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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced automotive fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Energy Energy Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 1999 FY 1999 FY 1999 FY 1999 Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation Technologies Office of Transportation Technologies Office of Transportation Technologies Office of Transportation Technologies Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies

2

Compatibility of alternative fuels with advanced automotive gas-turbine and Stirling engines. A literature survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of alternative fuels in advanced automotive gas turbine and Stirling engines is discussed on the basis of a literature survey. These alternative engines are briefly described, and the aspects that will influence fuel selection are identified. Fuel properties and combustion properties are discussed, with consideration given to advanced materials and components. Alternative fuels from petroleum, coal, oil shale, alcohol, and hydrogen are discussed, and some background is given about the origin and production of these fuels. Fuel requirements for automotive gas turbine and Stirling engines are developed, and the need for certain research efforts is discussed. Future research efforts planned at Lewis are described. 52 references.

Cairelli, J.; Horvath, D.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Lightweighting Automotive Materials for Increased Fuel Efficiency and Delivering Advanced Modeling and Simulation Capabilities to U.S. Manufacturers  

SciTech Connect

Abstract The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), to bring together research and development (R&D) collaborations to develop and accelerate the knowledgebase and infrastructure for lightweighting materials and manufacturing processes for their use in structural and applications in the automotive sector. The purpose/importance of this DOE program: • 2016 CAFÉ standards. • Automotive industry technology that shall adopt the insertion of lightweighting material concepts towards manufacturing of production vehicles. • Development and manufacture of advanced research tools for modeling and simulation (M&S) applications to reduce manufacturing and material costs. • U.S. competitiveness that will help drive the development and manufacture of the next generation of materials. NCMS established a focused portfolio of applied R&D projects utilizing lightweighting materials for manufacture into automotive structures and components. Areas that were targeted in this program: • Functionality of new lightweighting materials to meet present safety requirements. • Manufacturability using new lightweighting materials. • Cost reduction for the development and use of new lightweighting materials. The automotive industry’s future continuously evolves through innovation, and lightweight materials are key in achieving a new era of lighter, more efficient vehicles. Lightweight materials are among the technical advances needed to achieve fuel/energy efficiency and reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions: • Establish design criteria methodology to identify the best materials for lightweighting. • Employ state-of-the-art design tools for optimum material development for their specific applications. • Match new manufacturing technology to production volume. • Address new process variability with new production-ready processes.

Hale, Steve

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

4

G. Uniform Engine Fuels and Automotive Lubricants ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... dherence to automotive manufacturers' recommended requirements ... in Flexible Fuel Vehicles (FFV) Only ... states, “Consult Vehicle Manufacturer Fuel ...

2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

5

Advanced onboard storage concepts for natural gas-fueled automotive vehicles  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was the evaluation, both through experimentation and a literature review, of several advanced concepts for storing natural gas at reduced pressure. The advanced concepts included adsorption on high surface area carbon, adsorption in high porosity zeolite, storage in clathration compounds, and storage by dissolution in liquid solvents. Results indicated that high surface area carbons with high packing density were the best low pressure storage mediums. A simple mathematical model was used to compare adsorption storage on a state-of-the-art carbon with compression storage. The model indicated that a vehicle using adsorption storage of natural gas at 3.6 MPa will have 36% of the range, on the EPA city cycle, of a vehicle operating on a compression storage system having the same physical size and a peak storage pressure of 21 MPa. However, preliminary experiments and current literature suggest that the storage capacity of state-of-the-art carbons could be improved by as much as 50%, and that adsorption systems having a capacity equal to compression storage at 14 MPa are possible without exceeding a maximum pressure of 3.6 MPa.

Remick, R.J.; Elkins, R.H.; Camara, E.H.; Bulicz, T.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

G. Uniform Engine Fuels, Petroleum Products, and Automotive ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1.33. Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG). ... LNG automotive fuel shall be labeled with its automotive fuel rating in accordance with 16 CFR Part 306. ...

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

7

GATE Center for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems at Virginia Tech  

SciTech Connect

The Virginia Tech GATE Center for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems (CAFCS) achieved the following objectives in support of the domestic automotive industry: â?¢ Expanded and updated fuel cell and vehicle technologies education programs; â?¢ Conducted industry directed research in three thrust areas â?? development and characterization of materials for PEM fuel cells; performance and durability modeling for PEM fuel cells; and fuel cell systems design and optimization, including hybrid and plug-in hybrid fuel cell vehicles; â?¢ Developed MS and Ph.D. engineers and scientists who are pursuing careers related to fuel cells and automotive applications; â?¢ Published research results that provide industry with new knowledge which contributes to the advancement of fuel cell and vehicle systems commercialization. With support from the Dept. of Energy, the CAFCS upgraded existing graduate course offerings; introduced a hands-on laboratory component that make use of Virginia Techâ??s comprehensive laboratory facilities, funded 15 GATE Fellowships over a five year period; and expanded our program of industry interaction to improve student awareness of challenges and opportunities in the automotive industry. GATE Center graduate students have a state-of-the-art research experience preparing them for a career to contribute to the advancement fuel cell and vehicle technologies.

Nelson, Douglas

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

8

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automotive and MHE Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on AddThis.com...

9

Status and Prospects of the Global Automotive Fuel Cell Industry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNLTM-2013222 Energy and Transportation Science Division Center for Transportation Analysis STATUS AND PROSPECTS OF THE GLOBAL AUTOMOTIVE FUEL CELL INDUSTRY AND PLANS FOR...

10

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY DELPHI AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEMS FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DELPHI AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEMS FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DELPHI AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEMS FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF PATENT RIGHTS TO INVENTIONS MADE UNDER SUBCONTRACT QZ001 UNDER COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-NT0003894; W(A)-09-061 ; CH1525 Delphi Automotive Systems LLC (Delphi), requests an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions made under the above subcontract. Delphi is a subcontractor to United Technologies under the referenced cooperative agreement. The purpose of the cooperative agreement is the development of solid oxide fuel (SOFC) cell and stack technology suitable for use in highly-efficient, economically-competitive central generation power plant facilities fueled by coal synthesis gas, (syngas). According to its response to question 2 of the petition, Delphi states that development of this technology will significantly advance the nation's

11

TODAY: Secretary Chu and Senator Stabenow to Announce Advanced Automotive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TODAY: Secretary Chu and Senator Stabenow to Announce Advanced TODAY: Secretary Chu and Senator Stabenow to Announce Advanced Automotive Technology Loan for Michigan Manufacturer TODAY: Secretary Chu and Senator Stabenow to Announce Advanced Automotive Technology Loan for Michigan Manufacturer July 13, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - Today, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will join U.S. Senators Carl Levin and Debbie Stabenow on a conference call to make an announcement regarding an advanced automotive technology loan that is expected to create jobs in Michigan, increase manufacturing, and make American automakers more competitive. WHO: Secretary of Energy Steven Chu Senator Carl Levin Senator Debbie Stabenow WHAT: Press Conference Call WHEN: Wednesday, July 13, 2011 at 11:30 AM EDT RSVP: Please contact Karissa Marcum at karissa.marcum@hq.doe.gov to receive call-in

12

Alternative and Advanced Fuels  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

There are a variety of alternative and advanced fuels available, which are used to fuel alternative and advanced vehicles. Learn more about:

13

Asola Advanced and Automotive Solar Systems GmbH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Asola Advanced and Automotive Solar Systems GmbH Asola Advanced and Automotive Solar Systems GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name Asola Advanced and Automotive Solar Systems GmbH Place Erfurt, Germany Zip D-99428 Sector Solar Product German manufacturer of PV modules and spherical solar sun roofs for the automotive industry. References Asola Advanced and Automotive Solar Systems GmbH[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Asola Advanced and Automotive Solar Systems GmbH is a company located in Erfurt, Germany . References ↑ "Asola Advanced and Automotive Solar Systems GmbH" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Asola_Advanced_and_Automotive_Solar_Systems_GmbH&oldid=34237

14

Advanced Automotive Technologies annual report to Congress, fiscal year 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report serves to inform the United States Congress on the progress for fiscal year 1996 of programs under the Department of Energy`s Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies (OAAT). This document complies with the legislative requirement to report on the implementation of Title III of the Automotive Propulsion Research and Development Act of 1978. Also reported are related activities performed under subsequent relevant legislation without specific reporting requirements. Furthermore, this report serves as a vital means of communication from the Department to all public and private sector participants. Specific requirements that are addressed in this report are: Discussion of how each research and development contract, grant, or project funded under the authority of this Act satisfies the requirements of each subsection; Current comprehensive program definition for implementing Title III; Evaluation of the state of automotive propulsion system research and development in the United States; Number and amount of contracts and grants awarded under Title III; Analysis of the progress made in developing advanced automotive propulsion system technology; and Suggestions for improvements in automotive propulsion system research and development, including recommendations for legislation.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

REQUEST BY MERIDIAN AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEMS FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statement of Considerations Statement of Considerations REQUEST BY MERIDIAN AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEMS FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS MADE IN THE COURSE OF OR UNDER A SUBTIER CONTRACT UNDER UT-BATTELLE, LLC SUBCONTRACT NO. 4000010928, UNDER DOE PRIME CONTRACT DE-AC05- 00OR22725; DOE WAIVER DOCKET W(A)-2003-037; [ORO-780] Meridian Automotive Systems, Inc. (Meridian) has made a request for an advance waiver to worldwide rights in Subject Inventions made in the course of or under a subtier contract under UT-Battelle, LLC Subcontract No. 4000010928 with Volvo Trucks North America under Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DE-AC05-00OR22725. The scope of work of this project is for the utilization of Carbon Fiber Sheet Molding Compound (SMC) Materials for

16

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY DELPHI AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEMS, LLC FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UGCP-HO P.04,-07 UGCP-HO P.04,-07 * * STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY DELPHI AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEMS, LLC FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC36- 04G014319 ENTITLED "SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL DEVELOPMENT FOR AUXILLARY POWER IN HEAVY DUTY VEHICLE APPLICATIONS"; W(A)-04-082; CH-1261 As set out in the attached waiver petition and in subsequent discussions with DOE patent counsel, Delphi Automotive Systems, LLC (Delphi) has requested an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions made under the above-identified cooperative agreement by its employees and its subcontractors' employees, regardless of tier, except inventions made by subcontractors eligible to retain title to inventions pursuant to P.L.

17

G. Uniform Engine Fuels and Automotive Lubricants ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 3.6. Fuel Oils. 3.6.1. Labeling of Grade Required. – Fuel Oil shall be identified by the grades of No. ... 3.10. Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG). ...

2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

18

Advanced Fuels Synthesis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Fuels Synthesis Advanced Fuels Synthesis Coal and Coal/Biomass to Liquids Advanced Fuels Synthesis The Advanced Fuels Synthesis Key Technology is focused on catalyst and reactor optimization for producing liquid hydrocarbon fuels from coal/biomass mixtures, supports the development and demonstration of advanced separation technologies, and sponsors research on novel technologies to convert coal/biomass to liquid fuels. Active projects within the program portfolio include the following: Fischer-Tropsch fuels synthesis Small Scale Coal Biomass Liquids Production Using Highly Selective Fischer Tropsch Catalyst Small Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal/Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels Via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Coal Fuels Alliance: Design and Construction of Early Lead Mini Fischer-Tropsch Refinery

19

Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

20

Tribopolymerization: An advanced lubrication concept for automotive engines and systems of the future  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced lubrication technologies based on the concept of tribopolymerization as a mechanism of boundary lubrication are described. Advantages of this approach as well as potential applications which could have an impact on the design, manufacture, and performance of existing and future automotive engines are presented and discussed. Tribopolymerization, a novel concept of molecular design developed by Furey and Kajdas, involves the continuous formation of thin polymeric films on rubbing surfaces; the protective films formed are self-replenishing. The antiwear compounds developed from this technology are effective with metals as well as ceramics and in the liquid as well as vapor phases. Furthermore, they are ashless and contain no harmful phosphorus or sulfur; and many are biodegradable. Thus, potential applications of this technology are diverse and include a variety of cost/performance/energy/environmental advantages. Examples include the following: (a) machining and cutting applications using thin films to reduce friction and ceramic tool wear; (b) the lubrication of ceramic engines (e.g., low heat rejection diesel engines) or ceramic components; (c) the development of ashless lubricants for existing and future automotive engines to reduce exhaust catalyst poisoning and environmental emissions; (d) ashless antiwear or ``lubricity`` additives for fuels, including gasoline, diesel and jet fuel; (e) vapor phase applications of this technology to high temperature gaseous systems or to fuel injector wear problems associated with the use of natural gas engines; and (f) the use of the concept of tribopolymerization as an enabling technology in the development of new engines and new automotive propulsion systems.

Furey, M.J. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States); Kajdas, C. [Warsaw Univ. of Technology, Plock (Poland); Kaltenbach, K.W. [Triad Investors Corp., Baltimore, MD (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced automotive fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Demonstration of dissociated methanol as an automotive fuel: system performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results are presented of system performance testing of an automotive system devised to provide hydrogen-rich gases to an internal combustion engine by dissociating methanol on board the vehicle. The dissociation of methanol absorbs heat from the engine exhaust and increases the lower heating value of the fuel by 22%. The engine thermal efficiency is increased by raising the compression ratio and burning with excess air.

Finegold, J. G.; Karpuk, M. E.; McKinnon, J. T.; Passamaneck, R.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

LPG fuel supply system. [Patent for automotive  

SciTech Connect

A fuel supply system for an internal combustion engine operated on gaseous fuels, for example, liquid petroleum gas (Lpg). The system includes a housing having a chamber for vaporizing liquid gas, including means for heating the vaporizing chamber. Also included in the housing is a mixing chamber for mixing the vaporized gas with incoming air for delivery to the intake manifold of an internal combustion engine through a standard carburetor. The fuel supply system includes means for mounting the system on the carburetor, including means for supporting an air filter circumjacent the mixing chamber.

Pierson, W.V.

1982-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

23

Status of Automotive Fuel Cell Development: Applicability to Stationary Fuel Cell Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developers of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology -- targeting the automotive as well as the stationary markets -- are making significant strides in performance improvements and cost reductions. In concept, PEMFC systems could either replace internal combustion engine drivetrains or power auxiliary loads that would otherwise be powered by propulsion power plants. This report describes how automotive PEMFC development and stationary power PEMFC development will complement each other.

2002-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

24

Automotive Fuel Processor Development and Demonstration with Fuel Cell Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential for fuel cell systems to improve energy efficiency and reduce emissions over conventional power systems has generated significant interest in fuel cell technologies. While fuel cells are being investigated for use in many applications such as stationary power generation and small portable devices, transportation applications present some unique challenges for fuel cell technology. Due to their lower operating temperature and non-brittle materials, most transportation work is focusing on fuel cells using proton exchange membrane (PEM) technology. Since PEM fuel cells are fueled by hydrogen, major obstacles to their widespread use are the lack of an available hydrogen fueling infrastructure and hydrogen's relatively low energy storage density, which leads to a much lower driving range than conventional vehicles. One potential solution to the hydrogen infrastructure and storage density issues is to convert a conventional fuel such as gasoline into hydrogen onboard the vehicle using a fuel processor. Figure 2 shows that gasoline stores roughly 7 times more energy per volume than pressurized hydrogen gas at 700 bar and 4 times more than liquid hydrogen. If integrated properly, the fuel processor/fuel cell system would also be more efficient than traditional engines and would give a fuel economy benefit while hydrogen storage and distribution issues are being investigated. Widespread implementation of fuel processor/fuel cell systems requires improvements in several aspects of the technology, including size, startup time, transient response time, and cost. In addition, the ability to operate on a number of hydrocarbon fuels that are available through the existing infrastructure is a key enabler for commercializing these systems. In this program, Nuvera Fuel Cells collaborated with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop efficient, low-emission, multi-fuel processors for transportation applications. Nuvera's focus was on (1) developing fuel processor subsystems (fuel reformer, CO cleanup, and exhaust cleanup) that were small enough to integrate on a vehicle and (2) evaluating the fuel processor system performance for hydrogen production, efficiency, thermal integration, startup, durability and ability to integrate with fuel cells. Nuvera carried out a three-part development program that created multi-fuel (gasoline, ethanol, natural gas) fuel processing systems and investigated integration of fuel cell / fuel processor systems. The targets for the various stages of development were initially based on the goals of the DOE's Partnership for New Generation Vehicles (PNGV) initiative and later on the Freedom Car goals. The three parts are summarized below with the names based on the topic numbers from the original Solicitation for Financial Assistance Award (SFAA).

Nuvera Fuel Cells

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY DELPHI AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEMS FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2NT41246; W(A) 03-021 ; CH-1147 2NT41246; W(A) 03-021 ; CH-1147 As set out in the attached waiver petition and in subsequent discussions with DOE Patent Counsel, Delphi Automotive Systems, L.L.C (Delphi) has requested an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions made under the above subject cooperative agreement. The waiver will apply to inventions made by Delphi employees and its subcontractors' employees, regardless of tier, except inventions made by subcontractors eligible to retain title to inventions pursuant to P.L. 96-517, as amended, and National Laboratories. Referring to item 2 of Delphi's petition, the purpose of this agreement is to develop 5 kW Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) power systems for a range of fuels and applications. These

26

Advanced Cruciform Testing in the Center for Automotive ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, A new high capacity cruciform machine has been recently installed and commissioned in the Center for Automotive Lightweighting at NIST.

27

Component Development - Advanced Fuel Cells for Transportation Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Report summarizes results of second phase of development of Vairex air compressor/expander for automotive fuel cell power systems. Project included optimizing key system performance parameters, as well as reducing number of components and the project cost, size and weight of the air system. Objectives were attained. Advanced prototypes are in commercial test environments.

Butler, William

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

28

Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer Choice Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer Choice Model Agency/Company /Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer Choice Model, MA3T Project U.S. consumer demand for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) in competition among various light-duty vehicle technologies for hundreds of market segments based and multiple regions. For more information, contact the ORNL Energy and Transportation Science Division at http://www.ornl.gov/sci/ees/etsd/contactus.shtml References Retrieved from

29

Advanced Cladding Materials for Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel Cycle Research and Development. Advanced Cladding Materials for. Fuels. Stuart A. Maloy. M. Nastasi, A. Misra. Los Alamos National Laboratory.

30

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY DELPHI AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEMS FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1NT41022; W(A)-03-022; CH-1146 1NT41022; W(A)-03-022; CH-1146 As set out in the attached waiver petition and in subsequent discussions with DOE Patent Counsel, Delphi Automotive Systems, L.L.C (Delphi) has requested an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions made under the above subject cooperative agreement. The waiver will apply to inventions made by Delphi employees and its subcontractors' employees, regardless of tier, except inventions made by subcontractors eligible to retain title to inventions pursuant to P.L. 96-517, as amended, and National Laboratories. Referring to item 2 of Delphi's petition, the purpose of this agreement is the development of interconnects for solid oxide fuel cell systems. Delphi will investigate materials for the metal

31

Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program: Center of Automotive Technology Excellence in Advanced Hybrid Vehicle Technology at West Virginia University  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the technical and educational achievements of the Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center at West Virginia University (WVU), which was created to emphasize Advanced Hybrid Vehicle Technology. The Center has supported the graduate studies of 17 students in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and the Lane Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering. These students have addressed topics such as hybrid modeling, construction of a hybrid sport utility vehicle (in conjunction with the FutureTruck program), a MEMS-based sensor, on-board data acquisition for hybrid design optimization, linear engine design and engine emissions. Courses have been developed in Hybrid Vehicle Design, Mobile Source Powerplants, Advanced Vehicle Propulsion, Power Electronics for Automotive Applications and Sensors for Automotive Applications, and have been responsible for 396 hours of graduate student coursework. The GATE program also enhanced the WVU participation in the U.S. Department of Energy Student Design Competitions, in particular FutureTruck and Challenge X. The GATE support for hybrid vehicle technology enhanced understanding of hybrid vehicle design and testing at WVU and encouraged the development of a research agenda in heavy-duty hybrid vehicles. As a result, WVU has now completed three programs in hybrid transit bus emissions characterization, and WVU faculty are leading the Transportation Research Board effort to define life cycle costs for hybrid transit buses. Research and enrollment records show that approximately 100 graduate students have benefited substantially from the hybrid vehicle GATE program at WVU.

Nigle N. Clark

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

32

Final report: U.S. competitive position in automotive technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Patent data are presented and analyzed to assess the U.S. competitive position in eleven advanced automotive technology categories, including automotive fuel cells, hydrogen storage, advanced batteries, hybrid electric vehicles and others. Inventive activity in most of the technologies is found to be growing at a rapid pace, particularly in advanced batteries, automotive fuel cells and ultracapacitors. The U.S. is the clear leader in automotive fuel cells, on-board hydrogen storage and light weight materials. Japan leads in advanced batteries, hybrid electric vehicles, ultracapacitors, and appears to be close to overtaking the U.S. in other areas of power electronics.

Albert, Michael B.; Cheney, Margaret; Thomas, Patrick; Kroll, Peter

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

33

Engineering-economic analyses of automotive fuel economy potential in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Over the past 25 years more than 20 major studies have examined the technological potential to improve the fuel economy of passenger cars and light trucks in the US. The majority has used technology/cost analysis, a combination of analytical methods from the disciplines of economics and automotive engineering. In this paper the authors describe the key elements of this methodology, discuss critical issues responsible for the often widely divergent estimates produced by different studies, review the history of its use, and present results from six recent assessments. Whereas early studies tended to confine their scope to the potential of proven technology over a 10-year time period, more recent studies have focused on advanced technologies, raising questions about how best to include the likelihood of technological change. The paper concludes with recommendations for further research.

Greene, D.L.; DeCicco, J.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal

35

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Acquisition Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Acquisition Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Acquisition Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Acquisition Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Acquisition Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Acquisition Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Acquisition Requirements on AddThis.com...

36

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Acquisition Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Acquisition Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Acquisition Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Acquisition Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Acquisition Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Acquisition Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Acquisition Requirements on AddThis.com...

37

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Acquisition Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Acquisition Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Acquisition Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Acquisition Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Acquisition Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Acquisition Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Acquisition Requirements on AddThis.com...

38

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Advanced Combustion and Fuels...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Combustion and Fuels Projects NREL's advanced combustion and fuels projects bridge fundamental chemical kinetics and engine research to investigate how new vehicle fuels...

39

Advanced Fuels Campaign 2012 Accomplishments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) under the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program is responsible for developing fuels technologies to support the various fuel cycle options defined in the DOE Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap, Report to Congress, April 2010. The fiscal year 2012 (FY 2012) accomplishments are highlighted below. Kemal Pasamehmetoglu is the National Technical Director for AFC.

Not Listed

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

REQUEST BY UNITED STATES AUTOMOTIVE MATERIALS PARTNERSHIP (USAMP) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STATES AUTOMOTIVE MATERIALS STATES AUTOMOTIVE MATERIALS PARTNERSHIP (USAMP) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS MADE IN THE PERFORMANCE OF DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NUMBER DE-FC05-960R22363 AND FOR SUBJECT INVENTIONS MADE UNDER ITS SUBCONTRACTS WITH LARGE, FOR- PROFIT BUSINESSES; DOE WAIVER DOCKET W(A)-95-001 [ORO- 593] USAMP has made a timely request for an advance waiver to worldwide rights in Subject Inventions made in the performance of cooperative agreement DE-FC05-950R22363 and Subject Inventions made under its subcontracts with large, for-profit businesses. Background The award of this cooperative agreement has been made in response to an unsolicited proposal from USAMP entitled "Automotive Lightweight Materials Program" whose objectives are closely

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced automotive fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2007 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the years 2007, 2010, and 2015, and is the first annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis.

42

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2008 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the years 2006, 2010, and 2015, and is the second annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis.

43

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Ethanol Fuel Blend Research Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Advanced Ethanol Fuel Advanced Ethanol Fuel Blend Research Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Ethanol Fuel Blend Research Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Ethanol Fuel Blend Research Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Ethanol Fuel Blend Research Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Ethanol Fuel Blend Research Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Ethanol Fuel Blend Research Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Ethanol Fuel Blend Research Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Advanced Ethanol Fuel Blend Research Grants

44

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Tax

45

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicles Vehicles Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles on AddThis.com... Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles More than a dozen alternative fuels are in production or under development

46

Status and Outlook for the U.S. Non-Automotive Fuel Cell Industry: Impacts of Government Policies and Assessment of Future Opportunities  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Non-Automotive Fuel Cell Industry, Government Policy and Future Opportunities. Fuel cells (FCs)are considered essential future energy technologies by developed and developing economies alike. Several

47

Energy Basics: Alternative and Advanced Fuels  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

There are a variety of alternative and advanced fuels available, which are used to fuel alternative and advanced vehicles. Learn more about: Electricity Hydrogen Natural Gas...

48

Next Generation Bipolar Plates for Automotive PEM Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a successful U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) funded two-year $2.9 MM program lead by GrafTech International Inc. (GrafTech) are reported and summarized. The program goal was to develop the next generation of high temperature proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell bipolar plates for use in transportation fuel cell applications operating at temperatures up to 120 °C. The bipolar plate composite developed during the program is based on GrafTech’s GRAFCELL? resin impregnated flexible graphite technology and makes use of a high temperature Huntsman Advanced Materials resin system which extends the upper use temperature of the composite to the DoE target. High temperature performance of the new composite is achieved with the added benefit of improvements in strength, modulus, and dimensional stability over the incumbent resin systems. Other physical properties, including thermal and electrical conductivity of the new composite are identical to or not adversely affected by the new resin system. Using the new bipolar plate composite system, machined plates were fabricated and tested in high temperature single-cell fuel cells operating at 120 °C for over 1100 hours by Case Western Reserve University. Final verification of performance was done on embossed full-size plates which were fabricated and glued into bipolar plates by GrafTech. Stack testing was done on a 10-cell full-sized stack under a simulated drive cycle protocol by Ballard Power Systems. Freeze-thaw performance was conducted by Ballard on a separate 5-cell stack and shown to be within specification. A third stack was assembled and shipped to Argonne National Laboratory for independent performance verification. Manufacturing cost estimate for the production of the new bipolar plate composite at current and high volume production scenarios was performed by Directed Technologies Inc. (DTI). The production cost estimates were consistent with previous DoE cost estimates performed by DTI for the DoE on metal plates. The final result of DTI’s analysis for the high volume manufacturing scenario ($6.85 /kW) came in slightly above the DoE target of $3 to $5/kW. This estimate was derived using a “Best Case Scenario” for many of the production process steps and raw material costs with projections to high volumes. Some of the process improvements assumed in this “Best Case Scenario” including high speed high impact forming and solvent-less resins, have not yet been implemented, but have a high probability of potential success.

Orest Adrianowycz; Julian Norley; David J. Stuart; David Flaherty; Ryan Wayne; Warren Williams; Roger Tietze; Yen-Loan H. Nguyen; Tom Zawodzinski; Patrick Pietrasz

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Career  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Career Training to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Career Training on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Career Training on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Career Training on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Career Training on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Career Training on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Career Training on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

50

The individual contribution of automotive components to vehicle fuel consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel consumption has grown to become a major point of interest as oil reserves are depleted. The purpose of this study is to determine the key components that cause variation in the instantaneous fuel consumption of vehicles ...

Napier, Parhys L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Job  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel and Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Job Creation Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Job Creation Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Job Creation Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Job Creation Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Job Creation Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Job Creation Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Job Creation Tax Credit on AddThis.com...

52

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle System  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle System Manufacturing Incentive to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle System Manufacturing Incentive on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle System Manufacturing Incentive on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle System Manufacturing Incentive on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle System Manufacturing Incentive on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle System Manufacturing Incentive on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle System Manufacturing Incentive on AddThis.com...

53

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Rebate  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel and Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Rebate - San Joaquin Valley to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Rebate - San Joaquin Valley on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Rebate - San Joaquin Valley on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Rebate - San Joaquin Valley on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Rebate - San Joaquin Valley on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Rebate - San Joaquin Valley on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Rebate - San Joaquin Valley on AddThis.com...

54

Mass Production Cost Estimation For Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systesm for Automotive Applications: 2010 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report is the fourth annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis. It contains estimates for material and manufacturing costs of complete 80 kWnet direct?hydrogen proton ex

55

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2009 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report is the third annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis. It contains estimates for material and manufacturing cost of complete 80 kWnet direct hydrogen proton exch

56

Advanced fuel chemistry for advanced engines.  

SciTech Connect

Autoignition chemistry is central to predictive modeling of many advanced engine designs that combine high efficiency and low inherent pollutant emissions. This chemistry, and especially its pressure dependence, is poorly known for fuels derived from heavy petroleum and for biofuels, both of which are becoming increasingly prominent in the nation's fuel stream. We have investigated the pressure dependence of key ignition reactions for a series of molecules representative of non-traditional and alternative fuels. These investigations combined experimental characterization of hydroxyl radical production in well-controlled photolytically initiated oxidation and a hybrid modeling strategy that linked detailed quantum chemistry and computational kinetics of critical reactions with rate-equation models of the global chemical system. Comprehensive mechanisms for autoignition generally ignore the pressure dependence of branching fractions in the important alkyl + O{sub 2} reaction systems; however we have demonstrated that pressure-dependent 'formally direct' pathways persist at in-cylinder pressures.

Taatjes, Craig A.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Zador, Judit; Fernandes, Ravi X.; Miller, James A.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Trends and new developments in automotive fuel economy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The significant improvements in passenger car fuel economy that have been achieved up to the present time are identified, and the changes that have produced these improvements are examined in detail. Included are several comparisons of domestic versus foreign vehicles. The potential for further increases in fuel economy is then reviewed by examining the technological, marketing/economic, and other significant factors that will affect future fuel economy levels. Special attention is given to the effect that changing market mix has on corporate average fuel economy and to the future benefits that may be realized through the use of continuously variable transmissions, adiabatic diesel engines, and improved lubricants.

Simpson, B.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

A survey of processes for producing hydrogen fuel from different sources for automotive-propulsion fuel cells  

SciTech Connect

Seven common fuels are compared for their utility as hydrogen sources for proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells used in automotive propulsion. Methanol, natural gas, gasoline, diesel fuel, aviation jet fuel, ethanol, and hydrogen are the fuels considered. Except for the steam reforming of methanol and using pure hydrogen, all processes for generating hydrogen from these fuels require temperatures over 1000 K at some point. With the same two exceptions, all processes require water-gas shift reactors of significant size. All processes require low-sulfur or zero-sulfur fuels, and this may add cost to some of them. Fuels produced by steam reforming contain {approximately}70-80% hydrogen, those by partial oxidation {approximately}35-45%. The lower percentages may adversely affect cell performance. Theoretical input energies do not differ markedly among the various processes for generating hydrogen from organic-chemical fuels. Pure hydrogen has severe distribution and storage problems. As a result, the steam reforming of methanol is the leading candidate process for on-board generation of hydrogen for automotive propulsion. If methanol unavailability or a high price demands an alternative process, steam reforming appears preferable to partial oxidation for this purpose.

Brown, L.F.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vince Contini, Kathya Mahadevan, Fritz Eubanks, Vince Contini, Kathya Mahadevan, Fritz Eubanks, Jennifer Smith, Gabe Stout and Mike Jansen Battelle April 16, 2013 Manufacturing Cost Analysis of Fuel Cells for Material Handling Applications 2 Presentation Outline * Background * Approach * System Design * Fuel Cell Stack Design * Stack, BOP and System Cost Models * System Cost Summary * Results Summary 3 * 10 and 25 kW PEM Fuel Cells for Material Handling Equipment (MHE) applications Background 5-year program to provide feedback to DOE on evaluating fuel cell systems for stationary and emerging markets by developing independent models and cost estimates * Applications - Primary (including CHP) power, backup power, APU, and material handling * Fuel Cell Types - 80°C PEM, 180°C PEM, SOFC technologies

60

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Research and Development Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Research and Development Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Research and Development Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Research and Development Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Research and Development Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Research and Development Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced automotive fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Technology Research and Demonstration Bonds to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Technology Research and Demonstration Bonds on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Technology Research and Demonstration Bonds on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Technology Research and Demonstration Bonds on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Technology Research and Demonstration Bonds on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Technology Research and Demonstration Bonds on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative

62

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel, Advanced Vehicle, and Idle  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel, Alternative Fuel, Advanced Vehicle, and Idle Reduction Technology Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel, Advanced Vehicle, and Idle Reduction Technology Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel, Advanced Vehicle, and Idle Reduction Technology Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel, Advanced Vehicle, and Idle Reduction Technology Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel, Advanced Vehicle, and Idle Reduction Technology Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel, Advanced Vehicle, and Idle Reduction Technology Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative

63

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Laws & Incentives Laws & Incentives Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Funding - New York, NY to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Funding - New York, NY on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Funding - New York, NY on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Funding - New York, NY on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Funding - New York, NY on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Funding - New York, NY on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative

64

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) Development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) Quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) Characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) Elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; (5) Assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Future high-Mach aircraft will place severe thermal demands on jet fuels, requiring the development of novel, hybrid fuel mixtures capable of withstanding temperatures in the range of 400--500 C. In the new aircraft, jet fuel will serve as both an energy source and a heat sink for cooling the airframe, engine, and system components. The ultimate development of such advanced fuels requires a thorough understanding of the thermal decomposition behavior of jet fuels under supercritical conditions. Considering that jet fuels consist of hundreds of compounds, this task must begin with a study of the thermal degradation behavior of select model compounds under supercritical conditions. The research performed by The Pennsylvania State University was focused on five major tasks that reflect the objectives stated above: Task 1: Investigation of the Quantitative Degradation of Fuels; Task 2: Investigation of Incipient Deposition; Task 3: Characterization of Solid Gums, Sediments, and Carbonaceous Deposits; Task 4: Coal-Based Fuel Stabilization Studies; and Task 5: Exploratory Studies on the Direct Conversion of Coal to High Quality Jet Fuels. The major findings of each of these tasks are presented in this executive summary. A description of the sub-tasks performed under each of these tasks and the findings of those studies are provided in the remainder of this volume (Sections 1 through 5).

Schobert, H.H.

1999-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

Advanced Fuels Campaign Execution Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) Execution Plan is to communicate the structure and management of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) activities within the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program. Included in this document is an overview of the FCRD program, a description of the difference between revolutionary and evolutionary approaches to nuclear fuel development, the meaning of science-based development of nuclear fuels, and the “Grand Challenge” for the AFC that would, if achieved, provide a transformational technology to the nuclear industry in the form of a high performance, high reliability nuclear fuel system. The activities that will be conducted by the AFC to achieve success towards this grand challenge are described and the goals and milestones over the next 20 to 40 year period of research and development are established.

Kemal Pasamehmetoglu

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Advanced Fuels Campaign Execution Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) Execution Plan is to communicate the structure and management of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) activities within the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program. Included in this document is an overview of the FCRD program, a description of the difference between revolutionary and evolutionary approaches to nuclear fuel development, the meaning of science-based development of nuclear fuels, and the 'Grand Challenge' for the AFC that would, if achieved, provide a transformational technology to the nuclear industry in the form of a high performance, high reliability nuclear fuel system. The activities that will be conducted by the AFC to achieve success towards this grand challenge are described and the goals and milestones over the next 20 to 40 year period of research and development are established.

Kemal Pasamehmetoglu

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Advanced Fuels Campaign Execution Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) Execution Plan is to communicate the structure and management of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) activities within the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program. Included in this document is an overview of the FCRD program, a description of the difference between revolutionary and evolutionary approaches to nuclear fuel development, the meaning of science-based development of nuclear fuels, and the 'Grand Challenge' for the AFC that would, if achieved, provide a transformational technology to the nuclear industry in the form of a high performance, high reliability nuclear fuel system. The activities that will be conducted by the AFC to achieve success towards this grand challenge are described and the goals and milestones over the next 20 to 40 year period of research and development are established.

Kemal Pasamehmetoglu

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Partial oxidation fuel reforming for automotive power systems.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For widespread use of fuel cells to power automobiles in the near future, it is necessary to convert gasoline or other transportation fuels to hydrogen on-board the vehicle. Partial oxidation reforming is particularly suited to this application as it eliminates the need for heat exchange at high temperatures. Such reformers offer rapid start and good dynamic performance. Lowering the temperature of the partial oxidation process, which requires the development of a suitable catalyst, can increase the reforming efficiency. Catalytic partial oxidation (or autothermal) reformers and non-catalytic partial oxidation reformers developed by various organizations are presently undergoing testing and demonstration. This paper summarizes the process chemistries as well as recent test data from several different reformers operating on gasoline, methanol, and other fuels.

Ahmed, S.; Chalk, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Kumar, R.; Milliken, J.

1999-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

69

Experimental hydrogen-fueled automotive engine design data-base project. Volume 1. Executive summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary hydrogen-fueled automotive piston engine design data-base now exists as a result of a research project at the University of Miami. The effort, which is overviewed here, encompassed the testing of 19 different configurations of an appropriately-modified, 1.6-liter displacement, light-duty automotive piston engine. The design data base includes engine performance and exhaust emissions over the entire load range, generally at a fixed speed (1800 rpm) and best efficiency spark timing. This range was sometimes limited by intake manifold backfiring and lean-limit restrictions; however, effective measures were demonstrated for obviating these problems. High efficiency, competitive specific power, and low emissions were conclusively demonstrated.

