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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administrator weapons activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Weapons | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Weapons | National Nuclear Security Administration Weapons | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Weapons Home > Our Mission > Managing the Stockpile > Weapons Weapons The New START Treaty, which was signed in 2010, between the United States and Russian Federation will cap the strategic deployed nuclear arsenals of each country at 1,550 warheads, a nearly 75% reduction compared with the

2

The National Nuclear Security Administration's Weapons Dismantlement...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Nuclear Security Administration's Weapons Dismantlement and Disposition Program OAS-L-13-06 January 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 January 29, 2013...

3

Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle | National Nuclear Security Administration Life Cycle | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle Home > Our Mission > Managing the Stockpile > Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle Nuclear weapons are developed, produced, and maintained in the stockpile, and then retired and dismantled. This sequence of events is known as the

4

Weapon Detonation Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

5

Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing Resumes | National Nuclear Security Administration Testing Resumes | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes September 01, 1961 Washington, DC Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes The Soviet Union breaks the nuclear test moratorium and the United States

6

Weapons Activities/ Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

component of the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) responsive infrastructure, supports NNSA an important component of the scientific and technical understanding required to assess the safety, security, and reliability of the Nation's nuclear weapons without nuclear testing. The program provides this capability

7

Chemical Weapons Convention Requirements Part 745page 1 Export Administration Regulations September 28, 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Weapons Convention Requirements Part 745­page 1 Export Administration Regulations September 28, 2001 §745.1 ADVANCE NOTIFICATION AND ANNUAL REPORT OF ALL EXPORTS OF SCHEDULE 1 CHEMICALS the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) not less than 30 days in advance of every export

Bernstein, Daniel

8

Weapons Activities/ Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2012 Congressional Budget Campaign and a major goal for National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The ICF Campaign supports the NNSA's Stockpile Stewardship Program. The NIF provides NNSA extraordinary opportunities for scientific progress and discovery in the areas

9

Enforcement Letter; Quality Assurance Deficiencies Related to Weapon Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2005 2, 2005 Dr. Michael R. Anastasio Director Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory P.O. Box 808, L-001 Livermore, CA 94550 Subject: Enforcement Letter - Quality Assurance Deficiencies Related to Weapon Activities Dear Dr. Anastasio: This letter is to inform you of the Department of Energy's (DOE) concern regarding several quality assurance-related deficiencies involving actions by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) personnel. These deficiencies were associated with a cracked explosive event that occurred at the Pantex site in January 2004. The timing of this letter is intended to coincide with a DOE enforcement action stemming from this event. During the dismantlement of a retired nuclear weapon, for which LLNL was the design

10

Program Activities | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Activities | National Nuclear Security Administration Activities | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Program Activities Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D Programs > About ASC > Program Activities

11

Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled | National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

12

Nuclear Weapons  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nuclear science that has had a significant global influence. Following the observation of fission products of uranium by Hahn and Strassmann in 1938, a uranium fission weapon...

13

Nuclear Weapons Journal Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Weapons Journal Archive Nuclear Weapons Journal The Nuclear Weapons Journal ceased publication after Issue 2, 2009. Below are Nuclear Weapons Journal archived issues. Issue...

14

Program Activities | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

15

Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition: Plutonium Packaging, Storage and Transportation and Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal Activities  

SciTech Connect

A fifth annual Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition meeting organized by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was held February 16-18, 2004, at the State Education Center (SEC), 4 Aerodromnya Drive, St. Petersburg, Russia. The meeting discussed Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition topics for which LLNL has the US Technical Lead Organization responsibilities. The technical areas discussed included Radioactive Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal, Plutonium Oxide and Plutonium Metal Packaging, Storage and Transportation and Spent Fuel Packaging, Storage and Transportation. The meeting was conducted with a conference format using technical presentations of papers with simultaneous translation into English and Russian. There were 46 Russian attendees from 14 different Russian organizations and six non-Russian attendees, four from the US and two from France. Forty technical presentations were made. The meeting agenda is given in Appendix B and the attendance list is in Appendix C.

Jardine, L J; Borisov, G B

2004-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

16

Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOT/PHMSA DOT/PHMSA A ti iti Activities Michael Conroy U S Department of Transportation - 1 - U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety Radioactive Materials U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Overview * Harmonization with International Regulations * Update on Revisions to International Regulations * Recent Letters of Interpretation * Update on Rulemakings * PHMSA Information Resources - 2 - * PHMSA Information Resources 2 U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration HM-230 Harmonized with 2000 Version of IAEA's 1996 Edition - 3 - U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration

17

SECURITY AND CONTROL OF NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVES AND NUCLEAR WEAPONS  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

http://www.nnsa.energy.gov Office of Nuclear Weapon Surety and Quality http://www.nnsa.energy.gov Office of Nuclear Weapon Surety and Quality SUPPLEMENTAL DIRECTIVE Approved: 7-7-11 IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF CONTROLS TO PREVENT DELIBERATE UNAUTHORIZED USE NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Office of Defense Programs NA SD 452.4 NA SD 452.4 1 7-7-11 IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF CONTROLS TO PREVENT DELIBERATE UNAUTHORIZED USE 1. PURPOSE. This NNSA Supplemental Directive (SD) supports the requirements of DOE O 452.4B, Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons. Specifically, this SD supports the Order's requirements to implement deliberate unauthorized use (DUU) preventive measures for nuclear explosive operations (NEO) and associated activities and to perform independent evaluations to determine if NEOs

18

Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing | National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear...

19

Robert C. Seamans, Jr. Appointed to Lead Nuclear Weapons Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C. Seamans, Jr. Appointed to Lead Nuclear Weapons Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

20

Los Alamos Selected as Atomic Weapons Laboratory | National Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Los Alamos Selected as Atomic Weapons Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administrator weapons activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency...

22

Los Alamos Selected as Atomic Weapons Laboratory | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Selected as Atomic Weapons Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency...

23

Elimination of Weapons-Grade Plutonium Production | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Elimination of Weapons-Grade Plutonium Production | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

24

DOE O 452.6A, Nuclear Weapon Surety Interface with the Department of Defense  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Order establishes Department of Energy and National Nuclear Security Administration requirements and responsibilities for addressing joint nuclear weapon ...

2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

25

The National Nuclear Security Administration's B61 Spin Rocket...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

essentially identical, produce thrust to arm thz weapon. In Deceinber 2001, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) received Nuclear Weapons Council Standing and...

26

Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document has been funded by the United States Environmental Protection Agency under Contract 68-W6-0014. It has been subject to administrative review by all agencies participating in the Federal Remediation Technologies Roundtable, and has been approved for publication. Any mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use. TABLE OF CONTENTS

Technologies Roundtable

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing August 22, 1958 Washington, DC Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing

28

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Since 2001, the Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

$9.0 billion for the national security activities of the National Nuclear Security Administration to include maintaining the safety, security, reliability and effectiveness of the Nation's nuclear weapons "zero-emissions" initiatives for hydrogen fuel cells, clean coal, nuclear, and fusion power to increase

29

Identification of nuclear weapons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for non-invasively indentifying different types of nuclear weapons is disclosed. A neutron generator is placed against the weapon to generate a stream of neutrons causing fissioning within the weapon. A first detects the generation of the neutrons and produces a signal indicative thereof. A second particle detector located on the opposite side of the weapon detects the fission particles and produces signals indicative thereof. The signals are converted into a detected pattern and a computer compares the detected pattern with known patterns of weapons and indicates which known weapon has a substantially similar pattern. Either a time distribution pattern or noise analysis pattern, or both, is used. Gamma-neutron discrimination and a third particle detector for fission particles adjacent the second particle detector are preferably used. The neutrons are generated by either a decay neutron source or a pulled neutron particle accelerator.

Mihalczo, J.T.; King, W.T.

1987-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

30

Reconversion of nuclear weapons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nuclear predicament or nuclear option. Synopsis of three lectures : 1- The physical basis of nuclear technology. Physics of fission. Chain reaction in reactors and weapons. Fission fragments. Separration of isotopes. Radiochemistry.2- Nuclear reactors with slow and fast neutrons. Power, size, fuel and waste. Plutonium production. Dose rate, shielding and health hazard. The lessons of Chernobyl3- Nuclear weapons. Types, energy, blast and fallout. Fusion and hydrogen bombs. What to do with nuclear weapons when you cannot use them? Testing. Nonmilittary use. Can we get rid of the nuclear weapon? Nuclear proliferation. Is there a nuclear future?

Kapitza, Sergei P

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Peace, Stability, and Nuclear Weapons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Much About North Korean Nuclear Weapons, unpublished paper,the South and use nuclear weapons in doing so. How concernedout how to use nuclear weapons except for deterrence. Is a

Waltz, Kenneth N.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Largest Federally Owned Wind Farm Breaks Ground at U.S. Weapons...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

site for the assembly, disassembly, and maintenance of the United States' nuclear weapons stockpile. Under the Obama Administration, federal agencies have reduced greenhouse...

33

U.S. No Longer Building Any Nuclear Weapons | National Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

No Longer Building Any Nuclear Weapons | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency...

34

Principal Associate Director - Weapons Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weapons Programs As Principal Associate Director for the Weapons Program, Knapp leads the programs to assure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the systems in the nation's...

35

PIA - Weapons Data Control Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Weapons Data Control Systems PIA - Weapons Data Control Systems PIA - Weapons Data Control Systems PIA PIA - Weapons Data Control Systems...

36

Sandia Weapon Intern Program visits KCP | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Weapon Intern Program visits KCP | National Nuclear Security Weapon Intern Program visits KCP | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Sandia Weapon Intern Program visits KCP Sandia Weapon Intern Program visits KCP Posted By Office of Public Affairs Participants in Sandia's Weapon Intern Program recently visited and

37

President Truman Orders Development of Thermonuclear Weapon ...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Weapon President Truman Orders Development of Thermonuclear Weapon January 31, 1950 Washington, DC President Truman Orders Development of Thermonuclear Weapon President...

38

National Security, Weapons Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Security, Weapons Science National Security, Weapons Science /science-innovation/_assets/images/icon-science.jpg National Security, Weapons Science National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place on Earth pursues a broader array of world-class scientific endeavors. Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility (DARHT) The Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility at LANL is part of the DOE's stockpile stewardship program. It uses two large X-ray machines to record three-dimensional interior images of materials. In most experiments, materials (including plutonium) undergo hydrodynamic shock to simulate the implosion process in nuclear bombs and/or the effects of severe hydrodynamic stress. The tests are described as "full-scale mockups

39

Weapons assessment efficiencies through use of nondestructive laser gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weapons assessment efficiencies through use of nondestructive laser Weapons assessment efficiencies through use of nondestructive laser gas sampling Weapons assessment efficiencies through use of nondestructive laser gas sampling Nondestructive laser welding process far less expensive, no underground testing. June 8, 2012 Nondestructive Laser Gas Sampling Nondestructive Laser Gas Sampling is expected to save several million dollars per year and requires no underground testing. "We're continually innovating and working to improve the way we do business, and NDLGS is a big step for us," said National Nuclear Security Administration Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs Don Cook. New weapons assessment technology engineered: nondestructive laser welding process far less expensive, no underground testing Valveless Laser Processing

40

Chronic Benzodiazepine Administration Potentiates High Voltage-Activated Calcium Currents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.aspetjournals.orgDownloadedfrom #12;other drugs of abuse has been reported to enhance high voltage-activated calcium channels (HVAs

Brand, Paul H.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administrator weapons activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for Enforcement, published in June 1998, provides the opportunity for the Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) to periodically issue clarifying guidance regarding the processes used in its enforcement activities. This enforcement guidance focuses on the applicability of 10 CFR Part 830 to nuclear weapon programs and several related enforcement issues. Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues More Documents & Publications Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Enforcement Guidance Supplement 00-03: Specific Issues on Applicability of

42

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for Enforcement, published in June 1998, provides the opportunity for the Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) to periodically issue clarifying guidance regarding the processes used in its enforcement activities. This enforcement guidance focuses on the applicability of 10 CFR Part 830 to nuclear weapon programs and several related enforcement issues. Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues More Documents & Publications Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Enforcement Guidance Supplement 00-03: Specific Issues on Applicability of

43

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for Enforcement, published in June 1998, provides the opportunity for the Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) to periodically issue clarifying guidance regarding the processes used in its enforcement activities.This enforcement guidance focuses on the applicability of 10 CFR Part 830 to nuclear weapon programs and several related enforcement issues. Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues More Documents & Publications Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Enforcement Guidance Supplement 00-03: Specific Issues on Applicability of

44

Nuclear power and nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect

The proliferation of nuclear weapons and the expanded use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity and other peaceful uses are compared. The difference in technologies associated with nuclear weapons and nuclear power plants are described.

Vaughen, V.C.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Proceedings of the 6th Annual Meeting for Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition: Plutonium Packaging, Storage and Transportation and WasteTreatment, Storage and Disposal Activities  

SciTech Connect

The sixth annual Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition meeting organized by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was held November 15-17, 2004, at the State Education Center (SEC), 4 Aerodromnya Drive, St. Petersburg, Russia. The meeting discussed Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition topics for which LLNL has the US Technical Lead Organization responsibilities. The technical areas discussed included Radioactive Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal, and Plutonium Oxide and Plutonium Metal Packaging, Storage and Transportation and Spent Fuel Packaging, Storage and Transportation. The meeting was conducted with a conference format using technical presentations of papers with simultaneous translation into English and Russian. There were 55 Russian attendees from 16 different Russian organizations and four non-Russian attendees from the US. Forty technical presentations were made. The meeting agenda is given in Appendix B and the attendance list is in Appendix C. The 16 different Russian design, industrial sites, and scientific organizations in attendance included staff from Rosatom/Minatom, Federal Nuclear and Radiation Safety Authority of Russia (GOSATOMNADZOR, NIERA/GAN), All Russian Designing & Scientific Research Institute of Complex Power Technology (VNIPIET), Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI), A. A. Bochvar All Russian Scientific Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM), All Russian & Design Institute of Production Engineering (VNIPIPT), Ministry of Atomic Energy of Russian Federation Specialized State Designing Institute (GSPI), State Scientific Center Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR), Siberian Chemical Combine Tomsk (SCC), Mayak PO, Mining Chemical Combine (MCC K-26), Institute of Biophysics (IBPh), Sverdlosk Scientific Research Institute of Chemical Machine Building (SNIIChM), Kurchatov Institute (KI), Institute of Physical Chemistry Russian Academy of Science (IPCh RAS) and Radon PO-Moscow. The four non-Russian attendees included one representative from DOE NNSA, and LLNL, and two from Duratek, The meeting was organized into three major sessions: (1) Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal; (2) Plutonium Packaging, Storage and Transportation; (3) Spent Fuel Packaging, Storage and Transportation. Twenty presentations were made on the topic of Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal (Session II), ten presentations on Plutonium Packaging, Storage and Transportation (Session III), and four presentations on Spent Fuel Packaging, Storage and Transportation (Session IV). In addition, DOE/NNSA, Minatom/Rosatom and TVEL summarized the bases for the conference at the beginning of the meeting (Session I). Nine months had passed since the last LLNL contracts review meeting. During that time period, LLNL and TVEL have been able to sign six contracts for a total of $1,700,000 in the areas of: (1) Waste treatment, storage and disposal; and (2) Plutonium packaging, storage and transportation. The scope of several other work projects are now in various stages of development in these areas. It is anticipated that more contracts will be signed before the next meeting of this type. These events have allowed us to start work in our technical activities under new direction from TVEL, which is now the single Russian organization to coordinate and conclude contracts with LLNL. The meeting presentations and discussions have defined where we are and where we are going in the near term in regard to our joint interests in excess weapons plutonium disposition. Each topical section of this Proceedings is introduced by a summary of the presentations in that section.

Jardine, L J

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

46

Dietary resveratrol administration increases MnSOD expression and activity in mouse brain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOD protein level (140%) and activity (75%). The increase in MnSOD was not due to a substantial proliferationDietary resveratrol administration increases MnSOD expression and activity in mouse brain Ellen L oxidative stress. In vitro studies have shown an increase in antioxidant enzyme activities following

Stuart, Jeffrey A.

47

Neutrino Counter Nuclear Weapon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiations produced by neutrino-antineutrino annihilation at the Z0 pole can be used to heat up the primary stage of a thermonuclear warhead and can in principle detonate the device remotely. Neutrino-antineutrino annihilation can also be used as a tactical assault weapon to target hideouts that are unreachable by conventional means.

Alfred Tang

2008-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

48

Applying Agile MethodstoWeapon/Weapon-Related Software  

SciTech Connect

This white paper provides information and guidance to the Department of Energy (DOE) sites on Agile software development methods and the impact of their application on weapon/weapon-related software development. The purpose of this white paper is to provide an overview of Agile methods, examine the accepted interpretations/uses/practices of these methodologies, and discuss the applicability of Agile methods with respect to Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) Technical Business Practices (TBPs). It also provides recommendations on the application of Agile methods to the development of weapon/weapon-related software.

Adams, D; Armendariz, M; Blackledge, M; Campbell, F; Cloninger, M; Cox, L; Davis, J; Elliott, M; Granger, K; Hans, S; Kuhn, C; Lackner, M; Loo, P; Matthews, S; Morrell, K; Owens, C; Peercy, D; Pope, G; Quirk, R; Schilling, D; Stewart, A; Tran, A; Ward, R; Williamson, M

2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

49

Controlling weapons of mass destruction through the rule of law  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many who speak of the end of the Cold War emphasize the improvement in international relations when they speak of the momentous consequences of this event. According to this image, the half century since Trinity has been a period of sparse international communication during which the Eastern and Western blocs hibernated in their isolated dens of security alliances. The emphasis in the phrase ``Cold War`` was on the word ``cold,`` and relations with the former Communist regimes are now ``warm`` by comparison. It is equally valid to consider what has happened to the word ``was` in this highly descriptive phrase. While meaningful international dialogue was in a state of relative lethargy during much of the last fifty years, the military establishments of the Great Powers were actively engaged in using as much force as possible in their efforts to control world affairs, short of triggering a nuclear holocaust. Out of these military postures a tense peace ironically emerged, but the terms by which decisions were made about controlling weapons of mass destruction (i.e., nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons) were the terms of war. The thesis of this paper is that the end of the Cold War marks a shift away from reliance on military might toward an international commitment to controlling weapons,of mass destruction through the ``rule of law.`` Rawls wrote that ``legal system is a coercive order of public rules addressed to rational persons for the purpose of regulating their conduct and providing the framework for social cooperation. The regular and impartial administration of public rules, becomes the rule of law when applied to the legal system.`` Inparticular, Rawls identifies as part of this system of public rules those laws that aim to prevent free riders on the economic system and those that aim to correct such externalities as environmental pollution.``

Tanzman, E.A.

1995-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

50

Bret Knapp to head combined Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics Directorates Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics Directorates Bret Knapp to head combined Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics Directorates at Los Alamos National Laboratory New leadership position will allow for greater integration in the planning and execution of the stockpile stewardship program. August 18, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

51

Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing July 03, 1993 Washington, DC

52

Will our nuclear weapons work?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Will our nuclear weapons work? Will our nuclear weapons work? National Security Science magazine Latest Issue:April 2013 All Issues » submit Supercomputers are essential for assessing the health of the U.S. nuclear stockpile Supercomputers provide assurance by simulating nuclear weapons performance March 25, 2013 Graphic of a missile being tested through computer simulation Los Alamos uses supercomputers to make high-resolution 3D simulations that help to assess the health of nuclear weapons like this B-61 bomb. Contact Managing Editor Clay Dillingham Email The nuclear weapons in the U.S. stockpile were designed and built to be replaced with new designs and builds every 10 to 15 years. These weapons have lived beyond their expected lifespans. Supercomputers provide the high-resolution 3D simulations needed for

53

B53 Nuclear Bomb Dismantlement | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

B53 Nuclear Bomb Dismantlement | National Nuclear Security Administration B53 Nuclear Bomb Dismantlement | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Video Gallery > B53 Nuclear Bomb Dismantlement B53 Nuclear Bomb Dismantlement B53 Nuclear Bomb Dismantlement The elimination of the B53 by Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is consistent with the goal President Obama announced in his April 2009 Prague speech to reduce the number of nuclear weapons. The President said, "We will reduce the role of nuclear weapons in our national security strategy, and urge others to do the same." The dismantlement of the last remaining B53 ensures that the system will never again be part of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile. As a key part of its national security mission, NNSA is actively responsible for safely dismantling weapons that are no longer needed, and disposing of the excess material and components.

54

U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile September 17, 2007 - 2:41pm Addthis Declaration Reinforces U.S. Commitment to Nonproliferation VIENNA, AUSTRIA - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will remove nine metric tons of plutonium from further use as fissile material in U.S. nuclear weapons, signifying the Bush Administration's ongoing commitment to nonproliferation. Nine metric tons of plutonium is enough material to make over 1,000 nuclear weapons. The Secretary made today's announcement while speaking before the International Atomic Energy Agency's annual general conference.

55

U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile September 17, 2007 - 2:41pm Addthis Declaration Reinforces U.S. Commitment to Nonproliferation VIENNA, AUSTRIA - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will remove nine metric tons of plutonium from further use as fissile material in U.S. nuclear weapons, signifying the Bush Administration's ongoing commitment to nonproliferation. Nine metric tons of plutonium is enough material to make over 1,000 nuclear weapons. The Secretary made today's announcement while speaking before the International Atomic Energy Agency's annual general conference.

56

EA-1137: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

137: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri EA-1137: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support...

57

EA-1137: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for the Kansas City Plant Kansas City, Missouri EA-1137: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project...

58

Weapons production | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weapons production Weapons production An effective production infrastructure is critical to national security. Y-12 continues to replace World War II-era facilities to increase...

59

Risk in the Weapons Stockpile  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When it comes to the nuclear weapons stockpile, risk must be as low as possible. Design and care to keep the stockpile healthy involves all aspects of risk management. Design diversity is a method that helps to mitigate risk.

Noone, Bailey C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

60

Secretary Bodman Celebrates Clean Up Completion of Three Former Weapons  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Up Completion of Three Former Clean Up Completion of Three Former Weapons Research and Production Sites in Ohio Secretary Bodman Celebrates Clean Up Completion of Three Former Weapons Research and Production Sites in Ohio January 19, 2007 - 9:59am Addthis Over 1,100 Acres in Fernald, Columbus and Ashtabula Restored CROSBY TOWNSHIP, OH - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today certified that environmental cleanup is complete at three former weapons research and production facilities in Ohio. In a ceremony at the Fernald site, Secretary Bodman, joined by Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Stephen L. Johnson and U.S. Senator George Voinovich (R-OH), commemorated the efforts of thousands of workers for their contributions at the Fernald Closure site in Crosby Township, the Columbus Closure site at

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administrator weapons activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The Chemical Weapons Convention -- Legal issues  

SciTech Connect

The Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) offers a unique challenge to the US system of constitutional law. Its promise of eliminating what is the most purely genocidal type of weapon from the world`s arsenals as well as of destroying the facilities for producing these weapons, brings with it a set of novel legal issues. The reservations about the CWC expressed by US business people are rooted in concern about safeguarding confidential business information and protecting the constitutional right to privacy. The chief worry is that international verification inspectors will misuse their power to enter commercial property and that trade secrets or other private information will be compromised as a result. It has been charged that the Convention is probably unconstitutional. The author categorically disagrees with that view and is aware of no scholarly writing that supports it. The purpose of this presentation is to show that CWC verification activities can be implemented in the US consistently with the traditional constitutional regard for commercial and individual privacy. First, he very briefly reviews the types of verification inspections that the CWC permits, as well as some of its specific privacy protections. Second, he explains how the Fourth Amendment right to privacy works in the context of CWC verification inspections. Finally, he reviews how verification inspections can be integrated into these constitutional requirements in the SU through a federal implementing statute.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

DOE battery program for weapon applications  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the Department of Energy (DOE) Weapons Battery program which originates from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and involves activities ranging from research, design and development to testing, consulting and production support. The primary customer is the DOE/Office of Defense Programs, although work is also done for various Department of Defense agencies and their contractors. The majority of the SNL activities involve thermal battery (TB) and lithium ambient temperature battery (LAMB)technologies. Smaller efforts are underway in the areas of silver oxide/zinc and nickel oxide/cadmium batteries as well as double layer capacitors.

Clark, R.P.; Baldwin, A.R.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

DOE battery program for weapon applications  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the Department of Energy (DOE) Weapons Battery program which originates from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and involves activities ranging from research, design and development to testing, consulting and production support. The primary customer is the DOE/Office of Defense Programs, although work is also done for various Department of Defense agencies and their contractors. The majority of the SNL activities involve thermal battery (TB) and lithium ambient temperature battery (LAMB)technologies. Smaller efforts are underway in the areas of silver oxide/zinc and nickel oxide/cadmium batteries as well as double layer capacitors.

Clark, R.P.; Baldwin, A.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

TRACKING SURPLUS PLUTONIUM FROM WEAPONS TO DISPOSITION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supporting nuclear nonproliferation and global security principles, beginning in 1994 the United States has withdrawn more than 50 metric tons (MT) of government-controlled plutonium from potential use in nuclear weapons. The Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration, established protocols for the tracking of this "excess" and "surplus" plutonium, and for reconciling the current storage and utilization of the plutonium to show that its management is consistent with the withdrawal policies. Programs are underway to ensure the safe and secure disposition of the materials that formed a major part of the weapons stockpile during the Cold War, and growing quantities have been disposed as waste, after which they are not included in traditional nuclear material control and accountability (NMC&A) data systems. A combination of resources is used to perform the reconciliations that form the basis for annual reporting to DOE, to U.S. Department of State, and to international partners including the International Atomic Energy Agency.

Allender, J.; Beams, J.; Sanders, K.; Myers, L.

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

65

Bombs Versus Budgets: Inside the Nuclear Weapons Lobby  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The battle over deficits and defense has focused attention on the costs of nuclear weapons. Estimates of the full costs of nuclear weapons-related activities are hotly debated, but there is no question that they will reach hundreds of billions of dollars over the next decade. At a time of tight budgets, there is a real possibility that some of the systems and facilities described so far could be reduced, delayed, or cancelled outright. For example, former Vice-Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General James Cartwright noted in July 2011, The challenge here is that we have to re-capitalize all three legs [of the nuclear triad], and we dont have the money to do it. That same month, General Robert Kehler, the head of U.S. Strategic Command, asserted, Were not going to be able to go forward with weapon systems that cost what weapon systems cost today. This report provides a profile of the nuclear weapons lobby, noting along the way that in a constrained budgetary environment different parts of the lobby may either collaborate to promote higher nuclear weapons spending or compete for their share of a shrinking pie. An Ohio-Class Ballistic Missile Submarine (SSBN), slated to be replaced by a Next Generation Sub.

D. Hartung; Christine Anderson

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

U.S. Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress U.S. Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress July 24, 2007 - 2:55pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman joined the U.S. Secretaries of Defense and State in sending to Congress the Bush Administration's nuclear weapons strategy. This document not only describes the history of nuclear deterrence during the Cold War, but reinforces how deterrence applies to present and future security threats, and what a nuclear stockpile of the 21st century will need to look like in order to meet those threats. The strategy emphasizes President Bush's goal of maintaining a credible nuclear deterrent with the lowest possible number of nuclear weapons. It is consistent with the Moscow Treaty that sets U.S. and Russian

67

U.S. Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress U.S. Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress U.S. Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress July 24, 2007 - 2:55pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman joined the U.S. Secretaries of Defense and State in sending to Congress the Bush Administration's nuclear weapons strategy. This document not only describes the history of nuclear deterrence during the Cold War, but reinforces how deterrence applies to present and future security threats, and what a nuclear stockpile of the 21st century will need to look like in order to meet those threats. The strategy emphasizes President Bush's goal of maintaining a credible nuclear deterrent with the lowest possible number of nuclear weapons. It is consistent with the Moscow Treaty that sets U.S. and Russian

68

U.S. No Longer Building Any Nuclear Weapons | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

No Longer Building Any Nuclear Weapons | National Nuclear Security No Longer Building Any Nuclear Weapons | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > U.S. No Longer Building Any Nuclear Weapons U.S. No Longer Building Any Nuclear Weapons May 10, 1992 Washington, DC U.S. No Longer Building Any Nuclear Weapons

69

Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes | National Nuclear Security Administra...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

> Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes September 01, 1961 Washington, DC Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes The Soviet Union breaks the nuclear test...

70

Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Weapons Testing Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing July 03, 1993 Washington, DC Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing President Clinton...

71

Request For Records Disposition Authority-Nuclear Weapons | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

For Records Disposition Authority-Nuclear Weapons Request For Records Disposition Authority-Nuclear Weapons This document identifies the nuclear weapon records generated by the...

72

Securing NNSA's Nuclear Weapons Complex in a Post-9/11 World | National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Securing NNSA's Nuclear Weapons Complex in a Post-9/11 World | National Securing NNSA's Nuclear Weapons Complex in a Post-9/11 World | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Securing NNSA's Nuclear Weapons Complex in a ... Fact Sheet Securing NNSA's Nuclear Weapons Complex in a Post-9/11 World Jan 2, 2009 The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has several missions

73

Weapons Quality Assurance Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5-2008 5-2008 September 2008 DOE STANDARD WEAPON QUALITY ASSURANCE QUALIFICATION STANDARD NNSA Weapon Quality Assurance Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1025-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-STD-1025-2008 iv INTENTIONALLY BLANK DOE-STD-1025-2008 v TABLE OF CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENT ................................................................................................................ vii PURPOSE....................................................................................................................................

74

WEAPONS QUALITY ASSURANCE QUALIFICATION STANDARD REFERENCE GUIDE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Weapon Weapon Quality Assurance Qualification Standard Reference Guide AUGUST 2009 This page is intentionally blank. Table of Contents i LIST OF FIGURES ...................................................................................................................... ii LIST OF TABLES ........................................................................................................................ ii ACRONYMS ................................................................................................................................ iv PURPOSE...................................................................................................................................... 1 SCOPE ...........................................................................................................................................

75

WEAPONS EFFECTS FOR PROTECTIVE DESIGN  

SciTech Connect

A lecture intended to provide a general background in weapons effects is presented. Specific areas of nuclear explosion phenomena pertinent to the design of hardened systems discussed include nuclear radiation and shielding, fireball growth and effects, thermal radiation, air blast, cratering and throwout, ground shock effects, fallout, and afterwinds. (J.R.D.)

Brode, H.L.

