni, Thomas; Toma, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    The DARHT-II linear induction accelerator (LIA) now accelerates 2-kA electron beams to more than 17 MeV. This LIA is unique in that the accelerated current pulse width is greater than 2 microseconds. This pulse has a flat-top region where the final electron kinetic energy varies by less than 1% for more than 1.5 microseconds. The long risetime of the 6-cell injector current pulse is 0.5 {micro}s, which can be scraped off in a beam-head cleanup zone before entering the 68-cell main accelerator. We discuss our experience with tuning this novel accelerator; and present data for the resulting beam transport and dynamics. We also present beam stability data, and relate these to previous stability experiments at lower current and energy.

  10. Reaction Dynamics on the Formation of Styrene: A Crossed Molecular Beam Study of the Reaction of Phenyl Radicals with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Ralf I.

    Reaction Dynamics on the Formation of Styrene: A Crossed Molecular Beam Study of the Reaction the styrene molecule (C6H5C2H3). Experiments with D4-ethylene verified that in the corresponding reaction. The overall reaction to form styrene plus atomic hydrogen from the reactants was found to be exoergic by 25

  11. International Journal of Adhesion & Adhesives 26 (2006) 314324 Dynamic response of a repaired composite beam with an adhesively

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaziri, Ashkan

    2006-01-01

    International Journal of Adhesion & Adhesives 26 (2006) 314­324 Dynamic response of a repaired composite beam with an adhesively bonded patch under a harmonic peeling load A. Vaziri1 , H. Nayeb with adhesive. In the theoretical part, the equations of motion in the axial and transverse directions were

  12. Design Study of Beam Dynamics Issues for 1 TeV Next Linear Collider Based on Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam-Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, H.

    2008-01-01

    Yu, S. S. , "Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator,"Consideration of Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam AcceleratorStudy of the Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator

  13. First plasma of megawatt high current ion source for neutral beam injector of the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak on the test bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu Chundong; Xie Yahong; Liu Sheng; Xie Yuanlai; Jiang Caichao; Song Shihua; Li Jun; Liu Zhimin

    2011-02-15

    High current ion source is the key part of the neutral beam injector. In order to develop the project of 4 MW neutral beam injection for the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) on schedule, the megawatt high current ion source is prestudied in the Institute of Plasma Physics in China. In this paper, the megawatt high current ion source test bed and the first plasma are presented. The high current discharge of 900 A at 2 s and long pulse discharge of 5 s at 680 A are achieved. The arc discharge characteristic of high current ion source is analyzed primarily.

  14. Chirped-pulse manipulated carrier dynamics in low-temperature molecular-beam-epitaxy grown GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Chao-Kuei, E-mail: chuckcklee@yahoo.com [Department of Photonics, National Sun-Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 80400, Taiwan (China); Lin, Yuan-Yao [Department of Electrical Engineering, Institute of Photonics Technologies, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Lin, Sung-Hui [Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Lin, Gong-Ru [Department of Electrical Engineering, Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Roosevelt Road, Sec. 4, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Pan, Ci-Ling [Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Tsing Hwa University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China)

    2014-04-28

    Chirped pulse controlled carrier dynamics in low-temperature molecular-beam-epitaxy grown GaAs are investigated by degenerate pump-probe technique. Varying the chirped condition of excited pulse from negative to positive increases the carrier relaxation time so as to modify the dispersion and reshape current pulse in time domain. The spectral dependence of carrier dynamics is analytically derived and explained by Shockley-Read Hall model. This observation enables the new feasibility of controlling carrier dynamics in ultrafast optical devices via the chirped pulse excitations.

  15. Dynamics of Ultra-Relativistic Nuclear Collisions with Heavy Beams: An Experimental Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Braun-Munzinger; Johanna Stachel

    1998-03-30

    We review, from an experimental point of view, the current status of ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions with heavy beams.

  16. BEAM DYNAMICS STUDIES FOR THE SPIRAL-2 PROJECT J-L. Biarrotte#

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    this construction phase: freezing of the low-energy beam transport lines of the injector, consolidation of the mass of freezing the layout of the injector low-energy beam transport lines, as is shown in Figure 1, superconducting linac, and high-energy beam transport lines (HEBTs). The injector includes two ECR sources (one

  17. SciDAC advances in beam dynamics simulation: from light sources to colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang, J.

    2008-01-01

    accelerator facilities, e.g. LCLS, RHIC, Tevatron, LHC,generation and transport in the LCLS photoinjector. Figure 2vertical offsets through the LCLS photoinjector. With such a

  18. SciDAC advances in beam dynamics simulation: from light sources to colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang, Ji

    2009-01-01

    accelerator facilities, e.g. LCLS, RHIC, Tevatron, LHC,generation and transport in the LCLS photoinjector. Figure 2vertical offsets through the LCLS photoinjector. With such a

  19. The 19th ICFA Advanced Beam Dynamics Workshop on Future Light Sources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. CoalMexicoConferencePriceshielding evaluation for the

  20. Challenges in Accelerator Beam Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendt, M.

    2009-12-01

    The challenges in beam instrumentation and diagnostics for present and future particle accelerator projects are presented. A few examples for advanced hadron and lepton beam diagnostics are given.

  1. Study of freeze-out dynamics in STAR at RHIC Beam Energy Scan Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabita Das; for the STAR collaboration

    2014-12-01

    The STAR detector at RHIC, due to its large uniform acceptance and excellent particle identification capabilities, has measured a variety of hadron species ($\\pi^{\\pm}$, $K^{\\pm}$, $p$, $\\bar{p}$, $K^{0}_{S}$, $\\Lambda$, $\\bar{\\Lambda}$, $\\Xi^{-}$, $\\bar{\\Xi}^{+}$) produced in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt {s_{NN}}= 7.7$, 11.5, 27 and 39 GeV. These data are part of the Beam Energy Scan (BES) program at RHIC and provide an opportunity to measure the yields and transverse momentum spectra ($p_{T}$) of the particles produced in the collisions. The corresponding measurements allow to study the freeze-out properties and dynamics of heavy ion collisions. A statistical thermal model analysis of particle production in BES energies in both grand canonical and strangeness canonical ensembles, is used to extract the chemical freeze-out parameters. The $p_{T}$ spectra, particle ratios, and the energy and centrality dependence of freeze-out parameters determined from the thermal fit of particle ratios are discussed.

  2. Report of the ICFA Beam Dynamics Workshop 'Accelerators for a Higgs Factory: Linear vs. Circular' (HF2012)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alain Blondel; Alex Chao; Weiren Chou; Jie Gao; Daniel Schulte; Kaoru Yokoya

    2013-02-15

    This paper is a summary report of the ICFA Beam Dynamics Workshop 'Accelerators for a Higgs Factory: Linear vs. Circular' (HF2012). It discusses four types of accelerators as possible candidates for a Higgs factory: linear e+e- colliders, circular e+e- colliders, muon collider and photon colliders. The comparison includes: physics reach, performance (energy and luminosity), upgrade potential, technology maturity and readiness, and technical challenges requiring further R&D.

  3. Studies of dynamic contact of ceramics and alloys for advanced heat engines. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaydos, P.A.; Dufrane, K.F. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1993-06-01

    Advanced materials and coatings for low heat rejection engines have been investigated for almost a decade. Much of the work has concentrated on the critical wear interface between the piston ring and cylinder liner. Simplified bench tests have identified families of coatings with high temperature wear performance that could meet or exceed that of conventional engine materials at today`s operating temperatures. More recently, engine manufacturers have begun to optimize material combinations and manufacturing processes so that the materials not only have promising friction and wear performance but are practical replacements for current materials from a materials and manufacturing cost standpoint. In this study, the advanced materials supplied by major diesel engine manufacturers were evaluated in an experimental apparatus that simulates many of the in-cylinder conditions of a low heat rejection diesel engine. Results include ring wear factors and average dynamic friction coefficients measured at intervals during the test. These results are compared with other advanced materials tested in the past as well as the baseline wear of current engines. Both fabricated specimens and sections of actual ring and cylinder liners were used in the testing. Observations and relative friction and wear performance of the individual materials are provided.

  4. Study of Acquisition Electronics with a High Dynamic Range for a Beam Loss Measurement System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venturini, G; Dehning, B; Effinger, E

    2010-01-01

    The particles accelerated in CERN accelerator chain reach high energies, topped by the particle energy at collision in the LHC, 7 GeV. During the operation, an amount of particles is inevitably lost from the beam. Depending on the extent of the losses, physical damage to machine components may be caused and the shower of secondary emission particles deposits energy in the surrounding equipment constituting the accelerator. The hadronic cascade also activates their materials, representing a hazard to the workers at CERN. In the LHC, the superconducting magnets that constitute the synchrotron lattice are kept at an operating temperature of 1:9K through a cryogenic facility employing superliquid helium, the increase in their temperature potentially initiates a quench. In the SPS, the damage due to a lost beam is also visible. The Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system has been developed to reliably protect the machines composing CERN’s accelerator chain and additionally provide information about the beam status: th...

  5. Diagnostic Neutral Beam Injector for Active Plasma Spectroscopy at Gas-Dynamic Trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korepanov, S.A.; Deichuli, P.O.; Ivanov, A.A.; Mishagin, V.V.

    2005-01-15

    A diagnostic beam system has been developed for the GDT. This injector is the modification of the diagnostic injector RFX-DNBI. The system is primarily used for magnetic field measurements via motional Stark effect (MSE). The ion source provides 50keV, 5A hydrogen beam. Ions are extracted from a plasma created by an arc-discharge source and, after accelerating and focusing, are neutralized in a gas target. A plasma emitter, which is formed by collisionless expansion of a plasma jet on to the grids, has low perpendicular ion temperature. These results in rather low (0.01 rad) angular divergence of the extracted ion beam. In the accelerator, there is a set of four nested grids with 421 circular apertures of 4 mm diameter configured in a hexagonal pattern. The geometry of the elementary cell was optimized by using 2D computer code PBGUNS to obtain small angular divergence of the beam. The grids of ion optical system are spherically curved providing geometric focusing of the beam at a distance 1.5 m. Arc-discharge plasma box provides highly ionized plasma, so that the extracted beam has about 90% of full energy specie. The injector provides up to 4 ms duration pulse.

  6. Arc discharge regulation of a megawatt hot cathode bucket ion source for the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak neutral beam injector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie Yahong; Hu Chundong; Liu Sheng; Jiang Caichao; Li Jun; Liang Lizhen; Collaboration: NBI Team

    2012-01-15

    Arc discharge of a hot cathode bucket ion source tends to be unstable what attributes to the filament self-heating and energetic electrons backstreaming from the accelerator. A regulation method, which based on the ion density measurement by a Langmuir probe, is employed for stable arc discharge operation and long pulse ion beam generation. Long pulse arc discharge of 100 s is obtained based on this regulation method of arc power. It establishes a foundation for the long pulse arc discharge of a megawatt ion source, which will be utilized a high power neutral beam injection device.

  7. Beam Dynamics Studies for the First Muon Linac of the Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Bontoiu,M. Aslaninejad,J. Pozimski,Alex Bogacz

    2010-05-01

    Within the Neutrino Factory Project the muon acceleration process involves a complex chain of accelerators including a (single-pass) linac, two recirculating linacs and an FFAG. The linac consists of RF cavities and iron shielded solenoids for transverse focusing and has been previously designed relying on idealized field models. However, to predict accurately the transport and acceleration of a high emittance 30 cm wide beam with 10 % energy spread requires detailed knowledge of fringe field distributions. This article presents results of the front-to-end tracking of the muon beam through numerically simulated realistic field distributions for the shielded solenoids and the RF fields. Real and phase space evolution of the beam has been studied along the linac and the results are presented and discussed.

  8. Fully 3D Multiple Beam Dynamics Processes Simulation for the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, E.; Amundson, J.; Spentzouris, P; Valishev, A.; /Fermilab

    2010-06-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron has been, until 2010, the premier high-energy physics collider in the world. The data collected over the last decade by high-energy physics experiments running at the Tevatron have been analyzed to make important measurements in fundamental areas such as B meson masses and flavor oscillation, searches for the Higgs boson, and supersymmetry. Collecting these data at the limits of detectability has required the Tevatron to operate reliably at high beam intensities to maximize the number of collisions to analyze. This impressive achievement has been assisted by the use of HPC resources and software provided through the SciDAC program. This paper describes the enhancements to the BeamBeam3d code to realistically simulate the Tevatron, the validation of these simulations, and the improvement in equipment reliability and personal safety achieved with the aid of simulations.

  9. Dynamic Control of Laser-Produced Proton Beams K. Markey,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    College, London, SW7 2BW, United Kingdom 3 Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton. The peak focusing power and its temporal variation are shown to depend on the target characteristics, allowing for the collimation of the inherently highly divergent beam and the design of achromatic

  10. Statistical analysis of the dynamics of secondary electrons in the flare of a high-voltage beam-type discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demkin, V. P.; Mel'nichuk, S. V.

    2014-09-15

    In the present work, results of investigations into the dynamics of secondary electrons with helium atoms in the presence of the reverse electric field arising in the flare of a high-voltage pulsed beam-type discharge and leading to degradation of the primary electron beam are presented. The electric field in the discharge of this type at moderate pressures can reach several hundred V/cm and leads to considerable changes in the kinetics of secondary electrons created in the process of propagation of the electron beam generated in the accelerating gap with a grid anode. Moving in the accelerating electric field toward the anode, secondary electrons create the so-called compensating current to the anode. The character of electron motion and the compensating current itself are determined by the ratio of the field strength to the concentration of atoms (E/n). The energy and angular spectra of secondary electrons are calculated by the Monte Carlo method for different ratios E/n of the electric field strength to the helium atom concentration. The motion of secondary electrons with threshold energy is studied for inelastic collisions of helium atoms and differential analysis is carried out of the collisional processes causing energy losses of electrons in helium for different E/n values. The mechanism of creation and accumulation of slow electrons as a result of inelastic collisions of secondary electrons with helium atoms and selective population of metastable states of helium atoms is considered. It is demonstrated that in a wide range of E/n values the motion of secondary electrons in the beam-type discharge flare has the character of drift. At E/n values characteristic for the discharge of the given type, the drift velocity of these electrons is calculated and compared with the available experimental data.

  11. A new cantilever beam-rigid-body MEMS gyroscope: mathematical model and linear dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lajimi, Seyed Amir Mousavi; Abdel-Rahman, Eihab

    2014-01-01

    A new microbeam-rigid-body gyroscope is introduced and its static and dynamic behaviours are studied. The main structure includes a microbeam and an eccentric end-rigid-body influencing the dynamic and static characteristics of the sensor. The sensitivity of the device and the effect of system parameters on the microsystem's response are investigated.

  12. Particle simulation of collision dynamics for ion beam injection into a rarefied gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giuliano, Paul N.; Boyd, Iain D.

    2013-03-15

    This study details a comparison of ion beam simulations with experimental data from a simplified plasma test cell in order to study and validate numerical models and environments representative of electric propulsion devices and their plumes. The simulations employ a combination of the direct simulation Monte Carlo and particle-in-cell methods representing xenon ions and atoms as macroparticles. An anisotropic collision model is implemented for momentum exchange and charge exchange interactions between atoms and ions in order to validate the post-collision scattering behaviors of dominant collision mechanisms. Cases are simulated in which the environment is either collisionless or non-electrostatic in order to prove that the collision models are the dominant source of low- and high-angle particle scattering and current collection within this environment. Additionally, isotropic cases are run in order to show the importance of anisotropy in these collision models. An analysis of beam divergence leads to better characterization of the ion beam, a parameter that requires careful analysis. Finally, suggestions based on numerical results are made to help guide the experimental design in order to better characterize the ion environment.

  13. BEAM DYMANICS SIMULATIONS REGARDING THE EXPERIMENTAL FFAG EMMA, USING THE ON-LINE CODE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giboudot, Y; Méot, F; Yokoi, T

    2010-01-01

    The Electron Model for Many Applications FFAG (EMMA) has been the object of extensive beam dynamics simulations during its design and construction phases, using the ray-tracing code Zgoubi, which has been retained as the on-line simulation engine. On the other hand EMMA commissioning requires further advanced beam dynamics studies as well as on-line and off-line simulations. This contribution reports on some aspects of the studies so performed during the last months using Zgoubi.

  14. Field calculations, single-particle tracking, and beam dynamics with space charge in the electron lens for the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noll, Daniel; Stancari, Giulio

    2015-11-17

    An electron lens is planned for the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator as a nonlinear element for integrable dynamics, as an electron cooler, and as an electron trap to study space-charge compensation in rings. We present the main design principles and constraints for nonlinear integrable optics. A magnetic configuration of the solenoids and of the toroidal section is laid out. Singleparticle tracking is used to optimize the electron path. Electron beam dynamics at high intensity is calculated with a particle-in-cell code to estimate current limits, profile distortions, and the effects on the circulating beam. In the conclusions, we summarize the main findings and list directions for further work.

  15. Transverse beam dynamics in plasma-based linacs (Conference) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaon and PionExperimentsConnect Conference: Transverse beam

  16. Advanced High-Temperature Reactor Dynamic System Model Development: April 2012 Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qualls, A.L.; Cetiner, M.S.; Wilson, T.L., Jr.

    2012-04-30

    The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a large-output fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR). An early-phase preconceptual design of a 1500 MW(e) power plant was developed in 2011 [Refs. 1 and 2]. An updated version of this plant is shown as Fig. 1. FHRs feature low-pressure liquid fluoride salt cooling, coated-particle fuel, a high-temperature power cycle, and fully passive decay heat rejection. The AHTR is designed to be a “walk away” reactor that requires no action to prevent large off-site releases following even severe reactor accidents. This report describes the development of dynamic system models used to further the AHTR design toward that goal. These models predict system response during warmup, startup, normal operation, and limited off-normal operating conditions. Severe accidents that include a loss-of-fluid inventory are not currently modeled. The scope of the models is limited to the plant power system, including the reactor, the primary and intermediate heat transport systems, the power conversion system, and safety-related or auxiliary heat removal systems. The primary coolant system, the intermediate heat transport system and the reactor building structure surrounding them are shown in Fig. 2. These systems are modeled in the most detail because the passive interaction of the primary system with the surrounding structure and heat removal systems, and ultimately the environment, protects the reactor fuel and the vessel from damage during severe reactor transients. The reactor silo also plays an important role during system warmup. The dynamic system modeling tools predict system performance and response. The goal is to accurately predict temperatures and pressures within the primary, intermediate, and power conversion systems and to study the impacts of design changes on those responses. The models are design tools and are not intended to be used in reactor qualification. The important details to capture in the primary system relate to flows within the reactor vessel during severe events and the resulting temperature profiles (temperature and duration) for major components. Critical components include the fuel, reactor vessel, primary piping, and the primary-to-intermediate heat exchangers (P-IHXs). The major AHTR power system loops are shown in Fig. 3. The intermediate heat transfer system is a group of three pumped salt loops that transports the energy produced in the primary system to the power conversion system. Two dynamic system models are used to analyze the AHTR. A Matlab/Simulink?-based model initiated in 2011 has been updated to reflect the evolving design parameters related to the heat flows associated with the reactor vessel. The Matlab model utilizes simplified flow assumptions within the vessel and incorporates an empirical representation of the Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System (DRACS). A Dymola/Modelica? model incorporates a more sophisticated representation of primary coolant flow and a physics-based representation of the three-loop DRACS thermal hydraulics. This model is not currently operating in a fully integrated mode. The Matlab model serves as a prototype and provides verification for the Dymola model, and its use will be phased out as the Dymola model nears completion. The heat exchangers in the system are sized using spreadsheet-based, steady-state calculations. The detail features of the heat exchangers are programmed into the dynamic models, and the overall dimensions are used to generate realistic plant designs. For the modeling cases where the emphasis is on understanding responses within the intermediate and primary systems, the power conversion system may be modeled as a simple boundary condition at the intermediate-to-power conversion system heat exchangers.

  17. Beam dynamics study of a 30?MeV electron linear accelerator to drive a neutron source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Yang, Haeryong; Kang, Heung-Sik

    2014-02-14

    An experimental neutron facility based on 32?MeV/18.47?kW electron linac has been studied by means of PARMELA simulation code. Beam dynamics study for a traveling wave constant gradient electron accelerator is carried out to reach the preferential operation parameters (E?=?30?MeV, P?=?18?kW, dE/E?beam energy is obtained at the end of the linac. As high electron energy is required to produce acceptable neutron flux. The final neutron flux is estimated to be 5?×?10{sup 11}?n/cm{sup 2}/s/mA. Future development will be the real design of a 30?MeV electron linac based on S band traveling wave.

  18. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks: Concepts and Recent Advances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faybishenko, B.

    1999-02-01

    This publication contains extended abstracts of papers presented at the International Symposium ''Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks: Concepts and Recent Advances'' held at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory on February 10-12, 1999. This Symposium is organized in Honor of the 80th Birthday of Paul A. Witherspoon, who initiated some of the early investigations on flow and transport in fractured rocks at the University of California, Berkeley, and at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He is a key figure in the development of basic concepts, modeling, and field measurements of fluid flow and contaminant transport in fractured rock systems. The technical problems of assessing fluid flow, radionuclide transport, site characterization, modeling, and performance assessment in fractured rocks remain the most challenging aspects of subsurface flow and transport investigations. An understanding of these important aspects of hydrogeology is needed to assess disposal of nu clear wastes, development of geothermal resources, production of oil and gas resources, and remediation of contaminated sites. These Proceedings of more than 100 papers from 12 countries discuss recent scientific and practical developments and the status of our understanding of fluid flow and radionuclide transport in fractured rocks. The main topics of the papers are: Theoretical studies of fluid flow in fractured rocks; Multi-phase flow and reactive chemical transport in fractured rocks; Fracture/matrix interactions; Hydrogeological and transport testing; Fracture flow models; Vadose zone studies; Isotopic studies of flow in fractured systems; Fractures in geothermal systems; Remediation and colloid transport in fractured systems; and Nuclear waste disposal in fractured rocks.

  19. Beam-Energy and System-Size Dependence of Dynamical Net Charge Fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Monika

    2008-01-01

    We present measurements of net charge fluctuations in $Au + Au$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = $ 19.6, 62.4, 130, and 200 GeV, $Cu + Cu$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = $ 62.4, 200 GeV, and $p + p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = $ 200 GeV using the net charge dynamical fluctuations measure $\

  20. Beam-Energy and System-Size Dependence of Dynamical Net Charge Fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. I. Abelev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; B. D. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; Y. Bai; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Baumgart; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; F. Benedosso; R. R. Betts; S. Bhardwaj; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; B. Biritz; L. C. Bland; M. Bombara; B. E. Bonner; M. Botje; J. Bouchet; E. Braidot; A. V. Brandin; S. Bueltmann; T. P. Burton; M. Bystersky; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; J. Callner; O. Catu; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Y. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; K. E. Choi; W. Christie; S. U. Chung; R. F. Clarke; M. J. M. Codrington; J. P. Coffin; T. M. Cormier; M. R. Cosentino; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Dash; M. Daugherity; T. G. Dedovich; M. DePhillips; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; L. Didenko; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; F. Du; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; W. R. Edwards; L. G. Efimov; E. Elhalhuli; M. Elnimr; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; L. Eun; P. Fachini; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; A. Feng; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; L. Gaillard; D. R. Gangadharan; M. S. Ganti; E. Garcia-Solis; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; A. Gordon; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; B. Grube; S. M. Guertin; K. S. F. F. Guimaraes; A. Gupta; N. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; T. J. Hallman; A. Hamed; J. W. Harris; W. He; M. Heinz; S. Heppelmann; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; A. M. Hoffman; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; R. S. Hollis; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; A. Iordanova; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; P. Jakl; F. Jin; P. G. Jones; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kajimoto; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; V. Yu. Khodyrev; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; S. R. Klein; A. G. Knospe; A. Kocoloski; D. D. Koetke; M. Kopytine; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; P. Kravtsov; V. I. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; C. Kuhn; L. Kumar; P. Kurnadi; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. LaPointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; C-H. Lee; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; Y. Li; G. Lin; X. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; J. Liu; L. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; T. Ludlam; D. Lynn; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; J. Millane; M. L. Miller; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; A. Mischke; J. Mitchell; B. Mohanty; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; C. Nattrass; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; C. Nepali; P. K. Netrakanti; M. J. Ng; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; H. Okada; V. Okorokov; D. Olson; M. Pachr; S. K. Pal; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; S. C. Phatak; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; N. Porile; A. M. Poskanzer; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; J. Putschke; I. A. Qattan; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; A. Ridiger; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; M. J. Russcher; V. Rykov; R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; T. Sakuma; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; M. Sarsour; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; A. Shabetai; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; X-H. Shi; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; R. Snellings; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; A. Stadnik; T. D. S. Stanislaus; D. Staszak; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; N. L. Subba; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; S. Timoshenko; M. Tokarev; T. A. Trainor; V. N. Tram; A. L. Trattner; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; N. van der Kolk; M. van Leeuwen; A. M. Vander Molen; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; I. M. Vasilevski; A. N. Vasiliev; F. Videbaek; S. E. Vigdor; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; M. Wada; W. T. Waggoner; F. Wang; G. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; J. Wu; Y. Wu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; P. Yepes; I-K. Yoo; Q. Yue; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zhan; H. Zhang; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Y. Zhao; C. Zhong; J. Zhou; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva; J. X. Zuo

    2008-07-21

    We present measurements of net charge fluctuations in $Au + Au$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = $ 19.6, 62.4, 130, and 200 GeV, $Cu + Cu$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = $ 62.4, 200 GeV, and $p + p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = $ 200 GeV using the dynamical net charge fluctuations measure $\

  1. R&D ERL: Beam dynamics, parameters, and physics to be learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kayran, D.

    2010-02-01

    The R&D ERL facility at BNL aims to demonstrate CW operation of ERL with average beam current in the range of 0.1-1 ampere, combined with very high efficiency of energy recovery. The ERL is being installed in one of the spacious bays in Bldg. 912 of the RHIC/AGS complex (Fig. 1). The bay is equipped with an overhead crane. The facility has a control room, two service rooms and a shielded ERL cave. The control room is located outside of the bay in a separate building. The single story house is used for a high voltage power supply for 1 MW klystron. The two-story unit houses a laser room, the CW 1 MW klystron with its accessories, most of the power supplies and electronics. The ERL R&D program has been started by the Collider Accelerator Department (C-AD) at BNL as an important stepping-stone for 10-fold increase of the luminosity of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) using relativistic electron cooling of gold ion beams with energy of 100 GeV per nucleon. Furthermore, the ERL R&D program extends toward a possibility of using 10-20 GeV ERL for future electron-hadron/heavy ion collider, MeRHIC/eRHIC. These projects are the driving force behind the development of ampere-class ERL technology, which will find many applications including light sources and FELs. The intensive R&D program geared towards the construction of the prototype ERL is under way: from development of high efficiency photo-cathodes to the development of new merging system compatible with emittance compensation.

  2. Beam Dynamics Study of X-Band Linac Driven X-Ray FELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adolphsen, C.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Wu, J.; /SLAC; Sun, Y.; /SLAC

    2011-12-13

    Several linac driven X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs) are being developed to provide high brightness photon beams with very short, tunable wavelengths. In this paper, three XFEL configurations are proposed that achieve LCLS-like performance using X-band linac drivers. These linacs are more versatile, efficient and compact than ones using S-band or C-band rf technology. For each of the designs, the overall accelerator layout and the shaping of the bunch longitudinal phase space are described briefly. During the last 40 years, the photon wavelengths from linac driven FELs have been pushed shorter by increasing the electron beam energy and adopting shorter period undulators. Recently, the wavelengths have reached the X-ray range, with FLASH (Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg) and LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) successfully providing users with soft and hard X-rays, respectively. FLASH uses a 1.2 GeV L-band (1.3 GHz) superconducting linac driver and can deliver 10-70 fs FWHM long photon pulses in a wavelength range of 44 nm to 4.1 nm. LCLS uses the last third of the SLAC 3 km S-band (2.856 GHz) normal-conducting linac to produce 3.5 GeV to 15 GeV bunches to generate soft and hard X-rays with good spatial coherence at wavelengths from 2.2 nm to 0.12 nm. Newer XFELs (at Spring8 and PSI) use C-band (5.7 GHz) normal-conducting linac drivers, which can sustain higher acceleration gradients, and hence shorten the linac length, and are more efficient at converting rf energy to bunch energy. The X-band (11.4 GHz) rf technology developed for NLC/GLC offers even higher gradients and efficiencies, and the shorter rf wavelength allows more versatility in longitudinal bunch phase space compression and manipulation. In the following sections, three different configurations of X-band linac driven XFELs are described that operate from 6 to 14 GeV. The first (LOW CHARGE DESIGN) has an electron bunch charge of only 10 pC; the second (OPTICS LINEARIZATION DESIGN) is based on optics linearization of the longitudinal phase space in the first stage bunch compressor and can operate with either a high (250 pC) or low (20 pC) bunch charge; and the third (LCLS INJECTOR DESIGN) is similar to LCLS but uses an X-band linac after the first stage bunch compressor at 250 MeV to achieve a final beam energy up to 14 GeV. Compared with LCLS, these X-band linacs are at least a factor of three shorter.

  3. Start-to-end beam dynamics simulation of double triangular current profile generation in Argonne Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ha, G.; Power, J.; Kim, S. H.; Gai, W.; Kim, K.-J.; Cho, M. H.; Namkung, W. [POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of) and Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of) and Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-21

    Double triangular current profile (DT) gives a high transformer ratio which is the determining factor of the performance of collinear wakefield accelerator. This current profile can be generated using the emittance exchange (EEX) beam line. Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility plans to generate DT using the EEX beam line. We conducted start-to-end simulation for the AWA beam line using PARMELA code. Also, we discuss requirements of beam parameters for the generation of DT.

  4. FINAL REPORT DE-FG02-04ER41317 Advanced Computation and Chaotic Dynamics for Beams and Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cary, John R [U. Colorado

    2014-09-08

    During the year ending in August 2013, we continued to investigate the potential of photonic crystal (PhC) materials for acceleration purposes. We worked to characterize acceleration ability of simple PhC accelerator structures, as well as to characterize PhC materials to determine whether current fabrication techniques can meet the needs of future accelerating structures. We have also continued to design and optimize PhC accelerator structures, with the ultimate goal of finding a new kind of accelerator structure that could offer significant advantages over current RF acceleration technology. This design and optimization of these requires high performance computation, and we continue to work on methods to make such computation faster and more efficient.

  5. Baffle material characterization for Advanced LIGO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Cassandra R

    2008-01-01

    The transition to Advanced LIGO introduces new sensitivity requirements for the LIGO interferometers. When light scatters away from the main laser beam, then scatters off the beam tube and returns to the main beam, noise ...

  6. ADVANCED NEUTRAL-BEAM TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berkner, K.H.

    2010-01-01

    penetrate the magnetic confinement field and are trappedagainst magnetic fields from the confinement device (to

  7. Advanced Fluid Dynamics 2014 Sheet 5 Stokes flow around spherical particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogg, Andrew

    with no body force, where µ denotes the dynamic viscosity. Show that the stress tensor is given by ij = -2µ Ak xk ij + 2µ 2 xixj + xk 2 Ak xixj . (2) (b) Now consider the flow past a stationary sphere of radius the drag on the particle. 2. (a) Axisymmetric flow may be expressed in terms of spherical polar coordinates

  8. Beam/seam alignment control for electron beam welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burkhardt, Jr., James H. (Knoxville, TN); Henry, J. James (Oak Ridge, TN); Davenport, Clyde M. (Knoxville, TN)

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to a dynamic beam/seam alignment control system for electron beam welds utilizing video apparatus. The system includes automatic control of workpiece illumination, near infrared illumination of the workpiece to limit the range of illumination and camera sensitivity adjustment, curve fitting of seam position data to obtain an accurate measure of beam/seam alignment, and automatic beam detection and calculation of the threshold beam level from the peak beam level of the preceding video line to locate the beam or seam edges.

  9. Surface finishing of die and tool steels via plasma-based electron beam irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Z; WANG, ZHIGANG; Yamazaki, Kazuo; Sano, S

    2006-01-01

    Energy-beam processing of materials: Advanced manufacturing using various energy sources, Oxford University Press, New

  10. Dynamics of alkali ions-neutral molecules reactions: Radio frequency-guided beam experimental cross-sections and direct quasiclassical trajectory studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar, J.; Andres, J. de; Lucas, J. M.; Alberti, M.; Huarte-Larranaga, F.; Bassi, D.; Aguilar, A. [Departament de Quimica Fisica, Institut de Quimica Teorica i Computacional (IQTCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Trento, 38123 Povo-Trento (Italy); Departament de Quimica Fisica, Institut de Quimica Teorica i Computacional (IQTCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-11-27

    Different reactive processes taking place in collisions between alkali ions and neutral i-C{sub 3}H{sub 7}Cl molecules in the low (center of mass frame) energy range have been studied using an octopole radiofrequency guided-ion-beam apparatus developed in our laboratory. Cross-section energy dependences for all these reactions have been obtained in absolute units. Ab initio electronic structure calculations for those colliding systems evolving on the ground single potential surface have given relevant information on the main topological features of the surfaces. For some of the reactions a dynamic study by 'on the fly' trajectories has complemented the available experimental and electronic structure information.

