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1

DOE/EIA-0202(87/3Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3Q) 3Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections July 1987 aergy i . Energy ' Energy Energy Energy i Energy i . Energy . Energy Energy Energy . Energy . Energy Energy Energy Energy i Energy . Energy . Energy Energy Energy Energy . Energy "nergy ; Short-Term : Short-Term . Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-T'- Ent. Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energv Ene1" F- Ou Out, Outlc Outloc.

2

DOE/EIA-0202(88/3Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3Q) 3Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections July 1988 Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy . oi Lor L- . ; Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term . Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term . Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term . Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term . Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term . Short-Term Ent, Energ,, Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Ene r F- Ou Out, Outlc Outloc Outloo. Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlool Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlool

3

DOE/EIA-0202(88/2Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2Q) 2Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections April 1988 aergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy E nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy '? nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook '"""look Short-Terni Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

4

DOE/EIA-0202(87/2Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2Q) 2Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections April 1987 . m erm Term t-Term rt-Term jrt-Term ort-Term iort-Term ion-Term ion-Term lort-Term lort-Term ort-Term ort-Term Tt-Term ".-Term -Term Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

5

DOE/EIA-0202(88/1Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8/1Q) 8/1Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections January 1988 .m erm Term t-Term rt-Term jrt-Term ort-Term ion-Term ion-Term tort-Term jort-Term ion-Term ort-Term ore-Term rt-Term 't-Term -Term Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy "^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook ~">Mook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

6

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(83/3Q) (83/3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook iuarterly Projections August 1983 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. 20585 t rt jrt- .ort- iort- iort- iort- nort- lort- '.ort- ort- Tt- .-m .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term Term .-Term -Term xrm Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy -OJ.UUK Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

7

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - August 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook August 2005 Short-Term Energy Outlook - Regional Enhancements Starting with this edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), EIA is introducing regional projections (the scope of which will vary by fuel) of energy prices, consumption, and production. The addition of regional data and forecasts will allow us to examine regional fuel demands and prices, regional fuel inventory trends, the interaction between regional electricity demand shifts, and regional electric generating capacity. This edition of STEO includes regional projections for heating oil, propane, and gasoline prices and natural gas and electricity demand and prices. Over the next 2 months, we will include additional regional

8

DOE/EIA-0202(87/4Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections October 1987 i- rt- jrt ort lort lort lort- iort- lort- ort- ort Tt- " t- . m erm Perm -Term -Term -Term -Term ,-Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term 71 e rrn TT1 "1 Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy "nergy -cry Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook ""'tlook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

9

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - October 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 1 October 2005 Short-Term Energy Outlook and Winter Fuels Outlook October 12, 2005 Release (Next Update: November 8, 2005) Overview Warnings from previous Outlooks about the potential adverse impacts of an active hurricane season on domestic energy supply and prices are unfortunately being reflected in the challenging realities brought about by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. The impact of the hurricanes on oil and natural gas production, oil refining, natural gas processing, and pipeline systems have further strained already-tight natural gas and petroleum product markets on the eve of the 2005-2006 heating season (October through March). This combined Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook provides a current view of domestic energy supply and

10

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - January 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

January 2005 January 2005 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2005 Winter Fuels Update (Figure 1) Consumer prices for heating fuels are relatively unchanged since the December Outlook, leaving projections for household heating fuel expenditures about the same as previously projected, despite continued warm weather in the middle of the heating season. Heating oil expenditures by typical Northeastern households are expected to average 30 percent above last winter's levels, with residential fuel oil prices averaging $1.82 per gallon for the October-to-March period. Expenditures for propane-heated households are expected to increase about 20 percent this winter.

11

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - February 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

February 2005 February 2005 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2005 Winter Fuels Update (Figure 1) Despite some cold weather during the second half of January, expected average consumer prices for heating fuels this heating season are little changed since the January Outlook, leaving projections for household heating fuel expenditures about the same as previously reported. Heating oil expenditures by typical Northeastern households are expected to average 32 percent above last winter's levels, with residential fuel oil prices averaging $1.82 per gallon for the October-to-March period. Expenditures for propane-heated households are expected to increase about

12

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - April 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

April 2005 April 2005 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2005 2005 Summer Motor Gasoline Outlook (Figure 1) Gasoline prices in 2005 are projected to remain high, at an expected average of $2.28 per gallon for the April to September summer season, 38 cents above last summer. Similar high motor gasoline prices are expected through 2006. Monthly average prices are projected to peak at about $2.35 per gallon in May. Summer diesel fuel prices are expected to average $2.24 per gallon. As in 2004, the primary factor behind these price increases is crude oil costs. WTI, for example, is projected to average 37 cents per gallon higher than last summer. High world oil demand will continue to support crude oil prices and increase competition for

13

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - June 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook June 2005 2005 Summer Motor Fuels Outlook Update (Figure 1) In May, while West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil prices oscillated from the low $50s range to $47 and back again, retail gasoline prices declined steadily from about $2.24 per gallon at the beginning of the month to $2.10 on May 30. On June 6, average retail prices were $2.12 per gallon. Pump gasoline prices for the summer (April-September) are now projected to average $2.17 per gallon, similar to last month's projection but still about 26 cents per gallon above the year-ago level. Crude oil prices are expected to remain high enough to keep monthly average gasoline prices above $2.00 per gallon through 2006. The

14

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - April 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 1 April 2006 Short-Term Energy Outlook and Summer Fuels Outlook April 11, 2006 Release Contents Overview Global Petroleum Markets U.S. Petroleum Markets Motor Gasoline Diesel Fuel Natural Gas Markets Electricity Markets Coal Markets Overview Continued steady world oil demand growth, combined with only modest increases in world spare oil production capacity and the continuing risks of geopolitical instability, are expected to keep crude oil prices high through 2006. The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil is projected to average $65 per barrel in 2006 and $61 in 2007 (Figure 1. West Texas Intermediate Crude Oil Price). Retail regular gasoline prices are projected to average $2.50 per gallon in 2006 and $2.40 in

15

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - May 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook May 2005 2005 Summer Motor Gasoline Outlook Update (Figure 1) A considerable break in the expected strength of near-term crude oil prices has resulted in a lower forecast for retail gasoline prices this spring. Gasoline prices may well have seen their peak for the year, barring sharp disruptions in crude oil supply or refinery operations. Pump prices for the summer (April-September) are now projected to average $2.17 per gallon, still high by historical standards but well below the $2.28 anticipated last month. Our projection has been revised downward from the last Outlook as crude oil prices fell from the high $50s per barrel to the low $50s. However, oil prices remain high enough to keep expected

16

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - July 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

July 2005 July 2005 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2005 2005 Summer Motor Fuels Outlook Update (Figure 1) Retail regular-grade gasoline prices moved up from about $2.12 per gallon at the beginning of June to $2.33 on July 11. Gasoline pump prices for the summer (April-September) are now projected to average $2.25 per gallon, 8 cents per gallon higher than last month's projection and about 35 cents per gallon above the year-ago level. Crude oil prices are expected to remain high enough to keep quarterly average gasoline prices above $2.20 per gallon through 2006. The projected average for retail diesel this summer is $2.33 per gallon, up about 56 cents per gallon from last summer. Nationally, annual average diesel fuel prices

17

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Chart Gallery for February 2015 Short-Term Energy Outlook U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200 220 Jan...

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QUARTER SHORT-TERM ENERGY OUTLOOK QUARTERLY PROJECTIONS ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) 1991 1 QUARTER SHORT-TERM ENERGY OUTLOOK QUARTERLY PROJECTIONS ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION February 1991 This publication may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. Purchasing in formation for this or other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be obtained from the Government Printing Office or ElA's National Energy Information Center. Questions on energy statistics should be directed to the Center by mail, telephone, or telecommunications device for the hearing impaired. Addresses, telephone numbers, and hours are as follows: National Energy Information Center, El-231 Energy Information Administration Forrestal Building, Room 1F-048 Washington, DC 20585 (202) 586-8800 Telecommunications Device for the

19

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook Release Date: January 7, 2014 | Next Release Date: February 11, 2014 | Full Report | Text Only | All Tables | All Figures Glossary › FAQS › Overview STEO Report Highlights Prices Global Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels U.S. Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewables and CO2 Emissions U.S. Economic Assumptions Data Figures Tables Custom Table Builder Real Prices Viewer Forecast Changes (PDF) Special Analysis Price Uncertainty < Back to list of tables Working correctly. Table 1 : U.S. Energy Markets Summary Either scripts and active content are not permitted to run or Adobe Flash Player version ${version_major}.${version_minor}.${version_revision} or greater is not installed. Get Adobe Flash Player a Includes lease condensate.

20

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

‹ Analysis & Projections ‹ Analysis & Projections Short-Term Energy Outlook Release Date: January 7, 2014 | Next Release Date: February 11, 2014 | Full Report | Text Only | All Tables | All Figures Glossary › FAQS › Overview STEO Report Highlights Prices Global Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels U.S. Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewables and CO2 Emissions U.S. Economic Assumptions Data Figures Tables Custom Table Builder Real Prices Viewer Forecast Changes (PDF) Special Analysis Price Uncertainty Highlights This edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook is the first to include forecasts for 2015. After falling to the lowest monthly average of 2013 in November, U.S. regular gasoline retail prices increased slightly to reach an average of $3.28 per gallon (gal) during December. The annual average regular

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administration short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

‹ Analysis & Projections ‹ Analysis & Projections Short-Term Energy Outlook Release Date: December 10, 2013 | Next Release Date: January 7, 2014 | Full Report | Text Only | All Tables | All Figures Glossary › FAQS › Overview STEO Report Highlights Prices Global Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels U.S. Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewables and CO2 Emissions U.S. Economic Assumptions Data Figures Tables Custom Table Builder Real Prices Viewer Forecast Changes (PDF) Special Analysis Price Uncertainty Highlights After falling by more than 40 cents per gallon from the beginning of September through mid-November, weekly U.S. average regular gasoline retail prices increased by 8 cents per gallon to reach $3.27 per gallon on December 2, 2013, due in part to unplanned refinery maintenance and higher

22

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Release Schedule Release Schedule Release Date. The Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) scheduling procedure calls for the release of the STEO on the first Tuesday following the first Thursday of each month. For example, since the first Thursday of July 2009 was July 2, under this plan, the July edition was released on Tuesday, July 7. If a Federal holiday falls on the Monday before the normal release date the release is delayed until Wednesday. There may be the occasional unusual delay in the release because of scheduling around other events, such as the annual EIA Conference in April 2009. Barring holidays or unusual rescheduling, the STEO will normally appear between the 6th and the 12th of the month. Any unforeseen scheduling adjustments will be posted here and/or on the STEO homepage.

23

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Special Analysis Special Analysis + EXPAND ALL Feature Articles Status of Libyan Loading Ports and Oil and Natural Gas Fields September 2013 PDF EIA Estimates of Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Supply Disruptions September 2013 PDF 2013 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages June 2013 PDF Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential Electric Bills June 2013 PDF Key drivers for EIA's short-term U.S. crude oil production outlook February 2013 PDF Constraints in New England likely to affect regional energy prices this winter January 2013 PDF Change in STEO Regional and U.S. Degree Day Calculations September 2012 PDF Changes to Electricity and Renewables Tables August 2012 PDF Brent Crude Oil Spot Price Forecast July 2012 PDF 2012 Outlook for Hurricane-Related Production Outages in the Gulf of Mexico June 2012 PDF

24

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

‹ Analysis & Projections ‹ Analysis & Projections Short-Term Energy Outlook Release Date: December 10, 2013 | Next Release Date: January 7, 2014 | Full Report | Text Only | All Tables | All Figures Glossary › FAQS › Overview STEO Report Highlights Prices Global Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels U.S. Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewables and CO2 Emissions U.S. Economic Assumptions Data Figures Tables Custom Table Builder Real Prices Viewer Forecast Changes (PDF) Special Analysis Price Uncertainty Custom Table Builder Frequency: Annual Monthly Quarterly Select a Year Range: 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 to 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

25

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Market Prices and Uncertainty Report This is a regular monthly supplement to the EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook. Contact: James Preciado (James.Preciado@eia.gov) Full Report Crude Oil Prices: International crude oil benchmarks moved higher in November, showing their first month-over-month increase since August, while U.S. crude oil prices moved higher during the first week of December. The North Sea Brent front month futures price settled at $110.98 per barrel on December 5, an increase of $5.07 per barrel since its close on November 1 (Figure 1). The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) front month futures contract rose $2.77 per barrel compared to November 1, settling at $97.38 per barrel on December 5. Figure 1: Historical crude oil front month futures prices

26

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

STEO Archives STEO Archives Previous Short-Term Energy Outlook reports are available in the original Adobe Acrobat PDF file with text, charts, and tables, or just the monthly data tables in an Excel file. + EXPAND ALL 2013 STEO Issues Release Date Full PDF Report Excel Data File Energy Price Volatility and Forecast Uncertainty December 2013 12/10/2013 dec13.pdf dec13_base.xlsx dec13_uncertainty.pdf November 2013 11/13/2013 nov13.pdf nov13_base.xlsx nov13_uncertainty.pdf October 2013 10/08/2013 oct13.pdf oct13_base.xlsx oct13_uncertainty.pdf September 2013 09/10/2013 sep13.pdf sep13_base.xlsx sep13_uncertainty.pdf August 2013 08/06/2013 aug13.pdf aug13_base.xlsx aug13_uncertainty.pdf July 2013 07/09/2013 jul13.pdf jul13_base.xlsx jul13_uncertainty.pdf

27

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 : U.S. Energy Prices 2 : U.S. Energy Prices Either scripts and active content are not permitted to run or Adobe Flash Player version ${version_major}.${version_minor}.${version_revision} or greater is not installed. Get Adobe Flash Player a Average for all sulfur contents. b Average self-service cash price. c Includes fuel oils No. 4, No. 5, No. 6, and topped crude. - = no data available Notes: Prices are not adjusted for inflation. The approximate break between historical and forecast values is shown with estimates and forecasts in italics. Prices exclude taxes unless otherwise noted. Historical data: Latest data available from Energy Information Administration databases supporting the following reports: Petroleum Marketing Monthly, DOE/EIA-0380; Weekly Petroleum Status Report, DOE/EIA-0208; Natural Gas Monthly, DOE/EIA-0130; Electric Power Monthly, DOE/EIA-0226; and Monthly Energy Review, DOE/EIA-0035.

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Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9c : U.S. Regional Weather Data 9c : U.S. Regional Weather Data Either scripts and active content are not permitted to run or Adobe Flash Player version ${version_major}.${version_minor}.${version_revision} or greater is not installed. Get Adobe Flash Player - = no data available Notes: Regional degree days for each period are calculated by EIA as contemporaneous period population-weighted averages of state degree day data published by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). See STEO Supplement: Change in Regional and U.S. Degree-Day Calculations for more information. The approximate break between historical and forecast values is shown with historical data printed in bold; estimates and forecasts in italics. Regions refer to U.S. Census divisions. See "Census division" in EIA's Energy Glossary for a list of states in each region.

29

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 : U.S. Energy Markets Summary 1 : U.S. Energy Markets Summary Either scripts and active content are not permitted to run or Adobe Flash Player version ${version_major}.${version_minor}.${version_revision} or greater is not installed. Get Adobe Flash Player a Includes lease condensate. b Total consumption includes Independent Power Producer (IPP) consumption. c Renewable energy includes minor components of non-marketed renewable energy that is neither bought nor sold, either directly or indirectly, as inputs to marketed energy. EIA does not estimate or project end-use consumption of non-marketed renewable energy. d The conversion from physical units to Btu is calculated by using a subset of conversion factors used in the calculations of gross energy consumption in EIA’s Monthly Energy Review (MER). Consequently, the historical data may not precisely match those published in the MER or the Annual Energy Review (AER).

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Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

and forecast data STEO Custom Table Builder Real Prices Viewer In beta testing: STEO Data browser Related Tables Table 1. U.S. Energy Markets Summary PDF Table...

31

DOE/EIA-0202(84/1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections February 1984 Published: March 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt- .ort- iort- iort- .iort- iort- lort- Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Term' Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

32

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

All Tables All Tables Tables Table WF01. Average Consumer Prices and Expenditures for Heating Fuels During the Winter PDF Table 1. U.S. Energy Markets Summary PDF Table 2. U.S. Energy Prices PDF Table 3a. International Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Production, Consumption, and Inventories PDF Table 3b. Non-OPEC Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Supply PDF Table 3c. OPEC Crude Oil (excluding condensates) Supply PDF Table 3d. World Liquid Fuels Consumption PDF Table 4a. U.S. Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Supply, Consumption, and Inventories PDF Table 4b. U.S. Petroleum Refinery Balance PDF Table 4c. U.S. Regional Motor Gasoline Prices and Inventories PDF Table 5a. U.S. Natural Gas Supply, Consumption, and Inventories PDF Table 5b. U.S. Regional Natural Gas Prices PDF Table 6. U.S. Coal Supply, Consumption, and Inventories PDF

33

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts Overview Tancred Lidderdale 202-586-7321 tancred.lidderdale@eia.gov World Oil Prices/International Petroleum Erik Kreil 202-586-6573 erik.kreil@eia.gov Energy Prices Sean Hill 202-586-4247 sean.hill@eia.gov Futures Markets and Energy Price Uncertainty James Preciado 202-586-8769 james.preciado@eia.gov U.S. Crude Oil Production John Staub 202-586-6344 john.staub@eia.gov U.S. Petroleum Demand Michael Morris 202-586-1199 michael.morris@eia.gov U.S. Refinery Supply Arup Mallik 202-586-7713 arup.mallik@eia.gov U.S. Ethanol Tony Radich 202-586-0504 anthony.radich@eia.gov U.S. Biodiesel Sean Hill 202-586-4247 sean.hill@eia.gov U.S. Natural Gas Katherine Teller 202-586-6201 katherine.teller@eia.gov U.S. Coal Supply and Demand Elias Johnson 202-586-7277 elias.johnson@eia.gov U.S. Coal Prices

34

Short-term energy outlook quarterly projections. First quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short- term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets.

Not Available

1994-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

35

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Projected Winter Fuel Expenditures by Fuel and Region Projected Winter Fuel Expenditures by Fuel and Region The average household winter heating fuel expenditures discussed in this STEO provide a broad guide to changes compared with last winter. However, fuel expenditures for individual households are highly dependent on local weather conditions, market size, the size and energy efficiency of individual homes and their heating equipment, and thermostat settings (see Winter Fuels Outlook table). Forecast temperatures are close to last winter nationally, with the Northeast about 3% colder and the West 3% warmer. Natural Gas About one-half of U.S. households use natural gas as their primary heating fuel. EIA expects households heating with natural gas to spend an average of $80 (13%) more this winter than last winter. The increase in natural gas

36

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity So far this year (through October 2013), the electricity industry has added 10.0 gigawatts (GW) of new generating capacity. Much of this new capacity (6.2 GW) is fueled by natural gas. Renewable energy sources are used in 2.3 GW of the new capacity while two new coal plants (1.5 GW) have also started producing electricity this year. However, these new sources for power generation have been more than offset by 11.1 GW of retired capacity. Coal-fired and nuclear plants comprise the largest proportion of year-to-date retired capacity (3.8 GW and 3.6 GW, respectively). A total of 2.3 GW of natural-gas-fired capacity has been retired so far this year. U.S. Electricity Consumption Electricity sales during 2013 have experienced little, if any, growth.

37

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9b : U.S. Regional Macroeconomic Data 9b : U.S. Regional Macroeconomic Data Either scripts and active content are not permitted to run or Adobe Flash Player version ${version_major}.${version_minor}.${version_revision} or greater is not installed. Get Adobe Flash Player - = no data available Notes: The approximate break between historical and forecast values is shown with estimates and forecasts in italics. Regions refer to U.S. Census divisions. See "Census division" in EIA's Energy Glossary for a list of states in each region. Historical data: Latest data available from U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis; Federal Reserve System, Statistical release G17. Minor discrepancies with published historical data are due to independent rounding. Projections: Macroeconomic projections are based on the Global Insight Model of the U.S. Economy

38

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. Crude oil prices fell sharply at the onset of war in Iraq, but the initial declines probably overshot levels that we consider to be generally consistent with fundamental factors in the world oil market. Thus, while near-term price averages are likely to be below our previous projections, the baseline outlook for crude oil prices (while generally lower) is not drastically different and includes an average for spot West Texas Intermediate (WTI) that is close to $30 per barrel in 2003 (Figure 1). The mix of uncertainties related to key oil production areas has changed since last month, as Venezuelan production has accelerated beyond previous estimates while Nigerian output has been reduced due to internal conflict.

39

DOE/EIA-0202(84/2QH Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2QH 2QH Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections May 1984 Published: June 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort .iort .iort- iort- iort- '.ort- ort- .m .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term i-Term rTerm -Term xrm uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Tern Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

40

DOE/EIA-0202(85/2Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2Q) 2Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook amm Quarterly Projections April 1985 Published: May 1985 Energy Information Administration Washington, D C t rt jrt .ort lort .iort iort iort lort '.ort ort .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term xrm nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administration short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Short-Term Energy Outlook Figures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Independent Statistics & Analysis" Independent Statistics & Analysis" ,"U.S. Energy Information Administration" ,"Short-Term Energy Outlook Figures, December 2013" ,"U.S. Prices" ,,"West Texas Intermediate (WTI) Crude Oil Price" ,,"U.S. Gasoline and Crude Oil Prices" ,,"U.S. Diesel Fuel and Crude Oil Prices" ,,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Price" ,,"U.S. Natural Gas Prices" ,"World Liquid Fuels" ,,"World Liquid Fuels Production and Consumption Balance" ,,"Estimated Unplanned Crude Oil Production Outages Among OPEC Producers" ,,"Estimated Unplanned Crude Oil Production Disruptions Among non-OPEC Producers" ,,"World Liquid Fuels Consumption" ,,"World Liquid Fuels Consumption Growth"

42

Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, Third quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202). The feature article for this issue is Demand, Supply and Price Outlook for Reformulated Gasoline, 1995.

Not Available

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

43

Short-Term Energy Outlook September 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September 2013 1 September 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights Monthly average crude oil prices increased for the fourth consecutive month in August 2013, as...

44

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(STEO) (STEO) Highlights * Crude oil prices increased during the first three weeks of July 2013 as world oil markets tightened in the face of seasonal increases in world consumption, unexpected supply disruptions, and heightened uncertainty over the security of supply with the renewed unrest in Egypt. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) expects that the Brent crude oil spot price, which averaged $108 per barrel over the first half of 2013, will average $104 per barrel over the second half of 2013, and $100 per barrel in 2014. * The discount of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil to Brent crude oil, which averaged $18 per barrel in 2012 and increased to a monthly average of $21 per barrel in February 2013, closed below $1.50 per barrel on July 19, 2013, and averaged $3 per barrel for the

45

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Administration databases supporting the following reports: Petroleum Marketing Monthly , DOEEIA-0380; Prices are not adjusted for inflation. (b) Average self-service cash price....

46

Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 July 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights  The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) expects that the Brent crude oil spot price will average $102 per barrel over the second half of 2013, and $100 per barrel in 2014. This forecast assumes there are no disruptions to energy markets arising from the recent unrest in Egypt. After increasing to $119 per barrel in early February 2013, the Brent crude oil spot price fell to a low of $97 per barrel in mid-April and then recovered to an average of $103 per barrel in May and June, about the same as its average over the same two-month period last year.  The discount of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil to Brent crude oil, which averaged $18 per barrel in 2012 and increased to a monthly average of more than $20 per barrel in

47

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Administration databases supporting the following reports: Petroleum Marketing Monthly , DOEEIA-0380; 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 2013 2014 2015 Supply...

48

Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1995  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5) 5) Distribution Category UC-950 Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1995 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1995 ii Contacts Contacts The Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Energy Markets and End Use (EMEU). General questions concerning the content of the report may be directed to W. Calvin Kilgore (202/586-1617),

49

Short-Term Energy Outlook, Annual Supplement 1994  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4) 4) Distribution Category UC-950 Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1994 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1994 ii Contacts Contacts The Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Energy Markets and End Use (EMEU). General questions concerning the content of the report may be directed to W. Calvin Kilgore (202/586-1617),

50

Short Term Energy Outlook, January 2003  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. The oil market is vulnerable to a number of forces that could cause substantial price volatility over the...

51

Short-term energy outlook quarterly projections. Third quarter 1997  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the 1997 third quarter short term energy projections. Information is presented for fossil fuels and renewable energy.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Short-Term Energy Outlook: Quarterly projections. Fourth quarter 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202.) The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the fourth quarter of 1993 through the fourth quarter of 1994. Values for the third quarter of 1993, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data are EIA data published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications.

Not Available

1993-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

53

Short-Term Energy Outlook June 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 June 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights * After increasing to $119 per barrel in early February 2013, the Brent crude oil spot price fell to a low of $97 per barrel in mid-April and then recovered to an average of $103 per barrel in May. EIA expects that the Brent crude oil spot price will average $102 per barrel over the second half of 2013, and $100 per barrel in 2014. * EIA expects the price of regular gasoline will average $3.53 per gallon over the summer driving season (April through September). The annual average regular gasoline retail price is projected to decline from $3.63 per gallon in 2012 to $3.49 per gallon in 2013 and to $3.37 per gallon in 2014. Energy price forecasts are highly uncertain, and the current values of

54

August 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

August 2012 1 August 2012 1 August 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook Highlights  EIA projects that the Brent crude oil spot price will average about $103 per barrel during the second half of 2012, about $3.50 per barrel higher than in last month's Outlook. The forecast Brent crude oil spot price falls to an average of $100 per barrel in 2013. The projected West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price discount to Brent crude oil narrows from about $14 in the third quarter of 2012 to $9 by late 2013. These price forecasts assume that world oil-consumption-weighted real gross domestic product (GDP), which increased by 3.0 percent in 2011, grows by 2.8 percent in 2012 and 2.9

55

Short Term Energy Outlook, February 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. World oil markets will likely remain tight through most of 2003, as petroleum inventories and global spare production capacity continue to dwindle amid blasts of cold weather and constrained output from Venezuela. OPEC efforts to increase output to make up for lower Venezuela output has reduced global spare production capacity to only 2 million barrels per day, leaving little room to make up for unexpected supply or demand surprises. Meanwhile, the average West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price increased by $3.50 to $33 per barrel from December to January (Figure 1). For the year 2003, WTI oil prices are expected to remain over $30 per barrel, even though Venezuelan output appears to be moving toward normal sooner than expected. Also,

56

Short Term Energy Outlook ,November 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

November 2002 November 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook November 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: During the past 3-4 months, OPEC 10 production has risen more quickly than projected, thus reducing upward pressure on prices. More specifically, while the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price averaged $28.84 in October, about $6.70 per barrel above the year-ago level (Figure 1), the WTI average price for fourth quarter 2002 is now projected to soften to $28.20, which is about $2 per barrel below our fourth-quarter projection from last month. Meanwhile, OECD inventory levels, which are now approaching 5 -year lows, should begin to rise over the next few months as additional supplies reach markets, and return to the middle of their observed range by spring.

57

Short Term Energy Outlook, March 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook March 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. February crude oil prices moved higher than expected pushed by fears of a war in Iraq, low inventories, slow recovery in Venezuelan exports, continued cold weather and sharply higher natural gas prices in the United States. West Texas Intermediate prices averaged close to $36 for the month (Figure 1), a level not seen since October 1990. Oil inventories continued lower through the month resulting in a cumulative reduction in total commercial stocks of 101 million barrels since September 30, 2002, the beginning of the heating season. Total OECD inventories reached an estimated 2,424 million barrels at the end of February, which would be the lowest level since

58

Short-Term Energy Outlook- May 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook May 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. The April 24 meeting of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) raised official quotas for members (excluding Iraq) by 0.9 million barrels per day from the previous (suspended) quota to 25.4 million barrels per day. OPEC members also sought tighter compliance with quotas, calling for production cuts of 2 million barrels per day from April levels. We expect these measures to result in an average total OPEC (including Iraq) crude oil production rate of about 26.7 million barrels per day in the second and third quarters. This production level is not significantly different from our base case assumptions in last month's report. Individual OPEC country shares of these output levels will depend upon the speed with which

59

Short Term Energy Outlook ,October 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

October 2002 October 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook October 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: Continued high oil prices are the result of declining OECD commercial oil inventories, worries over a potential clash with Iraq, and OPEC's decision to leave production quotas unchanged at its September meeting. Solid growth in world oil demand this winter (and for 2003 as a whole) is likely to tighten world oil markets and reduce commercial oil inventories. The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price averaged $29.75 in September, about $3.50 per barrel above the year-ago level and about $10 per barrel above a low point seen last January. Home Heating Costs Outlook: While fuel supplies should remain sufficient under normal weather

60

Short Term Energy Outlook, December 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2002 December 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook December 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: Average crude oil prices fell by about $2.50 per barrel between October and November in response to continued high production levels from OPEC 10 countries (Figure 1). However, by the end of November oil prices had risen to end-October levels as concerns over the situations in Iraq and Venezuela pushed prices up. Oil inventories, which are currently in the lower portion of the previous 5-year range, are poised to rise to more comfortable levels soon if OPEC output continues at or above current levels. OPEC is considering cutbacks from current levels. Heating Fuels Update. As in October, weather was m uch colder than normal in November, boosting

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administration short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Short-Term Energy Outlook May 2014  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 October November December January February March U.S. Winter Heating Degree Days population-weighted 201112 201213 201314 201415 Source: Short-Term...

