Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Review of science issues, deployment strategy, and status for the ARM north slope of Alaska-Adjacent Arctic Ocean climate research site  

SciTech Connect

Recent climate modeling results point to the Arctic as a region that is particularly sensitive to global climate change. The Arctic warming predicted by the models to result from the expected doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide is two to three times the predicted mean global warming, and considerably greater than the warming predicted for the Antarctic. The North Slope of Alaska-Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA-AAO) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is designed to collect data on temperature-ice-albedo and water vapor-cloud-radiation feedbacks, which are believed to be important to the predicted enhanced warming in the Arctic. The most important scientific issues of Arctic, as well as global, significance to be addressed at the NSA-AAO CART site are discussed, and a brief overview of the current approach toward, and status of, site development is provided. ARM radiometric and remote sensing instrumentation is already deployed and taking data in the perennial Arctic ice pack as part of the SHEBA (Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic ocean) experiment. In parallel with ARM`s participation in SHEBA, the NSA-AAO facility near Barrow was formally dedicated on 1 July 1997 and began routine data collection early in 1998. This schedule permits the US Department of Energy`s ARM Program, NASA`s Arctic Cloud program, and the SHEBA program (funded primarily by the National Science Foundation and the Office of Naval Research) to be mutually supportive. In addition, location of the NSA-AAO Barrow facility on National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration land immediately adjacent to its Climate Monitoring and Diagnostic Laboratory Barrow Observatory includes NOAA in this major interagency Arctic collaboration.

Stamnes, K. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Geophysical Inst.; Ellingson, R.G. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Meteorology; Curry, J.A. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Aerospace and Engineering Sciences; Walsh, J.E. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences; Zak, B.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Review of Science Issues, Deployment Strategy, and Status for the ARM North Slope of Alaska–Adjacent Arctic Ocean Climate Research Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent climate modeling results point to the Arctic as a region that is particularly sensitive to global climate change. The Arctic warming predicted by the models to result from the expected doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide is two to three ...

K. Stamnes; R. G. Ellingson; J. A. Curry; J. E. Walsh; B. D. Zak

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Arctic Ocean circulation patterns revealed by GRACE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of ocean bottom pressure (OBP) anomalies from the satellite mission GRACE, complemented by information from two ocean models, are used to investigate the variations and distribution of the Arctic Ocean mass from 2002 through 2011. The ...

Cecilia Peralta-Ferriz; James H. Morison; John M. Wallace; Jennifer A. Bonin; Jinlun Zhang

4

The Arctic and Subarctic Ocean Flux of Potential Vorticity and the Arctic Ocean Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

According to observations, the Arctic Ocean circulation beneath a shallow thermocline can be schematized by cyclonic rim currents along shelves and over ridges. In each deep basin, the circulation is also believed to be cyclonic. This circulation ...

Jiayan Yang

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A summary is presented of the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) project, with a focus on the field experiment that was conducted from October 1997 to October 1998. The primary objective of the field work was to collectocean, ice, ...

Taneil Uttal; Judith A. Curry; Miles G. Mcphee; Donald K. Perovich; Richard E. Moritz; James A. Maslanik; Peter S. Guest; Harry L. Stern; James A. Moore; Rene Turenne; Andreas Heiberg; Mark C. Serreze; Donald P. Wylie; Ola G. Persson; Clayton A. Paulson; Christopher Halle; James H. Morison; Patricia A. Wheeler; Alexander Makshtas; Harold Welch; Matthew D. Shupe; Janet M. Intrieri; Knut Stamnes; Ronald W. Lindsey; Robert Pinkel; W. Scott Pegau; Timothy P. Stanton; Thomas C. Grenfeld

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

The Arctic Ocean Response to the North Atlantic Oscillation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The climatically sensitive zone of the Arctic Ocean lies squarely within the domain of the North Atlantic oscillation (NAO), one of the most robust recurrent modes of atmospheric behavior. However, the specific response of the Arctic to annual ...

R. R. Dickson; T. J. Osborn; J. W. Hurrell; J. Meincke; J. Blindheim; B. Adlandsvik; T. Vinje; G. Alekseev; W. Maslowski

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

AMOC: Acoustic monitoring of the ocean climate of the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of AMOC is to develop and design an acoustic system for long?term monitoring of the ocean temperature and ice thickness in the Arctic Ocean including the Fram Strait

Ola M. Johannessen; AMOC Group

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Intensification of Geostrophic Currents in the Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous sampling of upper-ocean hydrographic data in the Canada Basin from various sources spanning from 2003 through 2011 provides an unprecedented opportunity to observe changes occurring in a major feature of the Arctic Ocean. In a 112-km-...

Miles G. McPhee

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Session Papers North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

over the NSAAAO throughout the year, it is well positioned to address these issues. Ice Phase Clouds Ice phase clouds are important globally, not just regionally. However, at...

10

On the circulation of Atlantic Water in the Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An idealized eddy-resolving numerical model and an analytic three-layer model are used to develop ideas about what controls the circulation of Atlantic Water in the Arctic Ocean. The numerical model is forced with a surface heat flux, uniform ...

Michael A. Spall

11

Arctic Ocean Warming Contributes to Reduced Polar Ice Cap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of modern and historical observations demonstrates that the temperature of the intermediate-depth (150–900 m) Atlantic water (AW) of the Arctic Ocean has increased in recent decades. The AW warming has been uneven in time; a local 1°C ...

Igor V. Polyakov; Leonid A. Timokhov; Vladimir A. Alexeev; Sheldon Bacon; Igor A. Dmitrenko; Louis Fortier; Ivan E. Frolov; Jean-Claude Gascard; Edmond Hansen; Vladimir V. Ivanov; Seymour Laxon; Cecilie Mauritzen; Don Perovich; Koji Shimada; Harper L. Simmons; Vladimir T. Sokolov; Michael Steele; John Toole

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Hafnium isotopes in Arctic Ocean water Bettina Zimmermann a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-GEOMAR, 24148 Kiel, Germany d Laboratory for Isotope Geology, Swedish Museum of Natural History, Box 50007, SEHafnium isotopes in Arctic Ocean water Bettina Zimmermann a , Don Porcelli b,*, Martin Frank c-104 05 Stockholm, Sweden e Department of Geology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202, USA f

Baskaran, Mark

13

The Summer Cyclone Maximum over the Central Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fascinating feature of the northern high-latitude circulation is a prominent summer maximum in cyclone activity over the Arctic Ocean, centered near the North Pole in the long-term mean. This pattern is associated with the influx of lows ...

Mark C. Serreze; Andrew P. Barrett

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Arctic ocean long-term acoustic monitoring : ambient noise, environmental correlates, and transients north of Barrow, Alaska  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ambient Noise in the Arctic Ocean,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am. Vol.for sound speed in the oceans,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am. Vol. 70,Pritchard, R. S. , “Arctic Ocean Background Noise Caused by

Roth, Ethan H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Ocean Heat Transport as a Cause for Model Uncertainty in Projected Arctic Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arctic climate is governed by complex interactions and feedback mechanisms between the atmosphere, ocean, and solar radiation. One of its characteristic features, the Arctic sea ice, is very vulnerable to anthropogenically caused warming. ...

Irina Mahlstein; Reto Knutti

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Preliminary Geospatial Analysis of Arctic Ocean Hydrocarbon Resources  

SciTech Connect

Ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean is predicted to become thinner and to cover less area with time. The combination of more ice-free waters for exploration and navigation, along with increasing demand for hydrocarbons and improvements in technologies for the discovery and exploitation of new hydrocarbon resources have focused attention on the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Basin and its margins. The purpose of this document is to 1) summarize results of a review of published hydrocarbon resources in the Arctic, including both conventional oil and gas and methane hydrates and 2) develop a set of digital maps of the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Ocean. These maps can be combined with predictions of ice-free areas to enable estimates of the likely regions and sequence of hydrocarbon production development in the Arctic. In this report, conventional oil and gas resources are explicitly linked with potential gas hydrate resources. This has not been attempted previously and is particularly powerful as the likelihood of gas production from marine gas hydrates increases. Available or planned infrastructure, such as pipelines, combined with the geospatial distribution of hydrocarbons is a very strong determinant of the temporal-spatial development of Arctic hydrocarbon resources. Significant unknowns decrease the certainty of predictions for development of hydrocarbon resources. These include: 1) Areas in the Russian Arctic that are poorly mapped, 2) Disputed ownership: primarily the Lomonosov Ridge, 3) Lack of detailed information on gas hydrate distribution, and 4) Technical risk associated with the ability to extract methane gas from gas hydrates. Logistics may control areas of exploration more than hydrocarbon potential. Accessibility, established ownership, and leasing of exploration blocks may trump quality of source rock, reservoir, and size of target. With this in mind, the main areas that are likely to be explored first are the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea, in spite of the fact that these areas do not have highest potential for future hydrocarbon reserves. Opportunities for improving the mapping and assessment of Arctic hydrocarbon resources include: 1) Refining hydrocarbon potential on a basin-by-basin basis, 2) Developing more realistic and detailed distribution of gas hydrate, and 3) Assessing the likely future scenarios for development of infrastructure and their interaction with hydrocarbon potential. It would also be useful to develop a more sophisticated approach to merging conventional and gas hydrate resource potential that considers the technical uncertainty associated with exploitation of gas hydrate resources. Taken together, additional work in these areas could significantly improve our understanding of the exploitation of Arctic hydrocarbons as ice-free areas increase in the future.