  11. Center for beam physics 1996-1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    The Center for Beam Physics (CBP) is a multidisciplinary research and development unit in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory of the University of California. At the heart of the Center`s mission is the fundamental quest for mechanisms of acceleration, radiation, transport, and focusing of energy and information. Special features of the Center`s program include addressing R&D issues needing long development time and providing a platform for conception, initiation, and support of institutional projects based on beams. The Center brings to bear a significant amount of diverse, complementary, and self-sufficient expertise in accelerator physics, synchrotron radiation, advanced microwave techniques, plasma physics, optics, and lasers on the forefront R&D issues in particle and photon beam research. In addition to functioning as a clearinghouse for novel ideas and concepts and related R&D (e.g., various theoretical and experimental studies in beam physics such as nonlinear dynamics, phase space control, laser-beam-plasma interaction, free-electron lasers, optics, and instrumentation), the Center provides significant support to Laboratory facilities and initiatives. This roster and annual report provides a glimpse of the scientists, engineers, technical support, students, and administrative staff that make up the CBP`s outstanding team and gives a flavor of their multifaceted activities during 1996 and 1997.

  12. The Effects of a Dynamic Spectrum Access Overlay in LTE-Advanced Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juan D. Deaton; Ryan E. lrwin; Luiz A. DaSilva

    2011-05-01

    As early as 2014, wireless network operators spectral capacity will be overwhelmed by a data tsunami brought on by new devices and applications. To augment spectral capacity, operators could deploy a Dynamic Spectrum Access (DSA) overlay. In the light of the many planned Long Term Evolution (LTE) network deployments, the affects of a DSA overlay have not been fully considered into the existing LTE standards. Coalescing many different aspects of DSA, this paper develops the Spectrum Accountability (SA) framework. The SA framework defines specific network element functionality, protocol interfaces, and signaling flow diagrams for LTE to support service requests and enforce rights of responsibilities of primary and secondary users, respectively. We also include a network simulation to quantify the benefits of using DSA channels to augment capacity. Based on our simulation we show that, network operators can benefit up to %40 increase in operating capacity when sharing DSA bands to augment spectral capacity. With our framework, this paper could serve as an guide in developing future LTE network standards that include DSA.

  13. Experimental and numerical study of gas dynamic window for electron beam transport into the space with increased pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skovorodko, P. A.; Sharafutdinov, R. G.

    2014-12-09

    The paper is devoted to experimental and numerical study of the gas jet technical device for obtaining axisymmetric flow with low pressure in its near axis region. The studied geometry of the device is typical of that used in the plasma generator consisting of an electron gun with a hollow (plasma) cathode and a double supersonic ring nozzle. The geometry of the nozzles as well as the relation between the gas flow rates through the nozzles providing the electron beam extraction into the region with increased pressure are tested both experimentally and numerically. The maximum external pressure of about 0.25 bar that does not disturb the electron beam is achieved.

  14. A dynamic focusing x-ray monochromator for a wiggler beam line at the SRS of the SERC Daresbury Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Bruijn, D.; Van Zuylen, P. ); Kruizinga, G. , P.O. Box 93138, 2509 AC Den Haag State University of Utrecht, Sorbonnelaan 16, 3508 TB Utrecht )

    1992-01-01

    A Si(220) double-crystal monochromator for the energy range 10--30 keV is presented. It will be used for EXAFS as well as powder diffraction measurements. To determine the requirements for this monochromator we looked, apart from mean considerations, at the requirements dictated by EXAFS in transmission mode. For good data analyses the proper shape, amplitude, and location at the energy axis of each wiggle is required. Moreover it is essential to separate the wiggles from background and noise. For the latter a high flux through the sample is desirable, which can be achieved by horizontal focusing of the beam. For that we have chosen to bend the second crystal sagitally. The sagittal bending radius is adjustable between 50 and 0.8 m, because for different energies different sagittal radii are necessary to focus the beam on the sample. The mean meridional radius of the second crystal is fixed at 130 m, which is an optimization for 20 keV. The meridional radius of the first crystal can be tuned between 100 and 500 m. When this radius is set to 130 m the energy resolution is calculated to be 6, 3, and 35 eV for 10, 20, and 30 keV (for perfectly bent crystals). By changing the meridional radius of the first crystal, future users of this monochromator can make the trade off between resolution and intensity. Movement of the monochromator exit beam, during a scan, will occur due to the monochromator geometry, but is reduced as much as possible by using an asymmetrically cut second crystal, with an asymmetry angle of 2.5{degree}. The average exit beam movement of the monochromator for a 1-keV scan is 20 {mu}m. For 40% of the energy range (10--30 keV) the exit beam position remains within 10 {mu}m. For the second crystal no translation stage is used.

  15. Dynamic Modeling of Learning in Emerging Energy Industries: The Example of Advanced Biofuels in the United States: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vimmerstedt, Laura J.; Bush, Brian W.; Peterson, Steven O.

    2015-09-03

    This paper (and its supplemental model) presents novel approaches to modeling interactions and related policies among investment, production, and learning in an emerging competitive industry. New biomass-to-biofuels pathways are being developed and commercialized to support goals for U.S. advanced biofuel use, such as those in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. We explore the impact of learning rates and techno-economics in a learning model excerpted from the Biomass Scenario Model (BSM), developed by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to explore the impact of biofuel policy on the evolution of the biofuels industry. The BSM integrates investment, production, and learning among competing biofuel conversion options that are at different stages of industrial development. We explain the novel methods used to simulate the impact of differing assumptions about mature industry techno-economics and about learning rates while accounting for the different maturity levels of various conversion pathways. A sensitivity study shows that the parameters studied (fixed capital investment, process yield, progress ratios, and pre-commercial investment) exhibit highly interactive effects, and the system, as modeled, tends toward market dominance of a single pathway due to competition and learning dynamics.

  16. First Beam to FACET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, R.; Clarke, C.; Colocho, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.; Kalsi, S.; Lipkowitz, N.; Nelson, J.; Phinney, N.; Schuh, P.; Sheppard, J.; Smith, H.; Smith, T.; Stanek, M.; Turner, J.; Warren, J.; Weathersby, S.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2011-12-13

    The SLAC 3km linear electron accelerator has been reconfigured to provide a beam of electrons to the new Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) while simultaneously providing an electron beam to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). On June 23, 2011, the first electron beam was transported through this new facility. Commissioning of FACET is in progress. On June 23, 2011, an electron beam was successfully transported through the new FACET system to a dump in Sector 20 in the linac tunnel. This was achieved while the last third of the linac, operating from the same control room, but with a separate injector system, was providing an electron beam to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), demonstrating that concurrent operation of the two facilities is practical. With the initial checkout of the new transport line essentially complete, attention is now turning toward compressing the electron bunches longitudinally and focusing them transversely to support a variety of accelerator science experiments.

  17. Coherent instabilities of a relativistic bunched beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chao, A.W.

    1982-06-01

    A charge-particle beam contained in an accelerator vacuum chamber interacts electromagnetically with its environment to create a wake field. This field than acts back on the beam, perturbing the particle motion. If the beam intensity is high enough, this beam-environment interaction may lead to an instability and to subsequent beam loss. The beam and its environment form a dynamical system, and it is this system that will be studied. 84 references.

  18. Analysis of nonlinear dynamics of a cantilever beam-rigid-body MEMS gyroscope using a continuation method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lajimi, Seyed Amir Mousavi

    2014-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of a microbeam-rigid body gyroscope are investigated by using a continuation method. To study the nonlinear dynamics of the system, the Lagrangian of the system is discretized and the reduced-order model is obtained. By using the continuation method, the frequency-response curves are computed and the stability of response is determined.

  19. 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ELECTRON GUNS; BEAM EMITTANCE; CHARGE

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SPACE 430200* -- Particle Accelerators-- Beam Dynamics, Field Calculations, & Ion Optics The evolution of the electron-beam phase space distribution in laser-driven rf guns is...

  20. Beam Diagnostics for FACET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, S.Z.; Hogan, M.J.; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration beginning in summer 2011. The nominal FACET parameters are 23GeV, 3nC electron bunches compressed to about 20 {micro}m long and focussed to about 10 {micro}m wide. Characterization of the beam-plasma interaction requires complete knowledge of the incoming beam parameters on a pulse-to-pulse basis. FACET diagnostics include Beam Position Monitors, Toroidal current monitors, X-ray and Cerenkov based energy spectrometers, optical transition radiation (OTR) profile monitors and coherent transition radiation (CTR) bunch length measurement systems. The compliment of beam diagnostics and their expected performance are reviewed. Beam diagnostic measurements not only provide valuable insights to the running and tuning of the accelerator but also are crucial for the PWFA experiments in particular. Beam diagnostic devices are being set up at FACET and will be ready for beam commissioning in summer 2011.

  1. Two-beam detuned-cavity electron accelerator structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Y.; Hirshfield, J. L. [Beam Physics Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Beam Physics Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States) and Omega-P, Inc., New Haven, CT 06510 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    Progress has been made in the theory, development, cavity design and optimization, beam dynamics study, beam transport design, and hardware construction for studies of a detuned two-beam electron accelerator structure.

  2. Policy Issues for Retail Beamed Power Transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electric power on Earth is transmitted using wired power transmission systems. In this system, electricalPolicy Issues for Retail Beamed Power Transmission Girish Chowdhary, Rajeev Gadre, Narayanan solar electric power using retail delivery of beamed power. Recent advances in power beaming have made

  3. Plasma-beam traps and radiofrequency quadrupole beam coolers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maggiore, M., E-mail: mario.maggiore@lnl.infn.it; Cavenago, M.; Comunian, M.; Chirulotto, F.; Galatà, A.; De Lazzari, M.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Stark, S. [INFN-LNL, viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy)] [INFN-LNL, viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy); Caruso, A.; Longhitano, A. [INFN-LNS, via S. Sofia 54, 95123 Catania (Italy)] [INFN-LNS, via S. Sofia 54, 95123 Catania (Italy); Cavaliere, F.; Maero, G.; Paroli, B.; Pozzoli, R.; Romé, M. [INFN Sezione di Milano and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)] [INFN Sezione di Milano and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    Two linear trap devices for particle beam manipulation (including emittance reduction, cooling, control of instabilities, dust dynamics, and non-neutral plasmas) are here presented, namely, a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) beam cooler and a compact Penning trap with a dust injector. Both beam dynamics studies by means of dedicated codes including the interaction of the ions with a buffer gas (up to 3 Pa pressure), and the electromagnetic design of the RFQ beam cooler are reported. The compact multipurpose Penning trap is aimed to the study of multispecies charged particle samples, primarily electron beams interacting with a background gas and/or a micrometric dust contaminant. Using a 0.9 T solenoid and an electrode stack where both static and RF electric fields can be applied, both beam transport and confinement operations will be available. The design of the apparatus is presented.

  4. Remarks on the derivation of the governing equations for the dynamics of a nonlinear beam to a non ideal shaft coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenili, André; Lopes Rebello da Fonseca Brasil, Reyolando Manoel

    2014-12-10

    We derive nonlinear governing equations without assuming that the beam is inextensible. The derivation couples the equations that govern a weak electric motor, which is used to rotate the base of the beam, to those that govern the motion of the beam. The system is considered non-ideal in the sense that the response of the motor to an applied voltage and the motion of the beam must be obtained interactively. The moment that the motor exerts on the base of the beam cannot be determined without solving for the motion of the beam.

  5. Advanced Polymer Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muenchausen, Ross E.

    2012-07-25

    Some conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Radiation-assisted nanotechnology applications will continue to grow; (2) The APPF will provide a unique focus for radiolytic processing of nanomaterials in support of DOE-DP, other DOE and advanced manufacturing initiatives; (3) {gamma}, X-ray, e-beam and ion beam processing will increasingly be applied for 'green' manufacturing of nanomaterials and nanocomposites; and (4) Biomedical science and engineering may ultimately be the biggest application area for radiation-assisted nanotechnology development.

  6. LHC Beam Loss Monitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arauzo-Garcia, A; Ferioli, G; Gschwendtner, E

    2001-01-01

    At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) a beam loss system will be installed for a continuous surveillance of particle losses. These beam particles deposit their energy in the super-conducting coils leading to temperature increase, possible magnet quenches and damages. Detailed simulations have shown that a set of six detectors outside the cryostats of the quadrupole magnets in the regular arc cells are needed to completely diagnose the expected beam losses and hence protect the magnets. To characterize the quench levels different loss rates are identified. In order to cover all possible quench scenarios the dynamic range of the beam loss monitors has to be matched to the simulated loss rates. For that purpose different detector systems (PIN-diodes and ionization chambers) are compared.

  7. Theoretical and Computational Investigation of Periodically Focused Intense Charged-Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Chiping [Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-06-26

    The purpose of this report is to summarize results of theoretical and computational investigations of periodically focused intense charged-particle beams in parameter regimes relevant to the development of advanced high-brightness, high-power accelerators for high-energy physics research. The breakthroughs and highlights in our research in the period from April 1, 2010 to March 30, 2013 were: a) Theory and simulation of adiabatic thermal Child-Langmuir flow; b) Particle-in-cell simulations of adiabatic thermal beams in periodic solenoidal focusing field; c)Dynamics of charged particles in an adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium in a periodic solenoidal focusing field; d) Training of undergraduate researchers and graduate student in accelerator and beam physics. A brief introduction and summary is presented. Detailed descriptions of research results are provided in an appendix of publications at the end of the report.

  8. 14th international symposium on molecular beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This report discusses research being conducted with molecular beams. The general topic areas are as follows: Clusters I; reaction dynamics; atomic and molecular spectroscopy; clusters II; new techniques; photodissociation & dynamics; and surfaces.

  9. 14th international symposium on molecular beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted with molecular beams. The general topic areas are as follows: Clusters I; reaction dynamics; atomic and molecular spectroscopy; clusters II; new techniques; photodissociation dynamics; and surfaces.

  10. Studies on low energy beam transport for high intensity high charged ions at IMP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Y. Lu, W.; Fang, X.; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 ; Sun, L. T.; Hu, Q.; Cao, Y.; Feng, Y. C.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.; Xie, D. Z.

    2014-02-15

    Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) is an advanced fully superconducting ECR ion source at IMP designed to be operational at the microwave frequency of 18–24 GHz. The existing SECRAL beam transmission line is composed of a solenoid lens and a 110° analyzing magnet. Simulations of particle tracking with 3D space charge effect and realistic 3D magnetic fields through the line were performed using particle-in-cell code. The results of the beam dynamics show that such a low energy beam is very sensitive to the space charge effect and significantly suffers from the second-order aberration of the analyzing magnet resulting in large emittance. However, the second-order aberration could be reduced by adding compensating sextupole components in the beam line. On this basis, a new 110° analyzing magnet with relatively larger acceptance and smaller aberration is designed and will be used in the design of low energy beam transport line for a new superconducting ECR ion source SECRAL-II. The features of the analyzer and the corresponding beam trajectory calculation will be detailed and discussed in this paper.

  11. BEAM PROPAGATOR

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003691MLTPL00 Beam Propagator for Weather Radars, Modules 1 and 2  http://www.exelisvis.com/ProductsServices/IDL.aspx 

  12. High-Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-11-01

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing (HPC) are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the DOE SciDAC program has produced such accelerator-modeling tools, which have beem employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. In this article we discuss the Synergia beam-dynamics framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation packagemore »capable of handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. We present the design principles, key physical and numerical models in Synergia and its performance on HPC platforms. Finally, we present the results of Synergia applications for the Fermilab proton source upgrade, known as the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP).« less

  13. High-Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-11-01

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing (HPC) are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the DOE SciDAC program has produced such accelerator-modeling tools, which have beem employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. In this article we discuss the Synergia beam-dynamics framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable of handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. We present the design principles, key physical and numerical models in Synergia and its performance on HPC platforms. Finally, we present the results of Synergia applications for the Fermilab proton source upgrade, known as the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP).

  14. Final Report on DOE Project entitled Dynamic Optimized Advanced Scheduling of Bandwidth Demands for Large-Scale Science Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramamurthy, Byravamurthy

    2014-05-05

    In this project, developed scheduling frameworks for dynamic bandwidth demands for large-scale science applications. In particular, we developed scheduling algorithms for dynamic bandwidth demands in this project. Apart from theoretical approaches such as Integer Linear Programming, Tabu Search and Genetic Algorithm heuristics, we have utilized practical data from ESnet OSCARS project (from our DOE lab partners) to conduct realistic simulations of our approaches. We have disseminated our work through conference paper presentations and journal papers and a book chapter. In this project we addressed the problem of scheduling of lightpaths over optical wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) networks. We published several conference papers and journal papers on this topic. We also addressed the problems of joint allocation of computing, storage and networking resources in Grid/Cloud networks and proposed energy-efficient mechanisms for operatin optical WDM networks.

  15. Stability of Single Particle Motion with Head-On Beam-Beam Compensation in the RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo,Y.; Fischer, W.; Abreu, N.

    2008-05-01

    To compensate the large tune shift and tune spread generated by the head-on beam-beam interactions in the polarized proton run in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we proposed a low energy electron beam with a Gaussian transverse profiles to collide head-on with the proton beam. In this article, with a weak-strong beam-beam interaction model, we investigate the stability of single particle motion in the presence of head-on beam-beam compensation. Tune footprints, tune diffusion, Lyapunov exponents, and 10{sup 6} turn dynamic apertures are calculated and compared between the cases without and with beam-beam compensation. A tune scan is performed and the possibility of increasing the bunch intensity is studied. The cause of tune footprint foldings is discussed, and the tune diffusion and Lyapunov exponent analysis are compared.

  16. Physics Opportunities with Meson Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briscoe, William J; Haberzettl, Helmut; Manley, D Mark; Naruki, Megumi; Strakovsky, Igor I; Swanson, Eric S

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, meson photo- and electro-production data of unprecedented quality and quantity have been measured at electromagnetic facilities worldwide. By contrast, the meson-beam data for the same hadronic final states are mostly outdated and largely of poor quality, or even nonexistent, and thus provide inadequate input to help interpret, analyze, and exploit the full potential of the new electromagnetic data. To reap the full benefit of the high-precision electromagnetic data, new high-statistics data from measurements with meson beams, with good angle and energy coverage for a wide range of reactions, are critically needed to advance our knowledge in baryon and meson spectroscopy and other related areas of hadron physics. To address this situation, a state of-the-art meson-beam facility needs to be constructed. The present paper summarizes unresolved issues in hadron physics and outlines the vast opportunities and advances that only become possible with such a facility.

  17. Physics Opportunities with Meson Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William J. Briscoe; Michael Döring; Helmut Haberzettl; D. Mark Manley; Megumi Naruki; Igor I. Strakovsky; Eric S. Swanson

    2015-03-26

    Over the past two decades, meson photo- and electro-production data of unprecedented quality and quantity have been measured at electromagnetic facilities worldwide. By contrast, the meson-beam data for the same hadronic final states are mostly outdated and largely of poor quality, or even nonexistent, and thus provide inadequate input to help interpret, analyze, and exploit the full potential of the new electromagnetic data. To reap the full benefit of the high-precision electromagnetic data, new high-statistics data from measurements with meson beams, with good angle and energy coverage for a wide range of reactions, are critically needed to advance our knowledge in baryon and meson spectroscopy and other related areas of hadron physics. To address this situation, a state of-the-art meson-beam facility needs to be constructed. The present paper summarizes unresolved issues in hadron physics and outlines the vast opportunities and advances that only become possible with such a facility.

  18. Apply for Beam Time | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications TraditionalWithAntiferromagnetic Spins Do TheApplicationNontraditionalAll

  19. Coating thermal noise for arbitrary shaped beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard O'Shaughnessy

    2006-10-13

    Advanced LIGO's sensitivity will be limited by coating noise. Though this noise depends on beam shape, and though nongaussian beams are being seriously considered for advanced LIGO, no published analysis exists to compare the quantitative thermal noise improvement alternate beams offer. In this paper, we derive and discuss a simple integral which completely characterizes the dependence of coating thermal noise on shape. The derivation used applies equally well, with minor modifications, to all other forms of thermal noise in the low-frequency limit.

  20. Beams 92: Proceedings. Volume 1: Invited papers, pulsed power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosher, D.; Cooperstein, G.

    1993-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Ion beam papers; electron beam, bremsstrahlung, and diagnostics papers; radiating Z- pinch papers; microwave papers; electron laser papers; advanced accelerator papers; beam and pulsed power applications papers; pulsed power papers; and these papers have been indexed separately elsewhere.

  1. Wanapum Dam Advanced Hydro Turbine Upgrade Project: Part 2 - Evaluation of Fish Passage Test Results Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresser, Thomas J.; Dotson, Curtis L.; Fisher, Richard K.; Graf, Michael J.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Mathur, Dilip; Heisey, Paul G.

    2007-10-10

    This paper, the second part of a 2 part paper, discusses the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to gain further insight into the results of fish release testing conducted to evaluate the modifications made to upgrade Unit 8 at Wanapum Dam. Part 1 discusses the testing procedures and fish passage survival. Grant PUD is working with Voith Siemens Hydro (VSH) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) of DOE and Normandeau Associates in this evaluation. VSH has prepared the geometry for the CFD analysis corresponding to the four operating conditions tested with Unit 9, and the 5 operating conditions tested with Unit 8. Both VSH and PNNL have conducting CFD simulations of the turbine intakes, stay vanes, wicket gates, turbine blades and draft tube of the units. Primary objectives of the analyses were: • determine estimates of where the inserted fish passed the turbine components • determine the characteristics of the flow field along the paths calculated for pressure, velocity gradients and acceleration associated with fish sized bodies • determine the velocity gradients at the structures where fish to structure interaction is predicted. • correlate the estimated fish location of passage with observed injuries • correlate the calculated pressure and acceleration with the information recorded with the sensor fish • utilize the results of the analysis to further interpret the results of the testing. This paper discusses the results of the CFD analyses made to assist the interpretation of the fish test results.

  2. Beam History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara McClintockSecurity ComplexBeamBeam

  3. Beam Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara McClintockSecurityBeam Transport Beam

  4. Beam Status

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of raregovAboutRecovery ActTools toBadging, Badge OfficeBeam Request ToBeam

  5. Beams 92: Proceedings. Volume 2, Ion beams, electron beams, diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosher, D.; Cooperstein, G. [eds.] [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)] [eds.; Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics. Ion beam papers; electron beam papers; and these papers have been indexed separately elsewhere.

  6. Center for Beam Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    2010-01-01

    UV Laser Ionization and Electron Beam Diagnostics for Plasmaradiation based electron beam diagnostics, fast beamdiagnostic instru- mentation for electron and photon beams

  7. Center for Beam Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    2010-01-01

    1231 (1990). "Relativistic Klystron Version of the Two-BeamDesign of a Relativiatic Klystron Two-Beam AcceleratorSource for a Relativistic Klystron Two- Beam Accelerator" (

  8. Dynamic Modeling of Learning in Emerging Energy Industries: The Example of Advanced Biofuels in the United States; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Steve; Bush, Brian; Vimmerstedt, Laura

    2015-07-19

    This paper (and its supplemental model) presents novel approaches to modeling interactions and related policies among investment, production, and learning in an emerging competitive industry. New biomass-to-biofuels pathways are being developed and commercialized to support goals for U.S. advanced biofuel use, such as those in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. We explore the impact of learning rates and techno-economics in a learning model excerpted from the Biomass Scenario Model (BSM), developed by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to explore the impact of biofuel policy on the evolution of the biofuels industry. The BSM integrates investment, production, and learning among competing biofuel conversion options that are at different stages of industrial development. We explain the novel methods used to simulate the impact of differing assumptions about mature industry techno-economics and about learning rates while accounting for the different maturity levels of various conversion pathways. A sensitivity study shows that the parameters studied (fixed capital investment, process yield, progress ratios, and pre-commercial investment) exhibit highly interactive effects, and the system, as modeled, tends toward market dominance of a single pathway due to competition and learning dynamics.

  9. Center for Beam Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    2010-01-01

    Krishnagopal of CAT, Indore, India, we are also developing aon Beam Physics at CAT, Indore, India and Telecourse on Beam

  10. Multiple time step molecular dynamics in the optimized isokinetic ensemble steered with the molecular theory of solvation: Accelerating with advanced extrapolation of effective solvation forces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omelyan, Igor, E-mail: omelyan@ualberta.ca, E-mail: omelyan@icmp.lviv.ua [National Institute for Nanotechnology, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada) [National Institute for Nanotechnology, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G8 (Canada); Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 1 Svientsitskii Street, Lviv 79011 (Ukraine); Kovalenko, Andriy, E-mail: andriy.kovalenko@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [National Institute for Nanotechnology, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada) [National Institute for Nanotechnology, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G8 (Canada)

    2013-12-28

    We develop efficient handling of solvation forces in the multiscale method of multiple time step molecular dynamics (MTS-MD) of a biomolecule steered by the solvation free energy (effective solvation forces) obtained from the 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation (three-dimensional reference interaction site model complemented with the Kovalenko-Hirata closure approximation). To reduce the computational expenses, we calculate the effective solvation forces acting on the biomolecule by using advanced solvation force extrapolation (ASFE) at inner time steps while converging the 3D-RISM-KH integral equations only at large outer time steps. The idea of ASFE consists in developing a discrete non-Eckart rotational transformation of atomic coordinates that minimizes the distances between the atomic positions of the biomolecule at different time moments. The effective solvation forces for the biomolecule in a current conformation at an inner time step are then extrapolated in the transformed subspace of those at outer time steps by using a modified least square fit approach applied to a relatively small number of the best force-coordinate pairs. The latter are selected from an extended set collecting the effective solvation forces obtained from 3D-RISM-KH at outer time steps over a broad time interval. The MTS-MD integration with effective solvation forces obtained by converging 3D-RISM-KH at outer time steps and applying ASFE at inner time steps is stabilized by employing the optimized isokinetic Nosé-Hoover chain (OIN) ensemble. Compared to the previous extrapolation schemes used in combination with the Langevin thermostat, the ASFE approach substantially improves the accuracy of evaluation of effective solvation forces and in combination with the OIN thermostat enables a dramatic increase of outer time steps. We demonstrate on a fully flexible model of alanine dipeptide in aqueous solution that the MTS-MD/OIN/ASFE/3D-RISM-KH multiscale method of molecular dynamics steered by effective solvation forces allows huge outer time steps up to tens of picoseconds without affecting the equilibrium and conformational properties, and thus provides a 100- to 500-fold effective speedup in comparison to conventional MD with explicit solvent. With the statistical-mechanical 3D-RISM-KH account for effective solvation forces, the method provides efficient sampling of biomolecular processes with slow and/or rare solvation events such as conformational transitions of hydrated alanine dipeptide with the mean life times ranging from 30 ps up to 10 ns for “flip-flop” conformations, and is particularly beneficial for biomolecular systems with exchange and localization of solvent and ions, ligand binding, and molecular recognition.

  11. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2014-05-30

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  12. Advanced Components and Materials | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    toward a dynamically optimizing grid. R&D Activities: Novel energy materials Advanced sensors Power electronics Intelligent power flow control High-capacity cables and...

  13. Beam History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara McClintockSecurity ComplexBeam

  14. Beam Schedule

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of raregovAboutRecovery ActTools toBadging, Badge OfficeBeam Request To

  15. Beam Status

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of raregovAboutRecovery ActTools toBadging, Badge OfficeBeam Request

  16. Fast beam studies of I 2 Ar photodissociation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumark, Daniel M.

    Fast beam studies of IÀ 2 and IÀ 2 Á Ar photodissociation Alexandra A. Hoops, Jason R. Gascooke dynamics of bare IÀ 2 and IÀ 2 Á Ar at 413 and 390 nm have been investigated using a fast beam instrument reserved. 1. Introduction Fast beam dissociation experiments coupled with coincident fragment detection

  17. Solar Power Beaming: From Space to Earth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubenchik, A M; Parker, J M; Beach, R J; Yamamoto, R M

    2009-04-14

    Harvesting solar energy in space and power beaming the collected energy to a receiver station on Earth is a very attractive way to help solve mankind's current energy and environmental problems. However, the colossal and expensive 'first step' required in achieving this goal has to-date stifled its initiation. In this paper, we will demonstrate that recent advance advances in laser and optical technology now make it possible to deploy a space-based system capable of delivering 1 MW of energy to a terrestrial receiver station, via a single unmanned commercial launch into Low Earth Orbit (LEO). Figure 1 depicts the overall concept of our solar power beaming system, showing a large solar collector in space, beaming a coherent laser beam to a receiving station on Earth. We will describe all major subsystems and provide technical and economic discussion to support our conclusions.

  18. Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popple, Richard A. Brezovich, Ivan A.; Fiveash, John B.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. Results: In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. Conclusions: For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify arrangements equivalent to equiangular geometries but using fewer beams. Furthermore, SBA provides the value of the objective function as the number of beams is increased, allowing the planner to select the minimal beam number that achieves the clinical goals. The method is simple to implement and could readily be incorporated into an existing optimization system.

  19. The effect of inclination and stand-off on the dynamic response of beams impacted by slugs of a granular material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uth, T.; Wadley, H. N. G.; Deshpande, V. S.

    2014-12-04

    . It comprised a cylindrical cavity for the WC slug and a piston to push the slug out of the cavity when a projectile, fired from a gas gun, impacted the piston head. The launcher was bolted to a rigid support frame so that it remained stationary during... (identical plates were used for normal impact against sandwich and monolithic beams). These plates were bolted to the support rig using four M5 bolts (grade 12.9) and a uniform clamping pressure of approximately 60 MPa was applied by tightening the bolts...

  20. Advanced sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliot, T.C.

    1994-08-01

    This article examines how advances in sensor technology are beginning to close the gap with advances in other parts of the control and sensing loops; these advances are needed to more easily meet new EPA regulations and demand for more efficient power plant operation. Topics of the article include fiberoptic sensors, sensors for the air side of the plant, and water side sensors.

  1. Reaction dynamics of OH{sup +}({sup 3}{sigma}{sup -})+C{sub 2}H{sub 2} studied with crossed beams and density functional theory calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Li; Martin, Courtney; Farrar, James M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

    2006-10-07

    The reactions between OH{sup +}({sup 3}{sigma}{sup -}) and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} have been studied using crossed ion and molecular beams and density functional theory calculations. Both charge transfer and proton transfer channels are observed. Products formed by carbon-carbon bond cleavage analogous to those formed in the isoelectronic O({sup 3}P)+C{sub 2}H{sub 2} reaction, e.g., {sup 3}CH{sub 2}+HCO{sup +}, are not observed. The center of mass flux distributions of both product ions at three different energies are highly asymmetric, with maxima close to the velocity and direction of the precursor acetylene beam, characteristic of direct reactions. The internal energy distributions of the charge transfer products are independent of collision energy and are peaked at the reaction exothermicity, inconsistent with either the existence of favorable Franck-Condon factors or energy resonance. In proton transfer, almost the entire reaction exothermicity is transformed into product internal excitation, consistent with mixed energy release in which the proton is transferred with both the breaking and forming bonds extended. Most of the incremental translational energy in the two higher-energy experiments appears in product translational energy, providing an example of induced repulsive energy release.

  2. Weak-strong simulation on head-on beam-beam compensation in the RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo,Y.; Fischer, W.; McIntosh, E.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Abreu, N.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Montag, C.

    2009-05-04

    In the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beams collide in the two interaction points IP6 and IP8. To further increase the bunch intensity above 2 x 10{sup 11} or further reduce the transverse emittance in polarized proton operation, there will not be enough tune space between the current working area [2/3, 7/10] to hold the beam-beam generated tune spread. We proposed a low energy DC electron beam (e-lens) with similar Gaussian transverse profiles to collide with the proton beam at IP10. Early studies have shown that e-lens does reduce the proton-proton beam-beam tune spread. In this article, we carried out numerical simulation to investigate the effects of the head-on beam-beam effect on the proton's colliding beam lifetime and emittance growth. The preliminary results including scans of compensation strength, phase advances between IP8 and IP10, electron beam transverse sizes are presented. In these studies, the particle loss in the multi-particle simulation is used for the comparison between different conditions.

  3. Control and manipulation of electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piot, Philippe; /NICADD, DeKalb /Northern Illinois U. /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    The concepts of the advanced accelerators and light source rely on the production of bright electron beams. The rms areas of the beam phase space often need to be tailored to the specific applications. Furthermore, a new class of the forefront research calls for detailed specific distribution such as the particle density in the time coordinate. Several groups are tackling these various challenges and in this report we attempt to give a review of the state-of-the-art of the control and manipulation of the electron beams.

  4. Advanced medical accelerator design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso, J.R.; Elioff, T.; Garren, A.

    1982-11-01

    This report describes the design of an advanced medical facility dedicated to charged particle radiotherapy and other biomedical applications of relativistic heavy ions. Project status is reviewed and some technical aspects discussed. Clinical standards of reliability are regarded as essential features of this facility. Particular emphasis is therefore placed on the control system and on the use of technology which will maximize operational efficiency. The accelerator will produce a variety of heavy ion beams from helium to argon with intensities sufficient to provide delivered dose rates of several hundred rad/minute over large, uniform fields. The technical components consist of a linac injector with multiple PIG ion sources, a synchrotron and a versatile beam delivery system. An overview is given of both design philosophy and selected accelerator subsystems. Finally, a plan of the facility is described.