62

Short-term energy outlook annual supplement, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement (supplement) is published once a year as a complement to the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook), Quarterly Projections. The purpose of the Supplement is to review the accuracy of the forecasts published in the Outlook, make comparisons with other independent energy forecasts, and examine current energy topics that affect the forecasts.

NONE

1993-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

63

Short-term energy outlook: Quarterly projections, second quarter 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in January, April, July, and October in the Outlook. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the second quarter of 1997 through the fourth quarter of 1998. Values for the first quarter of 1997, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the second quarter 1997 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS). 34 figs., 19 tabs.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2014  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Administration databases supporting the following reports: Petroleum Marketing Monthly , DOEEIA-0380; Prices are not adjusted for inflation. (b) Average self-service cash price....

65

Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2014  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Administration databases supporting the following reports: Petroleum Marketing Monthly , DOEEIA-0380; 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 2013 2014 2015 Supply...

66

Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2014  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Administration databases supporting the following reports: Petroleum Marketing Monthly , DOEEIA-0380; 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 2013 2014 2015 Supply...

67

Short-Term Energy Outlook September 2014  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Administration databases supporting the following reports: Petroleum Marketing Monthly , DOEEIA-0380; 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 2013 2014 2015 Supply...

68

Short-Term Energy Outlook March 2014  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Administration databases supporting the following reports: Petroleum Marketing Monthly , DOEEIA-0380; 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 2013 2014 2015 Supply...

69

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

spring, averaging 4.89 per MMBtu in March, 4.92 in April, and 4.84 in May (Short-Term Energy Outlook, March 2004). Spot prices averaged 5.90 per MMBtu in January but fell to...

70

Short-Term Energy Outlook September 2013  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

the 2014 renewable fuel standards are identical to those for 2013. U.S. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions. EIA estimates that carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels...

71

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook This summary is based on the most recent Short-Term Energy Outlook released May 6, 2002. EIA projects that natural gas wellhead prices will average $2.73 per MMBtu in 2002 compared with about $4.00 per MMBtu last year (Short-Term Energy Outlook, May 2002). This projection reflects the sharp increases in spot and near-term futures prices in recent weeks. Average wellhead prices have risen 38 percent from $2.14 per MMBtu in February to an estimated $2.96 in April. Spot prices at the Henry Hub have increased to an even greater extent, rising more than $1.50 per MMBtu since early February. The upward price trend reflects a number of influences, such as unusual weather patterns that have led to increased gas consumption, and tensions in the Middle East and rising crude oil prices. Other factors contributing to the recent price surge include the strengthening economy, the increased capacity and planned new capacity of gas-burning power plants, and concerns about the decline in gas-directed drilling.

72

Microsoft PowerPoint - Arseneau_EIA_ShortTermDriversofEnergyPrices.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

SHORT-TERM ENERGY PRICES: SHORT-TERM ENERGY PRICES: WHAT DRIVERS MATTER MOST? DAVID M. ARSENEAU FEDERAL RESERVE BOARD U.S. Energy Information Administration & Johns Hopkins University - SAIS FEDERAL RESERVE BOARD Johns Hopkins University SAIS 2010 Energy Conference Washington, D.C., U.S.A. A il 6 2010 April 6, 2010 BROAD COMMODITY PRICES SINCE 2000 Short-term Energy Prices: What Drivers Matters Most? BROAD COMMODITY PRICES SINCE 2000 April 6, 2010 Seminar: 2010 EIA/SAIS Energy Conference 2 A (GROSSLY OVERSIMPLIFIED) FRAMEWORK Short-term Energy Prices: What Drivers Matters Most? A (GROSSLY OVERSIMPLIFIED) FRAMEWORK ...  Two candidate explanations:  "Fundamentals"  Fundamentals  Trend price movements appear broadly interpretable through lens of fundamental market developments...

73

Short-Term Solar Energy Forecasting Using Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short-Term Solar Energy Forecasting Using Wireless Sensor Networks Stefan Achleitner, Tao Liu an advantage for output power prediction. Solar Energy Prediction System Our prediction model is based variability of more then 100 kW per minute. For practical usage of solar energy, predicting times of high

Cerpa, Alberto E.

74

Management and Conservation Short-Term Impacts of Wind Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Management and Conservation Short-Term Impacts of Wind Energy Development on Greater Sage associated with wind energy development on greater sage-grouse populations. We hypothesized that greater sage-grouse nest, brood, and adult survival would decrease with increasing proximity to wind energy infrastructure

Beck, Jeffrey L.

75

Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013 1 and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013 1 October 2013 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights  EIA projects average U.S. household expenditures for natural gas and propane will increase by 13% and 9%, respectively, this winter heating season (October 1 through March 31) compared with last winter. Projected U.S. household expenditures are 2% higher for electricity and 2% lower for heating oil this winter. Although EIA expects average expenditures for households that heat with natural gas will be significantly higher than last winter, spending for gas heat will still be lower than the previous 5-year average (see EIA Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook slideshow).  Brent crude oil spot prices fell from a recent peak of $117 per barrel in early September to

76

Short-Term Test Results: Multifamily Home Energy Efficiency Retrofit  

SciTech Connect

Multifamily deep energy retrofits (DERs) represent great potential for energy savings, while also providing valuable insights on research-generated efficiency measures, cost-effectiveness metrics, and risk factor strategies for the multifamily housing industry. The Bay Ridge project is comprised of a base scope retrofit with a goal of achieving 30% savings (relative to pre-retrofit), and a DER scope with a goal of 50% savings (relative to pre-retrofit). The base scope has been applied to the entire complex, except for one 12-unit building which underwent the DER scope. Findings from the implementation, commissioning, and short-term testing at Bay Ridge include air infiltration reductions of greater than 60% in the DER building; a hybrid heat pump system with a Savings to Investment Ratio (SIR) > 1 (relative to a high efficiency furnace) which also provides the resident with added incentive for energy savings; and duct leakage reductions of > 60% using an aerosolized duct sealing approach. Despite being a moderate rehab instead of a gut rehab, the Bay Ridge DER is currently projected to achieve energy savings ? 50% compared to pre-retrofit, and the short-term testing supports this estimate.

Lyons, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

63 and $2.72 per MMBtu during the months through October without the wide variations that occurred over the spring and early summer months (Short-Term Energy Outlook, August 2002). Prices are expected to be less variable unless unusually hot weather in late summer results in gas being diverted from storage to meet the added cooling demand, or colder-than-normal weather for October results in an unexpected drawdown of storage stocks. Overall in 2002, wellhead prices are expected to average about $2.73 per MMBtu compared with $4.00 in 2001. Prices during the upcoming heating season (November through March), assuming normal weather, are expected to average close to $3.12 per MMBtu, which is about $0.75 higher than last winter's price but only about 10-15 percent higher than current prices.

78

January 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(STEO) (STEO)  This edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook is the first to include forecasts for 2014.  EIA expects that the Brent crude oil spot price, which averaged $112 per barrel in 2012, will fall to an average of $105 per barrel in 2013 and $99 per barrel in 2014. The projected discount of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil to Brent, which averaged $18 per barrel in 2012, falls to an average of $16 per barrel in 2013 and $8 per barrel in 2014, as planned new pipeline capacity lowers the cost of moving Mid-continent crude oil to the Gulf Coast refining centers.  EIA expects that falling crude prices will help national average regular gasoline retail prices

79

DOBEIA-0202(83/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

DOBEIA-0202(83/4Q) DOBEIA-0202(83/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections November 1983 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort .lort lort lort lort <.ort ort Tt- .-m .erm -Term -Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Nrm ,iergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short Short Short Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short Short Short Short Short-

80

DOE/EIA-0202(85/1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections January 1985 Published: February 1985 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort lort lort nort lort *.ort ort Tt .m .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administration short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

DOE/EIA-0202(84/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections October 1984 Published: November 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort iort lort iort lort \ort ort Tt .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term -Term -Term xrm nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short Short- Short- Short Short Short Short Short Short

82

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

in September and range between $4.37 and $4.58 per MMBtu in the last 3 months of 2003 (Short-Term Energy Outlook, September 2003). Spot prices at the Henry Hub have fallen somewhat from the unusually high levels that prevailed in the first half of the year and most of July, as mild summer weather in many areas of the country has reduced cooling demand and allowed record storage refill rates. As of September 5, working gas levels were only 5.5 percent below the 5-year average and, barring any disruptions, are on target to reach 3 Tcf by the end of October. However, gas prices remain high-wellhead prices this summer are estimated to be 60 to 70 percent higher than levels last summer. Overall in 2003, wellhead prices are expected to average $4.84 per MMBtu, which is nearly $2 more than the 2002 annual average and the largest year-to-year increase on record. For 2004, assuming normal weather, wellhead prices are projected to drop by about $1 per MMBtu, or almost 20 percent, to $3.89 per MMBtu, as the overall supply situation improves.

83

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5.57 per MMBtu in January 2004 and $5.40 in February, and then decrease to $4.77 in March as the heating season winds down (Short-Term Energy Outlook, January 2004). Spot prices were quite variable in December, with prices at the Henry Hub starting the month at around $5.00 per MMBtu, spiking to roughly $7.00 in the middle of the month, then falling to $5.50 toward the end of the month as warmer-than-normal weather eased demand. Spot prices will likely remain well above $5.00 over the next few months if normal or colder weather prevails, especially with oil prices remaining at relatively high levels. (Oil prices this winter are expected to average $31.35 per barrel (19 cents higher than last winter's average), or 5.41 per MMBtu.) Natural gas storage levels were 8 percent above average as of January 2, which could place downward pressure on prices if warm temperatures and weak heating demand occur later this winter, just as rising prices are possible if the weather becomes colder. Overall in 2004, natural gas wellhead prices are expected to average $4.73 per MMBtu, while spot prices will average nearly $5.00. In 2005, natural gas spot prices are projected to fall to an average of $4.83 per MMBtu under the assumption that domestic and imported supply can continue to grow by about 1-1.5 percent per year.

84

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Now that the heating season has ended, natural gas wellhead prices have fallen from the exceptionally high levels seen in February and early March. Nevertheless, they still remain historically and unseasonably high, hovering around $5.00 per MMBtu. EIA projects that natural gas wellhead prices will remain above $5.00 per MMBtu in April and then decrease to $4.36 in May and $4.26 in June (Short-Term Energy Outlook, April 2003). Wellhead prices for the 2002-2003 heating season (November through March) averaged $4.44 per MMBtu, or $2.08 more than last winter's price. Overall in 2003, wellhead prices are projected to increase about $1.53 per MMBtu over the 2002 level to $4.40 per MMBtu. This projection is based on the expectation of lower volumes of natural gas in underground storage compared with last year and continued increases in demand over 2002 levels. Cold temperatures this past winter led to a record drawdown of storage stocks. By the end of March, estimated working gas stocks were 676 Bcf (prior estimates were 696 Bcf), which is the lowest end-of-March level in EIA records and 44 percent below the previous 5-year average. In 2004, continued tightness of domestic natural gas supply and high demand levels are expected to keep the average wellhead price near the 2003 level.

85

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4.20 per MMBtu through January 2003 and then increase to $4.61 in February and $4.23 in March (Short-Term Energy Outlook, released January 8, 2003). Wellhead prices for the overall heating season (November through March), assuming normal weather, are expected to average about $4.10 per MMBtu, or $1.74 more than last winter's levels, while prices to residential customers are expected to average $8.51 per MMBtu compared with $7.14 last winter. Natural gas prices were higher than expected in November and December as below-normal temperatures throughout much of the nation increased heating demand, placing upward pressure on gas prices. Spot prices at the Henry Hub climbed above $5.00 per MMBtu in the second week of December and stayed near or above this threshold through the end of the month. Overall in 2002, wellhead prices are expected to average $2.90 per MMBtu compared with $4.00 in 2001. In 2003, average wellhead prices are projected to increase about $1.00 per MMBtu over the 2002 level to $3.90 per MMBtu, owing to expectations of higher demand levels than in 2002 and lower storage levels for most of the year compared with 2002 levels.

86

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 per MMBtu during the last 2 months of 2003 and increase to $4.36 in January 2004 (Short-Term Energy Outlook, November 2003). Prices have fallen in the past few months as mild weather and reduced industrial demand have allowed record storage refill rates. As of October 31, 2003, working gas levels had reached 3,155 Bcf, which is about 3 percent higher than the 5-year average and the first time since October 2002 that stocks exceeded the year-earlier levels. With the improved storage situation, wellhead prices during the current heating season (November through March) are expected to be about 12 percent less than last winter ($4.12 vs. $4.68 per MMBtu). However, prices in the residential sector will likely be about 8 percent higher than last winter, as accumulated natural gas utility costs through 2003 are recovered in higher household delivery charges. Overall in 2003, wellhead prices are expected to average $4.76 per MMBtu, which is nearly $2 more than the 2002 annual average and the largest year-to-year increase on record. For 2004, wellhead prices are projected to drop by nearly $0.90 per MMBtu, or about 18 percent, to $3.88 per MMBtu as the overall supply situation improves.

87

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

the rest of the winter and the first part of spring, with prices averaging $5.19 per MMBtu through March and $4.58 in April (Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2004). Wellhead prices for the current heating season (November 2003 through March 2004) are expected to average $4.99 per MMBtu, or about 7 percent higher than last winter's level. Spot prices at the Henry Hub averaged $5.90 per MMBtu in January as cold temperatures (6 percent colder than normal nationally and 19 percent colder than normal in the Northeast) kept natural gas prices and heating demand high. Despite the severe weather, natural gas storage stocks were 3 percent above average as of January 30 and spot prices in early February have moved down somewhat. Overall in 2004, spot prices are expected to average about $4.90 per MMBtu and wellhead prices are expected to average $4.63 per MMBtu, declining moderately from the 2003 levels. In 2005, natural gas spot prices are projected to average about $5.00 per MMBtu, under the assumption that domestic and imported supply can continue to grow by about 1 percent per year.

88

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

this summer and continue at elevated levels through the rest of 2003 (Short-Term Energy Outlook, June 2003). Natural gas wellhead prices are expected to average $5.40 per MMBtu in June and remain above $5.13 through December 2003. Spot prices at the Henry Hub have stayed well above $5.00 per MMBtu on a monthly basis since the beginning of the year and have been above $6.00 for the first 10 days of June. The low level of underground storage is the principal reason for these unusually high prices. As of June 6, 2003, working gas stocks were 1,324 Bcf, which is about 35 percent below year-earlier levels and 25 percent below the 5-year average. Natural gas prices are likely to stay high as long as above-normal storage injection demand competes with industrial and power sector demand for gas. Overall in 2003, wellhead prices are projected to increase about $2.33 per MMBtu (the largest U.S. annual wellhead price increase on record) over the 2002 level to a record annual high of about $5.20 per MMBtu. For 2004, prices are projected to ease only moderately, as supplies are expected to remain tight.

89

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

range from $2.91 to $3.19 per MMBtu through December 2002 and then increase to $3.53 in January 2003, the peak demand month of the heating season (Short-Term Energy Outlook, October 2002). Natural gas prices climbed sharply in late September as hurricanes Isidore and Lili caused production shut downs in the Gulf of Mexico. However, this price surge is expected to be short-lived, unless the weather in October is unusually cold or if additional storm activity in the Gulf curbs production further. Overall in 2002, wellhead prices are expected to average about $2.76 per MMBtu compared with $4.00 in 2001. Prices during the upcoming heating season (November through March), assuming normal weather, are expected to average $3.32 per MMBtu, which is about $0.96 higher than last winter's price. Prices to residential customers during the heating season are expected to average $7.55 per MMBtu compared with $7.14 last winter.

90

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

prices will remain relatively high during the storage refill season (April through October) and the rest of 2004. Wellhead prices are expected to average $4.87 per MMBtu in April and May, $4.71 from June through October, and $5.12 for November and December (Short-Term Energy Outlook, April 2004). Spot prices during the storage refill months will likely average $5.23 per MMBtu, virtually the same as the average price ($5.22) this past heating season. Overall in 2004, spot prices are expected to average $5.31 per MMBtu, slightly less than the 2003 price ($5.35), while wellhead prices will average about $4.90. In 2005, natural gas spot prices will likely average about $5.25 per MMBtu, under the assumption that domestic supply can continue to grow by about 1 percent per year. Total available supply (including imports and storage inventories) is expected to increase to 22.31 Tcf in 2004 compared with 21.78 Tcf in 2003. Storage stocks at the end of the traditional heating season (March 31) were about 6 percent less than the 5-year average but nearly 50 percent more than year-earlier levels.

91

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

average $2.83 per MMBtu in 2002 compared with about $4.00 last year (Short-Term Energy Outlook, June 2002). Average wellhead prices have increased by nearly 50 percent from $2.09 per MMBtu in February to an estimated $3.11 per MMBtu in May. Spot prices at the Henry Hub have also increased, rising more than $1.00 per MMBtu since early February. It is atypical to see higher spot gas prices in the cooling season than during the heating season, particularly when working gas in underground storage is at high levels, as it has been for the past several months. As of the end of May, working gas levels were more than 20 percent above the previous 5-year average for that month. Moreover, gas-directed drilling, while down sharply from summer 2001 levels, is still quite strong from a historical perspective. The gas rig count as of May 31 was up 22 percent from the recent low of 591 for the week ending April 5.

92

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4.41 per MMBtu in December 2003, although spot prices are expected to average $5.38 (Short-Term Energy Outlook, December 2003). The average wellhead price is expected to increase moderately to $4.56 during the first three months of 2004. Natural gas prices were lower in November than previously expected but forward price expectations remain sensitive to weather conditions. Prices increased rapidly in futures trading in early December as some cold weather moved into the Eastern United States and reported withdrawals from gas storage were slightly larger than expected. Spot prices above $5 per MMBtu remain likely over the next few months if normal (or colder) weather prevails, especially with oil prices remaining at relatively high levels. Natural gas storage levels are still above average and hold the potential to push prices back down if warm temperatures and weak heating demand materialize later in the winter, just as upward spikes remain a strong possibility if the weather turns cold.

93

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

about $3.49 per MMBtu through December 2002 and then increase to $3.76 in January 2003, the peak demand month of the heating season (Short-Term Energy Outlook, released November 7, 2002). Natural gas prices were higher than expected in October as storms in the Gulf of Mexico in late September temporarily shut in some gas production, causing spot prices at the Henry Hub and elsewhere to rise above $4.00 per million Btu for most of October. In addition, early winter-like temperatures, particularly in the Midwest and Northeast, increased demand for natural gas, placing upward pressure on gas prices. Overall in 2002, wellhead prices are expected to average about $2.84 per MMBtu compared with $4.00 in 2001. Prices during the heating season (November through March), assuming normal weather, are expected to average $3.56 per MMBtu, which is about $1.20 higher than last winter's price. Prices to residential customers during the heating season are expected to average $7.81 per MMBtu compared with $7.14 last winter. In 2003, wellhead prices are projected to average $3.28 per MMBtu, or about $0.44 per MMBtu more than in 2002, owing to expectations of increasing economic growth, little or no change in the annual average crude oil price for 2003, and lower storage levels for most of 2003 compared with 2002 levels.

94

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 per MMBtu during the last 3 months of 2003 and increase to $4.32 in January 2004 (Short-Term Energy Outlook, October 2003). Prices have fallen somewhat from the unusually high levels that prevailed in the first half of the year and most of July, as mild summer weather and reduced industrial demand allowed record storage refill rates. As of October 3, 2003, working gas levels were only 1 percent below the 5-year average and, barring any disruptions, are on target to reach 3 Tcf by the end of October. With the improved storage situation, wellhead prices during the upcoming heating season (November through March), assuming normal weather, are expected to be about 13 percent less than last winter ($4.17 vs. $4.68 per MMBtu). But prices in the residential sector are projected to be about 9 percent higher than last winter, as the recent decline in wellhead prices is too recent and insufficient to offset the impact of the substantial spring-summer increase in wellhead prices on residential prices. Overall in 2003, wellhead prices are expected to average $4.75 per MMBtu, which is nearly $2 more than the 2002 annual average and the largest year-to-year increase on record. For 2004, wellhead prices are projected to drop by nearly $0.90 per MMBtu, or about 20 percent, to $3.86 per MMBtu as the overall supply situation improves.

95

DOE/EIA-0202(86/4Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Ter  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6/4Q) 6/4Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Ter m Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections October 1986 .m erm Term t-Term rt-Term jrt-Term ort-Term ion-Term lort-Term ion-Term lort-Term lort-Term ort-Term ort-Term -rt-Term -t-Term -Term iiergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy " Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

96

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) projects that natural gas prices will remain relatively high for the rest of 2004. Wellhead prices are expected to average $5.41 per MMBtu through the end of the storage refill season (October 31) and $5.59 in November and December. Spot prices (composites for producing-area hubs) averaged about $5.30 per MMBtu in the first quarter of this year but are currently near $6.00. Barring cooler-than-normal weather this summer, the likelihood appears small that spot prices will fall significantly below $5.65 per MMBtu for the rest of 2004. Overall in 2004, spot prices will likely average $5.62 per MMBtu and wellhead prices will average $5.33. In 2005, spot prices are expected to increase to $5.90 per MMBtu. As in other recent projections, this outcome depends on modest growth in domestic production and total available supply (including imports and storage inventories) in both 2004 and 2005. Underground storage facilities reported net injections of 199 Bcf for April, well above the previous 5-year average of 139 Bcf. At the end of April, storage stocks were only about 2 percent below the 5-year average level and 37 percent higher than last year at this time based on monthly survey data.

97

DOE/EIA-0202(86/1Q) Energy Information Administration Washington, DC  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6/1Q) 6/1Q) Energy Information Administration Washington, DC Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections January 1986 Outlook Short-Term _ uergy Outlook Short-Term Ent,. , Energy Outlook Short-Term Energ^ .m Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy L .erm Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Ou Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Out, t-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlc rt-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outloc 3rt-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlocx .ort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook lort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook .iort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook nort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook iort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook lort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook '.ort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook

98

DOE/EIA-0202(86/2Q) Energy Information Administration Washington, DC  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2Q) 2Q) Energy Information Administration Washington, DC Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections April 1986 Outlook Short-Term _ Outlook Short-Term Exit,. . Energy Outlook Short-Term Energ^ .-m Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy L .erm Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Ou Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy OuU t-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlc rt-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outloc jrt-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlocx .ort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook. lort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook lort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook lort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook lort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook lort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook <.ort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook

99

The Application of Flywheels in Short-term Energy Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT In many alternative energy systems there is a requirement for energy storage over periods of up to 20 seconds in order to match supply and demand at times when these are changing rapidly and independently. The flywheel forms an ideal basis for such storage because of its relatively high cycle life and potential power and energy density. Wind energy conversion is taken as an example and the requirement for energy storage in WTG systems is assessed. Flywheel energy storage is compared with other forms of storage and is shown to be potentially suitable for this requirement. Power transmission between the flywheel and the WTG grid system requires a variable speed regenerative drive and associated frequency conversion. Such a scheme might permit variable speed WTG operation. A DC link converter is described.

C.M. Jefferson; N. Larsen

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

February 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

in the western United States. Producers reported wellhead freeze-offs in the San Juan, Green River, Uinta, and Piceance basins, according to recent Bentek Energy reports. As...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administration short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Newporter Apartments: Deep Energy Retrofit Short-Term Results  

SciTech Connect

This project demonstrates a path to meet the goal of the Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30% in multi-family buildings. The project demonstrates cost effective energy savings targets as well as improved comfort and indoor environmental quality (IEQ) associated with deep energy retrofits by a large public housing authority as part of a larger rehabilitation effort. The project focuses on a typical 1960's vintage low-rise multi-family apartment community (120 units in three buildings).

Gordon, A.; Howard, L.; Kunkle, R.; Lubliner, M.; Auer, D.; Clegg, Z.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

March 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(STEO) (STEO) Highlights  The weekly U.S. average regular gasoline retail price fell in early March for the first time since mid-December. The March 11 average was $3.71 per gallon, down $0.07 per gallon from February 25. EIA expects that lower crude oil prices will result in monthly average regular gasoline prices staying near the February average of $3.67 per gallon over the next few months, with the annual average regular gasoline retail price declining from $3.63 per gallon in 2012 to $3.55 per gallon in 2013 and $3.38 per gallon in 2014. Energy price forecasts are highly uncertain and the current values of futures and options contracts suggest that prices

103

DOE/EIA-0202(86/3Q) Energy Information Administration Washington, DC  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3Q) 3Q) Energy Information Administration Washington, DC Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections July 1986 t rt ort .ort lort lort nort iort lort \ort ort Tt "t- . m .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term xrm uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Enbrgy ^nergy -OJ.VJUK Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

104

Ducklings Exhibit Substantial Energy-Saving Mechanisms as a Response to Short-Term Food Shortage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

90 Ducklings Exhibit Substantial Energy-Saving Mechanisms as a Response to Short-Term Food Shortage platyrhyncos domesticus) exhibited any energy-saving mechanisms that could lessen the detrimental effects ex- hibited substantial energy-saving mechanisms as a response to diet restriction. After 5 d of diet

Bech, Claus

105

Short-Term Throughput Maximization for Battery Limited Energy Harvesting Nodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for energy recharge. Under the assumption of an increasing concave power-rate relationship, the short completion time of a given amount of data were found for an energy harvesting node under the assumptionShort-Term Throughput Maximization for Battery Limited Energy Harvesting Nodes Kaya Tutuncuoglu

Yener, Aylin

106

Session 4: "Short-Term Energy Prices - What Drivers Matter Most?"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4: "Short-Term Energy Prices - What Drivers Matter Most?" 4: "Short-Term Energy Prices - What Drivers Matter Most?" Speakers: Howard K. Gruenspecht, EIA David M. Arseneau, Federal Reserve Board Guy F. Caruso, Center for Strategic and International Studies Christopher Ellsworth, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Edward L. Morse, Credit Suisse Securities [Note: Recorders did not pick up introduction of panel (see biographies for details on the panelists) or introduction of session.] Howard: And this presentation could not be more timely, given current developments in oil and natural gas markets and the start of the traditional summer driving season. In discussions of rapidly rising oil prices leading to a peak of $147 per barrel in the summer of 2008, the factors that were traditionally the focus of EIA's

107

DSM savings verification through short-term pre-and-post energy monitoring at 90 facilities  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the DSM impact results obtained from short-term energy measurements performed at sites monitored as part of the Commercial, Industrial and Agricultural (CIA) Retrofit Incentives Evaluation Program sponsored by the Pacific Gas & Electric Company. The DSM measures include those typically found in these sectors; i.e., lighting, motors, irrigation pumps and HVAC modifications. The most important findings from the site measurements are the estimated annual energy and demand savings. Although there may be large differences of projected energy savings for individual sites, when viewed in the aggregate the total energy savings for the program were found to be fairly comparable to engineering estimates. This paper describes the lessons learned from attempting in-situ impact evaluations of DSM savings under both direct and custom rebate approaches. Impact parameters of interest include savings under both direct and custom rebate approaches. Impact parameters of interest include gross first-year savings and load shape impacts. The major method discussed in this paper is short-term before/after field monitoring of affected end-uses; however, the complete impact evaluation method also includes a billing analysis component and a hybrid statistical/engineering model component which relies, in part, on the short-term end-use data.

Misuriello, H.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

Efficacy of short-term administration of altrenogest to postpone ovulation in mares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, would sufficiently suppress LH thereby delaying ovulation. The objective of this experiment was to elucidate the potential for oral administration of altrenogest (17-Allyl-17phydroxyestra-4,9,1 1-trien-3-one) to postpone ovulation of a preovulatory...

James, Aida Nioma

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

109

Wind diesel design and the role of short term flywheel energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wind diesel hybrid systems can often provide a cost effective solution to electricity supply in many rural and grid remote applications. The potential market for such stand alone systems is vast. The sizing and design of these systems to suite a given application is non-trivial. Design principles for wind diesel systems are presented with stress placed on the role of short term energy storage. It is shown that flywheels are the most appropriate form of energy storage. A user-friendly software package to help engineers design wind diesel systems has been developed over the last three years with support from the CEC's JOULE programme. The modelling and software development was undertaken cooperatively by several EEC and EFTA countries. An brief introduction to the software, which models both logistic and dynamic aspects of system operation, is provided and there is a discussion of its validation.

D.G. Infield

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

DOE/EIA-0202(84/3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

As required by Government regulation, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) is conduct ing its annual publications mailing list review. If you are on the EIA mailing...

111

Methodology for Analyzing Energy and Demand Savings From Energy Services Performance Contract Using Short-Term Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

METHODOLOGY FOR ANALYZING ENERGY AND DEMAND SAVINGS FROM ENERGY SERVICES PERFORMANCE CONTRACT USING SHORT-TERM DATA Zi Liu, Jeff Haberl, Soolyeon Cho Energy Systems Laboratory Texas A&M University System College Station, TX 77843 Bobby... Contract, and includes the methodology developed to calculate the electricity and demand use savings based on different data sources including hourly data from permanently installed logger, hourly data from portable loggers, and weekly manual readings...