1960-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

RS-WEAPONS Records  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

~ ~ o c tnstructions o n r e v e r s e ) ' T O NATIONAL ARCHIVES and RECORDS ADMINISTRATION (NIR) \$'ASHINGTON. DC 20108 ' 1 FROM (Agency or establishment) U. S . De~artment of E ~ r n v 2 MAJOR SUBDIVISION 3 MINOR SUBDlVlSlOtJ I hereby certify that I am authorized to act for this agency in matters pertaining to the disposition of its records and that the records roposed for disposal on the attached 38 page(s) are not noJv needed for the business of t h ~ s agency or wi f not be needed after the retention erlods s ecified; and that wrritten concurrence from ,4eencies, P P the General A c c o u ~ t ~ n g Offlce, u n d e r the p r o v ~ s i o n s o Title 8 o the G A O M a n u a l for Guidance of Federal L t A V E BLANK (NARA use only) 'JOB NUMBER h / / - 4 3 C t ~ 7 6 -- 3 - DATE Z - 2 3 - 7 6 NOTIFICATIONTO AGENCY

77

FAQS Job Task Analyses - Weapons Quality Assurance Community  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NA-121.3 Weapons Quality Assurance Community NA-121.3 Weapons Quality Assurance Community Consolidated JOB/TASK Analysis 12/2011 Job Analysis Worksheet for Tasks WQA Specialist Task Source Import. Freq. #1 Monitors, inspects, analyzes and investigates complex electrical, electronic, mechanical, electro-mechanical, and nuclear components, subassemblies, and assemblies associated with the manufacture of nuclear weapons and other non-nuclear components as applicable QC-1, WQAPM, DesgnDefn 4 3 #2 Conducts Quality Assurance Surveys (including Product Acceptance) and oversight activities of contractor operations QC-1, WQAPM 5 2 #3 Performs verification inspection (including Contractor Acceptance Verification) of product manufactured by NNSA Contractors, QAIP development, QADRs, nonconformance activities/requirements

78

Hanford Activity Report for Specific Administrative Controls with EM at ORP, December 6-10, 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Activity Report on its Participation in a Review of Selected Aspects of Nuclear Safety at the Hanford Site Tank Farms, December 6-10, 2010 The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security, participated in an Office of Environmental Management Office of Standards and Quality Assurance, EM-23, review of Specific Administrative Controls (SAC). The EM-23 review included selected Office of River Protection programs at the Hanford Site. During the review, Independent Oversight personnel reviewed a few of the SACs applicable to the Tank Farms, which are under the auspices of the Office of River Protection. The results of the review

79

Administrator - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

www.eia.gov Adam Sieminski Administrator Biography Adam Sieminski was sworn in on June 4, 2012, as the eighth administrator of the U.S. Energy Information ...

80

Nuclear Weapons Complex reconfiguration study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shortly after assuming duties as Secretary of Energy, I reviewed the Nuclear Weapons Complex Modernization Report'' submitted to the Congress in January 1989 as required by the National Defense Authorization Act of 1988 and 1989. My review showed that several of the report's assumptions needed to be re-evaluated. During this eighteen-month review, dramatic world changes forced further reassessments of the future Nuclear Weapons Complex. These changes are reflected in the new report. The new report presents a plan to achieve a reconfigured complex, called Complex-21. Complex-21 would be smaller, less diverse, and less expensive to operated than the Complex of today. Complex-21 would be able to safely and reliability support nuclear deterrent stockpile objectives set forth by the President and funded by the Congress. It would be consistent with realities of the emerging international security environment and flexible enough to accommodate the likely range of deterrent contingencies. In addition, Complex-21 would be constructed and operated to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local laws, regulations, and orders. Achieving Complex-21 will require significant resources. This report provides and organized approach toward selecting the most appropriate configuration for Complex-21, satisfying environmental requirements, and minimizing costs. The alternative -- to continue to use piecemeal fixes to run an antiquated complex -- will be more expensive and provide a less reliable Nuclear Weapons Complex. As a consequence, implementation of the Complex-21 plan is considered necessary to ensure continued viability of our nuclear deterrent.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administrator weapons activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

President Obama Calls for an End to Nuclear Weapons | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Calls for an End to Nuclear Weapons | National Nuclear Calls for an End to Nuclear Weapons | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > President Obama Calls for an End to ... President Obama Calls for an End to Nuclear Weapons April 05, 2009 Prague, Czech Republic President Obama Calls for an End to Nuclear Weapons

82

Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering...

83

National Nuclear Security Administration Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2011 - 1, 2011 - Page 1 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Denver, Colorado May 11, 2011 Ahmad Al-Daouk Manager, National Security Department (NSD) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Service Center - Albuquerque, NM May 11, 2011 - Page 2 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF) * Introduction * NNSA Certifying Official Role * Offsite Source Recovery Project * Waste Shipments * Nuclear Materials Management Planning * Summary May 11, 2011 - Page 3 NNSA Plays a Critical Role: Ensuring our Nation's Security * Maintaining the safety, security and effectiveness of the nuclear weapons stockpile without nuclear testing * Reducing the global danger from the proliferation of nuclear weapons and materials * Provide safe and effective nuclear propulsion for the

84

Weapons Dismantlement and Disposition NNSS Capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has tasked the WDD working group to disposition the large inventory of legacy classified weapon components scattered across the complex.

Pat Arnold

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

FAQS Reference Guide Weapon Quality Assurance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the August 2008 edition of DOE-STD-1025-2008, Weapon Quality Assurance Functional Area Qualification Standard.

86

Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Uranium Weapons Components Successfully...

87

The physicists and the politicians: The pursuit of the international control of atomic weapons, 1943-1946  

SciTech Connect

This study examines the activities of those individuals in the US who advocated a particular approach to the international control of atomic weapons in the first years of the atomic age. These individuals - primarily, though not exclusively, Manhattan Project scientists and administrators - believed that peace in the atomic age could best be ensured through a system of international control based on the free interchange of scientific information. This belief in the need for free international scientific interchange made their approach unique. Many of the leading advocates of this approach held positions high in the Manhattan Project hierarchy, and therefore played a role in the formulation of US atomic weapons policy. The active public lobbying by the postwar political organizations of Manhattan Project scientists put this approach before Congress and the American people soon after Hiroshima. Despite these activities, the idea of international control based on free scientific interchange was not accepted by certain key US policy-makers. US policy during this era was moving towards an effort to maintain the American atomic monopoly as a hedge against possible Soviet expansion in Europe and the Mediterranean.

Graig, I.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Nuclear weapons, nuclear effects, nuclear war  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a brief and mostly non-technical description of the militarily important features of nuclear weapons, of the physical phenomena associated with individual explosions, and of the expected or possible results of the use of many weapons in a nuclear war. Most emphasis is on the effects of so-called ``strategic exchanges.``

Bing, G.F.

1991-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

89

January 3, 2007 National Nuclear Security AdministrationNational Nuclear Security Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

January 3, 2007 National Nuclear Security AdministrationNational Nuclear Security Administration & Objectives Reduce the threat to national security posed by nuclear weapons proliferation/detonation or the illicit trafficking of nuclear materials through the development of new and novel technology. Mission

Learned, John

90

Philippine Bases and U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BASES AN-fJ U.S. NUCLEAR WEAPONS POLICY In 1947, when Unitedcould bring as many nuclear weapons as It wanted onto theinclude opposition to U.S. nuclear weapons and bases In the

Schirmer, Daniel Boone

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

What do we do with Nuclear Weapons Now?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1990 What Do We Do with Nuclear Weapons Now? by Michael M.for the Future of U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy MICHAEL M. MAYan electoral majority in nuclear weapons states. Unlike

May, Michael M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Office of Secure Transportation Activities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Activities Our Mission To provide safe and secure ground and air transportation of nuclear weapons, nuclear weapons components, and special nuclear materials and conduct...

93

DOE's Former Rocky Flats Weapons Production Site to Become National...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Former Rocky Flats Weapons Production Site to Become National Wildlife Refuge DOE's Former Rocky Flats Weapons Production Site to Become National Wildlife Refuge July 12, 2007 -...

94

Robert C. Seamans, Jr. Appointed to Lead Nuclear Weapons Program...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

... Robert C. Seamans, Jr. Appointed to Lead Nuclear Weapons Program January 19, 1975 Washington, DC Robert C. Seamans, Jr. Appointed to Lead Nuclear Weapons Program The Energy...

95

EIS-0218: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

18: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel EIS-0218: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning...

96

Human factoring administrative procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In nonnuclear business, administrative procedures bring to mind such mundane topics as filing correspondence and scheduling vacation time. In the nuclear industry, on the other hand, administrative procedures play a vital role in assuring the safe operation of a facility. For some time now, industry focus has been on improving technical procedures. Significant efforts are under way to produce technical procedure requires that a validated technical, regulatory, and administrative basis be developed and that the technical process be established for each procedure. Producing usable technical procedures requires that procedure presentation be engineered to the same human factors principles used in control room design. The vital safety role of administrative procedures requires that they be just as sound, just a rigorously formulated, and documented as technical procedures. Procedure programs at the Tennessee Valley Authority and at Boston Edison's Pilgrim Station demonstrate that human factors engineering techniques can be applied effectively to technical procedures. With a few modifications, those same techniques can be used to produce more effective administrative procedures. Efforts are under way at the US Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex and at some utilities (Boston Edison, for instance) to apply human factors engineering to administrative procedures: The techniques being adapted include the following.

Grider, D.A.; Sturdivant, M.H.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 16:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 16: ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGEMENT RECORDS June 2007 Revision 1 This schedule covers those administrative management activities not covered by other Administrative Schedules. Included are disposable records created in the course of organizational planning, development, and simplification of procedures; records management activities; and administration of management improvement programs. See ADM 1 (items 12 and 13) for the disposition of case files on individuals involved in incentive award and similar types of management improvement programs. The organizational locations and titles of administrative management units vary. They may be scattered at numerous levels or locations, or may be centralized. For the purposes

98

Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nonproliferation Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation Nonproliferation One of the gravest threats the United States and the international community face is the possibility that terrorists or rogue nations will acquire nuclear weapons or other weapons of mass destruction (WMD). NNSA,

99

ABSTRACT: Zirconia Ceramics for Excess Weapons ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 26, 2007 ... A zirconia (ZrO sub(2))-based single-phase ceramic containing simulated excess weapons plutonium waste. ZrO sub(2) has large solubility for...

100

Nuclear power and nuclear-weapons proliferation  

SciTech Connect

The danger that fissile isotopes may be diverted from nuclear power production to the construction of nuclear weapons would be aggravated by a switch to the plutonium breeder: but future uranium supplies are uncertain.

Moniz, E.J.; Neff, T.L.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administrator weapons activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

AEC and control of nuclear weapons  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

control of nuclear weapons The Atomic Energy Commission took control of the atomic energy project known originally as the Manhattan Project on January 1, 1947. This shift from the...

102

EGS 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enforcement Guidance Supplement Enforcement Guidance Supplement EGS:01-01 Appendix E-Operational Procedures for Enforcement Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 October 15, 2001 MEMORANDUM FOR: DOE PAAA COORDINATORS CONTRACTOR PAAA COORDINATORS FROM: R. KEITH CHRISTOPHER DIRECTOR OFFICE OF ENFORCEMENT AND INVESTIGATION SUBJECT: Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for Enforcement, published in June 1998, provides the opportunity for the Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) to periodically issue clarifying guidance regarding the processes used in its enforcement activities. This enforcement guidance focuses on the applicability of 10 CFR Part 830 to nuclear weapon programs and several related enforcement issues.

103

Crystalline ceramics: Waste forms for the disposal of weapons plutonium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At present, there are three seriously considered options for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium: (i) incorporation, partial burn-up and direct disposal of MOX-fuel; (ii) vitrification with defense waste and disposal as glass ``logs``; (iii) deep borehole disposal (National Academy of Sciences Report, 1994). The first two options provide a safeguard due to the high activity of fission products in the irradiated fuel and the defense waste. The latter option has only been examined in a preliminary manner, and the exact form of the plutonium has not been identified. In this paper, we review the potential for the immobilization of plutonium in highly durable crystalline ceramics apatite, pyrochlore, monazite and zircon. Based on available data, we propose zircon as the preferred crystalline ceramic for the permanent disposition of excess weapons plutonium.

Ewing, R.C.; Lutze, W. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Robert C. Seamans, Jr. Appointed to Lead Nuclear Weapons Program | National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C. Seamans, Jr. Appointed to Lead Nuclear Weapons Program | National C. Seamans, Jr. Appointed to Lead Nuclear Weapons Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Robert C. Seamans, Jr. Appointed to Lead ... Robert C. Seamans, Jr. Appointed to Lead Nuclear Weapons Program January 19, 1975

105

AIR FORCE SPECIAL WEAPONS CENTER  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

HEADQUARTERS aII?y HEADQUARTERS aII?y 9 AIR FORCE SPECIAL WEAPONS CENTER 1 AIR FORCE SYSTEMS COMMAND . - KlRTlAND AIR FORCE BASE, NEW MEXICO - k FINAL REPORT O N AIR FORCE PARTICIPATION PROJECT RULISON .1 O c t o b e r 1969 P r e p a r e d by : CONT INENTAL TEST D I V I S ION DIRECTORATE OF NUCLEAR FIELD OPERATIONS This page intentionally left blank INDEX AIR FORCE PARTICIPATION I N PROJECT RULISON FINAL REPORT PARAGRAPH BASIC REPORT SUBJECT R e f e r e n c e s PAGE 2 G e n e r a l 1 3 P l a n n i n g 3 4 Command a n d C o n t r o l 5 O p e r a t i o n s , G r a n d ' J u n c t i o n M u n i c i p a l A i r p o r t . . ' A i r O p e r a t i o n s C e n t e r , He1 i c o p t e r P a d / ' 7.. - . M a t e r i e l : ' 8 M e d i c a l 1 9 R a d - S a f e C r a s h - R e s c u e S e c u r i t y 2 1 C o m m u n i c a t i o n s ~ d m i n i s t r a t ' i o n Summary ATTACHMENTS ATTACHMENT SUBJECI' 1 F r a g O r d e r 69-1 ( ~ r o j ' e c t RULISON) , AFSWC D

106

Implementing the chemical weapons convention  

SciTech Connect

In 1993, as the CWC ratification process was beginning, concerns arose that the complexity of integrating the CWC with national law could cause each nation to implement the Convention without regard to what other nations were doing, thereby causing inconsistencies among States as to how the CWC would be carried out. As a result, the author's colleagues and the author prepared the Manual for National Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention and presented it to each national delegation at the December 1993 meeting of the Preparatory Commission in The Hague. During its preparation, the Committee of CWC Legal Experts, a group of distinguished international jurists, law professors, legally-trained diplomats, government officials, and Parliamentarians from every region of the world, including Central Europe, reviewed the Manual. In February 1998, they finished the second edition of the Manual in order to update it in light of developments since the CWC entered into force on 29 April 1997. The Manual tries to increase understanding of the Convention by identifying its obligations and suggesting methods of meeting them. Education about CWC obligations and available alternatives to comply with these requirements can facilitate national response that are consistent among States Parties. Thus, the Manual offers options that can strengthen international realization of the Convention's goals if States Parties act compatibly in implementing them. Equally important, it is intended to build confidence that the legal issues raised by the Convention are finite and addressable. They are now nearing competition of an internet version of this document so that interested persons can access it electronically and can view the full text of all of the national implementing legislation it cites. The internet address, or URL, for the internet version of the Manual is http: //www.cwc.ard.gov. This paper draws from the Manual. It comparatively addresses approximately thirty implementing issues, showing how various States Parties have enacted measures that are responsive to CWC obligations. It is intended to highlight the issues that States Parties must address and to identify trends among States Parties that might be useful to States that have not yet made crucial decisions as to how to resolve key matters. At various points in the text, country names are listed in parenthesis to identify pieces of national legislation that demonstrate the point in the text. It should not be inferred that nations not listed have not addressed the point or have taken a different position. In some cases, a nation's position is explained in somewhat more depth to give specific detail to an assertion in the text. Attached to this paper is a chart which illustrates how States Parties in the Central European region as well as the United States respond to the issues raised. Obviously, in preparing such a chart, many subtle provisions in national legislation must be simplified. The point of the chart is to portray, on a few pages, the major trends of legislation.

Kellman, B.; Tanzman, E. A.

1999-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

107

Y-12, the Cold War, and nuclear weapons dismantlement ? Or:...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Cold War, and nuclear weapons dismantlement - Or: The Cold War and nuclear weapons dismantlement (title used in The Oak Ridger) The Cold War heated up over the years with such...

108

Interdicting a Nuclear-Weapons Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A proliferator seeks to complete a first small batch of fission weapons as quickly as possible, whereas an interdictor wishes to delay that completion for as long as possible. We develop and solve a max-min model that identifies ... Keywords: CPM, defense, foreign policy, government, integer, linear, military, programming, project management, targeting

Gerald G. Brown; W. Matthew Carlyle; Robert C. Harney; Eric M. Skroch; R. Kevin Wood

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

"Pipeline army": a Russian geopolitical weapon?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Huge potential of natural resources, including oil, has determined that the Russian Federation (by reserves, production and export) to occupy a dominant position in the global energy economy. Following the implosion of communism and the difficult economic ... Keywords: "geopolitical weapon", energy resources, oil, regions, russia

Teodor Simion; Gica Pehoiu; ?tefan Ispas; Ovidiu Mur?rescu

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

The history of nuclear weapon safety devices  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents the history of safety devices used in nuclear weapons from the early days of separables to the latest advancements in MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). Although the paper focuses on devices, the principles of Enhanced Nuclear Detonation Safety implementation will also be presented.

Plummer, D.W.; Greenwood, W.H.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Recovery from a chemical weapons accident or incident: A concept paper on planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emergency planning for an unintended release of chemical agent from the nation`s chemical weapons stockpile should include preparation for. the period following implementation of immediate emergency response. That period -- the recovery, reentry, and restoration stage -- is the subject of this report. The report provides an overview of the role of recovery, reentry, and restoration planning in the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP), describes the transition from immediate emergency response to restoration, and analyzes the legal framework that would govern restoration activities. Social, economic, and administrative issues, as well as technical ones, need to be considered in the planning effort. Because of possible jurisdictional conflicts, appropriate federal, state, and local agencies need to be included in a coordinated planning process. Advance consideration should be given to the pertinent federal and state statutes and regulations. On the federal level, the principal statutes and regulations to be considered are those associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act; the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act; and the National Environmental Policy Act. This report recommends that extensive preaccident planning be undertaken for the recovery, reentry, and restoration stage and outlines several key issues that should be considered in that planning. The need for interagency cooperation and coordination at all levels of the planning process is emphasized.

Herzenberg, C.L.; Haffenden, R.; Lerner, K.; Meleski, S.A.; Tanzman, E.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Lewis, L.M. [US Dept. of Agriculture (United States); Hemphill, R.C. [Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation (United States); Adams, J.D. [US Environmental Protection Agency (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Improving weapons of mass destruction intelligence Arnold Kanter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

weapons developments in Pakistan are primarily, if not exclusively, influenced by nuclear developments of nuclear capability by sub-national states and the security of WMD weapons, materials, and technology so for the foreseeable future. WMD includes nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons, but also

Deutch, John

113

Site map | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

map | National Nuclear Security Administration map | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Site map Site map Front page Front page of National Nuclear Security Administration NNSA Site Navigation Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Stockpile Stewardship Program Quarterly Experiments Dismantlement and Disposition Weapons NPT Compliance

114

FAQS Qualification Card - Weapon Quality Assurance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Weapon Quality Assurance Weapon Quality Assurance FAQS Qualification Card - Weapon Quality Assurance A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-WeaponQualityAssurance.docx Description Weapon Quality Assurance Qualification Card More Documents & Publications DOE-STD-1025-2008

115

Effects of nuclear weapons. Third edition  

SciTech Connect

Since the last edition of ''The Effects of Nuclear Weapons'' in 1962 much new information has become available concerning nuclear weapon effects. This has come in part from the series of atmospheric tests, including several at very high altitudes, conducted in the Pacific Ocean area in 1962. In addition, laboratory studies, theoretical calculations, and computer simulations have provided a better understanding of the various effects. A new chapter has been added on the electromagnetic pulse. The chapter titles are as follows: general principles of nuclear explosions; descriptions of nuclear explosions; air blast phenomena in air and surface bursts; air blast loading; structural damage from air blast; shock effects of surface and subsurface bursts; thermal radiation and its effects; initial nuclear radiation; residual nuclear radiation and fallout; radio and radar effects; the electromagnetic pulse and its effects; and biological effects. (LTN)

Glasstone, S.; Dolan, P.J.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Weapons test seismic investigations at Yucca Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain, located on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site, is being characterized as part of an ongoing effort to identify a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. This site will be subjected to seismic ground motions induced by underground nuclear explosions. A knowledge of expected ground motion levels from these tests will enable the designers to provide for the necessary structural support in the designs of the various components of the repository. The primary objective of the Weapons Test Seismic Investigation project is to develop a method to predict the ground motions expected at the repository site as a result of future weapons tests. This paper summarizes the data base presently assembled for the Yucca Mountain Project, characteristics of expected ground motions, and characterization of the two-dimensional seismic properties along paths between Yucca Mountain and the testing areas of the Nevada Test Site.

Phillips, J.S.; Shephard, L.E.; Walck, M.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Defense programs: A Sandia weapon review bulletin  

SciTech Connect

Sandia`s mission to explore technology that enhances US nuclear weapons capabilities has been the primary impetus for the development of a class of inertial measurement units not available commercially. The newest member of the family is the Ring Laser Gyro Assembly. The product of a five-year joint effort by Sandia and Honeywell`s Space and Strategic Systems Operation, the RLGA is a small, one-nautical-mile-per-hour-class inertial measurement unit that consumes only 16 watts - attributes that are important to a guidance and control capability for new or existing weapons. These same attributes led the Central Inertial Guidance Test Facility at Holloman Air Force Base to select the RLGA for their newest test instrumentation pod. The RLGA sensor assembly is composed of three Honeywell ring laser gyroscopes and three Sundstrand Data Control accelerometers that are selected from three types according to the user`s acceleration range and accuracy needs.

Floyd, H.L.; Goetsch, B.; Doran, L. [eds.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

The US nuclear weapon infrastructure and a stable global nuclear weapon regime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

US nuclear weapons capabilities -- extant force structure and nuclear weapons infrastructure as well as declared policy -- influence other nations' nuclear weapons postures, at least to some extent. This influence can be desirable or undesirable, and is, of course, a mixture of both. How strong the influence is, and its nature, are complicated, controversial, and -- in our view -- not well understood but often overstated. Divergent views about this influence and how it might shape the future global nuclear weapons regime seem to us to be the most serious impediment to reaching a national consensus on US weapons policy, force structure and supporting infrastructure. We believe that a paradigm shift to capability-based deterrence and dissuasion is not only consistent with the realities of the world and how it has changed, but also a desirable way for nuclear weapon postures and infrastructures to evolve. The US and other nuclear states could not get to zero nor even reduce nuclear arms and the nuclear profile much further without learning to manage latent capability. This paper has defined three principles for designing NW infrastructure both at the 'next plateau' and 'near zero.' The US can be a leader in reducing weapons and infrastructure and in creating an international regime in which capability gradually substitutes for weapons in being and is transparent. The current 'strategy' of not having policy or a Congressionally-approved plan for transforming the weapons complex is not leadership. If we can conform the US infrastructure to the next plateau and architect it in such a way that it is aligned with further arms reductions, it will have these benefits: The extant stockpile can be reduced in size, while the smaller stockpile still deters attack on the US and Allies. The capabilities of the infrastructure will dissuade emergence of new challenges/threats; if they emerge, nevertheless, the US will be able to deal with them in time. We will begin to transform the way other major powers view their nuclear capability. Finally, and though of less cosmic importance, it will save money in the long run.

Immele, John D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wagner, Richard L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

List of Major Information Systems,National Nuclear Security Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

List of Major Information Systems,National Nuclear Security List of Major Information Systems,National Nuclear Security Administration ADaPT Networked: List of Major Information Systems,National Nuclear Security Administration ADaPT Networked: List of Major Information Systems, Defense Line of Business National Nuclear Security Administration ADaPT Networked: Develops and deploys emerging information networking technology to production processes in support of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile. National Nuclear Security Administration ADaPT Network Infrastructure: Develops and deploys emerging information networking technology to production processes in support of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile. .major_information_systems.pdf List of Major Information Systems,National Nuclear Security Administration ADaPT Networked:

120

DOE's Nuclear Weapons Complex: Challenges to Safety, Security, and Taxpayer Stewardship  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oversight and Investigations Oversight and Investigations Committee on Energy and Commerce U.S. House of Representatives "DOE's Nuclear Weapons Complex: Challenges to Safety, Security, and Taxpayer Stewardship" FOR RELEASE ON DELIVERY 10:00 AM September 12, 2012 1 Mr. Chairman and Members of the Subcommittee, I am pleased to be here at your request to testify on matters relating to the Department of Energy's oversight of the nuclear weapons complex. 1 The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) was established under the National Defense Authorization Act of 2000 as a separately organized agency within the Department of Energy. This action was intended to allow NNSA to concentrate on its defense-related mission, free from other Departmental operations. Its creation was, in large measure, a reaction to highly

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121

Development of the nuclear weapons complex EP architecture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Weapons Guidance Team is an interagency committee led by Earl Whiteman, DOE that chartered the generation of EP40100, Concurrent Qualification and its successor EP401099, Concurrent Engineering and Qualification. As this new philosophy of concurrent operations has evolved and as implementation has been initiated, conflicts and insufficiencies in the remaining Engineering Procedures (EPs) have become more apparent. At the Guidance Team meeting in November 1995, this issue was explored and several approaches were considered. It was concluded at this meeting, that a smaller set of interagency EPs described in a hierarchical system could provide the necessary interagency direction to support complex-wide implementation. This set consolidates many existing EP processes where consistency and commonality are critical to success of the extended enterprise. The Guidance Team subsequently chartered an interagency team to initiate development activity associated with the envisioned new EP set. This team had participation from seven Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) sites as well as DOE/AL and DP-14 (team members are acknowledged later in this report). Per the Guidance Team, this team, referred to as the Architecture Subcommittee, was to map out and define an EP Architecture for the interagency EPs, make recommendations regarding a more agile process for EP approval and suggest an aggressive timeline to develop the combined EPs. The Architecture Subcommittee was asked to brief their output at the February Guidance Team meeting. This SAND report documents the results of the Architecture Subcommittee`s recommendations.

Murray, C.; Halbleib, L.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

The Need for a Strong Science and Technology Program in the Nuclear Weapons Complex for the 21st Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper I argue for the need for a strong Science and Technology program in the Nuclear Weapons Complex as the basis for maintaining a credible deterrence capability. The current Nuclear Posture Review establishes a New Triad as the basis for the United States deterrence strategy in a changing security environment. A predictive science capability is at the core of a credible National Nuclear Weapons program in the 21st Century. In absence of nuclear testing, the certification of our current Nuclear Weapons relies on predictive simulations and quantification of the associated simulation uncertainties. In addition, a robust nuclear infrastructure needs an active research and development program that considers all the required nuclear scenarios, including new configurations for which there is no nuclear test data. This paper also considers alternative positions to the need for a Science and Technology program in the Nuclear Weapons complex.

Garaizar, X

2010-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

123

Chemistry Department Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Administration Administration A. Harris, Chair (631) 344-4301 alexh@bnl.gov G. Hall, Deputy Chair (631) 344-4376 gehall@bnl.gov S. McAlary, Deputy BES Manager (631) 344-4305 mcalary2@bnl.gov J. Petterson, Senior Administrative Assistant (631) 344-4302 jpetter@bnl.gov Administrative Support Includes budgeting, procurement activities, foreign/domestic travel, seminars and general administrative concerns. Guest Appointments and Personnel matters should be referred to the Department's Senior Administrative Assistant. L. Sallustio (631) 344-4303 lsallust@bnl.gov Building and Stockroom Maintain the Chemistry Department stockroom and provide technical and building support to the staff. Information on the BNL Chemical Management Inventory system is available through the stockroom. Click here to view

124

Audit Report on "Management Controls over the Department's Excess Weapons Inventories and Selected Sensitive Equipment used by Protective Forces"  

SciTech Connect

Since September 11, 2001, the Department of Energy has, on several occasions, revised its security posture based on identified threats and adversaries. These revisions in security posture have driven Departmental sites to upgrade their defensive and tactical equipment. Subsequent changes in the perceived threats have, in some cases, led to a reduction in the need for certain types of weapons, thus creating a pool of surplus equipment. These surplus weapons could potentially be used by other Department sites and Federal law enforcement agencies. Recent Office of Inspector General reports have raised concerns with the adequacy of controls related to defensive and tactical equipment. For example, our report on Management Controls Over Defense Related High Risk Property (OAS-M-08-06, April 2008) found that administrative controls over certain defense related high risk property were not sufficient for providing accountability over these items. Because of prior reported weaknesses in controls over defensive and tactical equipment, we initiated this audit to determine whether the Department and its contractors were properly managing excess weapons inventories and selected sensitive equipment used by protective forces. Our review disclosed that the Department was not always properly managing its inventories of excess weapons and selected sensitive equipment. We identified issues with the retention of unneeded weapons at many locations and with the identification and tracking of sensitive items. More specifically: Sites maintained large inventories of weapons that were no longer needed but had not been made available for use by either other Departmental sites or other Federal law enforcement agencies. For instance, at six of the locations included in our review we identified a total of 2,635 unneeded weapons with a total acquisition value of over $2.8 million that had not been officially declared as excess - an action that would have made them available for others to use. In addition; Sites were not always identifying, tracking and properly disposing of potentially high risk and sensitive equipment. In particular, we identified control weaknesses in this area related to weapons sights and scopes. These issues occurred because the Department did not have processes in place to properly manage excess inventories of weapons. In particular, the Department does not have requirements for ensuring timely declaration of excess weapons. Additionally, certain sites indicated that they were unwilling to give up excess weapons because of the possibility that they may be needed in the future. However, other sites had a need for some of these weapons and could have avoided purchasing them had they been made available through the excess screening process. Also, we found that the Department lacks clear guidance on the identification of high risk/sensitive equipment. Except for immaterial differences, we were able to locate and verify accountability over the items of defensive and tactical equipment we selected for review. Specifically, we took statistical samples of weapons, ammunition, and other related equipment and were able to verify their existence. While these accountability measures were noteworthy, additional action is necessary to strengthen controls over weapon and sensitive equipment management. Untimely declaration of excess weapons may result in an inefficient use of scarce Government resources. Similarly, if selected high risk/sensitive equipment is not properly categorized and tracked, accountability issues may occur. To address these issues, we made recommendations aimed at improving the management of these categories of defensive and tactical equipment.