Swain, M.R.; Adt, R.R. Jr.; Pappas, J.M.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Advanced fuel concepts and applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Despite their more stringent plasma heating and confinement requirements, advanced fuel (AF) fusion cycles potentially offer improved environmental compatibility and lower costs. This comes about by elimination of tritium breeding requirements and by a reduction in neutron flux (hence, activation and radiation damage). Also a larger energy fraction carried by charged particles makes direct energy conversion more suitable. As a first application, a symbiotic system of semi-catalyzed-deuterium fueled hybrid fuel factories, supplying both fissle fuel to light water reactors and /sup 3/He to D-/sup 3/He satellite fusion reactors, is proposed. Subsequently, an evolution into a system of synfuel factories with satellite D-/sup 3/He reactors is envisioned.

Miley, G.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Automotive Powertrain Control - A Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper surveys recent and historical publications on automotive powertrain control. Controloriented models of gasoline and diesel engines and their aftertreatment systems are reviewed, and challenging control problems for conventional engines, hybrid vehicles and fuel cell powertrains are discussed. Fundamentals are revisited and advancements are highlighted. A comprehensive list of references is provided. 1

Jeffrey A. Cook; Jing Sun; Julia H. Buckl; Ilya V. Kolmanovsky; Huei Peng; Jessy W. Grizzle

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop - Breakout Group 4: Low Temperature Fuel Cell System BOP & FUEL Processors For Stationary and Automotive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BREAKOUT GROUP 4: LOW TEMPERATURE FUEL CELL SYSTEM BOP & FUEL PROCESSORS FOR STATIONARY AND AUTOMOTIVE BREAKOUT GROUP 4: LOW TEMPERATURE FUEL CELL SYSTEM BOP & FUEL PROCESSORS FOR STATIONARY AND AUTOMOTIVE PARTICIPANTS O NAME RGANIZATION Shabbir Ahmed Argonne National Laboratory Chris Ainscough NUVERA Rod Borup Los Alamos National Laboratory Vince Contini Battelle Rick Cutright PlugPower LLC David Frank Hydrogenics Jamie Holladay Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Terry Johnson Sandia National Laboratory Sridhas Kanuri UTC Power Ted Krause Argonne National Laboratory Michael McCarthy Protonex Technology Corporation Pinakin Patel FuelCell Energy Inc. Dennis Rapodios Argonne National Laboratory Eric Simpkins IdaTech LLC Anna Stefanopoulou University of Michigan Ken Stroh Los Alamos National Laboratory Olivier Verdu HELION Doug Wheeler National Renewable Energy Laboratory

73

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H 2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2008 Update March 26, 2009 v.30.2021.052209 Prepared by: Brian D. James & Jeffrey A. Kalinoski One Virginia Square 3601 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 650 Arlington, Virginia 22201 703-243-3383 Prepared for: Contract No. GS-10F-0099J to the U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Foreword Energy security is fundamental to the mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles have the potential to eliminate the need for oil in the transportation sector. Fuel cell vehicles can operate on hydrogen, which can be produced domestically, emitting less greenhouse gas and pollutants than

74

Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis  

SciTech Connect

This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules—23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis  

SciTech Connect

This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 26 cost modules—24 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, and high-level waste.

D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis  

SciTech Connect

This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules—23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Effect of automotive electrical system changes on fuel consumption using incremental efficiency methodology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There has been a continuous increase in automotive electric power usage. Future projections show no sign of it decreasing. Therefore, the automotive industry has a need to either improve the current 12 Volt automotive ...

Hardin, Christopher William

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Advanced Biofuel Advanced Biofuel Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Advanced Biofuel Incentives The North Dakota Industrial Commission's Renewable Energy Program provides matching grants and other forms of assistance to support research and

79

Automotive electronics business  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the automotive industry, due to the trend to introduce active safety systems, concerns about protecting the environment, and advances in information technology, key automotive manufacturers are eager to acquire new ...

Hase, Yoshiko, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Evaluation of dissociated and steam-reformed methanol as automotive engine fuels  

SciTech Connect

Dissociated and steam reformed methanol were evaluated as automotive engine fuels. Advantages and disadvantages in using methanol in the reformed rather than liquid state are discussed. Engine dynamometer tests were conducted with a four cylinder, 2.3 liter, spark ignition automotive engine to determine performance and emission characteristics operating on simulated dissociated and steam reformed methanol (2H/sub 2/ + CO and 3H/sub 2/ + CO/sub 2/ respectively), and liquid methanol. Results are presented for engine performance and emissions as functions of equivalence ratio, at various throttle settings and engine speeds. Operation on dissociated and steam reformed methanol was characterized by flashback (violent propagation of a flame into the intake manifold) which limited operation to lower power output than was obtainable using liquid methanol. It was concluded that: an automobile could not be operated solely on dissociated or steam reformed methanol over the entire required power range - a supplementary fuel system or power source would be necessary to attain higher powers; the use of reformed methanol, compared to liquid methanol, may result in a small improvement in thermal efficiency in the low power range; dissociated methanol is a better fuel than steam reformed methanol for use in a spark ignition engine; and use of dissociated or steam reformed methanol may result in lower exhaust emissions compared to liquid methanol. 36 references, 27 figures, 3 tables.

Lalk, T.R.; McCall, D.M.; McCanlies, J.M.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced automotive fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Advances in metallic nuclear fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metallic nuclear fuels have generated renewed interest for advanced liquid metal reactors (LMRs) due to their physical properties, ease of fabrication, irradiation behavior, and simple reprocessing. Irradiation performance for both steady-state and transient operations is excellent. Ongoing irradiation tests in Argonne-West's Idaho-based Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) have surpassed 100,000 MWd/T burnup and are on their way to a lifetime burnup of 150,000 MWd/T or greater. Metallic fuel also has a unique neutronic characteristic that enables benign reactor responses to loss-of-flow without scram and loss-of-heat-sink without scram accident conditions. This inherent safety potential of metallic fuel was demonstrated in EBR-II just one year ago. Safety tests performed in the reactor have also demonstrated that there is ample margin to fuel element cladding failure under transient overpower conditions. These metallic fuel attributes are key ingredients of the integral fast reactor (IFR) concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory.

Seidel, B.R.; Walters, L.C.; Chang, Y.I.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Survey Evidence on the Willingness of U.S. Consumers to Pay for Automotive Fuel Economy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prospect theory, which was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2002, holds that human beings faced with a risky bet will tend to value potential losses about twice as much as potential gains. Previous research has demonstrated that prospect theory could be sufficient to explain an energy paradox in the market for automotive fuel economy. This paper analyzes data from four random sample surveys of 1,000 U.S. households each in 2004, 2011, 2012 and 2013. Households were asked about willingness to pay for future fuel savings as well as the annual fuel savings necessary to justify a given upfront payment. Payback periods inferred from household responses are consistent over time and across different formulations of questions. Mean calculated payback periods are short, about 3 years, but there is substantial dispersion among individual responses. Calculated payback periods do not appear to be correlated with the attributes of respondents. Respondents were able to quantitatively describe their uncertainty about both vehicle fuel economy and future fuel prices. Simulation of loss averse behavior based on this stated uncertainty illustrate how loss aversion could lead consumers to substantially undervalue future fuel savings relative to their expected value.

Greene, David L [ORNL; Evans, David H [Sewanee, The University of the South; Hiestand, John [Indiana University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Costs and benefits of automotive fuel economy improvement: A partial analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper is an exercise in estimating the costs and benefits of technology-based fuel economy improvements for automobiles and light trucks. Benefits quantified include vehicle cots, fuel savings, consumer's surplus effects, the effect of reduced weight on vehicle safety, impacts on emissions of CO{sub 2} and criteria pollutants, world oil market and energy security benefits, and the transfer of wealth from US consumes to oil producers. A vehicle stock model is used to capture sales, scrappage, and vehicle use effects under three fuel price scenarios. Three alternative fuel economy levels for 2001 are considered, ranging from 32.9 to 36.5 MPG for cars and 24.2 to 27.5 MPG for light trucks. Fuel economy improvements of this size are probably cost-effective. The size of the benefit, and whether there is a benefit, strongly depends on the financial costs of fuel economy improvement and judgments about the values of energy security, emissions, safety, etc. Three sets of values for eight parameters are used to define the sensitivity of costs and benefits to key assumptions. The net present social value (1989$) of costs and benefits ranges from a cost of $11 billion to a benefit of $286 billion. The critical parameters being the discount rate (10% vs. 3%) and the values attached to externalities. The two largest components are always the direct vehicle costs and fuel savings, but these tend to counterbalance each other for the fuel economy levels examined here. Other components are the wealth transfer, oil cost savings, CO{sub 2} emissions reductions, and energy security benefits. Safety impacts, emissions of criteria pollutants, and consumer's surplus effects are relatively minor components. The critical issues for automotive fuel economy are therefore: (1) the value of present versus future costs and benefits, (2) the values of external costs and benefits, and (3) the financially cost-effective level of MPG achievable by available technology. 53 refs.

Greene, D.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Duleep, K.G. (Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Costs and benefits of automotive fuel economy improvement: A partial analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper is an exercise in estimating the costs and benefits of technology-based fuel economy improvements for automobiles and light trucks. Benefits quantified include vehicle cots, fuel savings, consumer`s surplus effects, the effect of reduced weight on vehicle safety, impacts on emissions of CO{sub 2} and criteria pollutants, world oil market and energy security benefits, and the transfer of wealth from US consumes to oil producers. A vehicle stock model is used to capture sales, scrappage, and vehicle use effects under three fuel price scenarios. Three alternative fuel economy levels for 2001 are considered, ranging from 32.9 to 36.5 MPG for cars and 24.2 to 27.5 MPG for light trucks. Fuel economy improvements of this size are probably cost-effective. The size of the benefit, and whether there is a benefit, strongly depends on the financial costs of fuel economy improvement and judgments about the values of energy security, emissions, safety, etc. Three sets of values for eight parameters are used to define the sensitivity of costs and benefits to key assumptions. The net present social value (1989$) of costs and benefits ranges from a cost of $11 billion to a benefit of $286 billion. The critical parameters being the discount rate (10% vs. 3%) and the values attached to externalities. The two largest components are always the direct vehicle costs and fuel savings, but these tend to counterbalance each other for the fuel economy levels examined here. Other components are the wealth transfer, oil cost savings, CO{sub 2} emissions reductions, and energy security benefits. Safety impacts, emissions of criteria pollutants, and consumer`s surplus effects are relatively minor components. The critical issues for automotive fuel economy are therefore: (1) the value of present versus future costs and benefits, (2) the values of external costs and benefits, and (3) the financially cost-effective level of MPG achievable by available technology. 53 refs.

Greene, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Duleep, K.G. [Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Costs and benefits of automotive fuel economy improvement: A partial analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper is an exercise in estimating the costs and benefits of technology-based fuel economy improvements for automobiles and light trucks. Benefits quantified include vehicle cots, fuel savings, consumer's surplus effects, the effect of reduced weight on vehicle safety, impacts on emissions of CO{sub 2} and criteria pollutants, world oil market and energy security benefits, and the transfer of wealth from US consumes to oil producers. A vehicle stock model is used to capture sales, scrappage, and vehicle use effects under three fuel price scenarios. Three alternative fuel economy levels for 2001 are considered, ranging from 32.9 to 36.5 MPG for cars and 24.2 to 27.5 MPG for light trucks. Fuel economy improvements of this size are probably cost-effective. The size of the benefit, and whether there is a benefit, strongly depends on the financial costs of fuel economy improvement and judgments about the values of energy security, emissions, safety, etc. Three sets of values for eight parameters are used to define the sensitivity of costs and benefits to key assumptions. The net present social value (1989$) of costs and benefits ranges from a cost of $11 billion to a benefit of $286 billion. The critical parameters being the discount rate (10% vs. 3%) and the values attached to externalities. The two largest components are always the direct vehicle costs and fuel savings, but these tend to counterbalance each other for the fuel economy levels examined here. Other components are the wealth transfer, oil cost savings, CO{sub 2} emissions reductions, and energy security benefits. Safety impacts, emissions of criteria pollutants, and consumer's surplus effects are relatively minor components. The critical issues for automotive fuel economy are therefore: (1) the value of present versus future costs and benefits, (2) the values of external costs and benefits, and (3) the financially cost-effective level of MPG achievable by available technology. 53 refs.

Greene, D.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Duleep, K.G. (Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ADVANCED REACTORS DIVISION FUEL LABORATORIES CHESWICK, PENNSYLVANIA Department of Energy Office of Policy, Safety and Environment Office of Operational Safety Environmental...

87

Los Alamos scientists advance biomass fuel production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Issues submit Los Alamos scientists advance biomass fuel production Adapting biomass waste molecules for energy production May 1, 2013 Lab research can yield energy from...

88

Technology development goals for automotive fuel cell power systems. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report determines cost and performance requirements for Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell vehicles carrying pure H{sub 2} fuel, to achieve parity with internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles. A conceptual design of a near term FCEV (fuel cell electric vehicle) is presented. Complete power system weight and cost breakdowns are presented for baseline design. Near term FCEV power system weight is 6% higher than ICE system, mid-term FCEV projected weights are 29% lower than ICE`s. There are no inherently high-cost components in FCE, and at automotive production volumes, near term FCEV cost viability is closer at hand than at first thought. PEM current vs voltage performance is presented for leading PEM manufacturers and researchers. 5 current and proposed onboard hydrogen storage techniques are critically compared: pressurized gas, cryogenic liquid, combined pressurized/cryogenic, rechargeable hydride, adsorption. Battery, capacitor, and motor/controller performance is summarized. Fuel cell power system component weight and cost densities (threshold and goal) are tabulated.

James, B.D.; Baum, G.N.; Kuhn, I.F. Jr. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Oxidation of automotive primary reference fuels in a high pressure flow reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Automotive engine knock limits the maximum operating compression ratio and ultimate thermodynamic efficiency of spark-ignition (SI) engines. In compression-ignition (CI) or diesel cycle engines the premixed urn phase, which occurs shortly after injection, determines the time it takes for autoignition to occur. In order to improve engine efficiency and to recommend more efficient, cleaner-burning alternative fuels, we must understand the chemical kinetic processes which lead to autoignition in both SI and CI engines. These engines burn large molecular-weight blended fuels, a class to which the primary reference fuels (PRF), n-heptane and isooctane belong. In this study, experiments were performed under engine-like conditions in a high pressure flow reactor using both the pure PRF fuels and their mixtures in the temperature range 550-880 K and at 12.5 atm pressure. These experiments not only provide information on the reactivity of each fuel but also identify the major intermediate products formed during the oxidation process. A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism is used to simulate these experiments and comparisons of experimentally measures and model predicted profiles for O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and temperature rise are presented. Intermediates identified in the flow reactor are compared with those present in the computations, and the kinetic pathways leading to their formation are discussed. In addition, autoignition delay times measured in a shock tube over the temperature range 690- 1220 K and at 40 atm pressure were simulated. Good agreement between experiment and simulation was obtained for both the pure fuels and their mixtures. Finally, quantitative values of major intermediates measured in the exhaust gas of a cooperative fuels research engine operating under motored engine conditions are presented together with those predicted by the detailed method.

Curran, H.J.; Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Callahan, C.V.; Dryer, F.L. [Princeton Univ., Areospace Engineering. NJ (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Uncertainty Analyses of Advanced Fuel Cycles  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy is developing technology, experimental protocols, computational methods, systems analysis software, and many other capabilities in order to advance the nuclear power infrastructure through the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFDI). Our project, is intended to facilitate will-informed decision making for the selection of fuel cycle options and facilities for development.

Laurence F. Miller; J. Preston; G. Sweder; T. Anderson; S. Janson; M. Humberstone; J. MConn; J. Clark

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

91

NREL: Learning - Advanced Vehicles and Fuels Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Vehicles and Fuels Basics Advanced Vehicles and Fuels Basics Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player This video provides an overview of the Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems and its research. Video produced for NREL by Fireside Production. Text Version We can improve the fuel economy of our cars, trucks, and buses by designing them to use the energy in fuels more efficiently. And we can help to reduce our nation's growing reliance on imported oil by running our vehicles on renewable and alternative fuels. Advanced vehicles and fuels can also put the brakes on air pollution and improve our environment. At least 250 million vehicles are in use in the United States today. They include all kinds of passenger cars, trucks, vans, buses, and large

92

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Transportation Tax Exclusion  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Advanced Advanced Transportation Tax Exclusion to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Transportation Tax Exclusion on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Transportation Tax Exclusion on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Transportation Tax Exclusion on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Transportation Tax Exclusion on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Transportation Tax Exclusion on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Transportation Tax Exclusion on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Advanced Transportation Tax Exclusion The California Alternative Energy and Advanced Transportation Financing

93

A design strategy applied to sulfur resistant lean NOx̳ automotive catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Catalyst poisoning due to sulfur compounds derived from fuel sulfur presents a major challenge, intractable thus far, to development of many advanced technologies for automotive catalysts such as the lean NOx, trap. Under ...

Tang, Hairong

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuels Strategic Plan  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Advanced Biofuels Strategic Plan to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuels Strategic Plan on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center:...

95

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Technology Advancement Funding - South Coast  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Technology Advancement Technology Advancement Funding - South Coast to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Technology Advancement Funding - South Coast on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Technology Advancement Funding - South Coast on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Technology Advancement Funding - South Coast on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Technology Advancement Funding - South Coast on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Technology Advancement Funding - South Coast on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Technology Advancement Funding - South Coast on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Technology Advancement Funding - South Coast

96

Advanced fuel cells for transportation applications. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Research and Development (R and D) contract was directed at developing an advanced technology compressor/expander for supplying compressed air to Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells in transportation applications. The objective of this project was to develop a low-cost high-efficiency long-life lubrication-free integrated compressor/expander utilizing scroll technology. The goal of this compressor/expander was to be capable of providing compressed air over the flow and pressure ranges required for the operation of 50 kW PEM fuel cells in transportation applications. The desired ranges of flow, pressure, and other performance parameters were outlined in a set of guidelines provided by DOE. The project consisted of the design, fabrication, and test of a prototype compressor/expander module. The scroll CEM development program summarized in this report has been very successful, demonstrating that scroll technology is a leading candidate for automotive fuel cell compressor/expanders. The objectives of the program are: develop an integrated scroll CEM; demonstrate efficiency and capacity goals; demonstrate manufacturability and cost goals; and evaluate operating envelope. In summary, while the scroll CEM program did not demonstrate a level of performance as high as the DOE guidelines in all cases, it did meet the overriding objectives of the program. A fully-integrated, low-cost CEM was developed that demonstrated high efficiency and reliable operation throughout the test program. 26 figs., 13 tabs.

NONE

1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

97

An advanced fuel cell simulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel cell power generation systems provide a clean alternative to the conventional fossil fuel based systems. Fuel cell systems have a high e?ciency and use easily available hydrocarbons like methane. Moreover, since the by-product is water, they have a very low environmental impact. The fuel cell system consists of several subsystems requiring a lot of e?ort from engineers in diverse areas. Fuel cell simulators can provide a convenient and economic alternative for testing the electrical subsystems such as converters and inverters. This thesis proposes a low-cost and an easy-to-use fuel cell simulator using a programmable DC supply along with a control module written in LabVIEW. This simulator reproduces the electrical characteristics of a 5kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack under various operating conditions. The experimental results indicate that the proposed simulator closely matches the voltage-current characteristic of the SOFC system under varying load conditions. E?ects of non-electrical parameters like hydrogen ?ow rate are also modeled and these parameters are taken as dynamic inputs from the user. The simulator is customizable through a graphical user interface and allows the user to model other types of fuel cells with the respective voltage-current data. The simulator provides an inexpensive and accurate representation of a solid oxide fuel cell under steady state and transient conditions and can replace an actual fuel cell during testing of power conditioning equipment.

Acharya, Prabha Ramchandra

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Advanced Fuels Campaign FY 2011 Accomplishments Report  

SciTech Connect

One of the major research and development (R&D) areas under the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program is advanced fuels development. The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) has the responsibility to develop advanced fuel technologies for the Department of Energy (DOE) using a science-based approach focusing on developing a microstructural understanding of nuclear fuels and materials. Accomplishments made during fiscal year (FY 20) 2011 are highlighted in this report, which focuses on completed work and results. The process details leading up to the results are not included; however, the technical contact is provided for each section. The order of the accomplishments in this report is consistent with the AFC work breakdown structure (WBS).

Not Listed

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Sensitivity Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fuel cycle economic analysis was performed on four fuel cycles to provide a baseline for initial cost comparison using the Gen IV Economic Modeling Work Group G4 ECON spreadsheet model, Decision Programming Language software, the 2006 Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis report, industry cost data, international papers, the nuclear power related cost study from MIT, Harvard, and the University of Chicago. The analysis developed and compared the fuel cycle cost component of the total cost of energy for a wide range of fuel cycles including: once through, thermal with fast recycle, continuous fast recycle, and thermal recycle.

David Shropshire; Kent Williams; J.D. Smith; Brent Boore

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Advanced Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced fuel cells have many potential utility applications including new multi-megawatt central power plants, repowering existing plants, and dispersed generation. A newly designed 25 kW planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system offers simplicity of construction, low cost manufacturing, efficient recovery of by product heat, and straight-forward system integration.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced automotive fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

An Analysis of Energy Savings Possible Through Advances in Automotive Tooling Technology  

SciTech Connect

The use of lightweight and highly formable advanced materials in automobile and truck manufacturing has the potential to save fuel. Advances in tooling technology would promote the use of these materials. This report describes an energy savings analysis performed to approximate the potential fuel savings and consequential carbon-emission reductions that would be possible because of advances in tooling in the manufacturing of, in particular, non-powertrain components of passenger cars and heavy trucks. Separate energy analyses are performed for cars and heavy trucks. Heavy trucks are considered to be Class 7 and 8 trucks (trucks rated over 26,000 lbs gross vehicle weight). A critical input to the analysis is a set of estimates of the percentage reductions in weight and drag that could be achieved by the implementation of advanced materials, as a consequence of improved tooling technology, which were obtained by surveying tooling industry experts who attended a DOE Workshop, Tooling Technology for Low-Volume Vehicle Production, held in Seattle and Detroit in October and November 2003. The analysis is also based on 2001 fuel consumption totals and on energy-audit component proportions of fuel use due to drag, rolling resistance, and braking. The consumption proportions are assumed constant over time, but an allowance is made for fleet growth. The savings for a particular component is then the product of total fuel consumption, the percentage reduction of the component, and the energy audit component proportion. Fuel savings estimates for trucks also account for weight-limited versus volume-limited operations. Energy savings are assumed to be of two types: (1) direct energy savings incurred through reduced forces that must be overcome to move the vehicle or to slow it down in braking. and (2) indirect energy savings through reductions in the required engine power, the production and transmission of which incur thermodynamic losses, internal friction, and other inefficiencies. Total savings for an energy use component are estimated by scaling up the direct savings with an approximate total-to-direct savings ratio. Market penetration for new technology vehicles is estimated from projections about scrappage. Retrofit savings are assumed negligible, but savings are also assumed to accrue with increases in the fleet size, based on economic growth forecasts. It is assumed that as vehicles in the current fleet are scrapped, they are replaced with advanced-technology vehicles. Saving estimates are based on proportions of new vehicles, rather than new-vehicle mileages. In practice, of course, scrapped vehicles are often replaced with used vehicles, and used vehicles are replaced with new vehicles. Because new vehicles are typically driven more than old, savings estimates based on count rather than mileage proportions tend to be biased down (i.e., conservative). Savings are expressed in terms of gallons of fuel saved, metric tons of CO2 emissions reductions, and percentages relative to 2001 levels of fuel and CO2. The sensitivity of the savings projections to inputs such as energy-audit proportions of fuel consumed for rolling resistance, drag, braking, etc. is assessed by considering different scenarios. Though based on many approximations, the estimates approximate the potential energy savings possible because of improvements in tooling. For heavy trucks, annual diesel savings of 2.4-6.8 percent, and cumulative savings on the order of 54-154 percent, of 2001 consumption could accrue by 2050. By 2050, annual gasoline savings of 2.8-12 percent, and cumulative savings on the order of 83-350 percent of 2001 consumption could accrue for cars.

Rick Schmoyer, RLS

2004-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

102

Advanced Fuels Campaign FY 2010 Accomplishments Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) Accomplishment Report documents the high-level research and development results achieved in fiscal year 2010. The AFC program has been given responsibility to develop advanced fuel technologies for the Department of Energy (DOE) using a science-based approach focusing on developing a microstructural understanding of nuclear fuels and materials. The science-based approach combines theory, experiments, and multi-scale modeling and simulation aimed at a fundamental understanding of the fuel fabrication processes and fuel and clad performance under irradiation. The scope of the AFC includes evaluation and development of multiple fuel forms to support the three fuel cycle options described in the Sustainable Fuel Cycle Implementation Plan4: Once-Through Cycle, Modified-Open Cycle, and Continuous Recycle. The word “fuel” is used generically to include fuels, targets, and their associated cladding materials. This document includes a brief overview of the management and integration activities; but is primarily focused on the technical accomplishments for FY-10. Each technical section provides a high level overview of the activity, results, technical points of contact, and applicable references.

Lori Braase

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Vehicle Acquisition and Biodiesel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Advanced Vehicle Advanced Vehicle Acquisition and Biodiesel Fuel Use Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Vehicle Acquisition and Biodiesel Fuel Use Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Vehicle Acquisition and Biodiesel Fuel Use Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Vehicle Acquisition and Biodiesel Fuel Use Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Vehicle Acquisition and Biodiesel Fuel Use Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Vehicle Acquisition and Biodiesel Fuel Use Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Vehicle Acquisition and Biodiesel Fuel Use Requirement on AddThis.com...

104

Advanced Fuels Campaign Cladding & Coatings Meeting Summary  

SciTech Connect

The Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) organized a Cladding and Coatings operational meeting February 12-13, 2013, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Representatives from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), national laboratories, industry, and universities attended the two-day meeting. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss advanced cladding and cladding coating research and development (R&D); review experimental testing capabilities for assessing accident tolerant fuels; and review industry/university plans and experience in light water reactor (LWR) cladding and coating R&D.

Not Listed

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Clean Cities: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Strategy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Events Events Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Clean Cities: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Strategy Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Strategy Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Strategy Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Strategy Workshop on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Strategy Workshop on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Strategy Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Strategy Workshop on AddThis.com...

106

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Technology Vehicle (ATV)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Advanced Technology Advanced Technology Vehicle (ATV) Manufacturing Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Technology Vehicle (ATV) Manufacturing Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Technology Vehicle (ATV) Manufacturing Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Technology Vehicle (ATV) Manufacturing Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Technology Vehicle (ATV) Manufacturing Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Technology Vehicle (ATV) Manufacturing Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Technology Vehicle (ATV) Manufacturing Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section...

107

DKRW Advanced Fuels LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DKRW Advanced Fuels LLC DKRW Advanced Fuels LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name DKRW Advanced Fuels LLC Place Houston, Texas Zip 77056 Product Focues on projects that utilise coal gasification technology, including coal-to-liquids, methanation, and integrated coal gasification combined cycle power projects. Coordinates 29.76045°, -95.369784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.76045,"lon":-95.369784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

108

Assessment of methane-related fuels for automotive fleet vehicles: technical, supply, and economic assessments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of methane-related fuels, derived from a variety of sources, in highway vehicles is assessed. Methane, as used here, includes natural gas (NG) as well as synthetic natural gas (SNG). Methanol is included because it can be produced from NG or the same resources as SNG, and because it is a liquid fuel at normal ambient conditions. Technological, operational, efficiency, petroleum displacement, supply, safety, and economic issues are analyzed. In principle, both NG and methanol allow more efficient engine operation than gasoline. In practice, engines are at present rarely optimized for NG and methanol. On the basis of energy expended from resource extraction to end use, only optimized LNG vehicles are more efficient than their gasoline counterparts. By 1985, up to 16% of total petroleum-based highway vehicle fuel could be displaced by large fleets with central NG fueling depots. Excluding diesel vehicles, which need technology advances to use NG, savings of 8% are projected. Methanol use by large fleets could displace up to 8% of petroleum-based highway vehicle fuel from spark-ignition vehicles and another 9% from diesel vehicles with technology advances. The US NG supply appears adequate to accommodate fleet use. Supply projections, future price differential versus gasoline, and user economics are uncertain. In many cases, attractive paybacks can occur. Compressed NG now costs on average about $0.65 less than gasoline, per energy-equivalent gallon. Methanol supply projections, future prices, and user economics are even more uncertain. Current and projected near-term methanol supplies are far from adequate to support fleet use. Methanol presently costs more than gasoline on an equal-energy basis, but is projected to cost less if produced from coal instead of NG or petroleum.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Future Transient Testing of Advanced Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transient in-reactor fuels testing workshop was held on May 4–5, 2009 at Idaho National Laboratory. The purpose of this meeting was to provide a forum where technical experts in transient testing of nuclear fuels could meet directly with technical instrumentation experts and nuclear fuel modeling and simulation experts to discuss needed advancements in transient testing to support a basic understanding of nuclear fuel behavior under off-normal conditions. The workshop was attended by representatives from Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique CEA, Japanese Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Department of Energy (DOE), AREVA, General Electric – Global Nuclear Fuels (GE-GNF), Westinghouse, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), universities, and several DOE national laboratories. Transient testing of fuels and materials generates information required for advanced fuels in future nuclear power plants. Future nuclear power plants will rely heavily on advanced computer modeling and simulation that describes fuel behavior under off-normal conditions. TREAT is an ideal facility for this testing because of its flexibility, proven operation and material condition. The opportunity exists to develop advanced instrumentation and data collection that can support modeling and simulation needs much better than was possible in the past. In order to take advantage of these opportunities, test programs must be carefully designed to yield basic information to support modeling before conducting integral performance tests. An early start of TREAT and operation at low power would provide significant dividends in training, development of instrumentation, and checkout of reactor systems. Early start of TREAT (2015) is needed to support the requirements of potential users of TREAT and include the testing of full length fuel irradiated in the FFTF reactor. The capabilities provided by TREAT are needed for the development of nuclear power and the following benefits will be realized by the refurbishment and restart of TREAT. •TREAT is an absolute necessity in the suite of reactor fuel test capabilities •TREAT yields valuable information on reactivity effects, margins to failure, fuel dispersal, and failure propagation •Most importantly, interpretation of TREAT experiment results is a stringent test of the integrated understanding of fuel performance.

Jon Carmack

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2010 Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H 2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2010 Update September 30, 2010 Prepared by: Brian D. James, Jeffrey A. Kalinoski & Kevin N. Baum One Virginia Square 3601 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 650 Arlington, Virginia 22201 703-243-3383 Prepared under: Subcontract No. AGB-0-40628-01 to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under Prime Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 to the U.S. Department of Energy Foreword Energy security is fundamental to the mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles have the potential to eliminate the need for oil in the transportation sector. Fuel cell vehicles can operate on hydrogen, which can be produced domestically, emitting less greenhouse gasses and pollutants than

111

Advanced Fuel Reformer Development: Putting the 'Fuel' in Fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Initial testing successfully completed * 1000 hrs of sub-scale durability completed (Target 8000). Shipboard Fuel Cell Workshop; Washington, D.C. March 2011 27 Benefits of...

112

Fuel Cells for Portable Power: 1. Introduction to DMFCs; 2. Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thanks to generally less stringent cost constraints, portable power fuel cells, the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) in particular, promise earlier market penetration than higher power polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) for the automotive and stationary applications. However, a large-scale commercialization of DMFC-based power systems beyond niche applications already targeted by developers will depend on improvements to fuel cell performance and performance durability as well as on the reduction in cost, especially of the portable systems on the higher end of the power spectrum (100-250 W). In this part of the webinar, we will focus on the development of advanced materials (catalysts, membranes, electrode structures, and membrane electrode assemblies) and fuel cell operating concepts capable of fulfilling two key targets for portable power systems: the system cost of $5/W and overall fuel conversion efficiency of 2.0-2.5 kWh/L. Presented research will concentrate on the development of new methanol oxidation catalysts, hydrocarbon membranes with reduced methanol crossover, and improvements to component durability. Time permitted, we will also present a few highlights from the development of electrocatalysts for the oxidation of two alternative fuels for the direct-feed fuel cells: ethanol and dimethyl ether.

Zelenay, Piotr [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

113

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect

Several technology advances since the early coal-fueled turbine programs that address technical issues of coal as a turbine fuel have been developed in the early 1980s: Coal-water suspensions as fuel form, improved methods for removing ash and contaminants from coal, staged combustion for reducing NO{sub x} emissions from fuel-bound nitrogen, and greater understanding of deposition/erosion/corrosion and their control. Several Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Systems programs were awarded to gas turbine manufacturers for for components development and proof of concept tests; one of these was Allison. Tests were conducted in a subscale coal combustion facility and a full-scale facility operating a coal combustor sized to the Allison Model 501-K industrial turbine. A rich-quench-lean (RQL), low nitrogen oxide combustor design incorporating hot gas cleanup was developed for coal fuels; this should also be applicable to biomass, etc. The combustor tests showed NO{sub x} and CO emissions {le} levels for turbines operating with natural gas. Water washing of vanes from the turbine removed the deposits. Systems and economic evaluations identified two possible applications for RQL turbines: Cogeneration plants based on Allison 501-K turbine (output 3.7 MW(e), 23,000 lbs/hr steam) and combined cycle power plants based on 50 MW or larger gas turbines. Coal-fueled cogeneration plant configurations were defined and evaluated for site specific factors. A coal-fueled turbine combined cycle plant design was identified which is simple, compact, and results in lower capital cost, with comparable efficiency and low emissions relative to other coal technologies (gasification, advanced PFBC).

Wenglarz, R.A.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Advanced Nuclear Fuel Concepts for Minor Actinide Burning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, New fuel cycle strategies entail advanced nuclear fuel concepts. This especially applies for the burning of minor actinides in a fast reactor cycle ...

115

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Laws and Incentives Advanced Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Laws and Incentives Laws and Incentives Advanced Search to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Laws and Incentives Advanced Search on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Laws and Incentives Advanced Search on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Laws and Incentives Advanced Search on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Laws and Incentives Advanced Search on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Laws and Incentives Advanced Search on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Laws and Incentives Advanced Search on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Advanced Search Search incentives and laws related to alternative fuels and advanced

116

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Alternative Fuel and Advanced  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heavy-Duty Alternative Heavy-Duty Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Purchase Vouchers to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Purchase Vouchers on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Purchase Vouchers on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Purchase Vouchers on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Purchase Vouchers on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Purchase Vouchers on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Purchase Vouchers on AddThis.com...

117

Property:RenewableFuelStandard/UndifferentiatedAdvancedBiofuel | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UndifferentiatedAdvancedBiofuel UndifferentiatedAdvancedBiofuel Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "RenewableFuelStandard/UndifferentiatedAdvancedBiofuel" Showing 14 pages using this property. R Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 0.5 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 4.5 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 1.75 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 4.5 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 4.5 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2.5 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 0.1 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 5 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 3 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 0.2 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 3.5 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 0.3 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 4 +

118

Advanced Electrocatalysts for PEM Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Webinar on PEM Fuel Cells 2-12-2013 Webinar on PEM Fuel Cells 2-12-2013 Advanced Electrocatalysts for PEM Fuel Cells Nenad M. Markovic Vojislav R. Stamenkovic Materials Science Division Argonne National Laboratory 1 st Layer 2 nd Layer 3 rd Layer Pt=100 at.% Pt=48 at.% Ni=52 at.% Pt=87 at.% Ni=13 at.% Pt[111]-Skin surface 5 nm (111) (100) 3 nm Size distribution c-15 nm Shape Bulk composition Surface structure ? HR-TEM: Characterization of Nanoscale Pt/C Catalyst x 15 x 5 Surface composition ? 2 Surface Science Approach design, synthesis, characterization, and testing of well-defined interfaces Pt/C H 2 O 2 Real Applications FUEL CELLS / BATTERIES / ELECTROLIZERS Activity and Stability Mapping DFT/MC EC Pt Au Ru Surface Characterization UHV Chemical / Physical Synthesis SXS/HRDFS FTIR HRTEM DOUBLE-LAYER-BY-DESIGN

119

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Energy Research Project Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Advanced Energy Advanced Energy Research Project Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Energy Research Project Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Energy Research Project Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Energy Research Project Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Energy Research Project Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Energy Research Project Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Energy Research Project Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Advanced Energy Research Project Grants The Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E) was established

120

Advanced Nuclear Fuel | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lithium-based Technologies Advanced Nuclear Fuel Advanced Nuclear Fuel Y-12 developers co-roll zirconium clad LEU-Mo. The Y-12 National Security Complex has over 60 years of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced automotive fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Alternative and Advanced Fuel Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Advanced Fuel Basics Alternative and Advanced Fuel Basics August 19, 2013 - 5:42pm Addthis Photo of a man in goggles looking at test tubes full of biodiesel. There are a...

122

Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

oil, possibly blended with performance-enhancing non-petroleum fossil resources such as natural gas or coal. Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels The Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels...

123

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Advance Biofuel Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Support for Advance Support for Advance Biofuel Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Advance Biofuel Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Advance Biofuel Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Advance Biofuel Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Advance Biofuel Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Advance Biofuel Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Advance Biofuel Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Support for Advance Biofuel Development The California Legislature urges the U.S. Congress or the U.S.

124

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Feedstock Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Advanced Biofuel Advanced Biofuel Feedstock Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Feedstock Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Feedstock Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Feedstock Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Feedstock Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Feedstock Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Feedstock Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Advanced Biofuel Feedstock Incentives The Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP; Section 9010) provides financial

125

Advanced direct methanol fuel cells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the program was an advanced proton-exchange membrane (PEM) for use as the electrolyte in a liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell which provides reduced methanol crossover while simultaneously providing high conductivity and low membrane water content. The approach was to use a membrane containing precross-linked fluorinated base polymer films and subsequently to graft the base film with selected materials. Over 80 different membranes were prepared. The rate of methanol crossover through the advanced membranes was reduced 90%. A 5-cell stack provided stable performance over a 100-hour life test. Preliminary cost estimates predicted a manufacturing cost at $4 to $9 per kW.