Long, Philip E.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Sullivan, E. C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bradley, Donald J.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

An Observational Estimate of Volume and Freshwater Flux Leaving the Arctic Ocean through Nares Strait  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arctic Ocean is an important link in the global hydrological cycle, storing freshwater and releasing it to the North Atlantic Ocean in a variable fashion as pack ice and freshened seawater. An unknown fraction of this return flow passes ...

Andreas Münchow; Humfrey Melling; Kelly K. Falkner

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Overview of Arctic Cloud and Radiation Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To provide a background for ARM's activities at the North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean sites, an overview is given of our current state of knowledge of Arctic cloud and radiation properties and processes. The authors describe the Arctic ...

Judith A. Curry; Julie L. Schramm; William B. Rossow; David Randall

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Toward an Explanation of the Annual Cycle of Cloudiness over the Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual cycle of low cloud amount over the Arctic Ocean is examined using climatological data and a radiative-turbulent column model. Three hypotheses for the annual cycle are formulated, compared with climatological data for consistency, and ...

J. A. Beesley; R. E. Moritz

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Surface Albedo over the Arctic Ocean Derived from AVHRR and Its Validation with SHEBA Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented for retrieving the broadband albedo over the Arctic Ocean using advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) data obtained from NOAA polar-orbiting satellites. Visible and near-infrared albedos over snow and ice surfaces ...

Xiaozhen Xiong; Knut Stamnes; Dan Lubin

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Deep-Water Flow over the Lomonosov Ridge in the Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arctic Ocean likely impacts global climate through its effect on the rate of deep-water formation and the subsequent influence on global thermohaline circulation. Here, the renewal of the deep waters in the isolated Canadian Basin is ...

M-L. Timmermans; P. Winsor; J. A. Whitehead

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

The Melting of Ice in the Arctic Ocean: The Influence of Double-Diffusive Transport of Heat from Below  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This investigation was originally prompted by two oceanographic observations: an increased rate of melting of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean, and the advance of an anomalously warm tongue of Atlantic water intruding across the Arctic below the ...

J. S. Turner

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes  

SciTech Connect

Vast quantities of methane are trapped in oceanic hydrate deposits, and there is concern that a rise in the ocean temperature will induce dissociation of these hydrate accumulations, potentially releasing large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. Because methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, such a release could have dramatic climatic consequences. The recent discovery of active methane gas venting along the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) on the shallow continental slope (150 m - 400 m) west of Svalbard suggests that this process may already have begun, but the source of the methane has not yet been determined. This study performs 2-D simulations of hydrate dissociation in conditions representative of the Arctic Ocean margin to assess whether such hydrates could contribute to the observed gas release. The results show that shallow, low-saturation hydrate deposits, if subjected to recently observed or future predicted temperature changes at the seafloor, can release quantities of methane at the magnitudes similar to what has been observed, and that the releases will be localized near the landward limit of the GHSZ. Both gradual and rapid warming is simulated, along with a parametric sensitivity analysis, and localized gas release is observed for most of the cases. These results resemble the recently published observations and strongly suggest that hydrate dissociation and methane release as a result of climate change may be a real phenomenon, that it could occur on decadal timescales, and that it already may be occurring.

Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Projected Impact of Climate Change on the Energy Budget of the Arctic Ocean by a Global Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual energy budget of the Arctic Ocean is characterized by a net heat loss at the air–sea interface that is balanced by oceanic heat transport into the Arctic. Two 150-yr simulations (1950–2099) of a global climate model are used to examine ...

James R. Miller; Gary L. Russell

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Impact of a Reduced Arctic Sea Ice Cover on Ocean and Atmospheric Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arctic sea ice cover declined over the last few decades and reached a record minimum in 2007, with a slight recovery thereafter. Inspired by this the authors investigate the response of atmospheric and oceanic properties to a 1-yr period of ...

Jan Sedlá?ek; Reto Knutti; Olivia Martius; Urs Beyerle

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Ice-Tethered Profiler Measurements of Dissolved Oxygen under Permanent Ice Cover in the Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four ice-tethered profilers (ITPs), deployed between 2006 and 2009, have provided year-round dissolved oxygen (DO) measurements from the surface mixed layer to 760-m depth under the permanent sea ice cover in the Arctic Ocean. These ITPs drifted ...

M.-L. Timmermans; R. Krishfield; S. Laney; J. Toole

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Low-Frequency Variability in the Arctic Atmosphere, Sea Ice, and Upper-Ocean Climate System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The low-frequency natural variability of the arctic climate system is modeled using a single-column, energy balance model of the atmosphere. sea ice, and upper-ocean system. Variability in the system is induced by forcing with realistic, random ...

C. M. Bitz; D. S. Battisti; R. E. Moritz; J. A. Beesley

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Winter convection transports Atlantic Water heat to the surface layer in the eastern Arctic Ocean.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one year (2009–2010) record of temperature and salinity profiles from Ice Tethered Profiler (ITP) buoys in the Eurasian Basin (EB) of the Arctic Ocean is used to quantify the flux of heat from the upper pycnocline to the surface mixed layer. The ...

Igor V. Polyakov; Andrey V. Pnyushkov; Robert Rember; Laurie Padman; Eddy C. Carmack; Jennifer M. Jackson

29

A Numerical Study of Sea Ice and Ocean Circulation in the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sea-ice model based bulk-viscous plastic dynamics and 3-layer thermodynamics is coupled to a multilevel primitive equation model of the Arctic Ocean and Greenland Sea. The combined model is forced by inflow through the Faeroe-Shetland Channel ...

Albert J. Semtner Jr.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

The ocean's role in polar climate change: asymmetric Arctic and Antarctic responses to greenhouse gas and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by order 12% per decade, with smaller reductions in winter. Coupled models suggest that under greenhouse-gasThe ocean's role in polar climate change: asymmetric Arctic and Antarctic responses to greenhouse gas and ozone forcing John Marshall, Kyle Armour, Jeffery Scott and Yavor Kostov (MIT) David Ferreira

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

31

Simulated Arctic Ocean Freshwater Budgets in the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arctic Ocean freshwater budgets in climate model integrations of the twentieth and twenty-first century are examined. An ensemble of six members of the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) is used for the analysis, allowing the ...

Marika M. Holland; Joel Finnis; Mark C. Serreze

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

The distribution of neodymium isotopes in Arctic Ocean basins Don Porcelli a,*, Per S. Andersson b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PR, UK b Laboratory for Isotope Geology, Swedish MuseumThe distribution of neodymium isotopes in Arctic Ocean basins Don Porcelli a,*, Per S. Andersson b of Natural History, Box 50007, SE-104 05 Stockholm, Sweden c Department of Geology, Wayne State University

Baskaran, Mark

33

Winter Convection Transports Atlantic Water Heat to the Surface Layer in the Eastern Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 1-yr (2009/10) record of temperature and salinity profiles from Ice-Tethered Profiler (ITP) buoys in the Eurasian Basin (EB) of the Arctic Ocean is used to quantify the flux of heat from the upper pycnocline to the surface mixed layer. The upper ...

Igor V. Polyakov; Andrey V. Pnyushkov; Robert Rember; Laurie Padman; Eddy C. Carmack; Jennifer M. Jackson

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Late-Twentieth-Century Simulation of Arctic Sea Ice and Ocean Properties in the CCSM4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To establish how well the new Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4) simulates the properties of the Arctic sea ice and ocean, results from six CCSM4 twentieth-century ensemble simulations are compared here with the available data. It ...