None

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

EA-1137: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

137: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support 137: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri EA-1137: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to renovate an existing building at the U.S. Department of Energy Kansas City Plant to accommodate equipment, security and environmental controls, and building restoration upon project completion, including disposal of equipment and wastes. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD December 21, 1995 EA-1137: Finding of No Significant Impact Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for the Kansas

126

National Day of Remembrance HSS Honors Former Nuclear Weapons...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workers National Day of Remembrance HSS Honors Former Nuclear Weapons Program Workers Third Radiation Effects Research Foundation Board of Councilors Meeting Held in Hiroshima...

127

EGS 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Act of 1988. The following case examples are provided to help illustrate how PAAA NTS reporting interfaces with nuclear weapon program NCR processes: Example 1: A reservoir...

128

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01, Nuclear Weapon Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Act of 1988. The following case examples are provided to help illustrate how PAAA NTS reporting interfaces with nuclear weapon program NCR processes: Example 1: A reservoir...

129

Sandia Weapon Intern Program visits KCP | National Nuclear Security...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Participants in Sandia's Weapon Intern Program recently visited and toured NNSA's Kansas City Plant. The program, established in 1998, was created to meet Sandia's changing mission...

130

Strategies for denaturing the weapons-grade plutonium stockpile  

SciTech Connect

In the next few years, approximately 50 metric tons of weapons-grade plutonium and 150 metric tons of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) may be removed from nuclear weapons in the US and declared excess. These materials represent a significant energy resource that could substantially contribute to our national energy requirements. HEU can be used as fuel in naval reactors, or diluted with depleted uranium for use as fuel in commercial reactors. This paper proposes to use the weapons-grade plutonium as fuel in light water reactors. The first such reactor would demonstrate the dual objectives of producing electrical power and denaturing the plutonium to prevent use in nuclear weapons.

Buckner, M.R.; Parks, P.B.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

DOE O 452.8, Control of Nuclear Weapon Data  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The directive establishes the policy, process and procedures for control of nuclear weapon data to ensure that dissemination of the information is restricted ...

2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

132

Nuclear Weapons Proliferation and the Civilian Nuclear Fuel Cycle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Sciences October 12-14, 2011, Northwestern University Evanston, Illinois Nuclear Weapons Proliferation and the Civilian Nuclear Fuel Cycle: Understanding and Reducing...

133

DOE's Nuclear Weapons Complex: Challenges to Safety, Security...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Investigations Committee on Energy and Commerce U.S. House of Representatives "DOE's Nuclear Weapons Complex: Challenges to Safety, Security, and Taxpayer Stewardship" FOR...

134

Audit Report on "The National Nuclear Security Administration's B61 Spin  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report on "The National Nuclear Security Administration's B61 Report on "The National Nuclear Security Administration's B61 Spin Rocket Motor Project," DOE/IG-0740 Audit Report on "The National Nuclear Security Administration's B61 Spin Rocket Motor Project," DOE/IG-0740 The Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories are refurbishing the Spin Rocket Motor, a prime component of the B61 nuclear weapon system. Both the original motor produced in i966 and the version last produced in 1991 are the subjects of the refurbishment. Both motors, which are essentially identical, produce thrust to arm the weapon. In December 2001, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) received Nuclear Weapons Council Standing and Safety Committee (NWCSSC) approval to study the feasibility and cost of replacement options In April 2003, the NWCSSC

135

Constraining potential nuclear-weapons proliferation from civilian reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cessation of the Cold War and renewed international attention to the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction are leading to national policies aimed at restraining nuclear-weapons proliferation that could occur through the nuclear-fuel cycle. Argonne, which has unique experience, technology, and capabilities, is one of the US national laboratories contributing to this nonproliferation effort.

Travelli, A.; Gaines, L.L.; Minkov, V.; Olson, A.P.; Snelgrove, J.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Nuclear weapons issues in South Asia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses how the US can play a productive mediating role in South Asia by engaging India and Pakistan in an international forum to manage nuclear weapons, as Edward Teller advocated. India and Pakistan have developed their nuclear capabilities because they fear their neighbors, not because they want to threaten fear their neighbors, not because they want to threaten the US. The appropriate response for the US, therefore, is diplomatic engagement and negotiations. In addition to the international approach, encouragement and facilitation of regional and bilateral interactions will also be important. Formal arms control agreements have been reached, but less formal confidence-building measures, and unilateral security pledges may well be combined to form a more secure strategic environment in South Asia than a nuclear armed confrontation across the porous South Asian border.

Joeck, N.

1993-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

137

The future of the Non-Proliferation Treaty and U.S. nuclear weapons policy .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis addresses the viability of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons NPT for short in light of U.S. nuclear weapons (more)

Claussen, Bjrn Ragnar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Dose reduction through automation of nuclear weapons dismantlement and storage procedures at the Department of Energy`s Pantex Facility  

SciTech Connect

With the end of the Cold War and the subsequent break up of the Soviet Union, the number of weapons in the nuclear stockpile now greatly exceeds any foreseeable future need. To compensate for this excess an estimated 20,000 nuclear warheads have been earmarked for dismantlement and storage at the Department of Energy`s Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. It is anticipated that the majority of these warheads will arrive at the Pantex facility by the year 2000. At that time, it is estimated that current dismantlement and inventory procedures will not be adequate to control worker radiation exposure within administrative and federal dose limits. To control these exposures alternate approaches to dismantlement and inventory must be developed. One attractive approach is to automate as many activities as possible, thus reducing worker exposure. To facilitate automation of dismantlement and storage procedures, current procedures were investigated in terms of collective dose to workers, time to completion, ease of completion, and cost of automation for each task. A cost-benefit comparison was then performed in order to determine which procedures would be most cost-effective to automate.

Thompson, D.A.; Poston, J.W. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Dose reduction through robotics and automation of nuclear weapons dismantlement and storage procedures at the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the end of the Cold War and subsequent break up of the Soviet Union, the number of weapons in the nuclear stockpile now greatly exceeds any foreseeable future need (Quirck et al., 1993). To compensate for this excess, an estimated 20,000 nuclear warheads have been earmarked for dismantlement and storage at the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. It is anticipated that the majority of these warheads will arrive at the Pantex facility by the year 2000. At that time, the cur-rent dismantlement and inventory procedures may not be adequate to control worker radiation exposure within administrative and federal dose limits, To control these exposures, alternate approaches to dismantlement and inventory procedures may need to be developed. One attractive approach is to automate as many activities as possible, thus reducing worker exposure. To facilitate automation of dismantlement and storage procedures, current procedures were investigated in terms of collective dose to workers, time to completion, ease of completion, and cost of automation for each task. Then a cost-benefit comparison was performed to determine which procedures would be most cost-effective to automate.

Thompson, David Andrew

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

EIS-0218: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

18: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy 18: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel EIS-0218: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel SUMMARY This study analyzes the potential environmental impacts of adopting a policy to manage foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel containing uranium enriched in the United States. In particular, the study examines the comparative impacts of several alternative approaches to managing the spent fuel. The analysis demonstrates that the impacts on the environmental, workers and the general public of implementing any of the alternative management approaches would be small and within applicable Federal and state regulator limits. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administrator weapons activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Macroencapsulation Equivalency Guidance for Classified Weapon Components and NNSSWAC Compliance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex has a surplus of classified legacy weapon components generated over the years with no direct path for disposal. The majority of the components have been held for uncertainty of future use or no identified method of sanitization or disposal. As more weapons are retired, there is an increasing need to reduce the amount of components currently in storage or on hold. A process is currently underway to disposition and dispose of the legacy/retired weapons components across the DOE complex.

Poling, J.

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

The National Nuclear Security Administration's B61 Spin Rocket Motor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

cf Energy's Sandia National Laboratories are refurbishing cf Energy's Sandia National Laboratories are refurbishing the Spin Rocket Motor, a 1:rime component of the B61 nuclear weapon system. Both the originai motor produced i2 i906 and the version last produced in 1991 are the subjects of the refurbishment. Rvth motors, which are essentially identical, produce thrust to arm thz weapon. In Deceinber 2001, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) received Nuclear Weapons Council Standing and Safety Committee (NWCSSC) approval to study the feasibility and cost of replacement options. In April 2003, ihe MWCSSC approved the development of a new Spin ~ o c k e t h ~ o tboarse d on Sandia's assei-tiolls that test data collected between 1997 and 2002 showed the motors. due in largc: part to "detrimental aging," were not performing according to specifications.

143

Management & Administration | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management & Administration Management & Administration Management & Administration Management & Administration The Office of Management and Administration directs the development, coordination, and execution of overall OIG management and administrative policy and planning. This responsibility includes directing the OIG's strategic planning process, financial management activities, personnel management and security programs, administrative support services, and information resources programs. In addition, the staff members from this Office represent the Inspector General at hearings, negotiations, and conferences on budget, financial, managerial, and other resource matters. The staff also coordinates activities of the Council of Inspector's General on Integrity and Efficiency. The Office is organized into two

144

Our Mission | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Mission | National Nuclear Security Administration Mission | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Home > Our Mission Our Mission NNSA is responsible for the management and security of the nation's nuclear weapons, nuclear nonproliferation, and naval reactor programs. It also responds to nuclear and radiological emergencies in the United States

145

Microsoft Word - 2011 Pantex Quality Assurance Survey Activity Report _May 2-6, 2011_ final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PTX-2011-05-06 PTX-2011-05-06 Site: Pantex Plant Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Pantex Site Office Quality Assurance Survey Dates of Activity : 05/02/2011 - 05/06/2011 Report Preparer William Macon Activity Description/Purpose: In coordination with the Pantex Site Office (PXSO), the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) site lead participated in a National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)/PXSO Quality Assurance Survey (QAS 1) of the contractor's weapon quality program conducted May 2-5, 2011. Result: The HSS site lead participated in the QAS 1 as a member of the survey team and was responsible for reviewing the following Department of Energy/NNSA Weapon Quality Policy (QC-1) elements: 2.1 Risk-Based Program, 2.2 Quality

146

Source options for nuclear weapons identification system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report briefly presents the advantages and disadvantages of two timed sources of neutrons that can be used with the source-driven noise analysis method: (1) {sup 252}Cf in an ionization chamber and (2) an associated-particle sealed tube neutron generator (APSTNG). These sources can be used with frequency and time analysis methods for nuclear weapons identification, quality assurance in production, special nuclear materials assay, criticality safety, and provision of measured data for verification of neutron and gamma ray transport calculational methods. The advantages of {sup 252}Cf for a nuclear materials identification system are that it is simple, reliable, and small and that all source events are detected. The disadvantages are that it cannot be turned off, leads to small radiation doses in handling, and produces more than one neutron per fission event. The advantages of APSTNG are that it is directional, can be turned off, and has one particle per deuterium-tritium reaction. The disadvantages are that it is large and complicated compared to {sup 252}Cf.

Mihalczo, J.T.; Koehler, P.E.; Valentine, T.E.; Phillips, L.D.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Introduction to Pits and Weapons Systems (U)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Nuclear Explosive Package includes the Primary, Secondary, Radiation Case and related components. This is the part of the weapon that produces nuclear yield and it converts mechanical energy into nuclear energy. The pit is composed of materials that allow mechanical energy to be converted to electromagnetic energy. Fabrication processes used are typical of any metal fabrication facility: casting, forming, machining and welding. Some of the materials used in pits include: Plutonium, Uranium, Stainless Steel, Beryllium, Titanium, and Aluminum. Gloveboxes are used for three reasons: (1) Protect workers and public from easily transported, finely divided plutonium oxides - (a) Plutonium is very reactive and produces very fine particulate oxides, (b) While not the 'Most dangerous material in the world' of Manhattan Project lore, plutonium is hazardous to health of workers if not properly controlled; (2) Protect plutonium from reactive materials - (a) Plutonium is extremely reactive at ambient conditions with several components found in air: oxygen, water, hydrogen, (b) As with most reactive metals, reactions with these materials may be violent and difficult to control, (c) As with most fabricated metal products, corrosion may significantly affect the mechanical, chemical, and physical properties of the product; and (3) Provide shielding from radioactive decay products: {alpha}, {gamma}, and {eta} are commonly associated with plutonium decay, as well as highly radioactive materials such as {sup 241}Am and {sup 238}Pu.

Kautz, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

148

DOE's Former Rocky Flats Weapons Production Site to Become National  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Former Rocky Flats Weapons Production Site to Become National Former Rocky Flats Weapons Production Site to Become National Wildlife Refuge DOE's Former Rocky Flats Weapons Production Site to Become National Wildlife Refuge July 12, 2007 - 2:54pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the transfer of nearly 4,000 acres of its former Rocky Flats nuclear weapons production site to the Department of the Interior's (DOI) U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) for use as a National Wildlife Refuge. After more than a decade of environmental cleanup work, the transfer creates the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge, 16 miles northwest of Denver, Colorado, and marks completion of the regulatory milestones to transform a formerly contaminated site into an environmental asset. "The Department of Energy's environmental cleanup of the Rocky Flats

149

EA-1137: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support 7: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for the Kansas City Plant Kansas City, Missouri EA-1137: Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for the Kansas City Plant Kansas City, Missouri SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to renovate an existing building at the U.S. Department of Energy Kansas City Plant to accommodate equipment, security and environmental controls, and building restoration upon project completion, including disposal of equipment and wastes. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD December 21, 1995 EA-1137: Finding of No Significant Impact Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for the Kansas City Plant Kansas City, Missouri

150

CRAD, Configuration Management - Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Configuration Management - Los Alamos National Laboratory Configuration Management - Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Facility CRAD, Configuration Management - Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Facility April 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for an assessment of the Configuration Management program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Weapons Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Configuration Management - Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, Configuration Management - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST

151

Office of Weapons Material Protection | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

located in closed cities. In some cases, these industrial sites are the size of small cities and contain hundreds of metric tons of highly attractive weapons-usable nuclear...

152

Arms Control: US and International efforts to ban biological weapons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons Convention, the treaty that bans the development, production, and stockpiling and acquisition of biological weapons was opened for signature in 1972 and came into force in 1975 after being ratified by 22 governments, including the depository nations of the USA, the United Kingdom, and the former Soviet Union. In support of the Convention, the USA later established export controls on items used to make biological weapons. Further, in accordance with the 1990 President`s Enhanced Proliferation Control Initiative, actions were taken to redefine and expand US export controls, as well as to encourage multilateral controls through the Australia Group. Thus far, the Convention has not been effective in stopping the development of biological weapons. The principal findings as to the reasons of the failures of the Convention are found to be: the Convention lacks universality, compliance measures are effective, advantage of verification may outweigh disadvantages. Recommendations for mitigating these failures are outlined in this report.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

An assessment of North Korea's nuclear weapons capabilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In February of 2013, North Korea conducted its third nuclear weapons test. Speculations are that this test was conducted to further develop a warhead small enough to fit on an intercontinental ballistic missile. This test ...

Sivels, Ciara (Ciara Brooke)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Fehner and Gosling, Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Test Site, Volume I Terrence R. Fehner and F.G. Gosling. Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951-1963. Battlefield of the Cold War: The Nevada Test Site, Volume I (pdf)....

155

A thousand suns : political motivations for nuclear weapons testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear weapon testing is the final step in the nuclear development process, an announcement of ability and strength. The consequences of a nuclear test are far from easy to bear, however: economic sanctions can be crippling ...

Raas, Whitney

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Briefing, Classification of Nuclear Weapons-Related Information- June 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This brief will familiarize individuals from agencies outside of DOE who may come in contact with RD and FRD with the procedures for identifying, classifying, marking, handling, and declassifying documents containing Nuclear Weapons-Related Information.

157

Paradigms of Development and Employment of Weapon Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Weapons procurement decisions are extremely complex, with an unmanageable quantity of variables to take into account. The human brain, unable to process such a complex problem in a strictly rational way, seeks mechanisms ...

Gillespie, Daniel M.

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

158

Data.gov Administrator | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data.gov Administrator Primary tabs View Track(active tab) Type Title Author Replies Last updated Community Consumer Data.gov Administrator 0 2 months 2 weeks ago Forum topic...

159

Phase 6.X Process | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Phase 6.X Process | National Nuclear Security Administration Phase 6.X Process | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Phase 6.X Process Home > Our Mission > Managing the Stockpile > Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle > Phase 6.X Process Phase 6.X Process The Phase 6.x Process is based on the original Joint Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle Process, which includes Phases 1 through 7 and covers all phases of a

160

ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: 3: PROCUREMENT, SUPPLY, AND GRANT RECORDS July 2008 Revision 2 Procurement and supply records document the acquisition of goods and non-personal services, controlling the volume of stock on hand, reporting procurement needs, and related supply matters which are part of daily procurement operations. The basic procurement files reflect a considerable range of procedure, from simple, small purchases to complicated prime contractor and subcontractor operations. Any records created prior to 1895 must first be offered to the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) for appraisal before applying the disposal instructions. Frequently copies of procurement papers become integral parts of other files, such as project files of various types or general subject files pertaining to program operations;

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administrator weapons activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM, DOE O 452.2D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM, DOE O 452.2D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY "To prevent accidents and inadvertent or unauthorized use of U.S. nuclear weapons and nuclear explosives. In conjunction with the Department of Defense (DoD), to protect the public health and safety by providing dual-agency judgment and responsibility for the safety, security, and use control (surety) of nuclear weapons. To establish nuclear explosive surety standards and nuclear weapon design surety requirements. To address surety vulnerabilities during all phases of the nuclear weapon life cycle and to upgrade surety during weapon stockpile refurbishments and/or new weapon

162

Plutonium Pits | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

nuclear weapons without underground nuclear testing; weapons go through a surveillance process, where they are regularly taken apart, examined, and tests run on their components....

163

Statement on Budget Priorities for NNSA Weapons Activities before...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and nuclear security programs around the globe, providing for Navy's nuclear propulsion capabilities, and developing and deploying nuclear counterterrorism and emergency...

164

Statement on Budget Priorities for NNSA Weapons Activities before...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering...

165

Record of decision for the Storage and Disposition of Weapons- Usable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

14 14 Federal Register / Vol. 62, No. 13 / Tuesday, January 21, 1997 / Notices Responses: 18,620 Burden Hours: 64,310. Abstract: The LESCP is being conducted in response to the legislative requirement in P.L. 103-382, Section 1501 to assess the implementation of Title I and related education reforms. The information will be used to examine changes-over a 3-year period-that are occurring in schools and classrooms. Teachers and teacher aides will complete a mail survey, and district Title I administrators, principals, school-based staff, and parents will be interviewed during on- site field work. [FR Doc. 97-1307 Filed 1-17-97; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4000-01-P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Record of decision for the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic

166

CONVERSION OF RUSSIAN WEAPON-GRADE PLUTONIUM INTO OXIDE FOR MIXED OXIDE (MOX) FUEL FABRICATION.  

SciTech Connect

Progress has been made in the Russian Federation towards the conversion of weapons-grade plutonium (w-Pu) into plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) suitable for further manufacture into mixed oxide (MOX) fuels. This program is funded both by French Commissariat x 1'Energie Atomique (CEA) and the US National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The French program was started as a way to make available their expertise gained from manufacturing MOX fuel. The US program was started in 1998 in response to US proliferation concerns and the acknowledged international need to decrease available w-Pu. Russia has selected both the conversion process and the manufacturing site. This paper discusses the present state of development towards fulfilling this mission: the demonstration plant designed to process small amounts of Pu and validate all process stages and the industrial plant that will process up to 5 metric tons of Pu per year.

Glagovski, E.; Kolotilov, Y.; Glagolenko, Y.; Zygmunt, Stanley J.; Mason, C. F. V. (Caroline F. V.); Hahn, W. K. (Wendy K.); Durrer, R. E. (Russell E.); Thomas, S.; Sicard, B.; Herlet, N.; Fraize, G.; Villa, A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Los Alamos National Laboratory names new head of weapons programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory names new head of weapons programs Laboratory names new head of weapons programs Los Alamos National Laboratory names new head of weapons programs Bret Knapp has been acting in that position since June 2011. December 1, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact Kevin Roark Communications Office (505) 665-9202

168

Tiny device can detect hidden nuclear weapons, materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tiny Tiny device can detect hidden nuclear weapons, materials Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Highlights Bookmark and Share Tiny device can detect hidden nuclear weapons, materials This tiny wafer can detect hidden nuclear weapons and materials NUCLEAR DETECTOR -- This small wafer could become the key component in

169

National Day of Remembrance HSS Honors Former Nuclear Weapons Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Day of Remembrance HSS Honors Former Nuclear Weapons National Day of Remembrance HSS Honors Former Nuclear Weapons Program Workers National Day of Remembrance HSS Honors Former Nuclear Weapons Program Workers October 28, 2013 - 3:11pm Addthis Color Guard | National Day of Remembrance - October 25, 2013 Color Guard | National Day of Remembrance - October 25, 2013 US Representative Dina Titus (1st Congressional District of Nevada) | National Day of Remembrance - October 25, 2013 US Representative Dina Titus (1st Congressional District of Nevada) | National Day of Remembrance - October 25, 2013 Mr. Al Tseu | National Day of Remembrance - October 25, 2013 Mr. Al Tseu | National Day of Remembrance - October 25, 2013 Mr. Glenn Podonsky, Chief Health Safety and Security Officer | National Day of Remembrance - October 25, 2013

170

Managing nuclear weapons in a changing world: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The Center for Security and Technology Studies was established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to support long-range technical studies on issues of importance to US national security. An important goal of the Center is to bring together Laboratory staff and the broader outside community through a program of technical studies, visitors, symposia, seminars, workshops, and publications. With this in mind, the Center and LLNL`s Defense Systems Program sponsored a conference on Managing Nuclear Weapons in a Changing World held on November 17--18,1992. The first day of the meeting focused on nuclear weapons issues in the major geographical areas of the world. On the second day, the conference participants discussed what could be done to manage, control, and account for nuclear weapons in this changing world. Each of the talks and the concluding panel discussion are being indexed as separate documents.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

171

Environmental Restoration Strategic Plan. Remediating the nuclear weapons complex  

SciTech Connect

With the end of the cold war, the US has a reduced need for nuclear weapons production. In response, the Department of Energy has redirected resources from weapons production to weapons dismantlement and environmental remediation. To this end, in November 1989, the US Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (renamed the Office of Environmental Management in 1994). It was created to bring under a central authority the management of radioactive and hazardous wastes at DOE sites and inactive or shut down facilities. The Environmental Restoration Program, a major component of DOE`s Environmental Management Program, is responsible for the remediation and management of contaminated environmental media (e.g., soil, groundwater, sediments) and the decommissioning of facilities and structures at 130 sites in over 30 states and territories.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Life Extension Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Life Extension Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration Life Extension Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Life Extension Programs Home > Our Mission > Managing the Stockpile > Life Extension Programs Life Extension Programs The term "life extension program (LEP)" means a program to repair/replace components of nuclear weapons to ensure the ability to meet

173

Design Basis Threat | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Design Basis Threat | National Nuclear Security Administration Design Basis Threat | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Design Basis Threat Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security > Design Basis Threat Design Basis Threat NNSA has taken aggressive action to improve the security of its nuclear weapons material (often referred to as special nuclear material, or SNM)

174

Our History | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

History | National Nuclear Security Administration History | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Our History Home > About Us > Our History Our History The NNSA was established by Congress in 2000 as a separately organized agency within the U.S. Department of Energy, responsible for the management and security of the nation's nuclear weapons, nuclear nonproliferation,

175

Our Leadership | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Leadership | National Nuclear Security Administration Leadership | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Our Leadership Home > About Us > Our Leadership Our Leadership The NNSA plays a critical role in ensuring the security of our Nation by maintaining the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile without nuclear testing; reducing the global danger from

176

Life Extension Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Extension Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration Extension Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Life Extension Programs Home > Our Mission > Managing the Stockpile > Life Extension Programs Life Extension Programs The term "life extension program (LEP)" means a program to repair/replace components of nuclear weapons to ensure the ability to meet

177

Defense Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Defense Programs Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs Defense Programs One of the primary missions of NNSA is to maintain and enhance the safety, security and reliability of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile. NNSA,

178

NNSA Timeline | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Timeline | National Nuclear Security Administration Timeline | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog NNSA Timeline Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline NNSA Timeline The NNSA was established by Congress in 2000 as a separately organized agency within the U.S. Department of Energy, responsible for the management and security of the nation's nuclear weapons, nuclear nonproliferation,

179

NPT Signed | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Signed | National Nuclear Security Administration Signed | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > NPT Signed NPT Signed March 05, 1970 New York, United States NPT Signed The United States, Great Britain, the Soviet Union, and forty-five other nations sign the Treaty for the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons

180

Our Leadership | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leadership | National Nuclear Security Administration Leadership | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Our Leadership Home > About Us > Our Leadership Our Leadership The NNSA plays a critical role in ensuring the security of our Nation by maintaining the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile without nuclear testing; reducing the global danger from

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Management and Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management and Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Management and Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Management and Administration Home > About Us > Our Programs > Powering the Nuclear Navy > Management and Administration Management and Administration NNSA's Naval Reactors is committed to excellence and dedicated to meeting

182

TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report originated in the authors participation in a multi-country study of national innovation systems and their impact on new technology development, sponsored by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Our task was to look at the U.S. national innovation systems impact on the commercial development of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells for residential power applications. Early drivers of PEM fuel cell innovation were the aerospace and defense programs, in particular the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), which used fuel cells on its spacecraft. In the early 1990s, deregulation hit the electric utility industry, which made utilities and entrepreneurs see the potential in generating electricity from distributed power. Throughout the 1990s, the Department of Energy funded a significant portion of civilian fuel cell research, while the Department of Defense and NASA funded more esoteric military and space applications. In 1998, the Department of Commerces Advanced Technology Program (ATP) awarded the first of 25 fuel cell projects, as prospects for adoption and commercialization of fuel cell technologies improved.

John M. Nail; Gary Anderson; Gerald Ceasar; Christopher J. Hansen; John M. Nail; Gerald Ceasar; Christopher J. Hansen; Carlos M. Gutierrez; Hratch G. Samerjian; Acting Director; Marc G. Stanley; Director Abstract

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

The Association between Cancers and Low Level Radiation: an evaluation of the epidemiological evidence at the Hanford Nuclear Weapons Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant. Rad Res 1989;120:19-Evidence at the Hanford Nuclear Weapons Facility MASTERAT T H E HANFORD NUCLEAR WEAPONS FACILITY JULIE BRITTON

Britton, Julie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Technical analysis of US Army Weapons Systems and related advanced technologies of military interest. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of an US Army technology security project designed to identify and develop effective policy guidelines for militarily critical technologies in specific Army systems and in broad generic technology areas of military interest, Individual systems analyses are documented in separate Weapons Systems Technical Assessments (WSTAs) and the general generic technology areas are evaluated in the Advanced Technology Assessment Reports (ATARs), However, specific details of these assessments are not addressed here, only recommendations regarding aspects of the defined approach, methodology, and format are provided and discussed.

NONE

1991-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

185

General Services Administration  

SciTech Connect

The Federal Energy Management Improvement Act of 1988 requires all federal agencies, including the General Services Administration (GSA), to reduce building energy usage by 10 percent from 1985 levels by 1995. While GSA has been actively pursuing energy conservation, it faces a formidable challenge in achieving the required 10-percent building energy reduction by 1995, and it is too early to tell whether GSA's efforts will be successful. Because GSA has developed a comprehensive strategy to reduce building energy usage, has begun funding a variety of specific energy conservation initiatives, and is actively exploring other energy-saving opportunities, this paper makes no recommendations to GSA.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

An analysis of technical and policy drivers in Current U.S. nuclear weapons force structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. nuclear weapons force structure accounts for the number and types of strategic and nonstrategic weapon systems in various locations that comprise the nuclear arsenal. While exact numbers, locations, and detailed designs ...

Baker, Amanda, S. B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Hot Cell Examination of Weapons-Grade MOX Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy has decided to dispose of a portion of the nation s surplus weapons-grade plutonium by reconstituting it into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and irradiating it in commercial power reactors. Four lead assemblies were manufactured with weapons-grade MOX and irradiated to a maximum fuel rod burnup of 47.3 MWd/kg. As part of the fuel qualification process, five fuel rods with varying burnups and plutonium contents were selected from one of the assemblies and shipped to Oak Ridge National Laboratory for hot cell examination. This is the first hot cell examination of weapons-grade MOX fuel. The rods have been examined nondestructively with the ADEPT apparatus and are currently being destructively examined. Examinations completed to date include length measurements, visual examination, gamma scanning, profilometry, eddy-current testing, gas measurement and analysis, and optical metallography. Representative results of these examinations are reviewed and found to be consistent with predictions and with prior experience with reactor-grade MOX fuel. The results will be used to support licensing of weapons-grade MOX for batch use in commercial power reactors.

Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL; McCoy, Kevin [Areva NP

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Incorporation of excess weapons material into the IFR fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect

The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) provides both a diversion resistant closed fuel cycle for commercial power generation and a means of addressing safeguards concerns related to excess nuclear weapons material. Little head-end processing and handling of dismantled warhead materials is required to convert excess weapons plutonium (Pu) to IFR fuel and a modest degree of proliferation protection is available immediately by alloying weapons Pu to an IFR fuel composition. Denaturing similar to that of spent fuel is obtained by short cycle (e.g. 45 day) use in an IFR reactor, by mixing which IFR recycle fuel, or by alloying with other spent fuel constituents. Any of these permanent denaturings could be implemented as soon as an operating IFR and/or an IFR recycle capability of reasonable scale is available. The initial Pu charge generated from weapons excess Pu can then be used as a permanent denatured catalyst, enabling the IFR to efficiently and economically generate power with only a natural or depleted uranium feed. The Pu is thereafter permanently safeguarded until consumed, with essentially none going to a waste repository.

Hannum, W.H.; Wade, D.C.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Disposition of weapons-grade plutonium in Westinghouse reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have studied the feasibility of using weapons-grade plutonium in the form of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in existing Westinghouse reactors. We have designed three transition cycles from an all LEU core to a partial MOX core. We found that four-loop Westinghouse reactors such as the Vogtle power plant are capable of handling up to 45 percent weapons-grade MOX loading without any modifications. We have also designed two kinds of weapons-grade MOX assemblies with three enrichments per assembly and four enrichments total. Wet annular burnable absorber (WABA) rods were used in all the feed and some burned MOX assemblies and some LEU feed assemblies. Integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA) was used in the rest of the LEU feed assemblies. The average discharge burnup of MOX assemblies was over 47,000 MWD/MTM, which is more than enough to meet the "spent fuel standard." One unit is capable of consuming 0.462 MT of weapons-grade plutonium a year. Preliminary analyses showed that important reactor physics parameters for the three transitions cycles are comparable to those of LEU cores including boron levels, reactivity coefficients, peaking factors, and shutdown margins. Further transient analyses need to be performed.