Hamdan, Monjid; Kosek, John A.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Mass-Production Cost Estimation for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Brian D. James (Primary Contact), Kevin Baum, Andrew B. Spisak, Whitney G. Colella Strategic Analysis, Inc. 4075 Wilson Blvd. Suite 200 Arlington VA 22203 Phone: (703) 778-7114 Email: bjames@sainc.com DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski, Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Gregory Kleen Phone: (720) 356-1672 Email: Gregory.Kleen@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0005236 Project Start Date: September 30, 2011 Project End Date: September 30, 2016 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Update 2011 automotive fuel cell cost model to include * latest performance data and system design information. Examine costs of fuel cell systems (FCSs) for light-duty * vehicle and bus applications.

127

Development of a Hybrid Compressor/Expander Module for Automotive Fuel Cell Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this program TIAX LLC conducted the development of an advanced technology compressor/expander for supplying compressed air to Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells in transportation applications. The overall objective of this program was to develop a hybrid compressor/expander module, based on both scroll and high-speed turbomachinery technologies, which will combine the strengths of each technology to create a concept with superior performance at minimal size and cost. The resulting system was expected to have efficiency and pressure delivery capability comparable to that of a scroll-only machine, at significantly reduced system size and weight when compared to scroll-only designs. Based on the results of detailed designs and analyses of the critical system elements, the Hybrid Compressor/Expander Module concept was projected to deliver significant improvements in weight, volume and manufacturing cost relative to previous generation systems.

McTaggart, Paul

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

128

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Payments  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Payments to someone by E-mail Payments to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Payments on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Payments on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Payments on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Payments on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Payments on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Payments on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Advanced Biofuel Production Payments Through the Bioenergy Program for Advanced Biofuels (Section 9005),

129

Green Racing's Impact on the Automotive World | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Racing's Impact on the Automotive World Green Racing's Impact on the Automotive World Green Racing's Impact on the Automotive World April 16, 2012 - 4:52pm Addthis One of the competitors from the Michelin Green X Challenge. | Photo courtesy of Green Racing. One of the competitors from the Michelin Green X Challenge. | Photo courtesy of Green Racing. Patrick B. Davis Patrick B. Davis Vehicle Technologies Program Manager What does this project do? Green Racing uses motorsports competition to help educate and promote alternative fuels and advanced vehicle technologies that can be transferred from the race track to the consumer market. The automotive racing world has a long history of moving the car industry forward through the development and use of new technology. Seeing racing's tremendous promise, the Energy Department, U.S. Environmental

130

Green Racing's Impact on the Automotive World | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Racing's Impact on the Automotive World Racing's Impact on the Automotive World Green Racing's Impact on the Automotive World April 16, 2012 - 4:52pm Addthis One of the competitors from the Michelin Green X Challenge. | Photo courtesy of Green Racing. One of the competitors from the Michelin Green X Challenge. | Photo courtesy of Green Racing. Patrick B. Davis Patrick B. Davis Vehicle Technologies Program Manager What does this project do? Green Racing uses motorsports competition to help educate and promote alternative fuels and advanced vehicle technologies that can be transferred from the race track to the consumer market. The automotive racing world has a long history of moving the car industry forward through the development and use of new technology. Seeing racing's tremendous promise, the Energy Department, U.S. Environmental

131

Working towards a future on alternative fuels : the role of the automotive industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complementarity of vehicles and fuels has posed significant barrier for increasing the use of alternative fuels in place of traditional ones. An initial positive number of either alternative fuel vehicle (AFV) users or ...

Chen, Cuicui

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Energy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency, Biomass, Hydrogen, Transportation Phase: Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan Topics: Datasets, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Dataset, Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/ Cost: Free References: Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center[1] The Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center provides a wide range of information and resources to enable the use of alternative fuels, in addition to other petroleum reduction options such as advanced vehicles,

133

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Grants and Loan  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Grants and Loan Guarantees to someone by E-mail Grants and Loan Guarantees to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Grants and Loan Guarantees on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Grants and Loan Guarantees on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Grants and Loan Guarantees on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Grants and Loan Guarantees on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Grants and Loan Guarantees on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Grants and Loan Guarantees on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

134

Advanced computational simulation for design and manufacturing of lightweight material components for automotive applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Computational vehicle models for the analysis of lightweight material performance in automobiles have been developed through collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration, and George Washington University. The vehicle models have been verified against experimental data obtained from vehicle collisions. The crashed vehicles were analyzed, and the main impact energy dissipation mechanisms were identified and characterized. Important structural parts were extracted and digitized and directly compared with simulation results. High-performance computing played a key role in the model development because it allowed for rapid computational simulations and model modifications. The deformation of the computational model shows a very good agreement with the experiments. This report documents the modifications made to the computational model and relates them to the observations and findings on the test vehicle. Procedural guidelines are also provided that the authors believe need to be followed to create realistic models of passenger vehicles that could be used to evaluate the performance of lightweight materials in automotive structural components.

Simunovic, S.; Aramayo, G.A.; Zacharia, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Toridis, T.G. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Bandak, F.; Ragland, C.L. [Dept. of Transportation, Washington, DC (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

INTRODUCTION The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies conducts research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conducts research and development on advanced rechargeable batteries for application in electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) systems. Problems impeding the development of high), which develops advanced batteries for EVs, and the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV

Kwak, Juhyoun

136

Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Program's TRISO Particle Fuel Sets A New World  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Program's TRISO Particle Fuel Sets A New Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Program's TRISO Particle Fuel Sets A New World Record For Irradiation Performance Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Program's TRISO Particle Fuel Sets A New World Record For Irradiation Performance November 16, 2009 - 1:12pm Addthis As part of the Office of Nuclear Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program, the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development Program has achieved a new international record for irradiation testing of next-generation particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors (HTGRs). The AGR Fuel Development Program was initiated by the Department of Energy in 2002 to develop the advanced fabrication and characterization technologies, and provide irradiation and safety performance data required to license TRISO particle fuel for the NGNP and future HTGRs. The AGR

137

Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Program  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the original Request for Proposal was to establish the technological bases necessary for the subsequent commercial development and deployment of advanced coal-fueled gas turbine power systems by the private sector. The offeror was to identify the specific application or applications, toward which his development efforts would be directed; define and substantiate the technical, economic, and environmental criteria for the selected application; and conduct such component design, development, integration, and tests as deemed necessary to fulfill this objective. Specifically, the offeror was to choose a system through which ingenious methods of grouping subcomponents into integrated systems accomplishes the following: (1) Preserve the inherent power density and performance advantages of gas turbine systems. (2) System must be capable of meeting or exceeding existing and expected environmental regulations for the proposed application. (3) System must offer a considerable improvement over coal-fueled systems which are commercial, have been demonstrated, or are being demonstrated. (4) System proposed must be an integrated gas turbine concept, i.e., all fuel conditioning, all expansion gas conditioning, or post-expansion gas cleaning, must be integrated into the gas turbine system.

Horner, M.W.; Ekstedt, E.E.; Gal, E.; Jackson, M.R.; Kimura, S.G.; Lavigne, R.G.; Lucas, C.; Rairden, J.R.; Sabla, P.E.; Savelli, J.F.; Slaughter, D.M.; Spiro, C.L.; Staub, F.W.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Tools (AFAVT), AFDC (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Web site offers a collection of calculators, interactive maps, and informational tools to assist fleets, fuel providers, and others looking to reduce petroleum consumption in the transportation sector.

Not Available

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Alternative Fuel Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Fuel Vehicles SuperShuttle CNG Van Alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) are vehicles designed to operate on alternative fuels such as compressed and liquefied natural gas,...

140

Technology development goals for automotive fuel cell power systems. Final report, Appendix B-2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Directed Technologies, Inc. has previously submitted a detailed technical assessment and concept design for a mid-size, five-passenger fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV), under contract to the Argonne National Laboratory. As a supplement to that contract, DTI has reviewed the literature and conducted a preliminary evaluation of two energy carriers for the FCEV: hydrogen and methanol. This report compares the estimated fuel efficiency, cost of producing and delivering the fuel, and the resultant life cycle costs of the FCEV when fueled directly by hydrogen and when fueled by methanol with on-board reforming to produce the required hydrogen-rich gas for the fuel cell. This work will be supplemented and expanded under the Ford contract with the Department of Energy to develop the FCEV and its fuel infrastructure.

Thomas, C.E.; James, B.D.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced automotive fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Updated Uranium Fuel Cycle Environmental Impacts for Advanced Reactor Designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to update the environmental impacts from the uranium fuel cycle for select advanced (GEN III+) reactor designs.

Nitschke, R.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

142

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicle Technologies: Information Resources (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Clean Cities brochure listing and describing Web sites and telephone numbers of resources for people interested in alternative fuels and advanced vehicle technologies.

Not Available

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center - Federal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and State Incentives and Laws Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center - Federal and State Incentives and...

144

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center - Codes and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Center - Codes and Standards Resources Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center - Codes and Standards Resources...

145

Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pilot Program Emissions Benefit Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program Emissions Benefit Tool...

146

Brazil-NETL Advanced Fossil Fuels Partnerships | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Brazil-NETL Advanced Fossil Fuels Partnerships Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Brazil-NETL...

147

The Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies (MA3T) Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be learned about how consumers will evaluate novel vehicle technologies, such as plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV), extended-range electric vehicle (EREV), battery electric vehicles (BEV) and fuel cell-- passenger cars and light-duty trucks. MA3 T considers the U.S. household users of light- duty vehicles (LDV

148

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Westinghouse's Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine System Program (DE-AC2l-86MC23167) was originally split into two major phases - a Basic Program and an Option. The Basic Program also contained two phases. The development of a 6 atm, 7 lb/s, 12 MMBtu/hr slagging combustor with an extended period of testing of the subscale combustor, was the first part of the Basic Program. In the second phase of the Basic Program, the combustor was to be operated over a 3-month period with a stationary cascade to study the effect of deposition, erosion and corrosion on combustion turbine components. The testing of the concept, in subscale, has demonstrated its ability to handle high- and low-sulfur bituminous coals, and low-sulfur subbituminous coal. Feeding the fuel in the form of PC has proven to be superior to CWM type feed. The program objectives relative to combustion efficiency, combustor exit temperature, NO[sub x] emissions, carbon burnout, and slag rejection have been met. Objectives for alkali, particulate, and SO[sub x] levels leaving the combustor were not met by the conclusion of testing at Textron. It is planned to continue this testing, to achieve all desired emission levels, as part of the W/NSP program to commercialize the slagging combustor technology.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY DELPHI AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEMS, LLC (DELPHI) FOR AN ADVANCE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SYSTEMS, LLC (DELPHI) FOR AN ADVANCE SYSTEMS, LLC (DELPHI) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE AWARD NO. DE-EE0005342; W(A) 2011-064 DELPHI has requested a waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights of the United States of America in all subject inventions arising from its pm1icipation under the above referenced cooperative agreement entitled "Cascaded Micro Inverter System for Reduced Costs." ·1 he cooperative agreement was made under the Solar Energy Grid Integration Systems- Adv

150

Fuel-flexible partial oxidation reforming of hydrocarbons for automotive applications.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Micro-reactor tests indicate that our partial oxidation catalyst is fuel-flexible and can reform conventional (gasoline and diesel) and alternative (ethanol, methanol, natural gas) fuels to hydrogen rich product gases with high hydrogen selectivity. Alcohols are reformed at lower temperatures (< 600 C) while alkanes and unsaturated hydrocarbons require slightly higher temperatures. Cyclic hydrocarbons and aromatics have also been reformed at relatively low temperatures, however, a different mechanism appears to be responsible for their reforming. Complex fuels like gasoline and diesel, which are mixtures of a broad range of hydrocarbons, require temperatures of > 700 C for maximum hydrogen production.

Ahmed, S.; Carter, J. D.; Kopasz, J. P.; Krumpelt, M.; Wilkenhoener, R.

1999-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

151

Emissions Characterization from Advanced Combustion & Alternative Fuels -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Characterization from Advanced Combustion & Emissions Characterization from Advanced Combustion & Alternative Fuels Exhaust emissions from engines operating in advanced combustion modes such as PCCI (Premixed Charge Compression Ignition) and HCCI (Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition) are analyzed with an array of analytical tools. Furthermore, emissions from a variety of alternative fuels and mixtures thereof with conventional gasoline and diesel fuels are also measured. In addition to measuring the criteria pollutants nitrogen oxides (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HCs) are also measured and categorized based on chemistry. These chemical details of the emissions provide important information for optimizing combustion processes to maximize fuel efficiency while minimizing emissions

152

Metallic fuels: The EBR-II legacy and recent advances  

SciTech Connect

Experimental Breeder Reactor – II (EBR-II) metallic fuel was qualified for high burnup to approximately 10 atomic per cent. Subsequently, the electrometallurgical treatment of this fuel was demonstrated. Advanced metallic fuels are now investigated for increased performance, including ultra-high burnup and actinide burning. Advances include additives to mitigate the fuel/cladding chemical interaction and uranium alloys that combine Mo, Ti and Zr to improve alloy performance. The impacts of the advances—on fabrication, waste streams, electrorefining, etc.—are found to be minimal and beneficial. Owing to extensive research literature and computational methods, only a modest effort is required to complete their development.

Douglas L. Porter; Steven L. Hayes; J. Rory Kennedy

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Enhanced air/fuel mixing for automotive stirling engine turbulator-type combustors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to the improved combustion of fuel in a combustion chamber of a stirling engine and the like by dividing combustion into primary and secondary combustion zones through the use of a diverter plate.

Riecke, George T. (Ballston Spa, NY); Stotts, Robert E. (Newark, NY)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels and Advanced...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

| Diesel Vehicles Electricity | Hybrid & Plug-In Electric Vehicles Ethanol | Flex Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen | Fuel Cell Vehicles Natural Gas | Natural Gas Vehicles Propane |...

155

Advanced fuel cells and their future market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The advantages of fuel cells over competing technologies are outlined. These include higher fuel-efficiency (and thus lower fuel costs) and financial credits that may help reduce the effective introductory capital costs and thus help broaden the market. The credits for fuel cells result from their modularity, relative independence of efficiency on size and load, dispersibility, and rapid installation time. The fuel cell of primary interest in the United States and Japan is the PAFC (whose operation is limited by materials problems to ca. 200{degrees}C), because it is the most highly developed for use with natural gas or clean light distillate fuels. Competing fuel cell (FC) technologies are the alkaline fuel cell (AFC, limited to 80{degrees}C if inexpensive construction materials are used), the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC, 650{degrees}C), and the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC, 1000{degrees}C). The author focuses on the MCFC in this paper.

Appleby, A.J. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (US))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines and Fuel Cells: 2000 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUELS FUELS FOR ADVANCED CIDI ENGINES AND FUEL CELLS FUELS FOR ADVANCED CIDI ENGINES AND FUEL CELLS 2000 ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT FUELS F O R ADVANCED CIDI ENGINES A N D FUEL CELLS A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T We would like to express our sincere appreciation to Argonne National Laboratory, Computer Systems Management, Inc., National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and QSS Group, Inc., for their artistic and technical contributions in preparing and publishing this report. In addition, we would like to thank all our program participants for their contributions to the programs and all the authors who prepared the project abstracts that comprise this report. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Transportation Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2000 Progress Report for Fuels for Advanced CIDI

157

Hydrogen fuel closer to reality because of storage advances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. Department of Energy's Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence describe a significant advance- 1 - Hydrogen fuel closer to reality because of storage advances March 21, 2012 Drive toward hydrogen vehicles just got shorter A significant advance in hydrogen storage could make hydrogen a more

Kurien, Susan

158

Experimental hydrogen-fueled automotive engine design data-base project. Volume 2. Main technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Operational performance and emissions characteristics of hydrogen-fueled engines are reviewed. The project activities are reviewed including descriptions of the test engine and its components, the test apparatus, experimental techniques, experiments performed and the results obtained. Analyses of other hydrogen engine project data are also presented and compared with the results of the present effort.

Swain, M.R.; Adt, R.R. Jr.; Pappas, J.M.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Advanced ECU Software Development Method for Fuel Cell Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electronic control unit (ECU) in electrical powered hybrid and fuel cell vehicles is exceedingly complex. Rapid prototyping control is used to reduce development time and eliminate errors during software development. This paper describes a high-efficiency development method and a flexible tool chain suitable for various applications in automotive engineering. The control algorithm can be deployed directly from a Matlab/Simulink/Stateflow environment into the ECU hardware together with an OSEK real-time operating system (RTOS). The system has been successfully used to develop a 20-kW fuel cell system ECU based on a Motorola PowerPC 555 (MPC555) microcontroller. The total software development time is greatly reduced and the code quality and reliability are greatly enhanced.

Tian Shuo; Liu Yuan; Xia Wenchuan; Li Jianqiu; Yang Minggao

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activity towards completing Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Phase I work was begun again in December. Effort to complete the Phase I work was temporarily suspended upon receipt of the ATS Phase II RFP the last week in August. The Westinghouse ATS team's efforts were directed at preparing the ATS Phase II proposal which was submitted November 18. It is planned to finish Phase I work and submit the topical report by the end of February 1993. The objective of the four slogging combustor tests conducted during this reporting period (i.e., tests SL3-1 through SL3-4) were to perform sulfur capture experiments using limestoneand iron oxide based sorbents and to collect exhaust vapor phase and solids bound alkali measurements using the Westinghouse and Ames Laboratory alkali probes/monitors. The most significant, if not outstanding result revealed by these tests is that the Ames alkali monitor indicates that the vapor phase sodium is approximately 23--30 ppbw and the vapor phase potassium is approximately 5--20 ppbw. For reference, alkalilevels of 20 ppbw are acceptable in Westinghouse gas turbines fueled with crude oil.

Not Available

1993-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced automotive fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Hydrogen fuel closer to reality because of storage advances  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen fuel closer to reality because of storage advances Hydrogen fuel closer to reality because of storage advances Hydrogen fuel closer to reality because of storage advances Advances made in rechargeable solid hydrogen fuel storage tanks. March 21, 2012 Field experiments on the Alamosa Canyon How best to achieve the benchmark of 300 miles of travel without refueling? It may be to use the lightweight compound ammonia-borane to carry the hydrogen. With hydrogen accounting for almost 20 percent of its weight, this stable, non-flammable compound is one of the highest-capacity materials for storing hydrogen. In a car, the introduction of a chemical catalyst would release the hydrogen as needed, thus avoiding on-board storage of large quantities of flammable hydrogen gas. When the ammonia-borane fuel is depleted of hydrogen, it would be regenerated at a

162

Ceramic Automotive Stirling Engine Program  

SciTech Connect

The Ceramic Automotive Stirling Engine Program evaluated the application of advanced ceramic materials to an automotive Stirling engine. The objective of the program was to evaluate the technical feasibility of utilizing advanced ceramics to increase peak engine operating temperature, and to evaluate the performance benefits of such an increase. Manufacturing cost estimates were also developed for various ceramic engine components and compared with conventional metallic engine component costs.

Not Available

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center - Fleet Experiences |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center - Fleet Experiences Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center - Fleet Experiences Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center - Fleet Experiences Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Focus Area: Vehicles Topics: Best Practices Complexity/Ease of Use: Not Available Website: www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/fleets/fleet_experiences.html Related Tools Finalize Historic National Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gases and Improve Fuel Economy for Cars and Trucks Diesel Idling Reduction Tool and Calculator (Transit, Fuel) ... further results Find Another Tool FIND TRANSPORTATION TOOLS This compilation of case studies shows how other fleets are using alternative fuel vehicles, dealing with infrastructure issues, obtaining

164

Alternative powertrains for automotive applications aim at improving emissions and fuel economy. Lack of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

studies. In our efforts to build a design envi- ronment for hybrid electric vehicles, we have developed algorithms. Vehicle handling simulations and advanced light-weight body structure designs are also available, rigor, since it is based on mathematical methods of decision making. A simple application to a hybrid

Papalambros, Panos

165

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Advanced Power Electronics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Research Search More Search Options Site Map The electric drive system is the technology foundation for hybrid electric and fuel cell vehicles. That's why NREL's Advanced Power Electronics project supports and promotes the design, development, and demonstration of power electronic components and systems that will overcome major technical barriers to the commercialization of hybrid, advanced internal combustion, and fuel cell vehicle technologies. In support of DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office, our researchers focus on developing advanced power electronics and electric machinery technologies that improve reliability, efficiency, and ruggedness, and dramatically decrease systems costs for advanced vehicles. Key components for these vehicles include the motor controller, DC to DC converters, and inverters

166

Connecticut Company to Advance Hydrogen Infrastructure and Fueling Station  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Connecticut Company to Advance Hydrogen Infrastructure and Fueling Connecticut Company to Advance Hydrogen Infrastructure and Fueling Station Technologies Connecticut Company to Advance Hydrogen Infrastructure and Fueling Station Technologies July 18, 2012 - 3:36pm Addthis As part of the U.S. Energy Department's commitment to give American businesses more options to cut energy costs and reduce reliance on imported oil, the Department today announced a $1.4 million investment to Wallingford- based Proton Energy Systems to collect and analyze performance data for hydrogen fueling stations and advanced refueling components. The projects will also help to track the performance and technical progress of innovative refueling systems to find ways to lower costs and improve operation. These investments are part of the Department's broader strategy

167

Brazil-NETL Advanced Fossil Fuels Partnerships | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Advanced Fossil Fuels Partnerships Advanced Fossil Fuels Partnerships (Redirected from Brazil-NETL Cooperation) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Brazil-NETL Cooperation Name Brazil-NETL Cooperation Agency/Company /Organization National Energy Technology Laboratory Partner Brazil Sector Energy Topics Background analysis Website http://www.netl.doe.gov/techno Program Start 2007 Program End 2012 Country Brazil South America References NETL Technologies Programs[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Advanced Fossil Fuels Partnerships with Brazil ORD International Research Agreements Brazilian Coal Gasification and CCS MOUs References ↑ NETL Technologies Programs Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Brazil-NETL_Advanced_Fossil_Fuels_Partnerships&oldid=375248"

168

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center - Codes and Standards  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center - Codes and Standards Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center - Codes and Standards Resources Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center - Codes and Standards Resources Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/codes_standards.html This resource provides an overview of codes and standards related to alternative fuel vehicles, dispensing, storage, and infrastructure to help project developers and code officials prepare and review code-compliant projects. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies: Improve - Enhance infrastructure & policies Learn more about the avoid, shift, improve framework for limiting air

169

Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New TRU Fuel Fabrication Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This second report in a series of three reviews possible safeguards approaches for the new transuranic (TRU) fuel fabrication processes to be deployed at AFCF – specifically, the ceramic TRU (MOX) fuel fabrication line and the metallic (pyroprocessing) line. The most common TRU fuel has been fuel composed of mixed plutonium and uranium dioxide, referred to as “MOX”. However, under the Advanced Fuel Cycle projects custom-made fuels with higher contents of neptunium, americium, and curium may also be produced to evaluate if these “minor actinides” can be effectively burned and transmuted through irradiation in the ABR. A third and final report in this series will evaluate and review the advanced safeguards approach options for the ABR. In reviewing and developing the advanced safeguards approach for the new TRU fuel fabrication processes envisioned for AFCF, the existing international (IAEA) safeguards approach at the Plutonium Fuel Production Facility (PFPF) and the conceptual approach planned for the new J-MOX facility in Japan have been considered as a starting point of reference. The pyro-metallurgical reprocessing and fuel fabrication process at EBR-II near Idaho Falls also provided insight for safeguarding the additional metallic pyroprocessing fuel fabrication line planned for AFCF.

Durst, Philip C.; Ehinger, Michael H.; Boyer, Brian; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Tolk, K.

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

Metal/ceria water-gas shift catalysts for automotive polymer electrolyte fuel cell system.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) systems are a leading candidate for replacing the internal combustion engine in light duty vehicles. One method of generating the hydrogen necessary for the PEFC is reforming a liquid fuel, such as methanol or gasoline, via partial oxidation, steam reforming, or autothermal reforming (a combination of partial oxidation and steam reforming). The H{sub 2}-rich reformate can contain as much as 10% carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide has been shown to poison the platinum-based anode catalyst at concentrations as low as 10 ppm,1 necessitating removal of CO to this level before passing the reformate to the fuel cell stack. The water-gas shift (WGS) reaction, CO + H{sub 2}O {rightleftharpoons} CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}, is used to convert the bulk of the reformate CO to CO{sub 2}. Industrially, the WGS reaction is conducted over two catalysts, which operate in different temperature regimes. One catalyst is a FeCr mixed oxide, which operates at 350-450 C and is termed the high-temperature shift (HTS) catalyst. The second catalyst is a CuZn mixed oxide, which operates at 200-250 C and is termed the low-temperature shift (LTS) catalyst. Although these two catalysts are used industrially in the production of H{sub 2} for ammonia synthesis, they have major drawbacks that make them unsuitable for transportation applications. Both the LTS and the HTS catalysts must first be ''activated'' before being used. For example, the copper in the copper oxide/zinc oxide LTS catalyst must first be reduced to elemental copper in situ before it becomes active for the WGS reaction. This reduction reaction is exothermic and must be carried out under well- controlled conditions using a dilute hydrogen stream (1 vol% H{sub 2}) to prevent high catalyst temperatures, which can result in sintering (agglomeration) of the copper particles and loss of active surface area for the WGS reaction. Also, once the catalyst has been activated by reduction, it must be protected from exposure to ambient air to prevent re-oxidation of the copper. The activated catalyst must also be protected from the condensation of liquids, for example, during start-up or transient operation. For these reasons, a more thermally rugged catalyst is needed which has sufficient activity to operate at the low temperatures that are thermodynamically necessary to achieve low CO concentrations.

Myers, D. J.; Krebs, J. F.; Carter, J. D.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

2002-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

171

Decision Framework for Evaluating Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI is working to develop tools to support long-term strategic planning for research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) of advanced nuclear fuel cycle technologies for electricity generation. The development of a decision framework to help guide the eventual deployment of advanced nuclear technologies represents a key component of this effort. This interim report describes the structure of a prototypical EPRI decision framework and illustrates how that framework can be applied to assess nuclear fuel...

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

172

Status and Outlook for the U.S. Non-Automotive Fuel Cell Industry: Impacts of Government Policies and Assessment of Future Opportunities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells (FCs) are considered essential future energy technologies by developed and developing economies alike. Several countries, including the United States, Japan, Germany, and South Korea have established publicly funded R&D and market transformation programs to develop viable domestic FC industries for both automotive and non-automotive applications. Important non-automotive applications include large scale and small scale distributed combined heat and electrical power, backup and uninterruptible power, material handling and auxiliary power units. The U.S. FC industry is in the early stages of development, and is working to establish sustainable markets in all these areas. To be successful, manufacturers must reduce costs, improve performance, and overcome market barriers to new technologies. U.S. policies are assisting via research and development, tax credits and government-only and government-assisted procurements. Over the past three years, the industry has made remarkable progress, bringing both stack and system costs down by more than a factor of two while improving durability and efficiency, thanks in part to government support. Today, FCs are still not yet able to compete in these markets without continued policy support. However, continuation or enhancement of current policies, such as the investment tax credit and government procurements, together with continued progress by the industry, appears likely to establish a viable domestic industry within the next decade.

Greene, David L [ORNL; Duleep, K. G. [ICF International; Upreti, Girish [ORNL

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Alternative Fuel Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are vehicles designed to operate on alternative fuels such as compressed and liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas (propane), ethanol, biodiesel, electricity, and...

174

Introduction to Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Advanced Nuclear Fuels: Jon ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 1, 2012 ... Increased use of fossil fuel will result in. • Resource shortfalls and regional conflicts,. • Serious environmental impact. • Worldwide expansion of ...

175

2000 Annual Progress Report for Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines and Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Technologies Fiscal Year (FY) 2000 Annual Progress Report for the Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines and Fuel Cells Program highlights progress achieved during FY 2000 and comprises 22 summaries of industry and National Laboratory projects that were conducted. The report provides an overview of the exciting work being conducted to tackle the tough technical challenges associated with developing clean burning fuels that will enable meeting the performance goals of the Emission Control R and D for Advanced CIDI Engines and the Transportation Fuel Cell Power Systems Programs. The summaries cover the effects of CIDI engine emissions and fuel cell power system performance, the effects of lubricants on engine emissions, the effects of fuel and consumed lubricants on exhaust emission control devices and the health and safety, materials compatibility, and economics of advanced petroleum-based fuels.

Chalk, S.

2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

176

Fuel cell and advanced turbine power cycle  

SciTech Connect

Solar has a vested interest in integration of gas turbines and high temperature fuels (particularly solid oxide fuel cells[SOFC]); this would be a backup for achieving efficiencies on the order of 60% with low exhaust emissions. Preferred cycle is with the fuel cell as a topping system to the gas turbine; bottoming arrangements (fuel cells using the gas turbine exhaust as air supply) would likely be both larger and less efficient unless complex steam bottoming systems are added. The combined SOFC and gas turbine will have an advantage because it will have lower NOx emissions than any heat engine system. Market niche for initial product entry will be the dispersed or distributed power market in nonattainment areas. First entry will be of 1-2 MW units between the years 2000 and 2004. Development requirements are outlined for both the fuel cell and the gas turbine.

White, D.J.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

The DOE Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high outlet temperatures and high thermal-energy conversion efficiency of modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) enable an efficient and cost effective integration of the reactor system with non-electricity generation applications, such as process heat and/or hydrogen production, for the many petrochemical and other industrial processes that require temperatures between 300°C and 900°C. The Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the HTGR concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project as a transformative application of nuclear energy that will demonstrate emissions-free nuclear-assisted electricity, process heat, and hydrogen production, thereby reducing greenhouse-gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The objective of the DOE Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification program is to qualify tristructural isotropic (TRISO)-coated particle fuel for use in HTGRs. The Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program consists of five elements: fuel manufacture, fuel and materials irradiations, post-irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing, fuel performance modeling, and fission-product transport and source term evaluation. An underlying theme for the fuel development work is the need to develop a more complete, fundamental understanding of the relationship between the fuel fabrication process and key fuel properties, the irradiation and accident safety performance of the fuel, and the release and transport of fission products in the NGNP primary coolant system. An overview of the program and recent progress is presented.

David Petti

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Surrogate Model Development for Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fuels used in internal-combustion engines are complex mixtures of a multitude of different types of hydrocarbon species. Attempting numerical simulations of combustion of real fuels with all of the hydrocarbon species included is highly unrealistic. Thus, a surrogate model approach is generally adopted, which involves choosing a few representative hydrocarbon species whose overall behavior mimics the characteristics of the target fuel. The present study proposes surrogate models for the nine fuels for advanced combustion engines (FACE) that have been developed for studying low-emission, high-efficiency advanced diesel engine concepts. The surrogate compositions for the fuels are arrived at by simulating their distillation profiles to within a maximum absolute error of 4% using a discrete multi-component (DMC) fuel model that has been incorporated in the multi-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, KIVA-ERC-CHEMKIN. The simulated surrogate compositions cover the range and measured concentrations of the various hydrocarbon classes present in the fuels. The fidelity of the surrogate fuel models is judged on the basis of matching their specific gravity, lower heating value, hydrogen/carbon (H/C) ratio, cetane number, and cetane index with the measured data for all nine FACE fuels.

Anand, Krishnasamy [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Ra, youngchul [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Reitz, Rolf [University of Wisconsin; Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Advanced Fuel Cell Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuel Cell Systems Fuel Cell Systems Place Amherst, New York Zip 14228 Product Collaboration of three companies (ATSI Engineering, ENrg, BioEconomy Development Corp) active in the development and application of fuel cell systems. Coordinates 44.450509°, -89.281675° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.450509,"lon":-89.281675,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

180

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Advanced Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials Advanced Materials The Advanced Materials group within NREL's Materials and Computational Sciences Center develops novel and optimized materials for energy-related applications that include sorption-based hydrogen storage, fuel cells, catalysts, photovoltaics, batteries, electrochromics, electronics, sensors, electricity conduction, and thermal management. These R&D efforts use first-principle models combined with state-of-the-art synthetic and characterization techniques to rationally design and construct advanced materials with new and improved properties. In addition to creating specific material properties tailored for the application of interest by understanding the underlying chemical and physical mechanisms involved, the research focuses on developing materials

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced automotive fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The Synthesis and Sintering of Advanced Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The future of nuclear energy in the U.S. and its worldwide ... and consequential use of complex nuclear fuels comprised of fissle materials such as Pu, ... in a Fusion/Fission Engine for Incineration of Weapons Grade Plutonium.

182

Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program Emissions  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program Emissions Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program Emissions Benefit Tool Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program Emissions Benefit Tool Agency/Company /Organization: Argonne National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options Topics: Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory Resource Type: Online calculator, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.transportation.anl.gov/modeling_simulation/AirCred/index.html

183

FY2001 Progress Report for Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines and Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUELS FOR ADVANCED CIDI FUELS FOR ADVANCED CIDI ENGINES AND FUEL CELLS 2 0 0 1 A N N U A L P R O G R E S S R E P O R T U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation Technologies A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T We would like to express our sincere appreciation to Argonne National Laboratory and QSS Group, Inc., for their artistic, editorial and technical contributions in preparing and publishing this report. In addition, we would like to thank all our program participants for their contributions to the programs and all the authors who prepared the project abstracts that comprise this report. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Transportation Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2001 Progress Report for Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines and Fuel Cells

184

Integration of carbonate fuel cells with advanced coal gasification systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbonate fuel cells have attributes which make them ideally suited to operate on coal-derived fuel gas; they can convert the methane, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide present in coal derived fuel gas directly to electricity, are not subject to thermodynamic cycle limits as are heat engines, and operate at temperatures compatible with coal gasifiers. Some new opportunities for improved efficiency have been identified in integrated coal gasification/carbonate fuel cells which take advantage of low temperature catalytic coal gasification producing a methane-rich fuel gas, and the internal methane reforming capabilities of Energy Research Corporation's carbonate fuel cells. By selecting the appropriate operating conditions and catalyst in the gasifier, methane formation is maximized to improve gasification efficiency and to take advantage of the heat management aspects of the internal reforming carbonate fuel cell. These advanced integrated gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems are projected to have better efficiencies than gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems employing conventional gasification, and also competing non-fuel cell systems. These improved efficiencies would be accompanied by a corresponding reduction in impact on the environment as well.

Steinfeld, G. (Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States)); Meyers, S.J. (Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)); Hauserman, W.B. (North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Integration of carbonate fuel cells with advanced coal gasification systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbonate fuel cells have attributes which make them ideally suited to operate on coal-derived fuel gas; they can convert the methane, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide present in coal derived fuel gas directly to electricity, are not subject to thermodynamic cycle limits as are heat engines, and operate at temperatures compatible with coal gasifiers. Some new opportunities for improved efficiency have been identified in integrated coal gasification/carbonate fuel cells which take advantage of low temperature catalytic coal gasification producing a methane-rich fuel gas, and the internal methane reforming capabilities of Energy Research Corporation`s carbonate fuel cells. By selecting the appropriate operating conditions and catalyst in the gasifier, methane formation is maximized to improve gasification efficiency and to take advantage of the heat management aspects of the internal reforming carbonate fuel cell. These advanced integrated gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems are projected to have better efficiencies than gasification/carbonate fuel cell systems employing conventional gasification, and also competing non-fuel cell systems. These improved efficiencies would be accompanied by a corresponding reduction in impact on the environment as well.

Steinfeld, G. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States); Meyers, S.J. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States); Hauserman, W.B. [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

ULTRACLEAN FUELS PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FOR THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY: ADVANCES TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION FUELS  

SciTech Connect

Ultraclean fuels production has become increasingly important as a method to help decrease emissions and allow the introduction of alternative feed stocks for transportation fuels. Established methods, such as Fischer-Tropsch, have seen a resurgence of interest as natural gas prices drop and existing petroleum resources require more intensive clean-up and purification to meet stringent environmental standards. This review covers some of the advances in deep desulfurization, synthesis gas conversion into fuels and feed stocks that were presented at the 245th American Chemical Society Spring Annual Meeting in New Orleans, LA in the Division of Energy and Fuels symposium on "Ultraclean Fuels Production and Utilization".

Fox, E.

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

187

Current Comparison of Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles  

SciTech Connect

This paper compares potential nuclear fuel cycle strategies – once-through, recycling in thermal reactors, sustained recycle with a mix of thermal and fast reactors, and sustained recycle with fast reactors. Initiation of recycle starts the draw-down of weapons-usable material and starts accruing improvements for geologic repositories and energy sustainability. It reduces the motivation to search for potential second geologic repository sites. Recycle in thermal-spectru

Steven Piet; Trond Bjornard; Brent Dixon; Robert Hill; Gretchen Matthern; David Shropshire

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Lessons Learned From Dynamic Simulations of Advanced Fuel Cycles  

SciTech Connect

Years of performing dynamic simulations of advanced nuclear fuel cycle options provide insights into how they could work and how one might transition from the current once-through fuel cycle. This paper summarizes those insights from the context of the 2005 objectives and goals of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). Our intent is not to compare options, assess options versus those objectives and goals, nor recommend changes to those objectives and goals. Rather, we organize what we have learned from dynamic simulations in the context of the AFCI objectives for waste management, proliferation resistance, uranium utilization, and economics. Thus, we do not merely describe “lessons learned” from dynamic simulations but attempt to answer the “so what” question by using this context. The analyses have been performed using the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Dynamics (VISION). We observe that the 2005 objectives and goals do not address many of the inherently dynamic discriminators among advanced fuel cycle options and transitions thereof.