Alexandra Jahn; Kara Sterling; Marika M. Holland; Jennifer E. Kay; James A. Maslanik; Cecilia M. Bitz; David A. Bailey; Julienne Stroeve; Elizabeth C. Hunke; William H. Lipscomb; Daniel A. Pollak

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Eddies in the Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean, Observed from Ice-Tethered Profilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five ice-tethered profilers (ITPs), deployed between 2004 and 2006, have provided detailed potential temperature ? and salinity S profiles from 21 anticyclonic eddy encounters in the central Canada Basin of the Arctic Ocean. The 12–35-m-thick ...

M-L. Timmermans; J. Toole; A. Proshutinsky; R. Krishfield; A. Plueddemann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Dynamics in the Deep Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean, Inferred by Thermistor Chain Time Series  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 50-day time series of high-resolution temperature in the deepest layers of the Canada Basin in the Arctic Ocean indicates that the deep Canada Basin is a dynamically active environment, not the quiet, stable basin often assumed. Vertical ...

M-L. Timmermans; H. Melling; L. Rainville

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Evolution of the Deep Water in the Canadian Basin in the Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An overflow of magnitude 0.25 Sv (Sv ? 106 m?3 s?1) has been predicted to enter the Makarov Basin (part of the Canadian Basin in the Arctic Ocean) from the Eurasian Basin via a deep gap in the dividing Lomonosov ridge. The authors argue that this ...

M-L. Timmermans; Chris Garrett

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Evolution of the Arctic Ocean Salinity, 2007–08: Contrast between the Canadian and the Eurasian Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors investigate the variability of salinity in the Arctic Ocean and in the Nordic and Labrador Seas over recent years to see how the freshwater balance in the Arctic and the exchanges with the North Atlantic have been affected by the ...

Camille Lique; Gilles Garric; Anne-Marie Treguier; Bernard Barnier; Nicolas Ferry; Charles-Emmanuel Testut; Fanny Girard-Ardhuin

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

A One-Dimensional Time-Dependent Model for the Vertical Stratification of the Upper Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional time-dependent model of the upper Arctic Ocean is presented. It describes the circulation above a dynamically passive reservoir of Atlantic water. The model is driven by freshwater runoff from land, ice production and export, ...

Göran Björk

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Wind-Driven Variability of the Large-Scale Recirculating Flow in the Nordic Seas and Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The varying depth-integrated currents in the Nordic seas and Arctic Ocean are modeled using an integral equation derived from the shallow-water equations. This equation assumes that mass divergence in the surface Ekman layer is balanced by ...

Pål E. Isachsen; J. H. LaCasce; C. Mauritzen; S. Häkkinen

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Arctic Sea Ice and Freshwater Changes Driven by the Atmospheric Leading Mode in a Coupled Sea Ice–Ocean Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observational and modeling studies have indicated recent large changes of sea ice and hydrographic properties in the Arctic Ocean. However, the observational database is sufficiently sparse that the mechanisms responsible for the recent changes ...

Xiangdong Zhang; Moto Ikeda; John E. Walsh

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Arctic Ocean Radiative Fluxes and Cloud Forcing Estimated from the ISCCP C2 Cloud Dataset, 1983?1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiative fluxes and cloud forcings for the ocean areas of the Arctic are computed from the monthly cloud product of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) for 1983?90. Spatially averaged short-wave fluxes compare well with ...

Axel J. Schweiger; Jeffrey R. Key

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Geochemistry of clathrate-derived methane in Arctic Ocean waters  

SciTech Connect

Alterations to the composition of seawater are estimated for microbial oxidation of methane from large polar clathrate destabilizations, which may arise in the coming century. Gas fluxes are taken from porous flow models of warming Arctic sediment. Plume spread parameters are then used to bracket the volume of dilution. Consumption stoichiometries for the marine methanotrophs are based on growth efficiency and elemental/enzyme composition data. The nutritional demand implied by extra CH{sub 4} removal is compared with supply in various high latitude water masses. For emissions sized to fit the shelf break, reaction potential begins at one hundred micromolar and falls to order ten a thousand kilometers downstream. Oxygen loss and carbon dioxide production are sufficient respectively to hypoxify and acidify poorly ventilated basins. Nitrogen and the monooxygenase transition metals may be depleted in some locations as well. Deprivation is implied relative to existing ecosystems, along with dispersal of the excess dissolved gas. Physical uncertainties are inherent in the clathrate abundance, patch size, outflow buoyancy and mixing rate. Microbial ecology is even less defined but may involve nutrient recycling and anaerobic oxidizers.

Elliott, S.M.; Reagan, M.T.; Moridis, G.J.; Cameron-Smith, P.J.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Bailey, D. A., P. B. Rhines, and S. Hkkinen, 2005: Formation and pathways of North Atlantic Deep Water in a coupled ice-ocean model of the Arctic-North Atlantic Oceans. Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water in a coupled ice-ocean model of the Arctic-North Atlantic Oceans. Climate Dyn., 25, doi:10.1007/s. P. Shen, World Scientific, Singapore, 360pp. Yeh, S.- W., and B. P. Kirtman, 2005: Pacific decadal

45

DOE/EA-1193: Environmental Assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Artic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site (February 1997)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

u. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY u. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT - The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Cloud and Radiation Testbed (ARM/CART), North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean. The purpose of the ARM/CART program is to collect and analyze atmospheric data for the development and validation of global climate change models. The program involves construction of several small facilities and operation of sensing equipment. The EA analyzes the impacts on land use, tundra, air quality, cultura.l resources, socioeconomics, and wildlife. Separate studies (summarized in the EA) were also conducted to ensure that the operation of the facilities would not

46

The dissolved Beryllium isotope composition of the Arctic Ocean M. Frank a,b,*, D. Porcelli c  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dissolved Beryllium isotope composition of the Arctic Ocean M. Frank a,b,*, D. Porcelli c , P Institute of Marine Research, IFM-GEOMAR, Wischhofstrasse 1-3, 24148 Kiel, Germany b Institute for Isotope Geology and Mineral Resources, Department of Earth Sciences, ETH Zurich, CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland c

Baskaran, Mark

47

Distribution and Validation of Cloud Cover Derived from AVHRR Data Over the Arctic Ocean During the SHEBA Year  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Validation of Cloud Cover and Validation of Cloud Cover Derived from AVHRR Data Over the Arctic Ocean During the SHEBA Year P. Minnis National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia D. A. Spangenberg and V. Chakrapani Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia Introduction Determination of cloud radiation interactions over large areas of the Arctic is possible only with the use of data from polar orbiting satellites. Cloud detection using satellite data is difficult in the Arctic due to the minimal contrast between clouds and the underlying snow surface in visible and infrared wavelengths. Polar clouds are frequently warmer or at the same brightness temperature as the background surface, complicating cloud detection. The brightness temperature differences between the

48

Why sequence arctic algae for alternative energy?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

arctic algae for alternative energy? Five different protists representing different algal classes isolated from the Arctic Ocean are being investigated for adaptation to perennial...

49

Microbial and viral genomics of surface ocean communities within the Southern California Bight and adjacent California Current Ecosystem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Williamson, S.J. Single Virus Genomics: A New Tool for VirusMicrobial and viral genomics of surface ocean communitiesa sequencing simulator for genomics and metagenomics. PloS

Zeigler, Lisa Ann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E/497E -Lecture 1 -Woodgate What makes the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"? Decreasing Ice cover Local communities subsistence Arctic Shipping Routes? Oil/Gas Exploration Links INPUTS/OUTPUTS ­ E-P, rivers RIVERS (Russian and US) - order 3000 km3/yr freshwater Evaporation-Precipitation - order 2000 km3/yr freshwater Ice Export through the Fram Strait - equivalent to order 2000 km3/yr

Washington at Seattle, University of

51

Impact of variable atmospheric and oceanic form drag on simulations of Arctic sea ice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over Arctic sea ice, pressure ridges, floe and melt pond edges all introduce discrete obstructions to the flow of air or water past the ice, and are a source of form drag. In current climate models form drag is only accounted for by tuning the air-...

Michel Tsamados; Daniel L. Feltham; David Schroeder; Daniela Flocco; Sinead L. Farrell; Nathan Kurtz; Seymour W. Laxon; Sheldon Bacon

52

The rotation model for the opening of the Canada Basin of the Arctic Ocean pre-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stromatolites, giant wave rip- ples, and decameters of pseudomorphosed former aragonite crystal fans, rests Katakturuk Dolomite, as the Cam- brian Saline River Formation rests on the ca. 723 Ma Natkusiak Formation) away from the Cana- dian Arctic islands about a pole in the Mack- enzie River Delta (Hamilton, 1970

Schrag, Daniel

53

Sensitivity of the Arctic Climate to Leads in a Coupled Atmosphere-Mixed Layer Ocean Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermodynamic sea ice code in a coupled atmosphere-mixed layer ocean GCM has been altered to allow the presence of open water within an ice pack (leads) and a prescribed turbulent oceanic heat flux at the ice bottom. Two experiments with the ...