Alsaed, Abdelhalim Ali

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

The role of nuclear weapons in the year 2000  

SciTech Connect

This publication presents the proceedings for the workshop, The Role of Nuclear Weapons in the Year 2000, held on October 22--24, 1990. The workshop participants considered the changing nature of deterrence and of our strategic relationship with the Soviet Union, the impact of nuclear proliferation on regional conflicts, and ways that the nuclear forces might be restructured to reflect new political circumstances.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Disposition of Weapons-Grade Plutonium in Westinghouse Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disposition of Weapons-Grade Plutonium in Westinghouse Reactors Abdelhalim Ali Alsaed and Marvin Adams We have studied the feasibility of using weapons-grade plutonium in the form of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in existing Westinghouse reactors. We have designed three transition cycles from an all LEU core to a partial MOX core. We found that four-loop Westinghouse reactors such as the Vogtle power plant are capable of handling up to 45 percent weapons-grade MOX loading without any modifications. We have also designed two kinds of weapons-grade MOX assemblies with three enrichments per assembly and four total enrichments. Wet annular burnable absorber (WABA) rods were used in all the MOX feed assemblies, some burned MOX assemblies, and some LEU feed assemblies. Integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA) was used in the rest of the LEU feed assemblies. The average discharge burnup of MOX assemblies was over 47,000 MWD/MTM, which is more than enough to meet the "spent fuel standard." One unit is ...

No. De-fc-al; Abdelhalim Ali Alsaed; Abdelhalim Ali Alsaed; Marvin Adams; Marvin Adams

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Radiations from nuclear weapons - signal detectors - NASA program information  

SciTech Connect

This letter is for the purpose of supplying the information that you requested at the meeting of the sub-committee on Project Vela. It is divided into three parts: (1) Radiations from nuclear weapons; (2) Backgrounds for Vela Signal Detectors; (3) Discussion of the NASA program.

White, R. S.

1960-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

193

Weapons Experiments Division Explosives Operations Overview  

SciTech Connect

Presentation covers WX Division programmatic operations with a focus on JOWOG-9 interests. A brief look at DARHT is followed by a high level overview of explosives research activities currently being conducted within in the experimental groups of WX-Division. Presentation covers more emphasis of activities and facilities at TA-9 as these efforts have been more traditionally aligned with ongoing collaborative explosive exchanges covered under JOWOG-9.

Laintz, Kenneth E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

194

Coordination Meeting with National Nuclear Security Administration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Coordination Meeting with National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos...

195

Data.gov Administrator | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data.gov Administrator Primary tabs View(active tab) Track Communities: Energy - Private group - Law Ocean BusinessUSA Consumer Cities Education Display Name: Data.gov...

196

Swords into Plowshares: Nuclear Weapon Dismantlement, Evaluation, and Maintenance at Pantex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The end of the Cold War changed the missions of facilities in the US nuclear weapons complex. They ceased production of new weapons and focused on dismantling old weapons and maintaining the safety, security, and reliability of those remaining. The Pantex ... Keywords: Government--programs, Production/scheduling--planning

Edwin A. Kjeldgaard; Dean A. Jones; George F. List; Mark A. Turnquist; James W. Angelo; Richard D. Hopson; John Hudson; Terry Holeman

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Reassessing U.S. nuclear weapons policy Harold Brown[1] and John Deutch[2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 / 28 The world-wide nuclear-weapon non-proliferation regime The Non Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Entry into force: 1970 Three "pillars": - Non Proliferation (of nuclear-weapon capabilities), - Nuclear of the globe. The collapse of the world-wide regime of nuclear- weapon non-proliferation might happen in two

Deutch, John

198

Newsletters | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Newsletters | National Nuclear Security Administration Newsletters | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Newsletters Home > Media Room > Newsletters Newsletters NNSA publishes a monthly newsletter featuring current events and activities across the nuclear security enterprise. Online archives are available back

199

Thomas D. Williams Assistant Administrator  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Thomas D. Williams Thomas D. Williams Assistant Administrator for Resource and Tecnology Management Duties Thomas D. Williams is the Assistant Administrator for Resource & Technology Management. He provides leadership and direction to oversee the management and operation of EIA's employee services, information technology policy and operations, and integrated planning, budget, procurement, evaluation and project management activity. Biography Thom is a career member of the Senior Executive Service with more than 27 years of professional experience in developing, linking, and implementing successful strategic, financial, human capital, operational, technology, and administrative policies and plans for federal research, science, engineering, and regulatory programs.

200

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Team Summary I. Background: Defense Programs (DP) provides the core of the NNSA National Security Enterprise through its preeminent nuclear weapons scientific, engineering, and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administrator weapons activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Photon Sciences | User Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Administration Postal Address User Administration Office Brookhaven National Laboratory 75 Brookhaven Avenue, Bldg. 725B Upton, NY 11973-5000 USA Office Hours Monday through...

202

CF NEUTRON TIME OF FLIGHT TRANSMISSION FOR MATERIAL IDENTIFICATION FOR WEAPONS TRAINERS  

SciTech Connect

The neutron transmission, elastic scattering, and non elastic reactions can be used to distinguish various isotopes. Neutron transmission as a function of energy can be used in some cases to identify materials in unknown objects. A time tagged californium source that provides a fission spectrum of neutrons is a useful source for neutron time-of-flight (TOF) transmission measurements. Many nuclear weapons trainer units for a particular weapons system (no fissile, but of same weight and center of gravity) in shipping containers were returned to the National Nuclear Security Administration Y-12 National Security Complex in the mid 1990s. Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) measurements with a time tagged californium neutron source were used to verify that these trainers did not contain fissile material. In these blind tests, the time distributions of neutrons through the containers were measured as a function of position to locate the approximate center of the trainer in the container. Measurements were also performed with an empty container. TOF template matching measurements were then performed at this location for a large number of units. In these measurements, the californium source was located on one end of the container and a proton recoil scintillator was located on the other end. The variations in the TOF transmission for times corresponding to 1 to 5 MeV were significantly larger than statistical. Further examination of the time distribution or the energy dependence revealed that these variations corresponded to the variations in the neutron cross section of aluminum averaged over the energy resolution of the californium TOF measurement with a flight path of about 90 cm. Measurements using different thicknesses of aluminum were also performed with the source and detector separated the same distance as for the trainer measurements. These comparison measurements confirmed that the material in the trainers was aluminum, and the total thickness of aluminum through the trainers was determined. This is an example of how californium transmission TOF measurements can be used to identify materials.

Mihalczo, John T [ORNL; Valentine, Timothy E [ORNL; Blakeman, Edward D [ORNL; Pare, Victor [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Towards a tactical nuclear weapons treaty? Is There a Role of IAEA Tools of Safeguards?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, there is growing interest in formal negotiations on non-strategic or tactical nuclear weapons. With the negotiations of New START, there has been much speculation that a tactical nuclear weapons treaty should be included in the follow on to New START. This paper examines the current policy environment related to tactical weapons and some of the issues surrounding the definition of tactical nuclear weapons. We then map out the steps that would need to be taken in order to begin discussions on a tactical nuclear weapons treaty. These steps will review the potential role of the IAEA in verification of a tactical nuclear weapons treaty. Specifically, does IAEA involvement in various arms control treaties serve as a useful roadmap on how to overcome some of the issues pertaining to a tactical nuclear weapons treaty?

Saunders, Emily C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rowberry, Ariana N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fearey, Bryan L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

204

U.S. Department of Energy Strategic Plan 13 In 2000, the National Nuclear Security Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 In 2000, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) was established as a new element within the Department in response to a Congressional mandate to reinvigorate the security posture throughout the nuclear weapons program and to reaffirm the Nation's commitment to maintaining the nuclear deterrence capabilities of the United States. NNSA was chartered to better focus management attention on enhanced security, proactive management practices, and mission focus within the Department's national defense and nonproliferation programs. The Department performs its national security mission involving nuclear weapons and nuclear materials and technology through the NNSA. Over the next six years, the Department will apply

205

A comparison of the additional protocols of the five nuclear weapon states and the ensuing safeguards benefits to international nonproliferation efforts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the 6 January 2009 entry into force of the Additional Protocol by the United States of America, all five declared Nuclear Weapon States that are part of the Nonproliferation Treaty have signed, ratified, and put into force the Additional Protocol. This paper makes a comparison of the strengths and weaknesses of the five Additional Protocols in force by the five Nuclear Weapon States with respect to the benefits to international nonproliferation aims. This paper also documents the added safeguards burden to the five declared Nuclear Weapon States that these Additional Protocols put on the states with respect to access to their civilian nuclear programs and the hosting of complementary access activities as part of the Additional Protocol.

Uribe, Eva C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, M Analisa [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, Marisa N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Leitch, Rosalyn M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Coordination of Biological Select Agent Activities at Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

security posed by the possible use of biological weapons of mass destruction has led to an increase in research and development activities involving biological select...

207

United States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable Highly Enriched Uranium from Hungary, Set Nuclear Security Milestone United States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable Highly Enriched Uranium from Hungary, Set Nuclear Security Milestone November 4, 2013 - 2:09pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced under a multi-year international effort coordinated between Hungary, the United States, the Russian Federation, and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the successful removal of all remaining highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Hungary. This makes Hungary the twelfth country to completely eliminate HEU from its borders since President Obama's 2009 announcement

208

Weapons testing data determines brain makes new neurons into adulthood  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 For immediate release: 06/10/2013 | NR-13-06-04 Weapons testing data determines brain makes new neurons into adulthood Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov Image courtesy of National Institutes of Health. LIVERMORE, Calif. -- Using data derived from nuclear weapons testing of the 1950s and '60s, Lawrence Livermore scientists have found that a small portion of the human brain involved in memory makes new neurons well into adulthood. The research may have profound impacts on human behavior and mental health. The study supports the importance of investigating the therapeutic potential of applying adult neurogenesis to the treatment of age-related cognitive disorders. Neurogenesis is the process by which neurons are generated from neural stem

209

A hazard separation system for dismantlement of nuclear weapon components  

SciTech Connect

Over the next decade, the US Department of Energy (DOE) must retire and dismantle many nuclear weapon systems. In support of this effort, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has developed the Hazard Separation System (HSS). The HSS combines abrasive waterjet cutting technology and real-time radiography. Using the HSS, operators determine the exact location of interior, hazardous sub-components and remove them through precision cutting. The system minimizes waste and maximizes the recovery of recyclable materials. During 1994, the HSS was completed and demonstrated. Weapon components processed during the demonstration period included arming, fusing, and firing units; preflight control units; neutron generator subassemblies; and x-units. Hazards removed included radioactive krytron tubes and gap tubes, thermal batteries, neutron generator tubes, and oil-filled capacitors. Currently, the HSS is being operated at SNL in a research and development mode to facilitate the transfer of the technology to other DOE facilities for support of their dismantlement operations.

Lutz, J.D.; Purvis, S.T.; Hospelhorn, R.L.; Thompson, K.R.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

A simple method for rapidly processing HEU from weapons returns  

SciTech Connect

A method based on the use of a high temperature fluidized bed for rapidly oxidizing, homogenizing and down-blending Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) from dismantled nuclear weapons is presented. This technology directly addresses many of the most important issues that inhibit progress in international commerce in HEU; viz., transaction verification, materials accountability, transportation and environmental safety. The equipment used to carry out the oxidation and blending is simple, inexpensive and highly portable. Mobile facilities to be used for point-of-sale blending and analysis of the product material are presented along with a phased implementation plan that addresses the conversion of HEU derived from domestic weapons and related waste streams as well as material from possible foreign sources such as South Africa or the former Soviet Union.

McLean, W. II; Miller, P.E.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Chinese strategic weapons and the plutonium option (U)  

SciTech Connect

In their article "Chinese Strategic Weapons and the Plutonium Option," John W. Lewis and Xue Litai of the Center for International Security and Arms Control at Stanford University's International Strategic Institute present an unclassified look at plutonium processing in the PRC. The article draws heavily on unclassified PRC sources for its short look at this important subject. Interested readers will find more detailed information in the recently available works referenced in the article.

Lewis, John W.; Xui Litai

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Use of commercial manipulator to handle a nuclear weapon component  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has developed a manipulator workcell to load and unload nuclear weapon pit assemblies from a cart. To develop this workcell, PNL procured a commercially available manipulator, equipped it with force-sensing and vision equipment, and developed manipulator control software. Manipulator workcell development demonstrated that commercially available manipulator systems can successfully perform this task if the appropriate manipulator is selected and the manipulator workcell tooling and software are carefully designed.

Baker, C.P.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Programs Home > Field Offices > Welcome to the Sandia Field Office > Programs Programs The SFO Programs office is responsible for direction, day-to-day oversight and contract administration activities in support of the technical

214

Depleted-Uranium Weapons the Whys and Wherefores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The only military application in which present-day depleted-uranium (DU) alloys out-perform tungsten alloys is long-rod penetration into a main battle-tank's armor. However, this advantage is only on the order of 10% and disappearing when the comparison is made in terms of actual lethality of complete anti-tank systems instead of laboratory-type steel penetration capability. Therefore, new micro- and nano-engineered tungsten alloys may soon out-perform existing DU alloys, enabling the production of tungsten munition which will be better than uranium munition, and whose overall life-cycle cost will be less due to the absence of the problems related to the radioactivity of uranium. The reasons why DU weapons have been introduced and used are analysed from the perspective that their radioactivity must have played an important role in the decision making process. It is found that DU weapons belong to the diffuse category of low-radiological-impact nuclear weapons to which emerging types of low-yield, i.e., fourth...

Gsponer, A

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Experience making mixed oxide fuel with plutonium from dismantled weapons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mixed depleted UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} (MOX) pellets prototypic of fuel proposed for use in commercial power reactors were made with plutonium recovered from dismantled weapons. We characterized plutonium dioxide powders that were produced at the Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (LANL and LLNL) using various methods to recover the plutonium from weapons parts and to convert It to oxide. The gallium content of the PUO{sub 2} prepared at LANL was the same as in the weapon alloy while the content of that prepared at LLNL was less. The MOX was prepared with a five weight percent plutonium content. We tested various MOX powders milling methods to improve homogeneity and found vibratory milling superior to ball milling. The sintering behavior of pellets made with the PuO{sub 2} from the two laboratories was similar. We evaluated the effects of gallium and of erbium and gadolinium, that are added to the MOX fuel as deplorable neutron absorbers, on the pellet fabrication process and an the sintered pellets. The gallium content of the sintered pellets was <10 ppm, suggesting that the gallium will not be an issue in the reactor, but that it will be an Issue in the operation of the fuel fabrication processing equipment unless it is removed from the PuO{sub 2} before it is blended with the UO{sub 2}.

Blair, H.T.; Ramsey, K.B.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Impact of a reduced nuclear weapons stockpile on strategic stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation is to discuss the impact of a reduced nuclear weapons stockpile on the strategic stability. Methodologies used to study strategic stability issues include what are basically strategic-force exchange models. These models are used to simulate a massive nuclear exchange in which one side attacks and the other side retaliates. These models have been of interest to the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) program. Researchers have been looking at issues concerning the stability of the transition period, during which some defenses have been deployed and during which deterrence and war-fighting capability reply partly on defense and partly on offense. Also, more recently, with interest in the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) and force reductions beyond START, the same calculation engines have been used to examine the impact of reduced forces on strategic stability. For both the SDI and the START reduction cases, exchange models are able to address only a rather narrow class of strategic stability issues. Other broader stability questions that are unrelated to nuclear weapons or that relate to nuclear weapons but are not addressed by the calculational tools which are not included in this discussion. 6 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab. (BN)

Chrzanowski, P.

1991-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

217

Manual for national implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention  

SciTech Connect

The Convention on the Prohibition on the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and on their Destruction, opened for signature, January 13, 1993, in Paris, France (CWC), is an unprecedented multilateral effort to eradicate an entire category of weapons of mass destruction and assure their continued absence through international verification. The CWC has been signed by over 150 nations, and is expected to enter into force in 1995. With its far-reaching system to verify compliance, the CWC presages a new foundation for international security based neither on fear nor on trust, but on the rule of law. A central feature of the CWC is that it requires each State Party to take implementing measures to make the Convention operative. The CWC goes beyond all prior arms control treaties in this regard. For this approach to succeed, and to inspire the eradication of other categories of mass destruction weaponry, coordination and planning are vital to harmonize CWC national implementation among States Parties. This Manual for National Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention is designed to assist States Parties, duly taking into account the distinctive aspects of their legal systems, in maximizing CWC enforcement consistent with their national legal obligations.

Kellman, B. [DePaul Univ., Chicago, IL (United States); Tanzman, E.A.; Gualtieri, D.S.; Grimes, S.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... active petrochemical industry, ... and the widespread use of electricity as the primary energy source for home ...

219

NNSA Policies | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > NNSA Policy About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > NNSA Policy System > NNSA Policies NNSA Policies NNSA Policies (NAPs) impart policy and requirements unique to the Administration or provide short-term notices until more formal direction can be provided. NAP-4B Corporate Performance Process for M&O Contractors June 30, 2008 NAP-5 Standards Management October 16, 2002 NAP-6 FEOSH Program for NNSA Headquarters Employees December 19, 2002 NAP-7 NNSA's Acquisition and Assistance Policy Guidance December 9, 2002 NAP-14.1D Baseline Cyber Security Program December 14, 2012 NAP-21 Signed Governance and Oversight March 2, 2011 NAP-23 Transformational Governance and Oversight February 28, 2011 NAP-24 Weapons Quality Policy June 20, 2013 NAP-25 Management and Operating Contractor Business Meals and Light Refreshment

220

Memorandum of Understanding between The Administrator for the National  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Administrator for the The Administrator for the National Nuclear Security Administration and The Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health Memorandum of Understanding between The Administrator for the National Nuclear Security Administration and The Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) establishes the principles and protocols that will enable the Administrator of the NNSA to effectively utilize these services ofEH for Price-Anderson activities. 20010108mou.PDF Description Memorandum of Understanding between The Administrator for the National Nuclear Security Administration and The Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health More Documents & Publications Memorandum of Understanding between the US Department of Energy and the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administrator weapons activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

DOE/CF-0084  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 Volume 1 Department of Energy FY 2014 Congressional Budget Request National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors April 2013 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 1 DOE/CF-0084 Volume 1 Department of Energy FY 2014 Congressional Budget Request National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors April 2013 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 1 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors

222

Bush Administration to Expand Beryllium Disease Screening Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bush Administration to Expand Beryllium Disease Screening Program Bush Administration to Expand Beryllium Disease Screening Program Bush Administration to Expand Beryllium Disease Screening Program February 23, 2005 - 10:27am Addthis Former employees of DOE vendors eligible for free screening WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced the Department of Energy (DOE) will expand a beryllium screening program to include former employees of now-defunct DOE beryllium vendor companies across the country. Beryllium is a component used in nuclear weapons built by the Department of Energy. "Through no fault of their own, these Cold Warriors were left out in the cold when their former employers went out of business. By expanding this screening program, President Bush and the Department of Energy honor these

223

ITER: The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and the Nuclear Weapons Proliferation Implications of Thermonuclear-Fusion Energy Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper contains two parts: (I) A list of points highlighting the strategic-political and militarytechnical reasons and implications of the very probable siting of ITER (the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) in Japan, which should be confirmed sometimes in early 2004. (II) A technical analysis of the nuclear weapons proliferation implications of inertial- and magnetic-confinement fusion systems substantiating the technical points highlighted in the first part, and showing that while full access to the physics of thermonuclear weapons is the main implication of ICF, full access to large-scale tritium technology is the main proliferation impact of MCF. The conclusion of the paper is that siting ITER in a country such as Japan, which already has a large separated-plutonium stockpile, and an ambitious laser-driven ICF program (comparable in size and quality to those of the United States or France) will considerably increase its latent (or virtual) nuclear weapons proliferation status, and foster further nuclear proliferation throughout the world. The safety and environmental problems related to the operation of largescale fusion facilities such as ITER (which contain massive amounts of hazardous and/or radioactive materials such as tritium, lithium, and beryllium, as well as neutron-activated structural materials) are not addressed in this paper.

Andr Gsponer; Jean-pierre Hurni

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Administrative | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Employee Services » Administrative Services » Employee Services » Administrative Administrative The Office of Management provides many of the administrative services that keep the Department of Energy operational. These functions are primarily provided by the Office of Administration, MA-40, the Office of Administrative Management and Support, MA-42. Administrative Management Services Conferencing and Special Events Copier Services Document Imaging Graphics Mail and Distribution Photography Printing For a listing of office contacts please use the About Us menu, the Contact Us section, available directly through this link. We welcome your comments or questions regarding these services. Please feel free to provide feedback to the Office of Administration's Customer Mailbox at: MA-40Customervoice@hq.doe.gov.

225

Quality at Y-12, part 2Or: Looking at Y-12 weapons quality ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

organizational structure. After seeing how all the other contractor sites in the Nuclear Weapons Complex were organized, DOE-AL felt Y-12 should have a specific organization...

226

DOE O 452.4B, Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety ...

2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

227

ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 14:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 14: INFORMATIONAL SERVICES RECORDS June 2007 Revision 1 This schedule covers certain records pertaining to informational services performed by the Department in their day-to-day affairs and in their relations with the public, including records created in administering Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and Privacy Act ) programs. Except as otherwise specified in individual items, it applies to copies of these records wherever located. Item 4 applies only to files maintained in office responsible for the operation of the information activities. Items 11 through 15 describe the files accumulated in carrying out the provisions of the FOIA, and items 21 through 26 describe the files created in administering the provisions of the Privacy Act. Items 31

228

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About this site About this site This Web site is the official Web site of the Southwestern Power Administration. It is part of a Federal computer system used to accomplish Federal functions and is monitored for security purposes to ensure it remains available to all users and to protect information in the system. By accessing this Web site, you are expressly consenting to these monitoring activities. Accessibility Southwestern is committed to providing the most up-to-date, relevant information to its stakeholders and to members of the general public, including those with disabilities and/or limited English proficiency. If you are unable to access information about Southwestern due to the presentation of information in this Web site, or if you have any questions, concerns, or comments you would like to share with us, please contact

229

Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration - EIA - Official Energy Statistics from the U.S. Government ... storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales.

230

National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

231

Glossary - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration ... (e.g., water vapor, carbon dioxide, helium, hydrogen sulfide, and nitrogen) ... Storage Withdrawals: ...

232

CSRC - Systems Administration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The intended audience is composed of Windows 2000 Systems Administrators and technical Windows 2000 Professional users working in ...

233

Administrative Committee Members  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volunteer Training Module. March 2013. 1. Your Professional Partner for Career Advancement. Administrative Committee. Members. Online Training Module.

234

Glossary - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration 137 Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Interim Report on Natural Gas Flows and Rates Glossary Affiliated ...

235

U.S. weapons-usable plutonium disposition policy: Implementation of the MOX fuel option  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive case study was conducted on the policy problem of disposing of US weapons-grade plutonium, which has been declared surplus to strategic defense needs. Specifically, implementation of the mixed-oxide fuel disposition option was examined in the context of national and international nonproliferation policy, and in contrast to US plutonium policy. The study reveals numerous difficulties in achieving effective implementation of the mixed-oxide fuel option including unresolved licensing and regulatory issues, technological uncertainties, public opposition, potentially conflicting federal policies, and the need for international assurances of reciprocal plutonium disposition activities. It is believed that these difficulties can be resolved in time so that the implementation of the mixed-oxide fuel option can eventually be effective in accomplishing its policy objective.

Woods, A.L. [ed.] [Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, TX (United States); Gonzalez, V.L. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Political Science

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

US weapons-useable plutonium disposition policy: implementation of the MOX fuel option  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comprehensive case study was conducted on the policy problem of disposing of U.S. weapons-grade plutonium which has been declared surplus to strategic defense needs. Specifically, implementation of the mixed-oxide fuel disposition option was examined in the context of national and international nonproliferation policy, and in contrast to U.S. plutonium policy. The study reveals numerous difficulties in achieving effective implementation of the mixed-oxide fuel option including unresolved licensing and regulatory issues, technological uncertainties, public opposition, potentially conflicting federal policies, and the need for international assurances of reciprocal plutonium disposition activities. It is believed that these difficulties can be resolved in time so that the implementation of the mixed-oxide fuel option can eventually be effective in accomplishing its policy objective.

Gonzalez, Vanessa L

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Plutonium: Aging Mechanisms and Weapon Pit Lifetime Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the end of this year, the U.S. Nuclear National Security Administration (NNSA) ... Experience from all materials in reactor environments of similar crystal...

238

LANL | Physics | Nuclear Weapons and Global Security Data Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Weapons and Global Security Data Analysis Nuclear Weapons and Global Security Data Analysis Physics Division applies advanced imaging techniques to many applications, from brain imaging to neutron imaging in inertial fusion to threat detection from airborne cameras. A particular strength is the quantitative analysis of penetrating radiography using techniques such as the Bayesian Inference Engine (BIE). An example from the Nuclear Event Analysis Team shows a test object (Figure 1) that is subsequently radiographed using the Dual-Axis Radiography Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility. Figures 2 and 3 show the radiograph and the inferred density of the object using the BIE, which can be compared to the known object to determine accurate error estimation. Test object Figure 1. The test object consists of a 1 cm-radius cavity void surrounded by a 4.5 cm radius surrogate fissile material of tungsten, tantalum, or depleted uranium. This sphere is surrounded by a 6.5 cm-radius copper sphere. At is thickest point, the tantalum test object has an areal density of 180 g/cm2, equivalent to 9" of steel.

239

Seaborne Delivery Interdiction of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD)  

SciTech Connect

Over the next 10-20 years, the probability of a terrorist attack using a weapon of mass destruction (WMD) on the United States is projected to increase. At some point over the next few decades, it may be inevitable that a terrorist group will have access to a WMD. The economic and social impact of an attack using a WMD anywhere in the world would be catastrophic. For weapons developed overseas, the routes of entry are air and sea with the maritime vector as the most porous. Providing a system to track, perform a risk assessment and inspect all inbound marine traffic before it reaches US coastal cities thereby mitigating the threat has long been a goal for our government. The challenge is to do so effectively without crippling the US economy. The Portunus Project addresses only the maritime threat and builds on a robust maritime domain awareness capability. It is a process to develop the technologies, policies and practices that will enable the US to establish a waypoint for the inspection of international marine traffic, screen 100% of containerized and bulk cargo prior to entry into the US if deemed necessary, provide a palatable economic model for transshipping, grow the US economy, and improve US environmental quality. The implementation strategy is based on security risk, and the political and economic constraints of implementation. This article is meant to provide a basic understanding of how and why this may be accomplished.

Glauser, H

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

240

Independent Activity Report, Sandia National Laboratories - April 2012 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratories - April Laboratories - April 2012 Independent Activity Report, Sandia National Laboratories - April 2012 April 2012 Sandia National Laboratories Site Visit [HIAR-SNL-2012-05-02] The purpose of the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) site visit activity at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Sandia Site Office (SSO), Albuquerque, NM, was to conduct an orientation visit on April 29, 2012, for the HSS site lead, and to shadow a portion of a National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) review during May 1-2, 2012, at SNL of the weapon design agencies (DAs') processes for proper implementation of DOE-NA-STD-3016-2006, Hazard Analysis Reports for Nuclear Explosive Operations. Overall, in the review activities observed by HSS, NNSA appropriately followed its assessment plan.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administrator weapons activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Contact Us | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

The National Nuclear Security Administration The National Nuclear Security Administration Contact Us Home > Field Offices > Welcome to the Sandia Field Office > Contact Us Contact Us If you have questions about activities at the Sandia Field Office, please contact the SFO Public Affairs Director at (505) 845-5264. Our mailing address is: U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Sandia Field Office, P.O. Box 5400, Albuquerque, NM 87185. Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr General Information About SFO Contact Us Contract Administration & Business Management Emergency Information Facilities & Projects Nuclear Operations Environment, Safety & Health Public Affairs Safeguards & Security Performance and Quality Assurance

242

Southwestern Power Administration One West...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the United States Department of Energy Southwestern Power Administration Strategic Plan March 2013 Administrator's Message The Southwestern Power Administration powers the...

243

Linking legacies: Connecting the Cold War nuclear weapons production processes to their environmental consequences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the aftermath of the Cold War, the US has begun addressing the environmental consequences of five decades of nuclear weapons production. In support of this effort, the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1995 directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to describe the waste streams generated during each step in the production of nuclear weapons. Accordingly, this report responds to this mandate, and it is the Department`s first comprehensive analysis of the sources of waste and contamination generated by the production of nuclear weapons. The report also contains information on the missions and functions of nuclear weapons facilities, on the inventories of waste and materials remaining at these facilities, as well as on the extent and characteristics of contamination in and around these facilities. This analysis unites specific environmental impacts of nuclear weapons production with particular production processes. The Department used historical records to connect nuclear weapons production processes with emerging data on waste and contamination. In this way, two of the Department`s legacies--nuclear weapons manufacturing and environmental management--have become systematically linked. The goal of this report is to provide Congress, DOE program managers, non-governmental analysts, and the public with an explicit picture of the environmental results of each step in the nuclear weapons production and disposition cycle.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Abdus Salam: A Reappraisal. Part II Salam's Part in the Pakistani Nuclear Weapon Programme  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Salam's biographies claim that he was opposed to Pakistan's nuclear weapon programme. This is somewhat strange given that he was the senior Science Advisor to the Pakistan government for at least some of the period between 1972 when the programme was initiated and 1998 when a successful nuclear weapon test was carried out. I look at the evidence for his participation in the programme.

Norman Dombey

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

245

Abdus Salam: A Reappraisal. Part II Salam's Part in the Pakistani Nuclear Weapon Programme  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Salam's biographies claim that he was opposed to Pakistan's nuclear weapon programme. This is somewhat strange given that he was the senior Science Advisor to the Pakistan government for at least some of the period between 1972 when the programme was initiated and 1998 when a successful nuclear weapon test was carried out. I look at the evidence for his participation in the programme.

Dombey, Norman

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Use of Lasers to Study the Impact of Fractionation and Condensation on the Toxicity of Nuclear Weapon Fallout  

SciTech Connect

An experimental concept has been developed to collect data to aid in the refinement of simulation programs designed to predict the fallout effects arising from surface and shallowly buried nuclear weapon detonations. These experiments, called the Condensation Debris Experiments (CDE), are intended to study the condensation/fractionation of material that is liberated following an initial deposition of laser energy onto a small, characterized target. The CDE effort also encompasses target development and material studies as well as supporting computational efforts studying radiation hydrodynamics, computational fluid dynamics, and relevant neutron activation processes (not discussed here).