Liu, Z.; Haberl, J. S.; Cho, S.; Lynn, B.; Cook, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential Electric Bills  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential Electric Bills June 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | STEO Supplement: Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential Electric Bills i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other federal agencies. June 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | STEO Supplement: Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential Electric Bills 1

113

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ENERGY CONVERSION, VOL. 24, NO. 1, MARCH 2009 125 Short-Term Prediction of Wind Farm Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ENERGY CONVERSION, VOL. 24, NO. 1, MARCH 2009 125 Short-Term Prediction of Wind Farm Power: A Data Mining Approach Andrew Kusiak, Member, IEEE, Haiyang Zheng, and Zhe Song, Student Member, IEEE Abstract--This paper examines time series models for predicting the power of a wind

Kusiak, Andrew

114

Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Status of Libyan Loading Ports and Oil and Natural Gas Fields  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Status of Libyan Loading Ports and Oil and Natural Gas Fields Tuesday, September 10, 2013, 10:00AM EST Overview During July and August 2013, protests at major oil loading ports in the central-eastern region of Libya forced the complete or partial shut-in of oil fields linked to the ports. As a result of protests at ports and at some oil fields, crude oil production fell to 1.0 million barrels per day (bbl/d) in July and 600,000 bbl/d in August, although the production level at the end of August was far lower. At the end of August, an armed group blocked pipelines that connect the El Sharara and El Feel (Elephant) fields to the Zawiya and Mellitah export terminals, respectively, forcing the shutdown of those fields. El Sharara had been

115

Chapter 6 - Incorporating Short-Term Stored Energy Resource into MISO Energy and Ancillary Service Market and Development of Performance-Based Regulation Payment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter analyzes various approaches to incorporate short-term stored energy resources (SERs) into MISO co-optimized energy and ancillary service market. Based on analysis, the best approach is to utilize short-term storage energy resources for regulating reserve with the real-time energy dispatch of the \\{SERs\\} to be set in such a way that the maximum regulating reserve on \\{SERs\\} can be cleared. It also introduces the implementation of market based regulation performance payment. The purpose of the enhancement is to provide fair compensation for resources such as \\{SERs\\} that can provide fast and accurate responses.

Yonghong Chen; Marc Keyser; Matthew H. Tackett; Ryan Leonard; Joe Gardner

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

American Solar Energy Society Proc. ASES Annual Conference, Raleigh, NC, 2011 SHORT-TERM IRRADIANCE VARIABILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

© American Solar Energy Society ­ Proc. ASES Annual Conference, Raleigh, NC, 2011 SHORT, as hypothesized in Hoff and Perez's optimum point. #12;© American Solar Energy Society ­ Proc. ASES Annual is the factor that determines whether the combined relative fluctuations of two solar systems add up when

Perez, Richard R.

117

DOE/EIA-0202|83/2Q)-1 Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ministration (EIA), Office of Energy Markets and End Use, under the direc tion "of Wray Smith (202252-1617). General supervision is provided by W. Calvin Kilgore (202252-1130),...

118

Short-term resource scheduling of a renewable energy based micro grid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In recent years due to the decreasing fossil fuel reserves and the increasing social stress, complex power networks have no other choices except to seek for alternative energy sources to eliminate the environmental issues caused by the traditional power systems. Thus, the scheduling of energy sources in a complex Micro-Grid (MG) comprising Micro Turbine (MT), Photo Voltaic (PV), Fuel Cell (FC), battery units and Wind Turbine (WT) has been investigated in this paper. Furthermore, a multi-objective framework is presented to simultaneously handle the two objective functions including minimization of total operation cost and minimization of emission. In this regard, Normal Boundary intersection (NBI) technique is employed to solve the proposed multi-objective problem and generate the Pareto set. Besides, a fuzzy satisfying method is used for decision making process. Afterward, the results obtained from the presented method are compared to the ones derived from other methods. Finally, it is verified that the proposed solution method results in better solutions for operation cost, emission and the execution time.

Maziar Izadbakhsh; Majid Gandomkar; Alireza Rezvani; Abdollah Ahmadi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

EIA's latest Short-Term Energy Outlook for natural gas › image chart of U.S. Natural Gas Production and Imports projections as described in linked Short-Term Energy Outlook Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Short-Term Energy Outlook, released monthly. Natural gas price volatility and uncertainty › Natural gas historical and implied volatility Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Short-Term Energy Outlook, Market Prices and Uncertainty Report. Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen Graph showing Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) 1998-2010, September 6, 2013. North America leads the world in production of shale gas ›

120

Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: 2013 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2013 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico 2013 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages June 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | STEO Supplement: 2013 Hurricane Outlook i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other federal agencies. June 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | STEO Supplement: 2013 Hurricane Outlook 1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administration short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP): A Public/Private Partnership for Improving Short Term Wind Energy Forecasts and Quantifying the Benefits of Utility Operations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP) is a U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored research project whose overarching goals are to improve the accuracy of short-term wind energy forecasts, and to demonstrate the economic value of these improvements.

122

THE FEDERAL ENERGY ADMINISTRATION By Roger Anders  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEDERAL ENERGY FEDERAL ENERGY ADMINISTRATION By Roger Anders November 1980 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Management Office of the Executive Secretariat Office of History and Heritage Resources 1 Introduction For the three-year period between 1974 and 1977, the Federal Energy Administration implemented federal oil allocation and pricing regulations. An independent agency, the Federal Energy Administration was the successor of the Federal Energy Office, a short-term organization created to coordinate the government's response to the Arab oil embargo. By October 1977, when it became a part of the newly established Department of Energy, the Federal Energy

123

Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Analysis & Projections Analysis & Projections Glossary › FAQS › Overview Projection Data Monthly Short-Term Forecasts to 2014 Annual Projections to 2040 International Projections Analysis & Projections Most Requested Annual Energy Outlook Related Congressional & Other Requests International Energy Outlook Related Presentations Short-Term Outlook Related Testimony All Reports Models & Documentation Price projections from Short-Term Energy Outlook › image chart of U.S. Gasoline and Crude Oil Prices as described in linked report Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Short-Term Energy Outlook, monthly. Increased tight oil production, vehicle efficiency reduce petroleum and liquid imports › graph of U.S. liquid fuels supply, as explained in the article text Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Today in Energy, December

124

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Highlights Highlights After falling by more than 40 cents per gallon from the beginning of September through mid-November, weekly U.S. average regular gasoline retail prices increased by 8 cents per gallon to reach $3.27 per gallon on December 2, 2013, due in part to unplanned refinery maintenance and higher crude oil prices. The annual average regular gasoline retail price, which was $3.63 per gallon in 2012, is expected to average $3.50 per gallon in 2013 and $3.43 per gallon in 2014. The North Sea Brent crude oil spot price averaged near $110 per barrel for the fifth consecutive month in November. EIA expects the Brent crude oil price to average $108 per barrel in December and decline gradually to $104 per barrel in 2014. Projected West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil prices average $95 per barrel during 2014.

125

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Natural Gas Cold weather in December had significant effects on demand, supply, and prices across the country. Cold weather led to a net withdrawal of 285 billion cubic feet (Bcf) for the week ending Friday, December 13. This was the largest storage withdrawal since recordkeeping began in 1994. Another larger-than-normal storage withdrawal of 177 Bcf occurred the following week. Widespread freeze-offs occurred in December and disrupted production for several days in the Piceance Basin in Utah and Wyoming, the Uinta Basin in Utah, the San Joaquin Basin in California, and the Williston Basin in North Dakota. Imports from Canada helped mitigate the loss of supply. During the month, prices rose across most of the country, and the Henry Hub price averaged about $0.60/MMBtu higher than the previous month's average.

126

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Real Prices Viewer Real Prices Viewer Real Petroleum Prices are computed by dividing the nominal price in a given month by the ratio of the Consumer Price Index (CPI) in that month to the CPI in some "base" period. The Real Petroleum Prices spreadsheet and charts are updated every month so that the current month is the base period in the monthly price series. Consequently, all real prices are expressed in "current" dollars and any current month price may be compared directly with any past or projected real prices. Download all real and nominal price series to an Excel Spreadsheet (Excel xlsx file) Data Sources History Imported Crude Oil Price (refiner average imported crude oil acquisition cost) 1968 - Present: EIA Petroleum Marketing Monthly Motor Gasoline Regular Grade Retail Price (including taxes)

127

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

marginal sources of supply for times of very high demand: liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports and pipeline imports from Canada. Although LNG imports have declined...

128

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

consumption comes from Annex VI to the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL Annex VI), which is an international agreement that generally...

129

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Global Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Global Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Global Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Overview EIA expects production from countries outside of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) to grow year-over-year by a record high of 1.9 million bbl/d in 2014. OPEC crude oil production is forecast to decline by 0.5 million bbl/d in 2014, mostly as a result of some OPEC producers cutting back production to accommodate non-OPEC supply growth. The projected decline in production by some OPEC producers increases in surplus crude oil production capacity, which grows from an average of 2.2 million bbl/d in 2013 to 2.7 million bbl/d in 2014. The call on OPEC crude oil and global stocks (world consumption less non-OPEC production and OPEC non-crude oil production) falls from an average 30.4 million bbl/d in 2013

130

DOE/EIA-0202(87/1Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

growth is projected to remain steady but weak through 1987, with slower growth in domes tic spending offset by the tendency to substitute some U.S. products for higher priced...

131

Shortterm solar effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...J. L. Culhane and J. C. R. Hunt Short-term solar effects Richard A. Harrison Space Science and Technology...OX11 0QX, UK Short-term transient events in the solar atmosphere, namely solar flares and coronal mass ejections, can have a direct...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Coal - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Coal Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Summary Prices Reserves Consumption Production Stocks Imports, Exports & Distribution Coal Transportation Rates International All Coal Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Consumption Environment Imports & Exports Industry Characteristics Prices Production Projections Reserves Stocks All Reports EIA's latest Short-Term Energy Outlook for coal › image chart of U.S. Natural Gas Production and Imports projections as described in linked Short-Term Energy Outlook Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Short-Term Energy Outlook, released monthly. U.S. coal production by quarter › Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Quarterly Coal Report. Quarterly data for coal shipments between states ›

133

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(STEO) (STEO) Highlights  After falling by more than 40 cents per gallon from the beginning of September through mid-November, weekly U.S. average regular gasoline retail prices increased by 8 cents per gallon to reach $3.27 per gallon on December 2, 2013, due in part to unplanned refinery maintenance and higher crude oil prices. The annual average regular gasoline retail price, which was $3.63 per gallon in 2012, is expected to average $3.50 per gallon in 2013 and $3.43 per gallon in 2014.  The North Sea Brent crude oil spot price averaged near $110 per barrel for the fifth consecutive month in November. EIA expects the Brent crude oil price to average $108 per barrel in December and decline gradually to $104 per barrel in 2014. Projected West Texas

134

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

capacity slightly more than doubled in 2013. EIA expects that utility-scale solar capacity will about double again between the end of 2013 and the end of 2015; about two-thirds...

135

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

in customer-sited distributed generation installations, utility-scale solar capacity doubled in 2013. EIA expects that utility-scale solar capacity will increase by 96%...

136

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

in 2015 comes from Annex VI to the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL Annex VI), which is an international agreement that generally...

137

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

consumption comes from Annex VI to the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL Annex VI), which is an international agreement that generally...

138

Environment - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Environment Environment Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Summary Electric Power Plant Environmental International Emissions All Environment Data Reports Analysis & Projections Carbon/Greenhouse Gas Emissions International Other Environmental Issues Projections All Reports EIA's latest Short-Term Energy Outlook for carbon dioxide emissions › chart showing U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Short-Term Energy Outlook, released monthly. Extending current energy policies would reduce U.S. energy use, carbon dioxide emissions › Graph of total energy-related co2 emissions, as explained in the article text Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Today in Energy, April 30, 2013. Power plant emissions of sulfur dioxide are projected to decline ›

139

The Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP): A Public/Private Partnership for Improving Short Term Wind Energy Forecasts and Quantifying the Benefits of Utility Operations the Southern Study Area  

SciTech Connect

This Final Report presents a comprehensive description, findings, and conclusions for the Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP)--Southern Study Area (SSA) work led by AWS Truepower (AWST). This multi-year effort, sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), focused on improving short-term (15-minute 6 hour) wind power production forecasts through the deployment of an enhanced observation network of surface and remote sensing instrumentation and the use of a state-of-the-art forecast modeling system. Key findings from the SSA modeling and forecast effort include: 1. The AWST WFIP modeling system produced an overall 10 20% improvement in wind power production forecasts over the existing Baseline system, especially during the first three forecast hours; 2. Improvements in ramp forecast skill, particularly for larger up and down ramps; 3. The AWST WFIP data denial experiments showed mixed results in the forecasts incorporating the experimental network instrumentation; however, ramp forecasts showed significant benefit from the additional observations, indicating that the enhanced observations were key to the model systems ability to capture phenomena responsible for producing large short-term excursions in power production; 4. The OU CAPS ARPS simulations showed that the additional WFIP instrument data had a small impact on their 3-km forecasts that lasted for the first 5-6 hours, and increasing the vertical model resolution in the boundary layer had a greater impact, also in the first 5 hours; and 5. The TTU simulations were inconclusive as to which assimilation scheme (3DVAR versus EnKF) provided better forecasts, and the additional observations resulted in some improvement to the forecasts in the first 1 3 hours.

Freedman, Jeffrey M.; Manobianco, John; Schroeder, John; Ancell, Brian; Brewster, Keith; Basu, Sukanta; Banunarayanan, Venkat; Hodge, Bri-Mathias; Flores, Isabel

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

140

U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Department of Energy Energy Information Administration Form EIA-5 (July 2011) Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report Coke Plants Page 1 Form Approved OMB No. 1905-0167 Expires: 06/30/2014 Burden: 1.50 Hours General Instructions: A. PURPOSE. The EIA-5 survey collects data related to coal receipts, stocks, and coke production at U.S. coke plants. The data are collected to provide Congress with basic statistics concerning coal consumption, stocks, prices, and quality as required by the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (FEAA) (P.L. 93-275), as amended. These data appear in the Annual Coal Report, the Quarterly Coal Report, the Monthly Energy Review, and the Annual Energy Review. In addition, the Energy Information Administration uses the data for coal demand analyses and in short-term modeling efforts, which produce forecasts of coal demand

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administration short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Nuclear & Uranium - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nuclear & Uranium Nuclear & Uranium Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Summary Uranium & Nuclear Fuel Nuclear Power Plants Radioactive Waste International All Nuclear Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Nuclear Plants and Reactors Projections Uranium All Reports EIA's latest Short-Term Energy Outlook for electricity › chart showing U.S. electricity generation by fuel, all sectors Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Short-Term Energy Outlook, released monthly. Quarterly uranium production data › image chart of Quarterly uranium production as described in linked report Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly, 3rd Quarter 2013, October 31, 2013. Uprates can increase U.S. nuclear capacity substantially without building

142

Administrative | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Employee Services » Administrative Services » Employee Services » Administrative Administrative The Office of Management provides many of the administrative services that keep the Department of Energy operational. These functions are primarily provided by the Office of Administration, MA-40, the Office of Administrative Management and Support, MA-42. Administrative Management Services Conferencing and Special Events Copier Services Document Imaging Graphics Mail and Distribution Photography Printing For a listing of office contacts please use the About Us menu, the Contact Us section, available directly through this link. We welcome your comments or questions regarding these services. Please feel free to provide feedback to the Office of Administration's Customer Mailbox at: MA-40Customervoice@hq.doe.gov.

143

Energy Efficiency Program Administration Powerpoint Presentation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency Program Administration Powerpoint Presentation Energy Efficiency Program Administration Powerpoint Presentation Energy Efficiency Program Administration Powerpoint...

144

Renewable & Alternative Fuels - U.S. Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Renewable & Alternative Fuels Renewable & Alternative Fuels Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Summary Biomass Geothermal Hydropower Solar Wind Alternative Transportation Fuels All Renewable & Alternative Fuels Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Alternative Fuels Capacity and Generation Consumption Environment Industry Characteristics Prices Production Projections Renewable Energy Type All Reports Don't miss: EIA's Alternative Fuel Vehicle Data. Including two interactive data viewers that provide custom data views of Alternative Fuel Vehicle data for both User & Fuel Data and Supplier Data. EIA's latest Short-Term Energy Outlook for renewables › chart showing U.S. renewable energy supply Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Short-Term Energy Outlook, released monthly.

145

Record of Decision for BPA Short-Term Marketing and Operating Arrangements (1/31/96)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 Federal Register / Vol. 61, No. 21 / Wednesday, January 31, 1996 / Notices Bonneville Power Administration Notice of Availability of Record of Decision for Short-Term Marketing and Operating Arrangements AGENCY: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Notice of Availability of Record of Decision (ROD). SUMMARY: BPA has decided to enter into short-term marketing and operational arrangements in order to participate continuously in the open electric power market. These arrangements would enable BPA to achieve the best reliability and expected economic outcome, as well as to best meet its environmental responsibilities, given diverse market conditions. This decision would support power cost control, enhance BPA competitiveness, and provide public benefits. The

146

Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Marks 25th Anniversary of 1973 Oil Embargo Marks 25th Anniversary of 1973 Oil Embargo Jay Hakes, Administrator, Energy Information Administration (EIA) September 3, 1998 Click here to start Table of Contents Energy Information Administration Some Views of 1973 Major Disruptions of World Oil Supply Imported Oil as a Percent of Total U. S. Consumption Percent of OPEC and Persian Gulf World Oil Production U. S. Retail Price of Gasoline U. S. Total Petroleum Consumption U. S. Per Capita Use of Petroleum U. S. Government Owned Crude Oil Stocks Cost of Finding Oil and Gas Reserves U. S. MPG Ratings for New Vehicles U. S. Average Horsepower of a New Vehicle Share of U. S. Electricity Generated By Petroleum Futures And Options Markets Changed Energy Marketing U. S. Total Energy Consumption U. S. Per Capita Use of Energy

147

Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) -  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Analysis & Projections Analysis & Projections Glossary › FAQS › Overview Projection Data Monthly Short-Term Forecasts to 2014 Annual Projections to 2040 International Projections Analysis & Projections Most Requested Annual Energy Outlook Related Congressional & Other Requests International Energy Outlook Related Presentations Short-Term Outlook Related Testimony All Reports Models & Documentation Full report Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2011 Release date: March 14, 2012 Background This paper was prepared in response to recent requests that the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) provide updated summary information regarding fossil fuel production on Federal and Indian lands1 in the United States. It provides EIA's current best estimates of fossil fuels sales from

148

Directory of Energy Information Administration models, 1990  

SciTech Connect

This directory revises and updates the Directory of Energy Information Administration Models, DOE/EIA-0293(89), Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy, May 1989. The major changes are the inclusion of the Building Energy End-Use Model (BEEM-PC), Residential Energy End-Use Model (REEM-PC), the Refinery Yield Model Spreadsheet System (RYMSS-PC), and the Capital Stock Model (CAPSTOCK-PC). Also, the following models have been inactivated: Energy Disaggregated Input-Output Model (EDIO), Household Model of Energy (HOME3-PC), Commercial Sector Energy Model (CSEM-PC), Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Supply Model (OCSM), and the Stock Module of the Intermediate Future Forecasting System (STOCK). This directory contains descriptions about each basic and auxiliary model, including the title, acronym, purpose, and type, followed by more detailed information on characteristics, uses, and requirements. For developing models, limited information is provided. Sources for additional information are identified. Included in this directory are 38 EIA models active as of March 1, 1990, as well as the PC-AEO Forecasting Model Overview and the three Subsystems for the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) Model. Models that run on personal computers are identified by PC'' as part of the acronym.

Not Available

1990-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

149

Short term forecasting of solar radiation based on satellite data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short term forecasting of solar radiation based on satellite data Elke Lorenz, Annette Hammer University, D-26111 Oldenburg Forecasting of solar irradiance will become a major issue in the future integration of solar energy resources into existing energy supply structures. Fluctuations of solar irradiance

Heinemann, Detlev

150

Appendix D Short-Term Analysis of Refinery Costs and Supply  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Short-Term Analysis of Refinery Costs and Supply 9302 Appendix D Short-Term Analysis of Refinery Costs and Supply As a result of the new regulations issued by the U.S. Estimating Components of the Distillate Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for ultra-low- Blend Pool sulfur diesel fuel (ULSD) the U.S. refining industry faces two major challenges: to meet the more stringent specifi- The initial step of the analysis was to analyze the poten- cations for diesel product, and to keep up with demand tial economics of producing ULSD for each refinery. by producing more diesel product from feedstocks of Using input and output data submitted to the Energy lower quality. Some refineries in the United States and Information Administration (E1A) by refiners, the cur-

151

Petroleum & Other Liquids - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum & Other Liquids Petroleum & Other Liquids Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Summary Prices Crude Reserves and Production Refining and Processing Imports/Exports & Movements Stocks Consumption/Sales All Petroleum & Other Liquids Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Consumption & Sales Crude Reserves & Production Imports/Exports & Movements Prices Projections Refining & Processing Stocks All Reports EIA's latest Short-Term Energy Outlook for crude oil and liquid fuels › image chart of World Liquid Fuels Supply and Demand as described in linked Short-Term Energy Outlook Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Short-Term Energy Outlook, released monthly. EIA's latest weekly petroleum analysis › Featured chart from This Week in Petroleum using statistics from the Weekly Petroleum Status Report

152

Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

World Shale Gas Resources: World Shale Gas Resources: An Initial Assessment of 14 Regions Outside the United States APRIL 2011 www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 The information presented in this overview is based on the report "World Shale Gas Resources: An Initial Assessment," which was prepared by Advanced Resources International (ARI) for the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The full report is attached. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies.

153

ANALYSIS OF SHORT-TERM SOLAR RADIATION DATA Gayathri Vijayakumar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and short- term radiation data. 1. INTRODUCTION Analyses to predict long-term performances of solar energy commonly used in these analyses and are readily available; (e.g., hourly data for 239 US locations for 30, TN, Madison, WI, Seattle, WA, Salt Lake City, UT, and Sterling, VA. One year of ISIS data, from

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

154

Energy Department Names Elliot Mainzer Bonneville Power Administration Administrator  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Department announced that Elliot Mainzer has been appointed Administrator for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

155

Understanding the strengths and weaknesses of a new-generation numerical weather prediction model for application to short-term wind energy prediction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Wind power is a growing economy and science. It has far reaching consequences in all aspects of society and if goals of energy sustainability and (more)

Fowler, Padriac

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

to totals. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A, C, and E of the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey....

157

About EIA - Ourwork - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mission and Overview Mission and Overview The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. EIA collects, analyzes, and disseminates independent and impartial energy information to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding of energy and its interaction with the economy and the environment. EIA is the nation's premier source of energy information and, by law, its data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the U.S. Government. photo of the James Forrestal building EIA conducts a comprehensive data collection program that covers the full spectrum of energy sources, end uses, and energy flows. EIA also prepares informative energy analyses, monthly short-term forecasts of energy market

158

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2012 | Release Date: Jan. 12, 1, 2012 | Release Date: Jan. 12, 2012 | Next Release: Jan. 19, 2012 Previous Issues Week: 12/22/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices | Storage In the News: EIA releases the Short-Term Energy Outlook On January 10, 2012, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) released its monthly Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), the first STEO to include forecasts for 2013. Highlights of January's STEO for natural gas include record volumetric increases in marketed production and inventories in 2011, as well as a significantly lower forecast for prices in 2012. Due largely to increased volumes from shale gas formations, total marketed production in 2011 rose by an estimated 4.5 billion cubic feet (Bcf) per day, the largest year-over-year volumetric increase on record. While EIA

159

Energy Information Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Internal PMA Scorecard for Human Capital Management (HCM) - FY 2006, Quarter 4 Internal PMA Scorecard for Human Capital Management (HCM) - FY 2006, Quarter 4 Office: Energy Information Administration Progress Score: Status Score: Requirements for HCM Plan 4th QTR REQUIREMENTS FY 06, Q4 Comments Integrate HCM Plan into decision-making processes - Plan linked to DOE mission, strategy, and goals - designates accountable officials Link performance appraisal plans and awards to DOE mission & goals for SES, managers, and more than 60% of workforce (HQ and Field); discuss difference between various levels of performance, discuss consequences based on performance HCM is linked to EIA's mission, strategy, and goals. Employee performance plans have at least one critical element with corresponding tasks supporting

160

Electricity storage for short term power system service (Smart...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity storage for short term power system service (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Electricity storage for short term power system service...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administration short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

September 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights  Brent crude oil spot prices have increased at a relatively steady pace from their 2012 low of $89 per barrel on June 25 to their recent high of $117 per barrel on August 23 because of the seasonal tightening of oil markets and continuing unexpected production outages. EIA expects Brent crude oil prices to fall from recent highs over the rest of 2012, averaging $111 per barrel over the last 4 months of 2012 and $103 per barrel in 2013. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot prices rose by a more modest $17 per barrel between June 25 and August 23, as the WTI discount to Brent crude oil widened from $10 per barrel to $22 per barrel. EIA expects WTI spot prices to average

162

Short-Term Energy Outlook May 2014  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

by the U.S. Supreme Court reversing a lower court opinion that vacated the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule (CSAPR). CSAPR will replace the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR). The...

163

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State Energy Profiles Updated narratives and data tables, maps, rankings › Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2014 Energy projections for supply, demand, and prices › Thirteen accomplishments worth celebrating in 2013 New and improved products and services from EIA › Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Reference case Projections for U.S. energy production, consumption, & imports through 2040 › Colombia has seen an increase in oil, natural gas, and coal production. Read the Country Analysis Brief › Natural Gas Monthly With data for October › What's New Northeastern Winter Natural Gas and Electricity Issues › January 7 Natural Gas Monthly › January 7 Short-Term Energy Outlook › January 7 More › Coming Up Ecuador Country Analysis Brief › The Availability and Price of Petroleum and Petroleum Products Produced in

164

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Supplement Tables - Supplemental  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The AEO Supplemental tables were generated for the reference case of the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006) using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets for 2003 to 2030. Most of the tables were not published in the AEO2006, but contain regional and other more detailed projections underlying the AEO2006 projections. The files containing these tables are in spreadsheet format. A total of one hundred and seventeen tables is presented. The data for tables 10 and 20 match those published in AEO2006 Appendix tables A2 and A3, respectively. Forecasts for 2004-2006 may differ slightly from values published in the Short Term Energy Outlook, which are the official EIA short-term forecasts and are based on more current information than the AEO.

165

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Supplement Tables - Supplemental  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 The AEO Supplemental tables were generated for the reference case of the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO2007) using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets for 2005 to 2030. Most of the tables were not published in the AEO2007, but contain regional and other more detailed projections underlying the AEO2007 projections. The files containing these tables are in spreadsheet format. A total of one hundred and eighteen tables is presented. The data for tables 10 and 20 match those published in AEO2007 Appendix tables A2 and A3, respectively. Projections for 2006 and 2007 may differ slightly from values published in the Short Term Energy Outlook, which are the official EIA short-term projections and are based on more current information than the AEO.

166

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

sum to totals. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A, C, and E of the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey....

167

Energy Information Administration (WFP) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

future. Energy Information Administration Responsible Contacts Thomas Wheeler Director, Workforce Analysis & Planning Division E-mail thomas.wheeler@hq.doe.gov Phone (202)...

168

Press Room - Press Releases - U.S. Energy Information Administration...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

fuel costs with the release of its October 2014 Short-Term Energy Outlook at a press conference as part of the 2014 - 2015 Winter Energy Outlook Conference. The Conference is an...

169

Microsoft Word - Alcoa_short-term_amendments_CX.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Mark Miller Account Executive, Long-term Sales and Purchases - PT-5 Proposed Action: Short-term Additional Amendments to the Alcoa Power Sales Agreement Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): A2 - Clarifying or administrative contract actions Location: Portland, OR and Ferndale, WA Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to execute one or more additional amendments to its existing 2009 Power Sales Agreement (Agreement) with Alcoa, Inc. (Alcoa) to further extend the Agreement's Initial Period provisions. The current date for expiration of these provisions under the most recent amendment (Amendment Number 2) is July 31, 2012.

170

ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.' :h I : ' ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20545 October 24, 1975 :.. ,. Memo to Piles' CARNEGIE-MELLON SC&RCCYCLOTRON On October 23, 1975, W....

171

The Federal Energy Administration | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Energy Administration - written by Roger Anders Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Energy, November 1980. 15 pp. FEA History.pdf More Documents & Publications A History of...