Stephen J. Vavrus

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the modeling work by Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. to simulate the biochemical effects of of the nutrient-enhanced seawater plumes that are discharged by one or several 100 megawatt OTEC plants. The modeling is needed to properly design OTEC plants that can operate sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. In order to quantify the effect of discharge configuration and phytoplankton response, Makai Ocean Engineering implemented a biological and physical model for the waters surrounding O`ahu, Hawai`i, using the EPA-approved Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). Each EFDC grid cell was approximately 1 square kilometer by 20 meters deep, and used a time step of three hours. The biological model was set up to simulate the biochemical response for three classes of organisms: Picoplankton (< 2 um) such as prochlorococccus, nanoplankton (2-20 um), and microplankton (> 20 um) e.g., diatoms. The dynamic biological phytoplankton model was calibrated using chemical and biological data collected for the Hawaii Ocean Time Series (HOTS) project. Peer review of the biological modeling was performed. The physical oceanography model uses boundary conditions from a surrounding Hawai'i Regional Ocean Model, (ROM) operated by the University of Hawai`i and the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration. The ROM provided tides, basin scale circulation, mesoscale variability, and atmospheric forcing into the edges of the EFDC computational domain. This model is the most accurate and sophisticated Hawai'ian Regional Ocean Model presently available, assimilating real-time oceanographic observations, as well as model calibration based upon temperature, current and salinity data collected during 2010 near the simulated OTEC site. The ROM program manager peer-reviewed Makai's implementation of the ROM output into our EFDC model. The supporting oceanographic data was collected for a Naval Facilities Engineering Command / Makai project. Results: The model was run for a 100 MW OTEC Plant consisting of four separate ducts, discharging a total combined flow rate of 420 m3/s of warm water and 320 m3/s of cold water in a mixed discharge at 70 meters deep. Each duct was assumed to have a discharge port diameter of 10.5m producing a downward discharge velocity of about 2.18 m/s. The natural system, as measured in the HOTS program, has an average concentration of 10-15 mgC/m3. To calibrate the biological model, we first ran the model with no OTEC plant and varied biological parameters until the simulated data was a good match to the HOTS observations. This modeling showed that phytoplankton concentration were patchy and highly dynamic. The patchiness was a good match with the data variability observed within the HOTS data sets. We then ran the model with simulated OTEC intake and discharge flows and associated nutrients. Directly under the OTEC plant, the near-field plume has an average terminal depth of 172 meters, with a volumetric dilution of 13:1. The average terminal plume temperature was 19.8oC. Nitrate concentrations are 1 to 2 umol/kg above ambient. The advecting plume then further dilutes to less than 1 umol/kg above ambient within a few kilometers downstream, while remaining at depth. Because this terminal near-field plume is well below the 1% light limited depths (~120m), no immediate biological utilization of the nutrients occurs. As the nitrate is advected and dispersed downstream, a fraction of the deep ocean nutrients (< 0.5 umol/kg perturbation) mix upward where they are utilized by the ambient phytoplankton population. This occurs approximately twenty-five kilometers downstream from the plant at 110 - 70 meters depth. For pico-phytoplankton, modeling results indicate that this nutrient perturbation causes a phytoplankton perturbation of approximately 1 mgC/m3 (~10% of average ambient concentrations) that covers an area 10x5 km in size at the 70 to 90m depth. Thus, the perturbations are well within the natural variability of the system, generally corresponding to a 10 to 15% increase above the a

PAT GRANDELLI, P.E.; GREG ROCHELEAU; JOHN HAMRICK, Ph.D.; MATT CHURCH, Ph.D.; BRIAN POWELL, Ph.D.

2012-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

55

Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the modeling work by Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. to simulate the biochemical effects of of the nutrient-enhanced seawater plumes that are discharged by one or several 100 megawatt OTEC plants. The modeling is needed to properly design OTEC plants that can operate sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. In order to quantify the effect of discharge configuration and phytoplankton response, Makai Ocean Engineering implemented a biological and physical model for the waters surrounding O`ahu, Hawai`i, using the EPA-approved Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). Each EFDC grid cell was approximately 1 square kilometer by 20 meters deep, and used a time step of three hours. The biological model was set up to simulate the biochemical response for three classes of organisms: Picoplankton ( 20 um) e.g., diatoms. The dynamic biological phytoplankton model was calibrated using chemical and biological data collected for the Hawaii Ocean Time Series (HOTS) project. Peer review of the biological modeling was performed. The physical oceanography model uses boundary conditions from a surrounding Hawai'i Regional Ocean Model, (ROM) operated by the University of Hawai`i and the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration. The ROM provided tides, basin scale circulation, mesoscale variability, and atmospheric forcing into the edges of the EFDC computational domain. This model is the most accurate and sophisticated Hawai'ian Regional Ocean Model presently available, assimilating real-time oceanographic observations, as well as model calibration based upon temperature, current and salinity data collected during 2010 near the simulated OTEC site. The ROM program manager peer-reviewed Makai's implementation of the ROM output into our EFDC model. The supporting oceanographic data was collected for a Naval Facilities Engineering Command / Makai project. Results: The model was run for a 100 MW OTEC Plant consisting of four separate ducts, discharging a total combined flow rate of 420 m3/s of warm water and 320 m3/s of cold water in a mixed discharge at 70 meters deep. Each duct was assumed to have a discharge port diameter of 10.5m producing a downward discharge velocity of about 2.18 m/s. The natural system, as measured in the HOTS program, has an average concentration of 10-15 mgC/m3. To calibrate the biological model, we first ran the model with no OTEC plant and varied biological parameters until the simulated data was a good match to the HOTS observations. This modeling showed that phytoplankton concentration were patchy and highly dynamic. The patchiness was a good match with the data variability observed within the HOTS data sets. We then ran the model with simulated OTEC intake and discharge flows and associated nutrients. Directly under the OTEC plant, the near-field plume has an average terminal depth of 172 meters, with a volumetric dilution of 13:1. The average terminal plume temperature was 19.8oC. Nitrate concentrations are 1 to 2 umol/kg above ambient. The advecting plume then further dilutes to less than 1 umol/kg above ambient within a few kilometers downstream, while remaining at depth. Because this terminal near-field plume is well below the 1% light limited depths (~120m), no immediate biological utilization of the nutrients occurs. As the nitrate is advected and dispersed downstream, a fraction of the deep ocean nutrients (< 0.5 umol/kg perturbation) mix upward where they are utilized by the ambient phytoplankton population. This occurs approximately twenty-five kilometers downstream from the plant at 110 - 70 meters depth. For pico-phytoplankton, modeling results indicate that this nutrient perturbation causes a phytoplankton perturbation of approximately 1 mgC/m3 (~10% of average ambient concentrations) that covers an area 10x5 km in size at the 70 to 90m depth. Thus, the perturbations are well within the natural variability of the system, generally corresponding to a 10 to 15% increase above the a

PAT GRANDELLI, P.E.; GREG ROCHELEAU; JOHN HAMRICK, Ph.D.; MATT CHURCH, Ph.D.; BRIAN POWELL, Ph.D.

2012-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

56

Summertime Low-Level Jets over the High-Latitude Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of a simple analytic boundary layer model developed by Thorpe and Guymer did not produce good agreement with observational data for oceanic low-level jet observations even though this model has worked well for the predictions of ...

Douglas O. ReVelle; E. Douglas Nilsson

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Basalt petrogenesis beneath slow- and ultraslow-spreading Arctic mid-ocean ridges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To explore the ability of melting mafic lithologies to produce alkaline ocean-island basalts (OIB), an experimental study was carried out measuring clinopyroxene (Cpx)melt and garnet (Gt)-melt partition coefficients during ...

Elkins, Lynne J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Uranium-series radionuclide records of paleoceanographic and sedimentary changes in the Arctic Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The radionuclides ²³¹Pa and ²³?Th, produced in the water column and removed from the ocean by particle scavenging and burial in sediments, offer a means for paleoceanographers to examine past dynamics of both water column ...