  5. Reaction dynamics study of O{sup -}+C{sub 2}H{sub 2} with crossed beams and density-functional theory calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Li; Li Yue; Farrar, James M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

    2005-09-01

    The reactions between O{sup -} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} have been studied using the crossed-beam technique and density-functional theory (DFT) calculations in the collision energy range from 0.35 to 1.5 eV (34-145 kJ/mol). Both proton transfer and C-O bond formation are observed. The proton transfer channel forming C{sub 2}H{sup -} is the dominant pathway. The center-of-mass flux distributions of the C{sub 2}H{sup -} product ions are highly asymmetric, with maxima close to the velocity and direction of the precursor acetylene beam, characteristic of direct reactions. The reaction quantitatively transforms the entire reaction exothermicity into internal excitation of the products, consistent with mixed energy release in which the proton is transferred in a configuration in which both the breaking and the forming bonds are extended. The C-O bond formation channel producing HC{sub 2}O{sup -} displays a distinctive kinematic picture in which the product distribution switches from predominantly forward scattering with a weak backward peak to sideways scattering as the collision energy increases. At low collision energies, the reaction occurs through an intermediate that lives a significant fraction of a rotational period. The asymmetry in the distribution leads to a lifetime estimate of 600 fs, in reasonable agreement with DFT calculations showing that hydrogen-atom migration is rate limiting. At higher collision energies, the sideways-scattered products arise from repulsive energy release from a bent transition state.

  6. Colliding Crystalline Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, J.

    2008-01-01

    6] J. Wei, et ai, Crystalline Beams and Related Issues,LABORATORY Colliding Crystalline Beams Jie Wei and A.M.CBP Note-262 Colliding Crystalline Beams* Jie Wei Brookhaven

  7. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-03-14

    Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction mechanisms, even beyond simple gas phase molecules. In this perspective, significant new directions utilizing the capabilities at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline are presented, along with an outlook for future synchrotron and free electron laser science in chemical dynamics. Among the established and emerging fields of investigations are cluster and biological molecule spectroscopy and structure, combustion flame chemistry mechanisms, radical kinetics and product isomer dynamics, aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, planetary and interstellar chemistry, and secondary neutral ion-beam desorption imaging of biological matter and materials chemistry.

  8. Photoconduction efficiencies and dynamics in GaN nanowires grown by chemical vapor deposition and molecular beam epitaxy: A comparison study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, R. S. [Graduate Institute of Applied Science and Technology, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Tsai, H. Y. [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Huang, Y. S. [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Chen, Y. T. [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chen, L. C. [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chen, K. H. [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2012-09-10

    The normalized gains, which determines the intrinsic photoconduction (PC) efficiencies, have been defined and compared for the gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires (NWs) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). By excluding the contributions of experimental parameters and under the same light intensity, the CVD-grown GaN NWs exhibit the normalized gain which is near two orders of magnitude higher than that of the MBE-ones. The temperature-dependent time-resolved photocurrent measurement further indicates that the higher photoconduction efficiency in the CVD-GaN NWs is originated from the longer carrier lifetime induced by the higher barrier height ({phi}{sub B} = 160 {+-} 30 mV) of surface band bending. In addition, the experimentally estimated barrier height at 20 {+-} 2 mV for the MBE-GaN NWs, which is much lower than the theoretical value, is inferred to be resulted from the lower density of charged surface states on the non-polar side walls.

  9. Systems and methods of varying charged particle beam spot size

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yu-Jiuan

    2014-09-02

    Methods and devices enable shaping of a charged particle beam. A modified dielectric wall accelerator includes a high gradient lens section and a main section. The high gradient lens section can be dynamically adjusted to establish the desired electric fields to minimize undesirable transverse defocusing fields at the entrance to the dielectric wall accelerator. Once a baseline setting with desirable output beam characteristic is established, the output beam can be dynamically modified to vary the output beam characteristics. The output beam can be modified by slightly adjusting the electric fields established across different sections of the modified dielectric wall accelerator. Additional control over the shape of the output beam can be excreted by introducing intentional timing de-synchronization offsets and producing an injected beam that is not fully matched to the entrance of the modified dielectric accelerator.

  10. Electron Beam Lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandini, Giulio

    Electron Beam Lithography Marco Salerno #12;Outline · general lithographic concepts · EBL www.cnf.cornell.edu/SPIEBook/SPIE1.HTM #12;Typical Electron Beam Column Zeiss GeminiTM column Types of Electron Beam Columns · no e- cross over no Boersch-effect (additional energy spread) · beam booster

  11. Chiral specific electron vortex beam spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Yuan; S. M. Lloyd; M. Babiker

    2013-07-29

    Electron vortex beams carry well-defined orbital angular momentum (OAM) about the propagation axis. Such beams are thus characterised by chirality features which make them potentially useful as probes of magnetic and other chiral materials. An analysis of the inelastic processes in which electron vortex beams interact with atoms and which involve OAM exchange is outlined, leading to the multipolar selection rules governing this chiral specific electron vortex beam spectroscopy. Our results show clearly that the selection rules are dependent on the dynamical state and location of the atoms involved. In the most favorable scenario, this form of electron spectroscopy can induce magnetic sublevel transitions which are commonly probed using circularly polarized photon beams.

  12. Beam physics in future electron hadron colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valloni, A; Klein, M; Schulte, D; Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    High-energy electron-hadron collisions could support a rich research programme in particle and nuclear physics. Several future projects are being proposed around the world, in particular eRHIC at BNL, MEIC at TJNAF in the US, and LHeC at CERN in Europe. This paper will highlight some of the accelerator physics issues, and describe related technical developments and challenges for these machines. In particular, optics design and beam dynamics studies are discussed, including longitudinal phase space manipulation, coherent synchrotron radiation, beam-beam kink instability, ion effects, as well as mitigation measures for beam break up and for space-charge induced emittance growth, all of which could limit the machine performance. Finally, first steps are presented towards an LHeC R&D facility, which should investigate relevant beam-physics processes.

  13. Laser Driven Dynamic Loading of Condensed Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Driven Dynamic Loading of Condensed Matter Laser Driven Dynamic Loading of Condensed Matter Advanced diagnostics of experiments covering many orders of magnitude in strain...

  14. Unlocking the potential for efficiency and demand response through advanced metering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Roger; Herter, Karen; Wilson, John

    2004-01-01

    Advanced Metering, Demand Response, and Dynamic Pricing. ”for Efficiency and Demand Response through Advanced Meteringenergy efficiency and demand response programs. Without

  15. Advanced Combustion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsicloudden DocumentationAccommodationsRegister /Advanced Energy Systems Advanced

  16. Vibrating wires for beam diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arutunian, S G; Wittenburg, Kay

    2015-01-01

    A new approach to the technique of scanning by wires is developed. Novelty of the method is that the wire heating quantity is used as a source of information about the number of interacting particles. To increase the accuracy and sensitivity of measurements the wire heating measurement is regenerated as a change of wire natural oscillations frequency. By the rigid fixing of the wire ends on the base an unprecedented sensitivity of the frequency to the temperature and to the corresponding flux of colliding particles. The range of used frequencies (tens of kHz) and speed of processes of heat transfer limit the speed characteristics of proposed scanning method, however, the high sensitivity make it a perspective one for investigation of beam halo and weak beam scanning. Traditional beam profile monitors generally focus on the beam core and loose sensitivity in the halo region where a large dynamic range of detection is necessary. The scanning by a vibrating wire can be also successfully used in profiling and det...

  17. Molecular beam mass spectrometry with tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golan, Amir; Ahmed, Musahid

    2012-01-01

    Tunable soft ionization coupled to mass spectroscopy is a powerful method to investigate isolated molecules, complexes and clusters and their spectroscopy and dynamics.[1-4] Fundamental studies of photoionization processes of biomolecules provide information about electronic structure of these systems. Furthermore determinations of ionization energies and other properties of biomolecules in the gas phase are not trivial, and these experiments provide a platform to generate these data. We have developed a thermal vaporization technique coupled with supersonic molecular beams that provides a gentle way to transport these species into the gas phase. Judicious combination of source gas and temperature allows for formation of dimers and higher clusters of the DNA bases. The focus of this particular work is on the effects of non-covalent interactions, i.e., hydrogen bonding, stacking, and electrostatic interactions, on the ionization energies and proton transfer of individual biomolecules, their complexes and upon micro-hydration by water.[1, 5-9] We have performed experimental and theoretical characterization of the photoionization dynamics of gas-phase uracil and 1,3-methyluracil dimers using molecular beams coupled with synchrotron radiation at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline[10] located at the Advanced Light Source and the experimental details are visualized here. This allowed us to observe the proton transfer in 1,3-dimethyluracil dimers, a system with pi stacking geometry and with no hydrogen bonds[1]. Molecular beams provide a very convenient and efficient way to isolate the sample of interest from environmental perturbations which in return allows accurate comparison with electronic structure calculations[11, 12]. By tuning the photon energy from the synchrotron, a photoionization efficiency (PIE) curve can be plotted which informs us about the cationic electronic states. These values can then be compared to theoretical models and calculations and in turn, explain in detail the electronic structure and dynamics of the investigated species [1, 3].

  18. Science at the Speed of Light: Advanced Photon Source

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Murray Gibson

    2010-01-08

    An introduction and overview of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, the technology that produces the brightest x-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere, and the research carried out by scientists using those x-rays.

  19. BEAMS: Curiosity | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BEAMS: Curiosity January 9, 2013 BEAMS, Becoming Excited About Math and Science, is one of our education programs. In particular, it is the only one in which I participate with...

  20. High-gradient two-beam electron accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2014-11-04

    The main goal for this project was to design, build, and evaluate a detuned-cavity, collinear, two-beam accelerator structure. Testing was to be at the Yale University Beam Physics Laboratory, under terms of a sub-grant from Omega-P to Yale. Facilities available at Yale for this project include a 6-MeV S-band RF gun and associated beam line for forming and transporting a ~1 A drive beam , a 300 kV beam source for use as a test beam, and a full panoply of laboratory infrastructure and test equipment. During the first year of this project, availability and functionality of the 6-MeV drive beam and 300 kV test beam were confirmed, and the beam line was restored to a layout to be used with the two-beam accelerator project. Major efforts during the first year were also focused on computational design and simulation of the accelerator structure itself, on beam dynamics, and on beam transport. Effort during the second year was focussed on building and preparing to test the structure, including extensive cold testing. Detailed results from work under this project have been published in twelve archival journal articles, listed in Section IV of the technical report.

  1. Advances in the Ion Source Research and Development Program at ISIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faircloth, D.C.; Thomason, J.W.G.; Sidlow, R.; Whitehead, M.O.

    2005-04-06

    This paper covers the advances in the ion source research and development Program at ISIS over the last 2 years. The work is a combination of theoretical finite element analysis calculations and experiments conducted on a purpose built development rig. The broad development goals are higher beam current with longer pulse length. A Finite Element Analysis (FEA) model is used here to understand the steady state and dynamic thermal behavior of the source, and to investigate the design changes necessary to offset the extra heating. Electromagnetic FEA modeling of the extraction region of the ISIS H- ion source has suggested that the present set up of extraction electrode and 90 deg. sector magnet is sub-optimal, with the result that the beam profile is asymmetric, the beam is strongly divergent in the horizontal plane and there is severe aberration in the focusing in the vertical plane. The FEA model of the beam optics has demonstrated that relatively simple changes to the system should produce a dramatic improvement in performance. The theoretical and experimental results are compared here.

  2. Off-momentum dynamic aperture for lattices in the RHIC heavy ion runs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo Y.; Bai, M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Gu, X.; Fischer, W.; Marusic, A.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Zhang, S.

    2012-05-20

    To reduce transverse emittance growth rates from intrabeam scattering in the RHIC heavy ion runs, a lattice with an increased phase advance in the arc FODO cells was adopted in 2008-2011. During these runs, a large beam loss due to limited off-momentum dynamic aperture was observed during longitudinal RF re-bucketing and with transverse cooling. Based on the beam loss observations in the previous ion runs and the calculated off-momentum apertures, we decided to adopt the lattice used before 2008 for the 2012 U-U and Cu-Au runs. The observed beam decay and the measured momentum aperture in the 2012 U-U run are presented.

  3. NEUTRAL-BEAM INJECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkel, W.B.

    2012-01-01

    escaping from magnetic confinement nuclear fusion devicesas a magnetic confinement scheme for advanced fuel fusion

  4. Advanced Computer Control Concepts Facilitate Energy Recovery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cutler, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    A process computer is a powerful tool for maximizing the use of energy and raw materials. Advanced computer control techniques are evolving which facilitate the recovery of energy by predictive control techniques. One such technique is Dynamic...

  5. Advanced ignition options for laser ICF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Rochester and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory #12;FSC · With day-one hardware, the NIF can explore high-gain shock ignition - Polar Shock Ignition (uses half the NIF beams to drive the implosion: multi-FM or 2D-SSD (talk by J. Soures at this meeting) The NIF can explore advanced ignition options

  6. Advanced Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, Gordon R.

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  7. Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - Particle beam dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgram GuidelinesThousandnstx-u The National Sphericalpppl-news en

  8. Status of LHC crab activity simulations and beam studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calaga,R.; Assman, R.; Barranco, J.; Barranco, J.; Calaga, R.; Caspers, F.; Ciapala, E.; De-Maria, R.; Koutchouk, J. P.; Linnecar, T.; Metral, E.; Morita, A.; Solyak, N.; Sun, Y.; Tomas, R.; Tuckmantel, J.; Weiler, T.; Zimmermann, F.

    2009-05-04

    The LHC crab cavity program is advancing rapidly towards a first prototype which is anticipated to be tested during the early stages of the LHC phase I upgrade and commissioning. The general project status and some aspects related to crab optics, collimation, aperture constraints, impedances, noise effects. beam transparency and machine protection critical for a safe and robust operation of LHC beams with crab cavities are addressed here.

  9. Review of ion beam therapy: Present and Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso, Jose R.

    2000-06-01

    First therapy efforts at the Bevalac using neon ions took place in the 70's and 80's. Promising results led to construction of HIMAC in Chiba Japan, and more recently to therapy trials at GSI. Both these facilities are now treating patients with carbon beams. Advances in both accelerator technology and beam delivery have taken place at these two centers. Plans are well along for new facilities in Europe and Japan.

  10. Methods of Beam Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    of Optical Stochastic Cooling", presented at PAC, (1995).1991). Hangst, J. , "Laser Cooling of a Stored Ion Beam - ATheorem and Phase Space Cooling", Proceedings of the

  11. Center for Beam Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    2010-01-01

    presented at APS Division of Plasma Physics, Denver,of Division of Physics of Beams of APS, InternationalLinear Colliders," APS New Directions in High Energy Physics

  12. Electron Beam Instability in Left-Handed Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yury P. Bliokh; Sergey Savel'ev; Franco Nori

    2008-04-08

    We predict that two electron beams can develop an instability when passing through a slab of left-handed media (LHM). This instability, which is inherent only for LHM, originates from the backward Cherenkov radiation and results in a self-modulation of the beams and radiation of electromagnetic waves. These waves leave the sample via the rear surface of the slab (the beam injection plane) and form two shifted bright circles centered at the beams. A simulated spectrum of radiation has well-separated lines on top of a broad continuous spectrum, which indicates dynamical chaos in the system. The radiation intensity and its spectrum can be controlled either by the beams' current or by the distance between the two beams.

  13. Advanced LIGO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration

    2014-11-17

    The Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are second generation instruments designed and built for the two LIGO observatories in Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA. The two instruments are identical in design, and are specialized versions of a Michelson interferometer with 4 km long arms. As in initial LIGO, Fabry-Perot cavities are used in the arms to increase the interaction time with a gravitational wave, and power recycling is used to increase the effective laser power. Signal recycling has been added in Advanced LIGO to improve the frequency response. In the most sensitive frequency region around 100 Hz, the design strain sensitivity is a factor of 10 better than initial LIGO. In addition, the low frequency end of the sensitivity band is moved from 40 Hz down to 10 Hz. All interferometer components have been replaced with improved technologies to achieve this sensitivity gain. Much better seismic isolation and test mass suspensions are responsible for the gains at lower frequencies. Higher laser power, larger test masses and improved mirror coatings lead to the improved sensitivity at mid- and high- frequencies. Data collecting runs with these new instruments are planned to begin in mid-2015.

  14. Advanced Materials | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Specific Binding ORNL discovery holds potential for separations, sensors, batteries, biotech and more Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials Advanced Materials |...

  15. Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) Code Verification and Validation Data Standards and Requirements: Fluid Dynamics Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Weirs; Hyung Lee

    2011-09-01

    V&V and UQ are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of M&S and, hence, to establish confidence in M&S. Though other industries are establishing standards and requirements for the performance of V&V and UQ, at present, the nuclear industry has not established such standards or requirements. However, the nuclear industry is beginning to recognize that such standards are needed and that the resources needed to support V&V and UQ will be very significant. In fact, no single organization has sufficient resources or expertise required to organize, conduct and maintain a comprehensive V&V and UQ program. What is needed is a systematic and standardized approach to establish and provide V&V and UQ resources at a national or even international level, with a consortium of partners from government, academia and industry. Specifically, what is needed is a structured and cost-effective knowledge base that collects, evaluates and stores verification and validation data, and shows how it can be used to perform V&V and UQ, leveraging collaboration and sharing of resources to support existing engineering and licensing procedures as well as science-based V&V and UQ processes. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Utah State University and others with the objective of establishing a comprehensive and web-accessible knowledge base to provide V&V and UQ resources for M&S for nuclear reactor design, analysis and licensing. The knowledge base will serve as an important resource for technical exchange and collaboration that will enable credible and reliable computational models and simulations for application to nuclear power. NE-KAMS will serve as a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, academia, the national laboratories, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the public and will help ensure the safe, economical and reliable operation of existing and future nuclear reactors.

  16. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1994-02-15

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus is described. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 7 figures.

  17. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1993-12-28

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 11 figures.

  18. Methodological advances in computer simulation of biomolecular systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Wolfgang

    Methodological advances in computer simulation of biomolecular systems Wilfred F. van Gunsteren Computer simulation of the dynamics of biomolecular systems by the molecular dynamics technique yields computing power. Recent advances in simulation methodology e.g. to rapidly compute many free energies from

  19. Multiple-beam laser–plasma interactions in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myatt, J. F. Zhang, J.; Maximov, A. V.; Short, R. W.; Seka, W.; Edgell, D. H.; Michel, D. T.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Froula, D. H.; Hinkel, D. E.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.

    2014-05-15

    The experimental evidence for multiple-beam laser-plasma instabilities of relevance to laser driven inertial confinement fusion at the ignition scale is reviewed, in both the indirect and direct-drive approaches. The instabilities described are cross-beam energy transfer (in both indirectly driven targets on the NIF and in direct-drive targets), multiple-beam stimulated Raman scattering (for indirect-drive), and multiple-beam two-plasmon decay instability (in direct drive). Advances in theoretical understanding and in the numerical modeling of these multiple beam instabilities are presented.

  20. Formation of compressed flat electron beams with high transverse-emittance ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, J.; Piot, P.; Mihalcea, D.; Prokop, C. R.

    2014-08-01

    Flat beams—beams with asymmetric transverse emittances—have important applications in novel light-source concepts and advanced-acceleration schemes and could possibly alleviate the need for damping rings in lepton colliders. Over the last decade, a flat beam generation technique based on the conversion of an angular-momentum-dominated beam was proposed and experimentally tested. In this paper we explore the production of compressed flat beams. We especially investigate and optimize the flat beam transformation for beams with substantial fractional energy spread. We use as a simulation example the photoinjector of Fermilab’s Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator. The optimizations of the flat beam generation and compression at Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator were done via start-to-end numerical simulations for bunch charges of 3.2 nC, 1.0 nC, and 20 pC at ?37??MeV. The optimized emittances of flat beams with different bunch charges were found to be 0.25???m (emittance ratio is ?400), 0.13????m, 15 nm before compression, and 0.41???m, 0.20???m, 16 nm after full compression, respectively, with peak currents as high as 5.5 kA for a 3.2?nC flat beam. These parameters are consistent with requirements needed to excite wakefields in asymmetric dielectric-lined waveguides or produce significant photon flux using small-gap micro-undulators.

  1. STOCHASTIC COOLING OF BUNCHED BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bisognano, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    March 11-13, 1981 STOCHASTIC COOLING OF BUNCHED BEAMS J.J.W-7406-BW-48 STOCHASTIC COOLING OF BUNCHED BEAMS* J.J.longitudinal stochastic cooling of bunched particle beams.

  2. Canted Undulator Upgrade for GeoSoilEnviroCARS Sector 13 at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutton, Stephen

    2013-02-02

    Support for the beamline component of the canted undulator upgrade of Sector 13 (GeoSoilEnviroCARS; managed and operated by the University of Chicago) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS; Argonne National Laboratory) was received from three agencies (equally divided): NASA-SRLIDAP (now LARS), NSF-EAR-IF (ARRA) and DOE-Single Investigator Small Group (SISGR). The associated accelerator components (undulators, canted front end) were provided by the APS using DOE-ARRA funding. The intellectual merit of the research enabled by the upgrade lies in advancing our knowledge of the composition, structure and properties of earth materials; the processes they control; and the processes that produce them. The upgrade will facilitate scientific advances in the following areas: high pressure mineral physics and chemistry, non-crystalline and nano-crystalline materials at high pressure, chemistry of hydrothermal fluids, reactions at mineral-water interfaces, biogeochemistry, oxidation states of magmas, flow dynamics of fluids and solids, and cosmochemistry. The upgrade, allowing the microprobe to operate 100% of the time and the high pressure and surface scattering and spectroscopy instruments to receive beam time increases, will facilitate much more efficient use of the substantial investment in these instruments. The broad scientific community will benefit by the increase in the number of scientists who conduct cutting-edge research at GSECARS. The user program in stations 13ID-C (interface scattering) and 13ID-D (laser heated diamond anvil cell and large volume press) recommenced in June 2012. The operation of the 13ID-E microprobe station began in the Fall 2012 cycle (Oct.-Dec 2012). The upgraded canted beamlines double the amount of undulator beam time at Sector 13 and provide new capabilities including extended operations of the X-ray microprobe down to the sulfur K edge and enhanced brightness at high energy. The availability of the upgraded beamlines will advance the research being conducted at Sector 13.

  3. Transient beam losses in the LHC injection kickers from micron scale dust particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard, B; Baer, T; Barnes, M J; Cerutti, F; Ferrari, A; Garrel, N; Gerardin, A; Guinchard, M; Lechner, A; Masi, A; Mertens, V; Morón Ballester, R; Redaelli, S; Uythoven, J; Vlachoudis, V; Zimmermann, F

    2012-01-01

    Transient beam losses on a time scale of a few ms have been observed in the LHC injection kickers, occurring mainly shortly after beam injection with a strong correlation in time to the kicker pulsing. The beam losses, which have at times affected LHC availability, are attributed to micron scale ceramic dust particles detached from the alumina beam pipe and accelerated into the beam. The beam related observations are described, together with laboratory measurements of beam pipe contamination and kicker vibration, simulations of electric field in the beam pipe and the basic dynamic model. Energy deposition simulations modelling the beam losses are presented and compared to measurement. Extrapolations to future LHC operation at higher intensities and energies are made, and prospects for mitigation are discussed.

  4. Limiting factors in sub-10 nm scanning-electron-beam lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berggren, Karl K.

    Achieving the highest possible resolution using scanning-electron-beam lithography (SEBL) has become an increasingly urgent problem in recent years, as advances in various nanotechnology applications [ F. S. Bates and G. ...

  5. MULTIMEGAWATT NEUTRAL BEAMS FOR TOKAMAKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkel, W.B.

    2010-01-01

    NEUTRAL BEAMS FOR TOKAMAKS Wulf B. Kunkel March 1979NEUTRAL BEAMS FOR TOKAMAKS* Wulf 6. Kunkel AV « tract Mostit seems probable that tokamaks will achieve "scientific"

  6. Simulations of beam-beam and beam-wire interactions in RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyung J.; Sen, Tanaji; /Fermilab; Abreu, Natalia P.; Fischer, Wolfram; /Brookhaven

    2009-02-01

    The beam-beam interaction is one of the dominant sources of emittance growth and luminosity lifetime deterioration. A current carrying wire has been proposed to compensate long-range beam-beam effects in the LHC and strong localized long-range beam-beam effects are experimentally investigated in the RHIC collider. Tune shift, beam transfer function, and beam loss rate are measured in dedicated experiments. In this paper, they report on simulations to study the effect of beam-wire interactions based on diffusive apertures, beam loss rates, and beam transfer function using a parallelized weak-strong beam simulation code (BBSIMC). The simulation results are compared with measurements performed in RHIC during 2007 and 2008.

  7. Electron Beam for LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mieczyslaw Witold Krasny

    2004-05-13

    A method of delivering a monochromatic electron beam to the LHC interaction points is proposed. In this method, heavy ions are used as carriers of the projectile electrons. Acceleration, storage and collision-stability aspects of such a hybrid beam is discussed and a new beam-cooling method is presented. This discussion is followed by a proposal of the Parasitic Ion-Electron collider at LHC (PIE@LHC). The PIE@LHC provides an opportunity, for the present LHC detectors, to enlarge the scope of their research program by including the program of electron-proton and electron-nucleuscollisions with minor machine and detector investments.

  8. LEDA BEAM DIAGNOSTICS INSTRUMENTATION: BEAM POSITION MONITORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. BARR; ET AL

    2000-05-01

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) facility located at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) accelerates protons to an energy of 6.7-MeV and current of 100-mA operating in either a pulsed or cw mode. Of key importance to the commissioning and operations effort is the Beam Position Monitor system (BPM). The LEDA BPM system uses five micro-stripline beam position monitors processed by log ratio processing electronics with data acquisition via a series of custom TMS32OC40 Digital Signal Processing (DSP) boards. Of special interest to this paper is the operation of the system, the log ratio processing, and the system calibration technique. This paper will also cover the DSP system operations and their interaction with the main accelerator control system.

  9. Heavy Oil Upgrading from Electron Beam (E-Beam) Irradiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Daegil

    2011-02-22

    to upgrade. This thesis demonstrates that electron beam (E-Beam) heavy oil upgrading, which uses unique features of E-Beam irradiation, may be used to improve conventional heavy oil upgrading. E-Beam processing lowers the thermal energy requirements and could...

  10. Focused ion beam system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Gough, Richard A. (Kensington, CA); Ji, Qing (Berkeley, CA); Lee, Yung-Hee Yvette (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 .mu.m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 .mu.m or less.

  11. Focused ion beam system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, K.; Gough, R.A.; Ji, Q.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1999-08-31

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 {mu}m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 m or less. 13 figs.

  12. Beam! Magic! | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with all the changes, the accelerator can be made to work. Beam Since my first serious introduction to nuclear and particle physics - when I worked for a few weeks one summer at...

  13. Advanced Accelerator Concepts Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wurtele, Jonathan S.

    2014-05-13

    A major focus of research supported by this Grant has been on the ALPHA antihydrogen trap. We first trapped antihydrogen in 2010 and soon thereafter demonstrated trapping for 1000s. We now have observed resonant quantum interactions with antihydrogen. These papers in Nature and Nature Physics report the major milestones in anti-atom trapping. The success was only achieved through careful work that advanced our understanding of collective dynamics in charged particle systems, the development of new cooling and diagnostics, and in- novation in understanding how to make physics measurements with small numbers of anti-atoms. This research included evaporative cooling, autoresonant excitation of longitudinal motion, and centrifugal separation. Antihydrogen trapping by ALPHA is progressing towards the point when a important theories believed by most to hold for all physical systems, such as CPT (Charge-Parity-Time) invariance and the Weak Equivalence Principle (matter and antimatter behaving the same way under the influence of gravity) can be directly tested in a new regime. One motivation for this test is that most accepted theories of the Big Bang predict that we should observe equal amounts of matter and antimatter. However astrophysicists have found very little antimatter in the universe. Our experiment will, if successful over the next seven years, provide a new test of these ideas. Many earlier detailed and beautiful tests have been made, but the trapping of neutral antimatter allows us to explore the possibility of direct, model-independent tests. Successful cooling of the anti atoms, careful limits on systematics and increased trapping rates, all planned for our follow-up experiment (ALPHA-II) will reach unrivaled precision. CPT invariance implies that the spectra of hydrogen and antihydrogen should be identical. Spectra can be measured in principle with great precision, and any di#11;erences we might observe would revolutionize fundamental physics. This is the physics motivation for our experiment, one that requires only a few dozen researchers but must effectively integrate plasma, accelerator, atomic, and fundamental physics, as well as combine numerous technologies in the control, manipulation, and measurement of neutral and non-neutral particles. The ELENA ring (to which we hope to contribute, should funding be provided) is expect, when completed, to significantly enhance the performance of antihydrogen trapping by increasing by a factor of 100 the number of antiprotons that can be successfully trapped and cooled. ELENA operation is scheduled to commence in 2017. In collaboration with LBNL scientists, we proposed a frictional cooling scheme. This is an alternative cooling method to that used by ELENA. It is less complicated, experimentally unproven, and produces a lower yield of cold antiprotons. Students and postdoctoral researchers work on the trapping, cooling, transport, and nonlinear dynamics of antiprotons bunches that are provided by the AD to ALPHA; they contribute to the operation of the experiment, to software development, and to the design and operation of experiments. Students are expected to spend at summers at CERN while taking courses; after completion of courses they typically reside at CERN for most of the half-year run. The Antiproton Decelerator [AD] at CERN, along with its experiments, is the only facility in the world where antiprotons can be trapped and cooled and combined with positrons to form cold antihydrogen, with the ultimate goal of studying CPT violation and, subsequently, gravitational interactions of antimatter. Beyond the ALPHA experiment, the group worked on beam physics problems including limits on the average current in a time-dependent period cathode and new methods to create longitudinally coherent high repetition rate soft x-ray sources and wide bandwidth mode locked x-ray lasers. We completed a detailed study of quantum mechanical effects in the transit time cooling of muons.

  14. Self-pinched transport of a high ?/? electron beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, M. C.; Wolford, M. F.; Sethian, J. D. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Plasma Physics Division, 4555 Overlook Ave., SW, Washington DC 20375 (United States)] [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Plasma Physics Division, 4555 Overlook Ave., SW, Washington DC 20375 (United States); Rose, D. V. [Voss Scientific, 418 Washington St. SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States)] [Voss Scientific, 418 Washington St. SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States); Hegeler, F. [Commonwealth Technology Inc., 5875 Barclay Drive, Alexandria, Virginia 22315 (United States)] [Commonwealth Technology Inc., 5875 Barclay Drive, Alexandria, Virginia 22315 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    The self-pinched transport of a 0.5 MeV, 18 kA cylindrical electron beam has been studied experimentally and computationally. The relatively low voltage and high current required for materials surface modification applications leads to complicated beam dynamics as the Alfven limit is approached. Transport and focusing of the high ?/? beam was done in a sub-Torr, neutral gas-filled, conducting tube in the ion-focused regime. In this regime, beam space charge forces are progressively neutralized to allow focusing of the beam by its self-magnetic field. The beam exhibits stable envelope oscillations as it is efficiently and reproducibly propagated for distances greater than a betatron wavelength. Experimental results follow the trends seen in 2-D particle-in-cell simulations. Results show that the input electron beam can be periodically focused to a peaked profile with the beam half-current radius decreased by a factor of 2.84. This results in an increase of a factor of 8 in beam current density. This focusing is sufficient to produce desired effects in the surface layers of metallic materials.

  15. Emittance and phase space exchange for advanced beam manipulation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Society Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Free Publicly Accessible Full Text Publisher's Version of Record...

  16. Emittance and Phase Space Exchange for Advanced Beam Manipulation and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech(Journal Article)atDiagnostics (Journal Article) | SciTech

  17. Emittance and phase space exchange for advanced beam manipulation and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech(Journal Article)atDiagnostics (Journal Article) |

  18. Photon beam position monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuzay, T.M.; Shu, D.

    1995-02-07

    A photon beam position monitor is disclosed for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade ''shadowing''. Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation. 18 figs.

  19. The Advanced Manufacturing Partnership and the Advanced Manufacturing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Advanced Manufacturing Partnership and the Advanced Manufacturing National Program Office The Advanced Manufacturing Partnership and the Advanced Manufacturing National Program...

  20. Single element laser beam shaper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shukui (Yorktown, VA); Michelle D. Shinn (Newport News, VA)

    2005-09-13

    A single lens laser beam shaper for converting laser beams from any spatial profile to a flat-top or uniform spatial profile. The laser beam shaper includes a lens having two aspheric surfaces. The beam shaper significantly simplifies the overall structure in comparison with conventional 2-element systems and therefore provides great ease in alignment and reduction of cost.

  1. Sandia Energy - Advanced Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Imaging Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Reacting Flow Experiments Advanced Imaging Advanced ImagingAshley Otero2015-10-30T01:47:37+00:00...