Steven J. Piet; Brent W. Dixon; Jacob J. Jacobson; Gretchen E. Matthern; David E. Shropshire

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Advanced materials for solid oxide fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is to improve the properties of the current state-of-the-art materials used for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The objectives are to: (1) develop materials based on modifications of the state-of-the-art materials; (2) minimize or eliminate stability problems in the cathode, anode, and interconnect; (3) Electrochemically evaluate (in reproducible and controlled laboratory tests) the current state-of-the-art air electrode materials and cathode/electrolyte interfacial properties; (4) Develop accelerated electrochemical test methods to evaluate the performance of SOFCs under controlled and reproducible conditions; and (5) Develop and test materials for use in low-temperature SOFCs.

Armstrong, T.; Stevenson, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles -- Main Challenges and Strategic Choices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a critical review of the technological challenges to the growth of nuclear energy, emerging advanced technologies that would have to be deployed, and fuel cycle strategies that could conceivably involve interim storage, plutonium recycling in thermal and fast reactors, reprocessed uranium recycling, and transmutation of minor actinide elements and fission products before eventual disposal of residual wastes.

2010-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

191

The AMP (Advanced MultiPhysics) Nuclear Fuel Performance Code  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The AMP (Advanced MultiPhysics) Nuclear Fuel Performance code is a new, three-dimensional, multi-physics tool that uses state-of-the-art solution methods and validated nuclear fuel models to simulate the nominal operation and anticipated operational transients of nuclear fuel. The AMP Nuclear Fuel Performance code leverages existing validated material models from traditional fuel performance codes and the Scale/ORIGEN-S spent-fuel characterization code to provide an initial capability that is shown to be sufficiently accurate for a single benchmark problem and anticipated to be accurate for a broad range of problems. The thermomechanics-chemical foundation can be solved in a time-dependent or quasi-static approach with any variation of operator-split or fully-coupled solutions at each time step. The AMP Nuclear Fuel Performance code provides interoperable interfaces to leading computational mathematics tools, which will simplify the integration of the code into existing parallel code suites for reactor simulation or lower-length-scale coupling. A baseline validation of the AMP Nuclear Fuel Performance code has been performed through the modeling of an experiment in the Halden Reactor Project (IFA-432), which is the first validation problem incorporated in the FRAPCON Integral Assessment report.

Clarno, Kevin T [ORNL; Philip, Bobby [ORNL; Cochran, Bill [ORNL; Sampath, Rahul S [ORNL; Allu, Srikanth [ORNL; Barai, Pallab [ORNL; Simunovic, Srdjan [ORNL; Ott, Larry J [ORNL; Pannala, Sreekanth [ORNL; Dilts, Gary A [ORNL; Mihaila, Bogdan [ORNL; Yesilyurt, Gokhan [ORNL; Lee, Jung Ho [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Banfield, James E [ORNL; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Model Year 2013: Alternative Fuel Vehicles and Advanced Technology Vehicles  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

13: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles 13: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles 1 (Updated 3/6/13) 1 Source: http:/afdc.energy.gov/vehicles/search/light/ Fuel/Powertrain Type Make Model Vehicle Type Engine Size/Cylinders Transmission Emissions Class 2 Fuel Economy Gasoline 3,4 City/Hwy Fuel Economy Alt Fuel 3,4 City/Hwy HEV Acura ILX Sedan 1.5L I4 ECVT Tier 2 Bin 3 LEVII PZEV 39 / 38 N/A FFV E85 Audi A4 Sedan 2.0 I4 Auto Tier 2 Bin 5 LEVII ULEV 20 / 29 14 / 20 FFV E85 Audi A5 Sedan 2.0 I4 Auto Tier 2 Bin 5 LEVII ULEV 20 / 29 14 / 20 FFV E85 Audi A5 Cabriolet Sedan 2.0 I4 Auto Tier 2 Bin 5 LEVII ULEV 20 / 29 14 / 20 FFV E85 Audi Allroad Quatro Wagon 2.0 I4 Auto Tier 2 Bin 5 LEVII ULEV 20 / 27 14 / 18 FFV E85 Audi Q5 SUV 2.0 I4 Auto Tier 2 Bin 5 LEVII ULEV 20 / 28 14 / 19 HEV Audi Q5 Hybrid SUV 2.0 I4 Auto Tier 2 Bin 5 LEVII ULEV 24 / 30 N/A FFV E85 Bentley

193

FUEL ELEMENTS FOR THE ARGONNE ADVANCED RESEARCH REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

The core design and the fuel element concept for the high-flux Argonne Advanced Research Reactor are presented. The core is cooled and moderated by light water and utilizes beryllium as a reflector. The fuel element assembly is rhomboidal in cross section and consists of 27 plates fastened together at their edges by dovetailed locking keys, and at each end by end fittings. Each fuel plate is 40 mils thick and contains a uniform dispersion of highly enriched UO/ sub 2/ particles, up to a maximum of 37 wt%, in a matrix of sintered stainless steel powder. A 5 mil thick stainless steel cladding is metallurgically bonded to each side of the fueled matrix. (N.W.R.)

Adolph, N.R.; Silberstein, M.S.; Weinstein, A.

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Fuel-cycle greenhouse gas emissions impacts of alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At an international conference on global warming, held in Kyoto, Japan, in December 1997, the United States committed to reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 7% over its 1990 level by the year 2012. To help achieve that goal, transportation GHG emissions need to be reduced. Using Argonne's fuel-cycle model, I estimated GHG emissions reduction potentials of various near- and long-term transportation technologies. The estimated per-mile GHG emissions results show that alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies can help significantly reduce transportation GHG emissions. Of the near-term technologies evaluated in this study, electric vehicles; hybrid electric vehicles; compression-ignition, direct-injection vehicles; and E85 flexible fuel vehicles can reduce fuel-cycle GHG emissions by more than 25%, on the fuel-cycle basis. Electric vehicles powered by electricity generated primarily from nuclear and renewable sources can reduce GHG emissions by 80%. Other alternative fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas, offer limited, but positive, GHG emission reduction benefits. Among the long-term technologies evaluated in this study, conventional spark ignition and compression ignition engines powered by alternative fuels and gasoline- and diesel-powered advanced vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by 10% to 30%. Ethanol dedicated vehicles, electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, and fuel-cell vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by over 40%. Spark ignition engines and fuel-cell vehicles powered by cellulosic ethanol and solar hydrogen (for fuel-cell vehicles only) can reduce GHG emissions by over 80%. In conclusion, both near- and long-term alternative fuels and advanced transportation technologies can play a role in reducing the United States GHG emissions.

Wang, M. Q.

1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

195

Fuel-cycle greenhouse gas emissions impacts of alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies.  

SciTech Connect

At an international conference on global warming, held in Kyoto, Japan, in December 1997, the United States committed to reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 7% over its 1990 level by the year 2012. To help achieve that goal, transportation GHG emissions need to be reduced. Using Argonne's fuel-cycle model, I estimated GHG emissions reduction potentials of various near- and long-term transportation technologies. The estimated per-mile GHG emissions results show that alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies can help significantly reduce transportation GHG emissions. Of the near-term technologies evaluated in this study, electric vehicles; hybrid electric vehicles; compression-ignition, direct-injection vehicles; and E85 flexible fuel vehicles can reduce fuel-cycle GHG emissions by more than 25%, on the fuel-cycle basis. Electric vehicles powered by electricity generated primarily from nuclear and renewable sources can reduce GHG emissions by 80%. Other alternative fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas, offer limited, but positive, GHG emission reduction benefits. Among the long-term technologies evaluated in this study, conventional spark ignition and compression ignition engines powered by alternative fuels and gasoline- and diesel-powered advanced vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by 10% to 30%. Ethanol dedicated vehicles, electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, and fuel-cell vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by over 40%. Spark ignition engines and fuel-cell vehicles powered by cellulosic ethanol and solar hydrogen (for fuel-cell vehicles only) can reduce GHG emissions by over 80%. In conclusion, both near- and long-term alternative fuels and advanced transportation technologies can play a role in reducing the United States GHG emissions.

Wang, M. Q.

1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

196

The Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE Education Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE Education Program conducted education and outreach activities and used the competition's technical goals and vehicle demonstrations as a means of attracting students and the public to learn more about advanced vehicle technologies, energy efficiency, climate change, alternative fuels, and the science and math behind efficient vehicle development. The Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE Education Program comprised three integrated components that were designed to educate the general public and create a multi-tiered initiative to engage students and showcase the 21st century skills students will need to compete in our global economy: teamwork, creativity, strong literacy, math and science skills, and innovative thinking. The elements included an Online Experience, a National Student Contest, and in person education events and activites. The project leveraged online connections, strategic partnerships, in-classroom, and beyond-the-classroom initiatives, as well as mainstream media. This education program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) also funded the specification of vehicle telemetry and the full development and operation of an interactive online experience that allowed internet users to follow the Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE vehicles as they performed in real-time during the Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE competition events.

Robyn Ready

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

Assessment of Research Needs for Advanced Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DOE Advanced Fuel Cell Working Group (AFCWG) was formed and asked to perform a scientific evaluation of the current status of fuel cells, with emphasis on identification of long-range research that may have a significant impact on the practical utilization of fuel cells in a variety of applications. The AFCWG held six meetings at locations throughout the country where fuel cell research and development are in progress, for presentations by experts on the status of fuel cell research and development efforts, as well as for inputs on research needs. Subsequent discussions by the AFCWG have resulted in the identification of priority research areas that should be explored over the long term in order to advance the design and performance of fuel cells of all types. Surveys describing the salient features of individual fuel cell types are presented in Chapters 2 to 6 and include elaborations of long-term research needs relating to the expeditious introduction of improved fuel cells. The Introduction and the Summary (Chapter 1) were prepared by AFCWG. They were repeatedly revised in response to comments and criticism. The present version represents the closest approach to a consensus that we were able to reach, which should not be interpreted to mean that each member of AFCWG endorses every statement and every unexpressed deletion. The Introduction and Summary always represent a majority view and, occasionally, a unanimous judgment. Chapters 2 to 6 provide background information and carry the names of identified authors. The identified authors of Chapters 2 to 6, rather than AFCWG as a whole, bear full responsibility for the scientific and technical contents of these chapters.

Penner, S.S.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation is a summary of a Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts.

Dinh, H.; Gennett, T.

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

199

White paper for Developing an Advanced Fueling System and for supporting Disruption Mitigation studies for ITER on NSTX-U  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

White paper for Developing an Advanced Fueling System and for supporting 2012) 1/3 White Paper for Developing Advanced Fueling System are not to scale. #12;White paper for Developing an Advanced Fueling System

200

Detection of arcs in automotive electrical systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the present time, there is no established method for the detection of DC electric arcing. This is a concern for forthcoming advanced automotive electrical systems which consist of higher DC electric power bus voltages, ...

Mishrikey, Matthew David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced automotive fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Use of Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis in the Design of Reactor Physics and Criticality Benchmark Experiments for Advanced Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Advances in Nuclear Fuel Management - Increased Enrichment/High Burnup and Light Water Reactor Fuel Cycle Optimization

B. T. Rearden; W. J. Anderson; G. A. Harms

202

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center - Federal and State  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Federal and State Federal and State Incentives and Laws Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center - Federal and State Incentives and Laws Database Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Focus Area: Standards - Incentives - Policies - Regulations Topics: Best Practices Website: www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/laws/ This database provides U.S. federal and state laws and incentives related to alternative fuels and vehicles, air quality, fuel efficiency, and other transportation-related topics. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies: Avoid - Cut the need for travel Shift - Change to low-carbon modes Improve - Enhance infrastructure & policies

203

Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dinh (PI) Dinh (PI) Thomas Gennett National Renewable Energy Laboratory October 1, 2009 Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Objectives Develop cost-effective, reliable, durable fuel cells for portable power applications (e.g., cell phones, computers, etc.) that meet all DOE targets. Note that the energy density (Wh/L), volumetric (W/L), and specific power (W/kg) all depend on knowing the weight and volume of the entire DMFC system as well as the volume and concentration of fuel, which are system specific (power application and manufacturer dependent). In our model study the surface power density levels on HOPG will allow for indirect evaluation of our system to DOE's energy density

204

Users Perspective on Advanced Fuel Cell Bus Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Users Perspective on Advanced Fuel Cell Bus Technology Lesl lie Eud dy - NREL Nico Bouwkamp - CaFCP DOE/FTA FCB Workshop DOE/FTA FCB Workshop June 7, 2010 - Transit Agencies FCB Demonstrations Transit Agencies FCB Demonstrations Reasons for participation Reasons for participation - Government regulations to reduce emissions - Public pressure Public pressure - Agency desire to be 'green' - Funding opportunity Funding opportunity - Learn about the newest technology 2 - Challenges: Performance Challenges: Performance Bus should match conventional bus performance Bus should match conventional bus performance - Operate 7 days/week, up to 20 hr/day - Complete day of service with one tank of fuel Complete day of service with one tank of fuel - Keep up with duty-cycle

205

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system  

SciTech Connect

Advances in coal-fueled gas turbine technology over the past few years, together with recent DOE-METC sponsored studies, have served to provide new optimism that the problems demonstrated in the past can be economically resolved and that the coal-fueled gas turbine can ultimately be the preferred system in appropriate market application sectors. The objective of the Solar/METC program is to prove the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of a coal-fired gas turbine for cogeneration applications through tests of a Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal fuel throughout the engine design operating range. The five-year program consists of three phases, namely: (1) system description; (2) component development; (3) prototype system verification. A successful conclusion to the program will initiate a continuation of the commercialization plan through extended field demonstration runs.

LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

New DOE program to advance fuel cell central power stations  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in technology have precipitated movement of fuel cells into the central power area in support of FutureGen (coal-based power plants with near-zero emissions). The idea is being implemented under the Fuel Cell Coal-Based Systems (FCCBS) programs. The Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) programme has identified solid oxide fuel cell designs with the most promise for scale-up to central power applications. These could be aggregated into modules, and serve as building blocks for greater than 100 MW FutureGen-type plants. The FCCBS objective is to have a SECA SOFC-based power island that costs $400 kW and can enable 50% efficiency and 90% CO{sub 2} capture in a FutureGen plant by 2015. The project teams have been selected and the three phases of the FCCBS project identified. 3 figs.

NONE

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

207

Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 1 DOE Kick-off Meeting, Washington, DC September 28, 2010 Fuel Cell Projects Kick-off Meeting Washington, DC - September 28, 2010 Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells for Portable Power Fuel Cells Piotr Zelenay Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information - t t Overview Timeline * Start date: September 2010 * End date: Four-year duration Budget Budget * Total funding estimate: - DOE share: $3,825K Contractor share: $342K $342K - Contractor share: * FY10 funding received: $250K * FY11 funding estimate: $1,000K Barriers * A. Durability (catalyst; electrode) (catalyst; electrode)

208

Model Year 2006: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

06: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles 06: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Fuel Type EPAct Compliant? Model Vehicle Type Emission Class Powertrain Fuel Capacity Range American Honda Motor Corporation 888-CCHONDA www.honda.com CNG Dedicated EPAct Yes Civic GX Compact Sedan SULEV Tier 2 Bin II 1.7L, 4-cylinder 8 GGE 200 mi HEV (NiMH) EPAct No Accord Hybrid Sedan ULEV 3.0L V6 144 volt NiMH + 17.1 Gal Gasoline TBD HEV (NiMH) EPAct No Civic Hybrid Sedan CA ULEV 1.3L, 4-cylinder 144 volt NiMH + 13.2 Gal Gasoline TBD HEV (NiMH) EPAct No Insight Two-seater SULEV (CVT model) ULEV (MT model) 1.0L, 3-cylinder 144 volt NiMH + 10.6 Gal Gasoline 636 mi DaimlerChrysler 800-999-FLEET www.fleet.chrysler.com E85 FFV EPAct Yes Dodge Ram Pickup 1500 Series 1 Pickup Tier 2 Bin 10A 4.7L V8 26 Gal 416 mi E85 FFV

209

ADVANCED HETEROGENEOUS REBURN FUEL FROM COAL AND HOG MANURE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was performed to investigate whether the nitrogen content inherent in hog manure and alkali used as a catalyst during processing could be combined with coal to produce a reburn fuel that would result in advanced reburning NO{sub x} control without the addition of either alkali or ammonia/urea. Fresh hog manure was processed in a cold-charge, 1-gal, batch autoclave system at 275 C under a reducing atmosphere in the presence of an alkali catalyst. Instead of the expected organic liquid, the resulting product was a waxy solid material. The waxy nature of the material made size reduction and feeding difficult as the material agglomerated and tended to melt, plugging the feeder. The material was eventually broken up and sized manually and a water-cooled feeder was designed and fabricated. Two reburn tests were performed in a pilot-scale combustor. The first test evaluated a reburn fuel mixture comprising lignite and air-dried, raw hog manure. The second test evaluated a reburn fuel mixture made of lignite and the processed hog manure. Neither reburn fuel reduced NO{sub x} levels in the combustor flue gas. Increased slagging and ash deposition were observed during both reburn tests. The material-handling and ash-fouling issues encountered during this study indicate that the use of waste-based reburn fuels could pose practical difficulties in implementation on a larger scale.

Melanie D. Jensen; Ronald C. Timpe; Jason D. Laumb

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT Project Title: Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing PROJECT OBJECTIVE The objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell system technology towards the commercial targets of power density, energy density and lifetime. These targets were laid out in the DOE’s R&D roadmap to develop an advanced direct methanol fuel cell power supply that meets commercial entry requirements. Such a power supply will enable mobile computers to operate non-stop, unplugged from the wall power outlet, by using the high energy density of methanol fuel contained in a replaceable fuel cartridge. Specifically this project focused on balance-of-plant component integration and miniaturization, as well as extensive component, subassembly and integrated system durability and validation testing. This design has resulted in a pre-production power supply design and a prototype that meet the rigorous demands of consumer electronic applications. PROJECT TASKS The proposed work plan was designed to meet the project objectives, which corresponded directly with the objectives outlined in the Funding Opportunity Announcement: To engineer the fuel cell balance-of-plant and packaging to meet the needs of consumer electronic systems, specifically at power levels required for mobile computing. UNF used existing balance-of-plant component technologies developed under its current US Army CERDEC project, as well as a previous DOE project completed by PolyFuel, to further refine them to both miniaturize and integrate their functionality to increase the system power density and energy density. Benefits of UNF’s novel passive water recycling MEA (membrane electrode assembly) and the simplified system architecture it enabled formed the foundation of the design approach. The package design was hardened to address orientation independence, shock, vibration, and environmental requirements. Fuel cartridge and fuel subsystems were improved to ensure effective fuel containment. PROJECT OVERVIEW The University of North Florida (UNF), with project partner the University of Florida, recently completed the Department of Energy (DOE) project entitled “Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing”. The primary objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell system technology towards the commercial targets as laid out in the DOE R&D roadmap by developing a 20-watt, direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), portable power supply based on the UNF innovative “passive water recovery” MEA. Extensive component, sub-system, and system development and testing was undertaken to meet the rigorous demands of the consumer electronic application. Numerous brassboard (nonpackaged) systems were developed to optimize the integration process and facilitating control algorithm development. The culmination of the development effort was a fully-integrated, DMFC, power supply (referred to as DP4). The project goals were 40 W/kg for specific power, 55 W/l for power density, and 575 Whr/l for energy density. It should be noted that the specific power and power density were for the power section only, and did not include the hybrid battery. The energy density is based on three, 200 ml, fuel cartridges, and also did not include the hybrid battery. The results show that the DP4 system configured without the methanol concentration sensor exceeded all performance goals, achieving 41.5 W/kg for specific power, 55.3 W/l for power density, and 623 Whr/l for energy density. During the project, the DOE revised its technical targets, and the definition of many of these targets, for the portable power application. With this revision, specific power, power density, specific energy (Whr/kg), and energy density are based on the total system, including fuel tank, fuel, and hybridization battery. Fuel capacity is not defined, but the same value is required for all calculations. Test data showed that the DP4 exceeded all 2011 Technical Status values; for example, the DP4 energy density was 373 Whr/l versus the DOE 2011 status of 200 Whr/l. For the

Fletcher, James H. [University of North Florida; Cox, Philip [University of North Florida; Harrington, William J [University of North Florida; Campbell, Joseph L [University of North Florida

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

211

FY2002 Progress Report for Fuels for Advanced Compression Ignition Direct Injection (CIDI) Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuels for Advanced Compression Fuels for Advanced Compression Ignition Direct Injection (CIDI) Engines Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Approved by Stephen Goguen November 2002 Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines FY 2002 Progress Report iii CONTENTS CONTENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii INDEX OF PRIMARY CONTACTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v I. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 II. FUEL/LUBRICANT EFFECTS TESTING ON ENGINE PERFORMANCE . . . . . . . . . 13 A. Oil Consumption Contribution to CIDI PM Emissions during Transient Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13

212

Autonomie Automotive Simulation Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Autonomie Automotive Simulation Tool Autonomie Automotive Simulation Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Autonomie Automotive Simulation Tool Agency/Company /Organization: Argonne National Laboratory Focus Area: Economic Development, Vehicles Phase: Create a Vision Topics: Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.transportation.anl.gov/modeling_simulation/PSAT/autonomie.html OpenEI Keyword(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools Language: English References: Autonomie[1] Rapidly evaluate new powertrain and propulsion technologies for improving fuel economy through virtual design and analysis in a math-based simulation environment. Argonne has developed a new tool, called Autonomie, to accelerate the

213

United States Automotive Materials Partnership LLC (USAMP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Automotive Materials Partnership LLC (USAMP) was formed in 1993 as a partnership between Chrysler Corporation, Ford Motor Company, and General Motors Corporation. Since then the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has supported its activities with funding and technical support. The mission of the USAMP is to conduct vehicle-oriented research and development in materials and materials processing to improve the competitiveness of the U.S. Auto Industry. Its specific goals are: (1) To conduct joint research to further the development of lightweight materials for improved automotive fuel economy; and (2) To work with the Federal government to explore opportunities for cooperative programs with the national laboratories, Federal agencies such as the DOE and universities. As a major component of the DOE's Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program (FCVT) collaboration with the USAMP, the Automotive Lightweighting Materials (ALM) program focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to significantly reduce automotive vehicle body and chassis weight without compromising other attributes such as safety, performance, recyclability, and cost. The FCVT was announced in FY 2002 and implemented in FY 2003, as a successor of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV), largely addressed under the first Cooperative Agreement. This second USAMP Cooperative Agreement with the DOE has expanded a unique and valuable framework for collaboratively directing industry and government research efforts toward the development of technologies capable of solving important societal problems related to automobile transportation. USAMP efforts are conducted by the domestic automobile manufacturers, in collaboration with materials and manufacturing suppliers, national laboratories, universities, and other technology or trade organizations. These interactions provide a direct route for implementing newly developed materials and technologies, and have resulted in significant technical successes to date, as discussed in the individual project summary final reports. Over 70 materials-focused projects have been established by USAMP, in collaboration with participating suppliers, academic/non-profit organizations and national laboratories, and executed through its original three divisions: the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC), the Automotive Metals Division (AMD), and Auto/Steel Partnership (A/SP). Two new divisions were formed by USAMP in 2006 to drive research emphasis on integration of structures incorporating dissimilar lightweighting materials, and on enabling technology for nondestructive evaluation of structures and joints. These new USAMP divisions are: Multi-Material Vehicle Research and Development Initiative (MMV), and the Non-Destructive Evaluation Steering Committee (NDE). In cooperation with USAMP and the FreedomCAR Materials Technical Team, a consensus process has been established to facilitate the development of projects to help move leveraged research to targeted development projects that eventually migrate to the original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) as application engineering projects. Research projects are assigned to one of three phases: concept feasibility, technical feasibility, and demonstration feasibility. Projects are guided through ongoing monitoring and USAMP offsite reviews, so as to meet the requirements of each phase before they are allowed to move on to the next phase. As progress is made on these projects, the benefits of lightweight construction and enabling technologies will be transferred to the supply base and implemented in production vehicles. The single greatest barrier to automotive use of lightweight materials is their high cost; therefore, priority is given to activities aimed at reducing costs through development of new materials, forming technologies, and manufacturing processes. The emphasis of the research projects reported in this document was largely on applied research and evaluation of mass savings opportunities thro

United States Automotive Materials Partnership

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Carolina Airport Advances With Plug-In  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

North Carolina Airport North Carolina Airport Advances With Plug-In Electric Buses to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Carolina Airport Advances With Plug-In Electric Buses on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Carolina Airport Advances With Plug-In Electric Buses on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Carolina Airport Advances With Plug-In Electric Buses on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Carolina Airport Advances With Plug-In Electric Buses on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Carolina Airport Advances With Plug-In Electric Buses on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Carolina Airport Advances With Plug-In Electric Buses on AddThis.com...

215

Recent advances in solid polymer electrolyte fuel cell technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With methods used to advance solid polymer electrolyte fuel cell technology, we are close to obtaining the goal of 1 A/cm/sup 2/ at 0.7. Higher power densities have been reported (2 A/cm/sup 2/ at 0.5 V) but only with high catalyst loading electrodes (2 mg/cm/sup 2/ and 4 mg/cm/sup 2/ at anode and cathode, respectively) and using a Dow membrane with a better conductivity and water retention characteristics. Work is in progress to ascertain performances of cells with Dow membrane impregnated electrodes and Dow membrane electrolytes. 5 refs., 6 figs.

Ticianelli, E.A.; Srinivasan, S.; Gonzalez, E.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Present and Future Automotive Composite Materials Research Efforts at DOE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Automobiles of the future will be forced to travel fi.uther on a tank of fuel while discharging lower levels of pollutants. Currently, the United States uses in excess of 16.4 million barrels of petroleum per day. Sixty-six percent of that petroleum is used in the transportation of people and goods. Automobiles currently account for just under two-thirds of the nation's gasoline consumptio~ and about one-third of the total United States energy usage. [1] By improving transportation related fiel efficiency, the United States can lessen the impact that emissions have on our environment and provide a cleaner environment for fiture generations. In 1992, The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Transportation Materials completed a comprehensive program plan entitled, The Lightweight MateriaIs (LWko Multi-Year Program Plan, for the development of technologies aimed at reducing vehicle mass [2]. This plan was followed in 1997 by the more comprehensive Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies research and development plan titled, Energy Eficient Vehicles for a Cleaner Environment [3] which outlines the department's plans for developing more efficient vehicles during the next ~een years. Both plans identi~ potential applications, technology needs, and R&D priorities. The goal of the Lightweight Materials Program is to develop materials and primary processing methods for the fabrication of lighter weight components which can be incorporated into automotive systems. These technologies are intended to reduce vehicle weight, increase fuel efficiency and decrease emissions. The Lightweight Materials program is jointly managed by the Department of Energy(DOE) and the United States Automotive Materials Partnership (USAMP). Composite materiak program work is coordinated by cooperative research efforts between the DOE and the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC).

Warren, C.D.

1999-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

217

Preliminary Advanced Test Reactor LEU Fuel Conversion Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density, high neutron flux research reactor operating in the United States. The ATR has large irradiation test volumes located in high flux areas. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum thermal power rating of 250 MWth with a maximum unperturbed thermal neutron flux rating of 1.0 x 1015 n/cm2–s. As a result, the ATR is a representative candidate for assessing the necessary modifications and evaluating the subsequent operating effects associated with low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel conversion. A detailed plate-by-plate MCNP ATR 1/8th core model was developed for the fuel cycle burnup comparison analysis. Using the current HEU 235U enrichment of 93.0 % as a baseline, an analysis can be performed to determine the LEU uranium density and 235U enrichment required in the fuel meat to yield an equivalent Keff between the HEU core and a LEU core versus effective full power days (EFPD). The MCNP ATR 1/8th core model will be used to optimize the 235U loading in the LEU core, such that the differences in Keff between the HEU and LEU core can be minimized for operation at 150 EFPD with a total core power of 115 MW. The Monte-Carlo with ORIGEN-2 (MCWO) method was used to calculate Keff versus EFPDs. The MCWO-calculated results for the LEU case demonstrated adequate excess reactivity such that the LEU core conversion designer should be able to optimize the 235U content of each fuel plate, so that the Keff and relative radial fission heat flux profile are similar to the reference ATR HEU case. However, to demonstrate that the LEU core fuel cycle performance can meet the Upgraded Final Safety Analysis Report (UFSAR) safety requirements, a further study will be required in order to investigate the detailed radial, axial, and azimuthal heat flux profile variations versus EFPDs.

G. S. Chang; R. G. Ambrosek

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Automobile Buyer Decisions about Fuel Economy and Fuel Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automotive Technology and Fuel Economy Trends: 1975 Throughof the Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards. ” EconomicImplications for Fuel Economy Policy. ” Presentation to SAE

Kurani, Ken; Turrentine, Thomas

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Objectives, Strategies, and Challenges for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper will summarize the objectives, strategies, and key chemical separation challenges for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The major objectives are as follows: Waste management - defer the need for a second geologic repository for a century or more, Proliferation resistance - be more resistant than the existing PUREX separation technology or uranium enrichment, Energy sustainability - turn waste management liabilities into energy source assets to ensure that uranium ore resources do not become a constraint on nuclear power, and Systematic, safe, and economic management of the entire fuel cycle. There are four major strategies for the disposal of civilian spent fuel: Once-through - direct disposal of all discharged nuclear fuel, Limited recycle - recycle transuranic elements once and then direct disposal, Continuous recycle - recycle transuranic elements repeatedly, and Sustained recycle - same as continuous except previously discarded depleted uranium is also recycled. The key chemical separation challenges stem from the fact that the components of spent nuclear fuel vary greatly in their influence on achieving program objectives. Most options separate uranium to reduce the weight and volume of waste and the number and cost of waste packages that require geologic disposal. Separated uranium can also be used as reactor fuel. Most options provide means to recycle transuranic (TRU) elements - plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np), americium (Am), curium (Cm). Plutonium must be recycled to obtain repository, proliferation, and energy recovery benefits. U.S. non-proliferation policy forbids separation of plutonium by itself; therefore, one or more of the other transuranic elements must be kept with the plutonium; neptunium is considered the easiest option. Recycling neptunium also provides repository benefits. Americium recycling is also required to obtain repository benefits. At the present time, curium recycle provides relatively little benefit; indeed, recycling curium in thermal reactors would significantly increase the hazard (hence cost) of the resulting fuel. Most options separate short-lived fission products cesium and strontium to allow them to decay in separate storage facilities tailored to that need, rather than complicate long-term geologic disposal. This can also reduce the number and cost of waste packages requiring geologic disposal. These savings are balanced by costs for separation and recycle systems. Several long-lived fission products, such as technetium-99 and iodine-129 go to geologic disposal in improved waste forms, recognizing that transmutation of these isotopes would be a slow process; however, the program has not precluded their transmutation as a future alternative.

Steven Piet; Brent Dixon; David Shropshire; Robert Hill; Roald Wigeland; Erich Schneider; J. D. Smith

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Synthetic liquid fuels development: assessment of critical factors. Volume IV. Energy/economic comparison of coal-based automotive energy supply systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Considerable debate has occurred in recent years about the relative merits of energy analysis versus traditional economic analysis. Some economists assert that energy analysis adds no new information to that in economic analysis; energy analysts claim that the explicit consideration of energy flows is necessary for a complete understanding of the implications of energy supply and use. In comparing the cost and energy consumption figures for the various automotive energy options, certain parallels are evident. Those system components that have the highest costs also require high levels of energy consumption. This is generally due to the severity of the processing conditions required to convert one energy form (e.g., coal) to another (e.g., methanol). These conditions require the use of capital-intensive equipment as well as the consumption of large amounts of energy. For some components that have relatively high costs but low energy requirements (e.g., fuel distribution), the costs are due to the many handling and transfer requirements. Overall, the capital- and energy-intensive energy conversion processes dominate the systems we have examined. Therefore, a comparison of cost with energy consumption for all the fuels considered shows a definite trend - increasing costs imply increasing energy consumption. Thus, decision makers concerned with promoting energy conservative supply options need not worry that their choices will be unduly costly. Rather, they will tend to be the least costly for the types of systems considered here. We caution against extrapolating these results to other systems, however, because systems that do not have the same kinds of capital- and energy-intensive components as those considered here may exhibit different trends.

Steele, R.V.; Sharma, K.J.; Dickson, E.M.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced automotive fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Program. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the original Request for Proposal was to establish the technological bases necessary for the subsequent commercial development and deployment of advanced coal-fueled gas turbine power systems by the private sector. The offeror was to identify the specific application or applications, toward which his development efforts would be directed; define and substantiate the technical, economic, and environmental criteria for the selected application; and conduct such component design, development, integration, and tests as deemed necessary to fulfill this objective. Specifically, the offeror was to choose a system through which ingenious methods of grouping subcomponents into integrated systems accomplishes the following: (1) Preserve the inherent power density and performance advantages of gas turbine systems. (2) System must be capable of meeting or exceeding existing and expected environmental regulations for the proposed application. (3) System must offer a considerable improvement over coal-fueled systems which are commercial, have been demonstrated, or are being demonstrated. (4) System proposed must be an integrated gas turbine concept, i.e., all fuel conditioning, all expansion gas conditioning, or post-expansion gas cleaning, must be integrated into the gas turbine system.

Horner, M.W.; Ekstedt, E.E.; Gal, E.; Jackson, M.R.; Kimura, S.G.; Lavigne, R.G.; Lucas, C.; Rairden, J.R.; Sabla, P.E.; Savelli, J.F.; Slaughter, D.M.; Spiro, C.L.; Staub, F.W.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Advanced water-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advanced Water Cooled Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Development program is being conducted by International Fuel Cells Corporation (IFC) to improve the performance and minimize the cost of water-cooled, electric utility phosphoric acid fuel cell stacks. The program adapts the existing on-site Configuration B cell design to electric utility operating conditions and introduces additional new design features. Task 1 consists of the conceptual design of a full-scale electric utility cell stack that meets program objectives. Tasks 2 and 3 develop the materials and processes required to fabricate the components that meet the program objective. The design of the small area and two 10-ft[sup 2] short stacks is conducted in Task 4. The conceptual design also is updated to incorporate the results of material and process developments, as well as results of stack tests conducted in Task 6. Fabrication and assembly of the short stacks are conducted in Task 5 and subsequent tests are conducted in Task 6. The Contractor expects to enter into a contract with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to assemble and endurance test the second 10-ft[sup 2] short stack. The management and reporting functions of Task 7 provide DOE/METC with program visibility through required documentation and program reviews. This report describes the cell design and development effort that is being conducted to demonstrate, by subscale stack test, the technical achievements made toward the above program objectives.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Development of Standards in Support of Hydrogen-Fueled ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Society of Automotive Engineers International (SAE) has proposed a Hydrogen Fuel Quality Specification Guideline. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Advanced proton-exchange materials for energy efficient fuel cells.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ''Advanced Proton-Exchange Materials for Energy Efficient Fuel Cells'' Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project began in October 2002 and ended in September 2005. This LDRD was funded by the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy strategic business unit. The purpose of this LDRD was to initiate the fundamental research necessary for the development of a novel proton-exchange membranes (PEM) to overcome the material and performance limitations of the ''state of the art'' Nafion that is used in both hydrogen and methanol fuel cells. An atomistic modeling effort was added to this LDRD in order to establish a frame work between predicted morphology and observed PEM morphology in order to relate it to fuel cell performance. Significant progress was made in the area of PEM material design, development, and demonstration during this LDRD. A fundamental understanding involving the role of the structure of the PEM material as a function of sulfonic acid content, polymer topology, chemical composition, molecular weight, and electrode electrolyte ink development was demonstrated during this LDRD. PEM materials based upon random and block polyimides, polybenzimidazoles, and polyphenylenes were created and evaluated for improvements in proton conductivity, reduced swelling, reduced O{sub 2} and H{sub 2} permeability, and increased thermal stability. Results from this work reveal that the family of polyphenylenes potentially solves several technical challenges associated with obtaining a high temperature PEM membrane. Fuel cell relevant properties such as high proton conductivity (>120 mS/cm), good thermal stability, and mechanical robustness were demonstrated during this LDRD. This report summarizes the technical accomplishments and results of this LDRD.

Fujimoto, Cy H.; Grest, Gary Stephen; Hickner, Michael A.; Cornelius, Christopher James; Staiger, Chad Lynn; Hibbs, Michael R.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Clean Cities' Guide to Alternative Fuel and Advanced Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Guide describes the alternative fuel and advanced medium- and heavy-duty vehicles available on the market, including buses, vans, refuse haulers, and more.

Not Available

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Investigation of Freeze-Cast Scaffolds as an Advanced Reactor Fuel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors II ... A Rate-Theory Approach to Irradiation Damage Modeling with Random ...