172

Berkeley Lab: Nearby Short-Term Accommodations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accommodations Accommodations Visitor Information Maps and Directions to the Lab Offsite Shuttle Bus Service Bay Area Mass Transit Information Site Access Parking Permits and Gate Passes UC Berkeley Campus Map Nearby Short-Term Accommodations Guest House Berkeley Lab Guest House - The Berkeley Lab guest house is conveniently located on the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory campus and features 57 tastefully appointed guest rooms, many with spectacular views of the San Francisco bay, skyline, and City of Berkeley. The guest house is only a few minutes away from the University of California Berkeley Campus and the dynamic Berkeley community itself. It is available to visiting researchers and those conducting business with the University. The Faculty Club * U.C. Campus

173

Markets & Finance - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Markets & Finance Markets & Finance Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Market Prices and Uncertainty Charts Archive Analysis & Projections Most Requested Electricity Financial Markets Financial Reporting System Working Papers Market Prices and Uncertainty Report What Drives Crude Oil Prices All Reports Don't miss: EIA's monthly Market Prices and Uncertainty Report or What Drives Crude Oil Prices? (an analysis of 7 key factors that may influence oil prices, physical market factorsand factors related to trading and financial markets). Crude oil price volatility and uncertainty› Evolution of WTI futures Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Short-Term Energy Outlook, Market Prices and Uncertainty Report. Heating oil price volatility and uncertainty› RBOB and Heating oil implied volatility

174

EIA Energy Information Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

gas demand due in part to the need to refill storage facilities; and overall expanding energy demand owing to 3 to 5 years of strong economic growth in the United States. The...

175

Federal Energy Management Program: General Services Administration -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Services General Services Administration - Suitland, Maryland to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: General Services Administration - Suitland, Maryland on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: General Services Administration - Suitland, Maryland on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: General Services Administration - Suitland, Maryland on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: General Services Administration - Suitland, Maryland on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: General Services Administration - Suitland, Maryland on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: General Services Administration - Suitland, Maryland on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products

176

Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2008 Electricity Forms Clearance Differences in Current Forms Compared to Those Published in the April 4, 2007 Federal Register Notice. Form EIA-411 No changes. Form EIA-826 Schedule 1, "Sales to Ultimate Consumers," has been changed to ask for the megawatthours sold and delivered and the revenue for the residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation sectors are now requested to be reported to the nearest dollar, rather than the nearest 10 dollars. Form EIA-860 The effective date of the reported data has been changed from January 1 to December 31. The following questions have been modified: Schedule 2. "Power Plant Data" has added: * Does this plant have Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Qualifying

177

Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington, 0 C Washington, 0 C Housing Characteristics 1984 i if I ^^^PVrjuV 9861 wo suoiidu.)sqns ot ,< iou Xq sn oj it ujnpj jsnui no^ - via ^Mi uo 3-ic no^ JI ')si -uoo si (VI3) uoiiBJisiuiuipv uoiieuuojui 3DI1ON meuoduii UB noX Suipuas sir jo -986! ' J '9861 uoos [((.w a Xq pwmbw sy (202) jo 0098-2SZ (202) S8S02 0 0 'uoi8u!M«eM 6uip|ing J0| soi aq XSLU si jepjo uy «0|eq jesdde sjaqainu auot|de|a] ptie sessaippv 'QI3N ^Ml oi uo suoqsano '(OI3N) J9iueo uoijeiujojui ASjeug IBUOIIBN S.VI3 aiJi JO Od9 (VI3) uoiiejisiunupy uot;6tux>|ui Xfijaug jat»o pue snji jo aseqajnd pue uorieauofui lueuiuWAOQ 5 Tl 'sjuauunooQ jo luepueiuiJ&dng &LJJ 0104 8iqet!*AB si uoiieoitqnd DOE/EiA-0314(84) Distribution Category UC-98 Residential Energy Consumption v^-^s--. Survey: Housing Characteristics 1984

178

Western Area Power Administration (Arizona) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Arizona) Arizona) Jump to: navigation, search Name Western Area Power Administration Place Arizona Utility Id 27000 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File2_2010[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Energy and Capacity Components of Firm Electric Service Industrial Firm Transmission Service of Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Power Commercial Long-Term Firm Point-to-Point Transmission Service Commercial Nonfirm Transmission Service Commercial Short-Term Firm Point-to-Point Transmission Service Commercial Average Rates Commercial: $0.0175/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File2_2010"

179

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Regional maps Figure F2. Electricity market module regions Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Analysis....

180

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Regional maps Figure F2. Electricity market module regions Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Analysis....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administration short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Policy Analysts Policy Analysts This page features the most requested EIA reports and features for policy analysts. If you can't find what you're looking for, please contact the EIA Information Center. Featured Links Responses to Congressional and other requests Congressional testimony Analysis papers from Annual Energy Outlook Financial data and analysis Environmental data and analysis National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) documentation Energy in Brief Maps Featured Reports Annual Energy Outlook International Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook The Availability and Price of Petroleum and Petroleum Products Produced in Countries Other Than Iran Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets Effect of Increased Natural Gas Exports on Domestic Energy Markets

182

STATEMENT OF ADAM SIEMINSKI ADMINISTRATOR ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

STATEMENT OF ADAM SIEMINSKI ADMINISTRATOR ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY before the SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND POWER COMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND COMMERCE U. S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES FEBRUARY 5, 2013 2 Mr. Chairman and Members of the Subcommittee, I appreciate the opportunity to appear before you today at this hearing on American Energy Security and Innovation: An Assessment of North America's Energy Resources. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. EIA collects, analyzes, and disseminates independent and impartial energy information to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding regarding energy and its interaction with the economy and the environment. EIA is the Nation's premier source of

183

NASEO 2010 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference October 13, 2010 Washington, DC Richard Newell, Administrator U.S. Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10 1 10 1 NASEO 2010 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference October 13, 2010 Washington, DC Richard Newell, Administrator U.S. Energy Information Administration EIA Short-Term and Winter Fuels Outlook Richard Newell, NASEO Winter Fuels Conference, October 2010 2 Overview * EIA expects average heating bills to be 3% higher this winter than last - an increase of $24 to a U.S. average of $986 per household * Due to higher fuel prices forecast this winter compared to last - 2% higher electricity prices - 8% higher heating oil prices - 6% higher residential natural gas prices - 11% higher propane prices * Bill increases are moderated by a warmer winter weather forecast for the South, but little change in the Midwest/West; slightly colder in the Northeast * Inventories of fuel oil and natural gas are currently well above typical levels,

184

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011 3 6 Table A18. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source (Million Metric Tons, Unless Otherwise Noted) Sector and Source Reference Case Annual Grow th 2009-2035 (percent) 2008 2009 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Residential Petroleum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 80 73 68 64 61 58 -1.2% Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265 259 261 263 263 262 260 0.0% Coal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 -1.1% Electricity 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 872 820 757 778 833 878 916 0.4% Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1220 1160 1092 1110 1161 1202 1234 0.2% Commercial Petroleum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 43 39 38 38 37 37 -0.5% Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 169 183 189 193 200 207 0.8% Coal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

185

STATEMENT OF ADAM SIEMINSKI ADMINISTRATOR ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ADAM SIEMINSKI ADAM SIEMINSKI ADMINISTRATOR ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY before the SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND POWER COMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND COMMERCE U. S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES JUNE 26, 2013 2 Chairman Whitfield, Ranking Member Rush and Members of the Subcommittee, thank you for the opportunity to appear before you today to discuss the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) program. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. EIA collects, analyzes, and disseminates independent and impartial energy information to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding regarding energy and its interaction with the economy and the environment. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and

186

STATEMENT OF ADAM SIEMINSKI ADMINISTRATOR ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ADAM SIEMINSKI ADAM SIEMINSKI ADMINISTRATOR ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE AND TECHNOLOGY UNITED STATES HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES FEBRUARY 13, 2013 Chairman Lummis, Ranking Member Swalwell and Members of the Committee, I appreciate the opportunity to appear before you today to provide testimony on the U.S. energy outlook. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. EIA collects, analyzes, and disseminates independent and impartial energy information to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding regarding energy and its interaction with the economy and the environment. EIA is the Nation's premier source of

187

Energy Information Administration - new releases. Volume 3  

SciTech Connect

This publication presents information compiled by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) on fuels, energy related topics, and the dissemination of other EIA publications.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Production and Preparation Production and Preparation Form EIA-7A PURPOSE The U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Form EIA-7A, Annual Survey of Coal Production and Preparation, collects coal production data from U.S. coal mining companies. This includes information on the type and status of coal operations, characteristics of coalbeds mined, recoverable reserves, productive capacity and the disposition of coal mined which provides Congress with basic statistics concerning coal supply. These data appear in the Annual Coal Report, the Quarterly Coal Report, the Monthly Energy Review, and the Annual Energy Review. In addition, the EIA uses the data for coal supply analyses and in short-term modeling efforts,

189

EIA Energy Kids - Energy Kids: Energy Information Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Administration - Energy Kids Information Administration - Energy Kids ENTER KEYWORDS Energy Kids: Energy Information Administration What Is Energy? » Energy Basics Forms of Energy Laws of Energy Sources of Energy Energy Units Basics Energy Calculators Periodic Table Energy Sources » Nonrenewable Oil (petroleum) Natural Gas Coal Uranium (nuclear) Renewable Biomass Geothermal Hydropower Solar Wind Electricity Science of Electricity Electricity in the U.S. Hydrogen Recent Statistics Using & Saving Energy » Energy Use Basics Energy and the Environment Greenhouse Gases In Homes In Commercial Buildings In Industry For Transportation Saving Energy Recycling History of Energy » Energy Timelines Coal Electricity Ethanol Geothermal Hydropower Municipal Solid Waste Natural Gas Nuclear Oil (petroleum) Photovoltaic Solar Thermal

190

STATEMENT OF ADAM SIEMINSKI ADMINISTRATOR ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STATEMENT OF ADAM SIEMINSKI STATEMENT OF ADAM SIEMINSKI ADMINISTRATOR ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Before the COMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND NATURAL RESOURCES U. S. SENATE JULY 16, 2013 2 Chairman Wyden, Ranking Member Murkowski, and Members of the Committee, thank you for the opportunity to appear before you today to discuss the U.S. petroleum supply system, which is changing rapidly. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. EIA collects, analyzes, and disseminates independent and impartial energy information to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding regarding energy and its interaction with the economy and the environment. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and

191

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Release Date: June 25, 2012 | Next Early Release Date: December 5, 2012 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383(2012) Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer Topics Source Oil/Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewable/Alternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication Chapter Executive Summary Market Trends Issues in Focus Legislation & Regulations Comparison Appendices Annual Energy Outlook 2012 presents yearly projections and analysis of energy topics Download the complete June 2012 published report. Executive summary The projections in the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (AEO2012) focus on the factors that shape the

192

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Release Dates: April 15 - May 2, 2013 | Next Early Release Date: December 2013 (See release cycle changes) | correction | full report Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer Topics Source Oil/Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewable/Alternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication Chapter Market Trends Issues in Focus Legislation & Regulations Comparison Appendices Annual Energy Outlook 2013 presents yearly projections and analysis of energy topics Download the full report. The projections in the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) focus on the factors that shape the

193

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Release Dates: April 15 - May 2, 2013 | Next Early Release Date: December 2013 (See release cycle changes) | correction | full report Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer Topics Source Oil/Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewable/Alternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication Chapter Market Trends Issues in Focus Legislation & Regulations Comparison Appendices Annual Energy Outlook 2013 presents yearly projections and analysis of energy topics Download the full report. The projections in the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) focus on the factors that shape the

194

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13, 2013 | Release Date: March 14, 13, 2013 | Release Date: March 14, 2013 | Next Release: March 21, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 12/29/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: EIA projects end-of-season inventories less than 2 trillion cubic feet (Tcf). U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) projects working inventories of natural gas in storage will end the heating season at levels significantly lower than last year. This month's Short-Term Energy Outlook projects that at the end of March, inventories will total 1,959 billion cubic feet (Bcf), which is lower than last year's record high level but still greater than recent years. Last year at the end of March working inventories totaled 2,477 Bcf, which was the result of robust

195

Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis & Projections Analysis & Projections Glossary › FAQS › Overview Projection Data Monthly Short-Term Forecasts to 2014 Annual Projections to 2040 International Projections Analysis & Projections Most Requested Annual Energy Outlook Related Congressional & Other Requests International Energy Outlook Related Presentations Short-Term Outlook Related Testimony All Reports Models & Documentation Full report Fuel Competition in Power Generation and Elasticities of Substitution Release date: June 2012 This report analyzes the competition between coal, natural gas and petroleum used for electricity generation by estimating what is referred to by economists as the elasticity of substitution among the fuels. The elasticity of substitution concept measures how the use of these fuels

196

Short-term CO? abatement in the European power sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the possibilities for short term abatement in response to a CO2 price through fuel switching in the European power sector. The model E-Simulate is used to simulate the electricity generation in Europe ...

Delarue, Erik D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

A model for short term electric load forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A MODEL FOR SHORT TERM ELECTRIC LOAD FORECASTING A Thesis by JOHN ROBERT TIGUE, III Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1975 Major... Subject: Electrical Engineering A MODEL FOR SHORT TERM ELECTRIC LOAD FORECASTING A Thesis by JOHN ROBERT TIGUE& III Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head Depart t) (Member) ;(Me r (Member) (Member) May 1975 ABSTRACT...

Tigue, John Robert

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency, energy consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Efficiency Efficiency Energy Efficiency energy consumption savings households, buildings, industry & vehicles The Energy Efficiency Page reflects EIA's information on energy efficiency and related information. This site provides an in depth discussion of the concept of energy efficiency and how it is measured, measurement, summaries of formal user meetings on energy efficiency data and measurement, as well as analysis of greenhouse gas emissions as related to energy use and energy efficiency. At the site you will find links to other sources of information, and via a listserv all interested analysts can share ideas, data, and ask for assistance on methodological problems associated with energy use, energy efficiency, and greenhouse gas issues. Contact: Behjat.Hojjati@eia.doe.gov

199

Energy Perspectives, Total Energy - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Energy Total Energy Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Monthly Annual Analysis & Projections this will be filled with a highchart PREVIOUSNEXT Energy Perspectives 1949-2011 September 2012 PDF | previous editions Release Date: September 27, 2012 Introduction Energy Perspectives is a graphical overview of energy history in the United States. The 42 graphs shown here reveal sweeping trends related to the Nation's production, consumption, and trade of energy from 1949 through 2011. Energy Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Total Energy Flow diagram image For footnotes see here. Energy can be grouped into three broad categories. First, and by far the largest, is the fossil fuels-coal, petroleum, and natural gas. Fossil fuels have stored the sun's energy over millennia past, and it is primarily

200

ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.' :h I : .' :h I : ' ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20545 October 24, 1975 :~.. ,. Memo to Piles' CARNEGIE-MELLON S~C&RCCYCLOTRON On October 23, 1975, W. J. McCool (HQOS), E. K. Loop (HQ-OS), R. E. Allen (HQ-OS), J. Pingel (CH), B. 3. Davis (CH), R. Drucker (CR-BAO) and I met at Germantown to discuss the clean-up of radio- activity at the Saxonburg accelerator site. After discussion, we concluded acceptable criteria would include removal of all material necessary to reduce the residual surface activity to a maximum ofO.04 mR/hr above ambient background. Since ambient backgrounds is 0.03 to 0.05 &/hr, the above 0.04 mR/hr criterion will essentially be the 0.08 mR/hr (induced +background) case discussed previously.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administration short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Bonneville Power Administration's Purchasing of Energy Savings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION'S PURCHASE OF ENERGY SAVINGS Harold (Skip) Schick Leslie E. McMillan Bonneville Power Administration Port1and, Oregon INTRODUCTION The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is conducting a commercial... of several activities BPA is conductin9 to develop the capabil ity to conserve energy in the com mercial sector of electrical energy use. This paper describes the benefits of the approach, the program des ign, 1essons 1earned through field testing...

Schick, H.

202

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Executive Summary Background This report responds to a November 2010 request to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) from U.S. Representatives Roscoe G. Bartlett,...

203

The Maritime Administration's Energy and Emissions Program -...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technologies Program The Maritime Administration's Energy and Emissions Program - Part 2 Vessel Cold-Ironing Using a Barge Mounted PEM Fuel Cell: Project Scoping and Feasibility...

204

Energy Information Administration / Petroleum Marketing Annual...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

55 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1997 Prices of Petroleum Products Table 31. Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State...

205

wind energy | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

wind energy | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

206

Advanced Biofuels Workshop U.S. Energy Information Administration 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Room 2E-069 Washington, DC 20585  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Room 2E-069 Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Room 2E-069 Washington, DC 20585 August 1, 2012 Presenter Bios (Arranged in presentation order) Anthony Radich Tony Radich is an economist with the Energy Information Administration. He is currently a member of the Biofuels and Emerging Technologies Team in the Petroleum, Natural Gas and Biofuels Analysis group of the Office of Energy Analysis. Dr. Radich has worked on biofuels issues since he joined EIA in 2001. He developed the cost models for the production of ethanol and biodiesel, the National Energy Modeling System, which is used to produce the EIA Annual Energy Outlook. He has served as a contributing author to numerous EIA publications, including the Annual Energy Outlook and the Short-Term

207

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Economic growth Economic growth Real gross domestic product (GDP) grows by an average of 2.7 percent per year from 2009 to 2035 in the AEO2011 Reference case, the same as in the AEO2010 Reference case. The Nation's population, labor force, and productivity grow at annual rates of 0.9 percent, 0.7 percent, and 2.0 percent, respectively, from 2009 to 2035. Beyond 2011, the economic assumptions underlying the AEO2011 Reference case refl ect trend projections that do not include shortterm fluctuations. The near-term scenario for economic growth is consistent with that in EIA's October 2010 Short-Term Energy Outlook. It is important to note that one must exercise care in evaluating percent growth relative to 2009 levels throughout the projection results since 2009 was the low point of the

208

Summary Short-Term Petroleum and Natural Gas Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Short-Term Petroleum and Natural Gas Outlook Short-Term Petroleum and Natural Gas Outlook 1/12/01 Click here to start Table of Contents Summary Short-Term Petroleum. and Natural Gas Outlook WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval Real and Nominal Crude Oil Prices OPEC Crude Oil Production 1999-2001 Total OECD Oil Stocks* U.S. Crude Oil Inventory Outlook U.S. Distillate Inventory Outlook Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of East Coast Winter Supply Retail Heating Oil and Diesel Fuel Prices Consumer Winter Heating Costs U.S. Total Gasoline Inventory Outlook Retail Motor Gasoline Prices* U.S. Propane Total Stocks Average Weekly Propane Spot Prices Current Natural Gas Spot Prices: Well Above the Recent Price Range Natural Gas Spot Prices: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval Working Gas in Storage (Percentage Difference fron Previous 5-Year Average)

209

Electricity storage for short term power system service (Smart Grid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

storage for short term power system service (Smart Grid storage for short term power system service (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Electricity storage for short term power system service Country Denmark Coordinates 56.26392°, 9.501785° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":56.26392,"lon":9.501785,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

210

Contact Us - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Forecasting & Analysis Forecasting & Analysis Short-Term (STEO) Energy Forecast Experts Long-Term (AEO) Energy Forecast Experts International (IEO) Energy Forecast Experts Renewable Energy Forecast Experts Short-Term (STEO) Analysis and Forecasting Experts Short-Term Energy Outlook Tancred Lidderdale 202-586-7321 tancred.lidderdale@eia.gov World Oil Price Eric Kreil 202-586-6573 erik.kreil@eia.gov Energy Prices Sean Hill 202-586-4247 sean.hill@eia.gov Futures Markets and Energy Price Uncertainty James Preciado 202-586-8769 james.preciado@eia.gov U.S. Crude Oil Production Gary Long 202-586-3467 gary.long@eia.gov U.S. Petroleum Demand Michael Morris 202-586-1199 michael.morris@eia.gov U.S. Refinery Supply Arup Mallik 202-586-7713 arup.mallik@eia.gov Ethanol Tony Radich 202-586-0504 anthony.radich@eia.gov

211

Status and evaluation of hybrid electric vehicle batteries for short term applications. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this task is to compile information regarding batteries which could be use for electric cars or hybrid vehicles in the short term. More specifically, this study applies lead-acid batteries and nickel-cadmium battery technologies which are more developed than the advanced batteries which are presently being investigated under USABC contracts and therefore more accessible in production efficiency and economies of scale. Moreover, the development of these batteries has advanced the state-of-the-art not only in terms of performance and energy density but also in cost reduction. The survey of lead-acid battery development took the biggest part of the effort, since they are considered more apt to be used in the short-term. Companies pursuing the advancement of lead-acid batteries were not necessarily the major automobile battery manufacturers. Innovation is found more in small or new companies. Other battery systems for short-term are discussed in the last part of this report. We will review the various technologies investigated, their status and prognosis for success in the short term.

Himy, A. [Westinghouse Electric Co., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Machinery Technology Div.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Short-term production and synoptic influences on atmospheric 7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short-term production and synoptic influences on atmospheric 7 Be concentrations Ilya G. Usoskin,1; published 21 March 2009. [1] Variations of the cosmogenic radionuclide 7 Be in the global atmosphere the variations in the 7 Be concentration in the atmosphere for the period from 1 January to 28 February 2005

213

U.S. Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Energy Information Administration Annual Report on Implementation of CIPSEA - 4/30/13 This report is for activity during calendar year 2012. 1) Use of the CIPSEA Confidentiality Pledge. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) collected information under Title V of the E-Government Act, Confidential Information Protection and Statistical Efficiency Act of 2002 (CIPSEA) from the following eleven (11) surveys during 2012. Office of Petroleum and Biofuels Statistics Petroleum Marketing Surveys OMB No: 1905-0174 Form EIA-863, "Petroleum Product Sales Identification Survey" Form EIA-878, "Motor Gasoline Price Survey" Form EIA-888, "On-Highway Diesel Fuel Price Survey"

214

QUARTER SHORT-TERM ENERGY OUTLOOK QUARTERLY PROJECTIONS ENERGY...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

production will be limited to domestic requirements plus a small volume of exports to Jordan. This assumes that the United Nations embargo against Iraq continues and Iraq does not...

215

SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL PROCESS EVALUATION: SHORT-TERM RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increasing interest to utilities with coal-fired units for a number of reasons. Sulfuric acid is a Toxic Release Inventory species, a precursor to acid aerosol/condensable emissions, and can cause a variety of plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of SCR for NOX control on some coal-fired plants, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project is testing the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different calcium- and/or magnesium-based alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents have been tested during four one- to two-week tests conducted on two FirstEnergy Bruce Mansfield Plant units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide slurry produced from a wet flue gas desulfurization system waste stream, from a system that employs a Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime scrubbing process. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercial magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners, while the other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles into the front wall of upper furnace, either across from the nose of the furnace or across from the pendant superheater tubes. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests. The longer-term tests are being conducted to confirm the effectiveness of the sorbents tested over extended operation and to determine balance-of-plant impacts. This reports presents the results of the short-term tests; the long-term test results will be reported in a later document. The short-term test results showed that three of the four reagents tested, dolomite powder, commercial magnesium hydroxide slurry, and byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry, were able to achieve 90% or greater removal of sulfuric acid compared to baseline levels. The molar ratio of alkali to flue gas sulfuric acid content (under baseline conditions) required to achieve 90% sulfuric acid removal was lowest for the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry. However, this result may be confounded because this was the only one of the three slurries tested with injection near the top of the furnace across from the pendant superheater platens. Injection at the higher level was demonstrated to be advantageous for this reagent over injection lower in the furnace, where the other slurries were tested.

Gary M. Blythe; Richard McMillan

2002-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

216

SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL PROCESS EVALUATION: SHORT-TERM RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increasing interest to utilities with coal-fired units for a number of reasons. Sulfuric acid is a Toxic Release Inventory species, a precursor to acid aerosol/condensable emissions, and can cause a variety of plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of SCR for NO{sub x} control on some coal-fired plants, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project is testing the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different calcium- and/or magnesium-based alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents have been tested during four one- to two-week tests conducted on two First Energy Bruce Mansfield Plant units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide slurry produced from a wet flue gas desulfurization system waste stream, from a system that employs a Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime scrubbing process. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercial magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners, while the other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles into the front wall of upper furnace, either across from the nose of the furnace or across from the pendant superheater tubes. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests. The longer-term tests are being conducted to confirm the effectiveness of the sorbents tested over extended operation and to determine balance-of-plant impacts. This reports presents the results of the short-term tests; the long-term test results will be reported in a later document. The short-term test results showed that three of the four reagents tested, dolomite powder, commercial magnesium hydroxide slurry, and byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry, were able to achieve 90% or greater removal of sulfuric acid compared to baseline levels. The molar ratio of alkali to flue gas sulfuric acid content (under baseline conditions) required to achieve 90% sulfuric acid removal was lowest for the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry. However, this result may be confounded because this was the only one of the three slurries tested with injection near the top of the furnace across from the pendant superheater platens. Injection at the higher level was demonstrated to be advantageous for this reagent over injection lower in the furnace, where the other slurries were tested.

Gary M. Blythe; Richard McMillan

2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

217

Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration P.O. Box 3621 Portland, Oregon 97208) Biological Opinion (BiOp). Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) supports the effort of developing a common-3621 ENVIRONMENT, FISH AND WILDLIFE May 18, 2009 In reply refer to: KEW-4 Ms. Nancy Leonard Northwest Power

218

Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration P.O. Box 3621 Portland, Oregon 97208 and Conservation Council (Council) members have asked that Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) make its in the rating process. As you know, the Northwest Power Act obligates Bonneville to use its authorities to fund

219

Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration P.O. Box 3621 Portland, Oregon 97208 about the amount and nature of cost-sharing offered. As a result, Bonneville Power Administration, Chairman Northwest Power and Conservation Council 851 S.W. Sixth Ave., Suite 1100 Portland, OR 97204

220

Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration P.O. Box 3621 Portland, Oregon 97208 to Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) review, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Columbia: Mr. Micah Russell, CREST (electronic mail) #12;Oregon Clatsop County ~ City of Astoria ~ City

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administration short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

STATEMENT OF ADAM SIEMINSKI ADMINISTRATOR ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Before the Before the COMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND NATURAL RESOURCES U. S. SENATE JULY 16, 2013 2 Chairman Wyden, Ranking Member Murkowski, and Members of the Committee, thank you for the opportunity to appear before you today to discuss the U.S. petroleum supply system, which is changing rapidly. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. EIA collects, analyzes, and disseminates independent and impartial energy information to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding regarding energy and its interaction with the economy and the environment. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States

222

Grants Administration | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

State Energy Program (SEP) Special Project: Strengthening Building Retrofit Markets and Stimulating Energy Efficiency Action (DE-FOA-0000251) The U.S. Department of...

223

Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

W W 32.9 30.5 See footnotes at end of table. 440 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table A3. RefinerReseller Prices of Distillate and Residual...

224

Southeastern Power Administration | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Search Search form Search Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Services Services Home Rate Schedules Acquisition Program Competitive Resource Strategies Annual Reports SEPA FOIA Power Operations Power Operations Home How it Works Generation Quick Facts Mission About Us About Us Home News News Home Press Releases Career Opportunities SEPA History SEPA Video Offices Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Power Operations Click to view a map of SEPA power operations. Latest Rate Schedules October 1, 2012 ALA-1-N Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: PowerSouth Energy Cooperative System: Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina October 1, 2012 Duke-1-E Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: Duke On-System System: Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina

225

Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a separate billing as perhaps the fundamental concern we have about future regional energy planning. If BPA's Energy Future The Northwest Power and Conservation Council (Council's) draft Fifth Power Plan (draft planDepartment of Energy Bonneville Power Administration P.O. Box 3621 Portland, Oregon 97208

226

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply on a regional basis (Figure 7). A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2006), (Washington, DC, 2006). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural

227

Administrative Management Records | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Administrative Management Records Administrative Management Records This schedule covers those administrative management activities not covered by other Administrative Schedules...

228

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Acronyms Acronyms List of Acronyms AB 32 Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 GDP Gross domestic product AEO Annual Energy Outlook LNG Liquefied natural gas AEO20011 Annual Energy Outlook 2011 NGL Natural gas liquids AEO2012 Annual Energy Outlook 2012 NHTSA National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Btu British thermal units NOx Nitrogen oxides CAFE Corporate Average Fuel Economy OCS Outer Continental Shelf CHP Combined heat and power OECD Organization for Economic Cooperation CO2 Carbon dioxide and Development CTL Coal-to-liquids OPEC Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries CSAPR Cross-State Air Pollution Rule RFS Renewable Fuels Standard EIA U.S. Energy Information Administration RPS Renewable Portfolio Standard

229

Southeastern Power Administration | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration View All Maps Addthis...

230

Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Career...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Graduates EnergyNational Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Career Pathways Program EnergyNational Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Career Pathways Program Intern...

231

Energy Information Administration - Transportation Energy Consumption...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Transportation Energy Consumption Surveys energy used by vehicles EIA conducts numerous energy-related surveys and other information programs. In general, the...

232

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Federal Highway Administration, Highway Statistics 2010 (Washington, DC, February 2012); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 31 (Oak Ridge, TN,...