  2. Electrostatic plasma lens for focusing negatively charged particle beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goncharov, A. A.; Dobrovolskiy, A. M.; Dunets, S. M.; Litovko, I. V.; Gushenets, V. I.; Oks, E. M.

    2012-02-15

    We describe the current status of ongoing research and development of the electrostatic plasma lens for focusing and manipulating intense negatively charged particle beams, electrons, and negative ions. The physical principle of this kind of plasma lens is based on magnetic isolation electrons providing creation of a dynamical positive space charge cloud in shortly restricted volume propagating beam. Here, the new results of experimental investigations and computer simulations of wide-aperture, intense electron beam focusing by plasma lens with positive space charge cloud produced due to the cylindrical anode layer accelerator creating a positive ion stream towards an axis system is presented.

  3. Single-Particle Dynamics in Electron Storage Rings with Extremely...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    order of reduction is expected. This requirement of ultra-low emittance presents many design challenges in beam dynamics, including better analysis of maps and improvement of...

  4. Advanced Thermal Control

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    thermal models power density cost lifetime Advanced Thermal Interface Materials Advanced Heat Transfer Technologies Air Cooling Thermal System Performance and Integration Thermal...

  5. Photo differential scanning calorimetry, UV thermal mechanical analysis and UV dynamic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    ; ultraviolet (UV) light is used often, but sometimes an electron beam or gamma radiation12 is used instead 10140, Thailand 2 Laboratory of Advanced Polymers & Optimized Materials

  6. THE EFFECT OF A SELF-INDUCED ELECTRIC FIELD ON ELECTRON BEAM DIFFERENTIAL SPECTRA IN FLARING ATMOSPHERES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zharkova, Valentina V.

    THE EFFECT OF A SELF-INDUCED ELECTRIC FIELD ON ELECTRON BEAM DIFFERENTIAL SPECTRA IN FLARING field decrease with depth reduces the electron decelera- tion that allows beam electrons to precipitate. INTRODUCTION The effect of the induced electric field on the dynam- ics of non-thermal electron beams

  7. LBNL-57600/CBP Note-698 Initial Self-Consistent 3D Electron-Cloud Simulations of the LHC Beam with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furman, Miguel

    LBNL-57600/CBP Note-698 Initial Self-Consistent 3D Electron-Cloud Simulations of the LHC Beam lattice elements are realistically modeled, as is the beam and the electron cloud dynamics. The simulated of the electron cloud, represented by macroparticles, under the action of successive bunch passages of the beam

  8. Beam Characterizations at Femtosecond Electron Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rimjaem, S.; Jinamoon, V.; Kangrang, M.; Kusoljariyakul, K.; Saisut, J.; Thongbai, C.; Vilaithong, T.; Rhodes, M.W.; Wichaisirimongkol, P.; Wiedemann, H.; /SLAC

    2006-03-17

    The SURIYA project at the Fast Neutron Research Facility (FNRF) has been established and is being commissioning to generate femtosecond (fs) electron bunches. Theses short bunches are produced by a system consisting of an S-band thermionic cathode RF-gun, an alpha magnet (a-magnet) serving as a magnetic bunch compressor, and a SLAC-type linear accelerator (linac). The characteristics of its major components and the beam characterizations as well as the preliminary experimental results will be presented and discussed in this paper.

  9. LHC beam-beam compensation studies at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer,W.; Abreu, N.; Calaga, R.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Luo, Y.; Montag, C.

    2009-05-04

    Long-range and head-on beam-beam effects are expected to limit the LHC performance with design parameters. To mitigate long-range effects current carrying wires parallel to the beam were proposed. Two such wires are installed in RHIC where they allow studying the effect of strong long-range beam-beam effects, as well as the compensation of a single long-range interaction. The tests provide benchmark data for simulations and analytical treatments. To reduce the head-on beam-beam effect electron lenses were proposed for both the LHC and RHIC. We present the experimental long-range beam-beam program and report on head-on compensations studies at RHIC, which are based on simulations.

  10. Beam-beam study of ERL based eRHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao, Y; Ptitsyn, V

    2014-01-01

    Beam-beam effects in eRHIC, the proposed ERL-based Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) at BNL, have several unique features distinguishing them from those in hadron-colliders and lepton-colliders. Taking the advantage of the fact that the electron beam is used only once, we expect the luminosity to be 10 times greater than for the ring-ring collision scheme with similar parameters. However, without instituting proper treatments, the quality of electron and hadron beams can undergo degradation or even beam loss, driven by the beam-beam interactions. We will discuss the harmful effects, including the disruption and mismatch effect of the electron beam, the kink instability and the noise heating of the ion beam and the possible countermeasures.

  11. The Low-Energy State of Circulating Stored Ion Beams: Crystalline Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, J.

    2008-01-01

    Proc. of the Workshop on Crystalline Ion Beams, Werheim,Critical Temperatures for Crystalline Beams", Proc. of theCirculating Stored Ion Beams: Crystalline Beams J. Wei, X. -

  12. Dynamic advance reservation with delayed allocation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vokkarane, Vinod; Somani, Arun

    2014-12-02

    A method of scheduling data transmissions from a source to a destination, includes the steps of: providing a communication system having a number of channels and a number of paths, each of the channels having a plurality of designated time slots; receiving two or more data transmission requests; provisioning the transmission of the data; receiving data corresponding to at least one of the two or more data transmission requests; waiting until an earliest requested start time T.sub.s; allocating at the current time each of the two or more data transmission requests; transmitting the data; and repeating the steps of waiting, allocating, and transmitting until each of the two or more data transmission requests that have been provisioned for a transmission of data is satisfied. A system to perform the method of scheduling data transmissions is also described.

  13. Advanced Review Mediators and dynamics of DNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei

    -wide classifies cell types uniquely and in several cases discriminates between healthy and cancerous cell types zinc fin- ger proteins, recognize the presence of methylated cytosines.4­13 DNMT1 maintains methylation mechanism that prevents the activation of these sequences.31­34 DNA methyla- tion is also present in genes

  14. Beam-beam Effects of 'Gear-changing' in Ring-Ring Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao, Yue; Ptitsyn, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    In ring-ring colliders, the collision frequency determines the bunch structures, e.g. the time between the bunches in both rings should be identical. Because of relatively low relativistic speed of the hadron beam in sub-TeV hadron-hadron- and electron-ions-colliders, scanning the hadron beam's energy would require either a change in the circumference of one of the rings, or a switching of the bunch (harmonic) number in a ring. The later would cause so-called 'gear-changing', i.e. the change of the colliding bunches turn by turn. In this article, we study the difficulties in beam dynamics in this 'gear-changing' scheme.

  15. Dynamic Systems, Measurement,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singhose, William

    Journal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement, and Control Technical Briefs Remote Vibration Control for Flexible Beams Subject to Harmonic Disturbances Shang-Teh Wu Department of Mechanical Engineering, National at the boundary are required in the control algorithm, which emulates the behavior of a set of mechanical spring

  16. Beam Physics at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Lyndon R

    2003-01-01

    The design of the Large Hadron Collider incorporates the accumulated knowledge obtained from previous generations of hadron colliders. Among the well known effects limiting machine performance are intrabeam scattering, the beam-beam interaction and stability against collective motion. Simulations and recent experiments in the SPS have shown that the electron cloud effect observed in the B-factories will be present both in the LHC and in its injector. All of these phenomena are discussed together with the measure taken in the machine design to overcome them.

  17. Advanced Manufacturing Office News

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-08-08

    News stories about advanced manufacturing, events, and office accomplishments. Subscribe to receive updates.

  18. Colliding beams of light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Ivanov

    2002-12-28

    The stationary gravitational field of two identical counter-moving beams of pure radiation is found in full generality. The solution depends on an arbitrary function and a parameter which sets the scale of the energy density. Some of its properties are studied. Previous particular solutions are derived as subcases.

  19. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenly, J.B.

    1997-08-12

    An improved pulsed ion beam source is disclosed having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center. 12 figs.

  20. Beam current sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuchnir, M.; Mills, F.E.

    1984-09-28

    A current sensor for measuring the dc component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivities in the nano-ampere range.

  1. High gradient lens for charged particle beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yu-Jiuan

    2014-04-29

    Methods and devices enable shaping of a charged particle beam. A dynamically adjustable electric lens includes a series of alternating a series of alternating layers of insulators and conductors with a hollow center. The series of alternating layers when stacked together form a high gradient insulator (HGI) tube to allow propagation of the charged particle beam through the hollow center of the HGI tube. A plurality of transmission lines are connected to a plurality of sections of the HGI tube, and one or more voltage sources are provided to supply an adjustable voltage value to each transmission line of the plurality of transmission lines. By changing the voltage values supplied to each section of the HGI tube, any desired electric field can be established across the HGI tube. This way various functionalities including focusing, defocusing, acceleration, deceleration, intensity modulation and others can be effectuated on a time varying basis.

  2. The Cooling of Particle Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    2008-01-01

    67, 15. Hangst, J "Laser Cooling of a Stored Ion Beam - ATheorem an.d Phase Space Cooling", Proceedings of theWorkshop on Beam Cooling and Related Topics, Montreaux, CERN

  3. Hadron beams session-summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, K.M. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1120, USA (US))

    1989-05-05

    The status of presently operating polarized beams at Fermilab, the AGS, and KEK is discussed. Other schemes such as Siberian Snakes and self-polarization of a beam in situ are briefly analyzed.(AIP)

  4. Laser beam pulse formatting method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daly, T.P.; Moses, E.I.; Patterson, R.W.; Sawicki, R.H.

    1994-08-09

    A method for formatting a laser beam pulse using one or more delay loops is disclosed. The delay loops have a partially reflective beam splitter and a plurality of highly reflective mirrors arranged such that the laser beam pulse enters into the delay loop through the beam splitter and circulates therein along a delay loop length defined by the mirrors. As the laser beam pulse circulates within the delay loop a portion thereof is emitted upon each completed circuit when the laser beam pulse strikes the beam splitter. The laser beam pulse is thereby formatted into a plurality of sub-pulses. The delay loops are used in combination to produce complex waveforms by combining the sub-pulses using additive waveform synthesis. 8 figs.

  5. Method and apparatus for real time imaging and monitoring of radiotherapy beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA); Macey, Daniel J. (Birmingham, AL); Weisenberger, Andrew G. (Yorktown, VA)

    2011-11-01

    A method and apparatus for real time imaging and monitoring of radiation therapy beams is designed to preferentially distinguish and image low energy radiation from high energy secondary radiation emitted from a target as the result of therapeutic beam deposition. A detector having low sensitivity to high energy photons combined with a collimator designed to dynamically image in the region of the therapeutic beam target is used.

  6. Nanofabrication using focused ion beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latif, Adnan

    Focused ion beam (FIB) technique uses a focused beam of ions to scan the surface of a specimen, analogous to the way scanning electron microscope (SEM) utilizes electrons. Recent developments in the FIB technology have led to beam spot size below...

  7. Anchor deformations drive limit cycle oscillations in interferometrically transduced MEMS beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rand, Richard H.

    Anchor deformations drive limit cycle oscillations in interferometrically transduced MEMS beams, the mechanism by which the thermal stresses drive limit cycle oscillations of initially flat beams was unknown element method Resonator Dynamical systems Limit cycle Hopf a b s t r a c t A micro-scale resonator

  8. Beam-driven acceleration in ultra-dense plasma media

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shin, Young-Min

    2014-09-15

    Accelerating parameters of beam-driven wakefield acceleration in an extremely dense plasma column has been analyzed with the dynamic framed particle-in-cell plasma simulator, and compared with analytic calculations. In the model, a witness beam undergoes a TeV/m scale alternating potential gradient excited by a micro-bunched drive beam in a 1025 m-3 and 1.6 x 1028 m-3 plasma column. The acceleration gradient, energy gain, and transformer ratio have been extensively studied in quasi-linear, linear-, and blowout-regimes. The simulation analysis indicated that in the beam-driven acceleration system a hollow plasma channel offers 20 % higher acceleration gradient by enlarging the channel radius (r)more »from 0.2 ?p to 0.6 ?p in a blowout regime. This paper suggests a feasibility of TeV/m scale acceleration with a hollow crystalline structure (e.g. nanotubes) of high electron plasma density.« less

  9. Noise estimation of beam position monitors at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, X.; Bai, M.; Lee, S. Y.

    2014-02-10

    Beam position monitors (BPM) are used to record the average orbits and transverse turn-by-turn displacements of the beam centroid motion. The Relativistic Hadron Ion Collider (RHIC) has 160 BPMs for each plane in each of the Blue and Yellow rings: 72 dual-plane BPMs in the insertion regions (IR) and 176 single-plane modules in the arcs. Each BPM is able to acquire 1024 or 4096 consecutive turn-by-turn beam positions. Inevitably, there are broadband noisy signals in the turn-by-turn data due to BPM electronics as well as other sources. A detailed study of the BPM noise performance is critical for reliable optics measurement and beam dynamics analysis based on turn-by-turn data.

  10. IFTS Intensive Course on Advanced Plasma Physics-Spring 2011,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zonca, Fulvio

    IFTS Intensive Course on Advanced Plasma Physics-Spring 2011, Non-linear charged particle dynamics/2 with the arc length along the magnetic field line, at the lowest order in the drift expansion for the charged

  11. Optical design and characterization of an advanced computational imaging system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepard III, R. Hamilton

    We describe an advanced computational imaging system with an optical architecture that enables simultaneous and dynamic pupil-plane and image-plane coding accommodating several task-specific applications. We assess the ...

  12. LBL-35528/CBP-074 CHAPTER 12: BEAM INSTABILITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furman, Miguel

    of the particles in the accelerator in given external electric and magnetic fields. As the particles traverse and can influence the beam dynamics, and hence the machine performance, significantly. Some machines such as damping rings and e+-e­ colliders. At the core of any discussion on instabilities

  13. High Power Hydrogen Injector with Beam Focusing for Plasma Heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deichuli, P.P.; Ivanov, A.A.; Korepanov, S.A.; Mishagin, V.V.; Sorokin, A.V.; Stupishin, N.V

    2005-01-15

    High power neutral beam injector has been developed with the atom energy of 25 keV, a current of 60 A, and several milliseconds pulse duration. Six of these injectors will be used for upgrade of the atomic injection system at central cell of a Gas Dynamic Trap (GDT) device and 2 injectors are planned for SHIP experiment.The injector ion source is based on an arc discharge plasma box. The plasma emitter is produced by a 1 kA arc discharge in hydrogen. A multipole magnetic field produced with permanent magnets at the periphery of the plasma box is used to increase its efficiency and improve homogeneity of the plasma emitter. The ion beam is extracted by a 4-electrodes ion optical system (IOS). Initial beam diameter is 200 mm. The grids of the IOS have a spherical curvature for geometrical focusing of the beam. The optimal IOS geometry and grid potentials were found with the numerical simulation to provide precise beam formation. The measured angular divergence of the beam is 0.02 rad, which corresponds to the 2.5 cm Gaussian radius of the beam profile measured at focal point.

  14. Ion beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Ian G. (1088 Woodside Rd., Berkeley, CA 94708); Galvin, James (2 Commodore #276, Emeryville, CA 94608)

    1987-01-01

    An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam.

  15. Ion beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, I.G.; Galvin, J.

    1987-12-22

    An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam. 10 figs.

  16. Stationary nonlinear Airy beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lotti, A.; Faccio, D.; Couairon, A.; Papazoglou, D. G.; Panagiotopoulos, P.; Tzortzakis, S.; Abdollahpour, D.

    2011-08-15

    We demonstrate the existence of an additional class of stationary accelerating Airy wave forms that exist in the presence of third-order (Kerr) nonlinearity and nonlinear losses. Numerical simulations and experiments, in agreement with the analytical model, highlight how these stationary solutions sustain the nonlinear evolution of Airy beams. The generic nature of the Airy solution allows extension of these results to other settings, and a variety of applications are suggested.

  17. Proton beam therapy facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-10-09

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs.

  18. Filamentation of Beam-Shaped Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polynkin, Pavel; Kolesik, Miroslav; Moloney, Jerome

    2010-10-08

    When ultra-intense and ultra-short optical pulses propagate in transparent dielectrics, the dynamic balance between multiple linear and nonlinear effects results in the generation of laser filaments. These peculiar objects have numerous interesting properties and can be potentially used in a variety of applications from remote sensing to the optical pulse compression down to few optical cycles to guiding lightning discharges away from sensitive sites. Materializing this practical potential is not straightforward owing to the complexity of the physical picture of filamentation. In this paper, we discuss recent experiments on using beam shaping as a means of control over the filament formation and dynamics. Two particular beam shapes that we have investigated so far are Bessel and Airy beams. The diffraction-free propagation of femtosecond Bessel beams allows for the creation of extended plasma channels in air. These extended filaments can be used for the generation of energetic optical pulses with the duration in the few-cycle range. In the case of filamentation of femtosecond Airy beams, the self-bending property of these beams allows for the creation of curved filaments. This is a new regime of the intense laser-pulse propagation in which the linear self-bending property of the beam competes against the nonlinear self-channeling. The bent filaments generated by ultra-intense Airy beams emit forward-propagating broadband radiation. Analysis of the spatial and spectral distribution of this emission provides for a valuable tool for analyzing the evolution of the ultra-intense optical pulse along the optical path.

  19. Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center demand responsive lighting systems ­ Importance of dimming ­ New wireless controls technologies · Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) #12;Objectives · Provide up-to-date information

  20. Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Karl T.; Pruski, Marek; Washton, Nancy M.; Lipton, Andrew S.

    2013-03-07

    This report recaps the "Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance" workshop, held in late 2011. This exploratory workshop's goal was to discuss and address challenges for the next generation of magnetic resonance experimentation. During the workshop, participants from throughout the world outlined the science drivers and instrumentation demands for high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and associated magnetic resonance techniques, discussed barriers to their advancement, and deliberated the path forward for significant and impactful advances in the field.

  1. Nondestructive Damage Detection in General Beams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dincal, Selcuk

    2010-12-08

    is to provide NDE methodologies that simultaneously identify the location, the extent, and the severity of damage in general beams. By general beams, we mean beyond Euler-Bernoulli beams (i.e. slender beams) to deep beams and stubby beams whose response may...

  2. Beam/Jet Trajectories April 1, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Beam/Jet Trajectories April 1, 2009 #12;Hg Jet Target Geometry Solenoid Axis Hg Jet Proton Beam BEAM CROSS rJET Previous results: Radius 5mm, beam =67mrad crossing = 33mrad #12;Optimized Target Energy, GeV Optimized Target Radius #12;Beam Angle and Jet/Beam Crossing Angle 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140

  3. AGATA - Advanced Gamma Tracking Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Akkoyun; A. Algora; B. Alikhani; F. Ameil; G. de Angelis; L. Arnold; A. Astier; A. Ataç; Y. Aubert; C. Aufranc; A. Austin; S. Aydin; F. Azaiez; S. Badoer; D. L. Balabanski; D. Barrientos; G. Baulieu; R. Baumann; D. Bazzacco; F. A. Beck; T. Beck; P. Bednarczyk; M. Bellato; M. A. Bentley; G. Benzoni; R. Berthier; L. Berti; R. Beunard; G. Lo Bianco; B. Birkenbach; P. G. Bizzeti; A. M. Bizzeti-Sona; F. Le Blanc; J. M. Blasco; N. Blasi; D. Bloor; C. Boiano; M. Borsato; D. Bortolato; A. J. Boston; H. C. Boston; P. Bourgault; P. Boutachkov; A. Bouty; A. Bracco; S. Brambilla; I. P. Brawn; A. Brondi; S. Broussard; B. Bruyneel; D. Bucurescu; I. Burrows; A. Bürger; S. Cabaret; B. Cahan; E. Calore; F. Camera; A. Capsoni; F. Carrió; G. Casati; M. Castoldi; B. Cederwall; J. -L. Cercus; V. Chambert; M. El Chambit; R. Chapman; L. Charles; J. Chavas; E. Clément; P. Cocconi; S. Coelli; P. J. Coleman-Smith; A. Colombo; S. Colosimo; C. Commeaux; D. Conventi; R. J. Cooper; A. Corsi; A. Cortesi; L. Costa; F. C. L. Crespi; J. R. Cresswell; D. M. Cullen; D. Curien; A. Czermak; D. Delbourg; R. Depalo; T. Descombes; P. Désesquelles; P. Detistov; C. Diarra; F. Didierjean; M. R. Dimmock; Q. T. Doan; C. Domingo-Pardo; M. Doncel; F. Dorangeville; N. Dosme; Y. Drouen; G. Duchêne; B. Dulny; J. Eberth; P. Edelbruck; J. Egea; T. Engert; M. N. Erduran; S. Ertürk; C. Fanin; S. Fantinel; E. Farnea; T. Faul; M. Filliger; F. Filmer; Ch. Finck; G. de France; A. Gadea; W. Gast; A. Geraci; J. Gerl; R. Gernhäuser; A. Giannatiempo; A. Giaz; L. Gibelin; A. Givechev; N. Goel; V. González; A. Gottardo; X. Grave; J. Gr?bosz; R. Griffiths; A. N. Grint; P. Gros; L. Guevara; M. Gulmini; A. Görgen; H. T. M. Ha; T. Habermann; L. J. Harkness; H. Harroch; K. Hauschild; C. He; A. Hernández-Prieto; B. Hervieu; H. Hess; T. Hüyük; E. Ince; R. Isocrate; G. Jaworski; A. Johnson; J. Jolie; P. Jones; B. Jonson; P. Joshi; D. S. Judson; A. Jungclaus; M. Kaci; N. Karkour; M. Karolak; A. Ka?ka?; M. Kebbiri; R. S. Kempley; A. Khaplanov; S. Klupp; M. Kogimtzis; I. Kojouharov; A. Korichi; W. Korten; Th. Kröll; R. Krücken; N. Kurz; B. Y. Ky; M. Labiche; X. Lafay; L. Lavergne; I. H. Lazarus; S. Leboutelier; F. Lefebvre; E. Legay; L. Legeard; F. Lelli; S. M. Lenzi; S. Leoni; A. Lermitage; D. Lersch; J. Leske; S. C. Letts; S. Lhenoret; R. M. Lieder; D. Linget; J. Ljungvall; A. Lopez-Martens; A. Lotodé; S. Lunardi; A. Maj; J. van der Marel; Y. Mariette; N. Marginean; R. Marginean; G. Maron; A. R. Mather; W. M?czy?ski; V. Mendéz; P. Medina; B. Melon; R. Menegazzo; D. Mengoni; E. Merchan; L. Mihailescu; C. Michelagnoli; J. Mierzejewski; L. Milechina; B. Million; K. Mitev; P. Molini; D. Montanari; S. Moon; F. Morbiducci; R. Moro; P. S. Morrall; O. Möller; A. Nannini; D. R. Napoli; L. Nelson; M. Nespolo; V. L. Ngo; M. Nicoletto; R. Nicolini; Y. Le Noa; P. J. Nolan; M. Norman; J. Nyberg; A. Obertelli; A. Olariu; R. Orlandi; D. C. Oxley; C. Özben; M. Ozille; C. Oziol; E. Pachoud; M. Palacz; J. Palin; J. Pancin; C. Parisel; P. Pariset; G. Pascovici; R. Peghin; L. Pellegri; A. Perego; S. Perrier; M. Petcu; P. Petkov; C. Petrache; E. Pierre; N. Pietralla; S. Pietri; M. Pignanelli; I. Piqueras; Z. Podolyak; P. Le Pouhalec; J. Pouthas; D. Pugnére; V. F. E. Pucknell; A. Pullia; B. Quintana; R. Raine; G. Rainovski; L. Ramina; G. Rampazzo; G. La Rana; M. Rebeschini; F. Recchia; N. Redon; M. Reese; P. Reiter; P. H. Regan; S. Riboldi; M. Richer; M. Rigato; S. Rigby; G. Ripamonti; A. P. Robinson; J. Robin; J. Roccaz; J. -A. Ropert; B. Rossé; C. Rossi Alvarez; D. Rosso; B. Rubio; D. Rudolph; F. Saillant; E. ?ahin; F. Salomon; M. -D. Salsac; J. Salt; G. Salvato; J. Sampson; E. Sanchis; C. Santos; H. Schaffner; M. Schlarb; D. P. Scraggs; D. Seddon; M. ?enyi?it; M. -H. Sigward; G. Simpson; J. Simpson; M. Slee; J. F. Smith; P. Sona; B. Sowicki; P. Spolaore; C. Stahl; T. Stanios; E. Stefanova; O. Stézowski; J. Strachan; G. Suliman; P. -A. Söderström; J. L. Tain; S. Tanguy; S. Tashenov; Ch. Theisen; J. Thornhill; F. Tomasi; N. Toniolo; R. Touzery; B. Travers; A. Triossi; M. Tripon; K. M. M. Tun-Lanoë; M. Turcato; C. Unsworth; C. A. Ur; J. J. Valiente-Dobon; V. Vandone; E. Vardaci; R. Venturelli; F. Veronese; Ch. Veyssiere; E. Viscione; R. Wadsworth; P. M. Walker; N. Warr; C. Weber; D. Weisshaar; D. Wells; O. Wieland; A. Wiens; G. Wittwer; H. J. Wollersheim; F. Zocca; N. V. Zamfir; M. Zi?bli?ski; A. Zucchiatti

    2012-09-17

    The Advanced GAmma Tracking Array (AGATA) is a European project to develop and operate the next generation gamma-ray spectrometer. AGATA is based on the technique of gamma-ray energy tracking in electrically segmented high-purity germanium crystals. This technique requires the accurate determination of the energy, time and position of every interaction as a gamma ray deposits its energy within the detector volume. Reconstruction of the full interaction path results in a detector with very high efficiency and excellent spectral response. The realization of gamma-ray tracking and AGATA is a result of many technical advances. These include the development of encapsulated highly-segmented germanium detectors assembled in a triple cluster detector cryostat, an electronics system with fast digital sampling and a data acquisition system to process the data at a high rate. The full characterization of the crystals was measured and compared with detector-response simulations. This enabled pulse-shape analysis algorithms, to extract energy, time and position, to be employed. In addition, tracking algorithms for event reconstruction were developed. The first phase of AGATA is now complete and operational in its first physics campaign. In the future AGATA will be moved between laboratories in Europe and operated in a series of campaigns to take advantage of the different beams and facilities available to maximize its science output. The paper reviews all the achievements made in the AGATA project including all the necessary infrastructure to operate and support the spectrometer.

  4. Pulsed particle beam vacuum-to-air interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cruz, G.E.; Edwards, W.F.

    1987-06-18

    A vacuum-to-air interface is provided for a high-powered, pulsed particle beam accelerator. The interface comprises a pneumatic high speed gate valve, from which extends a vacuum-tight duct, that terminates in an aperture. Means are provided for periodically advancing a foil strip across the aperture at the repetition rate of the particle pulses. A pneumatically operated hollow sealing band urges foil strip, when stationary, against and into the aperture. Gas pressure means periodically lift off and separate foil strip from aperture, so that it may be readily advanced. 5 figs.

  5. The 2011 Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nesbitt, David J.

    2011-07-11

    The Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference focuses on all aspects of molecular collisions--experimental & theoretical studies of elastic, inelastic, & reactive encounters involving atoms, molecules, ions, clusters, & surfaces--as well as half collisions--photodissociation, photo-induced reaction, & photodesorption. The scientific program for the meeting in 2011 included exciting advances in both the core & multidisciplinary forefronts of the study of molecular collision processes. Following the format of the 2009 meeting, we also invited sessions in special topics that involve interfacial dynamics, novel emerging spectroscopies, chemical dynamics in atmospheric, combustion & interstellar environments, as well as a session devoted to theoretical & experimental advances in ultracold molecular samples. Researchers working inside & outside the traditional core topics of the meeting are encouraged to join the conference. We invite contributions of work that seeks understanding of how inter & intra-molecular forces determine the dynamics of the phenomena under study. In addition to invited oral sessions & contributed poster sessions, the scientific program included a formal session consisting of five contributed talks selected from the submitted poster abstracts. The DMC has distinguished itself by having the Herschbach Medal Symposium as part of the meeting format. This tradition of the Herschbach Medal was first started in the 2007 meeting chaired by David Chandler, based on a generous donation of funds & artwork design by Professor Dudley Herschbach himself. There are two such awards made, one for experimental & one for theoretical contributions to the field of Molecular Collision Dynamics, broadly defined. The symposium is always held on the last night of the meeting & has the awardees are asked to deliver an invited lecture on their work. The 2011 Herschbach Medal was dedicated to the contributions of two long standing leaders in Chemical Physics, Professor Yuan T. Lee & Professor George Schatz. Professor Lee’s research has been based on the development & use of advanced chemical kinetics & molecular beams to investigate & manipulate the behavior of fundamental chemical reactions. Lee’s work has been recognized by many awards, including the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1986, as well as Sloan Fellow, Dreyfus Scholar, Fellowship in the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, Fellowship in the American Physical Society, Guggenheim Fellow, Member National Academy of Sciences, Member Academia Sinica, E.O. Lawrence Award, Miller Professor, Berkeley, Fairchild Distinguished Scholar, Harrison Howe Award, Peter Debye Award, & the National Medal of Science. Lee also has served as the President of the Academia Sinica in Taiwan (ROC). Professor Schatz’s research group is interested in using theory & computation to describe physical phenomena in a broad range of applications relevant to chemistry, physics, biology & engineering. Among the types of applications that we interested are: optical properties of nanoparticles & nanoparticle assemblies; using theory to model polymer properties; DNA structure, thermodynamics & dynamics; modeling self assembly & nanopatterning; & gas phase reaction dynamics. Among his many awards & distinctions have been appointment as an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow, Camille & Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar, the Fresenius Award, Fellow of the American Physical Society, the Max Planck Research Award, Fellowship in the American Association for the Advancement of Science, & election to the International Academy of Quantum Molecular Sciences & the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. Dr Schatz is also lauded for his highly successful work as Editor for the Journal of Physical Chemistry. We requested $10,000 from DOE in support of this meeting. The money was distributed widely among the student & post doctoral fellows & some used to attract the very best scientists in the field. The organizers were committed to encouraging women & minorities as well as encourage the field of Chemical Physics in scientific

  6. Progress in Advanced Accelerator Concepts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    2008-01-01

    Study of the Relativistic Klystron Two- Beam Acceleratorupon the development of klystron tubes and pulse compressionThese include cluster klystrons (B! '.TL), sheet-beam

  7. ADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, John E.

    ADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING WATER REACTOR AND THE HEAT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor - General Description . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.1 Modifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 ii #12;4. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 4

  8. Upgrade of Beam Energy Measurement System at BEPC-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Yong Zhang; Xiao Cai; Xiao-Hu Mo; Di-Zhou Guo; Jian-Li Wang; Bai-Qi Liu; M. N. Achasov; A. A. Krasnov; N. Yu. Muchnoi; E. E. Pyata; E. V. Mamoshkina; F. A. Harris

    2015-10-28

    The beam energy measurement system is of great importance and profit for both BEPC-II accelerator and BES-III detector. The system is based on measuring the energies of Compton back-scattered photons. Many advanced techniques and precise instruments are employed to realize the highly accurate measurement of positron/electron beam energy. During five year's running period, in order to meet the requirement of data taking and improve the capacity of measurement itself, the upgradation of system is continued, which involve the component reformation of laser and optics subsystem, replacement of view-port of the laser to vacuum insertion subsystem, the purchase of electric cooling system for high purity germanium detector, and the improvement of data acquisition and processing subsystem. The upgrading of system guarantees the smooth and efficient measuring of beam energy at BEPC-II and accommodates the accurate offline energy values for further physics analysis at BES-III.

  9. Upgrade of Beam Energy Measurement System at BEPC-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jian-Yong; Mo, Xiao-Hu; Guo, Di-Zhou; Wang, Jian-Li; Liu, Bai-Qi; Achasov, M N; Krasnov, A A; Muchnoi, N Yu; Pyata, E E; Mamoshkina, E V; Harris, F A

    2015-01-01

    The beam energy measurement system is of great importance and profit for both BEPC-II accelerator and BES-III detector. The system is based on measuring the energies of Compton back-scattered photons. Many advanced techniques and precise instruments are employed to realize the highly accurate measurement of positron/electron beam energy. During five year's running period, in order to meet the requirement of data taking and improve the capacity of measurement itself, the upgradation of system is continued, which involve the component reformation of laser and optics subsystem, replacement of view-port of the laser to vacuum insertion subsystem, the purchase of electric cooling system for high purity germanium detector, and the improvement of data acquisition and processing subsystem. The upgrading of system guarantees the smooth and efficient measuring of beam energy at BEPC-II and accommodates the accurate offline energy values for further physics analysis at BES-III.