227

Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Tools, Algorithms, and Methodologies  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Systems Analysis supports engineering economic analyses and trade-studies, and requires a requisite reference cost basis to support adequate analysis rigor. In this regard, the AFCI program has created a reference set of economic documentation. The documentation consists of the “Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC) Cost Basis” report (Shropshire, et al. 2007), “AFCI Economic Analysis” report, and the “AFCI Economic Tools, Algorithms, and Methodologies Report.” Together, these documents provide the reference cost basis, cost modeling basis, and methodologies needed to support AFCI economic analysis. The application of the reference cost data in the cost and econometric systems analysis models will be supported by this report. These methodologies include: the energy/environment/economic evaluation of nuclear technology penetration in the energy market—domestic and internationally—and impacts on AFCI facility deployment, uranium resource modeling to inform the front-end fuel cycle costs, facility first-of-a-kind to nth-of-a-kind learning with application to deployment of AFCI facilities, cost tradeoffs to meet nuclear non-proliferation requirements, and international nuclear facility supply/demand analysis. The economic analysis will be performed using two cost models. VISION.ECON will be used to evaluate and compare costs under dynamic conditions, consistent with the cases and analysis performed by the AFCI Systems Analysis team. Generation IV Excel Calculations of Nuclear Systems (G4-ECONS) will provide static (snapshot-in-time) cost analysis and will provide a check on the dynamic results. In future analysis, additional AFCI measures may be developed to show the value of AFCI in closing the fuel cycle. Comparisons can show AFCI in terms of reduced global proliferation (e.g., reduction in enrichment), greater sustainability through preservation of a natural resource (e.g., reduction in uranium ore depletion), value from weaning the U.S. from energy imports (e.g., measures of energy self-sufficiency), and minimization of future high level waste (HLW) repositories world-wide.

David E. Shropshire

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Oscar Automotive Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oscar Automotive Ltd Oscar Automotive Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Oscar Automotive Ltd Place London, Greater London, United Kingdom Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product OSCar Automotive is working towards the commercialisation of hydrogen fuel cells in the transport sector. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

229

Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-Off Study  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) Nuclear Fuel Development Research and Development (R&D) Pathway encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. To achieve significant operating improvements while remaining within safety boundaries, significant steps beyond incremental improvements in the current generation of nuclear fuel are required. Fundamental improvements are required in the areas of nuclear fuel composition, cladding integrity, and the fuel/cladding interaction to allow power uprates and increased fuel burn-up allowance while potentially improving safety margin through the adoption of an “accident tolerant” fuel system that would offer improved coping time under accident scenarios. With a development time of about 20 – 25 years, advanced fuel designs must be started today and proven in current reactors if future reactor designs are to be able to use them with confidence.

Kristine Barrett; Shannon Bragg-Sitton

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Assessment of Startup Fuel Options for the GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR)  

SciTech Connect

The Global Nuclear Energy Program (GNEP) includes a program element for the development and construction of an advanced sodium cooled fast reactor to demonstrate the burning (transmutation) of significant quantities of minor actinides obtained from a separations process and fabricated into a transuranic bearing fuel assembly. To demonstrate and qualify transuranic (TRU) fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype is needed. The ABR would necessarily be started up using conventional metal alloy or oxide (U or U, Pu) fuel. Startup fuel is needed for the ABR for the first 2 to 4 core loads of fuel in the ABR. Following start up, a series of advanced TRU bearing fuel assemblies will be irradiated in qualification lead test assemblies in the ABR. There are multiple options for this startup fuel. This report provides a description of the possible startup fuel options as well as possible fabrication alternatives available to the program in the current domestic and international facilities and infrastructure.

Jon Carmack (062056); Kemal O. Pasamehmetoglu (103171); David Alberstein

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Batteries and Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collage of electric cars, plug, battery research lab Collage of electric cars, plug, battery research lab Batteries and Fuel Cells EETD researchers study the basic science and development of advanced batteries and fuel cells for transportation, electric grid storage, and other stationary applications. This research is aimed at developing more environmentally friendly technologies for generating and storing energy, including better batteries and fuel cells. Li-Ion and Other Advanced Battery Technologies Research conducted here on battery technology is aimed at developing low-cost rechargeable advanced electrochemical batteries for both automotive and stationary applications. The goal of fuel cell research is to provide the technologies for the successful commercialization of polymer-electrolyte and solid oxide fuel

232

Enabling Advanced Modeling and Simulations for Fuel-Flexible Combustors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall goal of the present project is to enable advanced modeling and simulations for the design and optimization of fuel-flexible turbine combustors. For this purpose we use a high-fidelity, extensively-tested large-eddy simulation (LES) code and state-of-the-art models for premixed/partially-premixed turbulent combustion developed in the PI's group. In the frame of the present project, these techniques are applied, assessed, and improved for hydrogen enriched premixed and partially premixed gas-turbine combustion. Our innovative approaches include a completely consistent description of flame propagation, a coupled progress variable/level set method to resolve the detailed flame structure, and incorporation of thermal-diffusion (non-unity Lewis number) effects. In addition, we have developed a general flamelet-type transformation holding in the limits of both non-premixed and premixed burning. As a result, a model for partially premixed combustion has been derived. The coupled progress variable/level method and the general flamelet tranformation were validated by LES of a lean-premixed low-swirl burner that has been studied experimentally at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The model is extended to include the non-unity Lewis number effects, which play a critical role in fuel-flexible combustor with high hydrogen content fuel. More specifically, a two-scalar model for lean hydrogen and hydrogen-enriched combustion is developed and validated against experimental and direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Results are presented to emphasize the importance of non-unity Lewis number effects in the lean-premixed low-swirl burner of interest in this project. The proposed model gives improved results, which shows that the inclusion of the non-unity Lewis number effects is essential for accurate prediction of the lean-premixed low-swirl flame.

Heinz Pitsch

2010-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

233

Science based integrated approach to advanced nuclear fuel development - vision, approach, and overview  

SciTech Connect

Advancing the performance of Light Water Reactors, Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles, and Advanced Rcactors, such as the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants, requires enhancing our fundamental understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The capability to accurately model the nuclear fuel systems is critical. In order to understand specific aspects of the nuclear fuel, fully coupled fuel simulation codes are required to achieve licensing of specific nuclear fuel designs for operation. The backbone of these codes, models, and simulations is a fundamental understanding and predictive capability for simulating the phase and microstructural behavior of the nuclear fuel system materials and matrices. The purpose of this paper is to identify the modeling and simulation approach in order to deliver predictive tools for advanced fuels development. The coordination between experimental nuclear fuel design, development technical experts, and computational fuel modeling and simulation technical experts is a critical aspect of the approach and naturally leads to an integrated, goal-oriented science-based R & D approach and strengthens both the experimental and computational efforts. The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) and Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Fuels Integrated Performance and Safety Code (IPSC) are working together to determine experimental data and modeling needs. The primary objective of the NEAMS fuels IPSC project is to deliver a coupled, three-dimensional, predictive computational platform for modeling the fabrication and both normal and abnormal operation of nuclear fuel pins and assemblies, applicable to both existing and future reactor fuel designs. The science based program is pursuing the development of an integrated multi-scale and multi-physics modeling and simulation platform for nuclear fuels. This overview paper discusses the vision, goals and approaches how to develop and implement the new approach.

Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pasamehmetoglu, Kemal [IDAHO NATIONAL LAB; Carmack, Jon [IDAHO NATIONAL LAB

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Future Automotive Aftertreatment Solutions: The 150°C Challenge Workshop Report  

SciTech Connect

With future fuel economy standards enacted, the U.S. automotive manufacturers (OEMs) are committed to pursuing a variety of high risk/highly efficient stoichiometric and lean combustion strategies to achieve superior performance. In recognition of this need, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has partnered with domestic automotive manufacturers through U.S. DRIVE to develop these advanced technologies. However, before these advancements can be introduced into the U.S. market, they must also be able to meet increasingly stringent emissions requirements. A significant roadblock to this implementation is the inability of current catalyst and aftertreatment technologies to provide the required activity at the much lower exhaust temperatures that will accompany highly efficient combustion processes and powertrain strategies. Therefore, the goal of this workshop and report is to create a U.S. DRIVE emission control roadmap that will identify new materials and aftertreatment approaches that offer the potential for 90% conversion of emissions at low temperature (150°C) and are consistent with highly efficient combustion technologies currently under investigation within U.S. DRIVE Advanced Combustion and Emission Control (ACEC) programs.

Zammit, Michael; DiMaggio, Craig L.; Kim, Chang H.; Lambert, Christine; Muntean, George G.; Peden, Charles HF; Parks, James E.; Howden, Ken

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Analysis of Durability of MEAs in Automotive PEMFC Applications - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Randal L. Perry E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company Chestnut Run Plaza, 701/209 4417 Lancaster Pike Wilmington, DE 19805 Phone: (302) 999-6545 Email: randal.l.perry @usa.dupont.com DOE Managers HQ: Kathi Epping Martin Phone: (202) 586-7425 Email: Kathi.Epping@ee.doe.gov GO: David Peterson Phone: (720) 356-1747 Email: David.Peterson@go.doe.gov Technical Advisor Thomas Benjamin Phone: (630) 252-1632 Email: Benjamin@anl.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0003772 Subcontractors: * Nissan Technical Center North America, Farmington Hills, MI * Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), Chicago, IL Project Start Date: September 1, 2010

236

Generic Repository Concepts and Thermal Analysis for Advanced Fuel Cycles  

SciTech Connect

The current posture of the used nuclear fuel management program in the U.S. following termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, is to pursue research and development (R&D) of generic (i.e., non-site specific) technologies for storage, transportation and disposal. Disposal R&D is directed toward understanding and demonstrating the performance of reference geologic disposal concepts selected to represent the current state-of-the-art in geologic disposal. One of the principal constraints on waste packaging and emplacement in a geologic repository is management of the waste-generated heat. This paper describes the selection of reference disposal concepts, and thermal management strategies for waste from advanced fuel cycles. A geologic disposal concept for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or high-level waste (HLW) consists of three components: waste inventory, geologic setting, and concept of operations. A set of reference geologic disposal concepts has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Used Fuel Disposition Campaign, for crystalline rock, clay/shale, bedded salt, and deep borehole (crystalline basement) geologic settings. We performed thermal analysis of these concepts using waste inventory cases representing a range of advanced fuel cycles. Concepts of operation consisting of emplacement mode, repository layout, and engineered barrier descriptions, were selected based on international progress and previous experience in the U.S. repository program. All of the disposal concepts selected for this study use enclosed emplacement modes, whereby waste packages are in direct contact with encapsulating engineered or natural materials. The encapsulating materials (typically clay-based or rock salt) have low intrinsic permeability and plastic rheology that closes voids so that low permeability is maintained. Uniformly low permeability also contributes to chemically reducing conditions common in soft clay, shale, and salt formations. Enclosed modes are associated with temperature constraints that limit changes to the encapsulating materials, and they generally have less capacity to dissipate heat from the waste package and its immediate surroundings than open modes such as that proposed for a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Open emplacement modes can be ventilated for many years prior to permanent closure of the repository, limiting peak temperatures both before and after closure, and combining storage and disposal functions in the same facility. Open emplacement modes may be practically limited to unsaturated host formations, unless emplacement tunnels are effectively sealed everywhere prior to repository closure. Thermal analysis of disposal concepts and waste inventory cases has identified important relationships between waste package size and capacity, and the duration of surface decay storage needed to meet temperature constraints. For example, the choice of salt as the host medium expedites the schedule for geologic disposal by approximately 50 yr (other factors held constant) thereby reducing future reliance on surface decay storage. Rock salt has greater thermal conductivity and stability at higher temperatures than other media considered. Alternatively, the choice of salt permits the use of significantly larger waste packages for SNF. The following sections describe the selection of reference waste inventories, geologic settings, and concepts of operation, and summarize the results from the thermal analysis.

Hardin, Ernest [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Blink, James [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Carter, Joe [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); Massimiliano, Fratoni [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Greenberg, Harris [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Howard, Rob L [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Meeting Summary Advanced Light Water Reactor Fuels Industry Meeting Washington DC October 27 - 28, 2011  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced LWR Fuel Working Group first met in November of 2010 with the objective of looking 20 years ahead to the role that advanced fuels could play in improving light water reactor technology, such as waste reduction and economics. When the group met again in March 2011, the Fukushima incident was still unfolding. After the March meeting, the focus of the program changed to determining what we could do in the near term to improve fuel accident tolerance. Any discussion of fuels with enhanced accident tolerance will likely need to consider an advanced light water reactor with enhanced accident tolerance, along with the fuel. The Advanced LWR Fuel Working Group met in Washington D.C. on October 72-18, 2011 to continue discussions on this important topic.

Not Listed

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Subfreezing Start/Stop Protocol for an Advanced Metallic Open-Flowfield Fuel Cell Stack  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subfreezing Start/Stop Protocol for an Advanced Subfreezing Start/Stop Protocol for an Advanced Subfreezing Start/Stop Protocol for an Advanced Subfreezing Start/Stop Protocol for an Advanced Subfreezing Start/Stop Protocol for an Advanced Metallic Open Metallic Open Metallic Open Metallic Open- - - -Flowfield Flowfield Flowfield Flowfield Fuel Cell Stack Fuel Cell Stack Fuel Cell Stack Fuel Cell Stack Presented at: US DOE New Projects Kickoff Meeting Washington, DC 13-14 February 2007 Alternative Energy Efficient Simple Clean Today Alternative Energy Efficient Simple Clean Today Objective Objective Objective Objective This project will demonstrate a PEM fuel cell stack that is able to perform and start up in subfreezing conditions, respecting allowed energy budget, and showing limited impact at extreme temperatures over multiple

239

Department of Energy Awards Nearly $7 Million to Advance Fuel...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

energy, raw materials, and various components that will help identify ways to drive down production costs of transportation fuel cell systems, stationary fuel cell systems, and...

240

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles: Resources for Fleet Managers (Clean Cities) (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A discussion of the tools and resources on the Clean Cities, Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center, and the FuelEconomy.gov Web sites that can help vehicle fleet managers make informed decisions about implementing strategies to reduce gasoline and diesel fuel use.

Brennan, A.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced automotive fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Reactor Physics and Criticality Benchmark Evaluations for Advanced Nuclear Fuel - Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear industry interest in advanced fuel and reactor design often drives towards fuel with uranium enrichments greater than 5 wt% 235U. Unfortunately, little data exists, in the form of reactor physics and criticality benchmarks, for uranium enrichments ranging between 5 and 10 wt% 235U. The primary purpose of this project is to provide benchmarks for fuel similar to what may be required for advanced light water reactors (LWRs). These experiments will ultimately provide additional information for application to the criticality-safety bases for commercial fuel facilities handling greater than 5 wt% 235U fuel.

William Anderson; James Tulenko; Bradley Rearden; Gary Harms

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

242

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Research Search More Search Options Site Map Photo of Advanced Automotive Manikin Reducing fuel consumption by air conditioning systems is the focus of Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction (VALR) activities at NREL. About 7 billion gallons of fuel-about 5.5% of total national light-duty vehicle fuel use-are used annually just to cool light-duty vehicles in the United States. That's why our VALR team works with industry to help increase fuel economy and reduce tailpipe emissions by reducing the ancillary loads requirements in vehicles while maintaining the thermal comfort of the passengers. Approaches include improved cabin insulation, advanced window systems, advanced cooling and venting systems, and heat generated cooling. Another focus of the VALR project is ADAM, the ADvanced Automotive Manikin

243

UC Davis Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, and Hybrid Vehicle (FCH2V) GATE Center of Excellence  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

UC Davisâ??s existing GATE centers have become the campusâ??s research focal points on fuel cells and hybrid-electric vehicles, and the home for graduate students who are studying advanced automotive technologies. The centers have been highly successful in attracting, training, and placing top-notch students into fuel cell and hybrid programs in both industry and government.

Erickson, Paul

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

244

ENERGY REDUCTION IN AUTOMOTIVE PAINT SHOPS A REVIEW OF HYBRID/ELECTRIC VEHICLE BATTERY MANUFACTURING.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Automotive industry is facing fundamental challenges due to the rapid depletion of fossil fuels, energy saving and environmental concerns. The need of sustainable energy development… (more)

Arenas Guerrero, Claudia Patricia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

AUTOMOTIVE ALLOYS: III: Castings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal fly ash, an industrial waste by-product, is produced during combustion of ... DIE CASTING FOR AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATIONS--A Status Report: Hubert ...

246

Advanced Cathode Catalysts and Supports for PEM Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cathode Catalysts and Cathode Catalysts and Supports for PEM Fuel Cells DE-FG36-07GO17007 Mark K. Debe 3M Company Feb. 13, 2007 2007 DOE HFCIT Kick-off Meeting This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information Overview Advanced Cathode Catalysts and Supports for PEM FC's - 2007 DOE HFCIT Kick-off, Feb. 13-14, 2007 2 3 Barriers A. Electrode and MEA Durability B. Stack Material & Mfg Cost C. Electrode and MEA Performance DOE Technical Targets Electrocatalyst (2010, 2015) * Durability w/cycling: hrs < 80 o C - (5000, 5000) > 80 o C - (2000, 5000) * Cost: $/kW (5,4) * Mass activity: A/mg ( 0.44, 0.44) * PGM Total, g/ kW rated: (0.3, 0.2) MEA (2010, 2015) * Cost: $/kW (10,5) * Performance: W/cm 2 at Rated Pwr. (1,1) ; 0.8V (0.25, 0.25) Budget * Total Project funding $10.43MM

247

Advanced turbine design for coal-fueled engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this task is to perform a technical assessment of turbine blading for advanced second generation PFBC conditions, identify specific problems/issues, and recommend an approach for solving any problems identified. A literature search was conducted, problems associated with hot corrosion defined and limited experiments performed. Sulfidation corrosion occurs in industrial, marine and aircraft gas turbine engines and is due to the presence of condensed alkali (sodium) sulfates. The principle source of the alkali in industrial, marine and aircraft gas turbine engines is sea salt crystals. The principle source of the sulfur is not the liquid fuels, but the same ocean born crystals. Moreover deposition of the corrosive salt occurs primarily by a non-equilibrium process. Sodium will be present in the cleaned combusted gases that enter the PFBC turbine. Although equilibrium condensation is not favored, deposition via impaction is probable. Marine gas turbines operate in sodium chloride rich environments without experiencing the accelerated attack noted in coal fired boilers where condensed chlorides contact metallic surfaces. The sulfates of calcium and magnesium are the products of the reactions used to control sulfur. Based upon industrial gas turbine experience and laboratory tests, calcium and magnesium sulfates are, at temperatures up to 1500[degrees]F (815[degrees]C), relatively innocuous salts. In this study it is found that at 1650[degrees]F (900[degrees]C) and above, calcium sulfate becomes an aggressive corrodent.

Bornstein, N.S.

1992-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

248

Integrity Automotive | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Automotive Jump to: navigation, search Name Integrity Automotive Place Kentucky Product Joint venture between Kentucky businessman Randal Waldman of Integrity Manufacturing and...

249

Coda Automotive | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Coda Automotive Place Santa Monica, California Zip 90403 Product California-based electric vehicle company which builds its cars in China. References Coda Automotive1...

250

High-Level Functional and Operational Requirements for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Facilty  

SciTech Connect

High-Level Functional & Operational Requirements for the AFCF -This document describes the principal functional and operational requirements for the proposed Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility (AFCF). The AFCF is intended to be the world's foremost facility for nuclear fuel cycle research, technology development, and demonstration. The facility will also support the near-term mission to develop and demonstrate technology in support of fuel cycle needs identified by industry, and the long-term mission to retain and retain U.S. leadership in fuel cycle operations. The AFCF is essential to demonstrate a more proliferation-resistant fuel cycle and make long-term improvements in fuel cycle effectiveness, performance and economy.

Charles Park

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center for Hybrid Electric Drivetrains and Control Strategies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Beginning the fall semester of 1999, The University of Maryland, Departments of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering and the Institute for Systems Research served as a U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center for Hybrid Electric Drivetrains and Control Strategies. A key goal was to produce a graduate level education program that educated and prepared students to address the technical challenges of designing and developing hybrid electric vehicles, as they progressed into the workforce. A second goal was to produce research that fostered the advancement of hybrid electric vehicles, their controls, and other related automotive technologies. Participation ended at the University of Maryland after the 2004 fall semester. Four graduate courses were developed and taught during the course of this time, two of which evolved into annually-taught undergraduate courses, namely Vehicle Dynamics and Control Systems Laboratory. Five faculty members from Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and the Institute for Systems Research participated. Four Ph.D. degrees (two directly supported and two indirectly supported) and seven Master's degrees in Mechanical Engineering resulted from the research conducted. Research topics included thermoelectric waste heat recovery, fuel cell modeling, pre- and post-transmission hybrid powertrain control and integration, hybrid transmission design, H{sub 2}-doped combustion, and vehicle dynamics. Many of the participating students accepted positions in the automotive industry or government laboratories involved in automotive technology work after graduation. This report discusses the participating faculty, the courses developed and taught, research conducted, the students directly and indirectly supported, and the publication list. Based on this collection of information, the University of Maryland firmly believes that the key goal of the program was met and that the majority of the participating students are now contributing to the advancement of automotive technology in this country.

David Holloway

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

252

Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel Cleaning Using Advanced Ultrasonics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI Ultrasonic Fuel Cleaning Technology (patent pending) was successfully qualified and demonstrated in the field at AmerenUE Callaway Plant under joint sponsorship of the EPRI Robust Fuel Program, Working Group 1 Fuel/Water Chemistry, and an AmerenUE Tailored Collaboration. In October 1999, the project team cleaned sixteen reload assemblies, which are currently undergoing re-irradiation in Cycle 11 at Callaway Plant. The assemblies show no evidence to date of any adverse fuel performance as a consequen...

2000-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

253

Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-off Study |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-off LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-off Study Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-off Study The LWR Sustainability (LWRS) Program activities must support the timeline dictated by utility life extension decisions to demonstrate a lead test rod in a commercial reactor within 10 years. In order to maintain the demanding development schedule that must accompany this aggressive timeline, the LWRS Program focuses on advanced fuel cladding systems that retain standard UO2 fuel pellets for deployment in currently operating LWR power plants. The LWRS work scope focuses on fuel system components outside of the fuel pellet, allowing for alteration of the existing zirconium-based clad system through coatings, addition of ceramic sleeves, or complete replacement

254

MODELING ASSUMPTIONS FOR THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR FRESH FUEL SHIPPING CONTAINER  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor Fresh Fuel Shipping Container (ATR FFSC) is currently licensed per 10 CFR 71 to transport a fresh fuel element for either the Advanced Test Reactor, the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), or the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR-II). During the licensing process, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) raised a number of issues relating to the criticality analysis, namely (1) lack of a tolerance study on the fuel and packaging, (2) moderation conditions during normal conditions of transport (NCT), (3) treatment of minor hydrogenous packaging materials, and (4) treatment of potential fuel damage under hypothetical accident conditions (HAC). These concerns were adequately addressed by modifying the criticality analysis. A tolerance study was added for both the packaging and fuel elements, full-moderation was included in the NCT models, minor hydrogenous packaging materials were included, and fuel element damage was considered for the MURR and MITR-II fuel types.

Rick J. Migliore

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Status and Prospects of the Global Automotive Fuel Cell Industry and Plans for Deployment of Fuel Cell Vehicles and Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

Automobile manufacturers leading the development of mass-market fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) were interviewed in Japan, Korea, Germany and the United States. There is general agreement that the performance of FCVs with respect to durability, cold start, packaging, acceleration, refueling time and range has progressed to the point where vehicles that could be brought to market in 2015 will satisfy customer expectations. However, cost and the lack of refueling infrastructure remain significant barriers. Costs have been dramatically reduced over the past decade, yet are still about twice what appears to be needed for sustainable market success. While all four countries have plans for the early deployment of hydrogen refueling infrastructure, the roles of government, industry and the public in creating a viable hydrogen refueling infrastructure remain unresolved. The existence of an adequate refueling infrastructure and supporting government policies are likely to be the critical factors that determine when and where hydrogen FCVs are brought to market.

Greene, David L [ORNL; Duleep, Gopal [HD Systems

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Optimization of Fuel Cell System Operating Conditions for Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Indirect Methanol Pem Fuel Cell System, SAE 2001, (paperof automotive PEM fuel cell stacks, SAE 2000 (paper numberParasitic Loads in Fuel Cell Vehicles, International Journal

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Program on Technology Innovation: Advanced Nondestructive Hydrogen Sensor for Submerged Zircaloy-4 Alloy Fuel Cladding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the development of an advanced, in situ nondestructive sensor for the rapid determination of hydrogen content in a water-submerged Zircaloy-4 alloy fuel cladding.

2009-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

258

Seven Projects That Will Advance Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Research Selected by  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

That Will Advance Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Research That Will Advance Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Research Selected by DOE for Further Development Seven Projects That Will Advance Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Research Selected by DOE for Further Development July 27, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - Seven projects that will help develop low-cost solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology for environmentally responsible central power generation from the Nation's abundant fossil energy resources have been selected for further research by the Department of Energy (DOE). The projects, managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), are valued at a total of $4,391,570, with DOE contributing $3,499,250 and the remaining cost provided by the recipients. Four of the selected projects will pursue advances in cathode performance,

259

Department of Energy Awards Nearly $7 Million to Advance Fuel Cell and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Awards Nearly $7 Million to Advance Fuel Cell Awards Nearly $7 Million to Advance Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Storage Systems Research Department of Energy Awards Nearly $7 Million to Advance Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Storage Systems Research August 9, 2011 - 11:21am Addthis California, Ohio, and Virginia Projects to Find Ways to Reduce Component and Manufacturing Costs Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced nearly $7 million over five years for independent cost analyses that will support research and development efforts for fuel cells and hydrogen storage systems. The four projects - in California, Ohio, and Virginia - will generate rigorous cost estimates for manufacturing equipment, labor, energy, raw materials, and various components that will help identify ways to drive down production costs of transportation fuel cell systems,

260

Fueling the Navy's Great Green Fleet with Advanced Biofuels | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fueling the Navy's Great Green Fleet with Advanced Biofuels Fueling the Navy's Great Green Fleet with Advanced Biofuels Fueling the Navy's Great Green Fleet with Advanced Biofuels December 5, 2011 - 5:44pm Addthis Idaho National Laboratory describes R&D efforts to transform raw biomass into quality feedstocks for the production of renewable fuels, power and bioproducts. Aaron Crowell Senior Technical Research Analyst What does this project do? Develops and utilizes domestically produced biofuels to make our military and the nation more secure. From transporting the oil necessary to fuel jets and vehicles to supplying battery packs to infantry, energy plays a central role in almost everything the U.S. military does. Because of this reliance, it's imperative that the military cultivate energy sources that are not subject to the whims of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced automotive fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Integrated fuel processor development.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies has been supporting the development of fuel-flexible fuel processors at Argonne National Laboratory. These fuel processors will enable fuel cell vehicles to operate on fuels available through the existing infrastructure. The constraints of on-board space and weight require that these fuel processors be designed to be compact and lightweight, while meeting the performance targets for efficiency and gas quality needed for the fuel cell. This paper discusses the performance of a prototype fuel processor that has been designed and fabricated to operate with liquid fuels, such as gasoline, ethanol, methanol, etc. Rated for a capacity of 10 kWe (one-fifth of that needed for a car), the prototype fuel processor integrates the unit operations (vaporization, heat exchange, etc.) and processes (reforming, water-gas shift, preferential oxidation reactions, etc.) necessary to produce the hydrogen-rich gas (reformate) that will fuel the polymer electrolyte fuel cell stacks. The fuel processor work is being complemented by analytical and fundamental research. With the ultimate objective of meeting on-board fuel processor goals, these studies include: modeling fuel cell systems to identify design and operating features; evaluating alternative fuel processing options; and developing appropriate catalysts and materials. Issues and outstanding challenges that need to be overcome in order to develop practical, on-board devices are discussed.

Ahmed, S.; Pereira, C.; Lee, S. H. D.; Krumpelt, M.

2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

262

Advanced Nuclear Fuel Development for the Future in the United ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2010. Symposium, Materials Solutions for the Nuclear Renaissance. Presentation Title, Advanced ...

263

The DOE Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials for Nuclear Power Overview. The DOE Advanced ... electricity- generation applications, such as ... United States by reducing dependence on foreign ...

264

Advanced LWR Fuel Testing Capabilities in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new test capability for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is being developed that will allow testing of advanced nuclear fuels and cladding materials under prototypic light-water reactor (LWR) operating conditions in less time than it takes in other research reactors. This paper will describe the HFIR testing capabilities, the new advanced fuel/cladding testing facilities, and the initial cooperative irradiation experiments currently planned to start in late 2008.

Ott, Larry J [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL; Spellman, Donald J [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Joint Fuel Cell Technologies and Advanced Manufacturing Webinar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

development and demonstration, and diverse efforts to overcome institutional and market challenges. Key Goals : Develop hydrogen and fuel cell technologies for: 1. Early...

266

Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

against * steady state and transient operational cell data. Complete fuel cell water transport model improvements * and code package development to include two phase flow....

267

Maximum Fuel Utilization in Advanced Fast Reactors without Actinides Separation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Albright, D. , Plutonium and highly enriched uranium, 1996 :and swelling in uranium-plutonium mixed nitride fuels.products and to extract plutonium or any other actinide from

Heidet, Florent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Development of Advanced Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrids for Distributed Power Market Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A project was initiated with Rolls-Royce PLC to assess the technical and economic feasibility of their advanced solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology and to better understand the development hurdles to achieving megawatt-scale commercial products. This effort was part of a series of projects in 2001 assessing solid oxide fuel cell technology.

2002-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

269

Advanced Fuel/Cladding Testing Capabilities in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to test advanced fuels and cladding materials under reactor operating conditions in the United States is limited. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the newly expanded post-irradiation examination (PIE) capability at the ORNL Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory provide unique support for this type of advanced fuel/cladding development effort. The wide breadth of ORNL's fuels and materials research divisions provides all the necessary fuel development capabilities in one location. At ORNL, facilities are available from test fuel fabrication, to irradiation in HFIR under either thermal or fast reactor conditions, to a complete suite of PIEs, and to final product disposal. There are very few locations in the world where this full range of capabilities exists. New testing capabilities at HFIR have been developed that allow testing of advanced nuclear fuels and cladding materials under prototypic operating conditions (i.e., for both fast-spectrum conditions and light-water-reactor conditions). This paper will describe the HFIR testing capabilities, the new advanced fuel/cladding testing facilities, and the initial cooperative irradiation experiment that begins this year.

Ott, Larry J [ORNL; Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL; Spellman, Donald J [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

The DOE Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy has established the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program to address the following overall goals: Provide a baseline fuel qualification data set in support of the licensing and operation of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). Gas-reactor fuel performance demonstration and qualification comprise the longest duration research and development (R&D) task for the NGNP feasibility. The baseline fuel form is to be demonstrated and qualified for a peak fuel centerline temperature of 1250°C. Support near-term deployment of an NGNP by reducing market entry risks posed by technical uncertainties associated with fuel production and qualification. Utilize international collaboration mechanisms to extend the value of DOE resources. The Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program consists of five elements: fuel manufacture, fuel and materials irradiations, postirradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing, fuel performance modeling, and fission product transport and source term evaluation. An underlying theme for the fuel development work is the need to develop a more complete fundamental understanding of the relationship between the fuel fabrication process, key fuel properties, the irradiation performance of the fuel, and the release and transport of fission products in the NGNP primary coolant system. Fuel performance modeling and analysis of the fission product behavior in the primary circuit are important aspects of this work. The performance models are considered essential for several reasons, including guidance for the plant designer in establishing the core design and operating limits, and demonstration to the licensing authority that the applicant has a thorough understanding of the in-service behavior of the fuel system. The fission product behavior task will also provide primary source term data needed for licensing. An overview of the program and recent progress will be presented.

David Petti; Hans Gougar; Gary Bell

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Voluntary Vehicle Retirement Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Voluntary Vehicle Voluntary Vehicle Retirement Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Voluntary Vehicle Retirement Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Voluntary Vehicle Retirement Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Voluntary Vehicle Retirement Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Voluntary Vehicle Retirement Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Voluntary Vehicle Retirement Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Voluntary Vehicle Retirement Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Voluntary Vehicle Retirement Incentives Through the California Bureau of Automotive Repair's Consumer Assistance

272

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5025: Advanced Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and revolutionary solar and wind technologies will reduce overall demand for natural gas and lead to lower energy costs. The President's Advanced Energy Initiative proposes...

273

Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-off...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

composite Zr-based alloy hybrids, advanced Zr-based alloys, and engineered stainless steel alloys. Potential benefits and drawbacks have been identified in this study to aid...

274

Impact of Nuclear Energy Futures on Advanced Fuel Cycle Options  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act requires the Secretary of Energy to inform Congress before 2010 on the need for a second geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel. By that time, the spent fuel discharged from current commercial reactors will exceed the statutory limit of the first repository. There are several approaches to eliminate the need for another repository in this century. This paper presents a high-level analysis of these spent fuel management options in the context of a full range of possible nuclear energy futures. The analysis indicates the best option to implement varies depending on the nuclear energy future selected.

Dixon, B.W.; Piet, S.J.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

275

Maximum Fuel Utilization in Advanced Fast Reactors without Actinides Separation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential Uses for Depleted Uranium Oxide. 2009, DOE. p.15. WNA. Uranium and Depleted Uranium. 2009 [cited 2010R. , Direct Use of Depleted Uranium As Fuel in a Traveling-

Heidet, Florent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Connecticut Company to Advance Hydrogen Infrastructure and Fueling...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Fueling Station Technologies July 18, 2012 - 3:36pm Addthis As part of the U.S. Energy Department's commitment to give American businesses more options to cut energy costs...

277

NETL: News Release - New Electronic Technology Advances Fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

400 per kilowatt by 2010. SECA studies indicate that each 1 percent improvement in inverter efficiency can reduce fuel cell stack costs by 5-10 per kilowatt. As the nation...

278

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the Solar/METC program is to prove the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of coal-fired gas turbine for cogeneration applications through tests of a Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal fuel throughout the engine design operating range. This quarter, work was centered on design, fabrication, and testing of the combustor, cleanup, fuel specifications, and hot end simulation rig. 2 refs., 59 figs., 29 tabs.

LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: First Results Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for their newest prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. In May 2010, SunLine began operating its sixth-generation hydrogen fueled bus, an Advanced Technology (AT) fuel cell bus that incorporates the latest design improvements to reduce weight and increase reliability and performance. The agency is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the bus in revenue service. This report provides the early data results and implementation experience of the AT fuel cell bus since it was placed in service.

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Modeling & Simulation - Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GCTool Computer Model Helps Focus Fuel Cell Vehicle Research Somewhere near Detroit, an automotive engineer stares at the ceiling, wondering how to squeeze 1% more efficiency out...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced automotive fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of Advanced Mixed-Oxide Fuel Assemblies with VIPRE-01  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two new fuel assembly designs for light water reactors using advanced mixed-oxide fuels have been proposed to reduce the radiotoxicity of used nuclear fuel discharged from nuclear power plants. The research efforts of this thesis are the first to consider the effects of burnup on advanced mixed-oxide fuel assembly performance and thermal safety margin over an assembly?s expected operational burnup lifetime. In order to accomplish this, a new burnup-dependent thermal-hydraulic analysis methodology has been developed. The new methodology models many of the effects of burnup on an assembly design by including burnup-dependent variations in fuel pin relative power from neutronic calculations, assembly power reductions due to fissile content depletion and core reshuffling, and fuel material thermal-physical properties. Additionally, a text-based coupling method is developed to facilitate the exchange of information between the neutronic code DRAGON and thermal-hydraulic code VIPRE-01. The new methodology effectively covers the entire assembly burnup lifetime and evaluates the thermal-hydraulic performance against ANS Condition I, II, and III events with respect to the minimum departure from nucleate boiling ratio, peak cladding temperatures, and fuel centerline temperatures. A comprehensive literature survey on the thermal conductivity of posed fuel materials with burnup-dependence has been carried out to model the advanced materials in the thermal-hydraulic code VIPRE-01. Where documented conductivity values are not available, a simplified method for estimating the thermal conductivity has been developed. The new thermal conductivity models are based on established FRAPCON-3 fuel property models used in the nuclear industry, with small adjustments having been made to account for actinide additions. Steady-state and transient thermal-hydraulic analyses are performed with VIPRE- 01 for a reference UO2 assembly design, and two advanced mixed-oxide fuel assembly designs using the new burnup-dependent thermal-hydraulic analysis methodology. All three designs maintain a sufficiently large thermal margin with respect to the minimum departure from nucleate boiling ratio, and maximum cladding and fuel temperatures during partial and complete loss-of-flow accident scenarios. The presence of a thin (Am,Zr)O2 outer layer on the fuel pellet in the two advanced mixed-oxide fuel assembly designs increases maximum fuel temperatures during transient conditions, but does not otherwise greatly compromise the thermal margin of the new designs.

Bingham, Adam R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hydrogen-Fueled Mercedes Sprinter Van -- Operating Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure- hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of testing conducted over 6,864 kilometers (4,265 miles) of operation using the pure-hydrogen-fueled Mercedes Sprinter van.

Karner, D.; Francfort, James Edward

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hydrogen-Fueled Mercedes Sprinter Van Operating Summary - January 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of testing conducted over 6,864 kilometers (4,265 miles) of operation using the pure-hydrogen-fueled Mercedes Sprinter van.

Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

2003-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

284

Design optimization and analysis of coated particle fuel using advanced fuel performance modeling techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modifying material properties provides another approach to optimize coated particle fuel used in pebble bed reactors. In this study, the MIT fuel performance model (TIMCOAT) was applied after benchmarking against the ...