233

The Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP): A Public/Private Partnership for Improving Short Term Wind Energy Forecasts and Quantifying the Benefits of Utility Operations the Northern Study Area.  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the results from research aimed at improving short-range (0-6 hour) hub-height wind forecasts in the NOAA weather forecast models through additional data assimilation and model physics improvements for use in wind energy forecasting. Additional meteorological observing platforms including wind profilers, sodars, and surface stations were deployed for this study by NOAA and DOE, and additional meteorological data at or near wind turbine hub height were provided by South Dakota State University and WindLogics/NextEra Energy Resources over a large geographical area in the U.S. Northern Plains for assimilation into NOAA research weather forecast models. The resulting improvements in wind energy forecasts based on the research weather forecast models (with the additional data assimilation and model physics improvements) were examined in many different ways and compared with wind energy forecasts based on the current operational weather forecast models to quantify the forecast improvements important to power grid system operators and wind plant owners/operators participating in energy markets. Two operational weather forecast models (OP_RUC, OP_RAP) and two research weather forecast models (ESRL_RAP, HRRR) were used as the base wind forecasts for generating several different wind power forecasts for the NextEra Energy wind plants in the study area. Power forecasts were generated from the wind forecasts in a variety of ways, from very simple to quite sophisticated, as they might be used by a wide range of both general users and commercial wind energy forecast vendors. The error characteristics of each of these types of forecasts were examined and quantified using bulk error statistics for both the local wind plant and the system aggregate forecasts. The wind power forecast accuracy was also evaluated separately for high-impact wind energy ramp events. The overall bulk error statistics calculated over the first six hours of the forecasts at both the individual wind plant and at the system-wide aggregate level over the one year study period showed that the research weather model-based power forecasts (all types) had lower overall error rates than the current operational weather model-based power forecasts, both at the individual wind plant level and at the system aggregate level. The bulk error statistics of the various model-based power forecasts were also calculated by season and model runtime/forecast hour as power system operations are more sensitive to wind energy forecast errors during certain times of year and certain times of day. The results showed that there were significant differences in seasonal forecast errors between the various model-based power forecasts. The results from the analysis of the various wind power forecast errors by model runtime and forecast hour showed that the forecast errors were largest during the times of day that have increased significance to power system operators (the overnight hours and the morning/evening boundary layer transition periods), but the research weather model-based power forecasts showed improvement over the operational weather model-based power forecasts at these times. A comprehensive analysis of wind energy forecast errors for the various model-based power forecasts was presented for a suite of wind energy ramp definitions. The results compiled over the year-long study period showed that the power forecasts based on the research models (ESRL_RAP, HRRR) more accurately predict wind energy ramp events than the current operational forecast models, both at the system aggregate level and at the local wind plant level. At the system level, the ESRL_RAP-based forecasts most accurately predict both the total number of ramp events and the occurrence of the events themselves, but the HRRR-based forecasts more accurately predict the ramp rate. At the individual site level, the HRRR-based forecasts most accurately predicted the actual ramp occurrence, the total number of ramps and the ramp rates (40-60% improvement in ramp rates over the coarser resolution forecast

Finley, Cathy [WindLogics

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

234

NNSA Administrator to Depart | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Depart to Depart NNSA Administrator to Depart January 4, 2007 - 9:59am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Samuel Bodman today announced the resignation of Ambassador Linton Brooks, Administrator of the National Nuclear Security Administration. Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman released the following statement today: "During my tenure at the Department, and even before, there have been a number of management issues involving the National Nuclear Security Administration, the most recent of which was a serious security breach several months ago at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. These management and security issues can have serious implications for the security of the United States. The Deputy Secretary and I repeatedly have stressed to NNSA and laboratory management the importance of these issues

235

Directory of Energy Information Administration models 1996  

SciTech Connect

This directory revises and updates the Directory of Energy Information Administration Models 1995, DOE/EIA-0293(95), Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy, July 1995. Four models have been deleted in this directory as they are no longer being used: (1) Market Penetration Model for Ground-Water Heat Pump Systems (MPGWHP); (2) Market Penetration Model for Residential Rooftop PV Systems (MPRESPV-PC); (3) Market Penetration Model for Active and Passive Solar Technologies (MPSOLARPC); and (4) Revenue Requirements Modeling System (RRMS).

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Energy Information Administration | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Information Administration Information Administration Dataset Summary Description Supplemental Table 147 of EIA AEO 2011 Early Release Source EIA Date Released December 08th, 2010 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO Annual Energy Outlook barrel btu conversion EIA energy Energy Information Administration kWh TEF transportation Transportation Energy Futures Data text/csv icon Conversion_Factors.csv (csv, 153.2 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote

237

Utilities/ Energy efficiency program administrators | ENERGY STAR Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utilities/ Energy efficiency program administrators Utilities/ Energy efficiency program administrators Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

238

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Acronyms Acronyms AEO - Annual Energy Outlook AEO2010 - Annual Energy Outlook 2010 AEO2011 - Annual Energy Outlook 2011 ARRA - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act CAFE - Corporate Average Fuel Economy CHP - Combined heat and power CT:L - Coal-to-liquids EIA - U.S. Energy Information Administration EIEA2008 - Energy Improvement and Extension Act of 2008 EISA2007 - Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 EOR - Enhanced oil recovery EPA - U.S. Environmental Protection Agency GDP - Gross domestic product NGL - Natural gas liquids NHTSA - National Highway Trafic Safety Administration OCS - Outer Continental Shelf OECD - Organization for Economic Cooperation OPEC - Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries RFS - Renewable Fuels Standard RPS - Renewable Portfolio Standard

239

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2014 Alabama ...

240

Conditional Reliability Modeling of Short-term River Basin Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONDITIONAL RELIABILITY MODELING OF SHORT-TERM RIVER BASIN MANAGEMENT ASCE Texas Section Spring Meeting 2003 By: A.Andr?s Salazar, Ph.D. Freese and Nichols, Inc. and Ralph A. Wurbs, P.E., Ph.D. Texas A&M University 2 TEXAS WATER AVAILABITY MODEL...-88Year Storage (x 1000 ac-ft) Periods without shortage = 657 out of 672 (97.8%) What is the probability of satisfying demand when reservoir falls below 100,000 ac-ft? 9 CONDITIONAL RELIABILITY Statistical analysis of small sequences. Simulation 1...

Salazar, A.; Wurbs, R. A.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administration short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

U.S. Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Natural Gas Annual Figure 3. Marketed production of natural gas in the United States and the Gulf of Mexico, 2012 (million cubic feet) None 1-15,000 15,001-100,000 100,001-200,000 200,001-500,000 500,001 and over Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-895, "Annual Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Report"; Form EIA-914, "Monthly Natural Gas Production Report"; state agencies; Form EIA-23, "Annual Survey of Domestic Oil and Gas Reserves"; LCI; Ventyx; and the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement, and predecessor agencies. IN OH TN WV VA KY

242

Southeastern Power Administration | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Power Operations Click to view a map of SEPA power operations. Latest Rate Schedules October 1, 2012 ALA-1-N Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: PowerSouth Energy Cooperative System: Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina October 1, 2012 Duke-1-E Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: Duke On-System System: Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina October 1, 2012 Duke-2-E Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: Central System: Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina More schedules Annual Reports December 28, 2012 Southeastern Power Administration 2012 Annual Report This report reflects our agency's programs,accomplishments, operational, and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2011, and ending September 30, 2012.

243

National Nuclear Security Administration | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

National Nuclear Security Administration National Nuclear Security Administration National Nuclear Security Administration More Documents & Publications Global Threat Reduction...

244

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings Characteristics Tables, number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables, energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy End-Use Data, total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. All Principal Buildings Activities Number of Buildings, Total Floorspace, and Total Site and Primary Energy Consumption for All Principal Building Activities, 1995

245

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Conferences Energy Conferences NOTE: The following information on energy conferences is provided solely as a service for interested persons. Except for EIA-sponsored conferences, inclusion on this web page should not be considered as endorsement by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. November, December 2013 North America Rest of the World November 4-6: Innovation Ecosystems for Energy Solutions Conference Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL http://ncseonline.org/2013-cerel-annual-energy-innovation-conference November 5-6: Energy Forum: Environmental and Economic Challenges Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel, Baltimore, MD http://energy.awma.org/ November 7: Executive Energy Club (Viewpoints) Petroleum Club of Houston, Houston, TX http://www.execenergyclub.com/

246

Microsoft Word - Alcoa_short-term_amendments2_CX.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mark Miller Mark Miller Account Executive, Long-term Sales and Purchases - PT-5 Proposed Action: Short-term Additional Amendments to the Alcoa Power Sales Agreement Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): A2 - Clarifying or administrative contract actions Location: Portland, OR and Ferndale, WA Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to execute one or more additional amendments to its existing 2009 Power Sales Agreement (Agreement) with Alcoa, Inc. (Alcoa) to further extend the Agreement's Initial Period provisions. The current date for expiration of these provisions under the most recent amendment (Amendment Number 4) is September 30, 2012. The current proposal involves executing one or more additional

247

Press Room - Press Releases - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

October 22, 2013 October 22, 2013 EIA initiates new monthly Drilling Productivity Report The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) released today the initial edition of a new monthly Drilling Productivity Report (DPR) to provide region-specific insights into oil and natural gas drilling rig efficiency, new well productivity, existing well decline rates, and overall oil and natural gas production trends. Given the importance of drilling productivity trends as a driver for future domestic oil and natural gas production, EIA has been developing new approaches to assess the productivity of drilling operations. The DPR, which initially will cover six regions, will also inform EIA's own short-term production outlook. In 2011-12, these six regions accounted for 90% of domestic oil production growth and virtually all domestic natural

248

Short-Term Energy Outlook April 1999-Summer Gasoline Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summer Motor Gasoline Outlook Summer Motor Gasoline Outlook This year's base case outlook for summer (April-September) motor gasoline markets may be summarized as follows: * Pump Prices: (average regular) projected to average about $1.13 per gallon this summer, up 9-10 cents from last year. The increase, while substantial, still leaves average prices low compared to pre-1998 history, especially in inflation-adjusted terms. * Supplies: expected to be adequate, overall. Beginning-of-season inventories were even with the 1998 level, which was at the high end of the normal range. However, some refinery problems on the West Coast have tightened things up, at least temporarily. * Demand: up 2.0 percent from last summer due to solid economic growth and low (albeit rising) fuel prices; highway travel may reach 1.4 trillion miles for the

249

April 2013 Short-Term Energy and Summer Fuels Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Summer Fuels Outlook and Summer Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights  During the April-through-September summer driving season this year, regular gasoline retail prices are forecast to average $3.63 per gallon. The projected monthly average regular retail gasoline price falls from $3.69 per gallon in May to $3.57 per gallon in September. EIA expects regular gasoline retail prices to average $3.56 per gallon in 2013 and $3.39 per gallon in 2014, compared with $3.63 per gallon in 2012. The July 2013 New York harbor reformulated blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) futures contract averaged $2.97 per gallon for the five trading days ending April 4, 2013. Based on the market value of

250

Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2000--STEO Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

April 2000 April 2000 Summer 2000 Motor Gasoline Outlook Summary For the upcoming summer season (April to September), motor gasoline markets are projected to exhibit an extraordinarily tight supply/demand balance. * Retail gasoline prices (regular grade) are expected to average $1.46 per gallon, 25 percent higher than last summer's average of $1.17 per gallon. That projection also exceeds the previous (current-dollar) record summer average of $1.35 recorded in 1981. Nominal prices are expected to reach a peak of $1.52 per gallon in April-a new record--and decline steadily to $1.39 per gallon by September due to the impact of increases in world-wide crude oil production. These projections presume no disruptions of refinery motor gasoline production. *

251

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

in the summer months (June-August) and 6.00 per MMBtu in the fourth quarter, while composite spot prices will likely stay well above 6.00 through December. Spot prices averaged...

252

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

prices are expected to average 5.85 per MMBtu from July through December, while composite spot prices will likely stay well above 6.00. Spot prices at the Henry Hub averaged...

253

Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Weather Sensitivity in...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

last winter. EIA projects higher residential and commercial prices, but lower overall heating bills in the residential and commercial sectors because of lower consumption. Weather...

254

Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Uncertainties in the Short...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

headed to the Bonny terminal as Shell closed the Nembe Creek Trunkline and Trans Niger Pipeline multiple times to repair leaks attributed to oil theft. There will be lingering...

255

December 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(STEO) (STEO)  EIA expects that the Brent crude oil spot price will average $110 per barrel in the fourth quarter of 2012, while the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price will average $89 per barrel. The Brent and WTI crude oil spot prices are forecast to average $104 per barrel and $88 per barrel, respectively, in 2013. The projected WTI discount to Brent crude oil, which averaged $23 per barrel in November 2012, falls to an average of $11 per barrel by the fourth quarter of 2013. This forecast rests on the assumption that U.S. real gross domestic product (GDP) grows by 2.1 percent in 2012 and 1.8 percent in 2013, while world

256

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2013 | Release Date: May 23, 2, 2013 | Release Date: May 23, 2013 | Next Release: May 30, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 12/22/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: In the News: April-September cooling degree days up 4 percent in revised STEO forecast The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)'s May 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) forecasts 1,273 CDDs for April-September 2013, 4.3 percent more than in the April 2013 STEO, and 1,257 CDDs for April-September 2014, an upward revision of 4.1 percent. Both of these revised totals remain below the 1,390 CDDs recorded during a seasonably warm April-September 2012. Typically, around 90 percent of the CDDs for a given year occur during the April-September period. The May 2013 STEO uses data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

257

Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration P.O. Box 3621 Portland, Oregon 97208 Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) has been recommended for funding. These projects provide Bonneville, Chairman Northwest Power Planning Council 851 SW Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Portland, OR 97204-1348 Dear

258

Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

68.9 73.4 - 73.0 79.0 77.5 64.4 66.0 - 65.8 See footnotes at end of table. Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 117 Table 33. Oxygenated Motor...

259

Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64.1 62.2 - 62.5 74.4 73.8 57.1 55.6 - 55.9 See footnotes at end of table. Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 117 Table 33. Oxygenated Motor...

260

Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

63.3 53.6 73.5 60.8 82.9 63.8 68.1 56.2 See footnotes at end of table. 404 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table A1. RefinerReseller Motor...

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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261

Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

associated with electric power generation in the Pacific Northwest. We would appreciate continued focus to provide dependable capacity, and that those resources currently appear most likely to be gas-fired. #12Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration P.O. Box 3621 Portland, Oregon 97208

262

Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration P.O. Box 3621 Portland, Oregon 97208 the ISRP and Council agree with us that the UCSRB has produced a very comprehensive and professional are insufficiently developed....The project history section needs to describe the status of the work completed

263

Monthly Energy Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Energy Review Monthly Energy Review November 2013 PDF | previous editions Release Date: November 25, 2013 Next Update: December 24, 2013 A publication of recent energy statistics. This publication includes total energy production, consumption, and trade; energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international petroleum; carbon dioxide emissions; and data unit conversion values. EIA has expanded Sections 1 through 10 and Appendix A of the Monthly Energy Review (MER) to incorporate annual data as far back as 1949 in those data tables that are published in both the Annual Energy Review 2011 and MER. Similar revisions are pending for Section 12. Where available, Excel and CSV files now include pre-1973 data. For tables

264

Annual Energy Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual Energy Review Annual Energy Review Superseded -- see MER for key annual tables Annual Energy Review archives for data year: 2011 2010 2009 2008 all archives Go EIA has expanded the Monthly Energy Review (MER) to include annual data as far back as 1949 for those data tables that are found in both the Annual Energy Review (AER) and the MER . During this transition, EIA will not publish the 2012 edition of the AER. In the list of tables below, grayed-out table numbers now go to MER tables that contain 1949-2012 (and later) data series. New interactive tables and graphs have also been added and are currently on EIA's Beta site. Data categories + EXPAND ALL Energy Overview 1.0 Total Energy Flow, GRAPH 1.1 Primary Energy Overview, 1949- PDF XLS CSV INTERACTIVE 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source, 1949- PDF XLS CSV INTERACTIVE

265

U.S. Energy Information Administration/Prime Supplier Report...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AdministrationPrime Supplier Report, November 2014 1 U.S. Energy Information AdministrationPrime Supplier Report, November 2014 1 Prime Supplier sales volumes of petroleum...

266

STATEMENT OF GUY CARUSO DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

RICHARD NEWELL RICHARD NEWELL ADMINISTRATOR ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY before the COMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND COMMERCE SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND POWER U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES February 10, 2011 2 Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee: I appreciate the opportunity to appear before you today to address the subject of this hearing, the effects of Middle East events on U.S. energy markets. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. EIA collects, analyzes, and disseminates independent and impartial energy information to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding regarding energy and its interaction with the economy and the environment. EIA is the Nation's

267

International Energy Outlook 2011 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2011 International Energy Outlook 2011 Release Date: September 19, 2011 | Next Scheduled Release Date: June 10, 2013 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0484(2011) No International Energy Outlook will be released in 2012. The next edition of the report is scheduled for release in Spring 2013 Highlights International Energy Outlook 2011 cover. In the IEO2011 Reference case, which does not incorporate prospective legislation or policies that might affect energy markets, world marketed energy consumption grows by 53 percent from 2008 to 2035. Total world energy use rises from 505 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2008 to 619 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 770 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Figure 1). Much of the growth in energy consumption occurs in countries outside the Organization for

268

International Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Release Date: July 25, 2013 | Next Release Date: July 2014 (See release cycle changes) | correction | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0484(2013) Highlights International Energy Outlook 2011 cover. The International Energy Outlook 2013 (IEO2013) projects that world energy consumption will grow by 56 percent between 2010 and 2040. Total world energy use rises from 524 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2010 to 630 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and to 820 quadrillion Btu in 2040 (Figure 1). Much of the growth in energy consumption occurs in countries outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD),2 known as non-OECD, where demand is driven by strong, long-term economic growth. Energy use in non-OECD countries increases by 90 percent; in OECD countries, the increase

269

STATEMENT OF GUY CARUSO DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

STATEMENT OF ADAM SIEMINSKI STATEMENT OF ADAM SIEMINSKI ADMINISTRATOR ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE AND TECHNOLOGY UNITED STATES HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES FEBRUARY 13, 2013 2 Chairman Lummis, Ranking Member Swalwell and Members of the Committee, I appreciate the opportunity to appear before you today to provide testimony on the U.S. energy outlook. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. EIA collects, analyzes, and disseminates independent and impartial energy information to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding regarding energy and its interaction with the economy and the environment.

270

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review 1 Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections in Past Editions (1982-2006) * The Energy Information Administration (EIA) produces projections of energy supply and demand each year in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). The projections in the AEO are not statements of what will happen but of what might happen, given the assumptions and methodologies used. The projections are business-as-usual trend projections, given known technology, technological and demographic trends, and current laws and regulations. The potential impacts of pending or proposed legislation, regulations, and standards-or of sections of legislation that have been enacted but that require implementing regulations

271

Energy Information Administration - Transportation Energy Consumption by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Energy Consumption Transportation Energy Consumption Surveys energy used by vehicles EIA conducts numerous energy-related surveys and other information programs. In general, the surveys can be divided into two broad groups: supply surveys, directed to the suppliers and marketers of specific energy sources, that measure the quantities of specific fuels produced for and/or supplied to the market; and consumption surveys, which gather information on the types of energy used by consumer groups along with the consumer characteristics that are associated with energy use. In the transportation sector, EIA's core consumption survey was the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey. RTECS belongs to the consumption group because it collects information directly from the consumer, the household. For roughly a decade, EIA fielded the RTECS--data were first collected in 1983. This survey, fielded for the last time in 1994, was a triennial survey of energy use and expenditures, vehicle miles-traveled (VMT), and vehicle characteristics for household vehicles. For the 1994 survey, a national sample of more than 3,000 households that own or use some 5,500 vehicles provided data.

272

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 2 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings characteristics tables-number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy consumption and expenditures tables-energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy end-use tables-total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. Guide to the 1992 CBECS Detailed Tables Released: Nov 1999 Column Categories Row Categories The first set of detailed tables for the 1992 CBECS, Tables A1 through A70,

273

Summary of the Energy Information Administration's (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Spring Meeting with the American Statistical Association (ASA) Committee on Energy Statistics April 3 and 4, 2003 Thursday Morning, April 3, 2003 EIA's Survey Quality Effort: Where is EIA Going? Shawna Waugh, Statistics and Methods Group (SMG) Moderator, Jim Joosten and Tom Murphy, Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels (CNEAF), and Nancy Kirkendall, Tom Broene, John Vetter and Howard Bradsher-Fredrick, Facilitator, SMG. Session Overview Overview of EIA's Survey Quality Initiatives, Nancy Kirkendall, Director, Statistics and Methods Group, (SMG) EIA. EIA is undertaking several initiatives to plan, implement, measure, and evaluate the quality of survey data. Recent agency-wide quality initiatives include the: EIA Strategic

274

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model (Released in the STEO March 1998)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The blending of oxygenates, such as fuel ethanol and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), into motor gasoline has increased dramatically in the last few years because of the oxygenated and reformulated gasoline programs. Because of the significant role oxygenates now have in petroleum product markets, the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) was revised to include supply and demand balances for fuel ethanol and MTBE. The STIFS model is used for producing forecasts in the Short-Term Energy Outlook. A review of the historical data sources and forecasting methodology for oxygenate production, imports, inventories, and demand is presented in this report.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface The International Energy Outlook 2013 (IEO2013) presents an assessment by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2040. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2013 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) in April 2013. IEO2013 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, federal and state governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). The IEO2013 energy consumption projections are divided according to

276

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reference Notes & Figure Data Sources Reference Notes & Figure Data Sources Highlights Figure 1. World energy consumption, 1990-2040: History: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), International Energy Statistics database (as of November 2012), www.eia.gov/ies. Projections: EIA, World Energy Projection System Plus (2013). Figure 2. World energy consumption by fuel type, 1990-2040: History: EIA, International Energy Statistics database (as of November 2012), www.eia.gov/ies. Projections: EIA, World Energy Projection System Plus (2013). Figure 3. World petroleum and other liquids production, 2010-2040: History: EIA, Office of Petroleum, Natural Gas, and Biofuels Analysis. Projections EIA, Generate World Oil Balance application (2013). Figure 4. World increase in natural gas production by country grouping,

277

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Conferences Conferences NOTE: The following information on energy conferences is provided solely as a service for interested persons. Except for EIA-sponsored conferences, inclusion on this web page should not be considered as endorsement by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. November, December 2013 North America Rest of the World November 4-6: Innovation Ecosystems for Energy Solutions Conference Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL http://ncseonline.org/2013-cerel-annual-energy-innovation-conference November 5-6: Energy Forum: Environmental and Economic Challenges Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel, Baltimore, MD http://energy.awma.org/ November 7: Executive Energy Club (Viewpoints) Petroleum Club of Houston, Houston, TX http://www.execenergyclub.com/ November 12-13:

278

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Fede ral Highwa y Admi nistration, Highway Statistics 2008 (Washington, DC, April 2010); Oak Ridge N ational Labo ratory, Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 29 and Annual...

279

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

or fewer than 20 buildings were sampled. NNo responding cases in sample. Notes: Statistics for the "Energy End Uses" category represent total consumption in buildings that...

280

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

8A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administration short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of...

282

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

0A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of...

283

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace...

284

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Table C22. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace...

285

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

286

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of...

287

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

288

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

289

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of...

290

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

291

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet)...

292

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square...

293

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace...

294

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

295

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

0A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

296

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A18. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by sector and source (million metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Petroleum .............................................................. 85 78 71 66 62 59 57 -1.1% Natural gas ............................................................ 267 256 245 241 236 230 225 -0.5% Coal ....................................................................... 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 -0.8% Electricity 1 .............................................................. 875 828 744 776 817 862 888 0.2%

297

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Training Training NOTE: The following information is included on this web page as a service to organizations offering energy training and to persons interested in learning about energy training opportunities. A listing on this web page should not be considered an endorsement by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Selected Energy Training Classes Upcoming in 2014: January 23-24: Power Trading & Hedging Fundamentals â€" Energy Management Institute Houston, TX See course description at: http://www.energyinstitution.org/education/course-detail.php?filterby=A&filterval=0&returnto=schedule&id=104 Request information at: http://www.energyinstitution.org/education/request-syllabus.php?104 January 23-24: Physical Natural Gas Trading - Energy Management Institute

298

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface The International Energy Outlook 2011 (IEO2011) presents an assessment by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2035. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2011 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2011 (AEO2011) in April 2011. IEO2011 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are published pursuant to the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). The IEO2011 consumption projections are divided according to Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development members (OECD)1 and non-members (non-OECD). OECD members are divided into three basic country groupings:

299

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Manufacturing Energy Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Steel Industry Analysis Brief Change Topic: Steel | Chemical Steel Industry Analysis Brief Change Topic: Steel | Chemical JUMP TO: Introduction | Energy Consumption | Energy Expenditures | Producer Prices and Production | Energy Intensity | Energy Management Activities Introduction The steel industry is critical to the U.S. economy. Steel is the material of choice for many elements of construction, transportation, manufacturing, and a variety of consumer products. It is the backbone of bridges, skyscrapers, railroads, automobiles, and appliances. Most grades of steel used today - particularly high-strength steels that are lighter and more versatile - were not available a decade ago.1 The U.S. steel industry (including iron production) relies significantly on natural gas and coal coke and breeze for fuel, and is one of the largest

300

International Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Release Date: July 25, 2013 | Next Release Date: July 2014 (See release cycle changes) | correction | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0484(2013) Correction/Update July 27th A stray "2010" was left in the middle of Figure 1. August 1st Figure title changes (PDF only): Figure 10. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel type, 2010-2040 (billion metric tons) This should actually be: Figure 10. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel type, 1990-2040 (billion metric tons) Figure 11. OECD and non-OECD carbon intensities, 1990-2040 (metric tons carbon dioxide emitted per million 2010 dollars of gross domestic product) This should actually be: Figure 11. OECD and non-OECD carbon intensities, 1990-2040 (metric tons

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administration short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Manufacturing Energy Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Chemical Industry Analysis Brief Change Topic: Steel | Chemical Chemical Industry Analysis Brief Change Topic: Steel | Chemical JUMP TO: Introduction | Energy Consumption | Energy Expenditures | Producer Prices and Production | Energy Intensity | Energy Management Activities | Fuel Switching Capacity Introduction The chemical industries are a cornerstone of the U.S. economy, converting raw materials such as oil, natural gas, air, water, metals, and minerals into thousands of various products. Chemicals are key materials for producing an extensive assortment of consumer goods. They are also crucial materials in creating many resources that are essential inputs to the numerous industries and sectors of the U.S. economy.1 The manufacturing sector is classified by the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) of which the chemicals sub-sector is NAICS

302

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

303

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C3. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Sum of Major Fuel Consumption Number of Buildings (thousand)...

304

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

C7A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace...

305

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of...

306

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of...

307

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of...

308

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C3A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Sum of Major Fuel Consumption Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace...

309

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table C8A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total...

310

Ms. Rebecca Peterson Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Ms. Rebecca Peterson Ms. Rebecca Peterson Energy Information Administration Submitted by email: ERS2014@eia.gov Dear Ms. Peterson: This is to comment on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) solicitation of comments on the proposed three-year reauthorization of forms EIA-63B, EIA-411, EIA-826, EIA-860, EIA-860M, EIA-861, EIA-861S, and EIA-923, and the creation of form EIA-930. These comments are in response to the notice published in Vol. 78, No. 44 of the Federal Register on March 6, 2013. Omaha Public Power District (OPPD) is a customer-owned electric utility and political subdivision of the state of Nebraska. OPPD is currently a balancing authority and owns a transmission system and

311

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

229 229 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Regional maps Figure F2. Electricity market module regions Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Analysis. 12 11 10 19 22 21 20 15 14 9 13 7 5 6 1 2 3 4 16 17 8 18 1. ERCT ERCOT All 2. FRCC FRCC All 3. MROE MRO East 4. MROW MRO West 5. NEWE NPCC New England 6. NYCW NPCC NYC/Westchester 7. NYLI NPCC Long Island 8. NYUP NPCC Upstate NY 9. RFCE RFC East 10. RFCM RFC Michigan 11. RFCW RFC West 12. SRDA SERC Delta 13. SRGW SERC Gateway 14. SRSE SERC Southeastern 15. SRCE SERC Central 16. SRVC SERC VACAR 17. SPNO SPP North 18. SPSO SPP South 19. AZNM WECC Southwest 20. CAMX WECC California 21. NWPP WECC Northwest 22. RMPA WECC Rockies U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2011

312

F-3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Regional maps Figure F2. Electricity market module regions Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration,...