Hoffmann, Sharon Susanna

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Status of and Outlook for Large-Scale Modeling of Atmosphere–Ice–Ocean Interactions in the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arctic air masses have direct impacts on the weather and climatic extremes of midlatitude areas such as central North America. Arctic physical processes pose special and very important problems for global atmospheric models used for climate ...

David Randall; Judith Curry; David Battisti; Gregory Flato; Robert Grumbine; Sirpa Hakkinen; Doug Martinson; Ruth Preller; John Walsh; John Weatherly

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Assessment of Aerosol Radiative Impact over Oceanic Regions Adjacent to Indian Subcontinent using Multi-Satellite Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Using data from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments, we have retrieved regional distribution of aerosol column single scattering albedo (parameter indicative of the relative dominance of aerosol absorption and scattering effects), a most important, but least understood aerosol property in assessing its climate impact. Consequently we provide improved assessment of short wave aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) (on both regional and seasonal scales) estimates over this region. Large gradients in north-south ARF were observed as a consequence of gradients in single scattering albedo as well as aerosol optical depth. The highest ARF (-37 W m-2 at the surface) was observed over the northern Arabian Sea during June to August period (JJA). In general, ARF was higher over northern Bay of Bengal (NBoB) during winter and pre-monsoon period, whereas the ARF was higher over northern Arabian Sea (NAS) during the monsoon and post- monsoon period. The largest forcing observed over NAS during JJA is the consequence of large amounts of desert dust transported from the west Asian dust sources. High as well as seasonally invariant aerosol single scattering albedos (~0.98) were observed over the southern Indian Ocean region far from continents. The ARF estimates based on direct measurements made at a remote island location, Minicoy (8.3°N, 73°E) in the southern Arabian Sea are in good agreement with the estimates made following multisatellite analysis.

Satheesh, S. K.; Vinoj, V.; Krishnamoorthy, K.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The Seasonal Variability of the Arctic Ocean Ekman Transport and Its Role in the Mixed Layer Heat and Salt Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oceanic Ekman transport and pumping are among the most important parameters in studying the ocean general circulation and its variability. Upwelling due to the Ekman transport divergence has been identified as a leading mechanism for the ...

Jiayan Yang

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Brine-Driven Eddies under Sea Ice Leads and Their Impact on the Arctic Ocean Mixed Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eddy generation induced by a line-shaped salt flux under a sea ice lead and associated salt transport are investigated using a three-dimensional numerical model. The model is designed to represent a typical condition for the wintertime Arctic ...

Yoshimasa Matsumura; Hiroyasu Hasumi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Source and Pathway of the Western Arctic Upper Halocline in a Data-Constrained Coupled Ocean and Sea Ice Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A coupled ocean and sea ice model is used to investigate dense water (DW) formation in the Chukchi and Bering shelves and the pathways by which this water feeds the upper halocline. Two 1992–2008 data-constrained solutions ...

Nguyen, An T.

64

A Model for the Thickness and Salinity of the Upper Layer in the Arctic Ocean and the Relationship between the Ice Thickness and Some External Parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a dynamical model for the salinity and thickness of the upper layer in the Arctic. The parameters are the river runoff to the Arctic, the buoyancy supply through the Bering Strait, the export of ice from the Arctic and a ...

Anders Stigebrandt

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Development of a Regional Climate Model of the Western Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Arctic region climate system model has been developed to simulate coupled interactions among the atmosphere, sea ice, ocean, and land surface of the western Arctic. The atmospheric formulation is based upon the NCAR regional climate model ...

Amanda H. Lynch; William L. Chapman; John E. Walsh; Gunter Weller

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

The Sensitivity of the Arctic Ocean Sea Ice Thickness and Its Dependence on the Surface Albedo Parameterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the response of sea ice thickness to changes in the external forcing is investigated and particularly how this response depends on the surface albedo formulation by means of a one-dimensional coupled ocean–ice–atmosphere model. The ...

Göran Björk; Christian Stranne; Karin Borenäs

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Source and Pathway of the Western Arctic Upper Halocline in a Data-Constrained Coupled Ocean and Sea Ice Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled ocean and sea ice model is used to investigate dense water (DW) formation in the Chukchi and Bering shelves and the pathways by which this water feeds the upper halocline. Two 1992–2008 data-constrained solutions at 9- and 4-km ...

An T. Nguyen; Ronald Kwok; Dimitris Menemenlis

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Consequences of the Large-Scale Subsidence Rate on the Stably Stratified Atmospheric Boundary Layer Over the Arctic Ocean, as seen in Large-Eddy Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis of surface heat fluxes and sounding profiles from SHEBA indicated possible significant effects of subsidence on the structure of stably-stratified ABLs (Mirocha et al. 2005). In this study the influence of the large-scale subsidence rate on the stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over the Arctic Ocean during clear sky, winter conditions is investigated using a large-eddy simulation model. Simulations are conducted while varying the subsidence rate between 0, 0.001 and 0.002 ms{sup -1}, and the resulting quasi-equilibrium ABL structure and evolution are examined. Simulations conducted without subsidence yield ABLs that are deeper, more strongly mixed, and cool much more rapidly than were observed. The addition of a small subsidence rate significantly improves agreement between the simulations and observations regarding the ABL height, potential temperature profiles and bulk heating rates. Subsidence likewise alters the shapes of the surface-layer flux, stress and shear profiles, resulting in increased vertical transport of heat while decreasing vertical momentum transport. A brief discussion of the relevance of these results to parameterization of the stable ABL under subsiding conditions in large-scale numerical weather and climate prediction models is presented.

Mirocha, J D; Kosovic, B

2006-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

69

Stable isotopes in benthic foraminiferal calcite from a river-influenced Arctic marine environment, Kara and Pechora Seas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the World Ocean [e.g., Aagard and Car- mack, 1994]. During glacial periods, the Arctic hydro- graphic

Howat, Ian M.

70

Arctic ice islands  

SciTech Connect

The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Recovery mechanisms of Arctic summer sea ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] We examine the recovery of Arctic sea ice from prescribed ice?free summer conditions in simulations of 21st century climate in an atmosphere–ocean general circulation model. We find that ice extent recovers typically within two years. The excess oceanic heat that had built up during the ice?free summer is rapidly returned to the atmosphere during the following autumn and winter, and then leaves the Arctic partly through increased longwave emission at the top of the atmosphere and partly through reduced atmospheric heat advection from lower latitudes. Oceanic heat transport does not contribute significantly to the loss of the excess heat. Our results suggest that anomalous loss of Arctic sea ice during asinglesummerisreversible,astheice–albedo feedback is alleviated by large?scale recovery mechanisms. Hence, hysteretic threshold behavior (or a “tipping point”) is unlikely to occur during the decline of Arctic summer sea?

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Latitudinal distribution of the recent Arctic warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing Arctic temperature, disappearance of Arctic sea ice, melting of the Greenland ice sheet, sea level rise, increasing strength of Atlantic hurricanes are these impending climate catastrophes supported by observations? Are the recent data really unprecedented during the observational records? Our analysis of Arctic temperature records shows that the Arctic and temperatures in the 1930s and 1940s were almost as high as they are today. We argue that the current warming of the Arctic region is affected more by the multi-decadal climate variability than by an increasing concentration of carbon dioxide. Unfortunately, none of the existing coupled Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models used in the IPCC 2007 cIimate change assessment is able to reproduce neither the observed 20th century Arctic cIimate variability nor the latitudinal distribution of the warming.

Chylek, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lesins, Glen K [DALLHOUSIE UNIV.; Wang, Muyin [UNIV OF WASHINGTON

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

73

Observations of Thermohaline Convection adjacent to Brunt Ice Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations were made of ocean microstructure and horizontal currents adjacent to Brunt Ice Shelf in the southeastern Weddell Sea. Periods of in situ supercooled water extending as deep as 65 m were associated with ice nucleation and frazil ...

Ilker Fer; Keith Makinson; Keith W. Nicholls

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Arctic Sea ice model sensitivities.  

SciTech Connect

Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and, due to feedback effects, the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice state to internal model parameters. A new sea ice model that holds some promise for improving sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of this MPM sea ice code and compare it with the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness,and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana Stefanova

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Arctic house  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently available housing in the Arctic is limited to solutions that have been adapted from designs for less severe climates. This thesis has developed a new manner of residential construction designed specifically for ...

Turkel, Joel A. (Joel Abram), 1969-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

The Influence of Local Feedbacks and Northward Heat Transport on the Equilibrium Arctic Climate Response to Increased Greenhouse Gas Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study uses coupled climate model experiments to identify the influence of atmospheric physics [Community Atmosphere Model, versions 4 and 5 (CAM4; CAM5)] and ocean model complexity (slab ocean, full-depth ocean) on the equilibrium Arctic ...