Soontrapa, Chaiyod

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

A Blueprint for GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor Startup Fuel Fabrication Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this article is to identify the requirements and issues associated with design of GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor Fuel Facility. The report was prepared in support of providing data for preparation of a NEPA Environmental Impact Statement in support the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). One of the GNEP objectives was to reduce the inventory of long lived actinide from the light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. The LWR spent fuel contains Plutonium (Pu) -239 and other transuranics (TRU) such as Americium-241. One of the options is to transmute or burn these actinides in fast neutron spectra as well as generate the electricity. A sodium-cooled Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) concept was proposed to achieve this goal. However, fuel with relatively high TRU content has not been used in the fast reactor. To demonstrate the utilization of TRU fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype of ARR was proposed, which would necessarily be started up using weapons grade (WG) Pu fuel. The WG Pu is distinguished by relatively highest proportions of Pu-239 and lesser amount of other actinides. The WG Pu was assumed to be used as the startup fuel along with TRU fuel in lead test assemblies. Because such fuel is not currently being produced in the US, a new facility (or new capability in an existing facility) was being considered for fabrication of WG Pu fuel for the ABR. It was estimated that the facility will provide the startup fuel for 10-15 years and would take 3 to 5 years to construct.

S. Khericha

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - Optimized Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimized Fuel Injector Design Optimized Fuel Injector Design This project includes fundamental research and engineering development of low NOx burners and reburning fuel injectors. The team of Reaction Engineering International (REI), the University of Utah, Brown University and DB Riley, Inc., will develop fundamental information on low NOx burners. The work has two phases. In the first phase, the University of Utah will examine two-phase mixing and near-field behavior of coal injectors using a 15-million Btu/hr bench-scale furnace, Brown University will examine char deactivation and effectiveness of reburning, and REI will develop a comprehensive burner model using the data produced by the University of Utah and Brown University. In the second phase, an optimized injector design will be tested at the 100-million Btu/hr Riley Coal Burner Test Facility. It is anticipated that this work will provide improved hardware designs and computer simulation models for reduced NOx emissions and minimized carbon loss.

287

A Path Forward to Advanced Nuclear Fuels: Spectroscopic Calorimetry of Nuclear Fuel Materials  

SciTech Connect

The goal is to relieve the shortage of thermodynamic and kinetic information concerning the stability of nuclear fuel alloys. Past studies of the ternary nuclear fuel UPuZr have demonstrated constituent redistribution when irradiated or with thermal treatment. Thermodynamic data is key to predicting the possibilities of effects such as constituent redistribution within the fuel rods and interaction with cladding materials.

Tobin, J G

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

288

Fabrication of advanced oxide fuels containing minor actinide for use in fast reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

R and D of advanced fuel containing minor actinide for use in fast reactors is described related to the composite fuel with MgO matrix. Fabrication tests of MgO composite fuels containing Am were done by a practical process that could be adapted to the presently used commercial manufacturing technology. Am-containing MgO composite fuels having good characteristics, i.e., having no defects, a high density, a homogeneous dispersion of host phase, were obtained. As related technology, burn-up characteristics of a fast reactor core loaded with the present MgO composite fuel were also analyzed, mainly in terms of core criticality. Furthermore, phase relations of MA oxide which was assumed to be contained in MgO matrix fuel were experimentally investigated. (authors)

Miwa, Shuhei; Osaka, Masahiko; Tanaka, Kosuke; Ishi, Yohei; Yoshimochi, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kenya [Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Oarai-machi, Higashi-ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Building the Next Generation of Automotive Industry Leaders | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building the Next Generation of Automotive Industry Leaders Building the Next Generation of Automotive Industry Leaders Building the Next Generation of Automotive Industry Leaders December 7, 2010 - 4:23pm Addthis Zach Heir , a recent hire in the electric vehicle field Zach Heir , a recent hire in the electric vehicle field Dennis A. Smith Director, National Clean Cities It's no secret that when it comes to advanced vehicle technologies, the Department of Energy is kicking into high gear. We're investing more than $12 billion in grants and loans for research, development and deployment of advanced technology vehicles. These investments are helping to create a clean energy workforce. If we want to continue a leadership role in the global automotive industry, it is crucial that we take the long view and invest heavily in the next generation of innovators and critical thinkers

290

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the activity during the period from 2 June 1991 to 1 June 1992. The major areas of work include: the combustor sub-scale and full size testing, cleanup, coal fuel specification and processing, the Hot End Simulation rig and design of the engine parts required for use with the coal-fueled combustor island. To date Solar has demonstrated: Stable and efficient combustion burning coal-water mixtures using the Two Stage Slagging Combustor; Molten slag removal of over 97% using the slagging primary and the particulate removal impact separator; and on-site preparation of CWM is feasible. During the past year the following tasks were completed: The feasibility of on-site CWM preparation was demonstrated on the subscale TSSC. A water-cooled impactor was evaluated on the subscale TSSC; three tests were completed on the full size TSSC, the last one incorporating the PRIS; a total of 27 hours of operation on CWM at design temperature were accumulated using candle filters supplied by Refraction through Industrial Pump Filter; a target fuel specification was established and a fuel cost model developed which can identify sensitivities of specification parameters; analyses of the effects of slag on refractory materials were conducted; and modifications continued on the Hot End Simulation Rig to allow extended test times.

LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; When, C.S.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Vehicle Data for Alternative Fuel Vehicles (AFVs) and Hybrid Fuel Vehicles (HEVs) from the Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (AFCD)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The AFDC provides search capabilities for many different models of both light-duty and heavy-duty vehicles. Engine and transmission type, fuel and class, fuel economy and emission certification are some of the facts available. The search will also help users locate dealers in their areas and do cost analyses. Information on alternative fuel vehicles and on advanced technology vehicles, along with calculators, resale and conversion information, links to incentives and programs such as Clean Cities, and dozens of fact sheets and publications make this section of the AFDC a valuable resource for car buyers.

292

Advanced Neutron Imaging Facility (continued)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of fuel cells and lithium-ion batteries for automotive vehicle applications. ... the time to market introduction of the next generation electric car engines.

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

293

Program on Technology Innovation: Advanced Fuel Cycles - Impact on High-Level Waste Disposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a dynamic simulation analysis for deployment of advanced light water reactors (LWRs) and fast burner reactors, as proposed by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program. Conditions for the analysis were selected for their potential to challenge the nuclear fuel simulation codes that were used, due to the large variations in nuclear fuel composition for the burner reactors before equilibrium conditions are approached. The analysis was performed in a U.S. conte...

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

294

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, July 1995--September 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Penn State program in advanced thermally stable jet engine fuels has five components: development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer-sized and micrometer particles suspended in fuels during thermal stresses; characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; and assessment of the potential of producing high yields of cycloalkanes and hydroaromatics by direct coal liquefaction. Progress is described.

Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C. [and others

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Automotive materials usage trends  

SciTech Connect

The materials composition of US passenger cars is traced from 1960 and projected into 1990's. Sales-weighted average vehicle-weight trends are analyzed in terms of shifts in the large/small car mix, downsizing, and downweighting. The growth in the usage of lightweight materials: -high strength steels, cast/wrought aluminum, plastics and composites - are examined in detail. Usage trends in a host of other materials such as alloy steels, zinc, lead, copper, etc. are also discussed. An approximate quantitative analysis of changes in the usage of steel by the automotive industry worldwide show that about 10% of total decline in Western-World steel consumption is accounted for by the automotive industry. An assessment is presented for automotive industry use of critical materials such as chromium in alloy steels/cast irons and the platinum group metals in exhaust-gas catalysts. 10 references, 13 figures, 9 tables.

Gjostein, N.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

PRELIMINARY DATA CALL REPORT ADVANCED BURNER REACTOR START UP FUEL FABRICATION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide data for preparation of a NEPA Environmental Impact Statement in support the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). One of the GNEP objectives is to reduce the inventory of long lived actinide from the light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. The LWR spent fuel contains Plutonium (Pu) -239 and other transuranics (TRU) such as Americium-241. One of the options is to transmute or burn these actinides in fast neutron spectra as well as generate the electricity. A sodium-cooled Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) concept has been proposed to achieve this goal. However, fuel with relatively high TRU content has not been used in the fast reactor. To demonstrate the utilization of TRU fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype of ARR is proposed, which would necessarily be started up using weapons grade (WG) Pu fuel. The WG Pu is distinguished by relatively highest proportions of Pu-239 and lesser amount of other actinides. The WG Pu will be used as the startup fuel along with TRU fuel in lead test assemblies. Because such fuel is not currently being produced in the US, a new facility (or new capability in an existing facility) is being considered for fabrication of WG Pu fuel for the ABR. This report is provided in response to ‘Data Call’ for the construction of startup fuel fabrication facility. It is anticipated that the facility will provide the startup fuel for 10-15 years and will take to 3 to 5 years to construct.

S. T. Khericha

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

D. E. Shropshire

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - NREL to Showcase Two Advanced Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Showcase Two Advanced Vehicles at Estes Park Coolest Car Show on to Showcase Two Advanced Vehicles at Estes Park Coolest Car Show on July 4 July 1, 2013 The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will showcase two advanced Toyota vehicles -- a Highlander fuel cell hybrid vehicle (FCHV-adv) and a plug-in Prius hybrid electric vehicle -- at The Coolest Car Show in Colorado in Estes Park on July 4. Representatives from NREL will be on hand to answer questions about the vehicles on display and provide information and educational literature about alternative fuels and advanced vehicles. "We like to reach out to the community and provide information on alternative vehicle technologies and this is a great event to do that with all of the vehicle enthusiasts," said NREL's Melanie Caton. The car show, which is hosted by Estes Park Museum Friends and Foundation,

299

Fuel Properties Database from the Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (AFDC)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The database can be searched in various ways and can output numbers or explanatory text. Heavy vehicle chassis emission data are also available for some fuels.

300

Fuel Effects on Ignition and Their Impact on Advanced Combustion Engines (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to develop a pathway to use easily measured ignition properties as metrics for characterizing fuels in advanced combustion engine research--correlate IQT{trademark} measured parameters with engine data. In HCCL engines, ignition timing depends on the reaction rates throughout compression stroke: need to understand sensitivity to T, P, and [O{sub 2}]; need to rank fuels based on more than one set of conditions; and need to understand how fuel composition (molecular species) affect ignition properties.

Taylor, J.; Li, H.; Neill, S.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced automotive fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Opportunities for mixed oxide fuel testing in the advanced test reactor to support plutonium disposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous technical issues must be resolved before LWR operating licenses can be amended to allow the use of MOX fuel. These issues include the following: (1) MOX fuel fabrication process verification; (2) Whether and how to use burnable poisons to depress MOX fuel initial reactivity, which is higher than that of urania; (3) The effects of WGPu isotopic composition; (4) The feasibility of loading MOX fuel with plutonia content up to 7% by weight; (5) The effects of americium and gallium in WGPu; (6) Fission gas release from MOX fuel pellets made from WGPu; (7) Fuel/cladding gap closure; (8) The effects of power cycling and off-normal events on fuel integrity; (9) Development of radial distributions of burnup and fission products; (10) Power spiking near the interfaces of MOX and urania fuel assemblies; and (11) Fuel performance code validation. The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory possesses many advantages for performing tests to resolve most of the issues identified above. We have performed calculations to show that the use of hafnium shrouds can produce spectrum adjustments that will bring the flux spectrum in ATR test loops into a good approximation to the spectrum anticipated in a commercial LWR containing MOX fuel while allowing operation of the test fuel assemblies near their optimum values of linear heat generation rate. The ATR would be a nearly ideal test bed for developing data needed to support applications to license LWRs for operation with MOX fuel made from weapons-grade plutonium. The requirements for planning and implementing a test program in the ATR have been identified. The facilities at Argonne National Laboratory-West can meet all potential needs for pre- and post-irradiation examination that might arise in a MOX fuel qualification program.

Terry, W.K.; Ryskamp, J.M.; Sterbentz, J.W. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Fourth Results Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

SunLine Transit Agency, which provides public transit services to the Coachella Valley area of California, has demonstrated hydrogen and fuel cell bus technologies for more than 10 years. In May 2010, SunLine began demonstrating the advanced technology (AT) fuel cell bus with a hybrid electric propulsion system, fuel cell power system, and lithium-based hybrid batteries. This report describes operations at SunLine for the AT fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas buses. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is working with SunLine to evaluate the bus in real-world service to document the results and help determine the progress toward technology readiness. NREL has previously published three reports documenting the operation of the fuel cell bus in service. This report provides a summary of the results with a focus on the bus operation from February 2012 through November 2012.

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

THERMAL ANALYSIS OF A PROPOSED TRANSPORT CASK FOR THREE ADVANCED BURNER REACTOR USED FUEL ASSEMBLIES  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary studies of used fuel generated in the US Department of Energy’s Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative have indicated that current used fuel transport casks may be insufficient for the transportation of said fuel. This work considers transport of three 5-year-cooled oxide Advanced Burner Reactor used fuel assemblies with a burn-up of 160 MWD/kg. A transport cask designed to carry these assemblies is proposed. This design employs a 7-cm-thick lead gamma shield and a 20-cm-thick NS-4-FR composite neutron shield. The temperature profile within the cask, from its center to its exterior surface, is determined by two dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations of conduction, convection, and radiation within the cask. Simulations are performed for a cask with a smooth external surface and various neutron shield thicknesses. Separate simulations are performed for a cask with a corrugated external surface and a neutron shield thickness that satisfies shielding constraints. Resulting temperature profiles indicate that a three-assembly cask with a smooth external surface will meet fuel cladding temperature requirements but will cause outer surface temperatures to exceed the regulatory limit. A cask with a corrugated external surface will not exceed the limits for both the fuel cladding and outer surface temperatures.

T. Bullard; M. Greiner; M. Dennis; S. Bays; R. Weiner

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Automotive Accessibility and Efficiency Meet in the Innovative MV-1 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Automotive Accessibility and Efficiency Meet in the Innovative MV-1 Automotive Accessibility and Efficiency Meet in the Innovative MV-1 Automotive Accessibility and Efficiency Meet in the Innovative MV-1 March 11, 2011 - 4:03pm Addthis The MV-1, a new wheelchair accessible, fuel-efficient vehicle | Photo Courtesy of Vehicle Production Group The MV-1, a new wheelchair accessible, fuel-efficient vehicle | Photo Courtesy of Vehicle Production Group Daniel B. Poneman Daniel B. Poneman Deputy Secretary of Energy Yesterday, the Department of Energy announced that we've now finalized a loan for nearly $50 million to the Vehicle Production Group - or VPG. The project will support the development and manufacturing of a new wheelchair accessible, fuel-efficient car, the MV-1, that will run on compressed natural gas instead of gasoline, produce low emissions, and create 900 jobs

305

UC Davis Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, and Hybrid Vehicle (FCH2V) GATE Center of Excellence  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of the UC Davis Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, and Hybrid Vehicle (FCH2V) GATE Center of Excellence which spanned from 2005-2012. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program, to provide a new generation of engineers and scientists with knowledge and skills to create advanced automotive technologies. The UC Davis Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, and Hybrid Vehicle (FCH2V) GATE Center of Excellence established in 2005 is focused on research, education, industrial collaboration and outreach within automotive technology. UC Davis has had two independent GATE centers with separate well-defined objectives and research programs from 1998. The Fuel Cell Center, administered by ITS-Davis, has focused on fuel cell technology. The Hybrid-Electric Vehicle Design Center (HEV Center), administered by the Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, has focused on the development of plug-in hybrid technology using internal combustion engines. The merger of these two centers in 2005 has broadened the scope of research and lead to higher visibility of the activity. UC Davisâ??s existing GATE centers have become the campusâ??s research focal points on fuel cells and hybrid-electric vehicles, and the home for graduate students who are studying advanced automotive technologies. The centers have been highly successful in attracting, training, and placing top-notch students into fuel cell and hybrid programs in both industry and government.

Erickson, Paul

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL helps industry partners develop the next generation of energy efficient, high performance vehicles and fuels. NREL's transportation research spans from the materials to the systems level. NREL conducts research on the full range of vehicle types, from light-duty passenger cars to heavy-duty freight trucks. NREL's credible transportation research is grounded in real-world data. NREL's integrated approach links automotive technology advances to the full spectrum of renewable energy solutions. NREL researchers examine infrastructure, market conditions and driver behavior, as well as fuels and vehicles. NREL helps put fuel-efficient, low-emission cars and trucks on the road through research and innovation in electric vehicle, biofuel, and conventional automotive technologies. Researchers collaborate with industry

307

Automotive Lightweight Materials Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and manufacturing energy by lower energy use and cost during the vehicle operation life cycle stage. It is estimated -1500 -1000 -500 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 LifeCycleEnergySavings(MJ/vehicle) Manufacturing Use Recycle's (DOE's) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program (FCVT), Automotive Lightweighting

308

ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eltron Research Inc., and team members CoorsTek, McDermott Technology, Inc., Sued Chemie, Argonne National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying single-phase and composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize proton and electron conductivity without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. The proposed technology addresses the DOE Vision 21 initiative in two ways. First, this process offers a relatively inexpensive solution for pure hydrogen separation that can be easily incorporated into Vision 21 fossil fuel plants. Second, this process could reduce the cost of hydrogen, which is a clean burning fuel under increasing demand as supporting technologies are developed for hydrogen utilization and storage. Additional motivation for this project arises from the potential of this technology for other applications. Membranes testing during this reporting period were greater than 1 mm thick and had the general perovskite composition AB{sub 1-x}B'{sub x}O{sub 3-{delta}}, where 0.05 {<=} x {<=} 0.3. These materials demonstrated hydrogen separation rates between 1 and 2 mL/min/cm{sup 2}, which represents roughly 20% of the target goal for membranes of this thickness. The sintered membranes were greater than 95% dense, but the phase purity decreased with increasing dopant concentration. The quantity of dopant incorporated into the perovskite phase was roughly constant, with excess dopant forming an additional phase. Composite materials with distinct ceramic and metallic phases, and thin film perovskites (100 {micro}m) also were successfully prepared, but have not yet been tested for hydrogen transport. Finally, porous platinum was identified as a excellent catalyst for evaluation of membrane materials, however, lower cost nickel catalyst systems are being developed.

Shane E. Roark; Tony F. Sammells; Adam Calihman; Andy Girard; Pamela M. Van Calcar; Richard Mackay; Tom Barton; Sara Rolfe

2001-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

309

Evaluation of the advanced mixed oxide fuel test FO-2 irradiated in Fast Flux Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The advanced mixed-oxide (UO/sub 2/-PuO/sub 2/) test assembly, FO-2, irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), is undergoing postirradiation examination (PIE). This is one of the first FFTF tests examined that used the advanced ferrite-martensite alloy, HT9, which is highly resistant to irradiation swelling. The FO-2 includes the first annular fueled pins irradiated in FFTF to undergo destructive examination. The FO-2 is a lead assembly for the ongoing FFTF Core Demonstration Experiment (CDE) (Leggett and Omberg 1987) and was designed to evaluate the effects of fuel design variables, such as pellet density, smeared density, and fuel form (annular or solid fuel), on advanced pin performance. The assembly contains a total of 169 fuel pins of twelve different types. The test was irradiated for 312 equivalent full power days (EFPD) in FFTF. It had a peak pin power of 13.7 kW/ft and reached a peak burnup of 65.2 MWd/kgM with a peak fast fluence of 9.9 /times/ 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/ (E > 0.1 MeV). This document discusses the test and its results. 6 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs.

Gilpin, L.L.; Baker, R.B.; Chastain, S.A.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Hydrogen as a fuel  

SciTech Connect

A panel of the Committee on Advanced Energy Storage Systems of the Assembly of Engineering has examined the status and problems of hydrogen manufacturing methods, hydrogen transmission and distribution networks, and hydrogen storage systems. This examination, culminating at a time when rapidly changing conditions are having noticeable impact on fuel and energy availability and prices, was undertaken with a view to determining suitable criteria for establishing the pace, timing, and technical content of appropriate federally sponsored hydrogen R and D programs. The increasing urgency to develop new sources and forms of fuel and energy may well impact on the scale and timing of potential future hydrogen uses. The findings of the panel are presented. Chapters are devoted to hydrogen sources, hydrogen as a feedstock, hydrogen transport and storage, hydrogen as a heating fuel, automotive uses of hydrogen, aircraft use of hydrogen, the fuel cell in hydrogen energy systems, hydrogen research and development evaluation, and international hydrogen programs.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Estimating the impact on fuel tax revenues from a changing light vehicle fleet with increased advanced internal combustion engine vehicles and electric vehicles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Advanced fuel economies in both traditional internal combustion engine vehicles (ICEs) and electric vehicles (EVs) have a strong influence on transportation revenue by reducing fuel… (more)

Hall, Andrea Lynn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Tracking the Origins of Fossil Fuels | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tailoring the Properties of Magnetic Nanostructures Tailoring the Properties of Magnetic Nanostructures X-ray Holograms Expose Secret Magnetism How Dissolved Metal Ions Interact in Solution One Giant Leap for Radiation Biology? What's in the Cage Matters in Iron Antimonide Thermoelectric Materials Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Tracking the Origins of Fossil Fuels MAY 29, 2007 Bookmark and Share S-XANES absorbance and third derivative absorbance edge spectra of Duvernay (A) Type II kerogen and the results of curve fits using spectra from model compounds. Notice that sharp features appear in the thrid derivative spectrum that are easily associated with FeS2, aliphatic sulfur and

313

Advanced natural gas fuel technologies for military installations. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Energy conservation efforts reduced Department of Defense (DoD) fossil fuel consumption considerably between FYX5 and FY9 I, yet electricity consumption increased. Electricity consumption accounts for only one-third of DoD energy use, but over half of DoD energy costs. In addition, the production of electricity at coal or nuclear plants often creates environmental concerns, while the use of clean-burning natural gas does not; its use can help DoD bases comply with increasingly stringent environmental regulations. Recent developments in natural gas-fired technologies also demonstrate improved efficiency and productivity at lower costs. This report identifies state-of-the-art and emerging natural gas utilization technologies with potential application on DoD installations. This report describes various technologies that have potential residential, commercial, or industrial applications on DoD installations. Applications include heating, cooling, power generation, food preparation, and several industrial processes.

Savoie, M.J.; Freeman, P.M.; Blazek, C.F.; Potts, N.L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eltron Research Inc., and team members CoorsTek, McDermott Technology, inc., Sued Chemie, Argonne National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying single-phase and composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize proton and electron conductivity without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur.

Shane E. Roark; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard A. Mackay; Lyrik Y. Pitzman; Thomas A. Zirbel; Thomas F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; U. (Balu) Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; George Farthing; Dan Rowley; Tim R. Armstrong; R.D. Carneim; P.F. Becher; C-H. Hsueh; Aaron L. Wagner; Jon P. Wagner

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

315

Advanced Materials for PEM-Based Fuel Cell Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are quickly becoming attractive alternative energy sources for transportation, stationary power, and small electronics due to the increasing cost and environmental hazards of traditional fossil fuels. Two main classes of PEMFCs include hydrogen/air or hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). The current benchmark membrane for both types of PEMFCs is Nafion, a perfluorinated sulfonated copolymer made by DuPont. Nafion copolymers exhibit good thermal and chemical stability, as well as very high proton conductivity under hydrated conditions at temperatures below 80 �������������������������������°C. However, application of these membranes is limited due to their high methanol permeability and loss of conductivity at high temperatures and low relative humidities. These deficiencies have led to the search for improved materials for proton exchange membranes. Potential PEMs should have good thermal, hydrolytic, and oxidative stability, high proton conductivity, selective permeability, and mechanical durability over long periods of time. Poly(arylene ether)s, polyimides, polybenzimidazoles, and polyphenylenes are among the most widely investigated candidates for PEMs. Poly(arylene ether)s are a promising class of proton exchange membranes due to their excellent thermal and chemical stability and high glass transition temperatures. High proton conductivity can be achieved through post-sulfonation of poly(arylene ether) materials, but this most often results in very high water sorption or even water solubility. Our research has shown that directly polymerized poly(arylene ether) copolymers show important advantages over traditional post-sulfonated systems and also address the concerns with Nafion membranes. These properties were evaluated and correlated with morphology, structure-property relationships, and states of water in the membranes. Further improvements in properties were achieved through incorporation of inorganic fillers, such as phosphotungstic acid and zirconium hydrogen phosphate. Block copolymers were also studied due to the possibility to achieve a desired combination of homopolymer properties as well as the unique morphologies that are possible with block copolymers. Bezoyl substituted poly(p-phenylene) blocks were combined with poly(arylene ether) blocks to merge the structural rigidity of the poly(p-phenylene) with the ductility and high protonic conductivity of the poly(arylene ether)s. As evidenced by our many refereed publications and preprints, the research that we have conducted over the past several years has made a valuable and significant contribution to the literature and to the state of understanding of proton exchange membranes. Our early efforts at scale-up have suggested that the directly polymerized disulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) copolymers are commercially viable alternatives for proton exchange membranes. A new process for bipolar plates was developed and is described. An important single domain PEMFC model was developed and is documented in this final report.

James E. McGrath

2005-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

316

Advanced Materials for PEM-Based Fuel Cell Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are quickly becoming attractive alternative energy sources for transportation, stationary power, and small electronics due to the increasing cost and environmental hazards of traditional fossil fuels. Two main classes of PEMFCs include hydrogen/air or hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). The current benchmark membrane for both types of PEMFCs is Nafion, a perfluorinated sulfonated copolymer made by DuPont. Nafion copolymers exhibit good thermal and chemical stability, as well as very high proton conductivity under hydrated conditions at temperatures below 80 degrees C. However, application of these membranes is limited due to their high methanol permeability and loss of conductivity at high temperatures and low relative humidities. These deficiencies have led to the search for improved materials for proton exchange membranes. Potential PEMs should have good thermal, hydrolytic, and oxidative stability, high proton conductivity, selective permeability, and mechanical durability over long periods of time. Poly(arylene ether)s, polyimides, polybenzimidazoles, and polyphenylenes are among the most widely investigated candidates for PEMs. Poly(arylene ether)s are a promising class of proton exchange membranes due to their excellent thermal and chemical stability and high glass transition temperatures. High proton conductivity can be achieved through post-sulfonation of poly(arylene ether) materials, but this most often results in very high water sorption or even water solubility. Our research has shown that directly polymerized poly(arylene ether) copolymers show important advantages over traditional post-sulfonated systems and also address the concerns with Nafion membranes. These properties were evaluated and correlated with morphology, structure-property relationships, and states of water in the membranes. Further improvements in properties were achieved through incorporation of inorganic fillers, such as phosphotungstic acid and zirconium hydrogen phosphate. Block copolymers were also studied due to the possibility to achieve a desired combination of homopolymer properties as well as the unique morphologies that are possible with block copolymers. Bezoyl substituted poly(p-phenylene) blocks were combined with poly(arylene ether) blocks to merge the structural rigidity of the poly(p-phenylene) with the ductility and high protonic conductivity of the poly(arylene ether)s. As evidenced by our many refereed publications and preprints, the research that we have conducted over the past several years has made a valuable and significant contribution to the literature and to the state of understanding of proton exchange membranes. Our early efforts at scale-up have suggested that the directly polymerized disulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) copolymers are commercially viable alternatives for proton exchange membranes. A new process for bipolar plates was developed and is described. An important single domain PEMFC model was developed and is documented in herein.

James E. McGrath; Donald G. Baird; Michael von Spakovsky

2005-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

317

Status of the NGNP Fuel Experiment AGR-2 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2), which utilized the same experiment design as well as control and monitoring systems as AGR-1, started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The design of this experiment and support systems will be briefly discussed, followed by the progress and status of the experiment to date.

Blaine Grover

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Advancements in the behavioral modeling of fuel elements and related structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important aspect of the design and analysis of nuclear reactors is the ability to predict the behavior of fuel elements in the adverse environment of a reactor system. By understanding the thermomechanical behavior of the different materials which constitute a nuclear fuel element, analysis and predictions can be made regarding the integrity and reliability of fuel element designs. The SMiRT conference series, through the division on fuel elements and the post-conference seminars on fuel element modeling, provided technical forums for the international participation in the exchange of knowledge concerning the thermomechanical modeling of fuel elements. This paper discusses the technical advances in the behavioral modeling of fuel elements presented at the SMiRT conference series since its inception in 1971. Progress in the areas of material properties and constitutive relationships, modeling methodologies, and integral modeling approaches was reviewed and is summarized in light of their impact on the thermomechanical modeling of nuclear fuel elements. 34 refs., 5 tabs.

Billone, M.C.; Montgomery, R.O.; Rashid, Y.R.; Head, J.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); ANATECH Research Corp., San Diego, CA (USA); Royal Naval Coll., Greenwich (UK))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

EA-1851: Delphi Automotive Systems Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1851: Delphi Automotive Systems Electric Drive Vehicle Battery EA-1851: Delphi Automotive Systems Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative EA-1851: Delphi Automotive Systems Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide a financial assistance grant under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) to Delphi Automotive Systems, Limited Liability Corporation (LLC) (Delphi). Delphi proposes to construct a laboratory referred to as the "Delphi Kokomo, IN Corporate Technology Center" (Delphi CTC Project) and retrofit a manufacturing facility. The project would advance DOE's Vehicle Technology Program through manufacturing and testing of electric-drive vehicle components as well as assist in the

320

Automotive Energy Supply Corporation AESC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Automotive Energy Supply Corporation AESC Automotive Energy Supply Corporation AESC Jump to: navigation, search Name Automotive Energy Supply Corporation (AESC) Place Zama, Kanagawa, Japan Product JV formed for development and marketing of advanced lithium-ion batteries for automotive applications. Coordinates 32.974049°, -89.371101° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.974049,"lon":-89.371101,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

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321

Advanced water-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program was conducted to improve the performance and minimize the cost of existing water-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell stacks for electric utility and on-site applications. The goals for the electric utility stack technology were a power density of at least 175 watts per square foot over a 40,000-hour useful life and a projected one-of-a-kind, full-scale manufactured cost of less than $400 per kilowatt. The program adapted the existing on-site Configuration-B cell design to electric utility operating conditions and introduced additional new design features. Task 1 consisted of the conceptual design of a full-scale electric utility cell stack that meets program objectives. The conceptual design was updated to incorporate the results of material and process developments in Tasks 2 and 3, as well as results of stack tests conducted in Task 6. Tasks 2 and 3 developed the materials and processes required to fabricate the components that meet the program objectives. The design of the small area and 10-ft{sup 2} stacks was conducted in Task 4. Fabrication and assembly of the short stacks were conducted in Task 5 and subsequent tests were conducted in Task 6. The management and reporting functions of Task 7 provided DOE/METC with program visibility through required documentation and program reviews. This report describes the cell design and development effort that was conducted to demonstrate, by subscale stack test, the technical achievements made toward the above program objectives.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUELS PLANTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eltron Research Inc. and team members CoorsTek, Sued Chemie, and Argonne National Laboratory are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative, which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. Currently, this project is focusing on four basic categories of dense membranes: (1) mixed conducting ceramic/ceramic composites, (2) mixed conducting ceramic/metal (cermet) composites, (3) cermets with hydrogen permeable metals, and (4) layered composites containing hydrogen permeable alloys. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. This report presents hydrogen permeation data during long term tests and tests at high pressure in addition to progress with cermet, ceramic/ceramic, and thin film membranes.

Shane E. Roark; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard Mackay; Stewart Schesnack; Scott Morrison; Thomas A. Zirbel; Thomas F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; Aaron L. Wagner; Jon P. Wagner

2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

Advances in research for solid oxide fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cells are attracting considerable interest among industrial organizations wanting to position themselves in a potentially important technology of the future. More than a dozen new organizations worldwide have begun SOFC development in the last few years. Most of this R and D activity is in the planar technology, because it represents a good compromise between the proven but IR-limited tubular configuration and the high-performance but difficult-to-fabricate monolithic structure. The challenges of developing the planar cell configurations are finding high-temperature edge and manifold seal materials that will make very flat ceramic trilayers of sufficiently large area, and minimize contact resistances in stacks of cells. Also, decreasing the operating temperature requires development of reliable thin-film fabrication methods for the electrolyte, and finding a metal with good oxidation resistance and a thermal expansion coefficient well matched with the different cell components. Finally, toughness and a thermal stress tolerance of stacks need to be improved.

Krumpelt, M.; Kueper, T.W.; Doshi, R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Electrochemical Technology Program

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

324

Advanced turbine design for coal-fueled engines  

SciTech Connect

The investigators conclude that: (1) Turbine erosion resistance was shown to be improved by a factor of 5 by varying the turbine design. Increasing the number of stages and increasing the mean radius reduces the peak predicted erosion rates for 2-D flows on the blade airfoil from values which are 6 times those of the vane to values of erosion which are comparable to those of the vane airfoils. (2) Turbine erosion was a strong function of airfoil shape depending on particle diameter. Different airfoil shapes for the same turbine operating condition resulted in a factor of 7 change in airfoil erosion for the smallest particles studied (5 micron). (3) Predicted erosion for the various turbines analyzed was a strong function of particle diameter and weaker function of particle density. (4) Three dimensional secondary flows were shown to cause increases in peak and average erosion on the vane and blade airfoils. Additionally, the interblade secondary flows and stationary outer case caused unique erosion patterns which were not obtainable with 2-D analyses. (5) Analysis of the results indicate that hot gas cleanup systems are necessary to achieve acceptable turbine life in direct-fired, coal-fueled systems. In addition, serious consequences arise when hot gas filter systems fail for even short time periods. For a complete failure of the filter system, a 0.030 in. thick corrosion-resistant protective coating on a turbine blade would be eroded at some locations within eight minutes.

Wagner, J.H.; Johnson, B.V.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Vision 21 Fossil Fuel Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eltron Research Inc. and team members CoorsTek, Sued Chemie, Argonne National Laboratory, and NORAM are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative, which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. Currently, this project is focusing on four basic categories of dense membranes: (1) mixed conducting ceramic/ceramic composites, (2) mixed conducting ceramic/metal (cermet) composites, (3) cermets with hydrogen permeable metals, and (4) layered composites containing hydrogen permeable alloys. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. During this final quarter of the no cost extension several planar membranes of a cermet composition referred to as EC101 containing a high permeability metal and a ceramic phase were prepared and permeability testing was performed.

Carl R. Evenson; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

326

ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eltron Research Inc. and team members CoorsTek, Sued Chemie, and Argonne National Laboratory are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative, which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. Currently, this project is focusing on four basic categories of dense membranes: (i) mixed conducting ceramic/ceramic composites, (ii) mixed conducting ceramic/metal (cermet) composites, (iii) cermets with hydrogen permeable metals, and (iv) hydrogen permeable alloys. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. This report describes resent results for long-term hydrogen permeation and chemical stability measurements, new mixed conducting cermets, progress in cermet, thin film, and thin-walled tube fabrication, hydrogen absorption measurements for selected compositions, and membrane facilitated alkane to olefin conversion.

Shane E. Roark; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard A. Mackay; Lyrik Y. Pitzman; Thomas A. Zirbel; Stewart Schesnack; Thomas F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; U. (Balu) Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; Aaron L. Wagner; Jon P. Wagner

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

327

Advanced Water-Cooled Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program is being conducted to improve the performance and minimize the cost of water cooled, electric utility phosphoric acid fuel cell stacks. The program adapts the existing on-site Configuration B cell design to electric utility operating conditions and introduces additional new design features. Task 1 consists of the conceptual design of a full-scale electric utility cell stack that meets program objectives. Tasks 2 and 3 develop the materials and processes requested to fabricate the components that meet the program objective. The design of the small area and two 10-ft[sup 2] short stacks is conducted in Task 4. The conceptual design also is updated to incorporate the results of material and process developments, as well as results of stack tests conducted in Task 6. Fabrication and assembly of the short stacks are conducted in Task 5 and subsequent tests are conducted in Task 6. The Contractor expects to enter into a contract with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to assemble and endurance test the second 10-ft[sup 2] short stack. The management and reporting functions of Task 7 provide DOE/METC with program visibility through required documentation and program reviews. This report describes the cell design and development effort that is being conducted to demonstrate, by subscale stack test, the technical achievements made toward the above program objectives.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Lightweight Steel Solutions for Automotive Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, improvement in fuel efficiency and safety has become the biggest issue in worldwide automotive industry. Although the regulation of environment and safety has been tightened up more and more, the majority of vehicle bodies are still manufactured from stamped steel components. This means that the optimized steel solutions enable to demonstrate its ability to reduce body weight with high crashworthiness performance instead of expensive light weight materials such as Al, Mg and composites. To provide the innovative steel solutions for automotive industry, POSCO has developed AHSS and its application technologies, which is directly connected to EVI activities. EVI is a technical cooperation program with customer covering all stages of new car project from design to mass production. Integrated light weight solutions through new forming technologies such as TWB, hydroforming and HPF are continuously developed and provided for EVI activities. This paper will discuss the detailed status of these technologies especially light weight steel solutions based on innovative technologies.

Lee, Hong Woo; Kim, Gyosung; Park, Sung Ho [Technical Research Laboratories, POSCO, 699, Gumho-dong, Gwangyang-si, Jeonnam, 545-090 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems reference system definition update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the the Direct Coal-Fueled 80 MW Combustion Turbine Program is to establish the technology required for private sector use of an advanced coal-fueled combustion turbine power system. Under this program the technology for a direct coal-fueled 80 MW combustion turbine is to be developed. This unit would be an element in a 207 MW direct coal-fueled combustion turbine combined cycle which includes two combustion turbines, two heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. Key to meeting the program objectives is the development of a successful high pressure slagging combustor that burns coal, while removing sulfur, particulates, and corrosive alkali matter from the combustion products. Westinghouse and Textron (formerly AVCO Research Laboratory/Textron) have designed and fabricated a subscale slagging combustor. This slagging combustor, under test since September 1988, has been yielding important experimental data, while having undergone several design iterations.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Third Results Reports  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for their newest prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. In May 2010, SunLine began operating its sixth-generation hydrogen fueled bus, an Advanced Technology (AT) fuel cell bus that incorporates the latest design improvements to reduce weight and increase reliability and performance. The agency is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the bus in revenue service. NREL has previously published two reports documenting the operation of the fuel cell bus in service. This report provides a summary of the results with a focus on the bus operation from July 2011 through January 2012.