  10. Temporal structure of double plasma frequency emission of thin beam-heated plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Postupaev, V. V.; Ivanov, I. A.; Arzhannikov, A. V.; Vyacheslavov, L. N. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Lavrentjev Avenue, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation) [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Lavrentjev Avenue, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogova st., 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Burdakov, A. V.; Polosatkin, S. V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Lavrentjev Avenue, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation) [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Lavrentjev Avenue, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 20 Karl Marks Avenue, 630092 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Sklyarov, V. F.; Gavrilenko, D. Ye.; Kandaurov, I. V.; Kurkuchekov, V. V.; Mekler, K. I.; Popov, S. S.; Rovenskikh, A. F.; Sudnikov, A. V.; Sulyaev, Yu. S.; Trunev, Yu. A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Lavrentjev Avenue, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)] [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Lavrentjev Avenue, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kasatov, A. A. [Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogova st., 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)] [Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogova st., 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15

    In the work presented here dynamics of spiky microwave emission of a beam-heated plasma near the double plasma frequency in ?100 GHz band was studied. The plasma is heated by 80 keV, ?2 MW, sub-ms electron beam that is injected into the multiple-mirror trap GOL-3. The beam-heated plasma diameter is of the order of the emitted wavelength. Modulation of individual emission spikes in the microwave radiation is found. The radiation dynamics observed can be attributed to a small number of compact emitting zones that are periodically distorted.

  11. Ion boundary conditions in semi-infinite fluid models of electron beam-plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levko, Dmitry [LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT Toulouse, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France)

    2014-10-15

    The modified Bohm criterion is derived for the plasma consisting of the monoenergetic electron beam and thermal electrons. This criterion allows us to define the accurate ion boundary conditions for semi-infinite collisionless fluid models of electron beam–plasma interaction. In the absence of electron beam, these boundary conditions give the classical sheath parameters. When the monoenergetic electron beam propagates through the plasma, the fluid model with proposed boundary conditions gives the results, which are in qualitative agreement with the results obtained earlier in M. Sharifian and B. Shokri, Phys. Plasmas 14, 093503 (2007). However, dynamics and parameters of the plasma sheath are different.

  12. Simulation of Hollow Electron Beam Collimation in the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morozov, I.A.; Stancari, G.; Valishev, A.; Shatilov, D.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2012-05-01

    The concept of augmenting the conventional collimation system of high-energy storage rings with a hollow electron beam was successfully demonstrated in experiments at the Tevatron. A reliable numerical model is required for understanding particle dynamics in the presence of a hollow beam collimator. Several models were developed to describe imperfections of the electron beam profile and alignment. The features of the imperfections are estimated from electron beam profile measurements. Numerical simulations of halo removal rates are compared with experimental data taken at the Tevatron.

  13. DYNAMIC DELAMINATION IN THROUGH-THICKNESS REINFORCED DCB SPECIMEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. SRIDHAR; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    Bridged crack models using beam theory formulation have proved to be effective in the modeling of quasistatic delamination crack growth in through thickness reinforced structures. In this paper, we model dynamic crack propagation in these structures with the beam theory formulation. Steady state crack propagation characteristics unique to the dynamic case are first identified. Dynamic crack propagation and the energetics of steady state dynamic crack growth for a Double Cantilever beam (DCB) configuration loaded with a flying wedge is examined next. We find that steady state crack growth is attainable for this loading configuration provided certain conditions are satisfied.

  14. Neutral Beam Excitation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolar Photovoltaic(MillionNature and Origin WhatNetworks,Beam Excitation of

  15. Ion Beam Materials Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeat Pumps Heat PumpsfacilityviaGasforVendors »Ion Beam

  16. The Beam Loss Detection System of the LHC Ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gschwendtner, E; Ferioli, G; Friesenbichler, W; Kain, V

    2002-01-01

    At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) a beam loss system will be installed in the arc, dispersion suppressor and the straight regions for a continuous surveillance of particle losses. These beam particles deposit their energy partially in the super-conducting coils leading to temperature increase, possible magnet quenches and damages. The primary and secondary halo of the beam is absorbed by the collimation system. The tertiary halo will be lost at aperture limits in the ring. Its loss distribution along the magnets has been studies. At the positions, where most of the beam losses are expected, simulations of the particle fluences outside the cryostat and induced by lost protons at the aperture have been performed with the Monte Carlo Code Geant 3.2.1. This allows determining the most suitable positions of the detectors, the needed number of monitors and the impact on the dynamic range of the detectors. The design of the beam loss monitor system is presented that meet the required sensitivity, dynamic range and ...

  17. The ELENA Beam Diagnostics Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tranquille, G

    2013-01-01

    The Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA) to be built at CERN is aimed at substantially increasing the number of antiprotons to the low energy antiproton physics community. It will be a small machine which will decelerate low intensity beams (electron cooler to avoid beam losses during the deceleration and to significantly reduce beam phase space at extraction. To measure the beam parameters from the extraction point of the Antiproton Decelerator (AD), through the ELENA ring and all the way to the experiments, many systems will be needed to ensure that the desired beam characteristics are obtained. Particular attention needs to be paid to the performance of the electron cooler which depends on reliable instrumentation in order to efficiently cool the antiprotons. This contribution will present the different monitors that have been proposed to measure the various beam parameters as well as some of the developments going on to further improve th...

  18. Dynamics study of the reaction OH{sup -}+C{sub 2}H{sub 2}{yields}C{sub 2}H{sup -}+H{sub 2}O with crossed beams and density-functional theory calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Li; Li Yue; Farrar, James M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

    2006-03-28

    The proton transfer reaction between OH{sup -} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, the sole reactive process observed over the collision energy range from 0.37 to 1.40 eV, has been studied using the crossed beam technique and density-functional theory (DFT) calculations. The center of mass flux distributions of the product C{sub 2}H{sup -} ions at three different energies are highly asymmetric, characteristic of a direct process occurring on a time scale much less than a rotational period of any transient intermediate. The maxima in the flux distributions correspond to product velocities and directions close to those of the precursor acetylene reactants. The reaction quantitatively transforms the entire exothermicity into internal excitation of the products, consistent with an energy release motif in which the proton is transferred early, in a configuration in which the forming bond is extended. This picture is supported by DFT calculations showing that the first electrostatically bound intermediate on the reaction pathway is the productlike C{sub 2}H{sup -}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O species. Most of the incremental translational energy in the two higher collision energy experiments appears in product translational energy, and provides an example of induced repulsive energy release characteristic of the heavy+light-heavy mass combination.

  19. Electron beam diagnostic for space charge measurement of an ion beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01

    Electron beam diagnostic for space charge measurement of annon-perturbing electron beam diagnostic system for measuringnon intercepting electron beam diagnostic system consists of

  20. Electron-beam diagnostic for space-charge measurement of an ion beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01

    76, 023301 (2005) Electron-beam diagnostic for space-chargenonperturbing electron-beam diagnostic system for measuring8. (Color online). Electron-beam diagnostic, as installed in

  1. Electron beam diagnostic for space charge measurement of an ion beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01

    Electron beam diagnostic for space charge measurement of anAbstract A non-perturbing electron beam diagnostic systemlow energy, low current electron beam is swept transversely

  2. Electron-beam diagnostic for space-charge measurement of an ion beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01

    76, 023301 (2005) Electron-beam diagnostic for space-charge2005) A nonperturbing electron-beam diagnostic system forlow energy, low current electron beam is swept transversely

  3. Sandia Energy - Advanced Research & Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Development Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Photovoltaics Advanced Research & Development Advanced Research & DevelopmentCoryne...

  4. Longitudinal Dynamics and Tomography in the Tevatron

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stogin, J; Sen, T; Moore, R S

    2012-01-10

    Motivated by the desire to understand the longitudinal effects of beam-beam forces, we study the longitudinal dynamics of protons and anti-protons at injection and top energy in the Tevatron. Multi-turn data of the longitudinal profiles are captured to reveal information about frequencies of oscillation, and changes in the bunch distributions. Tomographic reconstruction is used to create phase space maps which are subsequently used to find the momentum distributions. Changes in these distributions for both proton and anti-proton beams are also followed through the operational cycle. We report on the details of interesting dynamics and some unexpected findings.

  5. Beam characterization by wavefront sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neal, D.R.; Alford, W.J.; Gruetzner, J.K.

    1999-08-10

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for characterizing an energy beam (such as a laser) with a two-dimensional wavefront sensor, such as a Shack-Hartmann lenslet array. The sensor measures wavefront slope and irradiance of the beam at a single point on the beam and calculates a space-beamwidth product. A detector array such as a charge coupled device camera is preferably employed. 21 figs.

  6. Beam characterization by wavefront sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neal, Daniel R. (17 Eric Alan Lane, Tijeras, NM 87059); Alford, W. J. (3455 Tahoe, N.E., Albuquerque, NM 87111); Gruetzner, James K. (9407 Shoehone, N.E., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method for characterizing an energy beam (such as a laser) with a two-dimensional wavefront sensor, such as a Shack-Hartmann lenslet array. The sensor measures wavefront slope and irradiance of the beam at a single point on the beam and calculates a space-beamwidth product. A detector array such as a charge coupled device camera is preferably employed.

  7. Broad-band beam buncher

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldberg, David A. (Walnut Creek, CA); Flood, William S. (Berkeley, CA); Arthur, Allan A. (Martinez, CA); Voelker, Ferdinand (Orinda, CA)

    1986-01-01

    A broad-band beam buncher is disclosed, comprising an evacuated housing, an electron gun therein for producing an electron beam, a buncher cavity having entrance and exit openings through which the beam is directed, grids across such openings, a source providing a positive DC voltage between the cavity and the electron gun, a drift tube through which the electron beam travels in passing through such cavity, grids across the ends of such drift tube, gaps being provided between the drift tube grids and the entrance and exit grids, a modulator for supplying an ultrahigh frequency modulating signal to the drift tube for producing velocity modulation of the electrons in the beam, a drift space in the housing through which the velocity modulated electron beam travels and in which the beam is bunched, and a discharge opening from such drift tube and having a grid across such opening through which the bunched electron beam is discharged into an accelerator or the like. The buncher cavity and the drift tube may be arranged to constitute an extension of a coaxial transmission line which is employed to deliver the modulating signal from a signal source. The extended transmission line may be terminated in its characteristic impedance to afford a broad-band response and the device as a whole designed to effect broad-band beam coupling, so as to minimize variations of the output across the response band.

  8. RadiaBeam PPT template

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    718 to 316 SS) Applications in nuclear (fission and fusion) and concentrated solar power components (DOE Nuclear Energy Phase III (DE-SC0011826)) RadiaBeam-led...

  9. Large dynamic range diagnostics for high current electron LINACs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evtushenko, Pavel [JLAB

    2013-11-01

    The Jefferson Lab FEL driver accelerator - Energy Recovery Linac has provided a beam with average current of up to 9 mA and beam energy of 135 MeV. The high power beam operations have allowed developing and testing methods and approaches required to set up and tune such a facility simultaneously for the high beam power and high beam quality required for high performance FEL operations. In this contribution we briefly review this experience and outline problems that are specific to high current - high power non-equilibrium linac beams. While the original strategy for beam diagnostics and tuning have proven to be quite successful, some shortcomings and unresolved issues were also observed. The most important issues are the non-equilibrium (non-Gaussian) nature of the linac beam and the presence of small intensity - large amplitude fraction of the beam a.k.a. beam halo. Thus we also present a list of the possible beam halo sources and discuss possible mitigations means. We argue that for proper understanding and management of the beam halo large dynamic range (>10{sup 6}) transverse and longitudinal beam diagnostics can be used. We also present results of transverse beam profile measurements with the dynamic range approaching 10{sup 5} and demonstrate the effect the increased dynamic range has on the beam characterization, i.e., emittance and Twiss parameters measurements. We also discuss near future work planned in this field and where the JLab FEL facility will be used for beam tests of the developed of new diagnostics.

  10. Large dynamic range diagnostics for high current electron LINACs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evtushenko, P., E-mail: Pavel.Evtushenko@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2013-11-07

    The Jefferson Lab FEL driver accelerator - Energy Recovery Linac has provided a beam with average current of up to 9 mA and beam energy of 135 MeV. The high power beam operations have allowed developing and testing methods and approaches required to set up and tune such a facility simultaneously for the high beam power and high beam quality required for high performance FEL operations. In this contribution we briefly review this experience and outline problems that are specific to high current - high power non-equilibrium linac beams. While the original strategy for beam diagnostics and tuning have proven to be quite successful, some shortcomings and unresolved issues were also observed. The most important issues are the non-equilibrium (non-Gaussian) nature of the linac beam and the presence of small intensity - large amplitude fraction of the beam a.k.a. beam halo. Thus we also present a list of the possible beam halo sources and discuss possible mitigations means. We argue that for proper understanding and management of the beam halo large dynamic range (>10{sup 6}) transverse and longitudinal beam diagnostics can be used. We also present results of transverse beam profile measurements with the dynamic range approaching 10{sup 5} and demonstrate the effect the increased dynamic range has on the beam characterization, i.e., emittance and Twiss parameters measurements. We also discuss near future work planned in this field and where the JLab FEL facility will be used for beam tests of the developed of new diagnostics.

  11. LHC Beam Diffusion Dependence on RF Noise: Models And Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mastorides, T.; Rivetta, C.; Fox, J.D.; Van Winkle, D.; Baudrenghien, P.; Butterworth, A.; Molendijk, J.; ,

    2010-09-14

    Radio Frequency (RF) accelerating system noise and non-idealities can have detrimental impact on the LHC performance through longitudinal motion and longitudinal emittance growth. A theoretical formalism has been developed to relate the beam and RF loop dynamics with the bunch length growth [1]. Measurements were conducted at LHC to validate the formalism, determine the performance limiting RF components, and provide the foundation for beam diffusion estimates for higher energies and intensities. A brief summary of these results is presented in this work. During a long store, the relation between the energy lost to synchrotron radiation and the noise injected to the beam by the RF accelerating voltage determines the growth of the bunch energy spread and longitudinal emittance. Since the proton synchrotron radiation in the LHC is very low, the beam diffusion is extremely sensitive to RF perturbations. The theoretical formalism presented in [1], suggests that the noise experienced by the beam depends on the cavity phase noise power spectrum, filtered by the beam transfer function, and aliased due to the periodic sampling of the accelerating voltage signal V{sub c}. Additionally, the dependence of the RF accelerating cavity noise spectrum on the Low Level RF (LLRF) configurations has been predicted using time-domain simulations and models [2]. In this work, initial measurements at the LHC supporting the above theoretical formalism and simulation predictions are presented.

  12. Interactive visualization of particle beams for accelerator design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Brett; Ma, Kwan-Liu; Qiang, Ji; Ryne, Robert

    2002-01-15

    We describe a hybrid data-representation and rendering technique for visualizing large-scale particle data generated from numerical modeling of beam dynamics. The basis of the technique is mixing volume rendering and point rendering according to particle density distribution, visibility, and the user's instruction. A hierarchical representation of the data is created on a parallel computer, allowing real-time partitioning into high-density areas for volume rendering, and low-density areas for point rendering. This allows the beam to be interactively visualized while preserving the fine structure usually visible only with slow point based rendering techniques.

  13. Beam Line Design and Beam Physics Study of Energy Recovery Linac Free Electron Laser at Peking University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guimei Wang

    2011-12-31

    Energy recovering linac (ERL) offers an attractive alternative for generating intense beams of charged particles by approaching the operational efficiency of a storage ring while maintaining the superior beam quality typical of a linear accelerator. In ERLs, the decelerated beam cancels the beam loading effects of the accelerated beam with high repetition rate. Therefore, ERLs can, in principle, accelerate very high average currents with only modest amounts of RF power. So the efficiency of RF power to beam is much higher. Furthermore, the energy of beam to dump is lower, so it will reduce dump radiation. With the successful experiments in large maximum-to-injection energy ratio up to 51:1 and high power FEL up to 14kW, the use of ERL, especially combining with superconducting RF technology, provides a potentially powerful new paradigm for generation of the charged particle beams used in MW FEL, synchrotron radiation sources, high-energy electron cooling devices and so on. The 3+1/2 DC-SC photo injector and two 9cell TESLA superconducting cavity for IR SASE FEL in PKU provides a good platform to achieve high average FEL with Energy Recovery. The work of this thesis is on Beam line design and Beam dynamics study of Energy Recovery Linac Free Electron Laser for Peking University. It is the upgrade of PKU facility, which is under construction. With ERL, this facility can work in CW mode, so it can operate high average beam current without RF power constraint in main linac and generate high average FEL power. Moreover, it provides a test facility to study the key technology in ERL. System parameters are optimized for PKU ERL-FEL. The oscillation FEL output power is studied with different bunch charge, transverse emittance, bunch length and energy spread. The theory of optimal RF power and Q{sub ext} with ERL and without ERL is analyzed and applied to PKU injector and linac including microphonic effect. pace charge effect in the injector and merger is studied for beam energy at ~5MeV. Simulation shows that in the 3+1/2 DC- C injector, there is a region the beam could be over focused by RF electromagnetic field and the transverse emittance in the transport line up to linac will increase instantly due to over focusing. In order to eliminate this effect on beam emittance, several solutions are investigated to avoid over focusing. This result is very important for beam loading experiment for low bunch charge operation. Meanwhile, different merger structures are compared in terms of error sensitivity and emittance increase with space charge effect. In recirculation beam line, a new symmetric 180{degree} arc structure is designed. It fulfills the achromatic condition and adjustable bunch compression. These two parameters are controlled by different Quads knob. With this novel structure, the recirculation lattice can achieve path length adjustment, bunch compression and decompression in a large range. With beamline error, the beam central orbit will deviate from the designed trajectory. An orbit correction system is optimized, which balances between cost and performance of orbit after correction at design level. Different methods are used to estimate its robustness. The BBU instability, especially multi-pass BBU imposed a potentially severe limitation to the average current that can be accelerated in an ERL. Simulation gives the harmful HOMs and predicts that the threshold average current in this machine is much higher than the possible operation current. This work is based on the existing facility in PKU, so it provides guidelines for the facility operation and upgrade in the future. The theoretical analysis of ERL requirement and FEL requirement on beam transport line and beam property paves the way for future ERL research.

  14. HFBR handbook, 1992: High flux beam reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Axe, J.D.; Greenberg, R.

    1992-10-01

    Welcome to the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), one of the world premier neutron research facilities. This manual is intended primarily to acquaint outside users (and new Brookhaven staff members) with (almost) everything they need to know to work at the HFBR and to help make the stay at Brookhaven pleasant as well as profitable. Safety Training Programs to comply with US Department of Energy (DOE) mandates are in progress at BNL. There are several safety training requirements which must be met before users can obtain unescorted access to the HFBR. The Reactor Division has prepared specific safety training manuals which are to be sent to experimenters well in advance of their expected arrival at BNL to conduct experiments. Please familiarize yourself with this material and carefully pay strict attention to all the safety and security procedures that are in force at the HFBR. Not only your safety, but the continued operation of the facility, depends upon compliance.

  15. Accelerators, Beams And Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators And Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siemann, R.H.; /SLAC

    2011-10-24

    Accelerator science and technology have evolved as accelerators became larger and important to a broad range of science. Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams was established to serve the accelerator community as a timely, widely circulated, international journal covering the full breadth of accelerators and beams. The history of the journal and the innovations associated with it are reviewed.

  16. Longitudinal phase-space coating of beam in a storage ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhat, C M

    2015-01-01

    In this Letter, I report on a novel scheme for beam stacking without any beam emittance dilution using a barrier rf system in synchrotrons. The general principle of the scheme called longitudinal phase-space coating, validation of the concept via multi-particle beam dynamics simulations applied to the Fermilab Recycler, and its experimental demonstration are presented. In addition, it has been shown and illustrated that the rf gymnastics involved in this scheme can be used in measuring the incoherent synchrotron tune spectrum of the beam in barrier buckets and in producing a clean hollow beam in longitudinal phase space. The method of beam stacking in synchrotrons presented here is the first of its kind.

  17. Tuning the beam: a physics perspective on beam diagnostic instrumentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gulley, Mark S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    In a nutshell, the role of a beam diagnostic measurement is to provide information needed to get a particle beam from Point A (injection point) to Point B (a target) in a useable condition, with 'useable' meaning the right energy and size and with acceptable losses. Specifications and performance requirements of diagnostics are based on the physics of the particle beam to be measured, with typical customers of beam parameter measurements being the accelerator operators and accelerator physicists. This tutorial will be a physics-oriented discussion of the interplay between tuning evolutions and the beam diagnostics systems that support the machine tune. This will include the differences between developing a tune and maintaining a tune, among other things. Practical longitudinal and transverse tuning issues and techniques from a variety of proton and electron machines will also be discussed.

  18. Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) program is designed to promote separate but parallel engine development between the major stationary, gaseous fueled engine manufacturers in the...

  19. Advanced Studies Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering Institute Advanced Studies Institute Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Professional Staff...

  20. Advanced Materials Manufacturing | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Materials Manufacturing New materials drive the development of innovative products. Building upon a rich history in materials science, ORNL is discovering and developing...

  1. Advanced Scientific Computing Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    today's tools and techniques to deliver exascale science Advances in mathematics and computing are providing the foundation for models and simulations that permit scientists to...

  2. Advancement of Electrochromic Windows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    Myser. 2002. “Active Load Management with Advanced Windowfor energy savings and load management by: Solving criticalalone, but their load management and non-energy benefits are

  3. Composition of Dynamic Analysis Aspects Eric Tanter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Binder, Walter

    Composition of Dynamic Analysis Aspects ´Eric Tanter PLEIAD Laboratory Computer Science Department thanks to recent advances in exhaustive weaving in core libraries. Casting dynamic analyses as aspects, simultaneously. However, even if dynamic analysis as- pects are mutually independent, their mere presence

  4. September 2015 MSME in Dynamics and Vibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feeny, Brian

    Arrival Spring Semester: 9cr ME 861 Advanced Dynamics 3 cr ME 814 Convective Heat Transfer (Breadth course and Research Topics Dynamics: Kinematics in two and three dimensions, Newton's equations of motion, energy body dynamics. (Mukherjee, Feeny) Vibration: Mathematical modeling of vibration systems using

  5. Molecular-beam scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vernon, M.F.

    1983-07-01

    The molecular-beam technique has been used in three different experimental arrangements to study a wide range of inter-atomic and molecular forces. Chapter 1 reports results of a low-energy (0.2 kcal/mole) elastic-scattering study of the He-Ar pair potential. The purpose of the study was to accurately characterize the shape of the potential in the well region, by scattering slow He atoms produced by expanding a mixture of He in N/sub 2/ from a cooled nozzle. Chapter 2 contains measurements of the vibrational predissociation spectra and product translational energy for clusters of water, benzene, and ammonia. The experiments show that most of the product energy remains in the internal molecular motions. Chapter 3 presents measurements of the reaction Na + HCl ..-->.. NaCl + H at collision energies of 5.38 and 19.4 kcal/mole. This is the first study to resolve both scattering angle and velocity for the reaction of a short lived (16 nsec) electronic excited state. Descriptions are given of computer programs written to analyze molecular-beam expansions to extract information characterizing their velocity distributions, and to calculate accurate laboratory elastic-scattering differential cross sections accounting for the finite apparatus resolution. Experimental results which attempted to determine the efficiency of optically pumping the Li(2/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) and Na(3/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) excited states are given. A simple three-level model for predicting the steady-state fraction of atoms in the excited state is included.

  6. Beyond ITER: Neutral beams for a demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAdams, R., E-mail: roy.mcadams@ccfe.ac.uk [EURATOM/CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    In the development of magnetically confined fusion as an economically sustainable power source, International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) is currently under construction. Beyond ITER is the demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) programme in which the physics and engineering aspects of a future fusion power plant will be demonstrated. DEMO will produce net electrical power. The DEMO programme will be outlined and the role of neutral beams for heating and current drive will be described. In particular, the importance of the efficiency of neutral beam systems in terms of injected neutral beam power compared to wallplug power will be discussed. Options for improving this efficiency including advanced neutralisers and energy recovery are discussed.

  7. Measurements of aperture and beam lifetime using movable beam scrapers in Indus-2 electron storage ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Ghodke, A. D.; Karnewar, A. K.; Holikatti, A. C.; Yadav, S.; Puntambekar, T. A.; Singh, G.; Singh, P.

    2013-12-15

    In this paper, the measurements of vertical and horizontal aperture which are available for stable beam motion in Indus-2 at beam energy 2.5 GeV using movable beam scrapers are presented. These beam scrapers are installed in one of the long straight sections in the ring. With the movement of beam scrapers towards the beam centre, the beam lifetime is measured. The beam lifetime data obtained from the movement of vertical and horizontal beam scrapers are analyzed. The contribution of beam loss due to beam-gas scattering (vacuum lifetime) and electron-electron scattering within a beam bunch (Touschek lifetime) is separated from the measured beam lifetime at different positions of the beam scrapers. Vertical and horizontal beam sizes at scrapers location are estimated from the scraper movement towards the beam centre in quantum lifetime limit and their values closely agree with measured value obtained using X-ray diagnostic beamline.

  8. Broad-band beam buncher

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldberg, D.A.; Flood, W.S.; Arthur, A.A.; Voelker, F.

    1984-03-20

    A broad-band beam bunther is disclosed, comprising an evacuated housing, an electron gun therein for producing an electron beam, a buncher cavity having entrance and exit openings through which the beam is directed, grids across such openings, a source providing a positive DC voltage between the cavity and the electron gun, a drift tube through which the electron beam travels in passing through such cavity, grids across the ends of such drift tube, gaps being provided between the drift tube grids and the entrance and exit grids, a modulator for supplying an ultrahigh frequency modulating signal to the drift tube for producing velocity modulation of the electrons in the beam, a drift space in the housing through which the velocity modulated electron beam travels and in which the beam is bunched, and a discharge opening from such drift tube and having a grid across such opening through which the bunched electron beam is discharged into an accelerator or the like. The buncher cavity and the drift tube may be arranged to constitute an extension of a coaxial transmission line which is employed to deliver the modulating signal from a signal source. The extended transmission line may be terminated in its characteristic impedance to afford a broad-

  9. Laser acceleration of ion beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. A. Egorova; A. V. Filatov; A. V. Prozorkevich; S. A. Smolyansky; D. B. Blaschke; M. Chubaryan

    2007-02-01

    We consider methods of charged particle acceleration by means of high-intensity lasers. As an application we discuss a laser booster for heavy ion beams provided, e.g. by the Dubna nuclotron. Simple estimates show that a cascade of crossed laser beams would be necessary to provide additional acceleration to gold ions of the order of GeV/nucleon.

  10. Cancer Therapy with Particle Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    Cancer Therapy with Particle Beams #12;· The potential to use high energy particle beams to treat many types of cancer has been known even before their creation. · The availability of these treatments to be used in medicine, specifically for the treatment of certain cancers. His paper was published when

  11. Operating characteristics of a new ion source for KSTAR neutral beam injection system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Tae-Seong Jeong, Seung Ho; Chang, Doo-Hee; Lee, Kwang Won; In, Sang-Ryul

    2014-02-15

    A new positive ion source for the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research neutral beam injection (KSTAR NBI-1) system was designed, fabricated, and assembled in 2011. The characteristics of the arc discharge and beam extraction were investigated using hydrogen and helium gas to find the optimum operating parameters of the arc power, filament voltage, gas pressure, extracting voltage, accelerating voltage, and decelerating voltage at the neutral beam test stand at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute in 2012. Based on the optimum operating condition, the new ion source was then conditioned, and performance tests were primarily finished. The accelerator system with enlarged apertures can extract a maximum 65 A ion beam with a beam energy of 100 keV. The arc efficiency and optimum beam perveance, at which the beam divergence is at a minimum, are estimated to be 1.0 A/kW and 2.5 uP, respectively. The beam extraction tests show that the design goal of delivering a 2 MW deuterium neutral beam into the KSTAR Tokamak plasma is achievable.

  12. Standard version Advanced version

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Julian

    Standard version Advanced version Xpress case study: Margaret Oil 26 June 2014 NATCOR Case study #12;Standard version Advanced version Margaret Oil - basic (1) Margaret Oil produces three products: gasoline, jet fuel, and heating oil. The average octane levels must be: Gasoline Jet fuel Heating oil

  13. Advanced uranium enrichment technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merriman, R.

    1983-03-10

    The Advanced Gas Centrifuge and Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation methods are described. The status and potential of the technologies are summarized, the programs outlined, and the economic incentives are noted. How the advanced technologies, once demonstrated, might be deployed so that SWV costs in the 1990s can be significantly reduced is described.

  14. Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ASIPP Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) Design, Fabrication and Assembly Weng of the project is to develop an advanced superconducting tokamak · Explore and demonstrate of steady magnets Total weight 38.7 tons, Total flux swing 10 VS Magnet system Superconducting coils; CIC conductor

  15. Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bolton, T.; Horton-Smith, G.; Maravin, Y.; Ratra, B.; Stanton, N.; von Toerne, E.; Wilson, G.

    2007-09-21

    KASP (Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project) completed the new Layer 0 upgrade for D0, assumed key electronics projects for the US CMS project, finished important new physics measurements with the D0 experiment at Fermilab, made substantial contributions to detector studies for the proposed e+e- international linear collider (ILC), and advanced key initiatives in non-accelerator-based neutrino physics.

  16. Delivering High IntensityDelivering High Intensity Proton Beam:Proton Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    11 Delivering High IntensityDelivering High Intensity Proton Beam:Proton Beam: Lessons for the NextFACT08NuFACT08 ­­ 4 July4 July S. ChildressS. Childress ­­ Proton BeamsProton Beams 22 Presentation OutlinePresentation Outline Key Proton Beam ConsiderationsKey Proton Beam Considerations The First

  17. Computational Design of Advanced Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savrasov, Sergey; Kotliar, Gabriel; Haule, Kristjan

    2014-06-03

    The objective of the project was to develop a method for theoretical understanding of nuclear fuel materials whose physical and thermophysical properties can be predicted from first principles using a novel dynamical mean field method for electronic structure calculations. We concentrated our study on uranium, plutonium, their oxides, nitrides, carbides, as well as some rare earth materials whose 4f eletrons provide a simplified framework for understanding complex behavior of the f electrons. We addressed the issues connected to the electronic structure, lattice instabilities, phonon and magnon dynamics as well as thermal conductivity. This allowed us to evaluate characteristics of advanced nuclear fuel systems using computer based simulations and avoid costly experiments.

  18. Aldol Reactions - Isotope Effects, Mechanism and Dynamic Effects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vetticatt, Mathew J.

    2011-02-22

    , described in this dissertation, represents a significant advance in our research methodology. The role of dynamic effects in aldol reactions is examined in great detail. The study of the proline catalyzed aldol reaction has revealed an intriguing new dynamic...

  19. Laser beam alignment apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruhn, Charles R. (Martinez, CA); Hammond, Robert B. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an apparatus and method for laser beam alignment. Thermoelectric properties of a disc in a laser beam path are used to provide an indication of beam alignment and/or automatic laser alignment.

  20. In vivo dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mijnheer, Ben [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Beddar, Sam [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Izewska, Joanna [Division of Human Health, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna 1400 (Austria); Reft, Chester [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) is in use in external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to detect major errors, to assess clinically relevant differences between planned and delivered dose, to record dose received by individual patients, and to fulfill legal requirements. After discussing briefly the main characteristics of the most commonly applied IVD systems, the clinical experience of IVD during EBRT will be summarized. Advancement of the traditional aspects of in vivo dosimetry as well as the development of currently available and newly emerging noninterventional technologies are required for large-scale implementation of IVD in EBRT. These new technologies include the development of electronic portal imaging devices for 2D and 3D patient dosimetry during advanced treatment techniques, such as IMRT and VMAT, and the use of IVD in proton and ion radiotherapy by measuring the decay of radiation-induced radionuclides. In the final analysis, we will show in this Vision 20/20 paper that in addition to regulatory compliance and reimbursement issues, the rationale for in vivo measurements is to provide an accurate and independent verification of the overall treatment procedure. It will enable the identification of potential errors in dose calculation, data transfer, dose delivery, patient setup, and changes in patient anatomy. It is the authors' opinion that all treatments with curative intent should be verified through in vivo dose measurements in combination with pretreatment checks.

  1. Beam Beam Simulation Studies for NLC And SLC2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, K.A.; Chen, P.; Irwin, J.; Zimmermann, F.; /SLAC

    2010-05-27

    We apply and modify the computer codes CAIN(P.Chen, G.Horton-Smith, T.Ohgaki, A.W.Weidemann, K.Yokoya, contributed to Workshop on Gamma-Gamma Colliders, Berkeley, CA, March 28-31, 1994; SLAC-PUB-6583.) and GUINEAPIG(D.Schulte (DESY), unpublished.) to make detailed studies of the beam-beam interaction in the SLAC design for a future linear collider (NLC), as well as to the proposed SLC2000 project. Using realistic beam distributions, we present simulations related to the tuning and optimization of luminosity in SLC2000 and NLC.