Vidnovic III, T; Bradley, K S; Debonnel, C S; Dipeso, G; Fournier, K; Karpenko, V P; Tobin, M

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Assessing the risk from the depleted uranium weapons used in Operation Allied Force.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conflict in Yugoslavia has been a source of great concern for the neighboring countries, about the radiological and toxic hazard posed by the alleged presence of depleted uranium in NATO weapons. In the present study a worst-case scenario is assumed mainly to assess the risk for Greece and other neighboring countries of Yugoslavia at similar distances. The risk of the weapons currently in use is proved to be negligible at distances greater than 100 Km. For shorter distances classified data of weapons composition are needed to obtain a reliable assessment. Operation Allied Force (OAF) has been going on for weeks in Yugoslavia with grave environmental consequences in the neighboring countries. Unfortunately, the sophisticated weapons that are being used carry the spectrum of radiological contamination. Over the past decades there has been a tremendous effort in weapons laboratories to use depleted uranium

unknown authors

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

EA-1035: Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los Alamos  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

35: Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los 35: Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico EA-1035: Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to relocate the Weapons Component Testing Facility from Building 450 to Building 207, both within Technical Area 16, at the U.S. Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD February 10, 1995 EA-1035: Finding of No Significant Impact Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico February 10, 1995 EA-1035: Final Environmental Assessment

249

Energy Efficiency Program Administration Powerpoint Presentation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Administration Powerpoint Presentation Energy Efficiency Program Administration Powerpoint Presentation Energy Efficiency Program Administration Powerpoint Presentation...

250

National Nuclear Security Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Nuclear Security Administration National Nuclear Security Administration Ofice of Secure Transportation mKlK= Box RQMM= ^luquerqueI= kj= UTNUR= ;JAN 03 213 MEMORANDUM FOR GREGORY eK= WOODS GENERAL COUNSEL DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FROM: SUBJECT: JEFFREY P. HARREL ASSIST ANT DEPU FOR SECURE 2013 ANNUAL PLANNING SUMMARY In response to your memorandum of December TI= 2012, the following information is provided for the National Nuclear Security Administration Ofice of Secure

251

INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE ASPECTS OF UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR WEAPON TEST DEBRIS RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect

The formation of a collapse crater by underground nuclear explosions is described. Safety problems associated with the re-entry of underground nuclear explosion areas include cavity collapse, toxic gases, explosive gases, radioactive gases, radioactive core, and hazards from the movement of heavy equipment on unstable ground. Data irom television, geophones, and telemetered radiation detectors determine when radiation and toxic material surveys of the area can be made and drills can be used to obtain samples of the bubble crust for analysis. Hazards to persornel engaged in obtaining weapon debris samples are reviewed. Data are presented on the radiation dose received by personnel at the Nevada Test Site engaged in this work during 1962. (C.H.)

Wilcox, F.W.

1963-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

252

Nonlethal weapons as force options for the Army  

SciTech Connect

This paper suggests that future challenges to US national security will be very different from those previously experienced. In a number of foreseeable circumstances, conventional military force will be inappropriate. The National Command Authority, and other appropriate levels of command, need expanded options available to meet threats for which the application of massive lethal force is counterproductive or inadvisable. It is proposed that nonlethal concepts be developed that provide additional options for military leaders and politicians. Included in this initiative should be exploration of policy, strategy, doctrine, and training issues as well as the development of selected technologies and weapons. In addition, civilian law enforcement agencies have similar requirements for less-than-lethal systems. This may be an excellent example for a joint technology development venture.

Alexander, J.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Articles - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

163 U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly February 2012 Articles Feature articles on energy-related subjects are ...

254

Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Presented at the 2012 International Field Directors and Technologies Conference in Orlando, FL as The Effect of Reporting Mode on Administrative Records: Are We ...

255

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 ANNUAL REPORT 7 ANNUAL REPORT Southwestern Power Administration Letter to the Secretary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 About Southwestern. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Accomplishments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Supplementary Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

256

Abbreviations - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Bcf Billion cubic feet DOE U.S. Department of Energy EIA Energy Information Administration, U.S. Department of Energy FERC

257

Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum prices, supply and demand information from the Energy Information Administration - EIA - Official Energy Statistics from the U.S. Government

258

Glossary - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

that are tariff based and corporately aligned with companies that own distribution facilities are also ... U.S. Energy Information Administration ...

259

Glossary - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration/Electric Power Monthly June 2012 167 Glossary Anthracite: ... the electric department at tariff or other specified rates

260

Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2010 EIA-64A Annual Report of the Origin of Natural Gas Liquids Production 1 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Energy Information Administration Washington, DC 20585

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administrator weapons activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

valdez - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sources: Petroleum supply data were derived from the Energy Information Administration, Weekly Petroleum Reporting System; crude oil and motor gasoline spot price ...

262

Section Administration and Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Section Information, Membership, Newsletters and Awards Section Administration and Resources Awards Program aocs award Awards baldwin fats global inform job listings member membership network oils ...

263

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FOIAPrivacy Act Submit a FOIA Request DOE FOIA Requester Service Center Electronic Reading Room FOIA Links Power Marketing Administrations' FOIA Links Bonneville Power...

264

Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual Report of the Origin of Natural Gas Liquids Production 1 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Energy Information Administration Washington, DC 20585 Form Approved OMB Number:...

265

Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

An order form is enclosed for your convenience. Send order form and payment to: ... U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration

266

RFS - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Technical Conference September 28, 2004 Elizabeth Campbell Energy Information Administration (EIA) Elizabeth.Campbell@eia.doe.gov. www.eia.gov ...

267

Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of ...

268

EIA - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas November 17, 1997 http://www.eia.doe.gov NYM EX Future Prices vs Henry Hub Spot Prices

269

Implications of a North Korean Nuclear Weapons Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Democratic People`s Republic of Korea (DPRK) is one of the Cold War`s last remaining totalitarian regimes. Rarely has any society been as closed to outside influences and so distant from political, economic, and military developments around the globe. In 1991 and in 1992, however, this dictatorship took a number of political steps which increased Pyongyang`s interaction with the outside world. Although North Korea`s style of engagement with the broader international community involved frequent pauses and numerous steps backward, many observers believed that North Korea was finally moving to end its isolated, outlaw status. As the end of 1992 approached, however, delay and obstruction by Pyongyang became intense as accumulating evidence suggested that the DPRK, in violation of the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), was seeking to develop nuclear weapons. On March 12, 1993, North Korea announced that it would not accept additional inspections proposed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to resolve concerns about possible violations and instead would withdraw from the Treaty. Pyongyang`s action raised the specter that, instead of a last act of the Cold War, North Korea`s diplomatic maneuvering would unravel the international norms that were to be the basis of stability and peace in the post-Cold War era. Indeed, the discovery that North Korea was approaching the capability to produce nuclear weapons suggested that the nuclear threat, which had been successfully managed throughout the Cold War era, could increase in the post-Cold War era.

Lehman, R.F. II

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Los Alamos National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our Locations > Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory http://www.lanl.gov/ Field Office: Los Alamos Field Office (NA-00-LA) manages the resources of the NNSA Los Alamos National Weapons Design Laboratory. NA-00-LA aims to

271

Salary administration practices, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report concerns the Department of Energy's (Department) oversight of Sandia National Laboratories' (Sandia) salary administration practices for employees not covered by union agreements. Sandia is a management and operating (MandO) contractor responsible for research and development (RandD) relating to nuclear weapons and energy. Sandia's 1987 payroll was $319 million, $42 million for bargaining and $277 million for non-bargaining unit employees. For the period covered by the audit, Department policy required Headquarters monitoring and approval of the reasonableness of MandO contractor salary administration practices in cases where the annual non-bargaining payroll exceeded $75 million. The purpose of this audit was to determine whether Department oversight of Sandia employee compensation assured that contractor pay rates were consistent with Department policy.

Not Available

1989-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

272

Independent Activity Report, Pantex Site Office - May 2011 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Office - May 2011 Site Office - May 2011 Independent Activity Report, Pantex Site Office - May 2011 May 2011 Pantex Site Office Quality Assurance Survey [HIAR-PTX-2011-05-06] In coordination with the Pantex Site Office (PXSO), the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) site lead participated in a National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)/PXSO Quality Assurance Survey (QAS 1) of the contractor's weapon quality program conducted May 2-5, 2011. The purpose of the QAS 1 survey was to examine how Babcock and Wilcox Technical Services Pantex, LLC (B&W Pantex) implements, monitors, and improves the Quality Management System and its implementing policies, processes, and procedures, as well as the level of compliance with the contractual requirements. Independent Activity Report, Pantex Site Office - May 2011

273

Modular authorization and administration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In large organizations the administration of access privileges (such as the assignment of access rights to a user in a particular role) is handled cooperatively through distributed administrators in various different capacities. A quorum may be necessary, ... Keywords: Modularity, Petri-Nets, composability, work-flow

Horst F. Wedde; Mario Lischka

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 23:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 23: ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 23: RECORDS COMMON TO MOST OFFICES June 2007 Revision 1 This schedule provides for the disposal of certain records common to most offices. It covers administrative subject files; facilitative records such as suspense files, tracking and control records, calendars, and indexes; and documents of transitory value. This schedule does not apply to any materials determined to be non-record or to materials such as calendars or work schedules claimed as personal. Office Administrative Files described under item 1 are records retained by an originating office as its record of initiation of an action, request, or response to requests for information. This item may be applied only to separate administrative files containing such records as copies of

275

Opening Statement by NNSA Administrator D'Agostino on the Current Status  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Current Status Current Status and Future Direction for U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy and Posture Before The Subcommittee on Strategic Forces House Armed Services Committee | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Congressional Testimony > Opening Statement by NNSA Administrator D'Agostino on ...

276

Concerns with Consulting Contract Administration at Various Department Sites, IG-0889  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inspection Report Inspection Report Concerns with Consulting Contract Administration at Various Department Sites DOE/IG-0889 June 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits & Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 June 7, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY OF ENERGY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Concerns with Consulting Contract Administration at Various Department Sites" INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The mission of the Department of Energy (Department) is to ensure America's national security and prosperity by addressing its energy, environmental, and nuclear weapons challenges through

277

Opening Statement by NNSA Administrator D'Agostino on the Current Status  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Current Status Current Status and Future Direction for U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy and Posture Before The Subcommittee on Strategic Forces House Armed Services Committee | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Congressional Testimony > Opening Statement by NNSA Administrator D'Agostino on ...

278

Techniques to evaluate the importance of common cause degradation on reliability and safety of nuclear weapons.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the nuclear weapon stockpile ages, there is increased concern about common degradation ultimately leading to common cause failure of multiple weapons that could significantly impact reliability or safety. Current acceptable limits for the reliability and safety of a weapon are based on upper limits on the probability of failure of an individual item, assuming that failures among items are independent. We expanded the current acceptable limits to apply to situations with common cause failure. Then, we developed a simple screening process to quickly assess the importance of observed common degradation for both reliability and safety to determine if further action is necessary. The screening process conservatively assumes that common degradation is common cause failure. For a population with between 100 and 5000 items we applied the screening process and conclude the following. In general, for a reliability requirement specified in the Military Characteristics (MCs) for a specific weapon system, common degradation is of concern if more than 100(1-x)% of the weapons are susceptible to common degradation, where x is the required reliability expressed as a fraction. Common degradation is of concern for the safety of a weapon subsystem if more than 0.1% of the population is susceptible to common degradation. Common degradation is of concern for the safety of a weapon component or overall weapon system if two or more components/weapons in the population are susceptible to degradation. Finally, we developed a technique for detailed evaluation of common degradation leading to common cause failure for situations that are determined to be of concern using the screening process. The detailed evaluation requires that best estimates of common cause and independent failure probabilities be produced. Using these techniques, observed common degradation can be evaluated for effects on reliability and safety.

Darby, John L.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Western Area Power Administration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Administration Administration Jump to: navigation, search Name Western Area Power Administration Place Colorado Utility Id 27000 Utility Location Yes Ownership F NERC Location WECC, MAPP NERC MRO Yes NERC SPP Yes NERC WECC Yes ISO CA Yes RTO SPP Yes ISO MISO Yes ISO Other Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Schedule R-8 Farm and Home Residential Average Rates Commercial: $0.0278/kWh

280

Assessing the risk from the depleted uranium weapons used in Operation Allied Force  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conflict in Yugoslavia has been a source of great concern for the neighboring countries, about the radiological and toxic hazard posed by the alleged presence of depleted uranium in NATO weapons. In the present study a worst-case scenario is assumed mainly to assess the risk for Greece and other neighboring countries of Yugoslavia at similar distances . The risk of the weapons currently in use is proved to be negligible at distances greater than 100 Km. For shorter distances classified data of weapons composition are needed to obtain a reliable assessment.

Liolios, T E

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administrator weapons activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Fourth generation nuclear weapons: Military effectiveness and collateral effects, Report ISRI-05-03  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper begins with a general introduction and update to Fourth Generation Nuclear Weapons (FGNW), and then addresses some particularly important military aspects on which there has been only limited public discussion so far. These aspects concern the unique military characteristics of FGNWs which make them radically different from both nuclear weapons based on previous-generation nuclear-explosives and from conventional weapons based on chemical-explosives: yields in the 1 to 100 tons range, greatly enhanced coupling to targets, possibility to drive powerful shaped-charge jets and forged fragments, enhanced prompt radiation effects, reduced collateral damage and residual radioactivity, etc.

Andre Gsponer

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

National Nuclear Security Administration IUA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IUA IUA '1.L'\I~~ Pantex Site Office IIV1'~~4j P. O. Box 30030 Amarillo, TX 79120 National Nuclear Security Administration NEPA Compliance Officer Rationale Pantex Site Office Proj. No.: EXP-IO-OlS-C NEPA ID No.: PXP-IO-OOOI Uninterruptable Power Supply (UPS)/Generator Replacement Application of DOE NEPA Procedure: Categorical Exclusions B 1.3 and B 1.23, Applicable to Facility Operations (10 CFR Part 1021 , Subpart D, Appendix B), apply to the proposed activity described below. Rationale: The U.S . Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), proposes to demolish Building 12-20, which is 225 square feet (sf) in size, along with a small concrete pad of approximately 32 sf. The building currently houses an inoperable

283

ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 11:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 11: ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 11: SPACE AND MAINTENANCE RECORDS June 2007 Revision 1 This schedule provides for the disposal of all copies, wherever located in the Department, of records relating to space and maintenance, except as indicated below. Records documenting these functions pertain to the acquisition, allocation, utilization, and release of space and include related correspondence and reports submitted to the General Services Administration (or equivalent agency with similar Government-wide responsibilities) as directed by law and regulation (41 CFR 101-17); correspondence and forms relating to the compilation of directory service listings; identification credentials and related accountable records; requests for building and equipment services;

284

Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information Administration...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2012 Executive Summary This report updates and expands upon a December 2011 U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) report, Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity:...

285

U.S. Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Energy Information Administration Annual Report on Implementation of CIPSEA - 4/30/13 This report is for activity during calendar year 2012. 1) Use of the CIPSEA Confidentiality Pledge. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) collected information under Title V of the E-Government Act, Confidential Information Protection and Statistical Efficiency Act of 2002 (CIPSEA) from the following eleven (11) surveys during 2012. Office of Petroleum and Biofuels Statistics Petroleum Marketing Surveys OMB No: 1905-0174 Form EIA-863, "Petroleum Product Sales Identification Survey" Form EIA-878, "Motor Gasoline Price Survey" Form EIA-888, "On-Highway Diesel Fuel Price Survey"

286

EIA Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

as of August 15, with Consuming East region storage facilities holding 1,217 Bcf. The Energy Information Administration has revised downward its estimate of working gas in storage...

287

EIA Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

East to 1,443 Bcf - 9 Bcf more than last year at this time according to AGA data. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates that the working gas level at the end of...

288

EIA Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

by almost 20 Bcf the weekly average of about 74.1 Bcf during May last year, using the Energy Information Administration&20;s (EIA) reported total net injections in May 1996 of 328...

289

Gina Pearson Assistant Administrator  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gina Pearson Gina Pearson Assistant Administrator for Communications Duties Gina Pearson is the Assistant Administrator (AA) for Communications, and in this capacity provides leadership and direction to conduct the U.S. Energy Information Administration's comprehensive communications program for diverse external customer groups and agency employees. The AA for Communications is responsible for Agency communications policies and standards, the www.eia.gov website, press and media rela- tions, marketing and outreach services, energy education and literacy efforts, and the Agency's employee intranet site. Biography Since 2006, Gina Pearson has played a leadership role in the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) strategy and operations for commu- nicating information and data to Federal, State and local agencies; the

290

Adam Sieminski Administrator Biography  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Adam Sieminski Adam Sieminski Administrator Biography Adam Sieminski was sworn in on June 4, 2012, as the eighth administrator of the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). From March 2012 to May 2012, while awaiting confirmation as EIA administrator, Mr. Siemin- ski served as senior director for energy and environment on the staff of the National Security Council. From 2005 until March 2012, he was the chief energy economist for Deutsche Bank, working with the Bank's global research and trading units. Drawing on extensive industry, government, and academic sources, Mr. Sieminski forecasted energy market trends and wrote on a variety of topics involving energy economics, climate change, geopoli- tics, and commodity prices. From 1998 to 2005, he served as the director and energy strategist for

291

Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual Report of the Origin of Natural Gas Liquids Production 1 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Energy Information Administration Washington, DC 20585 Form Approved XXXX XXXX OMB No....

292

Table - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

September 2013 U.S. Energy Information 9/27/2013 9:52:45 AM Administration | Natural Gas Monthly 9 Created on: Table 4. U.S. natural gas imports ...

293

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contact Us U.S. Department of Energy Southwestern Power Administration Gore Maintenance Office Mailing Address: P.O. Box 728 Gore, OK 74435-0728 Delivery Address: 14165 East 143rd...

294

National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Security Administration FY 2011 - FY 2015 Budget Outlook Managing the NNSA 4.0% Science, Technology & Engineering 14.5% Stockpile Support 17.9% Preventing the Spread of...

295

Bioforensics: Characterization of biological weapons agents by NanoSIMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The anthrax attacks of Fall 2001 highlight the need to develop forensic methods based on multiple identifiers to determine the origin of biological weapons agents. Genetic typing methods (i.e., DNA and RNA-based) provide one attribution technology, but genetic information alone is not usually sufficient to determine the provenance of the material. Non-genetic identifiers, including elemental and isotopic signatures, provide complementary information that can be used to identify the means, geographic location and date of production. Under LDRD funding, we have successfully developed the techniques necessary to perform bioforensic characterization with the NanoSIMS at the individual spore level. We have developed methods for elemental and isotopic characterization at the single spore scale. We have developed methods for analyzing spore sections to map elemental abundance within spores. We have developed rapid focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning techniques for spores to preserve elemental and structural integrity. And we have developed a high-resolution depth profiling method to characterize the elemental distribution in individual spores without sectioning. We used these newly developed methods to study the controls on elemental abundances in spores, characterize the elemental distribution of in spores, and to study elemental uptake by spores. Our work under this LDRD project attracted FBI and DHS funding for applied purposes.

Weber, P K; Ghosal, S; Leighton, T J; Wheeler, K E; Hutcheon, I D

2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

296

Charles McMillan to lead Los Alamos National Laboratory's Weapons Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

McMillan to Lead Weapons Program McMillan to Lead Weapons Program Charles McMillan to lead Los Alamos National Laboratory's Weapons Program He will provide oversight and direction for the nuclear weapons program at Los Alamos to accomplish the Laboratory's core mission. July 28, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

297

EA-0874: Low-level Waste Drum Staging Building at Weapons Engineering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

74: Low-level Waste Drum Staging Building at Weapons 74: Low-level Waste Drum Staging Building at Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility, TA-16 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico EA-0874: Low-level Waste Drum Staging Building at Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility, TA-16 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to place a 3 meter (m) by 4.5 m prefabricated storage building (transportainer) adjacent to the existing Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility at Technical Area 16, U.S. Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, and to use the building as a staging site for sealed 55-gallon drums of noncompactible waste contaminated with low levels of tritium. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES

298

U.S. and Russia Reaffirm Commitment to Disposing of Weapon-Grade Plutonium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reaffirm Commitment to Disposing of Weapon-Grade Reaffirm Commitment to Disposing of Weapon-Grade Plutonium U.S. and Russia Reaffirm Commitment to Disposing of Weapon-Grade Plutonium July 13, 2006 - 3:05pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman and Sergey Kiriyenko, the director of Russia's Federal Atomic Energy Agency, have signed a joint statement reaffirming their commitment to dispose of 34 metric tons of excess weapon-grade plutonium by irradiation in nuclear reactors. "This statement is a clear sign of our mutual commitment to keeping dangerous nuclear material out of the hands of terrorists. We look forward to working together with the Russians to ensure that this important nonproliferation project moves forward in both Russia and the United States," Secretary Bodman said.

299

EIS-0229: Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

29: Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile 29: Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials EIS-0229: Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Summary The EIS will evaluate the reasonable alternatives and potential environmental impacts for the proposed siting, construction, and operation of three types of facilities for plutonium disposition. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available For Download September 5, 2007 EIS-0229: Supplement Analysis (September 2007) Storage of Surplus Plutonium Materials at the Savannah River Site November 14, 2003 EIS-0229: Record of Decision (November 2003) Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials November 7, 2003 EIS-0229-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Fabrication of Mixed Oxide Fuel Lead Assemblies in Europe

300

EA-0874: Low-level Waste Drum Staging Building at Weapons Engineering...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

74: Low-level Waste Drum Staging Building at Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility, TA-16 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico EA-0874: Low-level Waste Drum...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administrator weapons activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Imaging the ionization track of alpha recoils for the directional detection of weapons grade plutonium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the dawn of the nuclear weapons era, political, military, and scientific leaders around the world have been working to contain the proliferation of Special Nuclear Material and explosively fissile material. This paper ...

Koch, William Lawrence

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Utilization of Surplus Weapons Plutonium As Mixed Oxide Fuel Background Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with worldwide stockpiles of plutonium, both civil and military. The 1995 position statement included an endorsement of the use of reactor irradiation for disposition of surplus U.S. and Russian weapons

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Quality at Y-12, part 3 -- Or: Quality goes beyond nuclear weapons...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at Y-12, part 3 Or: Quality goes beyond nuclear weapons (title as it appeared in The Oak Ridger) As we continue our look at the history of Quality at Y-12, Bud Leete, Y-12...

304

Physics studies of weapons plutonium disposition in the IFR closed fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect

The core performance impact of weapons plutonium introduction into the IFR closed fuel cycle is investigated by comparing three disposition scenarios: a power production mode, a moderate destruction mode, and a maximum destruction mode all at a constant heat rating of 840 MWt. For each scenario, two fuel cycle models are evaluated: cores using weapons material as the sole source of transuranics in a once-through mode, and recycle corns using weapons material only as required for a make-up feed. Calculated results include mass flows, detailed isotopic distributions, neutronic performance characteristics, and reactivity feedback coefficients. In general, it is shown that weapons plutonium feed does not have an adverse impact on IFR core performance characteristics.

Hill, R.N.; Wade, D.C.; Liaw, J.R.; Fujita, E.K.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

A quantitative assessment of nuclear weapons proliferation risk utilizing probabilistic methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comparative quantitative assessment is made of the nuclear weapons proliferation risk between various nuclear reactor/fuel cycle concepts using a probabilistic method. The work presented details quantified proliferation ...

Sentell, Dennis Shannon, 1971-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

A system for the detection of concealed nuclear weapons and fissile material aboard cargo cotainerships  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new approach to the detection of concealed nuclear weapons and fissile material aboard cargo containerships is proposed. The ship-based approach removes the constraints of current thinking by addressing the threat of ...

Gallagher, Shawn P., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Mission emphasis and the determination of needs for new weapon systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efforts to understand the determination of needs of new weapon systems must take into account inputs and actions beyond the formally documented requirements generation process. This study analyzes three recent historical ...

Gillespie, Daniel Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Proceedings: 17th Asilomar conference on fire and blast effects of nuclear weapons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the 1983 conference was to provide for the technical exchange of ideas relating to the science and technology of the immediate effects of nuclear weapon explosions. Separate abstracts were prepared for 39 of the papers.

Hickman, R.G.; Meier, C.A. (eds.) [eds.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 2: PAYROLL AND PAY ADMINISTRATION...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 2: PAYROLL AND PAY ADMINISTRATION RECORDS-Revision 2 Financial Management Handbook Handbook on Overseas Assignments...

310

October 2013 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or creativity in support of NNSA's nuclear weapons program." Honorees included: - Rick Poland, for leadership of the Federal Working Group on Industrial Digital Radiography - The...

311

Analysis of Enriched Uranium and Weapons Plutonium Reloads for PWRs Using BRACC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comparisons of the multicycle results demonstrate that the correlation coefficients based on the CASMO3 data were implemented correctly and that the Linear Reactivity Model is acceptably accurate for missed reloads containing both uranium and weapons plutonium fuel. The expanded set of correlation coefficients make BRACC a useful tool for performing multi-cycle in-core fuel management studies of PWR cores containing weapons plutonium.

Alonso, G.; Parish, T.A.

1997-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

312

Virtual enterprise model for the electronic components business in the Nuclear Weapons Complex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electronic components business within the Nuclear Weapons Complex spans organizational and Department of Energy contractor boundaries. An assessment of the current processes indicates a need for fundamentally changing the way electronic components are developed, procured, and manufactured. A model is provided based on a virtual enterprise that recognizes distinctive competencies within the Nuclear Weapons Complex and at the vendors. The model incorporates changes that reduce component delivery cycle time and improve cost effectiveness while delivering components of the appropriate quality.

Ferguson, T.J.; Long, K.S.; Sayre, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hull, A.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Carey, D.A.; Sim, J.R.; Smith, M.G. [Allied-Signal Aerospace Co., Kansas City, MO (United States). Kansas City Div.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Weapons of Mass Destruction Technology Evaluation and Training Range  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has a long history for providing technology evaluation and training for military and other federal level Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) response agencies. Currently there are many federal organizations and commercial companies developing technologies related to detecting, assessing, mitigating and protecting against hazards associated with a WMD event. Unfortunately, very few locations exist within the United States where WMD response technologies are realistically field tested and evaluated using real chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosive materials. This is particularly true with biological and radiological hazards. Related to this lack of adequate WMD, multi-hazard technology testing capability is the shortage of locations where WMD response teams can train using actual chemical, biological, and radiological material or highly realistic simulates. In response to these technology evaluation and training needs, the INL has assembled a consortium of subject matter experts from existing programs and identified dedicated resources for the purpose of establishing an all-hazards, WMD technology evaluation and training range. The author describes the challenges associated with creating the all-hazards WMD technology evaluation and training range and lists the technical, logistical and financial benefits of an all-hazards technology evaluation and training range. Current resources and capabilities for conducting all-hazard technology evaluation and training at the INL are identified. Existing technology evaluation and training programs at the INL related to radiological, biological and chemical hazards are highlighted, including successes and lessons learned. Finally, remaining gaps in WMD technology evaluation and training capabilities are identified along with recommendations for closing those gaps.

Kevin Larry Young

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Fabrication of zircon for disposition of weapons plutonium  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). In an effort to address the problems of long term storage and nuclear waste minimization, zircon has been proposed as a host medium for plutonium and other actinides recovered from dismantled nuclear weapons. The objective of this work is to investigate the feasibility of large scale fabrication of Pu-bearing zircon. Since PuO{sub 2} is thermodynamically less stable than ZrO{sub 2}, it is expected that the process parameters determined for synthesizing ZrSiO{sub 4} (zircon) would be applicable to those for PuSiO{sub 4} (Pu-zircon). Furthermore, since the foremost concern in plutonium processing is the potential for contamination release, this work emphasizes the development of process parameters, using zircon first, to anticipate potential material problems in the containment system for reaction mixtures during processing. Stoichiometric mixtures of ZrO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2}, in hundred-gram batches, have been subjected to hot isostatic pressing (HIP) at temperatures near 1,500 C and pressures approximately 10,000 psi. The product materials have been analyzed by x-ray powder diffraction, and are found to consist of zircon after approximately two hours of reaction time. From this work, it is clear that the fabrication of large quantities of Pu-zircon is feasible. The most notable result of this work is evidence for the existence of container problems. This result, in turn, suggests potential solutions to these problems. Experiments with the quartz inner container, the glass sealant, a sacrificial metal barrier, and a metal outer container are being investigated to mitigate these potential hazards.

Kim, K.C.; Huang, J.Y.; Serrano, P.L. [and others

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

National Nuclear Security Administration Overview | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Security Administration Overview National Nuclear Security Administration Overview National Nuclear Security Administration Overview More Documents & Publications National...

316

National Nuclear Security Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Nuclear Security Administration Finding of No Significant Impact for the Construction and Operation of a New Office Building and Related Structures within TA-3 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico U. S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos Area Office 528 35th Street Los Alamos, N M 8 7 5 4 4 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY. NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECUIRTY ADMINISTRATION FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT INIPACT Construction and Operation of a New Office Building and Related Structures withinTA-3 at Los Alarnos National Laboratory, Los Alamos. New Mexico FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT: The Environmental Assessment (EA) for Construction and Operation of a New Office Building and Related Structures within TA-3 at L os Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (DOE/EA- 7 375)

317

Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Marks 25th Anniversary of 1973 Oil Embargo Marks 25th Anniversary of 1973 Oil Embargo Jay Hakes, Administrator, Energy Information Administration (EIA) September 3, 1998 Click here to start Table of Contents Energy Information Administration Some Views of 1973 Major Disruptions of World Oil Supply Imported Oil as a Percent of Total U. S. Consumption Percent of OPEC and Persian Gulf World Oil Production U. S. Retail Price of Gasoline U. S. Total Petroleum Consumption U. S. Per Capita Use of Petroleum U. S. Government Owned Crude Oil Stocks Cost of Finding Oil and Gas Reserves U. S. MPG Ratings for New Vehicles U. S. Average Horsepower of a New Vehicle Share of U. S. Electricity Generated By Petroleum Futures And Options Markets Changed Energy Marketing U. S. Total Energy Consumption U. S. Per Capita Use of Energy

318

National Nuclear Security Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AI~W~~l AI~W~~l 11Vl'~~4 National Nuclear Security Administration Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office P.O. Box 98518 Las Vegas, NV 89193-8518 JAN! 8 2013 Gregory H. Woods, General Counsel, DOE/HQ (GC-1) FORS NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE (NNSA/NSO) NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) ANNUAL SUMMARY In accordance with DOE Order 451.1B, National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program, NNSA/NSO is submitting the enclosed Annual NEP A Planning Summary. The document provides a brief description of ongoing and planned NEP A actions for calendar year 2013. This summary provides information for completion of the Site- Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Nevada National Security Site and Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada.