Jennifer E. Kay; Marika M. Holland; Cecilia M. Bitz; Edward Blanchard-Wrigglesworth; Andrew Gettelman; Andrew Conley; David Bailey

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

How Well Do Regional Climate Models Reproduce Radiation and Clouds in the Arctic? An Evaluation of ARCMIP Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Downwelling radiation in six regional models from the Arctic Regional Climate Model Intercomparison (ARCMIP) project is systematically biased negative in comparison with observations from the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) ...

Michael Tjernström; Joseph Sedlar; Matthew D. Shupe

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Simulated Response of the Arctic Freshwater Budget to Extreme NAO Wind Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors investigate the response of the Arctic Ocean freshwater budget to changes in the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) using a regional-ocean configuration of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology GCM (MITgcm) and carry out several ...

Alan Condron; Peter Winsor; Chris Hill; Dimitris Menemenlis

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Near-Inertial Wave Propagation in the Western Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From October 1997 through October 1998, the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) ice camp drifted across the western Arctic Ocean, from the central Canada Basin over the Northwind Ridge and across the Chukchi Cap. During much of this period, ...

Robert Pinkel

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Arctic Precipitation and Evaporation: Model Results and Observational Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observational estimates of precipitation and evaporation over the Arctic Ocean and its terrestrial watersheds are compared with corresponding values from the climate model simulations of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP). ...

John E. Walsh; Vladimir Kattsov; Diane Portis; Valentin Meleshko

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Improved global bathymetry, global sea floor roughness, and deep ocean mixing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans (GEBCO) Hom. http://Chart of the Arctic Ocean (IBCAO). http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/in the South Atlantic ocean, Tectonophysics, 210, 235-253.

Becker, Joseph Jeffrey

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Improved Global Bathymetry, Global Sea Floor Roughness, and Deep Ocean Mixing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans (GEBCO) Hom. http://Chart of the Arctic Ocean (IBCAO). http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/in the South Atlantic ocean, Tectonophysics, 210, 235-253.

Becker, Joseph J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Generation and Separation of Mesoscale Eddies from Surface Ocean Fronts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study is motivated by Arctic Ocean observations of sub-mixed layer eddies found at large distances from their assumed formation region of a surface ocean front. We explore eddy formation through high resolution numerical simulations of ...

Georgy E. Manucharyan; Mary-Louise Timmermans

84

The FGGE Arctic Data Buoy Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An array of about 20 drifting data buoys was established in the Arctic Ocean during the early months of 1979. The position of each buoy and the surface pressure and temperature are measured several times daily. The program expands our capability ...

A. S. Thorndike

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

The Arctic Haze Phenomenon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The arctic atmosphere is the repository for surprisingly high concentrations of pollutants throughout the winter months. The polluted air mass in question includes virtually all the atmosphere above the Arctic Circle and also two great lobes that ...

Glenn E. Shaw

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate Speaker(s): Matthew T. Reagan Date: March 17, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane may have had a significant role in regulating past climate. However, the behavior of contemporary permafrost deposits and oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those now occurring in the arctic and those predicted under future climate change scenarios, has only recently been investigated. A recent expedition to the west coast of Spitsbergen discovered substantial methane gas plumes exiting the seafloor at depths that correspond to the upper limit of the receding gas hydrate stability zone. It has been suggested that these plumes may be the

87

The Role of Ice–Ocean Interactions in the Variability of the North Atlantic Thermohaline Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The simulated influence of Arctic sea ice on the variability of the North Atlantic climate is discussed in the context of a global coupled ice–ocean–atmosphere model. This coupled system incorporates a general circulation ocean model, an ...

Marika M. Holland; Cecilia M. Bitz; Michael Eby; Andrew J. Weaver

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Impact of Daily Arctic Sea Ice Variability in CAM3.0 during Fall and Winter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate projections suggest that an ice-free summer Arctic Ocean is possible within several decades and with this comes the prospect of increased ship traffic and safety concerns. The daily sea ice concentration tendency in five Coupled Model ...

Dyre O. Dammann; Uma S. Bhatt; Peter L. Langen; Jeremy R. Krieger; Xiangdong Zhang

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Sensitivity of Arctic Climate Variability to Mean State: Insights from the Cretaceous  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates Arctic climate variability during a period of extreme warmth using the Community Climate System Model, version 3 (CCSM3) coupled ocean–atmosphere general circulation model. Four mid-Cretaceous simulations were completed ...

Christopher J. Poulsen; Jing Zhou

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Influence of Humidified Aerosol on Lidar Depolarization Measurements below Ice-Precipitating Arctic Stratus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lidar measurements obtained during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) experiment under a mixed-phase stratus cloud that was lightly precipitating ice show a range of surprisingly low depolarization ratios (4%–23%), despite an ...

Bastiaan van Diedenhoven; Ann M. Fridlind; Andrew S. Ackerman

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

NETL: Arctic Energy Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Arctic Energy Office image showing Alaska landscape Alaska North Slope Resources Alaska Unconventional Resources ChallengesShortages AEO Program Fact Sheet Alaskas fossil...

92

Simulation of the Seasonal Cycle of the Tropical Pacific Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a general circulation model of the tropical Pacific Ocean forced with climatological seasonally varying winds, equatorial upwelling and downwelling in adjacent latitudes play central roles in closing the oceanic circulation. The transport of ...

S. G. H. Philander; W. J. Hurlin; A. D. Seigel

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Nighttime Cloud Detection Over the Arctic Using AVHRR Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Detection Over the Arctic Cloud Detection Over the Arctic Using AVHRR Data D. A. Spangenberg, D. R. Doelling, and V. Chakrapani Analytical Services & Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis National Aeronautics and Space Administration Hampton, Virginia T. Uttal National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder, Colorado Introduction Clouds play an important role in the Arctic energy budget. The magnitude and significance of the radiative impact of polar clouds, however, are not well known. Polar nocturnal clouds are often warmer or at the same temperature as the background snow surface, complicating cloud detection. Also, these clouds tend to be thin, with lower emittances than clouds occurring during the summer. Using only the infrared (IR) channels of satellite data to characterize cloud amount and distribution in the Arctic is

94

Intercomparison of Bulk Cloud Microphysics Schemes in Mesoscale Simulations of Springtime Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratiform Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A persistent, weakly forced, horizontally extensive mixed-phase boundary layer cloud observed on 4–5 May 1998 during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA)/First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Regional ...

H. Morrison; J. O. Pinto

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Atmospheric Radon Measurements in the Arctic; Fronts, Seasonal Observations, and Transport of Continental Air to Polar Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radon was determined in the atmosphere over the Arctic Ocean in flights of a United States Naval Research Laboratory aircraft in April and May 1974. Simultaneously collected air samples were analyzed for carbon monoxide, methane, ...

P. E. Wilkniss; R. E. Larson

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Arctic Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Arctic Solar Place G"LLIVARE, Sweden Zip SE- 98228 Product manufacturers of PV modules References Arctic Solar1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

97

Arctic Sea Ice Retreat in 2007 Follows Thinning Trend  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The minimum of Arctic sea ice extent in the summer of 2007 was unprecedented in the historical record. A coupled ice–ocean model is used to determine the state of the ice and ocean over the past 29 yr to investigate the causes of this ice extent minimum within a historical perspective. It is found that even though the 2007 ice extent was strongly anomalous, the loss in total ice mass was not. Rather, the 2007 ice mass loss is largely consistent with a steady decrease in ice thickness that began in 1987. Since then, the simulated mean September ice thickness within the Arctic Ocean has declined from 3.7 to 2.6 m at a rate of ?0.57 m decade ?1. Both the area coverage of thin ice at the beginning of the melt season and the total volume of ice lost in the summer have been steadily increasing. The combined impact of these two trends caused a large reduction in the September mean ice concentration in the Arctic Ocean. This created conditions during the summer of 2007 that allowed persistent winds to push the remaining ice from the Pacific side to the Atlantic side of the basin and more than usual into the Greenland Sea. This exposed large areas of open water, resulting in the record ice extent anomaly. 1.