313

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 9 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in the Building Characteristics tables, which include number of buildings and total floorspace for various Building Characteristics, and Consumption and Expenditures tables, which include energy usage figures for major energy sources. Complete sets of RSE tables (What is an RSE?) are also available in PDF format 1999 Summary Tables for all principal building activities Summary Tables For All Principal Building Activities Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Square Feet per Building (thousand) Median Age of Building (years)

314

Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1111-2013 July 2013 DOE STANDARD DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LABORATORY ACCREDITATION PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1111-2013 This document is available on the Department of Energy Office of Health, Safety and Security Approved DOE Technical Standards Web Site at www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ ii DOE-STD-1111-2013 FOREWORD The Department of Energy (DOE) implemented the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) for external dosimetry in 1987 and for radiobioassay in 1998. DOELAP strives to maintain and improve the competency of dose measurement laboratories through performance

315

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A15. Coal supply, disposition, and prices (million short tons per year, unless otherwise noted) Supply, disposition, and prices Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Production 1 Appalachia ............................................................. 336 337 288 295 295 289 283 -0.6% Interior ................................................................... 156 171 198 203 212 217 226 1.0% West ...................................................................... 592 588 585 616 646 664 658 0.4% East of the Mississippi ........................................... 446 456 438 447 456 455 453 -0.0%

316

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, stocks, imports and exports. Renewable & Alternative Fuels Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium

317

Directory of Energy Information Administration Models 1994  

SciTech Connect

This directory revises and updates the 1993 directory and includes 15 models of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Three other new models in use by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) have also been included: the Motor Gasoline Market Model (MGMM), Distillate Market Model (DMM), and the Propane Market Model (PPMM). This directory contains descriptions about each model, including title, acronym, purpose, followed by more detailed information on characteristics, uses and requirements. Sources for additional information are identified. Included in this directory are 37 EIA models active as of February 1, 1994.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Table A20. Macroeconomic Indicators (Billion 2005 Chain-Weighted Dollars, Unless Otherwise Noted) Indicators Reference Case Annual Grow th 2009-2035 (percent) 2008 2009 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Real Gross Domestic Product . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13229 12881 15338 17422 20015 22735 25692 2.7% Components of Real Gross Domestic Product Real Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9265 9154 10444 11669 13277 15049 16978 2.4% Real Investment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1957 1516 2590 2991 3549 4132 4853 4.6% Real Government Spending . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2503 2543 2555 2665 2796 2935 3069 0.7% Real Exports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1648 1491 2437 3381 4488 5763 7336 6.3% Real Imp orts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2152 1854 2622 3152 3845 4736 5912 4.6% Energy Inten sity (thousand Btu per 2005 dollar of GDP) Delivered Energy . . . . . . .

319

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Characteristics and Energy Consumed in Large Hospital Buildings in the United States in 2007 › CBECS Status November 20, 2013 CBECS field data collection completed The active field data collection phase of the 2012 CBECS ended last week. In the next month, home office staff at Westat (the CBECS survey contractor) will continue to work on open cases via telephone interviews. With over 200 interviewers deployed across the U.S. starting in mid-April 2013, the 2012 CBECS was the largest field collection in the 30-year history of CBECS. Westat has been transmitting cases to EIA every few weeks since May, and the data editing phase here at EIA is making good progress. We are on track to publish the first characteristics results in late April or early May.

320

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 8A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central All Buildings ................................ 178 238 104 3,788 7,286 2,521 47.0 32.7 41.3 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 23 27 11 346 360 218 66.6 75.8 51.9 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 14 36 Q 321 662 Q 45.1 53.8 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 31 33 Q 796 1,102 604 39.5 29.9 Q

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administration short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003 1A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet All Buildings ................................ 201 412 431 13,124 31,858 25,200 15.3 12.9 17.1 Principal Building Activity Education ....................................... 9 55 45 806 5,378 3,687 11.1 10.2 12.2 Food Sales ..................................... 36 24 Q 747 467 Q 48.8 51.1 Q

322

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/square foot) 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Buildings* ............................. 1,488 2,794 1,539 17,685 29,205 17,893 84.1 95.7 86.0 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................. 191 290 190 2,146 2,805 1,838 89.1 103.5 103.5 5,001 to 10,000 ............................ 131 231 154 1,972 2,917 1,696 66.2 79.2 91.0 10,001 to 25,000 .......................... 235 351 191 3,213 4,976 3,346 73.1 70.5 57.0

323

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 0A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 All Buildings .............................. 454 715 356 378 134 8,486 14,122 8,970 11,796 5,098 53.5 50.6 39.7 32.0 26.3 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................. 57 84 35 58 16 666 1,015 427 832 234 84.8 83.1 81.9 69.6 66.6 5,001 to 10,000 ........................... 50 57 33 61 17 666 1,030 639 1,243 392 75.2 54.9 51.2 49.2 44.0

324

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for All Buildings, 2003 A. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat Primary Site All Buildings ................................ 4,859 71,658 6,523 10,746 3,559 2,100 228 636 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 6,922 685 1,185 392 257 34 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 7,033 563 883 293 224 36 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 12,659 899 1,464 485 353 28 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 9,382 742 1,199 397 278 17 Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 147 10,291 913 1,579 523 277 29 Q

325

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 0A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 All Buildings .............................. 137 254 189 261 202 11,300 18,549 12,374 17,064 10,894 12.1 13.7 15.3 15.3 18.5 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................. 19 27 14 32 23 1,210 1,631 923 1,811 903 15.7 16.4 15.0 17.8 25.8 5,001 to 10,000 ........................... 12 18 15 27 14 1,175 1,639 1,062 1,855 914 10.2 10.9 14.3 14.3 15.5

326

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 5A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings ................................ 172 234 452 185 13,899 17,725 26,017 12,541 12.4 13.2 17.4 14.7 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 14 30 52 19 1,031 1,742 2,410 1,296 13.5 17.4 21.5 14.6 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 11 17 37 21 1,128 1,558 2,640 1,319 9.8 10.8 14.0 15.8 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 22 33 59 28 2,094 3,317 4,746 2,338 10.4 10.0 12.5 12.1

327

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 5A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings ................................ 448 728 511 350 10,162 14,144 15,260 8,907 44.1 51.5 33.5 39.3 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 50 92 68 40 547 1,086 912 629 90.6 84.6 74.5 63.7 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 39 63 69 46 661 1,064 1,439 806 59.2 59.4 48.1 57.4 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 58 133 81 70 1,293 2,656 2,332 1,542 45.2 50.1 34.7 45.7

328

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003 1A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet All Buildings ................................ 467 882 688 7,144 21,928 19,401 65.4 40.2 35.5 Principal Building Activity Education ....................................... Q 137 101 419 3,629 2,997 53.9 37.6 33.7 Food Sales ..................................... 16 Q Q 339 Q Q 46.6 Q Q

329

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 9A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific All Buildings ................................ 168 185 165 5,453 3,263 5,644 30.9 56.6 29.2 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 29 18 Q 334 266 363 87.9 68.5 60.2 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 25 Q Q 545 291 514 45.6 62.7 54.4 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 20 45 26 626 699 844 32.1 63.9 30.6

330

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 8A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central All Buildings ................................ 66 254 57 5,523 13,837 3,546 12.0 18.3 16.2 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 10 28 7 821 1,233 481 12.4 22.4 15.4 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 7 20 5 681 1,389 386 10.8 14.4 13.3 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 9 31 12 1,204 2,411 842 7.8 12.8 14.1

331

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C8. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 2 C8. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central All Buildings* ............................... 436 1,064 309 5,485 12,258 3,393 79.5 86.8 91.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 60 116 36 922 1,207 538 64.9 96.5 67.8 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 44 103 Q 722 1,387 393 60.5 74.0 Q

332

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet All Buildings ............................... 1,248 2,553 2,721 13,955 32,332 25,371 89.4 79.0 107.3 Principal Building Activity Education ...................................... 63 423 334 808 5,378 3,687 78.3 78.6 90.7 Food Sales ................................... 144 Q Q 765 467 Q 188.5 Q Q

333

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Table A5. Commercial Sector Key Indicators and Consumption (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) Key Indicators and Consumption Reference Case Annual Grow th 2009-2035 (percent) 2008 2009 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Key Indicators Total Floorsp ace (billion sq uare feet) Surviving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76.4 77.9 83.4 89.3 95.1 101.1 107.3 1.2% New Additions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4 2.3 2.0 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 0.4% Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78.8 80.2 85.5 91.5 97.4 103.5 109.8 1.2% Energy Co nsum ption Intensity (thousand B tu per squa re foot) Delivered Energy Consumption . . . . . . . . . . 109.1 105.9 105.1 103.6 102.0 101.1 100.5 -0.2% Electricity Related Losses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125.0 120.6 116.2 117.0 117.7 118.2 118.3 -0.1% Total Energy Consumption . . . . . . . .

334

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Total Energy Expenditures (million dollars) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 64,783 92,577 69,032 14,525 1,776 7,245 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 6,789 12,812 10,348 2,155 292 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 6,585 9,398 7,296 1,689 307 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 11,535 13,140 10,001 2,524 232 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 8,668 10,392 7,871 1,865 127 Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 129 9,057 11,897 8,717 1,868 203 Q

335

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 0. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 All Buildings* ........................... 990 1,761 1,134 1,213 724 10,622 17,335 11,504 15,739 9,584 93.2 101.6 98.5 77.0 75.5 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................ 143 187 90 170 95 1,313 1,709 1,010 1,915 975 108.7 109.6 88.8 89.0 97.9 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 110 137 91 156 69 1,248 1,725 1,077 2,024 959 88.1 79.3 84.6 77.1 71.7

336

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet All Buildings* ............................. 1,188 2,208 2,425 13,374 29,260 22,149 88.8 75.5 109.5 Principal Building Activity Education ...................................... 63 423 334 808 5,378 3,687 78.3 78.6 90.7

337

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 3 . Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific All Buildings* ............................... 575 381 530 7,837 3,675 7,635 73.4 103.8 69.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 87 44 64 788 464 871 110.9 94.7 73.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 60 36 76 879 418 820 68.2 86.7 92.9 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 53 76 73 1,329 831 1,256 40.2 91.7 58.4

338

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table C8A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Table C8A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central All Buildings ................................ 456 1,241 340 5,680 13,999 3,719 80.2 88.7 91.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 60 123 37 922 1,283 547 64.9 96.2 67.6 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 45 111 27 738 1,468 420 61.6 75.4 63.2

339

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings* ............................. 1,271 1,690 1,948 911 12,905 17,080 23,489 11,310 98.5 98.9 82.9 80.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................. 118 206 240 108 1,025 1,895 2,533 1,336 115.1 108.5 94.9 80.6 5,001 to 10,000 ............................ 102 117 185 112 1,123 1,565 2,658 1,239 90.7 74.7 69.5 90.8

340

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific All Buildings ................................ 684 446 617 9,022 4,207 8,613 75.8 106.1 71.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 87 44 64 788 466 871 110.9 94.8 73.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 67 39 84 957 465 878 69.7 84.8 95.1 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 77 91 89 1,555 933 1,429 49.4 97.2 62.4

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administration short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Table A2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) Sector and Source Reference Case Annual Grow th 2009-2035 (percent) 2008 2009 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Energy Consumption Residential Liquefied Petroleum Gases . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.52 0.53 0.49 0.48 0.48 0.48 0.48 -0.4% Kerosene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.02 0.03 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 -1.5% Distillate Fuel O il . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.66 0.61 0.56 0.50 0.44 0.40 0.37 -1.9% Liquid Fuels and Other Petroleum Subtotal 1.20 1.16 1.07 0.99 0.94 0.90 0.87 -1.1% Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.00 4.87 4.93 4.97 4.96 4.95 4.89 0.0% Coal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 -1.1% Renewable Energy 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.44 0.43 0.40 0.42 0.42 0.42 0.42 -0.1%

342

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C7A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 C7A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central All Buildings ................................ 345 1,052 1,343 3,452 10,543 12,424 99.8 99.7 108.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 37 86 147 383 676 986 95.9 127.9 148.9 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 39 68 83 369 800 939 106.0 85.4 88.2 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ Q 121 187 674 1,448 2,113 Q 83.4 88.4

343

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/square foot) 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Buildings ............................... 1,522 3,228 1,772 18,031 33,384 20,243 84.4 96.7 87.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................. 193 300 193 2,168 2,904 1,850 89.0 103.2 104.2 5,001 to 10,000 ............................ 134 263 165 2,032 3,217 1,784 66.0 81.9 92.5 10,001 to 25,000 .......................... 241 432 226 3,273 5,679 3,707 73.6 76.1 60.9

344

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 All Buildings ............................ 1,086 1,929 1,243 1,386 879 11,529 18,808 12,503 17,630 11,189 94.2 102.6 99.4 78.6 78.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................ 143 187 90 170 95 1,313 1,709 1,010 1,915 975 108.7 109.6 88.8 89.0 97.9 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 110 137 91 156 69 1,248 1,725 1,077 2,024 959 88.1 79.3 84.6 77.1 71.7

345

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C2A. Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel for All Buildings, 2003 C2A. Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Expenditures (million dollars) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings ................................ 4,859 71,658 107,897 82,783 16,010 1,826 7,279 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 6,922 13,083 10,547 2,227 292 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 7,033 10,443 8,199 1,830 307 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 12,659 15,689 12,172 2,897 238 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 9,382 11,898 9,179 2,054 134 Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 147 10,291 15,171 11,694 2,140 229 Q

346

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific All Buildings ................................ 141 68 117 8,634 4,165 8,376 16.3 16.3 14.0 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 17 7 12 696 439 857 24.1 15.7 14.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 12 5 15 865 451 868 13.8 12.1 17.7 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 16 12 16 1,493 933 1,405 11.0 13.0 11.5

347

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 2A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Buildings ................................ 162 538 343 17,509 32,945 19,727 9.2 16.3 17.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 24 54 38 2,072 2,767 1,640 11.4 19.4 23.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 16 41 29 1,919 3,154 1,572 8.2 13.0 18.4 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 28 69 45 3,201 5,610 3,683 8.7 12.3 12.2

348

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 2A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Buildings ............................... 580 986 471 12,407 22,762 13,304 46.8 43.3 35.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................... 86 103 61 1,245 1,271 659 69.0 81.0 92.1 5,001 to 10,000 ............................. 57 101 60 1,154 1,932 883 49.4 52.3 67.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................... 105 174 65 2,452 3,390 1,982 42.6 51.2 32.7

349

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 7A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central All Buildings ................................ 41 131 168 3,430 10,469 12,202 12.0 12.5 13.8 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 5 9 20 369 662 921 12.9 13.9 21.9 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 3 8 9 360 768 877 8.4 10.4 10.8 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ Q 16 24 674 1,420 2,113 Q 11.6 11.2

350

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 5A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Fuel Oil (million square feet) Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (gallons/square foot) North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings .............................. 1,302 172 107 64 6,464 2,909 4,663 2,230 0.20 0.06 0.02 Q Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 10,000 ............................ 381 Q Q Q 763 Q 274 Q 0.50 Q 0.10 Q 10,001 to 100,000 ........................ 404 63 Q Q 1,806 648 985 351 0.22 0.10 Q Q Over 100,000 ............................... 517 21 45 Q 3,894 2,055 3,404 1,780 0.13 0.01 0.01 Q

351

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 7A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central All Buildings ................................ 85 364 550 1,861 8,301 10,356 45.4 43.8 53.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ Q 42 69 Q 427 741 Q 98.4 92.9 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. Q 32 49 Q 518 743 Q 62.1 65.5 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ Q 47 102 Q 952 1,860 Q 49.7 54.6

352

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat Primary Site All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 64,783 5,820 9,168 3,037 1,928 222 634 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 6,789 672 1,164 386 250 34 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 6,585 516 790 262 209 36 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 11,535 776 1,229 407 309 27 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 8,668 673 1,058 350 258 16 Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 129 9,057 759 1,223 405 244 26 Q

353

About EIA - Organization - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Senior Executive Biographies Senior Executive Biographies Adam Sieminski, Administrator Adam Sieminski Administrator Biography Adam Sieminski was sworn in on June 4, 2012 as the eighth Administrator of the U.S. Energy Information Administration... Read more > E-mail: adam.sieminski@eia.gov Phone: (202) 586-4361 Fax: (202) 586-0329 Room: 2H-027 Howard K. Gruenspecht, Acting Administrator and Deputy Administrator Howard K. Gruenspecht Deputy Administrator Biography Howard Gruenspecht was named Deputy Administrator of EIA in March 2003... Read more > E-mail: howard.gruenspecht@eia.gov Phone: (202) 586-6351 Fax: (202) 586-0329 Room: 2H-027 John Conti, Director of the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting John Conti Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis Biography John Conti is the Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis and analyzes energy supply, demand, and prices including the impact of financial markets... Read more >

354

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Reference case Projections for U.S. energy production, consumption, & imports through 2040 › State Energy Profiles Updated narratives and data tables, maps, rankings › American Energy Data Challenge Administrator Sieminski announces winners of first phase › Thirteen accomplishments worth celebrating in 2013 New and improved products and services from EIA › Availability and Price of Petroleum and Petroleum Products Produced in Countries Other Than Iran › Annual Coal Report With data for 2012 › What's New AEO2014 Early Release Overview › December 16 U.S. Coal Reserves › December 16 Electric Power Annual 2012 › December 12 More › Coming Up Nigeria Country Analysis Brief › Colombia Country Analysis Brief › More ›

355

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Supplement Tables - Contact  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006) was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), under the direction of John J. Conti (john.conti@eia.does.gov, 202/586-2222), Director, Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Paul D. Holtberg (paul.holtberg@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1284), Director, Demand and Integration Division; Joseph A. Beamon (jbeamon@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2025), Director, Coal and Electric Power Division; Andy S. Kydes (akydes@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Acting Director, Oil and Gas Division and Senior Technical Advisor; and Glen E. Sweetnam (glen.sweetnam@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2188), Director, International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gases Division. For ordering information and questions on other energy statistics available from EIA, please contact EIA's National Energy Information Center. Addresses, telephone numbers, and hours are as follows:

356

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table C22. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Buildings* ............................... 155 447 288 17,163 28,766 17,378 9.0 15.5 16.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 23 52 37 2,049 2,668 1,628 11.3 19.6 23.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 15 35 27 1,859 2,854 1,484 8.1 12.2 18.1 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 27 55 37 3,141 4,907 3,322 8.5 11.3 11.2

357

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C3A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 C3A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Sum of Major Fuel Consumption Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) All Buildings ................................ 4,859 71,658 14.7 6,523 1,342 91.0 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 6,922 2.7 685 265 99.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 7,033 7.4 563 594 80.0 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 12,659 15.6 899 1,110 71.0 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 9,382 36.0 742 2,843 79.0

358

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C3. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 C3. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Sum of Major Fuel Consumption Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) per Worker (million Btu) All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 64,783 13.9 5,820 1,253 89.8 79.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 6,789 2.7 672 263 98.9 67.6 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 6,585 7.4 516 580 78.3 68.7 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 11,535 15.6 776 1,052 67.3 72.0 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 8,668 35.9 673 2,790 77.6 75.8

359

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Analysis. U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2010 213 Appendix F Regional Maps Figure F1. United States Census Divisions Pacific East South Central South Atlantic Middle Atlantic New England West South Central West North Central East North Central Mountain AK WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT VT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE SD MN ND AR LA OR CA HI Middle Atlantic New England East North Central West North Central Pacific West South Central East South Central South Atlantic Mountain Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Appendix F Regional Maps Figure F1. United States Census Divisions U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013

360

Measuring Short-term Air Conditioner Demand Reductions for Operations and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measuring Short-term Air Conditioner Demand Reductions for Operations and Measuring Short-term Air Conditioner Demand Reductions for Operations and Settlement Title Measuring Short-term Air Conditioner Demand Reductions for Operations and Settlement Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5330E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Bode, Josh, Michael J. Sullivan, and Joseph H. Eto Pagination 120 Date Published 01/2012 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords consortium for electric reliability technology solutions (certs), electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract Several recent demonstrations and pilots have shown that air conditioner (AC) electric loads can be controlled during the summer cooling season to provide ancillary services and improve the stability and reliability of the electricity grid. A key issue for integration of air conditioner load control into grid operations is how to accurately measure shorter-term (e.g., ten's of minutes to a couple of hours) demand reductions from AC load curtailments for operations and settlement. This report presents a framework for assessing the accuracy of shorter-term AC load control demand reduction measurements. It also compares the accuracy of various alternatives for measuring AC reductions - including methods that rely on regression analysis, load matching and control groups - using feeder data, household data and AC end-use data. A practical approach is recommended for settlement that relies on set of tables, updated annually, with pre-calculated load reduction estimates. The tables allow users to look up the demand reduction per device based on the daily maximum temperature, geographic region and hour of day and simplify the settlement process.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administration short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16, 2013 (See release cycle changes) | 16, 2013 (See release cycle changes) | correction | full report Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer Topics Source Oil/Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewable/Alternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication Chapter Market Trends Issues in Focus Legislation & Regulations Comparison Appendices Correction/Update May 13th & May 15th Revised data in the Issues in Focus chapter and the Market Trends chapters for Figures 38, 107, 198 & 111. One number on page 88 (first column) of the Market Trends Chapter text was corrected as indicated by the following bold value: Third paragraph, first sentence should read -"From 2011 to 2040,

362

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2013 (See release cycle changes) | correction | full 2013 (See release cycle changes) | correction | full report Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer Topics Source Oil/Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewable/Alternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication Chapter Market Trends Issues in Focus Legislation & Regulations Comparison Appendices Correction/Update May 13th & May 15th Revised data in the Issues in Focus chapter and the Market Trends chapters for Figures 38, 107, 198 & 111. One number on page 88 (first column) of the Market Trends Chapter text was corrected as indicated by the following bold value: Third paragraph, first sentence should read -"From 2011 to 2040,

363

WEC up! Energy Department Announces Wave Energy Conversion Prize Administrator  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Water Power Program today awarded $6.5 million to a Prize Administration Team for the development and execution of the Energy Departments Wave Energy Conversion (WEC) Prize Competition. The WEC Prize will continue to advance marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technology as a viable source for Americas clean energy future, in part by providing an opportunity for developers to test their innovative wave energy conversion (WEC) devices in a wave generating basin.

364

STATEMENT OF GUY CARUSO DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HOWARD GRUENSPECHT HOWARD GRUENSPECHT ACTING ADMINISTRATOR ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON COUNTERTERRORISM AND INTELLIGENCE COMMITTEE ON HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES MARCH 19, 2012 THE IMPLICATIONS OF REFINERY CLOSURES FOR U.S. HOMELAND SECURITY AND CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE SAFETY Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee, I appreciate the opportunity to appear before you today. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. EIA does not promote or take positions on policy issues, and has independence with respect to the information and analysis we provide. Our views should not be construed as representing those of the Department or other federal agencies.

365

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table A3. Energy Prices by Sector and Source (2009 Dollars per Million Btu, Unless Otherwise Noted) Sector and Source Reference Case Annual Grow th 2009-2035 (percent) 2008 2009 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Residential Liquefied Petroleum Gases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29.46 24.63 29.80 32.21 33.92 34.86 35.05 1.4% Distillate Fuel O il . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24.75 18.12 21.14 24.32 25.96 26.92 27.56 1.6% Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13.62 11.88 10.31 10.95 11.91 12.63 13.51 0.5% Electricity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33.16 33.62 32.00 31.43 31.22 31.18 31.67 -0.2% Commercial Liquefied Petroleum Gases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26.70 21.49 26.34 28.73 30.42 31.34 31.52 1.5% Distillate Fuel O il . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21.81 15.97 19.30 22.37 24.08 24.99 25.54 1.8% Resid ual Fu el Oil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15.80 13.45 13.26

366

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Table A19. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by End Use (Million Metric Tons) Sector and Source Reference Case Annual Grow th 2009-2035 (percent) 2008 2009 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Residential Space Heating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292.32 279.39 272.20 270.28 268.24 266.48 263.11 -0.2% Space Cooling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161.32 147.13 135.52 139.87 150.45 158.66 165.31 0.4% Water Heating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163.85 160.01 160.25 161.93 163.49 160.30 155.15 -0.1% Refrigeration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69.28 64.82 58.20 56.84 58.43 60.81 63.33 -0.1% Cooking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32.81 31.96 32.55 34.05 35.93 37.55 38.87 0.8% Clothes Drye rs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37.54 35.56 33.18 32.30 33.25 34.80 36.19 0.1% Freezers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14.73 13.84 12.94 13.11 13.72

367

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Table A6. Industrial Sector Key Indicators and Consumption Key Indicators and Consumption Reference Case Annual Grow th 2009-2035 (percent) 2008 2009 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Key Indicators Value of Shipments (billion 2005 dollars) Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4680 4197 5278 5639 6010 6386 6761 1.9% Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2039 1821 2200 2317 2388 2443 2537 1.3% Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6720 6017 7478 7956 8397 8829 9298 1.7% Energy Prices (2009 dollars per million Btu) Liquefied Petroleum Gases . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24.95 20.59 23.35 25.81 27.53 28.39 28.56 1.3% Motor Gasoline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16.48 16.59 25.95 28.11 29.59 30.34 30.77 2.4% Distillate Fuel O il . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22.57 16.56 19.39 22.47 24.27 25.15 25.69 1.7% Resid ual Fu el Oil

368

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 1 Table A1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) Supply, Disposition, and Prices Reference Case Annual Grow th 2007-2030 (percent) 2006 2007 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Production Crude O il and Lease Conden sate . . . . . . . . . . . 10.80 10.73 12.18 12.40 14.02 15.64 15.98 1.7% Natural Gas Plant Liquids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.36 2.41 2.52 2.50 2.52 2.56 2.55 0.3% Dry Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18.99 19.84 20.87 20.83 22.02 23.81 24.28 0.9% Coal 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23.79 23.50 24.21 24.56 24.41 25.05 26.79 0.6% Nuclear Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.21 8.41 8.45 8.68 9.00 9.05 9.44 0.5% Hydropower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.87 2.46 2.67 2.94 2.95 2.96 2.97 0.8% Biomass 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.97 3.23 4.20 5.16 6.49 7.86

369

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table A16. Renewable Energy Generating Capacity and Generation (Gigawatts, Unless Otherwise Noted) Capacity and Generation Reference Case Annual Grow th 2009-2035 (percent) 2008 2009 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Electric Power Sector 1 Net Sum mer C apacity Conventional Hydropower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76.87 76.87 77.39 77.60 78.17 79.15 79.66 0.1% Geothermal 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.42 2.42 2.56 3.05 3.76 4.75 5.84 3.4% Municipa l W aste 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.37 3.37 3.37 3.37 3.37 3.37 3.37 -0.0% Wood and Other Biomass 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.19 2.19 2.19 2.19 2.19 2.19 2.19 0.0% Solar Thermal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.53 0.61 1.26 1.28 1.30 1.32 1.35 3.1% Solar P hotov oltaic 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.05 0.07 0.15 0.23 0.32 0.43 0.56 8.2% Wind . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24.89 31.45 51.62 51.74 53.96

370

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case Table A2. Energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A2. Energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Energy consumption Residential Propane .............................................................. 0.53 0.53 0.52 0.52 0.52 0.52 0.52 -0.0% Kerosene ............................................................ 0.03 0.02 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 -1.8% Distillate fuel oil ................................................... 0.58 0.59 0.51 0.45 0.40 0.36 0.32 -2.1%

371

Energy Information Administration/Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

, , Energy Information Administration/Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 ix Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 presents statistics about energy-related characteristics of highway vehicles available for personal use by members of U.S. households. The data were collected in the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey, the final cycle in a series of nationwide energy consumption surveys conducted during the 1980's and 1990's by the Energy Information Administrations. Engines Became More Powerful . . . Percent Distribution of Total Residential Vehicle Fleet by Number of Cylinders, 1988 and 1994 Percent Distribution of Vehicle Fleet by Engine Size, 1988 and 1994 Percent Percent 4 cyl Less than 2.50 liters 6 cyl 2.50- 4.49 liters 8 cyl 4.50 liters or greater 20 20 40 40 Vehicle

372

United States Energy Information Administration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States Energy Information Administration United States Energy Information Administration (Redirected from U.S. Energy Information Administration) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: U.S. Energy Information Administration Name U.S. Energy Information Administration Address 1000 Independence Ave., SW Place Washington, DC Zip 20585 Phone number (202) 586-8800 Website http://www.eia.doe.gov/ Coordinates 38.8870027°, -77.0259567° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8870027,"lon":-77.0259567,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

373

United States Energy Information Administration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States Energy Information Administration United States Energy Information Administration (Redirected from Energy Information Administration) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: U.S. Energy Information Administration Name U.S. Energy Information Administration Address 1000 Independence Ave., SW Place Washington, DC Zip 20585 Phone number (202) 586-8800 Website http://www.eia.doe.gov/ Coordinates 38.8870027°, -77.0259567° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8870027,"lon":-77.0259567,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

374

MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHN CONTI ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHN CONTI ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY ANALYSIS PAUL HOLTBERG TEAM LEADER ANALYSIS INTEGRATION TEAM JIM TURNURE DIRECTOR OFFICE OF ENERGY CONSUMPTION...

375

DOE/EIA-0515(85) Energy Information Administration Manufacturing...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5(85) Energy Information Administration Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey: Fuel Switching, 1985 This publication is available from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S,...

376

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A17. Renewable energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Marketed renewable energy 1 Residential (wood) ............................................... 0.44 0.45 0.44 0.44 0.45 0.45 0.45 0.1% Commercial (biomass) ........................................ 0.11 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.0% Industrial 2 ............................................................. 2.32 2.18 2.53 2.67 2.82 3.08 3.65 1.8% Conventional hydroelectric ................................. 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.0%

377

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Retrospective Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

S e p t e mb e r 2 0 0 8 S e p t e mb e r 2 0 0 8 N e x t R e l e a s e D a t e : S e p t e mb e r 2 0 0 9 Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Retrospective Review 1 Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections in Past Editions (1982-2008) The Energy Information Administration (EIA) produces projections of energy supply and demand each year in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). The projections in the AEO are not statements of what will happen but of what might happen, given the assumptions and methodologies used. The projections are business-as-usual trend projections, given known technology, technological and demographic trends, and current laws and regulations. The potential impacts of pending or proposed legislation, regulations, and

378

Bonneville Power Administration (WFP) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bonneville Power Administration (WFP) Bonneville Power Administration (WFP) The purpose of the workforce Plan is to provide focus and direction to Human Resources (HR) strategy....