  2. Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angel, Roger

    2014-12-17

    The main project objective has been to develop an advanced gravity sag method for molding large glass solar reflectors with either line or point focus, and with long or short focal length. The method involves taking standard sized squares of glass, 1.65 m x 1.65 m, and shaping them by gravity sag into precision steel molds. The method is designed for high volume manufacture when incorporated into a production line with separate pre-heating and cooling. The performance objectives for the self-supporting glass mirrors made by this project include mirror optical accuracy of 2 mrad root mean square (RMS), requiring surface slope errors <1 mrad rms, a target not met by current production of solar reflectors. Our objective also included development of new methods for rapidly shaping glass mirrors and coating them for higher reflectivity and soil resistance. Reflectivity of 95% for a glass mirror with anti-soil coating was targeted, compared to the present ~94% with no anti-soil coating. Our mirror cost objective is ~$20/m2 in 2020, a significant reduction compared to the present ~$35/m2 for solar trough mirrors produced for trough solar plants. During the first year a custom batch furnace was built to develop the method with high power radiative heating to simulate transfer of glass into a hot slumping zone in a production line. To preserve the original high polish of the float glass on both front and back surfaces, as required for a second surface mirror, the mold surface is machined to the required shape as grooves which intersect the glass at cusps, reducing the mold contact area to significantly less than 1%. The mold surface is gold-plated to reflect thermal radiation. Optical metrology of glass replicas made with the system has been carried out with a novel, custom-built test system. This test provides collimated, vertically-oriented parallel beams from a linear array of co-aligned lasers translated in a perpendicular direction across the reflector. Deviations of each reflected beam from the paraboloid focus give a direct measure of surface slope error. Key findings • A gravity sag method for large (2.5 m2) second surface glass solar reflectors has been developed and demonstrated to a uniquely high level of accuracy. Mirror surface slope accuracy of 0.65 mrad in one dimension, 0.85 mrad in 2 dimensions (point focus) has been demonstrated by commercial partner REhnu using this process. This accuracy exceeds by a factor of two current solar reflector accuracy. Our replicas meet the Sunshot accuracy objective of 2 mrad optical, which requires better than 1 mrad rms slope error. • Point-focus as well as line-focus mirrors have been demonstrated at 1.65 m x 1.65 m square – a unique capability. • The new process using simple molds is economical. The molds for the 1.65 m square reflectors are bent and machined steel plates on a counter-weighted flotation support. To minimize thermal coupling by radiative heat transfer, the mold surface is grooved and gilded. The molds are simple to manufacture, and have minimal thermal stresses and distortion in use. Lapping and bending techniques have been developed to obtain better than 1 mrad rms surface mold accuracy. Float glass is sagged into the molds by rapid radiative heating, using a custom high power (350 kW) furnace. The method of manufacture is well suited for small as well as large volume production, and as it requires little capital investment and no high technology, it could be used anywhere in the world to make solar concentrating reflectors. • A novel slope metrology method for full 1.65 aperture has been demonstrated, with 25 mm resolution across the face of the replicas. The method is null and therefore inherently accurate: it can easily be reproduced without high-tech equipment and does not need sophisticated calibration. We find by cross calibration with reference trough reflectors from RioGlass that our null-test laser system yields a measurement accuracy better than 0.4 mrad rms slope error. Our system is inexpensive and could have broad application for test

  3. Single beam Fourier transform digital holographic quantitative phase microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand, A. Chhaniwal, V. K.; Mahajan, S.; Trivedi, V.; Faridian, A.; Pedrini, G.; Osten, W.; Dubey, S. K.; Javidi, B.

    2014-03-10

    Quantitative phase contrast microscopy reveals thickness or height information of a biological or technical micro-object under investigation. The information obtained from this process provides a means to study their dynamics. Digital holographic (DH) microscopy is one of the most used, state of the art single-shot quantitative techniques for three dimensional imaging of living cells. Conventional off axis DH microscopy directly provides phase contrast images of the objects. However, this process requires two separate beams and their ratio adjustment for high contrast interference fringes. Also the use of two separate beams may make the system more vulnerable to vibrations. Single beam techniques can overcome these hurdles while remaining compact as well. Here, we describe the development of a single beam DH microscope providing whole field imaging of micro-objects. A hologram of the magnified object projected on to a diffuser co-located with a pinhole is recorded with the use of a commercially available diode laser and an arrayed sensor. A Fourier transform of the recorded hologram directly yields the complex amplitude at the image plane. The method proposed was investigated using various phase objects. It was also used to image the dynamics of human red blood cells in which sub-micrometer level thickness variation were measurable.

  4. Alight a beam and beaming light: A theme with variations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chattopadhyay, S. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California94720 (United States)] [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California94720 (United States)

    1998-05-01

    The interaction of light (coherent and incoherent) with charged particle beams is explored in various configurations: incoherent scattering of coherent light (laser) from an incoherent particle beam (high temperature), coherent scattering of coherent light (laser) from a {open_quotes}cold{close_quotes} (bunched) beam, femtosecond generation of particle and light beams via {open_quotes}optical slicing{close_quotes} and Thomson/Compton scattering techniques, etc. The domains of ultrashort temporal duration (femtoseconds) as well as ultrashort wavelengths (x rays and shorter), with varying degrees of coherence, are explored. The relevance to a few critical areas of research in the natural sciences, e.g., ultrafast material, chemical and biological processes, protein folding, particle phase space cooling, etc. are touched upon. All the processes discussed involve proper interpretation and understanding of coherent states of matter and radiation, as well as the quality and quantity of information and energy embedded in them. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. CONTINUOUS EXTRACTED BEAM IN THE AGS FAST EXTERNAL BEAM LINE.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GLENN,J.W.; TSOUPAS,N.; BROWN,K.A.; BIRYUKOV,V.M.

    2001-06-18

    A method to split off a few percent of the 6 x 10{sup 13} AGS beam delivered to the Slow External Beam (SEB) lines and send it down the Fast External Beam line (FEB) has been developed. The mission is to feed a counter experiment off the FEB that directly measures the neutrino mass using the muon storage ring. The use of normal thin septum splitters would have an excessive loss overhead and been optically difficult. The AGS Slow Extraction uses a third integer resonance with sextuple strength so the resonance width is a few percent of the beam width. This results in a low density tail which will be clipped by a bent crystal and deflected into the FEB channel. This clipping off of the tail should reduce losses in the SEB transport line. Details of modeled orbits, particle distribution and extraction trajectories into and out off the crystal will be given.

  6. Electron beam machining using rotating and shaped beam power distribution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, J.W.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1996-07-09

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for electron beam (EB) machining (drilling, cutting and welding) that uses conventional EB guns, power supplies, and welding machine technology without the need for fast bias pulsing technology. The invention involves a magnetic lensing (EB optics) system and electronic controls to: (1) concurrently bend, focus, shape, scan, and rotate the beam to protect the EB gun and to create a desired effective power-density distribution, and (2) rotate or scan this shaped beam in a controlled way. The shaped beam power-density distribution can be measured using a tomographic imaging system. For example, the EB apparatus of this invention has the ability to drill holes in metal having a diameter up to 1,000 {micro}m (1 mm or larger), compared to the 250 {micro}m diameter of laser drilling. 5 figs.

  7. Electron beam machining using rotating and shaped beam power distribution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, John W. (Pleasanton, CA); O'Brien, Dennis W. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for electron beam (EB) machining (drilling, cutting and welding) that uses conventional EB guns, power supplies, and welding machine technology without the need for fast bias pulsing technology. The invention involves a magnetic lensing (EB optics) system and electronic controls to: 1) concurrently bend, focus, shape, scan, and rotate the beam to protect the EB gun and to create a desired effective power-density distribution, and 2) rotate or scan this shaped beam in a controlled way. The shaped beam power-density distribution can be measured using a tomographic imaging system. For example, the EB apparatus of this invention has the ability to drill holes in metal having a diameter up to 1000 .mu.m (1 mm or larger), compared to the 250 .mu.m diameter of laser drilling.

  8. Thermal stresses in laminated beams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcano, Victor Manuel

    1983-01-01

    Stresses Acting on a Section of the Laminated Beam -------- 15 5. Loading Geometry and Material Characteristics of the Test Problem 21 6. Simply-Supported Beam with a Sinusoidal Load--------- 30 7. Shear Stress Distribution for a Simply- Supported... 24. Normal Stress Distribution for a Cantilever Laminated Beam, T-Z sinzx/L --------------- 58 m. i 25. Axial Stress Distribution for a Cantilever Laminated Bearq, T-T (2z/8+1) 2 mi 27. Normal Stress Distribution for ("/L) ? ---- 6O 2 a...

  9. Sheet Beam Klystron Instability Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bane, K.L.F.; Jensen, A.; Li, Z.; Stupakov, G.; Adolphsen, C.; /SLAC

    2009-05-08

    Using the principle of energy balance we develop a 2D theory for calculating growth rates of instability in a two-cavity model of a sheet beam klystron. An important ingredient is a TE-like mode in the gap that also gives a longitudinal kick to the beam. When compared with a self-consistent particle-in-cell calculation, with sheet beam klystron-type parameters, agreement is quite good up to half the design current, 65 A; at full current, however, other, current-dependent effects come in and the results deviate significantly.

  10. Advanced Combustion FAQs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsicloudden DocumentationAccommodationsRegister /Advanced Energy Systems AdvancedAdvanced

  11. Advanced Usage Examples

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge KiosksAboutHelp &AdvancedAdvancedExamples Advanced

  12. Synchrotron radiation based beam diagnostics at the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Cheung, H. W.K.; Hahn, A.; Hurh, P.; Lorman, E.; Lundberg, C.; Meyer, T.; Miller, D.; Pordes, S.; Valishev, A.

    2011-09-01

    Synchrotron radiation has been used for many years as a beam diagnostic at electron accelerators. It is not normally associated with proton accelerators as the intensity of the radiation is too weak to make detection practical. However, if one utilizes the radiation originating near the edge of a bending magnet, or from a short magnet, the rapidly changing magnetic field serves to enhance the wavelengths shorter than the cutoff wavelength, which for more recent high energy proton accelerators such as Fermilab's Tevatron, tends to be visible light. This paper discusses the implementation at the Tevatron of two devices. A transverse beam profile monitor images the synchrotron radiation coming from the proton and antiproton beams separately and provides profile data for each bunch. A second monitor measures the low-level intensity of beam in the abort gaps which poses a danger to both the accelerator's superconducting magnets and the silicon detectors of the high energy physics experiments. Comparisons of measurements from the profile monitor to measurements from the flying wire profile systems are presented as are a number of examples of the application of the profile and abort gap intensity measurements to the modelling of Tevatron beam dynamics.

  13. Synchrotron radiation based beam diagnostics at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Hahn, A.; Hurh, P.; Lorman, E.; Lundberg, C.; Meyer, T.; Miller, D.; Pordes, S.; Valishev, A.

    2011-09-16

    Synchrotron radiation has been used for many years as a beam diagnostic at electron accelerators. It is not normally associated with proton accelerators as the intensity of the radiation is too weak to make detection practical. Therefore, if one utilizes the radiation originating near the edge of a bending magnet, or from a short magnet, the rapidly changing magnetic field serves to enhance the wavelengths shorter than the cutoff wavelength, which for more recent high energy proton accelerators such as Fermilab's Tevatron, tends to be visible light. This paper discusses the implementation at the Tevatron of two devices. A transverse beam profile monitor images the synchrotron radiation coming from the proton and antiproton beams separately and provides profile data for each bunch. A second monitor measures the low-level intensity of beam in the abort gaps which poses a danger to both the accelerator's superconducting magnets and the silicon detectors of the high energy physics experiments. Comparisons of measurements from the profile monitor to measurements from the flying wire profile systems are presented as are a number of examples of the application of the profile and abort gap intensity measurements to the modelling of Tevatron beam dynamics.

  14. Synchrotron radiation based beam diagnostics at the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Hahn, A.; Hurh, P.; Lorman, E.; Lundberg, C.; Meyer, T.; Miller, D.; Pordes, S.; Valishev, A.

    2011-09-16

    Synchrotron radiation has been used for many years as a beam diagnostic at electron accelerators. It is not normally associated with proton accelerators as the intensity of the radiation is too weak to make detection practical. Therefore, if one utilizes the radiation originating near the edge of a bending magnet, or from a short magnet, the rapidly changing magnetic field serves to enhance the wavelengths shorter than the cutoff wavelength, which for more recent high energy proton accelerators such as Fermilab's Tevatron, tends to be visible light. This paper discusses the implementation at the Tevatron of two devices. A transversemore »beam profile monitor images the synchrotron radiation coming from the proton and antiproton beams separately and provides profile data for each bunch. A second monitor measures the low-level intensity of beam in the abort gaps which poses a danger to both the accelerator's superconducting magnets and the silicon detectors of the high energy physics experiments. Comparisons of measurements from the profile monitor to measurements from the flying wire profile systems are presented as are a number of examples of the application of the profile and abort gap intensity measurements to the modelling of Tevatron beam dynamics.« less

  15. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garnett, Robert W. (Los Alamos, NM); Dobelbower, M. Christian (Toledo, OH)

    1995-01-01

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location.

  16. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garnett, R.W.; Dobelbower, M.C.

    1995-11-21

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location. 26 figs.

  17. Physics of Neutralization of Intense High-Energy Ion Beam Pulses by Electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaganovich, I. D.; Davidson, R. C.; Dorf, M. A.; Startsev, E. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Lee, E. P.; Friedman, A.

    2010-04-28

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by electrons forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self- magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating through the background plasma. If controlled, this physical effect can be used for optimized beam transport over long distances.

  18. Physics of Neutralization of Intense Charged Particle Beam Pulses by a Background Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaganovich, I.D.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.A.; Startsev, E.A.; Sefkow, A.B; Friedman, A.F.; Lee, E.P.

    2009-09-03

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by a background plasma forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self-magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating through the background plasma. If controlled, this physical effect can be used for optimized beam transport over long distances.

  19. Confined energy distribution for charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jason, Andrew J. (Los Alamos, NM); Blind, Barbara (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01

    A charged particle beam is formed to a relatively larger area beam which is well-contained and has a beam area which relatively uniformly deposits energy over a beam target. Linear optics receive an accelerator beam and output a first beam with a first waist defined by a relatively small size in a first dimension normal to a second dimension. Nonlinear optics, such as an octupole magnet, are located about the first waist and output a second beam having a phase-space distribution which folds the beam edges along the second dimension toward the beam core to develop a well-contained beam and a relatively uniform particle intensity across the beam core. The beam may then be expanded along the second dimension to form the uniform ribbon beam at a selected distance from the nonlinear optics. Alternately, the beam may be passed through a second set of nonlinear optics to fold the beam edges in the first dimension. The beam may then be uniformly expanded along the first and second dimensions to form a well-contained, two-dimensional beam for illuminating a two-dimensional target with a relatively uniform energy deposition.

  20. Fast beam studies of free radical photodissociation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neumark, D.M. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The authors have developed a novel technique for studying the photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals. In these experiments, radicals are generated by laser photodetachment of a fast (6-8 keV) mass-selected negative ion beam. The resulting radicals are photodissociated with a second laser, and the photofragments are collected and detected with high efficiency using a microchannel plate detector. The overall process is: ABC{sup -} {yields} ABC + e{sup -} {yields} A + BC, AB + C. Two types of fragment detection schemes are used. To map out the photodissociation cross-section of the radical, the photodissociation laser is scanned and the total photofragment yield is measured as a function of wavelength. In other experiments, the photodissociation frequency is fixed and the photofragment masses, kinetic energy release, and scattering angle is determined for each photodissociation event.

  1. Neon Ion Beam Lithography (NIBL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winston, Donald

    Existing techniques for electron- and ion-beam lithography, routinely employed for nanoscale device fabrication and mask/mold prototyping, do not simultaneously achieve efficient (low fluence) exposure and high resolution. ...

  2. A multi beam proton accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dolya, S N

    2015-01-01

    The article considers a proton accelerator containing seven independent beams arranged on the accelerator radius. The current in each beam is one hundred milliamps. The initial part of the accelerator consists of shielded spiral waveguides assembled in the common screen. The frequency of the acceleration: three hundred megahertz, high-frequency power twenty-five megawatts, the length of the accelerator six meters. After reaching the proton energy of six megaelektronvolts the protons using lenses with the azimuthal magnetic field are collected in one beam. Further beam acceleration is performed in the array of superconducting cavities tuned to the frequency one and three tenths gigahertz. The acceleration rate is equal to twenty megavolt per meter, the high-frequency power consumption fifteen megawatts per meter.

  3. Neutron beam testing of triblades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalak, Sarah E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du Bois, Andrew J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Storlie, Curtis B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rust, William N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du Bois, David H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Modl, David G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Quinn, Heather M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Blanchard, Sean P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Manuzzato, Andrea [UNIV DEGLI STUDI DI PADOVA ITALY

    2011-01-31

    PowerXCell 8i processors and Opterons in four IBM Triblades were tested at LANSCE. The hazard rate when the beam was aimed at the Opterons was higher than when it was aimed at the Cell processors.

  4. Center for Beam Physics, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This report contains the following information on the center for beam physics: Facilities; Organizational Chart; Roster; Profiles of Staff; Affiliates; Center Publications (1991--1993); and 1992 Summary of Activities.

  5. The Fermilab neutrino beam program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rameika, Regina A.; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    This talk presents an overview of the Fermilab Neutrino Beam Program. Results from completed experiments as well as the status and outlook for current experiments is given. Emphasis is given to current activities towards planning for a future program.

  6. Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Carbohydrates...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    More Documents & Publications Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Carbohydrates Production Advanced Conversion Roadmap Workshop Innovative Topics for Advanced Biofuels...

  7. Implementing Advances in Transport Security Technologies | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Implementing Advances in Transport Security Technologies Implementing Advances in Transport Security Technologies Implementing Advances in Transport Security Technologies More...

  8. Fact Sheet: Energy Storage Technology Advancement Partnership...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Advancement Partnership (October 2012) Fact Sheet: Energy Storage Technology Advancement Partnership (October 2012) The Energy Storage Technology Advancement Partnership...

  9. Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing (ATVM) Loan Program...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing (ATVM) Loan Program Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing (ATVM) Loan Program Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing (ATVM) Loan...

  10. The advanced microgrid. Integration and interoperability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bower, Ward Isaac; Ton, Dan T.; Guttromson, Ross; Glover, Steven F; Stamp, Jason Edwin; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Reilly, Jim

    2014-02-01

    This white paper focuses on "advanced microgrids," but sections do, out of necessity, reference today's commercially available systems and installations in order to clearly distinguish the differences and advances. Advanced microgrids have been identified as being a necessary part of the modern electrical grid through a two DOE microgrid workshops, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Smart Grid Interoperability Panel and other related sources. With their grid-interconnectivity advantages, advanced microgrids will improve system energy efficiency and reliability and provide enabling technologies for grid-independence to end-user sites. One popular definition that has been evolved and is used in multiple references is that a microgrid is a group of interconnected loads and distributed-energy resources within clearly defined electrical boundaries that acts as a single controllable entity with respect to the grid. A microgrid can connect and disconnect from the grid to enable it to operate in both grid-connected or island-mode. Further, an advanced microgrid can then be loosely defined as a dynamic microgrid.

  11. Advanced Review Geometry optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    Advanced Review Geometry optimization H. Bernhard Schlegel Geometry optimization is an important part of most quantum chemical calcu- lations. This article surveys methods for optimizing equilibrium geometries, lo- cating transition structures, and following reaction paths. The emphasis is on optimizations

  12. Advanced Combustion FAQs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The advantage of these advanced combustion systems is that the high concentration of CO2 in the flue gas reduces the cost and improves the performance of the CO2 capture...

  13. Advanced Article Article Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Shea, Paul

    -reduction) WILEY ENCYCLOPEDIA OF CHEMICAL BIOLOGY 2008, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 1 #12;Membrane PotentialsAdvanced Article Article Contents · Biological Background · Physical Chemistry Background of Biological Roles and of Tech- nologies for Measurement Membrane Potentials in Living Systems, Tools

  14. Renewable Chemicals and Advanced Biofuels

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Afternoon Plenary Session: Current Trends in the Advanced Bioindustry Advanced Biofuels & Policy—Brett Lund, Executive Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary, Gevo Inc.

  15. Advanced Integrated Systems Technology Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Renewable Energy Technologies Transportation Advanced Integrated Systems Technology Development is the final report for the Advanced Integrated Systems Technology Development project (

  16. Ultrafast Diagnostics for Electron Beams from Laser Plasma Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matlis, N. H.

    2011-01-01

    Ultrafast Diagnostics for Electron Beams from Laser Plasmadiagnostic techniques [2]. While the field of electron beam

  17. Advanced Computing Tech Team | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Computing Tech Team Advanced Computing Tech Team Advanced Computing Tech Team The Advanced Computing Tech Team is working with the DOE Energy Technology Offices, the...

  18. Electron beam diagnostic for profiling high power beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, John W. (Danville, CA); Palmer, Todd A. (Livermore, CA); Teruya, Alan T. (Livermore, CA)

    2008-03-25

    A system for characterizing high power electron beams at power levels of 10 kW and above is described. This system is comprised of a slit disk assembly having a multitude of radial slits, a conducting disk with the same number of radial slits located below the slit disk assembly, a Faraday cup assembly located below the conducting disk, and a start-stop target located proximate the slit disk assembly. In order to keep the system from over-heating during use, a heat sink is placed in close proximity to the components discussed above, and an active cooling system, using water, for example, can be integrated into the heat sink. During use, the high power beam is initially directed onto a start-stop target and after reaching its full power is translated around the slit disk assembly, wherein the beam enters the radial slits and the conducting disk radial slits and is detected at the Faraday cup assembly. A trigger probe assembly can also be integrated into the system in order to aid in the determination of the proper orientation of the beam during reconstruction. After passing over each of the slits, the beam is then rapidly translated back to the start-stop target to minimize the amount of time that the high power beam comes in contact with the slit disk assembly. The data obtained by the system is then transferred into a computer system, where a computer tomography algorithm is used to reconstruct the power density distribution of the beam.

  19. Overview of Light-Ion Beam Therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, William T.

    2006-01-01

    measurements using various dosimeters. Discussions of theseamong ion-beam centers • Dosimeter calibrations • Do you

  20. Method and system for controlling the position of a beam of light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinkraus, Jr., Robert F. (San Francisco, CA); Johnson, Gary W. (Livermore, CA); Ruggiero, Anthony J. (Livermore, CA)

    2011-08-09

    An method and system for laser beam tracking and pointing is based on a conventional position sensing detector (PSD) or quadrant cell but with the use of amplitude-modulated light. A combination of logarithmic automatic gain control, filtering, and synchronous detection offers high angular precision with exceptional dynamic range and sensitivity, while maintaining wide bandwidth. Use of modulated light enables the tracking of multiple beams simultaneously through the use of different modulation frequencies. It also makes the system resistant to interfering light sources such as ambient light. Beam pointing is accomplished by feeding back errors in the measured beam position to a beam steering element, such as a steering mirror. Closed-loop tracking performance is superior to existing methods, especially under conditions of atmospheric scintillation.

  1. Advanced Studies Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pattern Recognition Persistent Surveillance Bio-Sensing Dynamics of the Power Grid Human Machine-Interfaces Resilience of High-Performance Computers 2013...

  2. Advancement of isotope separation for the production of reference standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jared Horkley; Christopher McGrath; Andrew Edwards; Gaven Knighton; Kevin Carney; Jacob Davies; James Sommers; Jeffrey Giglio

    2012-03-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) operates a mass separator that is currently producing high purity isotopes for use as internal standards for high precision isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). In 2008, INL began the revival of the vintage 1970’s era instrument. Advancements thus far include the successful upgrading and development of system components such as the vacuum system, power supplies, ion-producing components, and beam detection equipment. Progress has been made in the separation and collection of isotopic species including those of Ar, Kr, Xe, Sr, and Ba. Particular focuses on ion source improvements and developments have proven successful with demonstrated output beam currents of over 10 micro-amps 138Ba and 350nA 134Ba from a natural abundance source charge (approximately 2.4 percent 134Ba). In order to increase production and collection of relatively high quantities (mg levels) of pure isotopes, several advancements have been made in ion source designs, source material introduction, and beam detection and collection. These advancements and future developments will be presented.

  3. Wavelet Bicoherence Analysis as a Method for Investigating Coherent Structures in an Electron Beam with an Overcritical Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Koronovskii; A. E. Hramov

    2006-01-31

    Results are presented from numerical modeling of the effect of the inhomogeneity of the ion background on the complicated spatiotemporal dynamics of an electron beam with a virtual cathode in plane geometry. The possibility is demonstrated of increasing the generation frequency without changing the beam current. The spatiotemporal structures that form in the beam and govern the complicated stochastic dynamics of the nonuniform electron-plasma system under consideration are investigated by the methods of wavelet bicoherence and by analyzing the calculated electron trajectories on the space-time diagrams

  4. Beam steering via resonance detuning in coherently coupled vertical cavity laser arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Matthew T., E-mail: matthew.johnson.9@us.af.mil; Siriani, Dominic F.; Peun Tan, Meng; Choquette, Kent D. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61820 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61820 (United States)

    2013-11-11

    Coherently coupled vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser arrays offer unique advantages for nonmechanical beam steering applications. We have applied dynamic coupled mode theory to show that the observed temporal phase shift between vertical-cavity surface-emitting array elements is caused by the detuning of their resonant wavelengths. Hence, a complete theoretical connection between the differential current injection into array elements and the beam steering direction has been established. It is found to be a fundamentally unique beam-steering mechanism with distinct advantages in efficiency, compactness, speed, and phase-sensitivity to current.

  5. INDEPENDENT COMPONENT ANALYSIS (ICA) APPLIED TO LONG BUNCH BEAMS IN THE LOS ALAMOS PROTON STORAGE RING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolski, Jeffrey S.; Macek, Robert J.; McCrady, Rodney C.; Pang, Xiaoying

    2012-05-14

    Independent component analysis (ICA) is a powerful blind source separation (BSS) method. Compared to the typical BSS method, principal component analysis (PCA), which is the BSS foundation of the well known model independent analysis (MIA), ICA is more robust to noise, coupling, and nonlinearity. ICA of turn-by-turn beam position data has been used to measure the transverse betatron phase and amplitude functions, dispersion function, linear coupling, sextupole strength, and nonlinear beam dynamics. We apply ICA in a new way to slices along the bunch and discuss the source signals identified as betatron motion and longitudinal beam structure.

  6. Electromagnetic Wavelets as Hertzian Pulsed Beams in Complex Spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerald Kaiser

    2002-09-12

    Electromagnetic wavelets are a family of 3x3 matrix fields W_z(x') parameterized by complex spacetime points z=x+iy with y timelike. They are translates of a \\sl basic \\rm wavelet W(z) holomorphic in the future-oriented union T of the forward and backward tubes. Applied to a complex polarization vector p (representing electric and magnetic dipole moments), W(z) gives an anti-selfdual solution W(z)p of Maxwell's equations derived from a selfdual Hertz potential Z(z)=-iS(z)p, where S is the \\sl Synge function \\rm acting as a Whittaker-like scalar Hertz potential. Resolutions of unity exist giving representations of sourceless electromagnetic fields as superpositions of wavelets. With the choice of a branch cut, S(z) splits into a difference of retarded and advanced \\sl pulsed beams \\rm whose limits as y\\to 0 give the propagators of the wave equation. This yields a similar splitting of the wavelets and leads to their complete physical interpretation as EM pulsed beams absorbed and emitted by a \\sl disk source \\rm D(y) representing the branch cut. The choice of y determines the beam's orientation, collimation and duration, giving beams as sharp and pulses as short as desired. The sources are computed as spacetime distributions of electric and magnetic dipoles supported on D(y). The wavelet representation of sourceless electromagnetic fields now splits into representations with advanced and retarded sources. These representations are the electromagnetic counterpart of relativistic coherent-state representations previously derived for massive Klein-Gordon and Dirac particles.

  7. Fourier-space generation of abruptly autofocusing beams and optical bottle beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhigang

    Fourier-space generation of abruptly autofocusing beams and optical bottle beams Ioannis Chremmos,1) Airy beam can be generated by Fourier-transforming an appropriately apodized Bessel beam whose radial distance of the Fourier- transforming lens, it is possible to generate AAF beams with one or two foci

  8. Haptic Feedback and Human Performance in a Dynamic Task Felix Huang R. Brent Gillespie Art Kuo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillespie, Brent

    by human subjects executing a dynamic task. We present the results of experiments involving the control1 Haptic Feedback and Human Performance in a Dynamic Task Felix Huang R. Brent Gillespie Art Kuo of a ball and beam. Human subjects perform position targeting of the ball through hand operation of the beam

  9. Advanced Distillation Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddalena Fanelli; Ravi Arora; Annalee Tonkovich; Jennifer Marco; Ed Rode

    2010-03-24

    The Advanced Distillation project was concluded on December 31, 2009. This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded project was completed successfully and within budget during a timeline approved by DOE project managers, which included a one year extension to the initial ending date. The subject technology, Microchannel Process Technology (MPT) distillation, was expected to provide both capital and operating cost savings compared to conventional distillation technology. With efforts from Velocys and its project partners, MPT distillation was successfully demonstrated at a laboratory scale and its energy savings potential was calculated. While many objectives established at the beginning of the project were met, the project was only partially successful. At the conclusion, it appears that MPT distillation is not a good fit for the targeted separation of ethane and ethylene in large-scale ethylene production facilities, as greater advantages were seen for smaller scale distillations. Early in the project, work involved flowsheet analyses to discern the economic viability of ethane-ethylene MPT distillation and develop strategies for maximizing its impact on the economics of the process. This study confirmed that through modification to standard operating processes, MPT can enable net energy savings in excess of 20%. This advantage was used by ABB Lumus to determine the potential impact of MPT distillation on the ethane-ethylene market. The study indicated that a substantial market exists if the energy saving could be realized and if installed capital cost of MPT distillation was on par or less than conventional technology. Unfortunately, it was determined that the large number of MPT distillation units needed to perform ethane-ethylene separation for world-scale ethylene facilities, makes the targeted separation a poor fit for the technology in this application at the current state of manufacturing costs. Over the course of the project, distillation experiments were performed with the targeted mixture, ethane-ethylene, as well as with analogous low relative volatility systems: cyclohexane-hexane and cyclopentane-pentane. Devices and test stands were specifically designed for these efforts. Development progressed from experiments and models considering sections of a full scale device to the design, fabrication, and operation of a single-channel distillation unit with integrated heat transfer. Throughout the project, analytical and numerical models and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were validated with experiments in the process of developing this platform technology. Experimental trials demonstrated steady and controllable distillation for a variety of process conditions. Values of Height-to-an-Equivalent Theoretical Plate (HETP) ranging from less than 0.5 inch to a few inches were experimentally proven, demonstrating a ten-fold performance enhancement relative to conventional distillation. This improvement, while substantial, is not sufficient for MPT distillation to displace very large scale distillation trains. Fortunately, parallel efforts in the area of business development have yielded other applications for MPT distillation, including smaller scale separations that benefit from the flowsheet flexibility offered by the technology. Talks with multiple potential partners are underway. Their outcome will also help determine the path ahead for MPT distillation.

  10. Advanced Integrated Systems Technology Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    building envelope, implementing daylighting and efficient lighting control strategies, and employing advanced

  11. Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines Increase Efficiency and Reduce Emissions for Distributed Power Generation Applications

  12. Optimized Superconducting Quadrupole Arrays for Multiple Beam Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinke, Rainer, B.; Goodzeit, Carl, L.; Ball, Millicent, J.

    2005-09-20

    This research project advanced the development of reliable, cost-effective arrays of superconducting quadrupole magnets for use in multi-beam inertial fusion accelerators. The field in each array cell must be identical and meet stringent requirements for field quality and strength. An optimized compact array design using flat double-layer pancake coils was developed. Analytical studies of edge termination methods showed that it is feasible to meet the requirements for field uniformity in all cells and elimination of stray external field in several ways: active methods that involve placement of field compensating coils on the periphery of the array or a passive method that involves use of iron shielding.

  13. Electron beam ion source and electron beam ion trap (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, Reinard [Scientific Software Service, Kapellenweg 2a, D-63571 Gelnhausen (Germany); Kester, Oliver [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) and its trap variant [electron beam ion trap (EBIT)] celebrated their 40th and 20th anniversary, respectively, at the EBIS/T Symposium 2007 in Heidelberg. These technologically challenging sources of highly charged ions have seen a broad development in many countries over the last decades. In contrast to most other ion sources the recipe of improvement was not ''sorcery'' but a clear understanding of the physical laws and obeying the technological constraints. This review will report important achievements of the past as well as promising developments in the future.

  14. Advanced servomanipulator development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuban, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    The Advanced Servomanipulator (ASM) System consists of three major components: the ASM slave, the dual arm master controller (DAMC) or master, and the control system. The ASM is remotely maintainable force-reflecting servomanipulator developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program. This new manipulator addresses requirements of advanced nuclear fuel reprocessing with emphasis on force reflection, remote maintainability, reliability, radiation tolerance, and corrosion resistance. The advanced servomanipulator is uniquely subdivided into remotely replaceable modules which will permit in situ manipulator repair by spare module replacement. Manipulator modularization and increased reliability are accomplished through a force transmission system that uses gears and torque tubes. Digital control algorithms and mechanical precision are used to offset the increased backlash, friction, and inertia resulting from the gear drives. This results in the first remotely maintainable force-reflecting servomanipulator in the world.

  15. MTCI advanced coal technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansour, M.N.; Chandran, R.R. [Manufacturing and Technology Conversion International, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States)

    1994-12-31

    MTCI is pursuing the development and commercialization of several advanced combustion and gasification systems based on pulse combustion technology. The systems include indirectly heated thermochemical reactor, atmospheric pressure pulse combustor, pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustor, direct coal-fired gas turbine pulse combustor island, and advanced concept second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustor island. Although the systems in toto are capable of processing lignite, subbituminous, bituminous, and anthracite coals in an efficient, economical and environmentally acceptable manner, each system is considered ideal for certain coal types. Brief descriptions of the systems, applications, selected test results and technology status are presented.