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Clean Cities Guide to Alternative Fuel and Advanced Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles (Book)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Today's fleets are increasingly interested in medium-duty and heavy-duty vehicles that use alternative fuels or advanced technologies that can help reduce operating costs, meet emissions requirements, improve fleet sustainability, and support U.S. energy independence. Vehicle and engine manufacturers are responding to this interest with a wide range of options across a steadily growing number of vehicle applications. This guide provides an overview of alternative fuel power systems?including engines, microturbines, electric motors, and fuel cells?and hybrid propulsion systems. The guide also offers a list of individual medium- and heavy-duty vehicle models listed by application, along with associated manufacturer contact information, fuel type(s), power source(s), and related information.

Not Available

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Second Results Report and Appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for their newest prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. In May 2010, SunLine began operating its sixth-generation hydrogen fueled bus, an Advanced Technology (AT) fuel cell bus that incorporates the latest design improvements to reduce weight and increase reliability and performance. The agency is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the bus in revenue service. This is the second results report for the AT fuel cell bus since it was placed in service, and it focuses on the newest data analysis and lessons learned since the previous report. The appendices, referenced in the main report, provide the full background for the evaluation. They will be updated as new information is collected but will contain the original background material from the first report.

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant/Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006, and the second experiment (AGR-2) is currently in the design phase. The design of test trains, as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation will be discussed. In addition, the purpose and differences between the two experiments will be compared and the irradiation results to date on the first experiment will be presented.

S. Blaine Grover

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Advanced alternate planar geometry solid oxide fuel cells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential of high temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells as high performance, high efficiency energy conversion device is well known. Investigation of several cell designs have been undertaken by various researchers to derive the maximum performance benefit from the device while maintaining a lower cost of production to meet the commercialization cost target. The present investigation focused on the planar SOFC design which allows for the use of mature low cost production processes to be employed. A novel design concept was investigated which allows for improvements in performance through increased interface stability, and lowering of cost through enhanced structural integrity and the use of low cost metal interconnects. The new cell design consisted of a co-sintered porous/dense/porous zirconia layer with the electrode material infiltrated into the porous layers. The two year program conducted by a team involving Ceramatec and the Institute of Gas Technology, culminated in a multi-cell stack test that exhibited high performance. Considerable progress was achieved in the selection of cell components, and establishing and optimizing the cell and stack fabrication parameters. It was shown that the stack components exhibited high conductivities and low creep at the operating temperature. The inter-cell resistive losses were shown to be small through out-of-cell characterization. The source of performance loss was identified to be the anode electrolyte interface. This loss however can be minimized by improving the anode infiltration technique. Manifolding and sealing of the planar devices posed considerable challenge. Even though the open circuit voltage was 250 mV/cell lower than theoretical, the two cell stack had a performance of 300 mA/cm{sup 2} at 0.4V/cell with an area specific resistance of 1 {Omega}-cm{sup 2}/cell. improvements in manifolding are expected to provide much higher performance.

Elangovan, S.; Prouse, D.; Khandkar, A.; Donelson, R.; Marianowski, L. [Ceramatec, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Advanced alternate planar geometry solid oxide fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential of high temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells as high performance, high efficiency energy conversion device is well known. Investigation of several cell designs have been undertaken by various researchers to derive the maximum performance benefit from the device while maintaining a lower cost of production to meet the commercialization cost target. The present investigation focused on the planar SOFC design which allows for the use of mature low cost production processes to be employed. A novel design concept was investigated which allows for improvements in performance through increased interface stability, and lowering of cost through enhanced structural integrity and the use of low cost metal interconnects. The new cell design consisted of a co-sintered porous/dense/porous zirconia layer with the electrode material infiltrated into the porous layers. The two year program conducted by a team involving Ceramatec and the Institute of Gas Technology, culminated in a multi-cell stack test that exhibited high performance. Considerable progress was achieved in the selection of cell components, and establishing and optimizing the cell and stack fabrication parameters. It was shown that the stack components exhibited high conductivities and low creep at the operating temperature. The inter-cell resistive losses were shown to be small through out-of-cell characterization. The source of performance loss was identified to be the anode electrolyte interface. This loss however can be minimized by improving the anode infiltration technique. Manifolding and sealing of the planar devices posed considerable challenge. Even though the open circuit voltage was 250 mV/cell lower than theoretical, the two cell stack had a performance of 300 mA/cm[sup 2] at 0.4V/cell with an area specific resistance of 1 [Omega]-cm[sup 2]/cell. improvements in manifolding are expected to provide much higher performance.

Elangovan, S.; Prouse, D.; Khandkar, A.; Donelson, R.; Marianowski, L. (Ceramatec, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Hydrogen storage via metal hydrides for utility and automotive energy storage applications. [HCl electrolysis for H/sub 2/--Cl/sub 2/ fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory is currently supported by ERDA to develop the technology and techniques for storing hydrogen via metal hydrides. Hydrogen is able to react with a wide variety of metal and metal alloy materials to form hydride compounds of hydrogen and metals. These compounds differ in stability--some are relatively unstable and can be readily formed and decomposed at low temperatures. The use of these systems for hydrogen storage involves the design of heat exchanger and mass transfer systems, i.e., removal of heat during the charging reaction and addition of heat during the discharge reaction. The most notable example of a metal hydride material is iron titanium which shows promise of being economical for a number of near term hydrogen storage applications. Recent work and progress on the development of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage connected with utility energy storage applications and natural gas supplementation are discussed and electric-to-electric storage system is described in some detail. A system of energy storage involving the electrolysis of hydrochloric acid is described which would utilize metal hydrides to store the hydrogen. In addition, the use of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage in automotive systems is described.

Salzano, F J; Braun, C; Beaufrere, A; Srinivasan, S; Strickland, G; Reilly, J J; Waide, C

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Advanced Research in Diesel Fuel Sprays Using X-rays From The Advanced Photon Source  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fuel distribution and degree of atomization in the combustion chamber is a primary factor in the formation of emissions in diesel engines. A number of diagnostics to study sprays have been developed over the last twenty years; these are primarily based on visible light measurement techniques. However, visible light scatters strongly from fuel droplets surrounding the spray, which prevents penetration of the light. This has made quantitative measurements of the spray core very difficult, particularly in the relatively dense near- nozzle region [1-3]. For this reason we developed the x-ray technique to study the properties of fuel sprays in a quantitative way [4]. The x-ray technique is not limited by scattering, which allows it to be used to make quantitative measurements of the fuel distribution. These measurements are particularly effective in the region near the nozzle where other techniques fail. This technique has led to a number of new insights into the structure of fuel sprays, including the discovery and quantitative measurement of shock waves generated under some conditions by high-pressure diesel sprays [5]. We also performed the first-ever quantitative measurements of the time-resolved mass distribution in the near-nozzle region, which demonstrated that the spray is atomized only a few nozzle diameters from the orifice [6]. Our recent work has focused on efforts to make measurements under pressurized ambient conditions. We have recently completed a series of measurements at pressures up to 5 bar and are looking at the effect of ambient pressure on the structure of the spray. The enclosed figure shows the mass distributions measured for 1,2, and 5 bar ambient pressures. As expected, the penetration decreases as the pressure increases. This leads to changes in the measured mass distribution, including an increase in the density at the leading edge of the spray. We have also observed a narrowing in the cone angle of the spray core as the pressure increases. This is counter to visible light spray measurements, and current work is underway in an effort to understand this effect.

Powell, C

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

338

Fuels Technology - Capabilities - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Capabilities Fuels Technology Advanced petroleum-based fuels Fuel-borne reductants On-board reforming Alternative fuels...

339

Introduction to DMFCs - Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Program Webinar Technologies Program Webinar July 17, 2012 1 Introduction to DMFCs Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells Piotr Zelenay Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, U.S.A. Fuel Cell Technologies Program Webinar - July 17, 2012 - The Fuel Choice P. Piela and P. Zelenay, Fuel Cell Review, 1, 17, 2004 Fuel Cell Technologies Program Webinar - July 17, 2012 2 Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode: Pt-Ru Cathode: Pt Membrane: e.g. Nafion ® 115 e - CH 3 OH H + H 2 O CH 3 OH Electroosmotic drag MEMBRANE 1.5 O 2 (air) H 2 O CO 2 + 3 H 2 O 6 H + + 6 e - ANODE CATHODE CH 3 OH (l) + 1.5 O 2  2 H 2 O (l) + CO 2  V = 1.21 V; G° = 6.1 kWh kg -1 = 4.8 kWh L -1 Fuel Cell Technologies Program Webinar - July 17, 2012 3 ______________________ O 2 H 

340

Task 4 -- Conversion to a coal-fueled advanced turbine system (CFATS)  

SciTech Connect

Solar is developing the technologies for a highly efficient, recuperated, Advanced Turbine System (ATS) that is aimed at the dispersed power generation market. With ultra-low-emissions in mind the primary fuel selected for this engine system is natural gas. Although this gas fired ATS (GFATS) will primarily employ natural gas the use of other fuels particular those derived from coal and renewable resources cannot be overlooked. The enabling technologies necessary to direct fire coal in gas turbines were developed during the 1980`s. This Solar development co-sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) resulted in the testing of a full size coal-water-slurry fired combustion system. In parallel with this program the DOE funded the development of integrated gasification combined cycle systems (IGCC). This report describes the limitations of the Solar ATs (recuperated engine) and how these lead to a recommended series of modifications that will allow the use of these alternate fuels. Three approaches have been considered: direct-fired combustion using either a slagging combustor, or a pressurized fluidized bed (PFBC), externally or indirectly fired approaches using pulverized fuel, and external gasification of the fuel with subsequent direct combustion of the secondary fuel. Each of these approaches requires substantial hardware and system modifications for efficient fuel utilization. The integration issues are discussed in the sections below and a recommended approach for gasification is presented.

1996-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced automotive fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

IRRADIATION TESTING OF THE RERTR FUEL MINIPLATES WITH BURNABLE ABSORBERS IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

Based on the results of the reactor physics assessment, conversion of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) can be potentially accomplished in two ways, by either using U-10Mo monolithic or U-7Mo dispersion type plates in the ATR fuel element. Both designs, however, would require incorporation of the burnable absorber in several plates of the fuel element to compensate for the excess reactivity and to flatten the radial power profile. Several different types of burnable absorbers were considered initially, but only borated compounds, such as B4C, ZrB2 and Al-B alloys, were selected for testing primarily due to the length of the ATR fuel cycle and fuel manufacturing constraints. To assess and compare irradiation performance of the U-Mo fuels with different burnable absorbers we have designed and manufactured 28 RERTR miniplates (20 fueled and 8 non-fueled) containing fore-mentioned borated compounds. These miniplates will be tested in the ATR as part of the RERTR-13 experiment, which is described in this paper. Detailed plate design, compositions and irradiations conditions are discussed.

I. Glagolenko; D. Wachs; N. Woolstenhulme; G. Chang; B. Rabin; C. Clark; T. Wiencek

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eltron Research Inc., and team members CoorsTek, McDermott Technology, Inc., Sued Chemie, Argonne National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying single-phase and composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize proton and electron conductivity without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. During this quarter, mixed proton/electron conductivity and hydrogen transport was measured as a function of metal phase content for a range of ceramic/metal (cermet) compositions. It was found that optimum performance occurred at 44 wt.% metal content for all compositions tested. Although each cermet appeared to have a continuous metal phase, it is believed that hydrogen transport increased with increasing metal content partially due to beneficial surface catalyst characteristics resulting from the metal phase. Beyond 44 wt.% there was a reduction in hydrogen transport most likely due to dilution of the proton conducting ceramic phase. Hydrogen separation rates for 1-mm thick cermet membranes were in excess of 0.1 mL/min/cm{sup 2}, which corresponded to ambipolar conductivities between 1 x 10{sup -3} and 8 x 10{sup -3} S/cm. Similar results were obtained for multiphase ceramic membranes comprised of a proton-conducting perovskite and electron conducting metal oxide. These multi-phase ceramic membranes showed only a slight improvement in hydrogen transport upon addition of a metal phase. The highest hydrogen separation rates observed this quarter were for a cermet membrane containing a hydrogen transport metal. A 1-mm thick membrane of this material achieved a hydrogen separation rate of 0.3 mL/min/cm{sup 2} at only 700 C, which increased to 0.6 mL/min/cm{sup 2} at 950 C.

Shane E. Roark; Tony F. Sammells; Richard A. Mackay; Lyrik Y. Pitzman; Alexandra Z. LaGuardia; Tom F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Mike J. Holmes; Aaron L. Wagner

2001-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

343

ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eltron Research Inc. and team members CoorsTek, Sued Chemie, Argonne National Laboratory, and NORAM are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative, which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. Over the past 12 months, this project has focused on four basic categories of dense membranes: (1) mixed conducting ceramic/ceramic composites, (2) mixed conducting ceramic/metal (cermet) composites, (3) cermets with hydrogen permeable metals, and (4) layered composites containing hydrogen permeable alloys. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. The ceramic/ceramic composites demonstrate the lowest hydrogen permeation rates, with a maximum of approximately 0.1 mL/min/cm{sup 2} for 0.5-mm thick membranes at 800 to 950 C. Under equivalent conditions, cermets achieve a hydrogen permeation rate near 1 mL/min/cm{sup 2}, and the metal phase also improves structural stability and surface catalysis for hydrogen dissociation. Furthermore, if metals with high hydrogen permeability are used in cermets, permeation rates near 4 mL/min/cm{sup 2} are achievable with relatively thick membranes. Layered composite membranes have by far the highest permeation rates with a maximum flux in excess of 200 mL {center_dot} min{sup -1} {center_dot} cm{sup -2}. Moreover, these permeation rates were achieved at a total pressure differential across the membrane of 450 psi. Based on these results, effort during the next year will focus on this category of membranes. This report contains long-term hydrogen permeation data over eight-months of continuous operation, and permeation results as a function of operating conditions at high pressure for layered composite membranes. Additional progress with cermet and thin film membranes also is presented.

Shane E. Roark; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard Mackay; Stewart R. Schesnack; Scott R. Morrison; Thomas F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; Aaron L. Wagner; Jon P. Wagner

2003-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

344

ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eltron Research Inc., and team members CoorsTek, Sued Chemie, and Argonne National Laboratory are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize hydrogen permeation without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. During this quarter, a composite metal membrane based on an inexpensive hydrogen permeable metal achieved permeation rates in excess of 25 mL/min/cm{sup 2}. Preliminary attempts to incorporate this metal into a cermet were successful, and a thick cermet membrane (0.83 mm) with 40 vol.% metal phase achieved a permeation rate of nearly 0.4 mL/min/cm{sup 2}. Increasing the metal phase content and decreasing membrane thickness should significantly increase permeation, while maintaining the benefits derived from cermets. Two-phase ceramic/ceramic composite membranes had low hydrogen permeability, likely due to interdiffusion of constituents between the phases. However, these materials did demonstrate high resistance to corrosion, and might be good candidates for other composite membranes. Temperature-programmed reduction measurements indicated that model cermet materials absorbed 2.5 times as much hydrogen than the pure ceramic analogs. This characteristic, in addition to higher electron conductivity, likely explains the relatively high permeation for these cermets. Incorporation of catalysts with ceramics and cermets increased hydrogen uptake by 800 to more than 900%. Finally, new high-pressure seals were developed for cermet membranes that maintained a pressure differential of 250 psi. This result indicated that the approach for high-pressure seal development could be adapted for a range of compositions. Other items discussed in this report include mechanical testing, new proton conducting ceramics, supported thin films, and alkane to olefin conversion.

Shane E. Roark; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard A. Mackay; Lyrik Y. Pitzman; Thomas A. Zirbel; Stewart R. Schesnack; Thomas F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; U. (Balu) Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; Aaron L. Wagner; Jon P. Wagner

2003-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

345

Intergovernmental Advanced Stationary PEM Fuel Cell System Demonstration Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program to complete the design, construction and demonstration of a PEMFC system fuelled by Ethanol, LPG or NG for telecom applications was initiated in October 2007. Early in the program the economics for Ethanol were shown to be unfeasible and permission was given by DOE to focus on LPG only. The design and construction of a prototype unit was completed in Jun 2009 using commercially available PEM FC stack from Ballard Power Systems. During the course of testing, the high pressure drop of the stack was shown to be problematic in terms of control and stability of the reformer. Also, due to the power requirements for air compression the overall efficiency of the system was shown to be lower than a similar system using internally developed low pressure drop FC stack. In Q3 2009, the decision was made to change to the Plug power stack and a second prototype was built and tested. Overall net efficiency was shown to be 31.5% at 3 kW output. Total output of the system is 6 kW. Using the new stack hardware, material cost reduction of 63% was achieved over the previous Alpha design. During a November 2009 review meeting Plug Power proposed and was granted permission, to demonstrate the new, commercial version of Plug Power's telecom system at CERL. As this product was also being tested as part of a DOE Topic 7A program, this part of the program was transferred to the Topic 7A program. In Q32008, the scope of work of this program was expanded to include a National Grid demonstration project of a micro-CHP system using hightemperature PEM technology. The Gensys Blue system was cleared for unattended operation, grid connection, and power generation in Aug 2009 at Union College in NY state. The system continues to operate providing power and heat to Beuth House. The system is being continually evaluated and improvements to hardware and controls will be implemented as more is learned about the system's operation. The program is instrumental in improving the efficiency and reducing costs of PEMFC based power systems using LPG fuel and continues to makes steps towards meeting DOE's targets. Plug Power would like to thank DOE for their support of this program.

Rich Chartrand

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

346

Systems Analysis of an Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Based on a Modified UREX+3c Process  

SciTech Connect

The research described in this report was performed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to describe and compare the merits of two advanced alternative nuclear fuel cycles -- named by this study as the “UREX+3c fuel cycle” and the “Alternative Fuel Cycle” (AFC). Both fuel cycles were assumed to support 100 1,000 MWe light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plants operating over the period 2020 through 2100, and the fast reactors (FRs) necessary to burn the plutonium and minor actinides generated by the LWRs. Reprocessing in both fuel cycles is assumed to be based on the UREX+3c process reported in earlier work by the DOE. Conceptually, the UREX+3c process provides nearly complete separation of the various components of spent nuclear fuel in order to enable recycle of reusable nuclear materials, and the storage, conversion, transmutation and/or disposal of other recovered components. Output of the process contains substantially all of the plutonium, which is recovered as a 5:1 uranium/plutonium mixture, in order to discourage plutonium diversion. Mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for recycle in LWRs is made using this 5:1 U/Pu mixture plus appropriate makeup uranium. A second process output contains all of the recovered uranium except the uranium in the 5:1 U/Pu mixture. The several other process outputs are various waste streams, including a stream of minor actinides that are stored until they are consumed in future FRs. For this study, the UREX+3c fuel cycle is assumed to recycle only the 5:1 U/Pu mixture to be used in LWR MOX fuel and to use depleted uranium (tails) for the makeup uranium. This fuel cycle is assumed not to use the recovered uranium output stream but to discard it instead. On the other hand, the AFC is assumed to recycle both the 5:1 U/Pu mixture and all of the recovered uranium. In this case, the recovered uranium is reenriched with the level of enrichment being determined by the amount of recovered plutonium and the combined amount of the resulting MOX. The study considered two sub-cases within each of the two fuel cycles in which the uranium and plutonium from the first generation of MOX spent fuel (i) would not be recycled to produce a second generation of MOX for use in LWRs or (ii) would be recycled to produce a second generation of MOX fuel for use in LWRs. The study also investigated the effects of recycling MOX spent fuel multiple times in LWRs. The study assumed that both fuel cycles would store and then reprocess spent MOX fuel that is not recycled to produce a next generation of LWR MOX fuel and would use the recovered products to produce FR fuel. The study further assumed that FRs would begin to be brought on-line in 2043, eleven years after recycle begins in LWRs, when products from 5-year cooled spent MOX fuel would be available. Fuel for the FRs would be made using the uranium, plutonium, and minor actinides recovered from MOX. For the cases where LWR fuel was assumed to be recycled one time, the 1st generation of MOX spent fuel was used to provide nuclear materials for production of FR fuel. For the cases where the LWR fuel was assumed to be recycled two times, the 2nd generation of MOX spent fuel was used to provide nuclear materials for production of FR fuel. The number of FRs in operation was assumed to increase in successive years until the rate that actinides were recovered from permanently discharged spent MOX fuel equaled the rate the actinides were consumed by the operating fleet of FRs. To compare the two fuel cycles, the study analyzed recycle of nuclear fuel in LWRs and FRs and determined the radiological characteristics of irradiated nuclear fuel, nuclear waste products, and recycle nuclear fuels. It also developed a model to simulate the flows of nuclear materials that could occur in the two advanced nuclear fuel cycles over 81 years beginning in 2020 and ending in 2100. Simulations projected the flows of uranium, plutonium, and minor actinides as these nuclear fuel materials were produced and consumed in a fleet of 100 1,000 MWe LWRs and in FRs. The model als

E. R. Johnson; R. E. Best

2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

347

Development of a Fissile Materials Irradiation Capability for Advanced Fuel Testing at the MIT Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A fissile materials irradiation capability has been developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Research Reactor (MITR) to support nuclear engineering studies in the area of advanced fuels. The focus of the expected research is to investigate the basic properties of advanced nuclear fuels using small aggregates of fissile material. As such, this program is intended to complement the ongoing fuel evaluation programs at test reactors. Candidates for study at the MITR include vibration-packed annular fuel for light water reactors and microparticle fuels for high-temperature gas reactors. Technical considerations that pertain to the design of the MITR facility are enumerated including those specified by 10 CFR 50 concerning the definition of a research reactor and those contained in a separate license amendment that was issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to MIT for these types of experiments. The former includes limits on the cross-sectional area of the experiment, the physical form of the irradiated material, and the removal of heat. The latter addresses experiment reactivity worth, thermal-hydraulic considerations, avoidance of fission product release, and experiment specific temperature scrams.

Hu Linwen; Bernard, John A.; Hejzlar, Pavel; Kohse, Gordon [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

DOE Provides $4.7 Million to Support Excellence in Automotive Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4.7 Million to Support Excellence in Automotive 4.7 Million to Support Excellence in Automotive Technology Education DOE Provides $4.7 Million to Support Excellence in Automotive Technology Education August 29, 2005 - 2:47pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced the selection of eight universities that will receive $4.7 million to be Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Centers of Excellence. The goal of GATE is to train a future workforce of automotive engineering professionals to overcome technology barriers preventing the development and production of cost-effective, high-efficiency vehicles for the U.S. market. "GATE Centers of Excellence are an exciting opportunity to equip a new generation of engineers and scientists with knowledge and skills in advanced automotive technologies," said Douglas L. Faulkner, Acting

349

Analyzing the proliferation resistance of advanced nuclear fuel cycles : in search of an assessment methodology for use in fuel cycle simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A methodology to assess proliferation resistance of advanced nuclear energy systems is investigated. The framework, based on Multi-Attribute Utility Theory (MAUT), is envisioned for use within early-stage fuel cycle ...

Pierpoint, Lara Marie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY MATERIALS, INC.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(ATMI) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS TO INVENTIONS MADE UNDER COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NUMBER DE-FC04-02AL67616, DOE WAIVER NO. W(A) 02-054. The Petitioner, ATMI, has requested a waiver of all domestic and foreign patent rights to inventions that may be conceived or first actually reduced to practice in the course of ATMI's subcontract work for United Technologies Corporation Fuel Cells (UTCFC) under Cooperative Agreement Number DE-FC04-02AL67616 entitled "The Development of Sensors for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems" with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The work to be done under the cooperative agreement will be the development of gas sensors for use in automotive fuel cell systems. The work to be done under the subcontract will be the design and development of a novel micro-machined hydrogen

351

SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Fourth Results Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SunLine Transit Agency SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Fourth Results Report L. Eudy and K. Chandler Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-57560 January 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Fourth Results Report L. Eudy and K. Chandler Prepared under Task No. HT12.8210 Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-57560 January 2013 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

352

Technology gap analysis on sodium-cooled reactor fuel handling system supporting advanced burner reactor development.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goals of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) are to expand the use of nuclear energy to meet increasing global energy demand in an environmentally sustainable manner, to address nuclear waste management issues without making separated plutonium, and to address nonproliferation concerns. The advanced burner reactor (ABR) is a fast reactor concept which supports the GNEP fuel cycle system. Since the integral fast reactor (IFR) and advanced liquid-metal reactor (ALMR) projects were terminated in 1994, there has been no major development on sodium-cooled fast reactors in the United States. Therefore, in support of the GNEP fast reactor program, the history of sodium-cooled reactor development was reviewed to support the initiation of this technology within the United States and to gain an understanding of the technology gaps that may still remain for sodium fast reactor technology. The fuel-handling system is a key element of any fast reactor design. The major functions of this system are to receive, test, store, and then load fresh fuel into the core; unload from the core; then clean, test, store, and ship spent fuel. Major requirements are that the system must be reliable and relatively easy to maintain. In addition, the system should be designed so that it does not adversely impact plant economics from the viewpoints of capital investment or plant operations. In this gap analysis, information on fuel-handling operating experiences in the following reactor plants was carefully reviewed: EBR-I, SRE, HNPF, Fermi, SEFOR, FFTF, CRBR, EBR-II, DFR, PFR, Rapsodie, Phenix, Superphenix, KNK, SNR-300, Joyo, and Monju. The results of this evaluation indicate that a standardized fuel-handling system for a commercial fast reactor is yet to be established. However, in the past sodium-cooled reactor plants, most major fuel-handling components-such as the rotatable plug, in-vessel fuel-handling machine, ex-vessel fuel transportation cask, ex-vessel sodium-cooled storage, and cleaning stations-have accumulated satisfactory construction and operation experiences. In addition, two special issues for future development are described in this report: large capacity interim storage and transuranic-bearing fuel handling.

Chikazawa, Y.; Farmer, M.; Grandy, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Program on Technology Innovation: Advanced Fuel Cycles--Impact on High-Level Waste Disposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of advanced fuel cycles is to improve the sustainability of nuclear energy by enhancing the effectiveness of natural uranium resource utilization and by mitigating waste disposal issues, while keeping the costs of energy products, in particular electricity, economically viable. In addition, this aim has to be achieved under conditions that minimize the risks of diversion of separated fissile materials and their possible misuse for non-peaceful ends. The report presents results from recently publi...

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

354

Program on Technology Innovation: Comparative Radiological Risk Assessment of Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is working to develop tools to support long-term strategic planning for research, development, and demonstration (RDD) of advanced nuclear fuel cycle technologies for electricity generation. The research described in this EPRI progress report supports the larger decision framework endeavor and intends to provide a standalone usable tool. Two strategic issues are addressed: radioactive and chemical waste management and safety (both radiological and chemical). U...

2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

355

Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design Optimization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in PEM Fuel Cells: in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design Optimization J. Vernon Cole and Ashok Gidwani CFDRC Prepared for: DOE Hydrogen Fuel Cell Kickoff Meeting February 13, 2007 This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information. Background Water Management Issues Arise From: ƒ Generation of water by cathodic reaction ƒ Membrane humidification requirements ƒ Capillary pressure driven transport through porous MEA and GDL materials ƒ Scaling bipolar plate channel dimensions J.H. Nam and M. Kaviany, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 46, pp. 4595-4611 (2003) Relevant Barriers and Targets ƒ Improved Gas Diffusion Layer, Flow Fields, Membrane Electrode Assemblies Needed to Improve Water Management: * Flooding blocks reactant transport

356

Advanced coal fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system. Final report, June 1986--April 1994  

SciTech Connect

Demonstration of a direct coal-fueled gas turbine system that is environmentally, technically, and economically viable depends on the satisfactory resolution of several key issues. Solar Turbines, Incorporates technical approach to these issues was to advance a complete direct coal-fueled gas turbine system that incorporated near-term technology solutions to both historically demonstrated problem areas such as deposition, erosion, and hot end corrosion, and to the emergent environmental constraints based on NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and particulates. Solar`s program approach was keyed to the full commercialization of the coal-fueled cogeneration gas turbine which would occur after extended field verification demonstrations conducted by the private sector. The program was structured in three phases plus an optional fourth phase: Phase 1 -- system description; Phase 2 -- component development; Phase 3 -- prototype system verification; and Phase 4 -- field evaluation.

LeCren, R.T.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Advanced spent fuel conditioning process (ACP) progress with respect to remote operation and maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing an Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process (ACP) to reduce the volume of spent fuel, and the construction of the ACP facility (ACPF) for a demonstration of its technical feasibility has been completed. In 2006 two inactive demonstrations were performed with simulated fuels in the ACPF. Accompanied by process equipment performance tests, its remote operability and maintainability were also tested during that time. Procedures for remote operation tasks are well addressed in this study and evaluated thoroughly. Also, remote maintenance and repair tasks are addressed regarding some important modules with a high priority order. The above remote handling test's results provided a lot of information such as items to be revised to improve the efficiency of the remote handling tasks. This paper deals with the current status of ACP and the progress of remote handling of ACPF. (authors)

Lee, Hyo Jik; Lee, Jong Kwang; Park, Byung Suk [NURE Lab, KAERI: 1045 Daedeokdaero, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Ji Sup [Spent Fuel Technology Development Division, KAERI: 1045 Daedeokdaero, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system. Annual report, June 1990--June 1991  

SciTech Connect

Advances in coal-fueled gas turbine technology over the past few years, together with recent DOE-METC sponsored studies, have served to provide new optimism that the problems demonstrated in the past can be economically resolved and that the coal-fueled gas turbine can ultimately be the preferred system in appropriate market application sectors. The objective of the Solar/METC program is to prove the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of a coal-fired gas turbine for cogeneration applications through tests of a Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal fuel throughout the engine design operating range. The five-year program consists of three phases, namely: (1) system description; (2) component development; (3) prototype system verification. A successful conclusion to the program will initiate a continuation of the commercialization plan through extended field demonstration runs.

LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY NUVERA FUEL CELLS, INC FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

rt -du 2005 16:22 FR IPL DOE CH 630 252 2779 TO RGCP-HQ P.02/03 rt -du 2005 16:22 FR IPL DOE CH 630 252 2779 TO RGCP-HQ P.02/03 * * STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY NUVERA FUEL CELLS, INC FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC36-02AL67618 ENTITLED "ADVANCED HIGH EFFICIENCY QUICK START FUEL PROCESSOR FOR TRANSPORTATION APPLICATIONS"; W(A)-04-041; CH-1208 As set out in the attached waiver petition and in subsequent discussions with DOE Patent Counsel, Nuvera Fuel Cells, Inc. (Nuvera) has requested an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions made under the above-identified cooperative agreement by its employees and its subcontractors' employees, regardless of tier, except inventions made by subcontractors eligible to retain title to inventions pursuant to P.L. 96-517,

360

The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) for Producing Hydrogen to Manufacture Liquid Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conventional world oil production is expected to peak within a decade. Shortfalls in production of liquid fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) from conventional oil sources are expected to be offset by increased production of fuels from heavy oils and tar sands that are primarily located in the Western Hemisphere (Canada, Venezuela, the United States, and Mexico). Simultaneously, there is a renewed interest in liquid fuels from biomass, such as alcohol; but, biomass production requires fertilizer. Massive quantities of hydrogen (H2) are required (1) to convert heavy oils and tar sands to liquid fuels and (2) to produce fertilizer for production of biomass that can be converted to liquid fuels. If these liquid fuels are to be used while simultaneously minimizing greenhouse emissions, nonfossil methods for the production of H2 are required. Nuclear energy can be used to produce H2. The most efficient methods to produce H2 from nuclear energy involve thermochemical cycles in which high-temperature heat (700 to 850 C) and water are converted to H2 and oxygen. The peak nuclear reactor fuel and coolant temperatures must be significantly higher than the chemical process temperatures to transport heat from the reactor core to an intermediate heat transfer loop and from the intermediate heat transfer loop to the chemical plant. The reactor temperatures required for H2 production are at the limits of practical engineering materials. A new high-temperature reactor concept is being developed for H2 and electricity production: the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR). The fuel is a graphite-matrix, coated-particle fuel, the same type that is used in modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGRs). The coolant is a clean molten fluoride salt with a boiling point near 1400 C. The use of a liquid coolant, rather than helium, reduces peak reactor fuel and coolant temperatures 100 to 200 C relative to those of a MHTGR. Liquids are better heat transfer fluids than gases and thus reduce three temperature losses in the system associated with (1) heat transfer from the fuel to the reactor coolant, (2) temperature rise across the reactor core, and (3) heat transfer across the heat exchangers between the reactor and H2 production plant. Lowering the peak reactor temperatures and thus reducing the high-temperature materials requirements may make the AHTR the enabling technology for low-cost nuclear hydrogen production.

Forsberg, C.W.; Peterson, P.F.; Ott, L.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced automotive fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Biofuels Fuels Technology Pathway Options for Advanced Drop-in Biofuels Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced drop-in hydrocarbon biofuels require biofuel alternatives for refinery products other than gasoline. Candidate biofuels must have performance characteristics equivalent to conventional petroleum-based fuels. The technology pathways for biofuel alternatives also must be plausible, sustainable (e.g., positive energy balance, environmentally benign, etc.), and demonstrate a reasonable pathway to economic viability and end-user affordability. Viable biofuels technology pathways must address feedstock production and environmental issues through to the fuel or chemical end products. Potential end products include compatible replacement fuel products (e.g., gasoline, diesel, and JP8 and JP5 jet fuel) and other petroleum products or chemicals typically produced from a barrel of crude. Considering the complexity and technology diversity of a complete biofuels supply chain, no single entity or technology provider is capable of addressing in depth all aspects of any given pathway; however, all the necessary expert entities exist. As such, we propose the assembly of a team capable of conducting an in-depth technology pathway options analysis (including sustainability indicators and complete LCA) to identify and define the domestic biofuel pathways for a Green Fleet. This team is not only capable of conducting in-depth analyses on technology pathways, but collectively they are able to trouble shoot and/or engineer solutions that would give industrial technology providers the highest potential for success. Such a team would provide the greatest possible down-side protection for high-risk advanced drop-in biofuels procurement(s).

Kevin L Kenney

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

The second and third NGNP advanced gas reactor fuel irradiation experiments  

SciTech Connect

The United States Dept. of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is currently scheduled to irradiate a total of five low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The irradiations are being accomplished to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas cooled reactors. The experiments will each consist of at least six separate capsules, and will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The effluent sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and completed a very successful irradiation in early November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010, and the third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single larger irradiation (AGR-3/4) that is currently being assembled. The design and status of the second through fourth experiments as well as the irradiation results of the second experiment to date are discussed. (authors)

Grover, S. B.; Petti, D. A. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N. Fremont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for Advanced Test Reactor LEU Fuel Conversion  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located in the ATR Complex of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), was constructed in the 1960s for the purpose of irradiating reactor fuels and materials. Other irradiation services, such as radioisotope production, are also performed at ATR. The ATR is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) matrix (UAlx) in an aluminum sandwich plate cladding. The National Nuclear Security Administration Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) strategic mission includes efforts to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological material at civilian sites around the world. Converting research reactors from using HEU to low-enriched uranium (LEU) was originally started in 1978 as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science. Within this strategic mission, GTRI has three goals that provide a comprehensive approach to achieving this mission: The first goal, the driver for the modification that is the subject of this determination, is to convert research reactors from using HEU to LEU. Thus the mission of the ATR LEU Fuel Conversion Project is to convert the ATR and Advanced Test Reactor Critical facility (ATRC) (two of the six U.S. High-Performance Research Reactors [HPRR]) to LEU fuel by 2017. The major modification criteria evaluation of the project pre-conceptual design identified several issues that lead to the conclusion that the project is a major modification.

Boyd D. Christensen; Michael A. Lehto; Noel R. Duckwitz

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Well-to-wheel energy use and greenhouse gas emissions of advanced fuel/vehicle systems North American analysis.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are differing, yet strongly held views among the various ''stakeholders'' in the advanced fuel/propulsion system debate. In order for the introduction of advanced technology vehicles and their associated fuels to be successful, it seems clear that four important stakeholders must view their introduction as a ''win'': Society, Automobile manufacturers and their key suppliers, Fuel providers and their key suppliers, and Auto and energy company customers. If all four of these stakeholders, from their own perspectives, are not positive regarding the need for and value of these advanced fuels/vehicles, the vehicle introductions will fail. This study was conducted to help inform public and private decision makers regarding the impact of the introduction of such advanced fuel/propulsion system pathways from a societal point of view. The study estimates two key performance criteria of advanced fuel/propulsion systems on a total system basis, that is, ''well'' (production source of energy) to ''wheel'' (vehicle). These criteria are energy use and greenhouse gas emissions per unit of distance traveled. The study focuses on the U.S. light-duty vehicle market in 2005 and beyond, when it is expected that advanced fuels and propulsion systems could begin to be incorporated in a significant percentage of new vehicles. Given the current consumer demand for light trucks, the benchmark vehicle considered in this study is the Chevrolet Silverado full-size pickup.

Wang, M.