R. W. Lindsay; J. Zhang; A. Schweiger; M. Steele; H. Stern

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

CONTENTS Developing Alaskan Arctic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing Alaskan Arctic Developing Alaskan Arctic Potential ...........................................1 Commentary ...................................2 NETL Develops Strategic Partnership with the Alaska Center for Energy and Power ...8 Deepwater and Ultra-Deepwater Produced Water Discharge ....10 Intelligent Production System for Ultra Deepwater with Short Hop Wireless Power and Wireless Data Transfer .........................................16 Snapshots ......................................19 CONTACTS Roy Long Technology Manager Ultra-Deepwater/Offshore 304-285-4479 roy.long@netl.doe.gov Ray Boswell Technology Manager Natural Gas Technology R&D 412-386-7614 ray.boswell@netl.doe.gov Eric Smistad Technology Manager Oil Technology R&D 281-494-2619 eric.smistad@netl.doe.gov

99

The 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2004 North Slope of Alaska 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment E. R. Westwater, M. A. Klein, and V. Leuski Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado A. J. Gasiewski, T. Uttal, and D. A. Hazen National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado D. Cimini Remote Sensing Division, CETEMPS Universita' dell'Aquila L'Aquila, Italy V. Mattioli Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettronica e dell'Informazione Perugia, Italy B. L. Weber and S. Dowlatshahi Science Technology Corporation Boulder, Colorado J. A. Shaw Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

100

Plant roots in arctic tundra  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

A synthesis of the available literature on tundra root distribution and dynamics, and their role in key ecosystem processes in the Arctic.

Colleen Iversen, Victoria Sloan, Paddy Sullivan, Eugenie Euskirchen, Dave McGuire, Richard Norby, Anthony Walker, Jeff Warren, Stan Wullschleger,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

NETL: Arctic Energy Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facts/Issues Facts/Issues Average South-Central natural gas consumption in 2005 was: 13.9% gas utility 20.0% power generation 54.3% industrial-LNG sales, oil refining, and fertilizer manufacturing 7.2% field operations 4.6% other Due to a lack of natural gas deliverability, the Cook Inlet fertilizer plant terminated operations in May 2008. LNG sales are increasingly curtailed during cold weather due to peak demand shortages. The LNG export license is up for renewal in 2011. Exploration must find new reserves on the order of 500 Bcf, and that will only solve the natural gas shortage until approximately 2019. Challenges Natural gas in the Arctic, until recently, has been largely overlooked. Little is known about the possible breadth of the Arctic storehouse of natural gas apart from the resource associated with the currently producing

102

Arctic Energy Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

O O G R A M FAC T S Strategic Center for Natural Gas & Oil CONTACTS Joel Lindstrom Arctic Energy Office National Energy Technology Laboratory 420 L Street, Suite 305 Anchorage, Alaska 99501 907-271-3618 joel.lindstrom@contr.netl.doe.gov Albert B. Yost II Sr. Management Technical Advisor Strategic Center for Natural Gas & Oil National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4479 albert.yost@netl.doe.gov

103

A 20-Year Dataset of Downwelling Longwave Flux at the Arctic Surface from TOVS Satellite Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20-Year Dataset of Downwelling Longwave Flux 20-Year Dataset of Downwelling Longwave Flux at the Arctic Surface from TOVS Satellite Data J. Francis Rutgers University New Brunswick, New Jersey A. Schweiger Polar Science Center University of Washington Seattle, Washington J. Key National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service Madison, Wisconsin Introduction This paper summarizes the progress of a study under way to generate a 20-year dataset of surface downwelling longwave flux (DLF) retrievals from satellite data over the Arctic Ocean. We will produce daily fields between late 1979 and late 1998 on a grid with a spatial resolution of 100 km x 100 km 2 north of 60°N. Surface measurements from the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) and the

104

Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic Using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate Model  

SciTech Connect

The primary research task completed for this project was the development of the Regional Arctic Climate Model (RACM). This involved coupling existing atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land models using the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) coupler (CPL7). RACM is based on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model, the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) ocean model, the CICE sea ice model, and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land model. A secondary research task for this project was testing and evaluation of WRF for climate-scale simulations on the large pan-Arctic model domain used in RACM. This involved identification of a preferred set of model physical parameterizations for use in our coupled RACM simulations and documenting any atmospheric biases present in RACM.

Cassano, John [Principal Investigator

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

105

Sensitivity of Arctic Climate Variability to Mean State: Insights from the Cretaceous  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates Arctic climate variability during a period of extreme warmth using the CCSM3 coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model. Four mid-Cretaceous simulations were completed with different CO2 levels (1x, 10x, and 16x pre-...

Christopher J. Poulsen; Jing Zhou

106

Comparison of Arctic Climate Simulations by Uncoupled and Coupled Global Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations of present-day Arctic climate are assessed from suites of 1) 13 global atmosphere-only models from the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP-II) and 2) 8 coupled atmosphere–ocean–ice models from the Data Distribution Center ...

John E. Walsh; Vladimir M. Kattsov; William L. Chapman; Veronika Govorkova; Tatyana Pavlova

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Nonlinear threshold behavior during the loss of Arctic sea ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In light of the rapid recent retreat of Arctic sea ice, a number of studies have discussed the possibility of a critical threshold (or "tipping point") beyond which the ice-albedo feedback causes the ice cover to melt away in an irreversible process. The focus has typically been centered on the annual minimum (September) ice cover, which is often seen as particularly susceptible to destabilization by the ice-albedo feedback. Here we examine the central physical processes associated with the transition from ice-covered to ice-free Arctic Ocean conditions. We show that while the ice-albedo feedback promotes the existence of multiple ice cover states, the stabilizing thermodynamic effects of sea ice mitigate this when the Arctic Ocean is ice-covered during a sufficiently large fraction of the year. These results suggest that critical threshold behavior is unlikely during the approach from current perennial sea ice conditions to seasonally ice-free conditions. In a further warmed climate, however, we find that a ...

Eisenman, I; 10.1073/pnas.0806887106

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Ocean Terracing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Artworks can improve humanity ability to apply macro-engineering principles which skirt or correct oceanographic problems impairing the economic usefulness of coastal land, the overhead airshed, and seawater temperature and salinity stability. A new form of Art, Ocean Art, is here proposed which centers on deliberate terracing of appropriate regions of our world ocean; a proposed example of macro-engineered useful Ocean Art is the technically possible 21-st Century terracing of the Mediterranean Sea. Ocean Art is applicable worldwide to places that might be practically improved by its judicious employment. Such Ocean Art may constitute an entirely unique category of solutions to coastal disaster prevention planning.

Richard Cathcart; Alexander Bolonkin

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

109

Predictions and Studies with a One-Dimensional Ice–Ocean Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled one-dimensional ice-ocean model is used for studies of Arctic phenomena. The ice-snow system is represented by the simplified thermodynamic ice model of Semtner and a dynamic approximation that neglects the internal stresses. The ocean ...

Shelley H. Riedlinger; Alex Warn-Varnas

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Development, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty quantification of high-fidelity arctic sea ice models.  

SciTech Connect

Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and due to feedback effects the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice to model physical parameters. A new sea ice model that has the potential to improve sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code and the MPM sea ice code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness, and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana S.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Springtime Visibility in the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the Ptarmigan flights in the 1950s, the springtime visibility reduction in the Arctic has been identified with pollution aerosol. However, observed values of the dry aerosol extinction coefficient are too small to explain the observed ...

F. G. Meyer; J. A. Curry; C. A. Brock; L. F. Radke

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Synoptically Driven Arctic Winter States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dense network of the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) observations is used to assess relationships between winter surface and atmospheric variables as the SHEBA site came under the influence of cyclonic and anticyclonic atmospheric ...

Kirstie Stramler; Anthony D. Del Genio; William B. Rossow

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Atmospheric and Oceanic Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction It is widely recognized that internal tides have strong influence on the global thermohaline circulation, because it contribute significantly to deep ocean mixing, the essential process for the maintenance of the thermohaline circulation [Munk and Wunsch, 1998]. Internal tides generated by strong tide-topography interactions occasionally break causing intense turbulent mixing [Lien and Gregg, 2001]. Turbulent mixing may also be induced far from wave generation sites, because propagating internal tides can nonlinearly interact with the background internal waves and cascade part of their energy down to small scales where breaking can occur. The East China Sea and adjacent seas are one of the most important generation regions of internal tides, and hence the associated turbulent mixing. Indeed, using a two-dimensional analytical model, Baines [1982] predicted that the continental shelf slope in the East China Sea is the second largest generator of the M 2 internal tide amon

Niwa; Group Representative

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Properties of the Arctic 2-Meter Air Temperature Field for 1979 to the Present Derived from a New Gridded Dataset  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the behavior of the Arctic Ocean surface air temperature field for 1979–93. Temperatures are derived from a new gridded 6-h, 2-m air temperature dataset called POLES. These gridded air temperatures are estimated from optimal ...