  16. Advanced Containment System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kostelnik, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kawamura, Hideki (Tokyo, JP); Richardson, John G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Noda, Masaru (Tokyo, JP)

    2005-02-08

    An advanced containment system for containing buried waste and associated leachate. The advanced containment system comprises a plurality of casing sections with each casing section interlocked to an adjacent casing section. Each casing section includes a complementary interlocking structure that interlocks with the complementary interlocking structure on an adjacent casing section. A barrier filler substantially fills the casing sections and may substantially fill the spaces of the complementary interlocking structure to form a substantially impermeable barrier. Some of the casing sections may include sensors so that the casing sections and the zone of interest may be remotely monitored after the casing sections are emplaced in the ground.

  17. Advanced Simulation Capability

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About Us ShirleyU.S. DRIVE11of EnergyBamdad Bahar4 AdvancedMayAdvanced for

  18. Advances in Lithography

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge KiosksAboutHelp &AdvancedAdvancedExamples

  19. Sandia Energy - Advanced Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni >Scientific andInstituteAdvanced BitAdvanced

  20. Advanced fuel chemistry for advanced engines.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taatjes, Craig A.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Zador, Judit; Fernandes, Ravi X.; Miller, James A.

    2009-09-01

    Autoignition chemistry is central to predictive modeling of many advanced engine designs that combine high efficiency and low inherent pollutant emissions. This chemistry, and especially its pressure dependence, is poorly known for fuels derived from heavy petroleum and for biofuels, both of which are becoming increasingly prominent in the nation's fuel stream. We have investigated the pressure dependence of key ignition reactions for a series of molecules representative of non-traditional and alternative fuels. These investigations combined experimental characterization of hydroxyl radical production in well-controlled photolytically initiated oxidation and a hybrid modeling strategy that linked detailed quantum chemistry and computational kinetics of critical reactions with rate-equation models of the global chemical system. Comprehensive mechanisms for autoignition generally ignore the pressure dependence of branching fractions in the important alkyl + O{sub 2} reaction systems; however we have demonstrated that pressure-dependent 'formally direct' pathways persist at in-cylinder pressures.

  1. FINAL FOCUS ION BEAM INTENSITY FROM TUNGSTEN FOIL CALORIMETER AND SCINTILLATOR IN NDCX-I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lidia, S.M.; Bieniosek, F.; Henestroza, E.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.

    2010-04-30

    Laboratory high energy density experiments using ion beam drivers rely upon the delivery of high-current, high-brightness ion beams with high peak intensity onto targets. Solid-state scintillators are typically used to measure the ion beam spatial profile but they display dose-dependent degradation and aging effects. These effects produce uncertainties and limit the accuracy of measuring peak beam intensities delivered to the target. For beam tuning and characterizing the incident beam intensity, we have developed a cross-calibrating diagnostic suite that extends the upper limit of measurable peak intensity dynamic range. Absolute intensity calibration is obtained with a 3 {micro}m thick tungsten foil calorimeter and streak spectrometer. We present experimental evidence for peak intensity measures in excess of 400 kW/cm{sup 2} using a 0.3 MV, 25 mA, 5-20 {micro}sec K{sup +1} beam. Radiative models and thermal diffusion effects are discussed because they affect temporal and spatial resolution of beam intensity profiles.

  2. Shimmed electron beam welding process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feng, Ganjiang (Clifton Park, NY); Nowak, Daniel Anthony (Alplaus, NY); Murphy, John Thomas (Niskayuna, NY)

    2002-01-01

    A modified electron beam welding process effects welding of joints between superalloy materials by inserting a weldable shim in the joint and heating the superalloy materials with an electron beam. The process insures a full penetration of joints with a consistent percentage of filler material and thereby improves fatigue life of the joint by three to four times as compared with the prior art. The process also allows variable shim thickness and joint fit-up gaps to provide increased flexibility for manufacturing when joining complex airfoil structures and the like.

  3. Low emittance pion beams generation from bright photons and relativistic protons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serafini, L; Petrillo, V

    2015-01-01

    Present availability of high brilliance photon beams as those produced by X-ray Free Electron Lasers in combination with intense TeV proton beams typical of the Large Hadron Collider makes it possible to conceive the generation of pion beams via photo-production in a highly relativistic Lorentz boosted frame: the main advantage is the low emittance attainable and a TeV-class energy for the generated pions, that may be an interesting option for the production of low emittance muon and neutrino beams. We will describe the kinematics of the two classes of dominant events, i.e. the pion photo-production and the electron/positron pair production, neglecting other small cross-section possible events like Compton and muon pair production. Based on the phase space distributions of the pion and muon beams we will analyze the pion beam brightness achievable in three examples, based on advanced high efficiency high repetition rate FELs coupled to LHC or Future Circular Collider (FCC) proton beams, together with the stud...

  4. Beam-driven acceleration in ultra-dense plasma media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Young-Min [Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, Dekalb, Illinois 60115 (United States); Accelerator Physics Center (APC), Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Accelerating parameters of beam-driven wakefield acceleration in an extremely dense plasma column has been analyzed with the dynamic framed particle-in-cell plasma simulator, and compared with analytic calculations. In the model, a witness beam undergoes a TeV/m scale alternating potential gradient excited by a micro-bunched drive beam in a 10{sup 25?}m{sup ?3} and 1.6?×?10{sup 28?}m{sup ?3} plasma column. The acceleration gradient, energy gain, and transformer ratio have been extensively studied in quasi-linear, linear-, and blowout-regimes. The simulation analysis indicated that in the beam-driven acceleration system a hollow plasma channel offers ?20% higher acceleration gradient by enlarging the channel radius (r) from 0.2 ?{sub p} to 0.6 ?{sub p} in a blowout regime. This paper suggests a feasibility of TeV/m scale acceleration with a hollow crystalline structure (e.g., nanotubes) of high electron plasma density.

  5. Beam-driven acceleration in ultra-dense plasma media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Young-Min [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States). Accelerator Physics Center

    2014-09-15

    Accelerating parameters of beam-driven wakefield acceleration in an extremely dense plasma column has been analyzed with the dynamic framed particle-in-cell plasma simulator, and compared with analytic calculations. In the model, a witness beam undergoes a TeV/m scale alternating potential gradient excited by a micro-bunched drive beam in a 1025 m-3 and 1.6 x 1028 m-3 plasma column. The acceleration gradient, energy gain, and transformer ratio have been extensively studied in quasi-linear, linear-, and blowout-regimes. The simulation analysis indicated that in the beam-driven acceleration system a hollow plasma channel offers 20 % higher acceleration gradient by enlarging the channel radius (r) from 0.2 ?p to 0.6 ?p in a blowout regime. This paper suggests a feasibility of TeV/m scale acceleration with a hollow crystalline structure (e.g. nanotubes) of high electron plasma density.

  6. Advances in Whole Genome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciocan-Fontanine, Ionut

    Advances in Whole Genome Sequencing IMA Public Lecture: Tuesday, May 6, 2003, 7:30 p.m. Moos Tower sequenced genome, the virus Lambda at 50,000 nucleotides, was sequenced via the shotgun method by Sanger that this approach could not be applied to genomes over 100,000 nucleotides long, so a long period followed where

  7. Advances in Lung Volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Michelle

    Advances in Lung Volume Reduction Surgery The Ohio University Medical Center Lung Volume Reduction LungVolumeReductionSurgery Spring 2010 © 2010 The Ohio State University Medical Center ­ 04 Consult Ohio State's #12;The Ohio State University Medical Center Lung Volume Reduction Surgery Patient

  8. Advanced Test Reactor Tour

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, Don

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  9. Advanced Bioeconomy Feedstocks Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This year’s Advanced Bioeconomy Feedstocks Conference will be held from June 9–10, 2015 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The conference will gather supply chain leaders of the bioeconomy to examine supply chain technologies, business models, and partnerships. BETO Director Jonathan Male and Technology Manager Steve Thomas will be speaking at the conference.

  10. Advanced Test Reactor Tour

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Miley, Don

    2013-05-28

    The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  11. Studies of beam dynamics in relativistic klystron two-beam accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lidia, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    material. Our design uses METGLAS with AB is different forof "1.3 T. Flux swings for METGLAS are several times largermore compact. Furthermore, METGLAS is quite inexpensive,

  12. Collective Dynamics and Coherent Diagnostics of Microbunched Relativistic Electron Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marinelli, Agostino

    2012-01-01

    x-ray diffraction pat- tern at the LCLS [1] (left image) andtransition radiation in the lcls linac. Proceedings of the1.1). Recent experiments at the LCLS include the imaging of

  13. The dynamic response of composite sandwich beams to transverse impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleck, Norman A.

    press). Likewise, in the automotive industry, the concern is with relatively low impact speeds (on understood. In the aerospace industry, the focus of attention has been mainly upon barely visible impact

  14. Beam Dynamics Issues in an Extended Relativistic Klystron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giordano, G.

    2008-01-01

    in an Extended Relativistic Klystron G. Giordano, H. Li, N.in an Extended Relativistic Klystron" G. Giordano, H. Li, N.an Extended Relativistic Klystron* G. Giordano t , H. Li, N.

  15. CROSSED MOLECULAR BEAM STUDIES OF UN-IMOLECULAR REACTION DYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buss, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    and velocity distributions provide another probe of the reactionreaction. Measurement of the angular and velocityin the IC1 reaction. The product velocity distributions are

  16. Report of the ICFA Beam Dynamics Workshop 'Accelerators for a...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for pages...

  17. Analysis of Beam Dynamics in a Circular Higgs Factory (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation4563AbuseConnect Technicalofand Pu (TechnicalSciTech Connect

  18. Analysis of Beam Dynamics in a Circular Higgs Factory (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation4563AbuseConnect Technicalofand Pu (TechnicalSciTech

  19. Beam Dynamics Studies for a Laser Acceleration Experiment (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (Technical Report) | SciTechReport) | SciTechgeologic sequestration

  20. Beam Dynamics Studies for a Laser Acceleration Experiment (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (Technical Report) | SciTechReport) | SciTechgeologic sequestrationSciTech

  1. EMITTANCE COMPENSATION FOR MAGNETIZED BEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KEWISCH,J.; CHANG, X.

    2007-06-25

    Emittance compensation is a well established technique for minimizing the emittance of an electron beam from a RF photo-cathode gun. Longitudinal slices of a bunch have a small emittance, but due to the longitudinal charge distribution of the bunch and time dependent RF fields they are not focused in the same way, so that the direction of their phase ellipses diverges in phase space and the projected emittance is much larger. Emittance compensation reverses the divergence. At the location where the slopes of the phase ellipses coincide the beam is accelerated, so that the space charge forces are reduced. A recipe for emittance compensation is given in. For magnetized beams (where the angular momentum is non-zero) such emittance compensation is not sufficient because variations in the slice radius lead to variations in the angular speed and therefore to an increase of emittance in the rotating game. We describe a method and tools for a compensation that includes the beam magnetization.

  2. High energy laser beam dump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halpin, John (Tracy, CA)

    2004-09-14

    The laser beam dump is positioned in a housing. An absorbing glass plate means is operatively connected to the housing. A heat sync means for extracting heat from the absorbing glass plate means is operatively connected to the housing and operatively connected to the absorbing glass plate means.

  3. Electron Beam Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakamura, Kei

    2012-01-01

    Electron Beam Charge Diagnostics for Laser PlasmaElectron beams were sent to the various charge diagnosticselectron spectrometer [27] before sending the e-beam to charge diagnostics,

  4. An ALS (Advanced Light Source) handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    This booklet aims to provide the prospective user of the Advanced Light Source with a concise description of the radiation a researcher might expect at his or her experimental station. The focus is therefore on the characteristics of the light that emerges from insertion devices and bending magnets and on how components of the beam lines further alter the properties of the radiation. The specifications and operating parameters of the ALS injection system and storage ring are of only peripheral interest. To this end, Sections 3 and 5 and most of Section 4 are devoted to summary presentations, by means of performance plots and tabular compilations, of radiation characteristics at the ALS--spectral brightness, flux, coherent power, resolution, time structure, etc.--assuming a representative set of four undulators and one wiggler and a corresponding set of five beam lines. As a complement to these performance summaries, Section 1 is a general introductory discussion of synchrotron radiation and the ALS, and Section 2 provides a compendious introduction to the characteristics of synchrotron radiation from bending magnets, wigglers, and undulators. In addition, Section 4 briefly introduces the theory of diffraction grating and crystal monochromators. 15 refs., 28 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Advances in Complex Systems, Vol. 14, No. 6 (2011) 817827 c World Scientific Publishing Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprott, Julien Clinton

    2011-01-01

    Advances in Complex Systems, Vol. 14, No. 6 (2011) 817­827 c World Scientific Publishing Company in [28] where they identify a quadratic family of dynamic optimization models and they prove

  6. A Measure of Flow Vorticity with Helical Beams of Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosales-Guzmán, Aniceto Belmonte Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    Vorticity describes the spinning motion of a fluid, i.e., the tendency to rotate, at every point in a flow. The interest in performing accurate and localized measurements of vorticity reflects the fact that many of the quantities that characterize the dynamics of fluids are intimately bound together in the vorticity field, being an efficient descriptor of the velocity statistics in many flow regimes. It describes the coherent structures and vortex interactions that are at the leading edge of laminar, transitional, and turbulent flows in nature. The measurement of vorticity is of paramount importance in many research fields as diverse as biology microfluidics, complex motions in the oceanic and atmospheric boundary layers, and wake turbulence on fluid aerodynamics. However, the precise measurement of flow vorticity is difficult. Here we put forward an optical sensing technique to obtain a direct measurement of vorticity in fluids using Laguerre-Gauss (LG) beams, optical beams which show an azimuthal phase vari...

  7. Rapid Generation of Light Beams Carrying Orbital Angular Momentum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad Mirhosseini; Omar S. Magana-Loaiza; Changchen Chen; Brandon Rodenburg; Mehul Malik; Robert W. Boyd

    2013-11-19

    We report a technique for encoding both amplitude and phase variations onto a laser beam using a single digital micro-mirror device (DMD). Using this technique, we generate Laguerre-Gaussian and vortex orbital-angular-momentum (OAM) modes, along with modes in a set that is mutually unbiased with respect to the OAM basis. Additionally, we have demonstrated rapid switching among the generated modes at a speed of 4 kHz, which is much faster than the speed regularly achieved by spatial light modulators (SLMs). The dynamic control of both phase and amplitude of a laser beam is an enabling technology for classical communication and quantum key distribution (QKD) systems that employ spatial mode encoding.

  8. IFTS Intensive Course on Advanced Plasma Physics-Spring 2011,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zonca, Fulvio

    IFTS Intensive Course on Advanced Plasma Physics-Spring 2011, Non-linear charged particle dynamics, the arc length along the magnetic field line and J the second invariant. (iii) In a large aspect ration), Ann. Phys. 41, 302), where the authors show that, when studying the physics of magnetized plasmas

  9. Advanced Plug-in Electric Vehicle Travel and Charging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Advanced Plug-in Electric Vehicle Travel and Charging Behavior UC Davis Plug-in Hybrid and Electric Vehicle Research Center Michael Nicholas Thomas Turrentine Gil Tal #12;Project Overview · Provide most in-depth study of PEV usage and charging dynamics. Inform policy on battery size/vehicle architecture

  10. World-leading research advancing the frontiers of technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Physics World-leading research advancing the frontiers of technology inspiring the Departments of Physics, Chemistry and Electronics, and has world-class facilities for nanoscale fabrication CONTENTS World-leading research in a dynamic environment 4 Teaching excellence 6 Graduation studies 7

  11. Collimation Studies with Hollow Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stancari, G.; Annala, G.; Johnson, T.R.; Saewert, G.W.; Shiltsev, V.; Still, D.A.; Valishev, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    Recent experimental studies at the Fermilab Tevatron collider have shown that magnetically confined hollow electron beams can act as a new kind of collimator for high-intensity beams in storage rings. In a hollow electron beam collimator, electrons enclose the circulating beam. Their electric charge kicks halo particles transversely. If their distribution is axially symmetric, the beam core is unaffected. This device is complementary to conventional two-stage collimation systems: the electron beam can be placed arbitrarily close to the circulating beam; and particle removal is smooth, so that the device is a diffusion enhancer rather than a hard aperture limitation. The concept was tested in the Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the existing electron lenses. We describe some of the technical aspects of hollow-beam scraping and the results of recent measurements.

  12. Radioactive beam production at the Bevalac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso, J.R.; Feinberg, B.; Kalnins, J.G.; Krebs, G.F.; McMahan, M.A.; Tanihata, I.

    1989-10-01

    At the Bevalac radioactive beams are routinely produced by the fragmentation process. The effectiveness of this process with respect to the secondary beam's emittance, intensity and energy spread depends critically on the nuclear reaction kinematics and the magnitude of the incident beam energy. When this beam energy significantly exceeds the energies of the nuclear reaction process, many of the qualities of the incident beam can be passed on to the secondary beam. Factors affecting secondary beam quality are discussed along with techniques for isolating and purifying a specific reaction product. The on-going radioactive beam program at the Bevalac is used as an example with applications, present performance and plans for the future. 6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Electron Beam--21st Century Food Technology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vestal, Andy

    2003-03-07

    This publication explains electron beam irradiation technology to consumers, industry professionals and government officials. Electron beam irradiation is a method of treating food and other products for pathogens that ...

  14. Autogenerator of beams of charged particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adler, R.J.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Miller, R.M.; Shope, S.L.; Smith, D.L.

    1983-10-31

    An autogenerating apparatus provides secondary intense relativistic current beam pulses in response to an injected beam pulse. One or more electromagnetic energy storage devices are provided in conjunction with gaps along a beam propagation path for the injected beam pulse. For injected beam pulses which are no longer than double the transit time of electromagnetic waves within the storage devices (which may be resonant cavities), distinct secondary beam pulses are generated by each of the energy storage devices. The beam propagation path, together with the one or more gaps provided therein, operates as a pulse forming transmission line cavity, in which the separate cavities associated with the gaps provide delays for electromagnetic waves generated at the gaps. After doubly traversing the cavity, the electromagnetic waves cause the gap to generate the secondary beam pulses, which are thus delayed by a time interval equal to the double transit time for the induced wave within the cavity.

  15. Autogenerator of beams of charged particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adler, Richard J. (Albuquerque, NM); Mazarakis, Michael G. (Albuquerque, NM); Miller, Robert B. (Albuquerque, NM); Shope, Steven L. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, David L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1986-01-01

    An autogenerating apparatus provides secondary intense relativistic current beam pulses in response to an injected beam pulse. One or more electromagnetic energy storage devices are provided in conjunction with gaps along a beam propagation path for the injected beam pulse. For injected beam pulses which are no longer than double the transit time of electromagnetic waves within the storage devices (which may be resonant cavities), distinct secondary beam pulses are generated by each of the energy storage devices. The beam propagation path, together with the one or more gaps provided therein, operates as a pulse forming transmission line cavity, in which the separate cavities associated with the gaps provide delays for electromagnetic waves generated at the gaps. After doubly traversing the cavity, the electromagnetic waves cause the gap to generate the secondary beam pulses, which are thus delayed by a time interval equal to the double transit time for the induced wave within the cavity.

  16. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  17. Low NOx Advanced Vortex Combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmonds, R.G. (Ramgen Power Systems, Inc., Bellevue, WA); Williams, J.T. (Ramgen Power Systems, Inc., Bellevue, WA); Steele, R.C. (EPRI); Straub, D.L.; Casleton, K.H.; Bining, Avtar (California Energy Commission, Sacramento, CA)

    2008-05-01

    A lean-premixed advanced vortex combustor (AVC) has been developed and tested. The natural gas fueled AVC was tested at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory in Morgantown, WV. All testing was performed at elevated pressures and inlet temperatures and at lean fuel-air ratios representative of industrial gas turbines. The improved AVC design exhibited simultaneous NOx /CO/unburned hydrocarbon (UHC) emissions of 4/4/0 ppmv (all emissions corrected to 15% O2 dry). The design also achieved less than 3 ppmv NOx with combustion efficiencies in excess of 99.5%. The design demonstrated marked acoustic dynamic stability over a wide range of operating conditions, which potentially makes this approach significantly more attractive than other lean-premixed combustion approaches. In addition, the measured 1.75% pressure drop is significantly lower than conventional gas turbine combustors, which could translate into an overall gas turbine cycle efficiency improvement. The relatively high velocities and low pressure drop achievable with this technology make the AVC approach an attractive alternative for syngas fuel applications.

  18. Electron beam exposure mechanisms in hydrogen silsesquioxane investigated by vibrational spectroscopy and in-situ electron beam induced desorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olynick, D.L.

    2010-01-01

    Electron beam exposure mechanisms in hydrogen silsesquioxanespectroscopy and in-situ electron beam induced desorption.Infrared) and electron beam desorption spectroscopy (EBDS).

  19. Beamed Core Antimatter Propulsion: Engine Design and Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronan Keane; Wei-Ming Zhang

    2012-05-16

    A conceptual design for beamed core antimatter propulsion is reported, where electrically charged annihilation products directly generate thrust after being deflected and collimated by a magnetic nozzle. Simulations were carried out using the Geant4 (Geometry and tracking) software toolkit released by the CERN accelerator laboratory for Monte Carlo simulation of the interaction of particles with matter and fields. Geant permits a more sophisticated and comprehensive design and optimization of antimatter engines than the software environment for simulations reported by prior researchers. The main finding is that effective exhaust speeds Ve ~ 0.69c (where c is the speed of light) are feasible for charged pions in beamed core propulsion, a major improvement over the Ve ~ 0.33c estimate based on prior simulations. The improvement resulted from optimization of the geometry and the field configuration of the magnetic nozzle. Moreover, this improved performance is realized using a magnetic field on the order of 10 T at the location of its highest magnitude. Such a field could be produced with today's technology, whereas prior nozzle designs anticipated and required major advances in this area. The paper also briefly reviews prospects for production of the fuel needed for a beamed core engine.

  20. Intensity Effects of the FACET Beam in the SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Decker, F.-J.; Lipkowitz, N.; Sheppard, J.; White, G.R.; Wienands, U.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2012-07-03

    The beam for FACET (Facility for Advanced aCcelerator Experimental Tests) at SLAC requires an energy-time correlation ('chirp') along the linac, so it can be compressed in two chicanes, one at the midpoint in sector 10 and one W-shaped chicane just before the FACET experimental area. The induced correlation has the opposite sign to the typical used for BNS damping, and therefore any orbit variations away from the center kick the tail of the beam more than the head, causing a shear in the beam and emittance growth. Any dispersion created along the linac has similar effects due to the high (>1.2% rms) energy spread necessary for compression. The initial huge emittances could be reduced by a factor of 10, but were still bigger than expected by a factor of 2-3. Normalized emittance of 3 {micro}m-rad in Sector 2 blew up to 150 {micro}m-rad in Sector 11 but could be reduced to about 6-12 {micro}m-rad, for the vertical plane although the results were not very stable. Investigating possible root causes for this, we found locations where up to 10 mm dispersion was created along the linac, which were finally verified with strong steering and up to 7 mm settling of the linac accelerator at these locations.

  1. Electron Beam Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Lin, Chen; Smith, Alan; Rodgers, David; Donahue, Rich; Byrne, Warren; Leemans, Wim

    2011-06-27

    A comprehensive study of charge diagnostics is conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs). First, a scintillating screen (Lanex) was extensively studied using subnanosecond electron beams from the Advanced Light Source booster synchrotron, at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Lanex was cross calibrated with an integrating current transformer (ICT) for up to the electron energy of 1.5 GeV, and the linear response of the screen was confirmed for charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm{sup 2} and 0.4 pC/(ps mm{sup 2}), respectively. After the radio-frequency accelerator based cross calibration, a series of measurements was conducted using electron beams from an LPA. Cross calibrations were carried out using an activation-based measurement that is immune to electromagnetic pulse noise, ICT, and Lanex. The diagnostics agreed within {+-}8%, showing that they all can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs.

  2. The NuMI Neutrino Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Adamson; K. Anderson; M. Andrews; R. Andrews; I. Anghel; D. Augustine; A. Aurisano; S. Avvakumov; D. S. Ayres; B. Baller; B. Barish; G. Barr; W. L. Barrett; R. H. Bernstein; J. Biggs; M. Bishai; A. Blake; V. Bocean; G. J. Bock; D. J. Boehnlein; D. Bogert; K. Bourkland; S. V. Cao; C. M. Castromonte; S. Childress; B. C. Choudhary; J. A. B. Coelho; J. H. Cobb; L. Corwin; D. Crane; J. P. Cravens; D. Cronin-Hennessy; R. J. Ducar; J. K. de Jong; A. V. Devan; N. E. Devenish; M. V. Diwan; A. R. Erwin; C. O. Escobar; J. J. Evans; E. Falk; G. J. Feldman; T. H. Fields; R. Ford; M. V. Frohne; H. R. Gallagher; V. Garkusha; R. A. Gomes; M. C. Goodman; P. Gouffon; N. Graf; R. Gran; N. Grossman; K. Grzelak; A. Habig; S. R. Hahn; D. Harding; D. Harris; P. G. Harris; J. Hartnell; R. Hatcher; S. Hays; K. Heller; A. Holin; J. Huang; J. Hylen; A. Ibrahim; D. Indurthy; G. M. Irwin; Z. Isvan; D. E. Jaffe; C. James; D. Jensen; J. Johnstone; T. Kafka; S. M. S. Kasahara; G. Koizumi; S. Kopp; M. Kordosky; A. Kreymer; K. Lang; C. Laughton; G. Lefeuvre; J. Ling; P. J. Litchfield; L. Loiacono; P. Lucas; W. A. Mann; A. Marchionni; M. L. Marshak; N. Mayer; C. McGivern; M. M. Medeiros; R. Mehdiyev; J. R. Meier; M. D. Messier; D. G. Michael; R. H. Milburn; J. L. Miller; W. H. Miller; S. R. Mishra; S. Moed Sher; C. D. Moore; J. Morfin; L. Mualem; S. Mufson; S. Murgia; M. Murtagh; J. Musser; D. Naples; J. K. Nelson; H. B. Newman; R. J. Nichol; J. A. Nowak; J. O Connor; W. P. Oliver; M. Olsen; M. Orchanian; S. Osprey; R. B. Pahlka; J. Paley; A. Para; R. B. Patterson; T. Patzak; Z. Pavlovic; G. Pawloski; A. Perch; E. A. Peterson; D. A. Petyt; M. M. Pfutzner; S. Phan-Budd; R. K. Plunkett; N. Poonthottathil; P. Prieto; D. Pushka; X. Qiu; A. Radovic; R. A. Rameika; J. Ratchford; B. Rebel; R. Reilly; C. Rosenfeld; H. A. Rubin; K. Ruddick; M. C. Sanchez; N. Saoulidou; L. Sauer; J. Schneps; D. Schoo; A. Schreckenberger; P. Schreiner; P. Shanahan; R. Sharma; W. Smart; C. Smith; A. Sousa; A. Stefanik; N. Tagg; R. L. Talaga; G. Tassotto; J. Thomas; J. Thompson; M. A. Thomson; X. Tian; A. Timmons; D. Tinsley; S. C. Tognini; R. Toner; D. Torretta; I. Trostin; G. Tzanakos; J. Urheim; P. Vahle; K. Vaziri; E. Villegas; B. Viren; G. Vogel; R. C. Webber; A. Weber; R. C. Webb; A. Wehmann; C. White; L. Whitehead; L. H. Whitehead; S. G. Wojcicki; M. L. Wong-Squires; T. Yang; F. X. Yumiceva; V. Zarucheisky; R. Zwaska

    2015-07-29

    This paper describes the hardware and operations of the Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beam at Fermilab. It elaborates on the design considerations for the beam as a whole and for individual elements. The most important design details of individual components are described. Beam monitoring systems and procedures, including the tuning and alignment of the beam and NuMI long-term performance, are also discussed.

  3. The NuMI Neutrino Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adamson, P; Andrews, M; Andrews, R; Anghel, I; Augustine, D; Aurisano, A; Avvakumov, S; Ayres, D S; Baller, B; Barish, B; Barr, G; Barrett, W L; Bernstein, R H; Biggs, J; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bocean, V; Bock, G J; Boehnlein, D J; Bogert, D; Bourkland, K; Cao, S V; Castromonte, C M; Childress, S; Choudhary, B C; Coelho, J A B; Cobb, J H; Corwin, L; Crane, D; Cravens, J P; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Ducar, R J; de Jong, J K; Devan, A V; Devenish, N E; Diwan, M V; Erwin, A R; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk, E; Feldman, G J; Fields, T H; Ford, R; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Garkusha, V; Gomes, R A; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Graf, N; Gran, R; Grossman, N; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Hahn, S R; Harding, D; Harris, D; Harris, P G; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Hays, S; Heller, K; Holin, A; Huang, J; Hylen, J; Ibrahim, A; Indurthy, D; Irwin, G M; Isvan, Z; Jaffe, D E; James, C; Jensen, D; Johnstone, J; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M S; Koizumi, G; Kopp, S; Kordosky, M; Kreymer, A; Lang, K; Laughton, C; Lefeuvre, G; Ling, J; Litchfield, P J; Loiacono, L; Lucas, P; Mann, W A; Marchionni, A; Marshak, M L; Mayer, N; McGivern, C; Medeiros, M M; Mehdiyev, R; Meier, J R; Messier, M D; Michael, D G; Milburn, R H; Miller, J L; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Sher, S Moed; Moore, C D; Morfin, J; Mualem, L; Mufson, S; Murgia, S; Murtagh, M; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nowak, J A; Connor, J O; Oliver, W P; Olsen, M; Orchanian, M; Osprey, S; Pahlka, R B; Paley, J; Para, A; Patterson, R B; Patzak, T; Pavlovic, Z; Pawloski, G; Perch, A; Peterson, E A; Petyt, D A; Pfutzner, M; Phan-Budd, S; Plunkett, R K; Poonthottathil, N; Prieto, P; Pushka, D; Qiu, X; Radovic, A; Rameika, R A; Ratchford, J; Rebel, B; Reilly, R; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Ruddick, K; Sanchez, M C; Saoulidou, N; Sauer, L; Schneps, J; Schoo, D; Schreckenberger, A; Schreiner, P; Shanahan, P; Sharma, R; Smart, W; Smith, C; Sousa, A; Stefanik, A; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Tassotto, G; Thomas, J; Thompson, J; Thomson, M A; Tian, X; Timmons, A; Tinsley, D; Tognini, S C; Toner, R; Torretta, D; Trostin, I; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Vaziri, K; Villegas, E; Viren, B; Vogel, G; Webber, R C; Weber, A; Webb, R C; Wehmann, A; White, C; Whitehead, L; Whitehead, L H; Wojcicki, S G; Wong-Squires, M L; Yang, T; Yumiceva, F X; Zarucheisky, V; Zwaska, R

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the hardware and operations of the Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beam at Fermilab. It elaborates on the design considerations for the beam as a whole and for individual elements. The most important design details of individual components are described. Beam monitoring systems and procedures, including the tuning and alignment of the beam and NuMI long-term performance, are also discussed.

  4. Beam instability studies for the SSC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, W.

    1994-09-01

    Beam instability studies of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) during the period 1989--1993 are briefly reviewed in this paper. Various topics are covered: single bunch and multi-bunch, single beam and beam-beam, parasitic heating and active feedback, etc. Although the SSC will not be built, many of the results obtained from these studies remain as useful references to the accelerator community.

  5. The NuMI Neutrino Beam

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamson, P.; Anderson, K.; Andrews, M.; Andrews, R.; Anghel, I.; Augustine, D.; Aurisano, A.; Avvakumov, S.; Ayres, D. S.; Baller, B.; et al

    2015-10-20

    Our paper describes the hardware and operations of the Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beam at Fermilab. It elaborates on the design considerations for the beam as a whole and for individual elements. The most important part of our design details pertaining to individual components is described. Beam monitoring systems and procedures, including the tuning and alignment of the beam and NuMI long-term performance, are also discussed.

  6. Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Francfort

    2004-06-01

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is to increase the body of knowledge as well as the awareness and acceptance of electric drive and other advanced technology vehicles (ATV). The AVTA accomplishes this goal by testing ATVs on test tracks and dynamometers (Baseline Performance testing), as well as in real-world applications (Fleet and Accelerated Reliability testing and public demonstrations). This enables the AVTA to provide Federal and private fleet managers, as well as other potential ATV users, with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance and infrastructure needs so they can make informed decisions about acquiring and operating ATVs. The ATVs currently in testing include vehicles that burn gaseous hydrogen (H2) fuel and hydrogen/CNG (H/CNG) blended fuels in internal combustion engines (ICE), and hybrid electric (HEV), urban electric, and neighborhood electric vehicles. The AVTA is part of DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program.