2001-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

365

Analysis of the Pebble-Bed VHTR Spectrum Shifting Capabilities for Advanced Fuel Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas-cooled nuclear reactors have been receiving specific attention for Generation IV possibilities due to desired characteristics such as relatively low cost, short construction period, and inherent safety. Attractive inherent characteristics include an inert, single phase helium coolant, refractory coated fuel with high temperature capability and low fission product release, and graphite moderator with high temperature stability and long response times. The passively safe design has a relatively low power density, annular core, large negative temperature coefficient, and passive decay heat removal system. The objective of the U.S. DOE NERI Project is to assess the possibility, advantages and limitations of achieving ultra-long life VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) configurations by utilizing minor actinides as a fuel component. The present analysis takes into consideration and compares capabilities of pebble-bed core designs with various core and reflector configuration to allow spectrum shifting for advanced actinide fuels. Whole-core 3D models for pebble-bed design with multi-heterogeneity treatments in SCALE 5.0 are developed to compare computational results with experiments. Obtained results are in agreement with the available HTR-10 data. By altering the moderator to fuel ratio, a shift in the spectrum is observed. The use of minor actinides as fuel components relies on spectrum shifting capabilities. Actinide fueled VHTR configurations reveal promising performance. With an optimized pebble-bed model, the spectrum shifting abilities are apparent and effects of altered moderator to fuel ratio, and Dancoff factor are investigated. This will lead to a facilitated development of new fuel cycles in support of future operation of Generation IV nuclear energy systems.

Pritchard, Megan; Tsvetkov, Pavel

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

366

Analysis of Pebble-Bed VHTR Spectrum Shifting Capabilities for Advanced Fuel Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas-cooled nuclear reactors have been receiving specific attention for Generation IV possibilities due to desired characteristics such as relatively low cost, short construction period, and inherent safety. Attractive inherent characteristics include an inert, single phase helium coolant, refractory coated fuel with high temperature capability and low fission product release, and graphite moderator with high temperature stability and long response times. The passively safe design has a relatively low power density, annular core, large negative temperature coefficient, and passive decay heat removal system. The objective of the U.S. DOE NERI Project is to assess the possibility, advantages and limitations of achieving ultra-long life VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) configurations by utilizing minor actinides as a fuel component. The present analysis takes into consideration and compares capabilities of pebble-bed core designs with various core and reflector configuration to allow spectrum shifting for advanced actinide fuels. Whole-core 3D models for pebble-bed design with multi-heterogeneity treatments in SCALE 5.0 are developed to compare computational results with experiments. Obtained results are in agreement with the available HTR-10 data. By altering the moderator to fuel ratio, a shift in the spectrum is observed. The use of minor actinides as fuel components relies on spectrum shifting capabilities. Actinide fueled VHTR configurations reveal promising performance. With an optimized pebble-bed model, the spectrum shifting abilities are apparent and effects of altered moderator to fuel ratio, and Dancoff factor are investigated. This will lead to a facilitated development of new fuel cycles in support of future operation of Generation IV nuclear energy systems.

Pritchard, Megan

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

367

Neutronic Analysis of an Advanced Fuel Design Concept for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents the neutronic analysis of an advanced fuel design concept for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that could significantly extend the current fuel cycle length under the existing design and safety criteria. A key advantage of the fuel design herein proposed is that it would not require structural changes to the present HFIR core, in other words, maintaining the same rated power and fuel geometry (i.e., fuel plate thickness and coolant channel dimensions). Of particular practical importance, as well, is the fact that the proposed change could be justified within the bounds of the existing nuclear safety basis. The simulations herein reported employed transport theory-based and exposure-dependent eigenvalue characterization to help improve the prediction of key fuel cycle parameters. These parameters were estimated by coupling a benchmarked three-dimensional MCNP5 model of the HFIR core to the depletion code ORIGEN via the MONTEBURNS interface. The design of an advanced HFIR core with an improved fuel loading is an idea that evolved from early studies by R. D. Cheverton, formerly of ORNL. This study contrasts a modified and increased core loading of 12 kg of 235U against the current core loading of 9.4 kg. The simulations performed predict a cycle length of 39 days for the proposed fuel design, which represents a 50% increase in the cycle length in response to a 25% increase in fissile loading, with an average fuel burnup increase of {approx}23%. The results suggest that the excess reactivity can be controlled with the present design and arrangement of control elements throughout the core's life. Also, the new power distribution is comparable or even improved relative to the current power distribution, displaying lower peak to average fission rate densities across the inner fuel element's centerline and bottom cells. In fact, the fission rate density in the outer fuel element also decreased at these key locations for the proposed design. Overall, it is estimated that the advanced core design could increase the availability of the HFIR facility by {approx}50% and generate {approx}33% more neutrons annually, which is expected to yield sizeable savings during the remaining life of HFIR, currently expected to operate through 2014. This study emphasizes the neutronics evaluation of a new fuel design. Although a number of other performance parameters of the proposed design check favorably against the current design, and most of the core design features remain identical to the reference, it is acknowledged that additional evaluations would be required to fully justify the thermal-hydraulic and thermal-mechanical performance of a new fuel design, including checks for cladding corrosion performance as well as for industrial and economic feasibility.

Xoubi, Ned [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Maldonado, G. Ivan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

TODAY: Secretary Chu and Senator Stabenow to Announce Advanced...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu and Senator Stabenow to Announce Advanced Automotive Technology Loan for Michigan Manufacturer TODAY: Secretary Chu and Senator Stabenow to Announce Advanced...

369

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Accomplishments and Progress  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accomplishments and Progress Accomplishments and Progress The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) efforts have greatly advanced the state of the art of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies-making significant progress toward overcoming many of the key challenges to widespread commercialization. DOE has also made major advances by demonstrating and validating the technologies under real-world conditions, supporting early markets through Recovery Act deployments, and leveraging domestic and international partnerships to advance the pace of commercialization. See the Fuel Cell Technologies Office's accomplishments fact sheet. Reducing the Cost and Improving the Durability and Performance of Fuel Cells Chart showing the cost of the automotive fuel cell system, which is projected to a high-volume manufacturing of 500,000 units per year. In 2002, the cost of the automotive fuel cell system (including balance of plant and stack) was $275/kW. The cost decreased to $108/kW in 2006, to $94/kW in 2007, to $73/kW in 2008, $61/kW in 2009, to $51/kW in 2010, and to $49/kW in 2011. The target cost for 2017 is $30/kW.

370

NETL: News Release - Fuel Cells to Advance Zero-Emissions Energy in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 17, 2003 September 17, 2003 Fuel Cells to Advance Zero-Emissions Energy in Tomorrow's Economy R&D on Key Components, Diagnostics, Modeling Gets $5.4 Million Boost with 10 New DOE Research Grants WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham today announced a new phase of fuel-cell research designed to hasten the wider availability of zero-emissions energy. The 10 Department of Energy (DOE) research grants, totaling $4.2 million, will be matched by another $1.2 million from university and private sector participants for research aimed at resolving obstacles to fuel-cell use. "The President's Hydrogen and Climate Initiatives envision fuel cells playing a prominent role in the economy and everyday life," Secretary Abraham said, "For that to occur, we have to reduce the costs of fuel cell acquisition and use. These projects address the most important priorities identified by industry and researchers, and were chosen for their technological impact and high potential for overall success."

371

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

goals for automotive fuel cell power systems hydrogen vs.a comparative assessment for fuel cell electric vehicles."plug-out hydrogen-fuel- cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity"

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Cadmium Depletion Impacts on Hardening Neutron6 Spectrum for Advanced Fuel Testing in ATR  

SciTech Connect

For transmuting long-lived isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products effectively is in a fast neutron spectrum reactor. In the absence of a fast spectrum test reactor in the United States of America (USA), initial irradiation testing of candidate fuels can be performed in a thermal test reactor that has been modified to produce a test region with a hardened neutron spectrum. A test region is achieved with a Cadmium (Cd) filter which can harden the neutron spectrum to a spectrum similar (although still somewhat softer) to that of the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). A fuel test loop with a Cd-filter has been installed within the East Flux Trap (EFT) of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A detailed comparison analyses between the cadmium (Cd) filter hardened neutron spectrum in the ATR and the LMFBR fast neutron spectrum have been performed using MCWO. MCWO is a set of scripting tools that are used to couple the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the isotope depletion and buildup code ORIGEN-2.2. The MCWO-calculated results indicate that the Cd-filter can effectively flatten the Rim-Effect and reduce the linear heat rate (LHGR) to meet the advanced fuel testing project requirements at the beginning of irradiation (BOI). However, the filtering characteristics of Cd as a strong absorber quickly depletes over time, and the Cd-filter must be replaced for every two typical operating cycles within the EFT of the ATR. The designed Cd-filter can effectively depress the LHGR in experimental fuels and harden the neutron spectrum enough to adequately flatten the Rim Effect in the test region.

Gray S. Chang

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

A Characteristics-Based Approach to Radioactive Waste Classification in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Framework   for   Nuclear   Fuel   Cycle   Concepts,”  Of   Used   Nuclear   Fuel”,   Nuclear  Engineering  and  Radiotoxicity  of  Spent  Nuclear   Fuel,”   Integrated  

Djokic, Denia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Landi-Hartog U. S. A. adjusts to the U. S. market. [Marketing of LPG carburetor systems for using propane as an automotive fuel  

SciTech Connect

Landi-Hartog U.S.A. has adjusted to the U.S. market in providing LPG carburetor systems for passenger cars. Landi-Hartog (LH) had to completely redesign the components on the system to be compatible with U.S. 300-525 cu in. engines. The company has California Air Resources Board approval for 300 cu in. engines and above in dual-fuel service. However, the U.S. market will remain severely restricted unless basic distribution (and the political) changes are made. The U.S. is st

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

The ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor and New Advanced Fuel Testing Capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy s High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), was originally designed (in the 1960s) primarily as a part of the overall program to produce transuranic isotopes for use in the heavy-element research program of the United States. Today, the reactor is a highly versatile machine, producing medical and transuranic isotopes and performing materials test experimental irradiations and neutron-scattering experiments. The ability to test advanced fuels and cladding materials in a thermal neutron spectrum in the United States is limited, and a fast-spectrum irradiation facility does not currently exist in this country. The HFIR has a distinct advantage for consideration as a fuel/cladding irradiation facility because of the extremely high neutron fluxes that this reactor provides over the full thermal- to fast-neutron energy range. New test capabilities have been developed that will allow testing of advanced nuclear fuels and cladding materials in the HFIR under prototypic light-water reactor (LWR) and fast-reactor (FR) operating conditions.

Ott, Larry J [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Evaluation of the advanced mixed-oxide fuel test FO-2 irradiated in the FFTF (Fast Flux Test Facility)  

SciTech Connect

The advanced mixed-oxide (UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2}) test assembly, FO-2, irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is undergoing postirradiation examination. This is one of the first FFTF tests examined that used the advanced ferrite-martensite alloy, HT9, which is highly resistant to irradiation swelling. The FO-2 includes the first annular fueled pins irradiated in FFTF to undergo destructive examination. The FO-2 is a lead assembly for the ongoing FFTF Core Demonstration Experiment (CDE) and was designed to evaluate the effects of fuel design variables, such as pellet density, smeared density, and fuel form (annular or solid fuel), on advanced pin performance. The assembly contains a total of 169 fuel pins of 12 different types. Two L (annular) fuel pins, GF02L04 (FFTF and transient tested) and GF02L09 (FFTF only), were destructively examined. Evaluation of the FO-2 fuel pins and assembly shows the excellent and predictable performance of the mixed-oxide fuels with HT9 structural material. This, combined with the robust behavior of the pins in transient tests, and the continued excellent performance of the CDE indicate this is a superior fuel system for liquid-metal reactors. It offers greatly reduced deformation during irradiation, while maintaining good operating characteristics.

Burley Gilpin, L.L.; Chastain, S.A.; Baker, R.B.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

ADVANCED GASIFICATION-BASED FUEL CONVERSION AND ELECTRIC ENERGY PRODUCTION SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

Boise Paper Solutions and the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) are cooperating to develop, demonstrate and place in continuous operation an advanced biomass gasification-based power generation system suitable for near-term commercial deployment in the Forest Products Industry. The system will be used in conjunction with, rather than in place of, existing wood waste fired boilers and flue gas cleanup systems. The novel system will include three advanced technological components based on GTI's RENUGAS{reg_sign} and three-stage stoker combustion technologies, and a gas turbine-based power generation concept developed in DOE's High Performance Power System (HIPPS) program. The system has, as its objective, to avoid the major hurdles of high-pressure gasification, i.e., high-pressure fuel feeding and ash removal, and hot gas cleaning that are typical for conventional IGCC power generation. It aims to also minimize capital intensity and technology risks. The system is intended to meet the immediate needs of the forest products industry for highly efficient and environmentally friendly electricity and steam generation systems utilizing existing wood waste as fuel resources. The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate the commercial applicability of an advanced biomass gasification-based power generation system at Boise Paper Solutions' pulp and paper mill located at DeRidder, Louisiana.

Joseph Rabovitser; Bruce Bryan

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

ADVANCED GASIFICATION-BASED FUEL CONVERSION AND ELECTRIC ENERGY PRODUCTION SYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Boise Paper Solutions and the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) are cooperating to develop, demonstrate and place in continuous operation an advanced biomass gasification-based power generation system suitable for near-term commercial deployment in the Forest Products Industry. The system will be used in conjunction with, rather than in place of, existing wood waste fired boilers and flue gas cleanup systems. The novel system will include three advanced technological components based on GTI's RENUGAS{reg_sign} and three-stage stoker combustion technologies, and a gas turbine-based power generation concept developed in DOE's High Performance Power System (HIPPS) program. The system has, as its objective, to avoid the major hurdles of high-pressure gasification, i.e., high-pressure fuel feeding and ash removal, and hot gas cleaning that are typical for conventional IGCC power generation. It aims to also minimize capital intensity and technology risks. The system is intended to meet the immediate needs of the forest products industry for highly efficient and environmentally friendly electricity and steam generation systems utilizing existing wood waste as fuel resources. The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate the commercial applicability of an advanced biomass gasification-based power generation system at Boise Paper Solutions' pulp and paper mill located at DeRidder, Louisiana.

Joseph Rabovitser; Bruce Bryan

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deployment Deployment Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on AddThis.com...

380

OVERVIEW OF ADVANCED PETROLEUM-BASED FUELS-DIESEL EMISSIONS CONTROL PROGRAM (APBF-DEC)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels-Diesel Emissions Control Program (APBF-DEC) began in February 2000 and is supported by government agencies and industry. The purpose of the APBF-DEC program is to identify and evaluate the optimal combinations of fuels, lubricants, diesel engines, and emission control systems to meet the projected emission standards for the 2000 to 2010 time period. APBF-DEC is an outgrowth of the earlier Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects Program (DECSE), whose objective is to determine the impact of the sulfur levels in fuel on emission control systems that could lower the emissions of NOx and particulate matter (PM) from diesel powered vehicles in the 2002 to 2004 period. Results from the DECSE studies of two emission control technologies-diesel particle filter (DPF) and NOx adsorber-will be used in the APBF-DEC program. These data are expected to provide initial information on emission control technology options and the effects of fuel properties (including additives) on the performance of emission control systems.

Sverdrup, George M.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced automotive fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Incorporation of a risk analysis approach for the nuclear fuel cycle advanced transparency framework.  

SciTech Connect

Proliferation resistance features that reduce the likelihood of diversion of nuclear materials from the civilian nuclear power fuel cycle are critical for a global nuclear future. A framework that monitors process information continuously can demonstrate the ability to resist proliferation by measuring and reducing diversion risk, thus ensuring the legitimate use of the nuclear fuel cycle. The automation of new nuclear facilities requiring minimal manual operation makes this possible by generating instantaneous system state data that can be used to track and measure the status of the process and material at any given time. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) are working in cooperation to develop an advanced transparency framework capable of assessing diversion risk in support of overall plant transparency. The ''diversion risk'' quantifies the probability and consequence of a host nation diverting nuclear materials from a civilian fuel cycle facility. This document introduces the details of the diversion risk quantification approach to be demonstrated in the fuel handling training model of the MONJU Fast Reactor.

Mendez, Carmen Margarita (Sociotecnia Solutions, LLC); York, David L.; Inoue, Naoko (Japan Atomic Energy Agency); Kitabata, Takuya (Japan Atomic Energy Agency); Vugrin, Eric D.; Vugrin, Kay White; Rochau, Gary Eugene; Cleary, Virginia D.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Fuel plate stability experiments and analysis for the Advanced Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The planned reactor for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) will use closely spaced arrays of involute-shaped fuel plates that will be cooled by water flowing through the channels between the plates. There is concern that at certain coolant flow velocities, adjacent plates may deflect and touch, with resulting failure of the plates. Experiments have been conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to examine this potential phenomenon. Results of the experiments and comparison with analytical predictions are reported. The tests were conducted using full-scale epoxy plate models of the aluminum/uranium silicide ANS involute-shaped fuel plates. Use of epoxy plates and model theory allowed lower flow velocities and pressures to explore the potential failure mechanism. Plate deflections and channel pressures as functions of the flow velocity are examined. Comparisons with mathematical models are noted.

Swinson, W.F.; Battiste, R.L.; Luttrell, C.R.; Yahr, G.T.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell technology advancement for coal-based power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program is conducted by a team consisting of AiResearch Los Angeles Division of Allied-Signal Aerospace Company and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The objective of the program is to advance materials and fabrication methodologies to develop a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) system capable of meeting performance, life, and cost goals for coal-based power generation. The program focuses on materials research and development, fabrication process development, cell/stack performance testing and characterization, cost and system analysis, and quality development.

Not Available

1992-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

384

Moving Forward With Fuel Economy Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Council. Automotive Fuel Economy: How Far Can We Go? (Lee Schipper. Automobile Fuel. Economy and CO 2 Emissions inGraham. The Effect of Fuel Economy Standards on Automobile

Schipper, Lee

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Society of Automotive Engineers World Congress | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Society of Automotive Engineers World Congress Society of Automotive Engineers World Congress Society of Automotive Engineers World Congress April 6, 2006 - 10:12am Addthis Remarks Prepared for Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman Thank you, Greg. It's always a pleasure to be in a room full of engineers. As an engineer myself, I know there is nothing our profession likes better than plain talk and solving problems. So, I'm going to serve you up some plain talk and then some assignments. Our nation faces big challenges in the energy and transportation arena. The President put it plainly in the State of the Union message when he said America is addicted to oil. To start us on the path to recovery from this addiction, he set out the Advanced Energy Initiative which calls for increasing spending on clean energy programs by 22% in next year's budget.

386

FY2001 Progress Report for Automotive Propulsion Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION MATERIALS 2 0 0 1 A N N U A L P R O G R E S S R E P O R T U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation Technologies A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T We would like to express our sincere appreciation to Argonne National Laboratory, Computer Systems Management, Inc., and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, for their artistic and technical contributions in preparing and publishing this report. In addition, we would like to thank all our program participants for their contributions to the programs and all the authors who prepared the project abstracts that comprise this report. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2001 Progress Report for Propulsion Materials

387

Integrated safeguards testing laboratories in support of the advanced fuel cycle initiative  

SciTech Connect

A key enabler for advanced fuel cycle safeguards research and technology development for programs such as the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) is access to facilities and nuclear materials. This access is necessary in many cases in order to ensure that advanced safeguards techniques and technologies meet the measurement needs for which they were designed. One such crucial facility is a hot cell based laboratory which would allow developers from universities, national laboratories, and commercial companies to perform iterative research and development of advanced safeguards instrumentation under realistic operating conditions but not be subject to production schedule limitations. The need for such a facility arises from the requirement to accurately measure minor actinide and/or fission product bearing nuclear materials that cannot be adequately shielded in glove boxes. With the contraction of the DOE nuclear complex following the end of the cold war, many suitable facilities at DOE sites are increasingly costly to operate and are being evaluated for closure. A hot cell based laboratory that allowed developers to install and remove instrumentation from the hot cell would allow for both risk mitigation and performance optimization of the instrumentation prior to fielding equipment in facilities where maintenance and repair of the instrumentation is difficult or impossible. These benefits are accomplished by providing developers the opportunity to iterate between testing the performance of the instrumentation by measuring realistic types and amounts of nuclear material, and adjusting and refining the instrumentation based on the results of these measurements. In this paper, we review the requirements for such a facility using the Wing 9 hot cells in the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Chemistry and Metallurgy Research facility as a model for such a facility and describe recent use of these hot cells in support of AFCI.

Santi, Peter A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Demuth, Scott F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Klasky, Kristen L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Haeok [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miller, Michael C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sprinkle, James K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, Bradley [DOE, NE

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

GATE Center of Excellence at UAB in Lightweight Materials for Automotive Applications  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the accomplishments of the UAB GATE Center of Excellence in Lightweight Materials for Automotive Applications. The first Phase of the UAB DOE GATE center spanned the period 2005-2011. The UAB GATE goals coordinated with the overall goals of DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicles Technologies initiative and DOE GATE program. The FCVT goals are: (1) Development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to significantly reduce automotive vehicle body and chassis weight without compromising other attributes such as safety, performance, recyclability, and cost; (2) To provide a new generation of engineers and scientists with knowledge and skills in advanced automotive technologies. The UAB GATE focused on both the FCVT and GATE goals in the following manner: (1) Train and produce graduates in lightweight automotive materials technologies; (2) Structure the engineering curricula to produce specialists in the automotive area; (3) Leverage automotive related industry in the State of Alabama; (4) Expose minority students to advanced technologies early in their career; (5) Develop innovative virtual classroom capabilities tied to real manufacturing operations; and (6) Integrate synergistic, multi-departmental activities to produce new product and manufacturing technologies for more damage tolerant, cost-effective, and lighter automotive structures.

None

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

goals for automotive fuel cell power systems hydrogen vs.a comparative assessment for fuel cell electric vehicles."Transition: Designing a Fuel- Cell Hypercar. ” 8th Annual

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

goals for automotive fuel cell power systems hydrogen vs.a comparative assessment for fuel cell electric vehicles."plug-out hydrogen-fuel- cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity"

Williams, Brett D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

AUTOMOTIVE ALLOYS: I: Fundamental Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present work, we have analyzed the tensile behavior of a series candidate .... This analysis provides information which can be used in the die and process ... of aluminum alloys and composite materials used in the automotive market.

392

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, July 1993--September 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Penn State program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; (5) assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. An exploratory study was conducted to investigate the pyrolysis of n-butylbenzene in a flow reactor at atmospheric pressure. A number of similarities to trends previously observed in high-pressure static reactions were identified. The product distribution from pyrolysis of n-tetradecane at 400{degrees}C and 425{degrees}C was investigated. The critical temperatures of a suite of petroleum- and coal-derived jet fuels were measured by a rapidly heating sealed tube method. Work has continued on refining the measurements of deposit growth for stressing mixtures of coal-derived JP-8C with tetradecane. Current work has given emphasis to the initial stages of fuel decomposition and the onset of deposition. Pretreatment of JPTS fuel with PX-21 activated carbon (50 mg of PX-21 in 15 mL JPTS) delayed degradation and prevented carbon deposition during thermal stressing at 425{degrees}C for 5 h in nitrogen and air atmospheres. Clear indications of initial and subsequent deposit formation on different metal surfaces have been identified for thermal stressing of dodecane. Seven additives were tested for their ability to retard decomposition of dodecane at 450{degrees}C under nitrogen. Nuclear magnetic resonance data for Dammar resin indicates that structures proposed in the literature are not entirely correct.

Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.; Hatcher, P.G.; Walsh, P.M.; Coleman, M.M.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED PHYSICAL FINE COAL CLEANING FOR PREMIUM FUEL APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Bechtel, together with Amax Research and Development Center (Amax R&D), has prepared this study which provides conceptual cost estimates for the production of premium quality coal-water slurry fuel (CWF) in a commercial plant. Two scenarios are presented, one using column flotation technology and the other the selective agglomeration to clean the coal to the required quality specifications. This study forms part of US Department of Energy program ?Engineering Development of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning for Premium Fuel Applications,? (Contract No. DE-AC22- 92PC92208), under Task 11, Project Final Report. The primary objective of the Department of Energy program is to develop the design base for prototype commercial advanced fine coal cleaning facilities capable of producing ultra-clean coals suitable for conversion to stable and highly loaded CWF. The fuels should contain less than 2 lb ash/MBtu (860 grams ash/GJ) of HHV and preferably less than 1 lb ash/MBtu (430 grams ash/GJ). The advanced fine coal cleaning technologies to be employed are advanced column froth flotation and selective agglomeration. It is further stipulated that operating conditions during the advanced cleaning process should recover not less than 80 percent of the carbon content (heating value) in the run-of-mine source coal. These goals for ultra-clean coal quality are to be met under the constraint that annualized coal production costs does not exceed $2.5 /MBtu ($ 2.37/GJ), including the mine mouth cost of the raw coal. A further objective of the program is to determine the distribution of a selected suite of eleven toxic trace elements between product CWF and the refuse stream of the cleaning processes. Laboratory, bench-scale and Process Development Unit (PDU) tests to evaluate advanced column flotation and selective agglomeration were completed earlier under this program with selected coal samples. A PDU with a capacity of 2 st/h was designed by Bechtel and installed at Amax R&D, Golden, Colorado by Entech Global for process evaluation tests. The tests successfully demonstrated the capability of advanced column flotation as well as selective agglomeration to produce ultra-clean coal at specified levels of purity and recovery efficiency. Test results and the experience gained during the operation of the PDU have provided valuable insights into the processes studied. Based on the design data obtained from the test work and a set of project design criteria, two sets of conceptual designs for commercial CWF production plants have been developed, one using column flotation and the other using selective agglomeration process. Using these designs, Capital as well as Operating and Maintenance (O&M) cost estimates for the plants have been compiled. These estimates have then been used to derive the annualized cost of production of premium CWF on a commercial scale. Further, a series of sensitivity analysis have been completed to evaluate the effects of variations in selected cost components and process parameters on the overall economics of premium fuel production

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Advanced Combustion, Emission Control, Health Impacts, and Fuels Merit Review and Peer Evaluation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

06 06 a n n u a l p r o g r e s s r e p o r t L e s s d e p e n d e n c e o n f o r e i g n o i l t o d a y, a n d t r a n s i t i o n t o a p e t r o l e u m - f r e e , e m i s s i o n s - f r e e v e h i c l e t o m o r r o w . F r e e d o m C A r A n d V e h i C l e T e C h n o l o g i e s P r o g r A m AdvAnced combustion, emission controls, HeAltH impActs, And Fuels merit review And peer evAluAtion Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 October 2006 Dear Colleague: This document summarizes the comments provided by the Review Panel for the FY 2006 Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Combustion, Emission Controls, Health Impacts, and Fuels Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, the "ACE Review," held on May 15-18, 2006 at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The raw evaluations and comments of the panel were provided (with reviewers' names deleted) to the presenters in early June and were used by national laboratory

395

ADVANCED GASIFICATION-BASED FUEL CONVERSION AND ELECTRIC ENERGY PRODUCTION SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

Boise Cascade Corporation and the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) are cooperating to develop, demonstrate and place in continuous operation an advanced biomass gasification-based power generation system suitable for near-term commercial deployment in the Forest Products Industry. The system will be used in conjunction with, rather than in place of, existing wood waste fired boilers and flue gas cleanup systems. The novel system will include three advanced technological components based on GTI's RENUGAS{reg_sign} and METHANE de-NOX{reg_sign} technologies, and a gas turbine-based power generation concept developed in DOE's High Performance Power System (HIPPS) program. The system has, as its objective, to avoid the major hurdles of high-pressure gasification, i.e., high-pressure fuel feeding and ash removal, and hot gas cleaning that are typical for conventional IGCC power generation. It aims to also minimize capital intensity and technology risks. The system is intended to meet the immediate needs of the forest products industry for highly efficient and environmentally friendly electricity and steam generation systems utilizing existing wood waste as fuel resources.

Joseph Rabovitser; Bruce Bryan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

ADVANCED GASIFICATION-BASED FUEL CONVERSION AND ELECTRIC ENERGY PRODUCTION SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

Boise Cascade Corporation and the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) are cooperating to develop, demonstrate and place in continuous operation an advanced biomass gasification-based power generation system suitable for near-term commercial deployment in the Forest Products Industry. The system will be used in conjunction with, rather than in place of, existing wood waste fired boilers and flue gas cleanup systems. The novel system will include three advanced technological components based on GTI's RENUGAS{reg_sign} and three-stage stoker combustion technologies, and a gas turbine-based power generation concept developed in DOE's High Performance Power System (HIPPS) program. The system has, as its objective, to avoid the major hurdles of high-pressure gasification, i.e., high-pressure fuel feeding and ash removal, and hot gas cleaning that are typical for conventional IGCC power generation. It aims to also minimize capital intensity and technology risks. The system is intended to meet the immediate needs of the forest products industry for highly efficient and environmentally friendly electricity and steam generation systems utilizing existing wood waste as fuel resources.

Joseph Rabovitser; Bruce Bryan

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

ADVANCED GASIFICATION-BASED FUEL CONVERSION AND ELECTRIC ENERGY PRODUCTION SYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Boise Cascade Corporation and the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) are cooperating to develop, demonstrate and place in continuous operation an advanced biomass gasification-based power generation system suitable for near-term commercial deployment in the Forest Products Industry. The system will be used in conjunction with, rather than in place of, existing wood waste fired boilers and flue gas cleanup systems. The novel system will include three advanced technological components based on GTI's RENUGAS{reg_sign} and three-stage stoker combustion technologies, and a gas turbine-based power generation concept developed in DOE's High Performance Power System (HIPPS) program. The system has, as its objective, to avoid the major hurdles of high-pressure gasification, i.e., high-pressure fuel feeding and ash removal, and hot gas cleaning that are typical for conventional IGCC power generation. It aims to also minimize capital intensity and technology risks. The system is intended to meet the immediate needs of the forest products industry for highly efficient and environmentally friendly electricity and steam generation systems utilizing existing wood waste as fuel resources.

Joseph Rabovitser; Bruce Bryan

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

ADVANCED GASIFICATION-BASED FUEL CONVERSION AND ELECTRIC ENERGY PRODUCTION SYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Boise Cascade Corporation and the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) are cooperating to develop, demonstrate and place in continuous operation an advanced biomass gasification-based power generation system suitable for near-term commercial deployment in the Forest Products Industry. The system will be used in conjunction with, rather than in place of, existing wood waste fired boilers and flue gas cleanup systems. The novel system will include three advanced technological components based on GTI's RENUGAS{reg_sign} and METHANE de-NOX{reg_sign} technologies, and a gas turbine-based power generation concept developed in DOE's High Performance Power System (HIPPS) program. The system has, as its objective, to avoid the major hurdles of high-pressure gasification, i.e., high-pressure fuel feeding and ash removal, and hot gas cleaning that are typical for conventional IGCC power generation. It aims to also minimize capital intensity and technology risks. The system is intended to meet the immediate needs of the forest products industry for highly efficient and environmentally friendly electricity and steam generation systems utilizing existing wood waste as fuel resources.

Joseph Rabovitser; Bruce Bryan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Measurements and Modeling of Advanced Automotive and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... this range occurs in the gap between the lower limit of Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar, or Kolsky Bar test methods, and the upper limit of servo-hydraulic testing.

400

Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of market segments based and multiple regions. For more information, contact the ORNL Energy and Transportation Science Division at http:www.ornl.govscieesetsd...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "advanced automotive fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system: Hot End Simulation Rig  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Hot End Simulation Rig (HESR) was an integral part of the overall Solar/METC program chartered to prove the technical, economic, an environmental feasibility of a coal-fueled gas turbine, for cogeneration applications. The program was to culminate in a test of a Solar Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal slurry fuel throughput the engine design operating range. This particular activity was designed to verify the performance of the Centaur Type H engine hot section materials in a coal-fired environment varying the amounts of alkali, ash, and sulfur in the coal to assess the material corrosion. Success in the program was dependent upon the satisfactory resolution of several key issues. Included was the control of hot end corrosion and erosion, necessary to ensure adequate operating life. The Hot End Simulation Rig addressed this important issue by exposing currently used hot section turbine alloys, alternate alloys, and commercially available advanced protective coating systems to a representative coal-fueled environment at turbine inlet temperatures typical of Solar`s Centaur Type H. Turbine hot end components which would experience material degradation include the transition duct from the combustor outlet to the turbine inlet, the shroud, nozzles, and blades. A ceramic candle filter vessel was included in the system as the particulate removal device for the HESR. In addition to turbine material testing, the candle material was exposed and evaluated. Long-term testing was intended to sufficiently characterize the performance of these materials for the turbine.

Galica, M.A.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

TransForum v6n1 - Hydrogen + Advances in Fuel Cell Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

available, fuel cells could operate on conventional fuels, such as natural gas, propane, gasoline, and diesel, or alternative fuels, such as methanol, ethanol, and...

403

Clean Cities Now, Vol. 11, No. 4, October 2007; Official Publication of Clean Cities and the Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (Newsletter)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formerly Clean Cities News Formerly Clean Cities News Official Publication of Clean Cities and the Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center Clean Cities Now (www.eere.energy.gov/cleancities/ccn) is the official publication of Clean Cities, an initiative of the U.S. Department of Energy designed to reduce petroleum consumption in the transportation sector by advancing the use of alternative fuel vehicles, idle reduction technologies, hybrid electric vehicles, fuel blends, and fuel economy. DOE Recognizes Coordinator Accomplishments

404

Gas Mileage of 2013 Vehicles by CODA Automotive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 CODA Automotive Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 2013 CODA Automotive CODA Automatic (A1), Electricity Compare 2013...

405

Gas Mileage of 2012 Vehicles by CODA Automotive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 CODA Automotive Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 2012 CODA Automotive CODA Automatic (A1), Electricity Compare 2012...

406

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: U.S. DRIVE Partnership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mission and Goals Mission and Goals Organization Chart and Contacts Background U.S. DRIVE Partnership Budget Timeline Program Activities Advisory Panels External Coordination U.S. Department of Energy Search help Home > About > Background > U.S. DRIVE Partnership Printable Version U.S. DRIVE Partnership The U.S. DRIVE Partnership is a collaborative effort among DOE and companies from the automotive, fuels, and electric utility industries, focused on advanced automotive and related infrastructure technology research and development. U.S. DRIVE Logo The U.S. DRIVE partners are: Automobile industry: U.S. Council for Automotive Research LLC (USCAR, the cooperative research organization for Chrysler Group, Ford Motor Company, and General Motors Company); Tesla Motors Electric utility industry: DTE Energy Company, Southern California

407

Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for Light-Duty Natural-Gas-Fueled Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to evaluate and make recommendations concerning technologies that promise to improve the efilciency of compressed natural gas (CNG) light-duty vehicles. Technical targets for CNG automotive technology given in the March 1998 OffIce of Advanced Automotive Technologies research and development plan were used as guidance for this effort. The technical target that necessitates this current study is to validate technologies that enable CNG light vehicles to have at least 10% greater - fuel economy (on a miles per gallon equivalent basis) than equivalent gasoline vehicles by 2006. Other tar- gets important to natural gas (NG) automotive technology and this study are to: (1) increase CNG vehicle range to 380 miles, (2) reduce the incremental vehicle cost (CNG vs gasoline) to $1500, and (3) meet the California ultra low-emission vehicle (ULEV) and Federal Tier 2 emission standards expected to be in effect in 2004.

Staunton, R.H.; Thomas, J.F.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

NREL: Learning - Advanced Vehicle Systems and Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Vehicle Systems and Components Advanced Vehicle Systems and Components Photo of a man checking out an advanced battery using testing equipment that includes a long metal tube on a table top. NREL's researchers test new batteries developed for hybrid electric vehicles. Credit: Warren Gretz Researchers and engineers at the NREL work closely with those in the automotive industry to develop new technologies, such as advanced batteries, for storing energy in cars, trucks, and buses. They also help to develop and test new technologies for using that energy more efficiently. And they work on finding new, energy-efficient ways to reduce the amount of fuel needed to heat and cool the interiors, or cabins, of vehicles. To help develop these new technologies, NREL's researchers are improving the efficiency of vehicle systems and components like these:

409

Automotive features : mass impact and deployment characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passenger car use is a major driver of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and fossil fuel consumption in the United States. Vehicles continue to incorporate increasing levels of technology, these advances do not translate ...

Zoepf, Stephen M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels--Diesel Emissions Control Project (APBF-DEC): Lubricants Project, Phase 1 Summary, July 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advanced Petroleum Based Fuels-Diesel Emission Control project is a government/industry collaborative project to identify the optimal combinations of low-sulfur diesel fuels, lubricants, diesel engines, and emission control systems to meet projected emission standards for the 2004-2010 time period. This summary describes the results of the first phase of the lubricants study investigating the impact on lubricant formulation on engine-out emissions.

Not Available

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Potential automotive uses of wrought magnesium alloys  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vehicle weight reduction is one of the major means available to improve automotive fuel efficiency. High-strength steels, aluminum (Al), and polymers are already being used to reduce weight significantly, but substantial additional reductions could be achieved by greater use of low-density magnesium (Mg) and its alloys. Mg alloys are currently used in relatively small quantities for auto parts, generally limited to die castings (e.g., housings). Argonne National Laboratory`s Center for Transportation Research has performed a study for the Lightweight Materials Program within DOE`s Office of Transportation Materials to evaluate the suitability of wrought Mg and its alloys to replace steel/aluminum for automotive structural and sheet applications. Mg sheet could be used in body nonstructural and semi-structural applications, while extrusions could be used in such structural applications as spaceframes. This study identifies high cost as the major barrier to greatly increased Mg use in autos. Two technical R and D areas, novel reduction technology and better hot-forming technology, could enable major cost reductions.

Gaines, L.; Cuenca, R.; Wu, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Stodolsky, F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Argonne National Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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