379

Establishing robust short-term distributions of load extremes of offshore wind turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A novel method with a rigorous theoretical foundation is proposed for establishing robust short-term distributions of load extremes of offshore wind turbines. Based on the wind turbine load time series, the proposed method begins with incorporating a declustering algorithm into the peaks over threshold (POT) method and searching for an optimum threshold level with the aid of a Mean Residual Life (MRL) plot. Then, the method of L-moments is utilized to estimate the parameters in the generalized Pareto distribution (GPD) of the largest values in all the selected clusters over the optimal threshold level. As an example of calculation, an optimal threshold level of the tower base fore-aft extreme bending moments of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 5-MW OC3-Hywind floating wind turbine has been obtained by utilizing the novel method. The short-term extreme response probability plots based on this optimal threshold level are compared with the probability plots based on the empirical and semi-empirical threshold levels, and the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed novel method are substantiated. Diagnostic plots are also included in this paper for validating the accuracy of the proposed novel method. The method has been further validated in another calculation example regarding an NREL 5-MW fixed-bottom monopile wind turbine.

Yingguang Wang; Yiqing Xia; Xiaojun Liu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Management & Administration Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 4, 2009 September 4, 2009 Audit Report: OAS-RA-09-04 Department of Energy's Efforts to Meet Accountability and Performance Reporting Objectives of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act August 27, 2009 Inspection Letter Report: INS-L-09-07 Allegations of Improper Hanford Workers' Compensation Payments (INS-L-09-07, S09IS027) August 20, 2009 Inspection Report: INS-O-09-04 Yucca Mountain Project Purchase Card Programs August 5, 2009 Special Report: IG-0819 Allegations of Conflict of Interest Regarding Licensing of PROTECT by Argonne National Laboratory July 24, 2009 Audit Letter Report: OAS-L-09-15 Audit of Bonneville Power Administration Fish Hatchery Projects July 24, 2009 Audit Letter Report: OAS-L-09-14 Controls over the U.S. Department of Energy's Performance Measures

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381

UNITED STATES ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

October 13, 1976 October 13, 1976 Mr. D. C. McCarter, Works Manager Al-Tech Specialty Steel Corporation Post Office Box 91 Watervliet, New York El89 Dear Mr. McCarter: FADIOMGICAL STATUS OF AL-TECH FACILITIES UTILIZED IN EARLY ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION CONTRACT WORK On August 19, 1976, representatives of the Energy Research and Development Administration visited the Al-Tech plant located on Spring Street Road in Watervliet, New York, to reevaluate the radiological status of the subject facilities. Rationale underlying this ERDA effort was indicated in the introductory letter to you dated August 5, 1976, from William T. Thornton of !ny staff. Based on our finding that (1) radiation levels as measured in the plant are indistinguishable from naturally occurring background levels, (2) ARC con-

382

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by Sector Energy Consumption by Sector Transportation The AEO2011 Reference case does not include the proposed fuel economy standards for heavy-duty vehicles provided in The Proposed Rule for Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards and Fuel Efficiency Standards for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Engines and Vehicles, published by the EPA and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) in November 2010, nor does it include increases in fuel economy standards for light-duty vehicles, as outlined in the September 2010 EPA/NHTSA Notice of Upcoming Joint Rulemaking to Establish 2017 and Later Model Year Light-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) Standards because the specifi cs of the new standards are not yet available. Figure DataAEO2011 assumes the adoption of CAFE standards for light-duty

383

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Developer Developer Announcing EIA's Application Programming Interface The U.S. Energy Information Administration is committed to making its data available through an Application Programming Interface (API) to better serve our customers. An API allows computers to more easily access our public data. By making EIA data available in this machine-readable format, the creativity in the private, the non-profit, and the public sectors can be harnessed to find new ways to innovate and create value-added services powered by public data. Currently, EIA's API is released as a beta product. On September 21, 2012, the initial 408,000 electricity series were added. On Jan 24, 2013 the entire State Energy Data System Was added, comprised of over 30,000 additional time-series. On August 23, 126,000 petroleum and natural gas

384

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Supplement Tables - Contact  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO2007) was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), under the direction of John J. Conti (john.conti@eia.doe.gov, 202-586-2222), Director, Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Paul D. Holtberg (paul.holtberg@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1284), Director, Demand and Integration Division; Joseph A. Beamon (jbeamon@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2025), Director, Coal and Electric Power Division; A. Michael Schaal (michael.schaal@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-5590), Director, Oil and Gas Division; Glen E. Sweetnam (glen.sweetnam@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2188), Director, International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gases Division; and Andy S. Kydes (akydes@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Senior Technical Advisor.

385

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A16. Renewable energy generating capacity and generation (gigawatts, unless otherwise noted) Net summer capacity and generation Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Electric power sector 1 Net summer capacity Conventional hydropower .................................. 77.82 77.87 78.34 78.94 79.11 79.63 80.31 0.1% Geothermal 2 ....................................................... 2.38 2.38 3.63 4.34 5.70 6.60 7.46 4.0% Municipal waste 3 ................................................ 3.26 3.34 3.44 3.44 3.44 3.44 3.44 0.1%

386

Management & Administration | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management & Administration Management & Administration Management & Administration Management & Administration The Office of Management and Administration directs the development, coordination, and execution of overall OIG management and administrative policy and planning. This responsibility includes directing the OIG's strategic planning process, financial management activities, personnel management and security programs, administrative support services, and information resources programs. In addition, the staff members from this Office represent the Inspector General at hearings, negotiations, and conferences on budget, financial, managerial, and other resource matters. The staff also coordinates activities of the Council of Inspector's General on Integrity and Efficiency. The Office is organized into two

387

Measuring Short-term Air Conditioner Demand Reductions for Operations and Settlement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

330E 330E Measuring Short-term Air Conditioner Demand Reductions for Operations and Settlement Josh Bode, Michael Sullivan, Joseph H. Eto January 2012 The work described in this report was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

388

About EIA - Organization - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Howard K. Gruenspecht, Acting Administrator and Deputy Administrator Howard K. Gruenspecht Print friendly PDF Howard K. Gruenspecht, Acting Administrator and Deputy Administrator Howard K. Gruenspecht Print friendly PDF Deputy Administrator E-mail: howard.gruenspecht@eia.gov Phone: (202) 586-6351 Fax: (202) 586-0329 Room: 2H-027 Address: U.S. Energy Information Administration 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585 Duties Howard Gruenspecht was named Deputy Administrator of the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) in March 2003. As the second-in-command at EIA and the agency's top career official, Howard is involved in all aspects of analyzing, and disseminating independent and impartial energy information to promote sound policy-making, efficient markets, and public understanding of energy and its interaction with the economy and the environment. He works closely with

389

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A1. Total energy supply, disposition, and price summary (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Supply, disposition, and prices Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Production Crude oil and lease condensate ............................ 11.59 12.16 15.95 14.50 13.47 13.40 13.12 0.3% Natural gas plant liquids ........................................ 2.78 2.88 4.14 4.20 3.85 3.87 3.89 1.0% Dry natural gas ...................................................... 21.82 23.51 27.19 29.22 30.44 32.04 33.87 1.3% Coal 1 ...................................................................... 22.04 22.21 21.74 22.54 23.25 23.60 23.54 0.2%

390

VPR RESEARCH BRIDGE PROGRAM Objective: Toprovide short-term,limitedfinancial support whenexternallyfundedresearchprogramshave  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VPR RESEARCH BRIDGE PROGRAM Objective: Toprovide short-term,limitedfinancial support following: pastrecord of external funding,effortsunderwaytosecure external fundingbeyondthe bridge

Kihara, Daisuke

391

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case Table A11. Liquid fuels supply and disposition (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A11. Liquid fuels supply and disposition (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Supply and disposition Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Crude oil Domestic crude production 1 ................................... 5.47 5.67 7.47 6.79 6.30 6.26 6.13 0.3% Alaska ................................................................. 0.60 0.57 0.49 0.35 0.38 0.35 0.41 -1.1% Lower 48 states .................................................. 4.88 5.10 6.98 6.44 5.92 5.91 5.72 0.4%

392

Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY U.S. Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

593 Federal Register 593 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 148 / Wednesday, August 1, 2012 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY U.S. Energy Information Administration Proposed Agency Information Collection AGENCY: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Notice and Request for Comments. SUMMARY: EIA invites public comment on the proposed collection of information for the new Form EIA-915, ''Monthly Gas Processing and Liquids Report'' that EIA is developing for submission to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. This new form would replace Form EIA-64A, Annual Report of the Origin of Natural Gas Liquids, and Form EIA-816,

393

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case Table A13. Natural gas supply, disposition, and prices (trillion cubic feet per year, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A13. Natural gas supply, disposition, and prices (trillion cubic feet per year, unless otherwise noted) Supply, disposition, and prices Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Supply Dry gas production 1 .............................................. 21.33 23.00 26.61 28.59 29.79 31.35 33.14 1.3% Supplemental natural gas 2 .................................... 0.06 0.06 0.06 0.06 0.06 0.06 0.06 0.2% Net imports ........................................................... 2.60 1.95 -0.14 -1.58 -2.10 -2.55 -3.55 - -

394

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case Table A12. Petroleum product prices (2010 dollars per gallon, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A12. Petroleum product prices (2011 dollars per gallon, unless otherwise noted) Sector and fuel Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Crude oil prices (2011 dollars per barrel) Brent spot .............................................................. 81.31 111.26 105.57 117.36 130.47 145.41 162.68 1.3% West Texas Intermediate spot ............................... 81.08 94.86 103.57 115.36 128.47 143.41 160.68 1.8% Average imported refiners acquisition cost 1 ........... 77.49 102.65 102.19 113.48 125.64 138.70 154.96 1.4%

395

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case Table A6. Industrial sector key indicators and consumption Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A6. Industrial sector key indicators and consumption Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators Value of shipments (billion 2005 dollars) Manufacturing ..................................................... 4,257 4,438 5,683 6,253 6,712 7,285 7,972 2.0% Nonmanufacturing .............................................. 1,585 1,582 2,211 2,295 2,375 2,494 2,644 1.8% Total ................................................................. 5,842

396

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2006 International Energy Outlook 2006 International Energy Outlook 2006 The International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2006 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Projection Tables Appendix A: Reference Case Appendix B: High Economic Growth Case Appendix C: Low Economic Growth Case Appendix D: Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Appendix E: Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production in Three Cases Appendix F: Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel

397

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Survey Forms Survey Forms Changes to Petroleum Supply Survey Forms for 2013 Released: November 27, 2012 Federal Register Notice The U.S. Energy Information Administration is requesting comments on the following proposed 2013 Petroleum Supply survey forms: EIA-800, Weekly Refinery and Fractionator Report EIA-801, Weekly Bulk Terminal Report EIA-802, Weekly Product Pipeline Report EIA-803, Weekly Crude Oil Report EIA-804, Weekly Imports Report EIA-805, Weekly Bulk Terminal and Blender Report EIA-809, Weekly Oxygenate Report EIA-22M, Monthly Biodiesel Production Report EIA-810, Monthly Refinery Report EIA-812, Monthly Product Pipeline Report EIA-813, Monthly Crude Oil Report EIA-814, Monthly Imports Report EIA-815, Monthly Bulk Terminal and Blender Report EIA-816, Monthly Natural Gas Plant Liquids Report

398

Management & Administration Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 26, 2012 March 26, 2012 Audit Report: IG-0861 Management of Bonneville Power Administration's Information Technology Program March 23, 2012 Management Alert: OAS-M-12-03 Purchase of Computers for the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service at the Savannah River Site February 23, 2012 Audit Report: OAS-M-12-02 The Department's Configuration Management of Non-Financial Systems February 21, 2012 Audit Report: OAS-L-12-02 Idaho's Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory February 17, 2012 Inspection Report: IG-0859 Property Accountability and Protection of Federal Sensitive Unclassified Information Under the Cooperative Agreement with the Incorporated County of Los Alamos January 18, 2012 Special Report: OAS-RA-12-03 Lessons Learned/Best Practices during the Department of Energy's

399

UNITED STATES ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.BJ' 1-7 I I .BJ' 1-7 I I .* , UNITED STATES ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION OAK RIDGE OPERATIONS P. 0. BOX E OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE 37830 AREA CODE 615 TELEPHONE 483.8611 March 10, 1977 Assistant Director for Health Protection, DSSC-HQ ATTN: R. H. Kennedy, DSSC-HQ ERDA RESURVEY PROGRAM: JOSLYN STAINLESS STEEL COMPANY, FORT WAYNE, INDIANA On October 23, 1976, H. W. Dickson and I visited the subject site to reassess the radiological status of those facilities utilized under AEC/MED contract during 1944-49 and to determine the need for a formal ERDA/ORNL survey. Discussions were held with Mr. Edwin E. Hodgess, Jr., Vice President-Operations who provided information on the AEC operations and identified those parts of the plant which were involved.

400

Forecasting short-term electricity consumption using a semantics-based genetic programming framework: The South Italy case  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Accurate and robust short-term load forecasting plays a significant role in electric power operations. This paper proposes a variant of genetic programming, improved by incorporating semantic awareness in algorithm, to address a short term load forecasting problem. The objective is to automatically generate models that could effectively and reliably predict energy consumption. The presented results, obtained considering a particularly interesting case of the South Italy area, show that the proposed approach outperforms state of the art methods. Hence, the proposed approach reveals appropriate for the problem of forecasting electricity consumption. This study, besides providing an important contribution to the energy load forecasting, confirms the suitability of genetic programming improved with semantic methods in addressing complex real-life applications.

Mauro Castelli; Leonardo Vanneschi; Matteo De Felice

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administration short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

"U.S. Energy Information Administration"  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration" U.S. Energy Information Administration" "November 2013 Monthly Energy Review" 0 "Release Date: November 25, 2013" "Next Update: December 24, 2013" "Table 1.1 Primary Energy Overview" "Month","Total Fossil Fuels Production","Nuclear Electric Power Production","Total Renewable Energy Production","Total Primary Energy Production","Primary Energy Imports","Primary Energy Exports","Primary Energy Net Imports","Primary Energy Stock Change and Other","Total Fossil Fuels Consumption","Nuclear Electric Power Consumption","Total Renewable Energy Consumption","Total Primary Energy Consumption"

402

Administrative Records Schedule 1 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

labor relations, academic and outreach programs, apprenticeship programs, job vacancies, unemployment compensation, recruitment and employee health Administrative Records...

403

About EIA - Organization - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Adam Sieminski, Administrator Adam Sieminski Print friendly PDF Adam Sieminski, Administrator Adam Sieminski Print friendly PDF Administrator E-mail: adam.sieminski@eia.gov Phone: (202) 586-4361 Fax: (202) 586-0329 Room: 2H-027 Address: U.S. Energy Information Administration 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585 Biography Adam Sieminski was sworn in on June 4, 2012, as the eighth administrator of the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). From March 2012 to May 2012, while awaiting confirmation as EIA administrator, Mr. Sieminski served as senior director for energy and environment on the staff of the National Security Council. From 2005 until March 2012, he was the chief energy economist for Deutsche Bank, working with the Bank's global research and trading units. Drawing on extensive industry, government, and academic

404

Short-term Wind Power Forecasting Using Advanced Statistical T.S. Nielsen1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short-term Wind Power Forecasting Using Advanced Statistical Methods T.S. Nielsen1 , H. Madsen1 , H considered in the ANEMOS project for short-term fore- casting of wind power. The total procedure typically in for prediction of wind power or wind speed, estimating the uncertainty of the wind power forecast, and finally

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

405

Weather or Other Short-Term Closing Policy 6.15  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Weather or Other Short-Term Closing Policy 6.15 Office of Human Resources Applies to: Faculty, staff, graduate associates, student employees, and students 1 1 This policy does not apply to Health State University ­ Office of Human Resources Page 1 of 1 Policy 6.15 Weather or Other Short-Term Closing

Howat, Ian M.

406

Short-term effects of salinity declines on juvenile hard clams, Mercenaria mercenaria.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be compounded or mitigated by other factors, such as other environmental conditions or handling effects. #12Short-term effects of salinity declines on juvenile hard clams, Mercenaria mercenaria. Final report to Florida Sea Grant, for a Program Development Award Project title: Short-term effects of rapid salinity

Florida, University of

407

Short-Term Audio-Visual Atoms for Generic Video Concept Classification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short-Term Audio-Visual Atoms for Generic Video Concept Classification Wei Jiang1 Courtenay Cotton1 the challenging issue of joint audio-visual analysis of generic videos targeting at semantic concept de- tection. We propose to extract a novel representation, the Short-term Audio-Visual Atom (S-AVA), for improved

Ellis, Dan

408

U. S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Supply Annual...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

in Energy Information Administration publications, such as the Weekly Petroleum Status Report, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and This Week In Petroleum. Northeast Heating Oil...

409

About EIA - Organization - U.S. Energy Information Administration...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

(AA) for Communications, and in this capacity provides leadership and direction to conduct the U.S. Energy Information Administration's comprehensive communications program...

410

U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

2011 EEO Report of Accomplishments U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Civil Rights 3rd Edition Issued: March 2012 EEO and Diversity -...

411

State Energy Program 2014 Administrative and Legal Requirements Document  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Administrative and Legal Requirements Document (ALRD) is to solicit the annual grant applications under the State Energy Program for Program Year 2014.

412

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Annual Energy Outlook with  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

with Projections to 2030 with Projections to 2030 Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 The Annual Energy Outlook 2007 presents a projection and analysis of US energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030. The projections are based on results from the Energy Information Administration's National Energy Modeling System. The AEO2007 includes the reference case, additional cases examining energy markets, and complete documentation. The report is also released in print. Errata as of 10/15/07 Forecast Data Tables Reference Case Tables (links to individual excel and PDF files) High Economic Growth Case Tables (links to individual excel and PDF files) Low Economic Growth Case Tables (links to individual excel and PDF files) High Price Case Tables (links to individual excel and PDF files)

413

Assumptions to Annual Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Assumptions to AEO2013 Assumptions to AEO2013 Release Date: May 14, 2013 | Next Release Date: May 2014 | full report Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [1] (AEO2013), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports [2]. The National Energy Modeling System Projections in the AEO2013 are generated using the NEMS, developed and maintained by the Office of Energy Analysis of the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). In addition to its use in developing the Annual

414

Assumptions to Annual Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to AEO2012 Assumptions to AEO2012 Release Date: August 2, 2012 | Next Release Date: August 2013 | Full report Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 [1] (AEO2012), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports [2]. The National Energy Modeling System The projections in AEO2012 are generated using the NEMS, developed and maintained by the Office of Energy Analysis (OEA) of the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). In addition to its use in developing the

415

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Annual Energy Outlook with  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2006 with Projections to 2030 2006 with Projections to 2030 Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 The Annual Energy Outlook 2006 presents a forecast and analysis of US energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030. The projections are based on results from the Energy Information Administration's National Energy Modeling System. The AEO2006 includes the reference case, additional cases examining energy markets, and complete documentation. Forecast Data Tables Reference Case Tables (links to individual excel and PDF files) High Macroeconomic Growth Case Tables (links to individual excel files) Low Macroeconomic Growth Case Tables (links to individual excel files) High Price Case Tables (links to individual excel files) Low Price Case Tables (links to individual excel files)

416

Department of Energy Official Touts Bush Administration's Efforts to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Official Touts Bush Administration's Efforts Department of Energy Official Touts Bush Administration's Efforts to Modernize our Nation's Electric Grid Department of Energy Official Touts Bush Administration's Efforts to Modernize our Nation's Electric Grid August 28, 2007 - 11:08am Addthis August 28, 2007 Department of Energy Official Touts Bush Administration's Efforts to Modernize our Nation's Electric GridLouisiana to increase energy efficiency with upgrades between the LaBarre and Metaire electric substations NEW ORLEANS, LA - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) newly confirmed Assistant Secretary for the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Kevin M. Kolevar today highlighted the Bush Administration's efforts to increase the use of advanced technologies in the Nation's power delivery system equipment, as well as DOE's recent announcement to invest

417

United States Energy Information Administration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Logo: U.S. Energy Information Administration Name U.S. Energy Information Administration Address 1000 Independence Ave., SW Place Washington, DC Zip 20585 Phone number (202) 586-8800 Website http://www.eia.doe.gov/ Coordinates 38.8870027°, -77.0259567° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8870027,"lon":-77.0259567,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

418

United States Energy Information Administration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from EIA) (Redirected from EIA) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: U.S. Energy Information Administration Name U.S. Energy Information Administration Address 1000 Independence Ave., SW Place Washington, DC Zip 20585 Phone number (202) 586-8800 Website http://www.eia.doe.gov/ Coordinates 38.8870027°, -77.0259567° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8870027,"lon":-77.0259567,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

419

U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

EIA-3 Instructions EIA-3 Instructions (July 2011) Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report Manufacturing and Transformation/Processing Coal Plants and Commercial and Institutional Coal Users Page 1 Form Approved OMB No. 1905-0167 Expires: 06/30/2014 Burden: 1.25 Hours GENERAL INFORMATION: A. PURPOSE. Using the EIA-3 survey, the Energy Information Administration collects data from U.S. manufacturing plants, coal transformation/processing plants, and commercial and institutional users of coal. This survey allows the EIA to provide Congress with basic statistics concerning coal consumption, stocks, prices, and quality as required by the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (FEAA) (P.L. 93-275), as amended. Data collected on this survey appear in the

420

A field study evaluation of short-term refined Gaussian dispersion models  

SciTech Connect

A tracer study was conducted at the Duke Forest Site in Chapel Hill, North Carolina in January, 1995 to evaluate the ability of three short-term refined Gaussian dispersion models to predict the fate of volume source emissions under field study conditions. Study participants included the American Petroleum Institute (API), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the US Department of Energy (DOE), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and private consulting firms. The models evaluated were Industrial Source Complex--Short Term versions 2 and 3 (ISC2, ISC3) and the American Meteorological Society (AMS) Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regulatory Model Improvement Committee (AERMIC) model, AERMOD. All three models are based on the steady-state Gaussian plume dispersion equation, which predicts concentrations at downwind receptor locations when integrated over the distance between the source and receptor. Chemicals were released at known rates and measurements were taken at various points in the study field using Tedlar bag point sampling and open-path Fourier Transform infrared (OP-FTIR) monitoring. The study found that ISC and AERMOD underpredicted the measured concentrations for each dataset collected in the field study. ISC and AERMOD each underpredicted the OPFTIR dataset by a factor of approximately 1.6. ISC underpredicted the Tedlar{reg_sign} dataset by approximately 2.1, while AERMOD underpredicted by a factor of approximately 2.6. Regardless of source configuration or measurement technique used, under-prediction with respect to the measured concentration was consistently observed. This indicates that safety factors or other corrections may be necessary in predicting contaminant concentrations over the distances examined in this study, i.e., in the near field of less than 200 meters.

Piper, A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administration short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Energy Information Administration / Supplement to: Energy Market and Economic Im  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Supplement to: Energy Market and Economic Impacts of S. 280, the Climate Stewardship and Innovation Act Supplement to: Energy Market and Economic Impacts of S. 280, the Climate Stewardship and Innovation Act of 2007 1 Supplement to: Energy Market and Economic Impacts of S. 280, the Climate Stewardship and Innovation Act of 2007 October 2007 This paper responds to a September 18, 2007, letter from Senators Barrasso, Inhofe, and Voinovich, hereinafter referred to as the BIV request, seeking further energy and economic analysis to supplement information presented in the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) recent analysis of S. 280, the Climate Stewardship and Innovation Act of 2007 1 . The BIV request raises issues that would also apply in the context of EIA analyses of other policy proposals. A copy of the request letter is provided in Appendix A. To meet the Senators' desire for an expedited response, this paper is organized around the main issues

422

Management & Administration Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reports Management & Administration Reports October 17, 2014 Special Review: DOEIG-0923 Issues Pertaining to the Termination of Ms. Donna Busche, a Contractor Employee...

423

Obama Administration Awards More than $141 Million for State Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Obama Administration Awards More than $141 Million for State Energy Obama Administration Awards More than $141 Million for State Energy Programs in Six States and Territories Obama Administration Awards More than $141 Million for State Energy Programs in Six States and Territories July 10, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced more than $141 million in Recovery Act funding to support energy efficiency and renewable energy projects in Hawaii, Maine, Nebraska, New Mexico, the Northern Mariana Islands and Texas. Under DOE's State Energy Program, states and territories have proposed statewide plans that prioritize energy savings, create or retain jobs, increase the use of renewable energy, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This program is part of the Obama Administration's national strategy to support job growth,

424

Department of Energy Official Touts Bush Administration's Efforts to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Official Touts Bush Administration's Efforts Department of Energy Official Touts Bush Administration's Efforts to Modernize our Nation's Electric Grid, August 28, 2007 Department of Energy Official Touts Bush Administration's Efforts to Modernize our Nation's Electric Grid, August 28, 2007 The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) newly confirmed Assistant Secretary for the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Kevin M. Kolevar today highlighted the Bush Administration's efforts to increase the use of new power delivery system equipment in New Orleans, as well as DOE's recent announcement to invest up to $51.8 million to modernize and secure our nation's electric grid. Department of Energy Official Touts Bush Administration's Efforts to Modernize our Nation's Electric Grid, August 28, 2007

425

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Reference case Table A8. Electricity supply, disposition, prices, and emissions (billion kilowatthours, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A8. Electricity supply, disposition, prices, and emissions (billion kilowatthours, unless otherwise noted) Supply, disposition, prices, and emissions Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Generation by fuel type Electric power sector 1 Power only 2 Coal .................................................................. 1,797 1,688 1,613 1,680 1,718 1,756 1,776 0.2% Petroleum ......................................................... 32 24 15 15 15 15 16 -1.5% Natural gas

426

Energy Information Administration / Petroleum Marketing Annual 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

55 55 Energy Information Administration / Petroleum Marketing Annual 1997 Prices of Petroleum Products Table 31. Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Geographic Area Month Regular Midgrade Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Through Retail Outlets Average a DTW Rack Bulk Average Through Retail Outlets Average a DTW Rack Bulk Average United States January ............................... 84.2 83.9 77.3 72.1 67.7 73.0 92.5 92.0 82.6 76.2 W 79.7 February ............................. 83.1 82.8 76.3 69.5 65.9 71.0 91.5 91.0 81.7 73.4 81.2 77.9 March .................................. 80.8 80.6 75.0 67.3 64.7 69.2 89.3 88.9 81.0 71.2 74.8 76.2 April .................................... 80.0 79.8

427

Daily/Hourly Hydrosystem Operation : How the Columbia River System Responds to Short-Term Needs.  

SciTech Connect

The System Operation Review, being conducted by the Bonneville Power Administration, the US Army Corps of Engineers, and the US Bureau of Reclamation, is analyzing current and potential future operations of the Columbia River System. One goal of the System Operations Review is to develop a new System Operation Strategy. The strategy will be designed to balance the many regionally and nationally important uses of the Columbia River system. Short-term operations address the dynamics that affect the Northwest hydro system and its multiple uses. Demands for electrical power and natural streamflows change constantly and thus are not precisely predictable. Other uses of the hydro system have constantly changing needs, too, many of which can interfere with other uses. Project operators must address various river needs, physical limitations, weather, and streamflow conditions while maintaining the stability of the electric system and keeping your lights on. It takes staffing around the clock to manage the hour-to-hour changes that occur and the challenges that face project operators all the time.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Administrative Records Schedules | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administrative Records Schedules Administrative Records Schedules Administrative Records Schedules Administrative Records Schedules NOTE: Most of the files below are in PDF, you will need Acrobat® Reader(tm) to view these files. SCHEDULE TITLE DATE LAST CHANGED AUTHORIZATION NUMBER 1 Personnel Records (pdf) 09/15/10 N1-434-98-4 2 Payroll & Pay Administration Records (pdf) 09/15/10 N1-434-98-5 3 Procurement, Supply, and Grant Records (pdf) 09/15/10 N1-434-98-6 N1-434-95-1 4 Property Disposal Records (pdf) 12/10/10 --- 5 Budget Preparation, Presentation and Apportionment Records (pdf) 12/10/10 N1-434-98-8 6 Accountable Officers' Accounts Records (pdf) 09/15/10 N1-434-98-9 7 Expenditure Accounting Records --- GRS 7 8 Stores, Plants and Cost Accounting Records --- GRS 8

429

Obama Administration Releases Roadmap for Solar Energy Development...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Releases Roadmap for Solar Energy Development on Public Lands Obama Administration Releases Roadmap for Solar Energy Development on Public Lands July 24, 2012 - 4:00pm Addthis News...