  7. Advanced Separation Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2006-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was formed in 2001 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy to conduct fundamental research in advanced separation and to develop technologies that can be used to produce coal and minerals in an efficient and environmentally acceptable manner. The CAST consortium consists of seven universities - Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, Montana Tech, University of Utah, University of Nevada-Reno, and New Mexico Tech. The consortium brings together a broad range of expertise to solve problems facing the US coal industry and the mining sector in general. At present, a total of 60 research projects are under way. The article outlines some of these, on topics including innovative dewatering technologies, removal of mercury and other impurities, and modelling of the flotation process. 1 photo.

  8. Maskless, resistless ion beam lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Qing

    2003-03-10

    As the dimensions of semiconductor devices are scaled down, in order to achieve higher levels of integration, optical lithography will no longer be sufficient for the needs of the semiconductor industry. Alternative next-generation lithography (NGL) approaches, such as extreme ultra-violet (EUV), X-ray, electron-beam, and ion projection lithography face some challenging issues with complicated mask technology and low throughput. Among the four major alternative NGL approaches, ion beam lithography is the only one that can provide both maskless and resistless patterning. As such, it can potentially make nano-fabrication much simpler. This thesis investigates a focused ion beam system for maskless, resistless patterning that can be made practical for high-volume production. In order to achieve maskless, resistless patterning, the ion source must be able to produce a variety of ion species. The compact FIB system being developed uses a multicusp plasma ion source, which can generate ion beams of various elements, such as O{sub 2}{sup +}, BF{sub 2}{sup +}, P{sup +} etc., for surface modification and doping applications. With optimized source condition, around 85% of BF{sub 2}{sup +}, over 90% of O{sub 2}{sup +} and P{sup +} have been achieved. The brightness of the multicusp-plasma ion source is a key issue for its application to maskless ion beam lithography. It can be substantially improved by optimizing the source configuration and extractor geometry. Measured brightness of 2 keV He{sup +} beam is as high as 440 A/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} Sr, which represents a 30x improvement over prior work. Direct patterning of Si thin film using a focused O{sub 2}{sup +} ion beam has been investigated. A thin surface oxide film can be selectively formed using 3 keV O{sub 2}{sup +} ions with the dose of 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. The oxide can then serve as a hard mask for patterning of the Si film. The process flow and the experimental results for directly patterned poly-Si features are presented. The formation of shallow pn-junctions in bulk silicon wafers by scanning focused P{sup +} beam implantation at 5 keV is also presented. With implantation dose of around 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}, the electron concentration is about 2.5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and electron mobility is around 200 cm{sup 2}/V{center_dot}s. To demonstrate the suitability of scanning FIB lithography for the manufacture of integrated circuit devices, SOI MOSFET fabrication using the maskless, resistless ion beam lithography is demonstrated. An array of microcolumns can be built by stacking multi-aperture electrode and insulator layers. Because the multicusp plasma source can achieve uniform ion density over a large area, it can be used in conjunction with the array of microcolumns, for massively parallel FIB processing to achieve reasonable exposure throughput.

  9. Herty Advanced Materials Development Center

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Session 1-B: Advancing Alternative Fuels for the Military and Aviation Sector Breakout Session 1: New Developments and Hot Topics Jill Stuckey, Acting Director, Herty Advanced Materials Development Center

  10. Advanced Combustion Turbines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsicloudden DocumentationAccommodationsRegister /Advanced Energy

  11. Advanced Photon Source Upgrade Project

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Mitchell, John; Gibson, Murray; Young, Linda; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2013-04-19

    Upgrade to Advanced Photon Source announced by Department Of Energy. Read more: http://go.usa.gov/ivZ

  12. Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - Advanced Instrumentation, Information and Control Systems Technologies - Reactor Safety Technical Support 2 Mission & Motivation for II&C Pathway * Current...

  13. 3. Advanced Polymer Molecular Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duh, Kevin

    3. Advanced Polymer Molecular Science Advanced Polymer Science 4. Photo-Functional Elements at the Center of Advanced Technology Photonic Device Science 5. Research on Functional Information Elements supporting the Next-generation Information Society Information Device Science EL 6. Energy Electronic

  14. November 16, 2005 MSME in Dynamics and Vibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feeny, Brian

    and Vibration Spring Arrival Spring Semester: 9cr ME 861 Advanced Dynamics 3 cr ME 814 Convective Heat Transfer and Research Topics Dynamics: Kinematics in two and three dimensions, Newton's equations of motion, energy body dynamics. (Shaw, Haddow, Feeny) Vibration: Mathematical modeling of vibration systems using

  15. Quantum effects in spontaneous emission by a relativistic, undulating electron beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. R. M. Robb; R. Bonifacio

    2011-10-27

    Current models of the effect of spontaneous emission on the electron beam dynamics neglect the discreteness of electron recoil associated with photon emission. We present a novel, one-dimensional model of the effect of spontaneous emission on the electron beam dynamics in an undulator both in the classical regime where discrete electron recoil is negligible, and the quantum regime where it is significant. It is shown that in the classical regime, continuous decrease of the average electron energy and diffusive growth of the electron energy spread occurs, in agreement with previous classical models. In the quantum regime, it is shown that the evolution of the electron momentum distribution occurs as discrete momentum groups according to a Poisson distribution. The narrow momentum features of the quantum regime may be useful for generation of coherent radiation, which relies on electron beams having sufficiently narrow momentum/energy distributions.

  16. Nonlinear physics and energetic particle transport features of the beam-plasma instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlevaro, Nakia; Montani, Giovanni; Zonca, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study transport features of a one-dimensional beam-plasma system in the presence of multiple resonances. As a model description of the general problem of a warm energetic particle beam, we assume $n$ cold supra-thermal beams and investigate the self-consistent evolution in the presence of the complete spectrum of nearly degenerate Langmuir modes. A qualitative transport estimation is obtained by computing the Lagrangian Coherent Structures of the system on given temporal scales. This leads to the splitting of the phase space into regions where the local transport processes are relatively faster. The general theoretical framework is applied to the case of the nonlinear dynamics of two cold beams, for which numerical simulation results are illustrated and analyzed.

  17. Sandia Energy - TTU Advanced Doppler Radar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TTU Advanced Doppler Radar Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy SWiFT Facility & Testing TTU Advanced Doppler Radar TTU Advanced Doppler...

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Advanced Combustion Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2014 Advanced Combustion Engine Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Advanced Combustion Engine Annual Progress Report The Advanced Combustion Engine research...

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Advanced Combustion Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Combustion Engine Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Advanced Combustion Engine Annual Progress Report The Advanced Combustion Engine research and...

  20. The Effect of Thermal Load Configurations on Passive Chilled Beam Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Ian 1982-

    2012-11-15

    dynamics (CFD) model was developed in Star CCM+ v6.06 and used for further analysis of the flow field and to predict additional spatial arrangements of the beam, interior dimensions, and heat source configurations. The CFD model implemented a calculation...

  1. Connection between beam polarization and systematical errors in storage ring electric-dipole-moment experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander J. Silenko

    2013-08-12

    Analysis of spin dynamics in storage ring electric-dipole-moment (EDM) experiments ascertains that the use of initial vertical beam polarization allows to cancel spin-dependent systematical errors imitating the EDM effect. While the use of this polarization meets certain difficulties, it should be considered as an alternative or supplementary possibility of fulfilling the EDM experiment.

  2. The impact of sand slugs against beams and plates: Coupled discrete particle/finite element simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    The impact of sand slugs against beams and plates: Coupled discrete particle/finite element/continuum coupling Dynamic loading a b s t r a c t The impact of a slug of dry sand particles against a metallic for shock mitigation. The sand particles interact via a combined linear-spring-and-dashpot law whereas

  3. Beam collimation at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2003-08-12

    Operational and accidental beam losses in hadron colliders can have a serious impact on machine and detector performance, resulting in effects ranging from minor to catastrophic. Principles and realization are described for a reliable beam collimation system required to sustain favorable background conditions in the collider detectors, provide quench stability of superconducting magnets, minimize irradiation of accelerator equipment, maintain operational reliability over the life of the machine, and reduce the impact of radiation on personnel and the environment. Based on detailed Monte-Carlo simulations, such a system has been designed and incorporated in the Tevatron collider. Its performance, comparison to measurements and possible ways to further improve the collimation efficiency are described in detail. Specifics of the collimation systems designed for the SSC, LHC, VLHC, and HERA colliders are discussed.

  4. Neutron beam testing of triblades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalak, Sarah E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du Bois, Andrew J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Storlie, Curtis B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rust, William N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du Bois, David H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Modl, David G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Quinn, Heather M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Blanchard, Sean P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Manuzzato, Andrea [UNIV DEGLI STUDI DI PADOVA ITALY

    2010-12-16

    Four IBM Triblades were tested in the Irradiation of Chips and Electronics facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Triblades include two dual-core Opteron processors and four PowerXCell 8i (Cell) processors. The Triblades were tested in their field configuration while running different applications, with the beam aimed at the Cell processor or the Opteron running the application. Testing focused on the Cell processors, which were tested while running five different applications and an idle condition. While neither application nor Triblade was statistically important in predicting the hazard rate, the hazard rate when the beam was aimed at the Opterons was significantly higher than when it was aimed at the Cell processors. In addition, four Cell blades (one in each Triblade) suffered voltage shorts, leading to their inoperability. The hardware tested is the same as that in the Roadrunner supercomputer.

  5. Oxygen ion-beam microlithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsuo, Y.S.

    1991-08-20

    A method of providing and developing a resist on a substrate for constructing integrated circuit (IC) chips includes the following steps: of depositing a thin film of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon on the substrate and exposing portions of the amorphous silicon to low-energy oxygen ion beams to oxidize the amorphous silicon at those selected portions. The nonoxidized portions are then removed by etching with RF-excited hydrogen plasma. Components of the IC chip can then be constructed through the removed portions of the resist. The entire process can be performed in an in-line vacuum production system having several vacuum chambers. Nitrogen or carbon ion beams can also be used. 5 figures.

  6. Center for Beam Physics, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The Center for Beam Physics is a multi-disciplinary research and development unit in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. At the heart of the Center`s mission is the fundamental quest for mechanisms of acceleration, radiation and focusing of energy. Dedicated to exploring the frontiers of the physics of (and with) particle and photon beams, its primary mission is to promote the science and technology of the production, manipulation, storage and control systems of charged particles and photons. The Center serves this mission via conceptual studies, theoretical and experimental research, design and development, institutional project involvement, external collaborations, association with industry and technology transfer. This roster provides a glimpse at the scientists, engineers, technical support, students, and administrative staff that make up this team and a flavor of their multifaceted activities during 1993.

  7. Beam intensity upgrade at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchionni, A.; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01

    The performance of the Fermilab proton accelerator complex is reviewed. The coming into operation of the NuMI neutrino line and the implementation of slip-stacking to increase the anti-proton production rate has pushed the total beam intensity in the Main Injector up to {approx} 3 x 10{sup 13} protons/pulse. A maximum beam power of 270 kW has been delivered on the NuMI target during the first year of operation. A plan is in place to increase it to 350 kW, in parallel with the operation of the Collider program. As more machines of the Fermilab complex become available with the termination of the Collider operation, a set of upgrades are being planned to reach first 700 kW and then 1.2 MW by reducing the Main Injector cycle time and by implementing proton stacking.

  8. Beam Cooling with ionisation losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Rubbia; A. Ferrari; Y. Kadi; V. Vlachoudis

    2006-02-03

    A novel type of particle "cooling", called Ionization Cooling, is applicable to slow (v of the order of 0.1c) ions stored in a small ring. The many traversals through a thin foil enhance the nuclear reaction probability, in a steady configuration in which ionisation losses are recovered at each turn by a RF-cavity. For a uniform target "foil" the longitudinal momentum spread diverges exponentially since faster (slower) particles ionise less (more) than the average. In order to "cool" also longitudinally, a chromaticity has to be introduced with a wedge shaped "foil". Multiple scattering and straggling are then "cooled" in all three dimensions, with a method similar to the one of synchrotron cooling, but valid for low energy ions. Particles then stably circulate in the beam indefinitely, until they undergo for instance nuclear processes in the thin target foil. This new method is under consideration for the nuclear production of a few MeV/A ion beams. Simple reactions, for instance Li 7 + D Li 8 + p, are more favourably exploited with the heavier ion colliding against a gas-jet D2 target. Kinematics is generally very favourable, with emission angles in a narrow angular cone and a relatively concentrated outgoing energy spectrum which allows an efficient collection as a neutral gas in a tiny volume with a technology at high temperatures perfected at ISOLDE. It is however of a much more general applicability. The method appears capable of producing a "table top" storage ring with an accumulation rate in excess of 10**14 Li-8 radioactive ion/s for possible use for radioactive beams for physics studies (for example for beta-beams) or for therapy.

  9. Advanced ST Plasma Scenario Simulations for NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.E. Kessel; E.J. Synakowski; D.A. Gates; R.W. Harvey; S.M. Kaye; T.K. Mau; J. Menard; C.K. Phillips; G. Taylor; R. Wilson; the NSTX Research Team

    2004-10-28

    Integrated scenario simulations are done for NSTX [National Spherical Torus Experiment] that address four primary milestones for developing advanced ST configurations: high {beta} and high {beta}{sub N} inductive discharges to study all aspects of ST physics in the high-beta regime; non-inductively sustained discharges for flattop times greater than the skin time to study the various current-drive techniques; non-inductively sustained discharges at high {beta} for flattop times much greater than a skin time which provides the integrated advanced ST target for NSTX; and non-solenoidal start-up and plasma current ramp-up. The simulations done here use the Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC) and are based on a discharge 109070. TRANSP analysis of the discharge provided the thermal diffusivities for electrons and ions, the neutral-beam (NB) deposition profile, and other characteristics. CURRAY is used to calculate the High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) heating depositions and current drive. GENRAY/CQL3D is used to establish the heating and CD [current drive] deposition profiles for electron Bernstein waves (EBW). Analysis of the ideal-MHD stability is done with JSOLVER, BALMSC, and PEST2. The simulations indicate that the integrated advanced ST plasma is reachable, obtaining stable plasmas with {beta} {approx} 40% at {beta}{sub N}'s of 7.7-9, I{sub P} = 1.0 MA, and B{sub T} = 0.35 T. The plasma is 100% non-inductive and has a flattop of 4 skin times. The resulting global energy confinement corresponds to a multiplier of H{sub 98(y,2)} = 1.5. The simulations have demonstrated the importance of HHFW heating and CD, EBW off-axis CD, strong plasma shaping, density control, and early heating/H-mode transition for producing and optimizing these plasma configurations.

  10. Electron beam generation in Tevatron electron lenses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Solyak, N.; Tiunov, M.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2006-08-01

    New type of high perveance electron guns with convex cathode has been developed. Three guns described in this article are built to provide transverse electron current density distributions needed for Electron Lenses for beam-beam compensation in the Tevatron collider. The current distribution can be controlled either by the gun geometry or by voltage on a special control electrode located near cathode. We present the designs of the guns and report results of beam measurements on the test bench. Because of their high current density and low transverse temperature of electrons, electron guns of this type can be used in electron cooling and beam-beam compensation devices.

  11. W-Band Sheet Beam Klystron Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheitrum, G.; Caryotakis, G.; Burke, A.; Jensen, A.; Jongewaard, E.a Krasnykh, A.; Neubauer, M.; Phillips, R.; Rauenbuehler, K.; /SLAC

    2011-11-11

    Sheet beam devices provide important advantages for very high power, narrow bandwidth RF sources like accelerator klystrons [1]. Reduced current density and increased surface area result in increased power capabi1ity, reduced magnetic fields for focusing and reduced cathode loading. These advantages are offset by increased complexity, beam formation and transport issues and potential for mode competition in the ovennoded cavities and drift tube. This paper will describe the design issues encountered in developing a 100 kW peak and 2 kW average power sheet beam k1ystron at W-band including beam formation, beam transport, circuit design, circuit fabrication and mode competition.

  12. Fresnel diffraction patterns as accelerating beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yiqi; Zheng, Huaibin; Wu, Zhenkun; Li, Yuanyuan; Lu, Keqing; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that beams originating from Fresnel diffraction patterns are self-accelerating in free space. In addition to accelerating and self-healing, they also exhibit parabolic deceleration property, which is in stark contrast to other accelerating beams. We find that the trajectory of Fresnel paraxial accelerating beams is similar to that of nonparaxial Weber beams. Decelerating and accelerating regions are separated by a critical propagation distance, at which no acceleration is present. During deceleration, the Fresnel diffraction beams undergo self-smoothing, in which oscillations of the diffracted waves gradually focus and smooth out at the critical distance.

  13. Adapting High Brightness Relativistic Electron Beams for Ultrafast Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scoby, Cheyne Matthew

    2012-01-01

    111 Transverse electron beamfemtosecond relativistic electron beams . . Organization offields of a relativistic electron beam. Phys. Rev. Lett. ,

  14. Sandia Energy - Scattering Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scattering Dynamics Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Combustion Chemistry Chemical Dynamics Scattering Dynamics Scattering DynamicsAshley...

  15. Scattering apodizer for laser beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Summers, M.A.; Hagen, W.F.; Boyd, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    A method is disclosed for apodizing a laser beam to smooth out the production of diffraction peaks due to optical discontinuities in the path of the laser beam, such method comprising introduction of a pattern of scattering elements for reducing the peak intensity in the region of such optical discontinuities, such pattern having smoothly tapering boundaries in which the distribution density of the scattering elements is tapered gradually to produce small gradients in the distribution density, such pattern of scattering elements being effective to reduce and smooth out the diffraction effects which would otherwise be produced. The apodizer pattern may be produced by selectively blasting a surface of a transparent member with fine abrasive particles to produce a multitude of minute pits. In one embodiment, a scattering apodizer pattern is employed to overcome diffraction patterns in a multiple element crystal array for harmonic conversion of a laser beam. The interstices and the supporting grid between the crystal elements are obscured by the gradually tapered apodizer pattern of scattering elements.

  16. Scattering apodizer for laser beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Summers, Mark A. (Livermore, CA); Hagen, Wilhelm F. (Livermore, CA); Boyd, Robert D. (Livermore, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A method is disclosed for apodizing a laser beam to smooth out the production of diffraction peaks due to optical discontinuities in the path of the laser beam, such method comprising introduction of a pattern of scattering elements for reducing the peak intensity in the region of such optical discontinuities, such pattern having smoothly tapering boundaries in which the distribution density of the scattering elements is tapered gradually to produce small gradients in the distribution density, such pattern of scattering elements being effective to reduce and smooth out the diffraction effects which would otherwise be produced. The apodizer pattern may be produced by selectively blasting a surface of a transparent member with fine abrasive particles to produce a multitude of minute pits. In one embodiment, a scattering apodizer pattern is employed to overcome diffraction patterns in a multiple element crystal array for harmonic conversion of a laser beam. The interstices and the supporting grid between the crystal elements are obscured by the gradually tapered apodizer pattern of scattering elements.

  17. Search advanced Past issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Articles Basic Choices and Constraints on Long-Term Energy Supplies Population growth and energy demand are exhausting the world's fossil energy supplies, some on the timescale of a single human lifespan. Increasingly Human society, like any system composed of dynamic processes, depends on an external energy source

  18. Reversible Electron Beam Heating for Suppression of Microbunching Instabilities at Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behrens, Christopher; /DESY; Huang, Zhirong; Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

    2012-05-30

    The presence of microbunching instabilities due to the compression of high-brightness electron beams at existing and future x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) results in restrictions on the attainable lasing performance and renders beam imaging with optical transition radiation impossible. The instability can be suppressed by introducing additional energy spread, i.e., heating the electron beam, as demonstrated by the successful operation of the laser heater system at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The increased energy spread is typically tolerable for self-amplified spontaneous emission FELs but limits the effectiveness of advanced FEL schemes such as seeding. In this paper, we present a reversible electron beam heating system based on two transverse deflecting radio-frequency structures (TDSs) upstream and downstream of a magnetic bunch compressor chicane. The additional energy spread is introduced in the first TDS, which suppresses the microbunching instability, and then is eliminated in the second TDS. We show the feasibility of the microbunching gain suppression based on calculations and simulations including the effects of coherent synchrotron radiation. Acceptable electron beam and radio-frequency jitter are identified, and inherent options for diagnostics and on-line monitoring of the electron beam's longitudinal phase space are discussed.

  19. Remote Handling and Maintenance in the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgess, Thomas W; Aaron, Adam M; Carroll, Adam J; DeVore, Joe R; Giuliano, Dominic R; Graves, Van B; Bennett, Richard P; Bollen, Georg; Cole, Daniel F.; Ronningen, Reginald M.; Schein, Mike E; Zeller, Albert F

    2011-01-01

    Michigan State University (MSU) in East Lansing, MI was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to design and establish a Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), a cutting-edge research facility to advance the understanding of rare nuclear isotopes and the evolution of the cosmos. The research conducted at the FRIB will involve experimentation with intense beams of rare isotopes within a well-shielded target cell that will result in activation and contamination of components. The target cell is initially hands-on accessible after shutdown and a brief cool-down period. Personnel are expected to have hands-on access to the tops of shielded component modules with the activated in-beam sections suspended underneath. The modules are carefully designed to include steel shielding for protecting personnel during these hand-on operations. However, as the facility has greater levels of activation and contamination, a bridge mounted servomaniputor may be added to the cell, to perform the disconnecting of services to the component assemblies. Dexterous remote handling and exchange of the modularized activated components is completed at a shielded window workstation with a pair of master-slave manipulators. The primary components requiring exchange or maintenance are the production target, the beam wedge filter, the beam dump, and the beam focusing and bending magnets. This paper provides an overview of the FRIB Target Facility remote handling and maintenance design requirements, concepts, and techniques.

  20. A Mathematical Devoloped Model for Light Ion Beam Interactions with Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirfayzi, S R

    2011-01-01

    Light Ion Beams are providing an efficient system for high energy applications using confinement reaction (ICF). This paper will demonstrate the mathematical properties of ion beams leaving ICF reactors and hitting a solid target. A single Hydrogen heavy nucleus current has been demonstrated using Child-Langmuir in an infinite radius as it leaves the reactor chamber. The maximum energy emission has been recorded by examining the total energy loss of the beam pulse using Bethe-Bloch (dE/dx) where it hits the target and forming plasma. Also the target has been analysed by measuring the induction energy, drift and collision current. A set of formula has been developed for charge and current neutrality, the ion beam is being rotated in azimuthal direction, this induces self-magnetism in this purposes. The concept of self-magnetism Er and Br also has been introduced to the rotating-propagating beam inverse to the beam current through ionized and neutral gas. This has been advanced by developing a set of magnetic f...

  1. Generation of low-divergence laser beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-09-14

    Apparatus for transforming a conventional beam of coherent light, having a Gaussian energy distribution and relatively high divergence, into a beam in which the energy distribution approximates a single, non-zero-order Bessel function and which therefore has much lower divergence. The apparatus comprises a zone plate having transmitting and reflecting zones defined by the pattern of light interference produced by the combination of a beam of coherent light with a Gaussian energy distribution and one having such a Bessel distribution. The interference pattern between the two beams is a concentric array of multiple annuli, and is preferably recorded as a hologram. The hologram is then used to form the transmitting and reflecting zones by photo-etching portions of a reflecting layer deposited on a plate made of a transmitting material. A Bessel beam, containing approximately 50% of the energy of the incident beam, is produced by passing a Gaussian beam through such a Bessel zone plate. The reflected beam, also containing approximately 50% of the incident beam energy and having a Bessel energy distribution, can be redirected in the same direction and parallel to the transmitted beam. Alternatively, a filter similar to the Bessel zone plate can be placed within the resonator cavity of a conventional laser system having a front mirror and a rear mirror, preferably axially aligned with the mirrors and just inside the front mirror to generate Bessel energy distribution light beams at the laser source. 11 figures.

  2. Particle beam injector system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guethlein, Gary

    2013-06-18

    Methods and devices enable coupling of a charged particle beam to a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. Coupling of the charged particle beam is accomplished, at least in-part, by relying on of sensitivity of the input phase space acceptance of the radio frequency quadrupole to the angle of the input charged particle beam. A first electric field across a beam deflector deflects the particle beam at an angle that is beyond the acceptance angle of the radio frequency quadrupole. By momentarily reversing or reducing the established electric field, a narrow portion of the charged particle beam is deflected at an angle within the acceptance angle of the radio frequency quadrupole. In another configuration, beam is directed at an angle within the acceptance angle of the radio frequency quadrupole by the first electric field and is deflected beyond the acceptance angle of the radio frequency quadrupole due to the second electric field.

  3. Beam Echoes in the CERN SPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brüning, Oliver Sim; Ruggiero, F; Scandale, Walter; Shaposhnikova, Elena; Stellfeld, D

    1998-01-01

    Longitudinal echo signals have been produced in the CERN SPS by exciting a proton beam at 120~GeV/c with two short RF pulses separated by a suitable time-delay. The aim of the experiments was to confirm the analytical predictions for beam echoes in the SPS and to probe the applicability of beam echoes for a measurement of the energy distribution and diffusion coefficients in the accelerator. We summarise here the results obtained with bunched and un-bunched beams. For an un-bunched beam, the excitation frequencies are at different harmonics of the revolution frequency and result in an echo response at the difference frequency of the two RF kicks. For the case of a bunched beam, the RF kicks are adjusted to excite the quadrupole mode of the bunch motion and the beam echo response can also be observed as a quadrupole mode.

  4. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apostolos A. Nikolopoulos; Santosh K. Gangwal; William J. McMichael; Jeffrey W. Portzer

    2003-01-01

    Conventional sulfur removal in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants involves numerous steps: COS (carbonyl sulfide) hydrolysis, amine scrubbing/regeneration, Claus process, and tail-gas treatment. Advanced sulfur removal in IGCC systems involves typically the use of zinc oxide-based sorbents. The sulfides sorbent is regenerated using dilute air to produce a dilute SO{sub 2} (sulfur dioxide) tail gas. Under previous contracts the highly effective first generation Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) for catalytic reduction of this SO{sub 2} tail gas to elemental sulfur was developed. This process is currently undergoing field-testing. In this project, advanced concepts were evaluated to reduce the number of unit operations in sulfur removal and recovery. Substantial effort was directed towards developing sorbents that could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur in an Advanced Hot Gas Process (AHGP). Development of this process has been described in detail in Appendices A-F. RTI began the development of the Single-step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP) to eliminate the use of sorbents and multiple reactors in sulfur removal and recovery. This process showed promising preliminary results and thus further process development of AHGP was abandoned in favor of SSRP. The SSRP is a direct Claus process that consists of injecting SO{sub 2} directly into the quenched coal gas from a coal gasifier, and reacting the H{sub 2}S-SO{sub 2} mixture over a selective catalyst to both remove and recover sulfur in a single step. The process is conducted at gasifier pressure and 125 to 160 C. The proposed commercial embodiment of the SSRP involves a liquid phase of molten sulfur with dispersed catalyst in a slurry bubble-column reactor (SBCR).

  5. Horizontal Advanced Tensiometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2004-06-22

    An horizontal advanced tensiometer is described that allows the monitoring of the water pressure of soil positions, particularly beneath objects or materials that inhibit the use of previous monitoring wells. The tensiometer includes a porous cup, a pressure transducer (with an attached gasket device), an adaptive chamber, at least one outer guide tube which allows access to the desired horizontal position, a transducer wire, a data logger and preferably an inner guide tube and a specialized joint which provides pressure on the inner guide tube to maintain the seal between the gasket of the transducer and the adaptive chamber.

  6. Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advance Manufacture of Reflectors fact sheet describes a SunShot Initiative project being conducted research team led by the University of Arizona, which is working to develop a novel method for shaping float glass. The technique developed by this research team can drastically reduce the time required for the shaping step. By enabling mass production of solar concentrating mirrors at high speed, this project should lead to improved performance and as much as a 40% reduction in manufacturing costs for reflectors made in very high volume.

  7. Advanced NTR options. [Ta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.W.; Mills, J.C.; Glass, J.F.; Tu, W. (Rockwell International/Rocketdyne Division, 6633 Canoga Avenue, MS HB23 Canoga Park, California 81303 (US))

    1991-01-05

    Advanced NTR concepts which offer performance improvements over the ROVER/NERVA designs have been investigated. In addition, the deliverable performance of low pressure operation and materials issues have been investigated. Based on current experience, a maximum exit gas temperature of 3200 K is likely achievable with a ZrC based PBR design. At 3200 K a low pressure NTR would have marginal performance advantage (Isp) over a high pressure system. If tantalum or other high melting point carbides are used then an exit gas temperature of 3500 K may be feasible. At 3500 K low pressure operation offers more significant performance improvements which could outweigh associated size and mass penalties.

  8. AdvAnced

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge KiosksAboutHelp & Reference Users AdvAnced test

  9. Advanced Scientific Computing Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge KiosksAboutHelp & ReferenceAdvancedWorkshops

  10. Advanced Studies Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge KiosksAboutHelp &Advanced Simulation andInstitute

  11. Advanced Commercial Buildings Initiative

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing ToolInternationalReportOfficeAcqguide18pt0Department ofHigh Efficiency Light DutyAdvanced

  12. Advanced Feedstock Supply System

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing ToolInternationalReportOfficeAcqguide18pt0Department ofHigh2 DOEFactory-Built 1 |Advanced

  13. Sandia Energy - Advanced Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni >Scientific andInstituteAdvanced Bit

  14. Model-independent analysis of the Fermilab Tevatron turn-by-turn beam position monitor measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrenko, A.V.; Valishev, A.A.; Lebedev, V.A.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Coherent transverse beam oscillations in the Tevatron were analyzed with the model-independent analysis (MIA) technique. This allowed one to obtain the model-independent values of coupled betatron amplitudes, phase advances, and dispersion function around the ring from a single dipole kick measurement. In order to solve the MIA mode mixing problem which limits the accuracy of determination of the optical functions, we have developed a new technique of rotational MIA mode untangling. The basic idea is to treat each beam position monitor (BPM) as two BPMs separated in a ring by exactly one turn. This leads to a simple criterion of MIA mode separation: the betatron phase advance between any BPM and its counterpart shifted by one turn should be equal to the betatron tune and therefore should not depend on the BPM position in the ring. Furthermore, we describe a MIA-based technique to locate vibrating magnets in a storage ring.

  15. Integral window/photon beam position monitor and beam flux detectors for x-ray beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shu, Deming (Darien, IL); Kuzay, Tuncer M. (Naperville, IL)

    1995-01-01

    A monitor/detector assembly in a synchrotron for either monitoring the position of a photon beam or detecting beam flux may additionally function as a vacuum barrier between the front end and downstream segment of the beamline in the synchrotron. A base flange of the monitor/detector assembly is formed of oxygen free copper with a central opening covered by a window foil that is fused thereon. The window foil is made of man-made materials, such as chemical vapor deposition diamond or cubic boron nitrate and in certain configurations includes a central opening through which the beams are transmitted. Sensors of low atomic number materials, such as aluminum or beryllium, are laid on the window foil. The configuration of the sensors on the window foil may be varied depending on the function to be performed. A contact plate of insulating material, such as aluminum oxide, is secured to the base flange and is thereby clamped against the sensor on the window foil. The sensor is coupled to external electronic signal processing devices via a gold or silver lead printed onto the contact plate and a copper post screw or alternatively via a copper screw and a copper spring that can be inserted through the contact plate and coupled to the sensors. In an alternate embodiment of the monitor/detector assembly, the sensors are sandwiched between the window foil of chemical vapor deposition diamond or cubic boron nitrate and a front foil made of similar material.

  16. Using time separation of signals to obtain independent proton and antiproton beam position measurements around the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webber, R.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    Independent position measurement of the counter-circulating proton and antiproton beams in the Tevatron, never supported by the original Tevatron Beam Position Monitor (BPM) system, presents a challenge to upgrading that system. This paper discusses the possibilities and complications of using time separation of proton and antiproton signals at the numerous BPM locations and for the dynamic Tevatron operating conditions. Results of measurements using one such method are presented.

  17. Particle beam fusion progress report for 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, M.A.

    1994-08-01

    This report summarizes the progress on the pulsed power approach to inertial confinement fusion. In 1989, the authors achieved a proton focal intensity of 5 TW/cm{sup 2} on PBFA-II in a 15-cm-radius applied magnetic-field (applied-B) ion diode. This is an improvement by a factor of 4 compared to previous PBFA-II experiments. They completed development of the three-dimensional (3-D), electromagnetic, particle-in-cell code QUICKSILVER and obtained the first 3-D simulations of an applied-B ion diode. The simulations, together with analytic theory, suggest that control of electromagnetic instabilities could reduce ion divergence. In experiments using a lithium fluoride source, they delivered 26 kJ of lithium energy to the diode axis. Rutherford-scattered ion diagnostics have been developed and tested using a conical foil located inside the diode. They can now obtain energy density profiles by using range filters and recording ion images on nuclear track recording film. Timing uncertainties in power flow experiments on PBFA-II have been reduced by a factor of 5. They are investigating three plasma opening switches that use magnetic fields to control and confine the injected plasma. These new switches provide better power flow than the standard plasma erosion switch. Advanced pulsed-power fusion drivers will require extraction-geometry applied-B ion diodes. During this reporting period, progress was made in evaluating the generation, transport, and focus of multiple ion beams in an extraction geometry and in assessing the probable damage to a target chamber first wall.

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