319

Federal Railroad Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Update Du Update Du Jour Department Of Energy Transportation External Coordination Working Group Meeting Albuquerque, New Mexico April 21-23, 2004 Presented by Kevin R. Blackwell Radioactive Materials Program Manager Federal Railroad Administration Federal Railroad Administration Dedicated Train Study- Report to Congress FRA' s Research & Development Office (as lead on the study) received a draft final report from the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (VNTSC) in late November, 2003. Editorial corrections were made and a final draft dated February, 2004 was provided to FRA. Final Draft Report FRA has been reviewed and been sent to FRA Administrator for clearance and forwarding to DOT OST. FRA has already "Officially Coordinated" and briefed DOT OST and

320

Western Area Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Loveland Area Projects November 29-30, 2011 2 Agenda * Overview of Western Area Power Administration * Post-1989 Loveland Area Projects (LAP) Marketing Plan * Energy Planning and Management Program * Development of the 2025 PMI Proposal * 2025 PMI Proposal * 2025 PMI Comment Period & Proposal Information * Questions 3 Overview of Western Area Power Administration (Western) * One of four power marketing administrations within the Department of Energy * Mission: Market and deliver reliable, renewable, cost-based Federal hydroelectric power and related services within a 15-state region of the central and western U.S. * Vision: Provide premier power marketing and transmission services Rocky Mountain Region (RMR) is one of five regional offices 4 Rocky Mountain Region

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administrator weapons activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22 Federal Register 22 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 29 / Friday, February 11, 2011 / Rules and Regulations SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 13 CFR Parts 121 and 124 RIN 3245-AF53 Small Business Size Regulations; 8(a) Business Development/Small Disadvantaged Business Status Determinations AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This rule makes changes to the regulations governing the section 8(a) Business Development (8(a) BD) program, the U.S. Small Business Administration's (SBA or Agency) size regulations, and the regulations affecting Small Disadvantaged Businesses (SDBs). It is the first comprehensive revision to the 8(a) BD program in more than ten years. Some of the changes involve technical issues such as changing the term ''SIC code'' to

322

Southeastern Power Administration | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Power Operations Click to view a map of SEPA power operations. Latest Rate Schedules October 1, 2012 ALA-1-N Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: PowerSouth Energy Cooperative System: Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina October 1, 2012 Duke-1-E Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: Duke On-System System: Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina October 1, 2012 Duke-2-E Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: Central System: Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina More schedules Annual Reports December 28, 2012 Southeastern Power Administration 2012 Annual Report This report reflects our agency's programs,accomplishments, operational, and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2011, and ending September 30, 2012.

323

National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Federal Equal Opportunity Recruitment Program Plan Certification - Fiscal Year 2009 Please type or print clearly and return this sheet with original signature to: Ms. Carmen Andujar, Manager Recruiting, Examining and Assessment Group Center for Talent and Capacity Policy Strategic Human Resources Policy Attn: FY 2009 FEORP Report U.S. Office of Personnel Management 1900 E Street, NW, Room 6547 Washington, D.C. 20415-9800 A. Name and Address of Agency National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Diversity and Outreach 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 B. Name and Title of Designated FEORP Official (include address, if different from above,

324

National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

i. i. Message from the Administrator President Obama has reshaped our national security priorities making enterprise infrastructure modernization with integrated Information Technology (IT) capabilities a key strategic initiative. Our IT infrastructure must ensure that our workforce can access appropriate information in a secure, reliable, and cost-effective manner. Effective information sharing throughout the government enhances the national security of the United States (US). For the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), effective information sharing helps strengthen our nuclear security mission; builds collaborative networks within NNSA as well as with the Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Defense (DoD), and other national security

325

Dear Secretary/ Administrator:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Management and Budget Dear Secretary/ Administrator: Executive Office of the President Council on Environmental Quality Consistent with the President's focus on sound stewardship of our natural resources, we are committed to improving environmental governance through constructive and timely approaches to addressing challenges that arise over the use, conservation, and restoration of the environment, natural resources, and public lands. To achieve better governance, the Administration calls for department and agency commitment to the goals identified in the Memorandum on Environmental Collaboration and Conflict Resolution, and the goals identified in related policy guidance. This approach supports other transparency and good government initiatives including the Memorandum on Transparency and Open Government (January 21,

326

Federal Railroad Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE TRANSPORTATION EXTERNAL WORKING GROUP MEETING Pueblo, CO. September 20, 2005 Presented by Kevin R. Blackwell Radioactive Materials/Hazardous Materials Specialist Federal Railroad Administration - HQ Hazmat Division, Washington, DC. Federal Railroad Administration Dedicated Train Study - Report to Congress November 2003 - FRA' s Ofc. Of Research & Development (RDV), as lead on the Dedicated Train Study (DTS), received draft final report from the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (VNTSC), the contractor conducting the study. February, 2004 - FRA completed review of DFR and submitted editorial corrections back to VNTSC. Final draft of the DTS with editorial corrections received from VNTSC in February, 2004. March to September 2004 -

327

ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 22:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 22: ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 22: AUDIT/INVESTIGATIVE RECORDS June 2007 Revision 1 Section I of this schedule covers records associated with investigations other than those performed by the Office of the Inspector General (OIG). Types of investigations may include: routine and significant internal program investigations, specific purpose investigations, audits, inspections, appraisals, and management reviews. Investigations may be described or referred to as audits, appraisals, surveillance, self-assessments, management assessments, or evaluations. Investigations may be conducted by DOE or by its contractors. Section II covers records created by the Department's OIG investigations. OIG investigations serve to prevent or reduce waste and fraud in Departmental programs,

328

National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Federal Equal Opportunity Recruitment Program Plan Certification - Fiscal Year 2011 Please type or print clearly and return this sheet with original signature to: Ms. Carmen Andujar, Manager Recruiting, Examining and Assessment Group Center for Talent and Capacity Policy Strategic Human Resources Policy Attn: FY 2011 FEORP Report U.S. Office of Personnel Management 1900 E Street, NW, Room 6547 Washington, D.C. 20415-9800 A. Name and Address of Agency National Nuclear Security Administration 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 B. Name and Title of Designated FEORP Official (include address, if different from above,

329

Computer hardware fault administration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Computer hardware fault administration carried out in a parallel computer, where the parallel computer includes a plurality of compute nodes. The compute nodes are coupled for data communications by at least two independent data communications networks, where each data communications network includes data communications links connected to the compute nodes. Typical embodiments carry out hardware fault administration by identifying a location of a defective link in the first data communications network of the parallel computer and routing communications data around the defective link through the second data communications network of the parallel computer.

Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN); Megerian, Mark G. (Rochester, MN); Ratterman, Joseph D. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian E. (Rochester, MN)

2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

330

FY 2005 Volume 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Volume 1 February 2004 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Naval Reactors Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Department of Energy Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Request DOE/ME-0032 Volume 1 February 2004 Volume 1 Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Printed with soy ink on recycled paper National Nuclear Security Administration National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation

331

Proliferation concerns in the Russian closed nuclear weapons complex cities : a study of regional migration behavior.  

SciTech Connect

The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 left the legacy of the USSR weapons complex with an estimated 50 nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons cities containing facilities responsible for research, production, maintenance, and destruction of the weapons stockpile. The Russian Federation acquired ten such previously secret, closed nuclear weapons complex cities. Unfortunately, a lack of government funding to support these facilities resulted in non-payment of salaries to employees and even plant closures, which led to an international fear of weapons material and knowledge proliferation. This dissertation analyzes migration in 33 regions of the Russian Federation, six of which contain the ten closed nuclear weapons complex cities. This study finds that the presence of a closed nuclear city does not significantly influence migration. However, the factors that do influence migration are statistically different in regions containing closed nuclear cities compared to regions without closed nuclear cities. Further, these results show that the net rate of migration has changed across the years since the break up of the Soviet Union, and that the push and pull factors for migration have changed across time. Specifically, personal and residential factors had a significant impact on migration immediately following the collapse of the Soviet Union, but economic infrastructure and societal factors became significant in later years. Two significant policy conclusions are derived from this research. First, higher levels of income are found to increase outmigration from regions, implying that programs designed to prevent migration by increasing incomes for closed city residents may be counter-productive. Second, this study finds that programs designed to increase capital and build infrastructure in the new Russian Federation will be more effective for employing scientists and engineers from the weapons complex, and consequently reduce the potential for emigration of potential proliferants.

Flores, Kristen Lee

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Data Administration Area: Date Issued  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy Data Administration Policy Area: Date Issued: April, 1994 Title: Data Administration Last. INTRODUCTION The President established the Committee on Data Administration (CODA) in May, 1992, to advise him on policies in the area of data administration (attached as references Policy ADC 011 and TOR for CODA

Brownstone, Rob

333

Fuel Consumption - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration, Residential Energy Consumption Survey(RTECS), 1994 Fuel Consumption

334

Alternative Fuels - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration, Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey(RTECS), Transporation Channel of Alternative Fuels

335

ADMINISTRATIVE AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

development of risk management- relatedITservicesthatbenefittheentireUCsystem. The systems developed at UC and maintenance have diminished so dramatically. #12;7 ADMINISTRATIVE AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AnnuAl RepoRt 2010, are collaborating to implement a new asset management, work management, and integrated planning system

Hammock, Bruce D.

336

ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.' :h I : .' :h I : ' ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20545 October 24, 1975 :~.. ,. Memo to Piles' CARNEGIE-MELLON S~C&RCCYCLOTRON On October 23, 1975, W. J. McCool (HQOS), E. K. Loop (HQ-OS), R. E. Allen (HQ-OS), J. Pingel (CH), B. 3. Davis (CH), R. Drucker (CR-BAO) and I met at Germantown to discuss the clean-up of radio- activity at the Saxonburg accelerator site. After discussion, we concluded acceptable criteria would include removal of all material necessary to reduce the residual surface activity to a maximum ofO.04 mR/hr above ambient background. Since ambient backgrounds is 0.03 to 0.05 &/hr, the above 0.04 mR/hr criterion will essentially be the 0.08 mR/hr (induced +background) case discussed previously.

337

Igniting the Light Elements: The Los Alamos Thermonuclear Weapon Project, 1942-1952  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The American system of nuclear weapons research and development was conceived and developed not as a result of technological determinism, but by a number of individual architects who promoted the growth of this large technologically-based complex. While some of the technological artifacts of this system, such as the fission weapons used in World War II, have been the subject of many historical studies, their technical successors--fusion (or hydrogen) devices--are representative of the largely unstudied highly secret realms of nuclear weapons science and engineering. In the postwar period a small number of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's staff and affiliates were responsible for theoretical work on fusion weapons, yet the program was subject to both the provisions and constraints of the US Atomic Energy Commission, of which Los Alamos was a part. The Commission leadership's struggle to establish a mission for its network of laboratories, least of all to keep them operating, affected Los Alamos's leaders' decisions as to the course of weapons design and development projects. Adapting Thomas P. Hughes's ''large technological systems'' thesis, I focus on the technical, social, political, and human problems that nuclear weapons scientists faced while pursuing the thermonuclear project, demonstrating why the early American thermonuclear bomb project was an immensely complicated scientific and technological undertaking. I concentrate mainly on Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's Theoretical, or T, Division, and its members' attempts to complete an accurate mathematical treatment of the ''Super''--the most difficult problem in physics in the postwar period--and other fusion weapon theories. Although tackling a theoretical problem, theoreticians had to address technical and engineering issues as well. I demonstrate the relative value and importance of H-bomb research over time in the postwar era to scientific, politician, and military participants in this project. I analyze how and when participants in the H-bomb project recognized both blatant and subtle problems facing the project, how scientists solved them, and the relationship this process had to official nuclear weapons policies. Consequently, I show how the practice of nuclear weapons science in the postwar period became an extremely complex, technologically-based endeavor.

Anne C. Fitzpatrick

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Secretary Chu, NNSA Administrator and the Tennessee Congressional  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and the Tennessee Congressional and the Tennessee Congressional Delegation Join Local Officials in Dedicating Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility at Y-12 Secretary Chu, NNSA Administrator and the Tennessee Congressional Delegation Join Local Officials in Dedicating Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility at Y-12 March 22, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - Secretary of Energy Steven Chu today gave the keynote address at a dedication ceremony recognizing the start-up of operations at the nation's new, one of a kind storage facility for weapons-grade uranium. The Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility (HEUMF) - the ultra-secure uranium warehouse at the Y-12 National Security Complex - replaces multiple aging buildings with a single state-of-the-art storage facility. Secretary Chu was joined by Representative Zach Wamp from Tennessee's 3rd

339

Radiocesium discharges and subsequent environmental transport at the major US weapons production facilities  

SciTech Connect

Radiocesium is one of the more prevalent radionuclides in the environment as a result of weapons production-related atomic projects in the USA and the former Soviet Union. Radiocesium discharges during the 1950s account for a large fraction of the historical releases from US weapons production facilities. Releases of radiocesium to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems during the early years of nuclear weapons production provided the opportunity to conduct multidisciplinary studies on the transport mechanisms of this potentially hazardous radionuclide. The major US Department of Energy facilities (Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee, Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, and Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina, USA) are located in regions of the country that have different geographical characteristics. The facility siting provided diverse backgrounds for the development of an understanding of environmental factors contributing to the fate and transport of radiocesium. In this paper, we summarize the significant environmental releases of radiocesium in the early years of weapons production and then discuss the historically significant transport mechanisms for {sup 137}Cs at the three facilities that were part of the US nuclear weapons complex.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Hamby, D. M. [Oregon State University; Schreckhise, R. G. [Washington State University

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Radiocesium Discharges and Subsequent Environmental Transport at the Major U.S. Weapons Production Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Radiocesium is one of the more prevalent radionuclides in the environment as a result of weapons production related atomic projects in the United States and the former Soviet Union. Radiocesium discharges during the 1950's account for a large fraction of the historical releases from U.S. weapons production facilities. Releases of radiocesium to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems during the early ,years of nuclear weapons production provided the opportunity to conduct multidisciplinary studies on the transport mechanisms of this potentially hazardous radionuclide. The major U.S. Department of Energy facilities (Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee, Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, and Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina) are located in regions of the country that have different geographical characteristics. The facility siting provided diverse backgrounds for the development of an understanding of environmental factors contributing to the fate and transport of radiocesium. In this paper, we summarize the significant environmental releases of radiocesium in the early -years of weapons production and then discuss the historically significant transport mechanisms for r37Cs at the three facilities that were part of the U.S. nuclear weapons complex.

Garten, Jr. C.T.; Hamby, D.M.; Schreckhise, R.G.

1999-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administrator weapons activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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341

Statement by NNSA Administrator D'Agostino on the Current Status and  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

by NNSA Administrator D'Agostino on the Current Status and by NNSA Administrator D'Agostino on the Current Status and Future Direction for U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy and Posture Before The Subcommittee on Strategic Forces House Armed Services Committee | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Congressional Testimony > Statement by NNSA

342

Supplement Analysis for the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Continued Operation of the Pantex Plant and Associated Storage of Nuclear Weapon Components  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

D D E P A R T M E N T O F E N E R G Y U N I T E D S T A T E S O F A M E R I C A SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR THE FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR THE CONTINUED OPERATION OF THE PANTEX PLANT AND ASSOCIATED STORAGE OF NUCLEAR WEAPON COMPONENTS DOE/EIS-0225/SA-03 United States Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Pantex Site Operations P.O. Box 30030 Amarillo, Texas 79120-0030 February 2003 i Summary The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Implementing Procedures at 10 CFR 1021.330(d) require evaluation of its site-wide environmental impact statements (EISs) at least every 5 years by preparation of a supplement analysis (SA), as provided in 10 CFR 1021.314. Based on the SA, a determination is made as to whether the existing EIS remains

343

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News & Publications News & Publications Annual Performance Plan Annual Report Newsletters Strategic Plan SWPA - Overview Video System Map Press Releases 2012 Skip Navigation Links Turner Named Southwestern Administrator 2009 Skip Navigation Links New Deputy Administrator Selected for Liaison Office Ice Storm Damage Update - March 24, 2009 Ice Storm Damage Update - March 12, 2009 Ice Storm Damage Update - March 10, 2009 Ice Storm Damage Update - March 05, 2009 Ice Storm Damage Update - March 04, 2009 Ice Storm Damage Update - March 02, 2009 Ice Storm Damage Update - February 23, 2009 Ice Storm Damage Update - February 17, 2009 Ice Storm Damage Update - February 13, 2009 Ice Storm Damage Update - February 12, 2009 Ice Storm Damage Update - February 11, 2009 Ice Storm Damage Update - February 10, 2009

344

National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wnchington, DC 20585 Wnchington, DC 20585 July 13, 2010 OFFICE O F THE ADMINISTRATOR 'l'he Honorable Peter S. Winokur Chairman Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board 625 Indiana Avenue, NW, Suite 700 Washington, D.C. 20004 [>ear Mr. Chairman: By the direction of the Secretary of Energy, the enclosed is the Department's Implementation Plan (Plan) for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) Recommendation 2009-2, Los Alamos Nutional Luhorutory Plutoniu?lt Fucilitj. Sr i s m ic Sufety. The Plan provides the Department's approach for implementing near-term actions to reduce the consequences of seismically-induced events at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility, and longer-tcrm actions to ensure continued safe operation of the facility. Mr. James .I. McConnell. Assistant Deputy Administrator for Nuclear Safety and

345

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News Items News Items Skip Navigation Links December 7, 2012 Southwestern Helps Restore Power After Hurricane Sandy September 27, 2012 New Administrator April 27, 2012 Table Rock Visitor Center April 24, 2012 WFEC Earth Day Publications Skip Navigation Links Annual Performance Plan Annual Report Newsletters Press Releases Strategic Plan SWPA - Overview Video System Map December 7, 2012 Southwestern Helps Restore Power After Hurricane Sandy Southwestern Aids Sandy Recovery Line crews from Southwestern repair distribution lines in Tom's River, New Jersey, following Hurricane Sandy. In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy in early November 2012, Southwestern Power Administration sent several line, substation, and right-of-way brush crews and 30 pieces of heavy equipment to help restore the electrical grid

346

SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMINISTRATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9/01 9/01 SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMINISTRATION CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION (CX) DETERMINATION BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF PROPOSED ACTION: Hydroelectric Power Rate Increase for the Integrated System of Hydropower Projects. PROPOSED BY: Southwestern Power Administration. NUMBER AND TITLE OF THE CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION BEING APPLIED: ( 10 CFR 1021, Appendix B to Subpart D, 1-1-03 Edition, Part B4.3 - Electric power marketing rate changes. REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS IN 10 CFR 1021.410(B): (1) The proposed action fits within a class of actions that is listed in Appendix, A or B to Subpart D. (2) There are no extraordinary circumstances related to the proposal that may affect the Significance of the environmental effects of the proposal; and (3) The proposal is not "connected" to other actions with potentially significant impacts, is not related to

347

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skip Navigation Links Skip Navigation Links Annual Performance Plan Annual Report Mission Organization Strategic Plan SWPA - Overview Video System Map About the Agency Southwestern Power Administration was established in 1943 by the Secretary of the Interior as a Federal Agency that today operates within the Department of Energy under the authority of Section 5 of the Flood Control Act of 1944. As one of four Power Marketing Administrations in the United States, Southwestern markets hydroelectric power in Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas from 24 U.S. Army Corps of Engineers multipurpose dams. By law, Southwestern's power is marketed and delivered primarily to public bodies such as rural electric cooperatives and municipal utilities. Southwestern has over one hundred such "preference" customers, and these

348

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Occupational Occupational Safety & Health Administration Safety The safety and well-being of all Southwestern Power Administration employees are the firm and continuing responsibilities of every member of management. Each employee, in turn, shares with management the responsibility for his or her own safety by performing his or her duties in a safe and conscientious manner, complying with all safety rules and regulations, and observing the provisions of Executive Order 12196, "Occupational Safety and Health Programs for Federal Employees." Southwestern's Recordable Accident Frequency Rate (RAFR) for Calendar Year 2011 (Jan - Dec 2011) was 1.28, and for Fiscal Year 2011 (Oct 2010 - Sep 2011) the RAFR was 0.64. Additionally, 2011 marked the nineteenth consecutive

349

ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 21:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 21: AUDIOVISUAL RECORDS June 2007 Revision 1 This schedule covers audiovisual and related records created by or for Department and those acquired in the normal course of business. For audiovisual records that are not described in this schedule, an SF 115, Request for Records Disposition Authority, must be submitted to the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). Audiovisual records include still and motion picture photography, graphic materials, and sound and video recordings. Related documentation includes (1) production files or other files documenting the creation, justification, ownership, and rights to the records and (2) finding aids used to identify or access the records. This schedule does not cover: (1) cartographic records, (2) remote sensing imagery

350

National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

National Nuclear Security Administration National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog US, UK, France Discuss Stockpile Stewardship, Arms Control and Nonproliferation and Visit the Nevada National Security Site Learn More NNSA DOE removes all remaining HEU from Hungary Learn More DOE removes all remaining HEU from Hungary Tiffany A. Blanchard-Case receives 2013 Linton Brooks Medal

351

SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMINISTRATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

01 01 SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMINISTRATION CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION (CX) DETERMINATION BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF PROPOSED ACTION: Hydroelectric Power Rate Increase for the Integrated System of Hydropower Projects. PROPOSED BY: Southwestern Power Administration. NUMBER AND TITLE OF THE CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION BEING APPLIED: ( 10 CFR 1021, Appendix B to Subpart D, 1-1-03 Edition, Part B4.3 - Electric power marketing rate changes. REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS IN 10 CFR 1021.410(B): (1) The proposed action fits within a class of actions that is listed in Appendix, A or B to Subpart D. (2) There are no extraordinary circumstances related to the proposal that may affect the Significance of the environmental effects of the proposal; and (3) The proposal is not "connected" to other actions with potentially significant impacts, is not related to

352

Candidate processes for diluting the {sup 235}U isotope in weapons-capable highly enriched uranium  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is evaluating options for rendering its surplus inventories of highly enriched uranium (HEU) incapable of being used to produce nuclear weapons. Weapons-capable HEU was earlier produced by enriching uranium in the fissile {sup 235}U isotope from its natural occurring 0.71 percent isotopic concentration to at least 20 percent isotopic concentration. Now, by diluting its concentration of the fissile {sup 235}U isotope in a uranium blending process, the weapons capability of HEU can be eliminated in a manner that is reversible only through isotope enrichment, and therefore, highly resistant to proliferation. To the extent that can be economically and technically justified, the down-blended uranium product will be made suitable for use as commercial reactor fuel. Such down-blended uranium product can also be disposed of as waste if chemical or isotopic impurities preclude its use as reactor fuel.

Snider, J.D.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Laboratory's role in Cold War nuclear weapons testing program focus of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

70th anniversary lecture 70th anniversary lecture Laboratory's role in Cold War nuclear weapons testing program focus of next 70th anniversary lecture Lab's role in the development of nuclear weapons during the Cold War period will be discussed by Byron Ristvet of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency. September 5, 2013 This photograph captures the expanding fireball of the world's first full-scale hydrogen bomb test, Ivy-Mike, which was conducted Oct. 31, 1952. This photograph captures the expanding fireball of the world's first full-scale hydrogen bomb test, Ivy-Mike, which was conducted Oct. 31, 1952. Contact Steve Sandoval Communications Office (505) 665-9206 Email "Los Alamos National Laboratory's role in conjunction with the Department of Defense in meeting this challenge with new nuclear weapon

354

Largest Federally-Owned Wind Farm Breaks Ground at U.S. Weapons Facility |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Largest Federally-Owned Wind Farm Breaks Ground at U.S. Weapons Largest Federally-Owned Wind Farm Breaks Ground at U.S. Weapons Facility Largest Federally-Owned Wind Farm Breaks Ground at U.S. Weapons Facility August 13, 2013 - 10:54am Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Building on President Obama's Climate Action Plan, which calls for steady, responsible steps to reduce carbon pollution, the Energy Department today broke ground on the nation's largest federally-owned wind project at the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas. Once completed, this five-turbine 11.5 megawatt project will power more than 60 percent of the plant with clean, renewable wind energy and reduce carbon emissions by over 35,000 metric tons per year - equivalent to taking 7,200 cars off the road. The Pantex Plant is the primary site for the assembly, disassembly,

355

Largest Federally-Owned Wind Farm Breaks Ground at U.S. Weapons Facility |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Largest Federally-Owned Wind Farm Breaks Ground at U.S. Weapons Largest Federally-Owned Wind Farm Breaks Ground at U.S. Weapons Facility Largest Federally-Owned Wind Farm Breaks Ground at U.S. Weapons Facility August 13, 2013 - 10:54am Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Building on President Obama's Climate Action Plan, which calls for steady, responsible steps to reduce carbon pollution, the Energy Department today broke ground on the nation's largest federally-owned wind project at the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas. Once completed, this five-turbine 11.5 megawatt project will power more than 60 percent of the plant with clean, renewable wind energy and reduce carbon emissions by over 35,000 metric tons per year - equivalent to taking 7,200 cars off the road. The Pantex Plant is the primary site for the assembly, disassembly,

356

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Staff version which still requires senior executive review Staff version which still requires senior executive review Office of Office of Human Capita Human Capital Management Management Bonneville Power Administration Risk Informed Human Capital - Workforce Plan 2007-2009 September 15, 2006 2007 BPA Risk Informed Human Capital - Workforce Plan Table of Contents INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................. 5 Impact of the 2006 Workforce Plan ..............................................................................................6 BPA Strategic Objectives as drivers of the WP .......................................................................... 6 I. CONTEXT ................................................................................................................... 6

357

Office of Human Resources and Administration - Mission and Functions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Resources and Administration Human Resources and Administration Home Sub Offices › Business Operations › Human Resources and Administration › Information Management Mission & Functions › Information Management › Human Resources and Adminstration › Business Operations HSS Logo Office of Human Resources and Administration Reports to the Office of Resource Management Mission and Functions Mission The Office of Human Resources and Administration provides a broad range of human resource and administrative management activities in support of the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS). Functions Integrates, synchronizes, and concentrates human resource management activities in support of HSS, Departmental leadership, and other customers. Assists HSS managers in recruiting and hiring qualified, talented and capable candidates. Advises and informs HSS managers on hiring requirements, capabilities, and limitations. Assists managers, candidates, and new employees through the employment process. Manages special hiring programs such as interns, disadvantaged and minorities.

358

A HOST PHASE FOR THE DISPOSAL OF WEAPONS PLUTONIUM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research was conducted into the possible use of zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}) as a host phase for storage or disposal of excess weapons plutonium. Zircon is one of the most chemically durable minerals. Its structure can accommodate a variety of elements, including plutonium and uranium. Natural zircon contains uranium and thorium together in different quantities, usually in the range of less than one weight percent up to several weight percent. Zircon occurs in nature as a crystalline or a partially to fully metamict mineral, depending on age and actinide element concentration, i.e., on radiation damage. These zircon samples have been studied extensively and the results are documented in the literature in terms of radiation damage to the crystal structure and related property changes, e.g., density, hardness, loss of uranium and lead, etc. Thus, a unique suite of natural analogues are available to describe the effect of decay of {sup 239}Pu on zircon's structure and how zircon's physical and chemical properties will be affected over very long periods of time. Actually, the oldest zircon samples known are over 3 billion years old. This period covers the time for decay of {sup 239}Pu (half-life 24,300 yr.) and most of its daughter {sup 235}U (half-life 700 million yr.). Because of its chemical durability, even under extreme geological conditions, zircon is the most widely used mineral for geochronological dating (7,000 publications). It is the oldest dated mineral on earth and in the universe. Zircon has already been doped with about 10 weight percent of plutonium. Pure PuSiO{sub 4} has also been synthesized and has the same crystal structure as zircon. However, use of zircon as a storage medium or waste form for plutonium requires further materials characterization. Experiments can either be conducted in laboratories where plutonium can be handled or plutonium can be simulated by other elements, and experiments can be done under less restricted conditions. The authors conducted work with zircon doped with thorium, uranium and cerium, respectively. They synthesized various zircon compositions and studied the solid solution properties of mixed (Zr,X)SiO{sub 4} [X represents Th, U, Ce, respectively]. They measured the dissolution rate of pure crystalline zircon at elevated temperatures and of an amorphous hydrated zircon. This final report together with two previous annual reports summarize the accomplishments made in two areas: (1) synthesis of zircon solid solutions with Th, U, and Ce; and (2) measurement of the chemical durability of zircon. The focus of the final report is on the measurement of zircon's dissolution rate in water and on the determination of volubility limits of Th, U, and Ce in zircon.

WERNER LUTZE; K. B. HELEAN; W. L. GONG - UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO RODNEY C. EWING - UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

FY 2009 Volume 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 DOE/CF-024 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Volume 1 DOE/CF-024 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2009 Congressional Budget Volume 1 Table of Contents

360

FY 2013 Volume I  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 DOE/CF-0071 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 1 DOE/CF-0071 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration Page 1 FY 2013 Congressional Budget

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361

FY 2007 Volume 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chief Financial Officer Chief Financial Officer Volume 1 DOE/CF-002 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 1 DOE/CF-002 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2007 Congressional Budget

362

FY 2011 Volume 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 DOE/CF-0047 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request February 2010 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 1 DOE/CF-0047 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2011 Congressional Budget

363

FY 2008 Volume 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 DOE/CF-014 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 1 DOE/CF-014 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2008 Congressional Budget Volume 1 Table of Contents

364

FY 2010 Volume 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 DOE/CF-035 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 1 DOE/CF-035 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2010 Congressional Budget Volume 1 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary.............................................................................................................3

365

Exploring the Possible Use of Information Barriers for future Biological Weapons Verification Regimes  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a path forward for implementing information barriers in a future generic biological arms-control verification regime. Information barriers have become a staple of discussion in the area of arms control verification approaches for nuclear weapons and components. Information barriers when used with a measurement system allow for the determination that an item has sensitive characteristics without releasing any of the sensitive information. Over the last 15 years the United States (with the Russian Federation) has led on the development of information barriers in the area of the verification of nuclear weapons and nuclear components. The work of the US and the Russian Federation has prompted other states (e.g., UK and Norway) to consider the merits of information barriers for possible verification regimes. In the context of a biological weapons control verification regime, the dual-use nature of the biotechnology will require protection of sensitive information while allowing for the verification of treaty commitments. A major question that has arisen is whether - in a biological weapons verification regime - the presence or absence of a weapon pathogen can be determined without revealing any information about possible sensitive or proprietary information contained in the genetic materials being declared under a verification regime. This study indicates that a verification regime could be constructed using a small number of pathogens that spans the range of known biological weapons agents. Since the number of possible pathogens is small it is possible and prudent to treat these pathogens as analogies to attributes in a nuclear verification regime. This study has determined that there may be some information that needs to be protected in a biological weapons control verification regime. To protect this information, the study concludes that the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array may be a suitable technology for the detection of the genetic information associated with the various pathogens. In addition, it has been determined that a suitable information barrier could be applied to this technology when the verification regime has been defined. Finally, the report posits a path forward for additional development of information barriers in a biological weapons verification regime. This path forward has shown that a new analysis approach coined as Information Loss Analysis might need to be pursued so that a numerical understanding of how information can be lost in specific measurement systems can be achieved.