430

A History of the Energy Research and Development Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A History of the Energy Research and Development Administration - written byAlice L. BuckWashington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Energy, March 1982.22 pp

431

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Reference case Table A7. Transportation sector key indicators and delivered energy consumption Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A7. Transportation sector key indicators and delivered energy consumption Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators Travel indicators (billion vehicle miles traveled) Light-duty vehicles less than 8,501 pounds .... 2,654 2,629 2,870 3,089 3,323 3,532 3,719 1.2% Commercial light trucks 1 ................................. 65 65 80 87 94 102 110 1.8% Freight trucks greater than 10,000 pounds ..... 235 240 323 350 371 401 438 2.1% (billion seat miles available)

432

Today in Energy - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Today in Energy Today in Energy Glossary › FAQS › Home Browse by Tag Most Popular Tags electricity oil/petroleum natural gas liquid fuels prices states production crude oil consumption international coal generation renewable demand weather gasoline capacity nuclear exports forecast View All Tags › View Tag Cloud › Prices Archive About Dec 20, 2013 U.S. electricity sales have decreased in four of the past five years graph of U.S. electricity end use, as explained in the article text Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Monthly Energy Review Note: Electricity end use includes both retail electricity sales and the onsite use of power at utility-scale generators. Total U.S. electricity sales have declined in four of the past five years, and are on track to continue to decline in 2013. The only year-over-year

433

FACT SHEET: Obama Administration Commitment to American Made Energy |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FACT SHEET: Obama Administration Commitment to American Made Energy FACT SHEET: Obama Administration Commitment to American Made Energy FACT SHEET: Obama Administration Commitment to American Made Energy March 21, 2012 - 5:02pm Addthis Today, President Obama highlighted his Administration's focus on a sustained, all-of-the-above approach to developing American energy, which has included doubling renewable electricity generation, increasing oil and gas production on federal lands and waters, and reducing our reliance on foreign oil, most notably through the historic fuel economy standards the President has established, which will nearly double the efficiency of the vehicles we drive and save families $1.7 trillion at the pump. As part of the President's comprehensive strategy for a secure energy future, he will outline the steps his Administration is taking to promote the

434

FACT SHEET: Obama Administration Commitment to American Made Energy |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FACT SHEET: Obama Administration Commitment to American Made Energy FACT SHEET: Obama Administration Commitment to American Made Energy FACT SHEET: Obama Administration Commitment to American Made Energy March 21, 2012 - 5:02pm Addthis Today, President Obama highlighted his Administration's focus on a sustained, all-of-the-above approach to developing American energy, which has included doubling renewable electricity generation, increasing oil and gas production on federal lands and waters, and reducing our reliance on foreign oil, most notably through the historic fuel economy standards the President has established, which will nearly double the efficiency of the vehicles we drive and save families $1.7 trillion at the pump. As part of the President's comprehensive strategy for a secure energy future, he will outline the steps his Administration is taking to promote the

435

Department of Energy Official Touts Bush Administration's Efforts to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Official Touts Bush Administration's Efforts Official Touts Bush Administration's Efforts to Modernize our Nation's Electric Grid Department of Energy Official Touts Bush Administration's Efforts to Modernize our Nation's Electric Grid August 28, 2007 - 11:08am Addthis August 28, 2007 Department of Energy Official Touts Bush Administration's Efforts to Modernize our Nation's Electric GridLouisiana to increase energy efficiency with upgrades between the LaBarre and Metaire electric substations NEW ORLEANS, LA - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) newly confirmed Assistant Secretary for the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Kevin M. Kolevar today highlighted the Bush Administration's efforts to increase the use of advanced technologies in the Nation's power delivery system equipment, as well as DOE's recent announcement to invest

436

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Natural Gas Annual U.S. Energy Information Administration | Natural Gas Annual Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal Supply Statistics www.eia.gov Natural Gas Annual 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Natural Gas Monthly ii This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or

437

National Telecommunications and Information Administration | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Telecommunications and Information Administration Telecommunications and Information Administration Jump to: navigation, search Logo: National Telecommunications and Information Administration Name National Telecommunications and Information Administration Address 1401 Constitution Avenue, N.W. Place Washington, District of Columbia Zip 20230 Phone number 202-482-2000 Website http://www.ntia.doc.gov/ Coordinates 38.893672°, -77.033665° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.893672,"lon":-77.033665,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

438

Federal Aviation Administration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aviation Administration Aviation Administration Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Federal Aviation Administration Name Federal Aviation Administration Address 800 Independence Ave., SW Place Washington, District of Columbia Zip 20591 Year founded 1958 Website http://www.faa.gov/ Coordinates 38.8872756°, -77.0230138° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8872756,"lon":-77.0230138,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

439

Southwestern Power Administration (WFP) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southwestern Power Administration (WFP) Southwestern Power Administration (WFP) Southwestern Power Administration (WFP) The purpose of the workforce Plan is to provide focus and direction to Human Resources (HR) strategy. This will enable the agency to have the right number of people with the right competencies in the right positions at the right time to successfully achieve agency's business objectives today and in the future. Southwestern Power Administration Responsible Contacts Thomas Wheeler Director, Workforce Analysis & Planning Division E-mail thomas.wheeler@hq.doe.gov Phone (202) 586-8481 More Documents & Publications Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural Resources Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power

440

Electricity Monthly Update - Energy Information Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Administration, Form EIA-923, Power Plant Operations Report Coal stockpiles at electric power plants totaled 136 million tons at the end of October, lower than in recent years for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administration short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Management & Administration Reports | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

July 24, 2009 Audit Letter Report: OAS-L-09-15 Audit of Bonneville Power Administration Fish Hatchery Projects July 24, 2009 Audit Letter Report: OAS-L-09-14 Controls over the U.S....

442

Arizona Administrative Code | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Code Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Arizona Administrative CodeLegal Abstract This website is the table of...

443

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A1. Total energy supply, disposition, and price summary (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Supply, disposition, and prices Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Production Crude oil and lease condensate ............................ 11.59 12.16 15.95 14.50 13.47 13.40 13.12 0.3% Natural gas plant liquids ........................................ 2.78 2.88 4.14 4.20 3.85 3.87 3.89 1.0% Dry natural gas ...................................................... 21.82 23.51 27.19 29.22 30.44 32.04 33.87 1.3% Coal 1 ...................................................................... 22.04 22.21 21.74 22.54 23.25 23.60 23.54 0.2%

444

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

20 20 Reference case Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A3. Energy prices by sector and source (2011 dollars per million Btu, unless otherwise noted) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Propane ................................................................ 27.61 25.06 23.41 24.77 25.73 26.70 27.99 0.4% Distillate fuel oil ..................................................... 21.77 26.38 26.91 29.08 31.26 33.71 36.54 1.1% Natural gas ........................................................... 11.36 10.80 11.78 12.67 13.37 14.60 16.36 1.4% Electricity .............................................................. 34.52 34.34 33.62 33.96 34.56 35.42 37.10 0.3%

445

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Annual Energy Outlook 2007 -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO2007) was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), under the direction of John J. Conti (john.conti@eia.doe.gov, 202-586-2222), Director, Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Paul D. Holtberg (paul.holtberg@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1284), Director, Demand and Integration Division; Joseph A. Beamon (jbeamon@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2025), Director, Coal and Electric Power Division; A. Michael Schaal (michael.schaal@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-5590), Director, Oil and Gas Division; Glen E. Sweetnam (glen.sweetnam@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2188), Director, International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gases Division; and Andy S. Kydes (akydes@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Senior Technical Advisor.

446

US National Nuclear Security Administration NNSA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nuclear Security Administration NNSA Nuclear Security Administration NNSA Jump to: navigation, search Name US National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Place Washington, DC Zip 20585 Product Washington D.C.-based nuclear body established by the United States Congress as a separately organized agency within the US Department of Energy. References US National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. US National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is a company located in Washington, DC . References ↑ "US National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=US_National_Nuclear_Security_Administration_NNSA&oldid=352617

447

Short-Term Effects of Air Pollution on Wheeze in Asthmatic Children in Fresno, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of winter air pollution on respira- tory health of asthmaticChildrens Health Short-Term Effects of Air Pollution onEnvironmental Health Perspectives Effects of air pollution

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Spatiotemporal Model for Short-Term Predictions of Air Pollution Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently, the interest of many environmental agencies is on short-term air pollution predictions referred at high spatial resolution. This ... be informed with visual and easy access to air-quality assessment. We...

Francesca Bruno; Lucia Paci

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

A New Neuro-Based Method for Short Term Load Forecasting of Iran National Power System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a new neuro-based method for short term load forecasting of Iran national power system (INPS). A MultiLayer Perceptron ( ... were selected through a peer investigation on historical data relea...

R. Barzamini; M. B. Menhaj; Sh. Kamalvand

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Short-term irradiance variability: Preliminary estimation of station pair correlation as a function of distance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review Short-term irradiance variability: Preliminary estimation of station pair correlation, 2010; SMUD, 2010; IEA, 2010). In a recently published article, Hoff and Perez (2010a,b) advanced

451

DOE Announces More Key Administration Posts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Key Administration Posts More Key Administration Posts DOE Announces More Key Administration Posts March 20, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Today, President Barack Obama announced his intent to nominate the following individuals to key administration posts: Dr. Steven E. Koonin, Under Secretary for Science, Department of Energy; David Sandalow, Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Affairs, Department of Energy; Ambassador Johnnie Carson, Assistant Secretary for African Affairs, State Department; Kathy Martinez, Assistant Secretary for Disability Employment Policy (ODEP), Department of Labor; Jonathan S. Adelstein, Administrator for the Rural Utilities Service, United States Department of Agriculture; Timothy W. Manning, Deputy Administrator for National Preparedness, FEMA, Department of Homeland Security; and Priscilla

452

Obama Administration Awards More than $119 Million for State Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Obama Administration Awards More than $119 Million for State Energy Obama Administration Awards More than $119 Million for State Energy Programs in Seven States and Territories Obama Administration Awards More than $119 Million for State Energy Programs in Seven States and Territories August 14, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced more than $119 million in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to support energy efficiency and renewable energy projects in Alabama, American Samoa, the District of Columbia, Illinois, Maryland, North Dakota, and Wyoming. Under DOE's State Energy Program, states and territories have proposed statewide plans that prioritize energy savings, create or retain jobs, increase the use of renewable energy, and reduce

453

Western Area Power Administration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Administration Administration Jump to: navigation, search Name Western Area Power Administration Place Colorado Utility Id 27000 Utility Location Yes Ownership F NERC Location WECC, MAPP NERC MRO Yes NERC SPP Yes NERC WECC Yes ISO CA Yes RTO SPP Yes ISO MISO Yes ISO Other Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Schedule R-8 Farm and Home Residential Average Rates Commercial: $0.0278/kWh

454

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Reference case Table A9. Electricity generating capacity (gigawatts) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A9. Electricity generating capacity (gigawatts) Net summer capacity 1 Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Electric power sector 2 Power only 3 Coal ..................................................................... 308.0 309.5 268.7 267.9 267.9 267.9 269.0 -0.5% Oil and natural gas steam 4 .................................. 105.6 101.9 86.4 78.3 69.1 66.6 64.0 -1.6% Combined cycle ................................................... 171.8 179.5 193.2 207.6 238.3 265.8 288.4 1.6% Combustion turbine/diesel ................................... 134.5 136.1 149.9 162.1 177.2 190.2 208.9 1.5%

455

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Reference case Table A21. International liquids supply and disposition summary (continued) (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A21. International liquids supply and disposition summary (continued) (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Supply and disposition Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Selected world liquids production subtotals: Petroleum 6 Crude oil and equivalents 7 .................................. 74.11 74.08 80.28 82.51 85.26 87.59 90.90 0.7% Tight oil ............................................................ 0.82 1.27 3.83 4.52 4.91 5.54 6.10 5.6% Bitumen 8 .......................................................... 1.65 1.74 3.00 3.52 3.95 4.21 4.26 3.1%

456

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Reference case Table A10. Electricity trade (billion kilowatthours, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A10. Electricity trade (billion kilowatthours, unless otherwise noted) Electricity trade Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Interregional electricity trade Gross domestic sales Firm power .......................................................... 237.5 173.8 104.4 47.1 24.2 24.2 24.2 -6.6% Economy ............................................................. 150.1 158.1 162.7 167.5 189.9 186.3 220.2 1.1% Total ................................................................ 387.6 332.0 267.1 214.6 214.1 210.5 244.4 -1.1% Gross domestic sales (million 2011 dollars)

457

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Reference case Table A20. Macroeconomic indicators (billion 2005 chain-weighted dollars, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A20. Macroeconomic indicators (billion 2005 chain-weighted dollars, unless otherwise noted) Indicators Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Real gross domestic product ................................ 13,063 13,299 16,859 18,985 21,355 24,095 27,277 2.5% Components of real gross domestic product Real consumption .................................................. 9,196 9,429 11,528 12,792 14,243 15,941 17,917 2.2% Real investment ..................................................... 1,658 1,744 2,909 3,363 3,914 4,582 5,409 4.0% Real government spending .................................... 2,606

458

About EIA - Organization - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

John Conti, Director of the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting John ContiPrint-friendly PDF John Conti, Director of the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting John ContiPrint-friendly PDF Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis E-mail: john.conti@eia.gov Phone: (202) 586-2222 Fax: (202) 586-3045 Room: 2H-073 Address: U.S. Energy Information Administration 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585 Duties John Conti is the Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis and analyzes energy supply, demand, and prices including the impact of financial markets on energy markets; prepares reports on current and future energy use; analyzes the impact of energy policies; and develops advanced techniques for conducting energy information analyses. John also oversees the planning and execution of EIA's analysis and forecasting programs to ensure that EIA

459

Obama Administration Announces Nearly $40 Million for Energy Efficiency and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Obama Administration Announces Nearly $40 Million for Energy Obama Administration Announces Nearly $40 Million for Energy Efficiency and Conservation Projects in Florida and Maine Obama Administration Announces Nearly $40 Million for Energy Efficiency and Conservation Projects in Florida and Maine November 17, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today that DOE is awarding nearly $40 million in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to Florida and Maine to support clean energy projects. Under DOE's Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) program, these states will implement programs that lower energy use, reduce carbon pollution, and create green jobs locally. "This funding will allow states across the country to make major investments in energy solutions that will strengthen America's economy and

460

SUPPORT ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES FOR THE NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SUPPORT ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES FOR THE NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION B - SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICES/COSTS ........................................................................ 8 B.1 SERVICES BEING ACQUIRED - SUPPORT ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES ................................. 8 B.2 GUARANTEED MINIMUM CONTRACT VALUE - MAXIMUM AVAILABLE PERFORMANCE AWARD FEE ........................................................................................................................................................... 8 B.3 CEILING PRICE OF CONTRACT ............................................................................................................ 8 B.4 ESTIMATED LEVEL OF EFFORT ........................................................................................................... 8

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administration short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011 1 Table C1. Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) Supply, Disposition, and Prices 2009 Projections 2015 2025 2035 Low Oil Price Reference High Oil Price Low Oil Price Reference High Oil Price Low Oil Price Reference High Oil Price Production Crude Oil and Lease Condensate . . . . . . . . . . 11.34 12.35 12.51 12.76 11.19 12.64 15.18 9.32 12.80 15.31 Natural Gas Plant Liquids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.57 2.88 2.86 2.90 3.50 3.55 3.62 3.85 3.92 3.86 Dry Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21.50 23.05 23.01 23.23 24.24 24.60 25.20 26.91 27.00 27.63 Coal 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21.58 20.63 20.94 20.83 23.30 23.64 24.98 23.82 26.01 30.33 Nuclear Power . . . . . . . .

462

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers archived reports Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers archived reports Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers, 2008 (PDF format) Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers, 2007 (PDF format) Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers, 2006 (PDF format) Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers, 2005 (PDF format) Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers, 2004 (PDF format) Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers, 2003 (PDF format) Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers, 2002 (PDF format) Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers, 2001 (PDF format) Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers, 2000 (PDF format) Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers, 1999 (PDF format) Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers, 1998 (PDF format)

463

Daily prediction of short-term trends of crude oil prices using neural networks exploiting multimarket dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper documents a systematic investigation on the predictability of short-term trends of crude oil prices on a daily basis. In stark contrast with longer-term predictions of crude oil prices, short-term pred...

Heping Pan; Imad Haidar; Siddhivinayak Kulkarni

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to provide the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) decision for the fish and wildlife protection by the Council at its October and November meetings, and forwarded to BPA on November 20, 2006. BPA appreciates. In evaluating the Council's project recommendations and making BPA's implementation decision, BPA has endeavored

465

Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accord Funds Dear Mr. Schriever: BPA Power Administration (BPA) received the Idaho Department of Fish-607-00 to the Snake River Sockeye Captive Propagation project 2007-402- 00. BPA acknowledges the change in priorities the Biological Opinion. BPA supports of your request to place priority for use of these funds on the Snake River

466

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- CBECS Survey Background...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

energy; Wind generation; Other Presence of: Passive solar features; Photovoltaic arrays; Geothermal energy; Well water for Cooling ; Wind Generation Not collected Not collected...

467

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

information for that building such as building size, year constructed, type of energy used, energy-using equipment, and conservation features. The smallest level of...

468

Bush Administration Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation Nuclear Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation Nuclear Energy Systems Bush Administration Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation Nuclear Energy Systems February 28, 2005 - 10:33am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC-The Bush Administration today took a major step in advancing international efforts to develop the next generation of clean, safe nuclear energy systems. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman joined representatives from Canada, France, Japan, and the United Kingdom to sign the first multilateral agreement in history aimed at the development of next generation nuclear energy systems. The work of the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) is essential to advancing an important component of the Bush Administration's comprehensive energy strategy in the development of next generation nuclear energy technologies.

469

About EIA - History - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Legislative Timeline Legislative Timeline The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) was created in response to the need for additional Federal initiatives to collect and disseminate energy-related information, and to evaluate and analyze this information. These needs were revealed as the United States sought to respond to the energy crises of the 1970s. The first law to address these needs was the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 and, over the years, many subsequent laws have contributed to EIA's evolution and growth. 1974: Federal Energy Administration (FEA) Act (P.L. 93-275, 15 USC 761) Created the FEA and mandated it to collect, assemble, evaluate, and analyze energy information; provide energy information and projections to the Federal Government, State Governments, and the public; and provide Congress

470

Help Build a Better Energy Information Administration Website | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Help Build a Better Energy Information Administration Website Help Build a Better Energy Information Administration Website Help Build a Better Energy Information Administration Website February 10, 2012 - 1:11pm Addthis Matthew Loveless Matthew Loveless Data Integration Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? Visit EIA's beta site and offer feedback on their new tools. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is launching a beta website that encourages the public, researchers, analysts and others to test and comment on the agency's latest product enhancements, and review other users' comments. This approach allows EIA to "crowd test" innovations before they are introduced on the agency's official website. The first features you can test on the beta site allow you to easily create

471

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Pub  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), which requires the EIA Administrator to prepare annual reports on trends and projections for energy use and supply. Projections by EIA are not...

472

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. U.S. Coal Summary Statistics, 2008 - 2014 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2014 Table ES-1. U.S. Coal Summary...

473

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Sales Price of U.S. Coal by State and Disposition, 2012 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 33. Average Sales...

474

Help Build a Better Energy Information Administration Website | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Help Build a Better Energy Information Administration Website Help Build a Better Energy Information Administration Website Help Build a Better Energy Information Administration Website February 10, 2012 - 1:11pm Addthis Matthew Loveless Matthew Loveless Data Integration Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? Visit EIA's beta site and offer feedback on their new tools. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is launching a beta website that encourages the public, researchers, analysts and others to test and comment on the agency's latest product enhancements, and review other users' comments. This approach allows EIA to "crowd test" innovations before they are introduced on the agency's official website. The first features you can test on the beta site allow you to easily create

475

DOE Announces More Key Administration Posts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Key Administration Posts More Key Administration Posts DOE Announces More Key Administration Posts March 27, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Today, President Barack Obama announced his intent to nominate the following individuals to key administration posts: Ray Mabus, Secretary of the Navy, Department of Defense; Donald Remy, General Counsel of the Army, Department of Defense; J. Randolph Babbitt, Administrator, Federal Aviation Administration; Jose D. Riojas, Assistant Secretary for Operations, Security and Preparedness, Department of Veterans Affairs; John Trasviña, Assistant Secretary for Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity, Department of Housing and Urban Development; Lawrence E. Strickling, Assistant Secretary for Communications and Information, Department of Commerce; and Cathy Zoi, Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and

476

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Reference case Table A19. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by end use (million metric tons) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A19. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by end use (million metric tons) Sector and end use Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Space heating ........................................................ 285.69 274.74 255.95 247.75 241.43 234.50 224.88 -0.7% Space cooling ........................................................ 162.29 158.49 146.49 159.05 173.02 187.28 194.44 0.7% Water heating ........................................................ 159.50 156.30 155.23 157.27 156.47 154.26 153.31 -0.1% Refrigeration .......................................................... 66.67 63.92 58.33 59.80 62.44 65.23 66.18 0.1%

477

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

182 182 Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011 - May 16, 2011 1 Table D1. Key Results for Residential and Commercial Sector Technology Cases Energy Consumption 2009 2015 2025 2010 Technology Reference High Technology Best Available Technology 2010 Technology Reference High Technology Best Available Technology Residential Energy Consumption (quadrillion Btu) Liquefied Petroleum Gases . . . . . . . . 0.53 0.50 0.49 0.48 0.48 0.49 0.48 0.45 0.45 Kerosene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.03 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 Distillate Fuel Oil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.61 0.57 0.56 0.55 0.52 0.48 0.44 0.41 0.37 Liquid Fuels and Other Petroleum 1.16 1.09 1.07 1.05 1.02 0.99 0.94 0.88 0.83 Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.87 5.00 4.94 4.79 4.57 5.23 4.96 4.62 4.18 Coal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.01 0.01

478

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Intensity Intensity Figure DataThe energy intensity of the U.S. economy, measured as primary energy use (in Btu) per dollar of GDP (in 2005 dollars), declines by 40 percent from 2009 to 2035 in the AEO2011 Reference case as the result of a continued shift from energy-intensive manufacturing to services, rising energy prices, and the adoption of policies that promote energy efficiency (Figure 8). The Reference case reflects observed historical relationships between energy prices and energy conservation. To the extent that consumer preferences change over the projection, the improvement in energy intensity or energy consumption per capita could be greater or smaller. Figure DataSince 1992, the energy intensity of the U.S. economy has declined on average by 2 percent per year, in large part because the

479

Short term performance comparisons between a solar thermosyphon water heater and two numerical models  

SciTech Connect

An experimental study of a solar thermosyphon domestic water heater was conducted in the indoor solar simulator facility at Colorado State University (Bickford, 1994). The system consisted of a closed-loop collector circuit filled with propylene glycol and water solution and a horizontal storage tank with an annular tank-in-tank heat exchanger. Short-term irradiated tests with and without timed draws were performed to assess overall performance and monitor collector flow rate, storage tank stratification, and heat exchanger temperature distribution. The measured performance was compared with the ``standard`` thermosyphon model in TRNSYS 13.1 (transient system simulation program). A revised TRNSYS model was developed by Graham Morrison at the University of New South Wales, Australia. The revised model specifically addressed the horizontal tank, closed-loop configuration. The standard TRNSYS version predicted solar gain within 17% of the measured values and differed dramatically from experimental collector temperatures, closed-loop flow rate, and tank stratification. This is not surprising since this model does not include the tank and tank heat exchanger. The revised TRNSYS model agreed more closely with experimental results. It predicted closed-loop flow at 8% lower than observed flow and collector temperature rise that was higher than the observed flow by approximately the same amount, resulting in extremely accurate prediction of collector output energy. Losses from the storage tank and piping were significantly underpredicted in both models, however.

Bickford, C.; Hittle, D.C. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Solar Energy Applications Lab.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

DOE/EIA-0516(85) Energy Information Administration Manufacturing...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6(85) Energy Information Administration Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey: Changes in Energy Efficienc y 1980-198 5 0 6 6 T ' L I A n s n u e r b i r p u T J d J T O J u o i...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "administration short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Obama Administration Awards More than $154 Million for State Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 Million for State Energy 4 Million for State Energy Programs in Four States Obama Administration Awards More than $154 Million for State Energy Programs in Four States June 25, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced more than $154 million in Recovery Act funding to support energy efficiency and renewable energy projects in California, Missouri, New Hampshire and North Carolina. Under DOE's State Energy Program, states have proposed statewide plans that prioritize energy savings, create or retain jobs, increase the use of renewable energy, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This initiative is part of the Obama Administration's national strategy to support job growth, while making a historic down payment on clean energy and conservation.

482

How This Administration's Clean Energy Tax Policies are Improving the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

How This Administration's Clean Energy Tax Policies are Improving How This Administration's Clean Energy Tax Policies are Improving the Markets How This Administration's Clean Energy Tax Policies are Improving the Markets October 19, 2010 - 1:55pm Addthis Cathy Zoi Former Assistant Secretary, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What are the key facts? The 1603 program has provided much needed capital to more than 3,600 renewable energy projects in 46 states, plus the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. A Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory study showed that in 2009, about 60 percent of the content was manufactured in the U.S - up from 25% just a few years ago. Research also found that these investments have put more than 50,000 Americans to work. The 1603 program under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act has been

483

About EIA - Organization - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Stephen Harvey, Director of the Office of Oil and Gas Stephen Harvey Print-friendly PDF Stephen Harvey, Director of the Office of Oil and Gas Stephen Harvey Print-friendly PDF Assistant Administrator for Energy Statistics E-mail: stephen.harvey@eia.gov Phone: (202) 586-6012 Fax: (202) 586-9739 Room: 2G-020 Address: U.S. Energy Information Administration 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585 Duties Stephen Harvey is the Assistant Administrator (AA) for Energy Statistics and is responsible for a wide range of survey, statistical methods, and integration activities related to: energy consumption and efficiency; electricity; nuclear and renewable energy; oil, gas and coal supply; and petroleum and biofuels. The AA for Energy Statistics also manages the EIA data collection program and the quality control for weekly, monthly, quarterly, annual and quadrennial statistical reports.

484

Press Room - Testimony - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Previous Years: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 Previous Years: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 2013 Congressional Testimony U.S. petroleum supply system pdf Subject: EIA, Petroleum Presented by: Adam Sieminski, Administrator Presented to: Committee on Energy and Natural Resources U.S. Senate Washington, DC-July 16, 2013 Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) program pdf Subject: EIA, Renewable, Forecasts Presented by: Adam Sieminski, Administrator Presented to: Subcommittee on Energy and Power Committee on Energy and Commerce U.S. House of Representatives Washington, DC-June 26, 2013 U.S. Energy Outlook pdf Subject: EIA, Energy Markets, Forecasts Presented by: Adam Sieminski, Administrator Presented to: Subcommittee on Energy Committee on Science, Space and Technology

485

Scenarios for a South African CSP Peaking System in the Short Term  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The South African Integrated Resource Plan is a policy document, which by law allocates the energy resources that will be built to meet the future electricity needs of South Africa. The current Integrated Resource Plan indicates the electricity generation types that will be built from 2010 to 2030. It states that most of the future peak load will be met by Open Cycle Gas Turbines which operate using diesel and represents an allocation of 4,930M W. Further, the Integrated Resource Plan does not identify CSP as a potential peaking solution and allocates 1,200M W of capacity to CSP. This represents less than 2% of total capacity in 2030. This paper investigates the feasibility of utilizing CSP Plants as peaking plants in the short to medium term based on a proposition that under certain scenarios, a fleet of unsubsidized CSP peaking plants could drop the LCOE of the current Integrated Resource Plan. This is done by modeling a contemporary CSP tower system with Thermal Energy Storage. The Gemasolar CSP plant is used as the reference plant in order to obtain operating parameters. Our analysis suggests that at current fuels costs, diesel powered Open Cycle Gas Turbines produce electricity in excess of 5.08 ZAR/kWh (?0.63 US$/kWh), significantly above current CSP energy generating costs. This is the context that informed the undertaking of this study, to influence policy and provide technical evidence that CSP can guarantee and deliver energy at competitive costs in the short term. Two alternate scenarios show a lower LCOE for providing peak power. The most promising is a combined distributed CSP system wit h diesel powered Open Cycle Gas Turbine system as backup. The LCOE for this system is 2.78 ZAR (?0.34 $/kWh) or a drop of 45% when no fuel price inflation is considered. This system also increases security of supply due to a lower dependence on fuel prices.

C. Silinga; P. Gauch

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Regional maps Figure F6. Coal supply regions Figure F6. Coal Supply Regions WA ID OR CA NV UT TX OK AR MO LA MS AL GA FL TN SC NC KY VA WV WY CO SD ND MI MN WI IL IN OH MD PA NJ DE CT MA NH VT NY ME RI MT NE IA KS MI AZ NM 500 0 SCALE IN MILES APPALACHIA Northern Appalachia Central Appalachia Southern Appalachia INTERIOR NORTHERN GREAT PLAINS Eastern Interior Western Interior Gulf Lignite Dakota Lignite Western Montana Wyoming, Northern Powder River Basin Wyoming, Southern Powder River Basin Western Wyoming OTHER WEST Rocky Mountain Southwest Northwest KY AK 1000 0 SCALE IN MILES Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office

487

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Buildings sector energy consumption Buildings sector energy consumption Overview The buildings sector represents energy use in places where people reside, work, and buy goods and services. The sector excludes industrial facilities used for producing, processing, or assembling goods. In 2010, the buildings sector accounted for more than one-fifth of total worldwide consumption of delivered energy. While energy consumption increases in all end-use demand sectors, energy use in the buildings sector grows fastest throughout the projection. This growth, along with unprecedented changes in the underlying living standards and economic conditions, will make developments within the buildings sector important in understanding future world energy markets. Figure 97. World buildings sector delivered energy consumption, 2010-2040