Luke, S J

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

366

Disposition of excess weapon plutonium in deep boreholes - site selection handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the options for disposing of excess weapons plutonium is to place it near the base of deep boreholes in stable crystalline rocks. The technology needed to begin designing this means of disposition already exists, and there are many attractive sites available within the conterminous United States. There are even more potential sites for this option within Russia. The successful design of a borehole system must address two criteria: (1) how to dispose of 50 metric tons of weapons plutonium while making it inaccessible for unauthorized retrieval, and (2) how to prevent contamination of the accessible biosphere, defined here as the Earth`s surface and usable groundwaters.

Heiken, G.; Woldegabriel, G.; Morley, R.; Plannerer, H.; Rowley, J.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Neutronics and safety characteristics of a 100% MOX fueled PWR using weapons grade plutonium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary neutronics and safety studies, pertaining to the feasibility of using 100% weapons grade mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in an advanced PWR Westinghouse design are presented in this paper. The preliminary results include information on boron concentration, power distribution, reactivity coefficients and xenon and control rode worth for the initial and the equilibrium cycle. Important safety issues related to rod ejection and steam line break accidents and shutdown margin requirements are also discussed. No significant change from the commercial design is needed to denature weapons-grade plutonium under the current safety and licensing criteria.

Biswas, D.; Rathbun, R.; Lee, Si Young [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Rosenthal, P. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

368

ACTIVITY: Calibrating Thermometers - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Teachers may obtain free coal samples from the American Coal Foundation at www.wgcn.com/acf.htm. Question: Are the small and large paper clips made of the same material?

369

Hanford Activity Report for Specific Administrative Controls...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report on its Participation in a Review of Selected Aspects of Nuclear Safety at the Hanford Site Tank Farms, December 6-10, 2010 The U.S. Department of Energy Office of...

370

SYSTEM ADMINISTRATOR: WINDOWS SERVER 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SYSTEM ADMINISTRATOR: WINDOWS SERVER 2003 MCSA © 2011 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved MCPDMCPD WINDOWS DEVELOPERWEB DEVELOPER Job Role/Achievement Certification Recommended Coursework Student TECHNICIAN: WINDOWS 7 MCITPMCITP SUPPORT TECHNICIAN: WINDOWS VISTA SERVER ADMINISTRATOR: WINDOWS SERVER 2003

Atkinson, Katie

371

Opportunities exist for the diversion of weapons-usable material at the front end of the fuel cycle, during which  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, North Korea, Pakistan, and South Africa. (South Africa abandoned its nuclear weapons in 1991. Libya in building a weapon once they had the fissile mate- rial. The science behind nuclear bombs is well known The coming expansion of nuclear power can be a security as well as an environmental blessing, but only

Laughlin, Robert B.

372

Chemistry and materials science progress report. Weapons-supporting research and laboratory directed research and development: FY 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers different materials and chemistry research projects carried out a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during 1995 in support of nuclear weapons programs and other programs. There are 16 papers supporting weapons research and 12 papers supporting laboratory directed research.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Related Links | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

The National Nuclear Security Administration The National Nuclear Security Administration Related Links Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D Programs > Related Links Related Links NNSA Lab Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Lab Directed Research and Development Collaborations DOE Adanced Scientific Computing Research DTRA (Defense Threat Reduction Agency) NAS (National Academy of Sciences) NSF (National Science Foundation) DOD (Department of Defense) NASA Exascale Activities NNSA Exascale Environment Planning Workshop ASCR Co-Design Centers Supercomputing Top 500 List ASC at Supercomputing Conference Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Facebook

374

Directory of Energy Information Administration models 1996  

SciTech Connect

This directory revises and updates the Directory of Energy Information Administration Models 1995, DOE/EIA-0293(95), Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy, July 1995. Four models have been deleted in this directory as they are no longer being used: (1) Market Penetration Model for Ground-Water Heat Pump Systems (MPGWHP); (2) Market Penetration Model for Residential Rooftop PV Systems (MPRESPV-PC); (3) Market Penetration Model for Active and Passive Solar Technologies (MPSOLARPC); and (4) Revenue Requirements Modeling System (RRMS).

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Georgia Profile - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Sustainability Division; Georgia Energy Data; Southeastern Power Administration; Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicle Data Center - Federal and State Incentives ...

376

FOIA | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

377

Pollux | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollux | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our...

378

Testimonials | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testimonials | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our...

379

Training | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

380

Appendix E - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Natural Gas 1996: Issues and Trends 149 Appendix E Analysis of Capacity Release Trading: Results and Methodology

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

TMS Administrative and Policy Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS Administrative and Policy Manual. Last updated: June 2013. I. INTRODUCTION II. ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION III. SOCIETY BYLAWS. IV.

382

Counterterrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

383

Vocabulary | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

384

Pantex | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

385

Awards | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

386

Policy | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

387

Supercomputers | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

388

Engineering | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

389

Contacts | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

390

Accomplishments | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

391

Preparedness | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

392

Public | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

393

Recovery | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

394

Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

395

Overview | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

396

Mission | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

397

Operations | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

398

Conferences | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

399

Planning | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

400

Alaska Profile - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PADD): 5; Other Websites. Alaska Energy Authority; Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission;

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401

Data Sources - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Production Forecast: Energy Information Administration, Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System, December 2000; and Model GASCAP94 C102500.

402

Compensation | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

403

Convert | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

404

Protect | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

405

Leave | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

406

International | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

407

Remove | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

408

Interdiction | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

409

Features | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our...

410

Administrative supervision and information relationships  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many countries, administrative supervision has grown dramatically in recent years. Administrative supervision is a form of interaction between policy makers and policy executors, aimed at improving political accountability. In this paper, the role ... Keywords: administrative supervision, information relationships, supervisory authorities

Victor Bekkers; Vincent Homburg

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 20:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20: 20: ELECTRONIC RECORDS April 2008 Revision 2 This schedule authorizes the disposition of specified electronic records and hard-copy or microform records and are integrally related to them. The electronic records may either be created or received. Included are records created by computer operators, programmers, analysts, systems administrators, and all personnel with access to a computer. Disposition authority is provided for certain master files, including some tables that are components of data base management systems, and certain files created from master files for specific purposes. In addition, this schedule covers certain disposable electronic records produced by end users in office automation applications. These disposition authorities apply to the

412

NNSA Established | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Established | National Nuclear Security Administration Established | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > NNSA Established NNSA Established March 01, 2000 Washington, DC NNSA Established The Department activates the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), meeting the statutory deadline established by the FY 2000 defense

413

Original Research Chlorine Gas: An Evolving Hazardous Material Threat and Unconventional Weapon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chlorine gas represents a hazardous material threat from industrial accidents and as a terrorist weapon. This review will summarize recent events involving chlorine disasters and its use by terrorists, discuss pre-hospital considerations and suggest strategies for the initial management for acute chlorine exposure events. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(2):151-156.

Robert Jones Md; Brandon Wills Do; Christopher Kang Md

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

An Assessment of Tritium Supply Alternatives in Support of the U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear weapons require the periodic replacement of tritium, a radioactive gas that decays at approximately 5.5 percent per year. Currently no tritium-supply facility exists in the US, and due to the decay, the tritium inventory will fall below the required ... Keywords: Decision Analysis-Multiple Criteria, Government-Defense

Detlof Von Winterfeldt; Eric Schweitzer

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Underwater Bomb Trajectory Prediction for Stand-off Assault (Mine/IED) Breaching Weapon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Underwater Bomb Trajectory Prediction for Stand-off Assault (Mine/IED) Breaching Weapon Fuse to determine accurately underwater (full-size) bomb trajectory path so that the final detonation position of a six degrees of freedom (6-DOF) model to predict underwater high-speed bomb trajectory and orientation

Chu, Peter C.

416

Safety issues in fabricating mixed oxide fuel using surplus weapons plutonium  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an assessment of the safety issues and implications of fabricating mixed oxide (MOX) fuel using surplus weapons plutonium. The basis for this assessment is the research done at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in identifying and resolving the technical issues surrounding the production of PuO{sub 2} feed, removal of gallium from the PuO{sub 2} feed, the fabrication of test fuel, and the work done at the LANL plutonium processing facility. The use of plutonium in MOX fuel has been successfully demonstrated in Europe, where the experience has been almost exclusively with plutonium separated from commercial spent nuclear fuel. This experience in safely operating MOX fuel fabrication facilities directly applies to the fabrication and irradiation of MOX fuel made from surplus weapons plutonium. Consequently, this paper focuses on the technical difference between plutonium from surplus weapons, and light-water reactor recycled plutonium. Preliminary assessments and research lead to the conclusion that no new process or product safety concerns will arise from using surplus weapons plutonium in MOX fuel.

Buksa, J.; Badwan, F.; Barr, M.; Motley, F.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

A Multiattribute Utility Analysis of Alternatives for the Disposition of Surplus Weapons-Grade Plutonium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an application of multiattribute utility theory to support the selection of a technology for the disposition of surplus weapons-grade plutonium by the Department of Energy (DOE). This analysis evaluated 13 alternatives, examined ... Keywords: Utility/preference, applications, multiattribute

James S. Dyer; Thomas Edmunds; John C. Butler; Jianmin Jia

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Utilization of Surplus Weapons Plutonium As Mixed Oxide Fuel Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Nuclear Society (ANS) endorses the rapid application of mixed uraniumplutonium oxide (MOX) fuel technology to accomplish the timely disposition of surplus weapons-grade plutonium. The end of the Cold War has led to universal recognition that both the United States and Russia possess stockpiles of weapons-grade plutonium that far exceed their defense requirements. In 1994 the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) stated the following: The existence of this material [surplus weapons-usable plutonium and highly enriched uranium] constitutes a clear and present danger to national and international security. 1 Russia and the United States have held extensive discussions on plutonium disposition, culminating in a September 2000 agreement 2 to dispose of 34 metric tons of surplus weaponsgrade plutonium in each country. The U.S. Department of Energy has completed two major Environmental Impact Statements on surplus plutonium disposition. 3,4 Implementation of the associated Records of Decision 5,6 has resulted in an ongoing program to dispose of surplus U.S. weapons-grade plutonium by fabricating the material into MOX fuel and using the fuel in commercial nuclear reactors. As with the blend-down of highly enriched uranium, a

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Plutonium Disposition Program | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plutonium Disposition Program Plutonium Disposition Program Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Fissile Materials Disposition > Plutonium Disposition Program Plutonium Disposition Program The U.S.-Russia Plutonium Management and Disposition Agreement (PMDA), which entered into force on July 13, 2011, commits each country to dispose of at least 34 metric tons (MT) of weapon-grade plutonium withdrawn from their respective nuclear weapon programs. The U.S. remains firmly committed to its PMDA obligation to dispose of excess weapons plutonium. U.S. Plutonium Disposition The current U.S. plan to dispose of 34 MT of weapon-grade plutonium is to fabricate it into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel and irradiate it in existing light water reactors. This approach requires construction of new facilities

420

User Research Administration | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Administration LCLS and SSRL User Research Administration Cathy Knotts User Research Administration Manager Tel: (650) 926-3191 Fax: (650) 926-3600 LCLS and SSRL User...

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421

CRAD, Specific Administrative Controls - December 14, 2007 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Specific Administrative Controls - December 14, 2007 Specific Administrative Controls - December 14, 2007 CRAD, Specific Administrative Controls - December 14, 2007 December 14, 2007 Specific Administrative Controls Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 64-32) The Department of Energy (DOE) has set expectations for implementing Administrative Controls (ACs) that are selected to provide preventive and/or mitigative functions for specific potential accident scenarios, and which also have safety importance equivalent to engineered controls that would be classified as safety class or safety significant if engineered controls were available and selected. This class of AC is designated as Specific Administrative Controls (SACs). The following provides an overview of the typical activities that will be performed to collect information

422

Energy Information Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Internal PMA Scorecard for Human Capital Management (HCM) - FY 2006, Quarter 4 Internal PMA Scorecard for Human Capital Management (HCM) - FY 2006, Quarter 4 Office: Energy Information Administration Progress Score: Status Score: Requirements for HCM Plan 4th QTR REQUIREMENTS FY 06, Q4 Comments Integrate HCM Plan into decision-making processes - Plan linked to DOE mission, strategy, and goals - designates accountable officials Link performance appraisal plans and awards to DOE mission & goals for SES, managers, and more than 60% of workforce (HQ and Field); discuss difference between various levels of performance, discuss consequences based on performance HCM is linked to EIA's mission, strategy, and goals. Employee performance plans have at least one critical element with corresponding tasks supporting

423

Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

World Shale Gas Resources: World Shale Gas Resources: An Initial Assessment of 14 Regions Outside the United States APRIL 2011 www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 The information presented in this overview is based on the report "World Shale Gas Resources: An Initial Assessment," which was prepared by Advanced Resources International (ARI) for the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The full report is attached. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies.

424

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Disability Employment Disability Employment Duty Locations Equal Employment New Employee Orientation Reasonable Accommodation Student Employment Opportunities Pathways Skip Navigation Links USAJOBS Veteran Employment Opportunities Feds Hire Vets Current Vacancy Announcements There are currently no employment vacancies. Please check here regularly for career opportunities at Southwestern Power Administration. Apply At USAJOBS USAJobs is the official job site of the US Federal Government. Please visit this site to see all job vacancies within Southwestern, the Department of Energy, and the Federal Government. Please pay close attention to the closing date in the "Open Period" section as well as the information in the "Who May Be Considered" section on the first page of each announcement to determine if you are

425

and Acting NOAA Administrator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

30 30 th 9:00-9:30 Welcome * Dr. Kathryn Sullivan, Acting Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and Acting NOAA Administrator 9:30-10:30 What does Open Data Look Like? This session will provide some case studies of the use of open data to illustrate some of the issues associated with presentation of the data in a way which optimises its usefulness for end-users. It will consider different types of data, guiding principles, and different uses of data, including both research data and national agricultural data-sets. Moderator: * Tim Benton, Champion, UK Global Food Security Programme, UK Speakers: * Johannes Keizer, Team Leader, FAO United Nations, Italy * Dr. Sander Janssen, Wageningen, Netherlands * Dr. Rajeev Varshney, Director, Center of Excellence in Genomics (CEG), ICRISAT, Hyderabad,

426

Security Administration Production Office,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JUNE/JULY 2013 JUNE/JULY 2013 inside this issue ... Reaching the summit - Big hitters talk economic development Page 3 Saving yesterday's knowledge today Page 5 What's a fellow to do? Page 6 ... and other Y-12 news On June 3 newly appointed Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz (right) made Oak Ridge the site of his first official visit since being sworn in as head of the U.S. Department of Energy. Secretary Moniz met earlier in the day with national lab directors at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, then came to Y-12 for tours and a meeting with the National Nuclear Security Administration Production Office, B&W Y-12 and ORNL employees. He was joined by Rep. Chuck Fleischmann. The Secretary described Oak Ridge as a place where DOE's chief missions of nuclear security, environmental

427

Federal Railroad Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Transportation Federal Railroad Administration Overview of Proposed Rail Safety & Security Rulemakings Kevin R. Blackwell FRA Hazmat Division Washington, DC Federal Authority DOT Authority to regulate safety and security of hazardous materials transportation Hazardous Materials Transportation Law (49 U.S.C. 5101 et.seq.) Federal Railroad Safety Act (49 U.S.C. 20101 et.seq.) TSA Authority to regulate security of hazardous material transportation Aviation Transportation Security Act (Pub. L. 107-71, 115 Stat. 597) Routing as a Part of the Transportation Cycle Routing decisions are continually made as a part of the transportation cycle for a variety of reasons. E c o n o m i c s Security S a f e t y Routing Decision Pyramid DOT NPRM HM-232E NPRM published on December 21, 2006.

428

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Student Employment Opportunities Student Employment Opportunities There are currently no student employment vacancies. Please check here regularly for career opportunities at Southwestern Power Administration. Learn more about the type of work engineers perform at Southwestern: Electric Power Marketing Engineering and Planning Reliability Compliance and Transmission Policy Resources and Rates Apply At USAJOBS USAJobs is the official job site of the US Federal Government. Please visit this site to see all job vacancies within Southwestern, the Department of Energy, and the Federal Government. Please pay close attention to the closing date in the "Open Period" section as well as the information in the "Who May Be Considered" section on the first page of each announcement to determine if you are

429

NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA Policy Letter: NAP-5 NNSA Policy Letter: NAP-5 (DOE P 450.3) Date: October 16, 2002 TITLE: Policy Letter for Standards Management I. OBJECTIVE: Establish NNSA expectations for Standards Management Programs used to select and maintain applicable standards for work performed at NNSA Headquarters and field sites. II. APPLICABILITY: NNSA federal staff and NNSA management and operating contractors, and other prime contractors as determined by NNSA Headquarters and/or field site management, shall use a defined formal process to tailor environment, safety, and health; project management; safeguards and security; quality assurance; business; and administrative standards and, as determined by NNSA management, other standards used to perform federal and contractor work. Here, the term standard encompasses federal,

430

Western Area Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Area Power Administration Customer Meeting The meeting will begin at 12:30 pm MST We have logged on early for connectivity purposes Please stand-by until the meeting begins Please be sure to call into the conference bridge at: 888-989-6414 Conf. Code 60223 If you have connectivity issues, please contact: 866-900-1011 1 Introduction  Welcome  Introductions  Purpose of Meeting ◦ Status of the SLCA/IP Rate ◦ SLCA/IP Marketing Plan ◦ Credit Worthiness Policy ◦ LTEMP EIS update ◦ Access to Capital  Handout Materials http://www.wapa.gov/crsp/ratescrsp/default.htm 2 SLCA/IP Rate 3 1. Status of Repayment 2. Current SLCA/IP Firm Power Rate (SLIP-F9) 3. Revenue Requirements Comparison Table 4.SLCA/IP Rate 5. Next Steps

431

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Privacy Notice For statistical purposes only, Southwestern collects the following data: IP addresses of users who visit our Web site Dates of average Web site activity Most viewed...

432

Energy Information Administration  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

sources. The remainder of the FRS companies' activity consists of uranium production, oil shale de velopment, and a variety of nonconventional energy projects. This segment has...

433

Small Arms Transfers: Exporting States WEAPONS & MARKETS Research Notes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

annual authorized trade in small arms 1 to exceed USD 7 billion a year (Small Arms Survey, 2011, p. 9). 2 A lack of transparency on the part of many states and difficulties of disaggregating data on transfers that some states do report create numerous challenges for the study of this activity. Lists of the most active countries tend to be skewed toward those that are more transparent or cater to large civilian markets. Nonetheless, sufficient data and expertise exist to allow for broad assessments to be made about the trade in small arms. This Research Note assesses the countries that export the greatest value of small arms. It does not focus on volumes of materiel or a transfers effect on peace and security. States report on their arms transfers very unevenly. Some are very transparent, while others are secretive. Sometimes countries view transfers of small arms as aid, gifts, or security assistance for which no payment is made or customs fees levied. These transfers tend not to appear in open records. Nevertheless, customs data is an especially important source of data, 3 as are countries national arms export reports and submissions to the UN Register of Conventional Arms (UNROCA). 4 The news media as well as research and advocacy organizations also help shed light on this activity. The Survey has supplemented these sources by contacting governments and industry officials directly, some of whom have provided information not otherwise available. The rankings provided here tend to capture more accurately the activities of those countries that are more forthcoming in publicly recording their exports. Moreover, the dollar values of countries exports are, generally speaking, underestimates. For example, it is not possible

The Small; Arms Survey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

USD(AT&L) SUBJECT: DoD Response to U.S. Nuclear Weapon Incidents References: See Enclosure 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(a)), this Instruction: a. Establishes policy and assigns responsibilities for the DoD response to U.S. nuclear weapon incidents in accordance with DoDD 3150.08 (Reference (b)). b. Authorizes DoD support for the Nuclear Weapons Accident Incident Response Subcommittee (NWAIRS) to the Nuclear Command and Control System (NCCS) Committee of Principals (CoP) to address the Federal Government response to U.S. nuclear weapon incidents. 2. APPLICABILITY. This Instruction applies to OSD, the Military Departments, the Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS) and the Joint Staff, the Combatant Commands,

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Executive Summary - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ix ... Transportation tariffs for interstate pipeline companies are few years have increased the availability of some natural gas

436

Facilities | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

The National Nuclear Security Administration Facilities Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation > Office of Test...

437

Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

The National Nuclear Security Administration Reports Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation > Office of Test and...

438

Summary Statistics - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

See Glossary. b Values reflect the month of acquisition, ... U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly February 2012 38 Table 17.

439

Paddistrict IV - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly August 2012 36 Figure 6. U.S. No. 2 Distillate Prices to Residences by PAD District

440

Appendix A - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales 2009 37 Technical Note 1: EIA-821: Annual Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales Report, 2007

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administrator weapons activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

National Nuclear Security Administration Contractors' Disability Compensation and Return-to-Work Programs, IG-0867  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Audit Report Audit Report The National Nuclear Security Administration Contractors' Disability Compensation and Return-to-Work Programs DOE/IG-0867 June 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 June 18, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "NNSA Contractors' Disability Compensation and Return-to-Work Programs" INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration is responsible for the Nation's nuclear weapons programs. NNSA relies on contractors to manage and operate the seven sites that form its nuclear security enterprise, including three national laboratories. Under

442

Videos from the National Nuclear Safety Administration's (NNSA) YouTube Channel  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

NNSA was established by Congress in 2000 as a separately organized agency within the U.S. Department of Energy, responsible for the management and security of the nation's nuclear weapons, nuclear nonproliferation, and naval reactor programs. NNSA's program support is divided into several key program areas including Defense, Nuclear Nonproliferation, Naval Reactors, Emergency Operations, Infrastructure and Environment, Nuclear Security, Management and Administration and the Office of the Administrator. Each program area is focused on specific challenges. The nuclear security enterprise spans eight sites, including three national laboratories, with more than six decades of cutting-edge nuclear security experience. That history and technical expertise enables NNSA to accomplish its work across its four mission areas. (Copied from http://www.nnsa.energy.gov/aboutus). NNSA has more than 80 videos available on its YouTube channel.

443

Administrative & Policy Manual - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

members for the balance of unexpired terms, make or approve the ..... distribution or expenditure, engage in any activity, hold any assets, or enter into any transaction ...... asset allocation, manager search, and performance monitoring. 6.

444

Western Area Power Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

v*Zy- i , . v*Zy- i , . r ,v * -i S # Af [, (e- . - o -A tl }r- 0 v-" l^~4~S J l ^-)^ I^U^ck iM clti ^ Administration Follow-up to Nov. 25, 2008 Transition Meeting Undeveloped Transmission Right-of-Way Western has very little undeveloped transmission right-of-way. There is a 7-mile right- of-way between Folsom, CA and Roseville, CA where Western acquired a 250' wide right-of-way but is only using half of it. Another line could be built parallel to Western's line to relieve congestion in the Sacramento area. In addition, Western has rights-of- way for many transmission lines that could be rebuilt to increase transmission capacity. For example, Western's Tracy-Livermore 230-kV line is a single circuit line but the existing towers could support a double circuit line. These rights-of-way would have to

445

FY 2009 Volume 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9,019,929 9,350,399 +330,470 +3.7% Atomic Energy Defense Activities National nuclear security administration: Weapons activities......

446

Digitizing the Administrative Records of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (Em) and Office of Legacy Management (LM) Ohio Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As former weapons sites close and are transitioned to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM), continued public involvement is essential for the successful turnover of long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS and M) activities. During the environmental remediation process, public participation was a key factor in cleanup completion. The same level of commitment to encourage active public participation is true for the LTS and M activities at the LM sites, such as the Miamisburg Closure Project and the Fernald Closure Project. Community members participate in the transition and the decision-making processes for LTS and M as they did for the selection of response actions under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) cleanup process. [1] A key part of the post-closure activities for the Ohio Sites transitioning to LM from the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) is the preservation of site history and stakeholder involvement in the LTS and M activities that will continue during post-closure. In meeting the regulatory requirements of providing the CERCLA Administrative Record Reading Room for public access and to ensure that appropriate records are retrievable and available for all stakeholders, a decision was made to digitize the Miamisburg Closure Project and the Fernald Closure Project Administrative Records. This decision was, in part, based on the information and lessons learned from the digitization of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) CERCLA Administrative Records (AR). The Ohio Sites effort was expanded to include the Living History Project from the Fernald Closure Project. In most cases, the CERCLA AR maintained by EM closure sites and transitioned to LM will provide adequate baselines for identifying and capturing the information required by LM for post-closure stewardship of the sites. The AR established under Section 113(k) [2] of CERCLA serves two primary purposes. First, the record contains those documents that form the basis for selection of a response action and comply with Section 113(j) [3]; judicial review of any issue concerning the adequacy of any response action is limited to the record. Second, Section 113(k) [2] requires that the AR act as a vehicle for public participation in selecting a response action. The AR is the body of documents that 'forms the basis' for the selection of a particular response action at a site and contains historic information that has future study value by scholars, historians, regulators, and other stakeholders. (authors)

Powell, J. [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Cincinnati, Ohio (United States); Williams, K.; Walpole, S. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Miamisburg, Ohio (United States); McKinney, R. [Source One Management, Inc., Denver, Colorado (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

LANL Reaches Waste Shipment Milestone: Waste from Cold War-era weapons  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reaches Waste Shipment Milestone: Waste from Cold War-era Reaches Waste Shipment Milestone: Waste from Cold War-era weapons production being shipped to WIPP LANL Reaches Waste Shipment Milestone: Waste from Cold War-era weapons production being shipped to WIPP May 31, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Fred deSousa 505-665-3430 fdesousa@lanl.gov LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico - Los Alamos National Laboratory has reached an important milestone in its campaign to ship transuranic (TRU) waste from Cold War-era nuclear operations to the U.S. Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. This month, the Lab surpassed 100,000 plutonium-equivalent curies of TRU waste shipped to WIPP, about one-third of the Lab's total. The waste, sent from LANL to WIPP in more than 750 shipments since 1999,

448

Assessing the risk from the depleted Uranium weapons used in Operation Allied Force.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conflict in Yugoslavia has been a source of great concern due to the radiological and toxic hazard posed by the alleged presence of depleted uranium in NATO weapons. In the present study some worst-case scenaria are assumed in order to assess the risk for Yugoslavia and its neighboring countries. The risk is proved to be negligible for the neighboring countries while for Yugoslavia itself evidence is given that any increase in total long-term cancer mortality will be so low that it will remain undetected. Local radioactive hotspots such as DU weapons fragments and abandoned battle tanks, fortified or contaminated with DU, constitute a post-war hazard which is not studied in this article.

unknown authors

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Laboratory directed research and development on disposal of plutonium recovered from weapons. FY1994 final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research project was conceived as a multi-year plan to study the use of mixed plutonium oxide-uranium oxide (MOX) fuel in existing nuclear reactors. Four areas of investigation were originally proposed: (1) study reactor physics including evaluation of control rod worth and power distribution during normal operation and transients; (2) evaluate accidents focusing upon the reduced control rod worth and reduced physical properties of PuO{sub 2}; (3) assess the safeguards required during fabrication and use of plutonium bearing fuel assemblies; and (4) study public acceptance issues associated with using material recovered from weapons to fuel a nuclear reactor. First year accomplishments are described. Appendices contain 2 reports entitled: development and validation of advanced computational capability for MOX fueled ALWR assembly designs; and long-term criticality safety concerns associated with weapons plutonium disposition.

Pitts, J.H.; Choi, J.S.

1994-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

450

CERCLA Preliminary Assessment of DOE'S Nevada Operations Office Nuclear Weapons Testing  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

tudies/B ackground tudies/B ackground Book 1 CERCLA Preliminary Assessment of DOE'S Nevada Operations Office Nuclear Weapons Testing Areas Vol. 11, April 1988 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. CERCLA PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF DOE'S NEVADA OPERATIONS OFFICE WCILEAR WEAPONS T E S r n G AREAS Prepared by Water Resources Center Desert Research Institute University of Nevada System ,Prepared for U . S . Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office Las Vegas, Nevada under contract DE-AC08-85NV10384 A p r i l 1988 CONTENTS VOLUME I I. INTRODUCTION 1.1 11. NEVADA TEST SITE TESTING AREAS 2.1 Frenchman Flat (Area 5) 2.1.1 2.2 Yucca Flat (Areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 15)

451

Lagrangian finite element analysis of the penetration of earth penetrating weapons  

SciTech Connect

Buried targets, such as hardened missile silos, that are resistant to the effects of air blast from above-ground or surface-burst explosions may be vulnerable to the effects of ground motion produced by nearby underground explosions. An earth penetrating weapon (EPW) is being developed to exploit this phenomena. To design the EPW system, loads on the weapon due to the penetration event must be determined. This paper presents the methodology for performing Lagrangian finite-element analysis of the penetration event in two and three dimensions. In order to describe the methodology, results from analyses done for a particular EPW impacting a particular target medium are presented. The results for impacts with nonzero angles of incidence and nonzero angles of attack show the importance of being able to calculate three dimensional penetration loads. 62 figs.

Rosinsky, R.W.

1985-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

452

Public distrust and hazard management success at the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant  

SciTech Connect

Based on experience gained while serving a public oversight commission appointed by the governor of Colorado, hazard management at the Department of Energy's Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant is reviewed. Specific reference is made to the plant's history of controversy, its defense-in-depth strategy of hazard control, occupational health issues, public exposure to plutonium, and the assessment of low-probability, high-consequence risks. This leads to the conclusion that Rocky flats is, by any objective standard, a hazard management success. It follows that public distrust of Rocky Flats arises as much from fear and loathing of nuclear weapons themselves as from the manufacturing process by which they are made.

Hohenemser, C.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Nuclear Surety This revisiono Implements DOD Directive 5210.42, Nuclear Weapons Personnel Reliability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

o Updates the responsibilities to reflect the fact that the Army no longer has custody of nuclear weapons or nuclear weapons delivery systems (para 1-4). o Designates the DCSOPS (DAMO-SS) as approval authority for waivers and exceptions to policy requirements and reclamas to nuclear surety inspections o Deletes the requirement that commanders with nuclear surety missions establish a nuclear surety board, making it an optional requirement as determined by the commander; and retains guidance on the functioning of a surety board to assist commanders who want to establish one (para 1-6). o Deletes guidance on Physical Security and Survivability. AR 190-54 now covers applicable physical security requirements at Army nuclear reactor facilities (chap 2). o Reorganizes the Personnel Reliability Program (PRP), to more closely follow the sequence of events in certifying an individual into and out of the PRP

unknown authors

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

The PEACE PIPE: Recycling nuclear weapons into a TRU storage/shipping container  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes results of a contract undertaken by the National Conversion Pilot Project (NCPP) at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) to fabricate stainless steel ``pipe`` containers for use in certification testing at Sandia National Lab, Albuquerque to qualify the container for both storage of transuranic (TRU) waste at RFETS and other DOE sites and shipping of the waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP). The paper includes a description of the nearly ten-fold increase in the amount of contained plutonium enabled by the product design, the preparation and use of former nuclear weapons facilities to fabricate the components, and the rigorous quality assurance and test procedures that were employed. It also describes how stainless steel nuclear weapons components can be converted into these pipe containers, a true ``swords into plowshare`` success story.

Floyd, D.; Edstrom, C. [Manufacturing Sciences Corp. (United States); Biddle, K.; Orlowski, R. [BNFL, Inc. (United States); Geinitz, R. [Safe Sites of Colorado, Golden, CO (United States); Keenan, K. [USDOE-RFFO (United States); Rivera, M. [Science Applications International Corp./LATA (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Weapons Activities/ Advanced Simulation and Computing Campaign FY 2011 Congressional Budget  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

agencies, ASC plays an important role in supporting nonproliferation, emergency response, nuclear forensics

456

Safety Functions and Other Features of Remotely Operated Weapon Systems (ROWS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1047-2008 DOE-STD-1047-2008 August 2008 DOE STANDARD Safety Functions and Other Features of Remotely Operated Weapon Systems (ROWS) U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1047-2008 TABLE OF CONTENTS FOREWORD ....................................................................................................................... i 1. SCOPE AND PURPOSE .........................................................................................1 2. APPLICABILITY ....................................................................................................1 3. NORMATIVE REFERENCES................................................................................2

457

Literature survey of blast and fire effects of nuclear weapons on urban areas  

SciTech Connect

The American literature of the past 30 years on fire and blast effects of nuclear weapons on urban areas has been surveyed. The relevant work is briefly sketched and areas where information is apparently lacking are noted. This report is intended to provide the basis for suggesting research priorities in the fire and blast effects area for the Federal Emergency Management Agency. It is also intended to provide entry into the literature for researchers. over 850 references are given.

Reitter, T.A.; McCallen, D.B.; Kang, S.W.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

USD(AT&L) SUBJECT: DoD Transportation of U.S. Nuclear Weapons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

accordance with the authority in DoDD 5134.01 (Reference (b)) to establish policy, update responsibilities, and prescribe procedures for DoD transportation of U.S. nuclear weapons, including logistic transportation, operational transport, and emergency logistic movement as defined in the Glossary. b. Incorporates and cancels DoD 4540.5-M (Reference (c)). c. Authorizes the establishment of the Nuclear Transportation Working Group (NTWG).

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Chemistry {ampersand} Materials Science program report, Weapons Resarch and Development and Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY96  

SciTech Connect

This report is the annual progress report for the Chemistry Materials Science Program: Weapons Research and Development and Laboratory Directed Research and Development. Twenty-one projects are described separately by their principal investigators.

Chase, L.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Probabilistic cost-benefit analysis of enhanced safety features for strategic nuclear weapons at a representative location  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We carried out a demonstration analysis of the value of developing and implementing enhanced safety features for nuclear weapons in the US stockpile. We modified an approach that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) developed in response to a congressional directive that NRC assess the ``value-impact`` of regulatory actions for commercial nuclear power plants. Because improving weapon safety shares some basic objectives with NRC regulations, i.e., protecting public health and safety from the effects of accidents involving radioactive materials, we believe the NRC approach to be appropriate for evaluating weapons-safety cost-benefit issues. Impact analysis includes not only direct costs associated with retrofitting the weapon system, but also the expected costs (or economic risks) that are avoided by the action, i.e., the benefits.

Stephens, D.R.; Hall, C.H.; Holman, G.S.; Graham, K.F.; Harvey, T.F.; Serduke, F.J.D.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administrator weapons activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Transmutation facility for weapons grade plutonium based on a tokamak fusion neutron source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is suggested that weapons grade plutonium could be processed through a transmutation facility to build up sufficient actinide and fission product inventories to serve as a deterrent to diversion or theft, pending eventual use as nuclear reactor fuel. A transmutation facility consisting of a fusion neutron source surrounded by fuel assemblies containing the weapons grade plutonium in the form of PuO2 pebbles in a lithium slurry was investigated and found to be technically feasible. A design concept/operation scenario was developed for a facility which would be able to transmute the world's estimated inventory of weapons grade plutonium to 11% Pu-240 concentration in about 25 years. The fusion neutron source would be based on tokamak plasma operating conditions and magnet technology being qualified in ongoing R D programs, and the plutonium fuel would be based on existing technology. A new R D program would be required to qualify a refractory metal alloy structural material needed to handle the high heat fluxes. Extensions of existing technologies and acceleration of existing R D programs would seem to be adequate to qualify other technologies required for the facility.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Transmutation facility for weapons-grade plutonium disposition based on a tokamak fusion neutron source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is suggested that weapons-grade plutonium could be processed through a transmutation facility to build up sufficient actinide and fission product inventories to serve as a deterrent to diversion or theft during subsequent storage, pending eventual use as fuel in commercial nuclear reactors. A transmutation facility consisting of a tokamak fusion neutron source surrounded by fuel assemblies containing the weapons-grade plutonium in the form of PuO{sub 2} pebbles in a lithium slurry is investigated. A design concept/operation scenario is developed for a facility that would be able to transmute the world`s estimated surplus inventory of weapons-grade plutonium to 11% {sup 240}Pu concentration in nearly 25 yr. The fusion neutron source would be based on plasma physics and plasma support technology being qualified in ongoing research and development (R&D) programs, and the plutonium fuel would be based on existing technology. A new R&D program would be required to qualify a refractory metal alloy structural material that would be needed to handle the high heat fluxes; otherwise, extensions of existing technologies and acceleration of existing R&D programs would seem to be adequate to qualify all required technologies. Such a facility might feasibly be deployed in 20 to 30 yr, or sooner with a crash program. 49 refs., 5 figs., 13 tabs.

Stacey, W.M.; Pilger, B.L.; Mowrey, J.A. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

North Korea's nuclear weapons program:verification priorities and new challenges.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive settlement of the North Korean nuclear issue may involve military, economic, political, and diplomatic components, many of which will require verification to ensure reciprocal implementation. This paper sets out potential verification methodologies that might address a wide range of objectives. The inspection requirements set by the International Atomic Energy Agency form the foundation, first as defined at the time of the Agreed Framework in 1994, and now as modified by the events since revelation of the North Korean uranium enrichment program in October 2002. In addition, refreezing the reprocessing facility and 5 MWe reactor, taking possession of possible weapons components and destroying weaponization capabilities add many new verification tasks. The paper also considers several measures for the short-term freezing of the North's nuclear weapon program during the process of negotiations, should that process be protracted. New inspection technologies and monitoring tools are applicable to North Korean facilities and may offer improved approaches over those envisioned just a few years ago. These are noted, and potential bilateral and regional verification regimes are examined.

Moon, Duk-ho (Korean Consulate General in New York)

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Assessing State Nuclear Weapons Proliferation: Using Bayesian Network Analysis of Social Factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Bayesian network (BN) model of social factors can support proliferation assessments by estimating the likelihood that a state will pursue a nuclear weapon. Social factors including political, economic, nuclear capability, security, and national identity and psychology factors may play as important a role in whether a State pursues nuclear weapons as more physical factors. This paper will show how using Bayesian reasoning on a generic case of a would-be proliferator State can be used to combine evidence that supports proliferation assessment. Theories and analysis by political scientists can be leveraged in a quantitative and transparent way to indicate proliferation risk. BN models facilitate diagnosis and inference in a probabilistic environment by using a network of nodes and acyclic directed arcs between the nodes whose connections, or absence of, indicate probabilistic relevance, or independence. We propose a BN model that would use information from both traditional safeguards and the strengthened safeguards associated with the Additional Protocol to indicate countries with a high risk of proliferating nuclear weapons. This model could be used in a variety of applications such a prioritization tool and as a component of state safeguards evaluations. This paper will discuss the benefits of BN reasoning, the development of Pacific Northwest National Laboratorys (PNNL) BN state proliferation model and how it could be employed as an analytical tool.

Coles, Garill A.; Brothers, Alan J.; Olson, Jarrod; Whitney, Paul D.

2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

465

Howard Gruenspecht Deputy Administrator Duties  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Howard Gruenspecht Howard Gruenspecht Deputy Administrator Duties Howard Gruenspecht was named Deputy Administrator of the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) in March 2003. As the EIA Deputy Administrator, Howard assists the Administrator in collecting, analyzing, and disseminating independent and impartial energy information to promote sound policy-making, efficient markets, and public understanding of energy and its interaction with the econo- my and the environment. EIA provides a wide range of information and data products covering energy production, stocks, demand, imports, exports, and prices. EIA also prepares analyses and special reports on topics of current interest. Howard works closely with the Administra- tor to provide overall leadership, planning, and policy direction for the

466

History of the US weapons-usable plutonium disposition program leading to DOE`s record of decision  

SciTech Connect

This report highlights important events and studies concerning surplus weapons-usable plutonium disposition in the United States. Included are major events that led to the creation of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fissile Materials Disposition in 1994 and to that DOE office issuing the January 1997 Record of Decision for the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Useable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. Emphasis has been given to reactor-based plutonium disposition alternatives.

Spellman, D.J.; Thomas, J.F.; Bugos, R.G.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Karen Leffingwell Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-fated attempt to stop the NASA Office of the Inspector General from continuing to investigate his activities Inspector General Martin commended the outstanding investigative work of the agents from the NASA Office of Inspector General and prosecutive work of the U.S. Attorneys Office in the Southern District of Mississippi

Knowles, David William

468

Two-person control administration: preventing administration faults through duplication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern computing systems are complex and difficult to administer, making them more prone to system administration faults. Faults can occur simply due to mistakes in the process of administering a complex system. These mistakes can make the system insecure ...

Shaya Potter; Steven M. Bellovin; Jason Nieh

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Southwestern Power Administration Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Erosion Control Project along Transmission Line 3016, Structure 31 Erosion Control Project along Transmission Line 3016, Structure 31 Program or Field Office: Southwestern Power Administration Location(s) (City/County/State): Muskogee County, Oklahoma Proposed Action Description: Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) proposes to initiate a project to prevent water erosion around transmission line 3016, structure number 31 located in Muskogee County, Oklahoma. The structure foundation is being eroded by water runoff and streambed washout activities within an unnamed tributary of the Canadian River. Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: 10 CFR 1021 , Appendix B to Subpart D, Part B 1.33- Stormwater runoff control. For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, including the

470

Southwestern Power Administration Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Line Relocation Project for Farrell Cooper Mining Company Line Relocation Project for Farrell Cooper Mining Company Program or Field Office: Southwestern Power Administration Location(s) (City/County/State): Stigler, Haskell County, Oklahoma Proposed Action Description: Farrell Cooper Mining Company (FCMC) proposes to require the relocation of a portion of Southwestern Power Administration's transmission line number 3016 to accommodate FCMCs coal mining activity in the area. Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: 10 CFR 1021 , Appendix B to Subpart D, Part B4.l3- Upgrading or rebuilding approximately 20 miles in length or less of existing electric powerlines, which may involve minor relocations of small segments of the powerlines. For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, including the

471

Southwestern Power Administration Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Erosion Control Project along Transmission Line 3016, Structure 31 Erosion Control Project along Transmission Line 3016, Structure 31 Program or Field Office: Southwestern Power Administration Location(s) (City/County/State): Muskogee County, Oklahoma Proposed Action Description: Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) proposes to initiate a project to prevent water erosion around transmission line 3016, structure number 31 located in Muskogee County, Oklahoma. The structure foundation is being eroded by water runoff and streambed washout activities within an unnamed tributary of the Canadian River. Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: 10 CFR 1021 , Appendix B to Subpart D, Part B 1.33- Stormwater runoff control. For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, including the

472

Employee Concerns Program | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Human Resources About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Human Resources > Employee Concerns Program Employee Concerns Program The National Nuclear Security Administration Service Center (NNSA/SC) Employee Concerns Program (ECP) is a formalized alternative means for DOE/NNSA federal, contractor, and subcontractor employees to report concerns as supported by the DOE Secretary Bodman's Program Statement (pdf, 66kb) and the NNSA Administrator's Statement (doc, 22kb). The concerns may be associated with the: Environment Safety Health Security Fraud Waste Abuse Mismanagement of DOE/NNSA and contractor managed activities or Reprisal for having reported such issues The program encourages employees to use their own organization's established means for reporting issues. If resolution cannot be achieved,

473

Southwestern Power Administration Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Line Relocation Project for Farrell Cooper Mining Company Line Relocation Project for Farrell Cooper Mining Company Program or Field Office: Southwestern Power Administration Location(s) (City/County/State): Stigler, Haskell County, Oklahoma Proposed Action Description: Farrell Cooper Mining Company (FCMC) proposes to require the relocation of a portion of Southwestern Power Administration's transmission line number 3016 to accommodate FCMCs coal mining activity in the area. Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: 10 CFR 1021 , Appendix B to Subpart D, Part B4.l3- Upgrading or rebuilding approximately 20 miles in length or less of existing electric powerlines, which may involve minor relocations of small segments of the powerlines. For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, including the

474

Speeches | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Speeches | National Nuclear Security Administration Speeches | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Speeches Home > Media Room > Speeches Speeches NNSA officials frequently speak at public events around the world on topics ranging from nuclear security to infrastructure and strategic planning.

475

Supercomputers | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supercomputers | National Nuclear Security Administration Supercomputers | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Supercomputers Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D Programs > Supercomputers

476

Speeches | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Speeches | National Nuclear Security Administration Speeches | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Speeches Home > Media Room > Speeches Speeches NNSA officials frequently speak at public events around the world on topics ranging from nuclear security to infrastructure and strategic planning.

477

Announcements | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Announcements | National Nuclear Security Administration Announcements | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Announcements Home > About Us > Our Operations > Acquisition and Project Management > Major Contract Solicitations > Environmental Program Services Contract > Announcements

478

Environmental recordkeeping: The administrative record  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides information on an environmental records management system. It includes information on environmental recordkeeping; environmental regulations with emphasis on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA); and the administrative record including a case study of the Hanford Site's administrative record system. This paper will focus on the following objectives: (1) Identify resources that can be used as reference tools; (2) understand the reasons for developing and maintaining an administrative record; and, (3) evaluate an existing system and identify means of complying with the regulations. 15 refs., 2 figs.

Sprouse, B.S.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Grants Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools & Resources Tools & Resources Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Grants Administration to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Grants Administration on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Grants Administration on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Grants Administration on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Grants Administration on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Grants Administration on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Grants Administration on AddThis.com... Case Studies Resource Directory Webcasts Workshops Grants Administration Grants Administration Better Buildings Neighborhood Program award recipients were selected

480

ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.' :h I : ' ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20545 October 24, 1975 :.. ,. Memo to Piles' CARNEGIE-MELLON SC&RCCYCLOTRON On October 23, 1975, W....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administrator weapons activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

ADMINISTRATION OF ORNL RESEARCH REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

Organization of the ORNL Operations division for administration of the Oak Ridge Research Reactor, the Low Intensity Testing Reactor, and the Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor is described. (J.R.D.)

Casto, W.R.

1962-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

482

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Meeting 8 Meeting 2007 Meeting 2006 Meeting 2009 Hydropower Meeting The 2009 Regional Hydropower Council and Meeting were hosted by the Tulsa District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Click the links below to view materials from the council and meeting. June 9-10, 2009, Council Skip Navigation Links 2009 Hydropower Council Agenda FY 2010 Proposed Project Packet FY 2010 Proposed Rayburn/Willis Packet FY 2011 Preliminary Project Packet June 10-11, 2009, Meeting Skip Navigation Links 2009 Hydropower Meeting Agenda Corps Southwest Region NERC Activities DOE Water Power Research & Development Future Energy Resource Mix Little Rock District Projects Impacting Hydropower MOA Subagreement Status NERC Compliance Requirements Ozark Rehab Pumpback PMA Perspective

483

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Conference 8 Conference 2007 Conference 2006 Conference 2009 Hydropower Conference The 2009 Regional Hydropower Council and Conference was hosted by the Tulsa District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Click the links below to view materials from the council and conference. June 9-10, 2009, Council Skip Navigation Links 2009 Hydropower Council Agenda FY 2010 Proposed Project Packet FY 2010 Proposed Rayburn/Willis Packet FY 2011 Preliminary Project Packet June 10-11, 2009, Conference Skip Navigation Links 2009 Hydropower Conference Agenda Corps Southwest Region NERC Activities DOE Water Power Research & Development Future Energy Resource Mix Little Rock District Projects Impacting Hydropower MOA Subagreement Status NERC Compliance Requirements Ozark Rehab

484

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southwestern Duty Locations Southwestern Duty Locations The City of Gore, Oklahoma, established in 1903 at the southern edge of the Cherokee Nation in eastern Oklahoma, is known as the "Trout Capital of Oklahoma" owing to its location near many pristine lakes and rivers. In addition to year-round fishing, the area offers camping, hunting, scuba diving, and many other outdoor activities. The city itself boasts a number of antique stores and sponsors annual events such as car shows, arts and crafts festivals, and music festivals. With a population of approximately 1,000, Gore offers country living within easy highway driving of the larger cities of Tulsa, Oklahoma (74 miles) and Fort Smith, Arkansas (45 miles). back to top The City of Jonesboro, Arkansas, established in 1859, is the farming,

485

Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas 1998: Issues and Trends Natural Gas 1998: Issues and Trends 175 Appendix B Offshore Oil and Gas Recovery Technology The success of offshore exploration and production during general types of offshore platforms, as described by the the past four decades can be attributed, in large part, to Minerals Management Service. technological advances. Innovative technologies, such as new offshore production systems, three-dimensional (3-D) ü A Fixed Platform (FP) consists of a jacket (a tall seismic surveys, and improved drilling and completion vertical section made of tubular steel members techniques, have improved the economics of offshore supported by piles driven into the seabed) with a deck activities and enabled development to occur in deeper, more placed on top (Figure B1). The deck provides space for

486

NNSA honors Y-12 employees | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

are given annually to recognize significant achievements in quality, productivity, cost savings, safety or creativity in support of NNSA's nuclear weapons program. Posted on...

487

Non-Nuclear Treaties | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Treaties Non-Nuclear Treaties The Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling of Bacteriological and Toxin Weapons and on their Destruction off...

488

NNSA honors Y-12 employees | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Nuclear Weapons Stockpile Director Joseph Oder recently visited the Y-12 National Security Complex to present Defense Programs Awards of Excellence. Fifteen teams consisting...

489

FY 2012 Annual Report National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

scientific capability, technical experience, and policy understanding to combat the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) materials, technology, and expertise. More...

490

Nigeria - Analysis - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... militants came to an agreement with the government whereby they handed over weapons in exchange for cash payments and training opportunities.

491

Y-12 National Security Complex | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Home > About Us > Our Locations > Y-12 National Security Complex Home > About Us > Our Locations > Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex http://www.y12.doe.gov/ Field Office: The NNSA Production Office is responsible for contract management and oversight of the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas and the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tenn. Y-12 supports the Nuclear Security Enterprise through nuclear material processing, manufacturing and storage operations and nuclear nonproliferation activities and provides enriched uranium feedstock for the U.S. Navy. National Security Complex: The Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) serves as the nation's only source of enriched uranium nuclear weapons components and provides enriched uranium for the U.S. Navy. Y-12 is a leader in materials science and precision manufacturing and serves as the

492

No.","Financial and Activity Report (sheet 1 of 2) Version 1.4",,,,,,,,39843,"(0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

53,,,,,,,39857,"(006) Department of Commerce","(005-05) Department of Agriculture: Departmental Administration","(12-0403 2009 \ 2010) Salaries and Expenses","Discretionary Grant" 53,,,,,,,39857,"(006) Department of Commerce","(005-05) Department of Agriculture: Departmental Administration","(12-0403 2009 \ 2010) Salaries and Expenses","Discretionary Grant" ,"Agency / Bureau","TAFS","Sub-Account Code (OPTIONAL)","Award Type","US Indicator","State Code","Total Obligations","Total Gross Outlays",39864,"(007) Department of Defense--Military","(005-08) Department of Agriculture: Office of the Inspector General","(12-0599 2009 \ 2010) Salaries and Expenses, Recovery Act","Direct Loan" 1,"(019-05) Department of Energy: National Nuclear Security Administration","(89-0240 \ X ) Weapons Activities",,"Contracts and Orders (including modifications)","Y-US",,25253400,134832.72,39871,"(018) Department of Education","(005-18) Department of Agriculture: Agricultural Research Service","(12-0803 2009 \ 2013) Office of the Inspector General, Recovery Act","Guaranteed Loan"

493

No.","Financial and Activity Report (sheet 1 of 2) Version 1.4",,,,,,,,39843,"(0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

095,,,,,,,39857,"(006) Department of Commerce","(005-05) Department of Agriculture: Departmental Administration","(12-0403 2009 \ 2010) Salaries and Expenses","Discretionary Grant" 095,,,,,,,39857,"(006) Department of Commerce","(005-05) Department of Agriculture: Departmental Administration","(12-0403 2009 \ 2010) Salaries and Expenses","Discretionary Grant" ,"Agency / Bureau","TAFS","Sub-Account Code (OPTIONAL)","Award Type","US Indicator","State Code","Total Obligations","Total Gross Outlays",39864,"(007) Department of Defense--Military","(005-08) Department of Agriculture: Office of the Inspector General","(12-0599 2009 \ 2010) Salaries and Expenses, Recovery Act","Direct Loan" 1,"(019-05) Department of Energy: National Nuclear Security Administration","(89-0240 \ X ) Weapons Activities",,"Contracts and Orders (including modifications)","Y-US",,25977059,330278.19,39871,"(018) Department of Education","(005-18) Department of Agriculture: Agricultural Research Service","(12-0803 2009 \ 2013) Office of the Inspector General, Recovery Act","Guaranteed Loan"

494

No.","Financial and Activity Report (sheet 1 of 2) Version 1.4",,,,,,,,39843,"(0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81,,,,,,,39857,"(006) Department of Commerce","(005-05) Department of Agriculture: Departmental Administration","(12-0403 2009 \ 2010) Salaries and Expenses","Discretionary Grant" 81,,,,,,,39857,"(006) Department of Commerce","(005-05) Department of Agriculture: Departmental Administration","(12-0403 2009 \ 2010) Salaries and Expenses","Discretionary Grant" ,"Agency / Bureau","TAFS","Sub-Account Code (OPTIONAL)","Award Type","US Indicator","State Code","Total Obligations","Total Gross Outlays",39864,"(007) Department of Defense--Military","(005-08) Department of Agriculture: Office of the Inspector General","(12-0599 2009 \ 2010) Salaries and Expenses, Recovery Act","Direct Loan" 1,"(019-05) Department of Energy: National Nuclear Security Administration","(89-0240 \ X ) Weapons Activities",,"Contracts and Orders (including modifications)","Y-US",,25341992,192740.3,39871,"(018) Department of Education","(005-18) Department of Agriculture: Agricultural Research Service","(12-0803 2009 \ 2013) Office of the Inspector General, Recovery Act","Guaranteed Loan"

495

No.","Financial and Activity Report (sheet 1 of 2) Version 1.4",,,,,,,,39843,"(0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

48,,,,,,,39857,"(006) Department of Commerce","(005-05) Department of Agriculture: Departmental Administration","(12-0403 2009 \ 2010) Salaries and Expenses","Discretionary Grant" 48,,,,,,,39857,"(006) Department of Commerce","(005-05) Department of Agriculture: Departmental Administration","(12-0403 2009 \ 2010) Salaries and Expenses","Discretionary Grant" ,"Agency / Bureau","TAFS","Sub-Account Code (OPTIONAL)","Award Type","US Indicator","State Code","Total Obligations","Total Gross Outlays",39864,"(007) Department of Defense--Military","(005-08) Department of Agriculture: Office of the Inspector General","(12-0599 2009 \ 2010) Salaries and Expenses, Recovery Act","Direct Loan" 1,"(019-05) Department of Energy: National Nuclear Security Administration","(89-0240 \ X ) Weapons Activities",,,,,0,0,39871,"(018) Department of Education","(005-18) Department of Agriculture: Agricultural Research Service","(12-0803 2009 \ 2013) Office of the Inspector General, Recovery Act","Guaranteed Loan"

496

No.","Financial and Activity Report (sheet 1 of 2) Version 1.4",,,,,,,,39843,"(0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8,,,,,,,39857,"(006) Department of Commerce","(005-05) Department of Agriculture: Departmental Administration","(12-0403 2009 \ 2010) Salaries and Expenses","Discretionary Grant" 8,,,,,,,39857,"(006) Department of Commerce","(005-05) Department of Agriculture: Departmental Administration","(12-0403 2009 \ 2010) Salaries and Expenses","Discretionary Grant" ,"Agency / Bureau","TAFS","Sub-Account Code (OPTIONAL)","Award Type","US Indicator","State Code","Total Obligations","Total Gross Outlays",39864,"(007) Department of Defense--Military","(005-08) Department of Agriculture: Office of the Inspector General","(12-0599 2009 \ 2010) Salaries and Expenses, Recovery Act","Direct Loan" 1,"(019-05) Department of Energy: National Nuclear Security Administration","(89-0240 \ X ) Weapons Activities",,"Contracts and Orders (including modifications)","Y-US",,24100000,29966.25,39871,"(018) Department of Education","(005-18) Department of Agriculture: Agricultural Research Service","(12-0803 2009 \ 2013) Office of the Inspector General, Recovery Act","Guaranteed Loan"

497

No.","Financial and Activity Report (sheet 1 of 2) Version 1.4",,,,,,,,39843,"(0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9,,,,,,,39857,"(006) Department of Commerce","(005-05) Department of Agriculture: Departmental Administration","(12-0403 2009 \ 2010) Salaries and Expenses","Discretionary Grant" 9,,,,,,,39857,"(006) Department of Commerce","(005-05) Department of Agriculture: Departmental Administration","(12-0403 2009 \ 2010) Salaries and Expenses","Discretionary Grant" ,"Agency / Bureau","TAFS","Sub-Account Code (OPTIONAL)","Award Type","US Indicator","State Code","Total Obligations","Total Gross Outlays",39864,"(007) Department of Defense--Military","(005-08) Department of Agriculture: Office of the Inspector General","(12-0599 2009 \ 2010) Salaries and Expenses, Recovery Act","Direct Loan" 1,"(019-05) Department of Energy: National Nuclear Security Administration","(89-0240 \ X ) Weapons Activities",,"Contracts and Orders (including modifications)","Y-US",,25977059,330278.19,39871,"(018) Department of Education","(005-18) Department of Agriculture: Agricultural Research Service","(12-0803 2009 \ 2013) Office of the Inspector General, Recovery Act","Guaranteed Loan"

498

No.","Financial and Activity Report (sheet 1 of 2) Version 1.4",,,,,,,,39843,"(0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

40004,,,,,,,39857,"(006) Department of Commerce","(005-05) Department of Agriculture: Departmental Administration","(12-0403 2009 \ 2010) Salaries and Expenses","Discretionary Grant" 40004,,,,,,,39857,"(006) Department of Commerce","(005-05) Department of Agriculture: Departmental Administration","(12-0403 2009 \ 2010) Salaries and Expenses","Discretionary Grant" ,"Agency / Bureau","TAFS","Sub-Account Code (OPTIONAL)","Award Type","US Indicator","State Code","Total Obligations","Total Gross Outlays",39864,"(007) Department of Defense--Military","(005-08) Department of Agriculture: Office of the Inspector General","(12-0599 2009 \ 2010) Salaries and Expenses, Recovery Act","Direct Loan" 1,"(019-05) Department of Energy: National Nuclear Security Administration","(89-0240 \ X ) Weapons Activities",,"Contracts and Orders (including modifications)","Y-US",,24170000,29966.25,39871,"(018) Department of Education","(005-18) Department of Agriculture: Agricultural Research Service","(12-0803 2009 \ 2013) Office of the Inspector General, Recovery Act","Guaranteed Loan"

499

No.","Financial and Activity Report (sheet 1 of 2) Version 1.4",,,,,,,,39843,"(0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

60,,,,,,,39857,"(006) Department of Commerce","(005-05) Department of Agriculture: Departmental Administration","(12-0403 2009 \ 2010) Salaries and Expenses","Discretionary Grant" 60,,,,,,,39857,"(006) Department of Commerce","(005-05) Department of Agriculture: Departmental Administration","(12-0403 2009 \ 2010) Salaries and Expenses","Discretionary Grant" ,"Agency / Bureau","TAFS","Sub-Account Code (OPTIONAL)","Award Type","US Indicator","State Code","Total Obligations","Total Gross Outlays",39864,"(007) Department of Defense--Military","(005-08) Department of Agriculture: Office of the Inspector General","(12-0599 2009 \ 2010) Salaries and Expenses, Recovery Act","Direct Loan" 1,"(019-05) Department of Energy: National Nuclear Security Administration","(89-0240 \ X ) Weapons Activities",,"Contracts and Orders (including modifications)","Y-US",,25253400,192740.3,39871,"(018) Department of Education","(005-18) Department of Agriculture: Agricultural Research Service","(12-0803 2009 \ 2013) Office of the Inspector General, Recovery Act","Guaranteed Loan"

500

No.","Financial and Activity Report (sheet 1 of 2) Version 1.4",,,,,,,,39843,"(0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

67,,,,,,,39857,"(006) Department of Commerce","(005-05) Department of Agriculture: Departmental Administration","(12-0403 2009 \ 2010) Salaries and Expenses","Discretionary Grant" 67,,,,,,,39857,"(006) Department of Commerce","(005-05) Department of Agriculture: Departmental Administration","(12-0403 2009 \ 2010) Salaries and Expenses","Discretionary Grant" ,"Agency / Bureau","TAFS","Sub-Account Code (OPTIONAL)","Award Type","US Indicator","State Code","Total Obligations","Total Gross Outlays",39864,"(007) Department of Defense--Military","(005-08) Department of Agriculture: Office of the Inspector General","(12-0599 2009 \ 2010) Salaries and Expenses, Recovery Act","Direct Loan" 1,"(019-05) Department of Energy: National Nuclear Security Administration","(89-0240 \ X ) Weapons Activities",,"Contracts and Orders (including modifications)","Y-US",,25253400,192740.3,39871,"(018) Department of Education","(005-18) Department of Agriculture: Agricultural Research Service","(12-0803 2009 \ 2013) Office of the Inspector General, Recovery Act","Guaranteed Loan"