Seelye Martin; Esther A. Munoz

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Geochemistry of clathrate-derived methane in Arctic Ocean waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

venting in the eastern Aleutian subduction zone, J. Geophys.Pacific North Pacific Aleutians Bear Island Hakon Mosby

Elliott, S.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

ARM - Field Campaign - Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

g-meter, the Pilewskie Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR), the NASA-GoddardU. of Wash. Spectral Scanning Radiometer, and the SPEC Inc. Cloud Particle Imager. This was the...

117

Seismicity in Azerbaijan and Adjacent Caspian Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

So far no general view on the geodynamic evolution of the Black Sea to the Caspian Sea region is elaborated. This is associated with the geological and structural complexities of the region revealed by geophysical, geochemical, petrologic, structural, and other studies. A clash of opinions on geodynamic conditions of the Caucasus region, sometimes mutually exclusive, can be explained by a simplified interpretation of the seismic data. In this paper I analyze available data on earthquake occurrences in Azerbaijan and the adjacent Caspian Sea region. The results of the analysis of macroseismic and instrumental data, seismic regime, and earthquake reoccurrence indicate that a level of seismicity in the region is moderate, and seismic event are concentrated in the shallow part of the lithosphere. Seismicity is mostly intra-plate, and spatial distribution of earthquake epicenters does not correlate with the plate boundaries.

Panahi, Behrouz M. [Geology Institute, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, 29-A H. Javid Ave., Baku 1143 (Azerbaijan)

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

118

Ocean Datasets | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Datasets Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Ocean, Coast, and Great Lakes Planning...

119

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site http:energy.govnepadownloads...

120

Alaska | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Measurement (ARM) Program North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site May 1, 1994 EIS-0186: Mitigation Action Plan Alaska...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

North Slope of Alaska ARM Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Emergency Response Plan June 2010 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility North Slope of AlaskaAdjacent Arctic Ocean Emergency Response Plan Purpose The...

122

The Necklace around the Arctic Arctic indigenous peoples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

national choir). #12;The economies of the Arctic settlements invariably involve fish, oil or gas: natural in the 1002 area. This work was undertaken by a private exploration firm and funded by a group of oil exploration apparently began abruptly in A.D. 793 with an attack on Lindesfarne, an island off the NE

123

Makai Ocean Engineering Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Makai Ocean Engineering Inc Makai Ocean Engineering Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Makai Ocean Engineering Inc Address PO Box 1206 Place Kailua Zip 96734-1206 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Year founded 1973 Number of employees 28 Phone number 808.259.8871 Website http://www.makai.com Region United States LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Deep Water Pipelines This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it.

124

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity.

125

Short-Term Climatic Variability of the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The circulation of the Arctic atmosphere undergoes large fluctuations about its monthly and annual means. The statistics of Arctic sea level pressure and temperature are evaluated in order to place Arctic atmospheric variability into the context ...

John E. Walsh; William L. Chapman

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

European Geosciences Union Ocean Science Formulation of an ocean model for global climate simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. This paper summarizes the formulation of the ocean component to the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory’s (GFDL) climate model used for the 4th IPCC Assessment (AR4) of global climate change. In particular, it reviews the numerical schemes and physical parameterizations that make up an ocean climate model and how these schemes are pieced together for use in a state-of-the-art climate model. Features of the model described here include the following: (1) tripolar grid to resolve the Arctic Ocean without polar filtering, (2) partial bottom step representation of topography to better represent topographically influenced advective and wave processes, (3) more accurate equation of state, (4) three-dimensional flux limited tracer advection to reduce overshoots and undershoots, (5) incorporation of regional climatological variability in shortwave penetration,

B. L. Samuels; M. J. Spelman; M. Winton; R. Zhang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1. Overview of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Background. The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) 1002 Area of the Alaska North Slope represents an area ...

128

The ecology of Arctic cod (Boreogadus saida) and interactions with seabirds, seals, and whales in the Canadian Arctic.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis investigates the foraging of Arctic cod (Boreogadus saida) and its predators during the summer in the Canadian Arctic. Findings included the identification of… (more)

Matley, Jordan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Ocean Map | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Map Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Map Gallery Planning for ocean, coastal, and Great...

130

8, 1175511819, 2008 mixed-phase Arctic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of25 supercooled water in both saturatedACPD 8, 11755­11819, 2008 Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds I. Sednev et al. Title Page.0 License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

131

Arctic Inversion Strength in Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent work indicates that climate models have a positive bias in the strength of the wintertime low-level temperature inversion over the high-latitude Northern Hemisphere. It has been argued this bias leads to underestimates of the Arctic’s ...

Brian Medeiros; Clara Deser; Robert A. Tomas; Jennifer E. Kay

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

A 20-year data set of surface longwave fluxes in the Arctic  

SciTech Connect

Creation of 20-year data set of surface infrared fluxes from satellite measurements. A reliable estimate of the surface downwelling longwave radiation flux (DLF) is a glaring void in available forcing data sets for models of Arctic sea ice and ocean circulation. We have developed a new method to estimate the DLF from a combination of satellite sounder retrievals and brightness temperatures from the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS), which has flown on NOAA polar-orbiting satellites continuously since late 1979. The overarching goal of this project was to generate a 20-year data set of surface downwelling longwave flux measurements from TOVS data over the Arctic Ocean. Daily gridded fields of DLF were produced with a spatial resolution of (100 km){sup 2} north of 60{sup o}N for 22.5 years rather than only 20. Surface measurements from the field station at Barrow, AK--part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program --and from the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) were used to validate the satellite-derived fluxes and develop algorithm improvements for conditions that had resulted in systematic errors in early versions of the algorithm. The resulting data set has already been sent to two other investigators for incorporation into their research, and we will soon complete preparations to send the products to the National Snow and Ice Data Center and ARM data archive, where it can be disseminated to the scientific community.

Jennifer Francis

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

On Scatterometer Ocean Stress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scatterometers estimate the relative atmosphere–ocean motion at spatially high resolution and provide accurate inertial-scale ocean wind forcing information, which is crucial for many ocean, atmosphere, and climate applications. An empirical ...

M. Portabella; A. Stoffelen

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

The Ventilated Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adiabatic theories of ocean circulation and density structure have a long tradition, from the concept of the ventilated thermocline to the notion that deep ocean ventilation is controlled by westerly winds over the Southern Ocean. This study ...

Patrick Haertel; Alexey Fedorov

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Energy Basics: Ocean Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy...

136

Ocean | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description Related Links List of Ocean Thermal Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleOcean&oldid273467"...

137

A Numerical Study of the Circulation of the Bering Sea Basin and Exchange with the North Pacific Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A limited-area, primitive equation, three-layer hydrodynamic model, with realistic coastlines and bathymetry and ?° resolution, is used to investigate the circulation of the Bering Sea basin and the adjacent North pacific ocean. The westward ...

James E. Overland; Michael C. Spillane; Harley E. Hurlburt; Alan J. Wallcraft

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

The Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security.  

SciTech Connect

The Arctic region is rapidly changing in a way that will affect the rest of the world. Parts of Alaska, western Canada, and Siberia are currently warming at twice the global rate. This warming trend is accelerating permafrost deterioration, coastal erosion, snow and ice loss, and other changes that are a direct consequence of climate change. Climatologists have long understood that changes in the Arctic would be faster and more intense than elsewhere on the planet, but the degree and speed of the changes were underestimated compared to recent observations. Policy makers have not yet had time to examine the latest evidence or appreciate the nature of the consequences. Thus, the abruptness and severity of an unfolding Arctic climate crisis has not been incorporated into long-range planning. The purpose of this report is to briefly review the physical basis for global climate change and Arctic amplification, summarize the ongoing observations, discuss the potential consequences, explain the need for an objective risk assessment, develop scenarios for future change, review existing modeling capabilities and the need for better regional models, and finally to make recommendations for Sandia's future role in preparing our leaders to deal with impacts of Arctic climate change on national security. Accurate and credible regional-scale climate models are still several years in the future, and those models are essential for estimating climate impacts around the globe. This study demonstrates how a scenario-based method may be used to give insights into climate impacts on a regional scale and possible mitigation. Because of our experience in the Arctic and widespread recognition of the Arctic's importance in the Earth climate system we chose the Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security. Sandia can make a swift and significant contribution by applying modeling and simulation tools with internal collaborations as well as with outside organizations. Because changes in the Arctic environment are happening so rapidly, a successful program will be one that can adapt very quickly to new information as it becomes available, and can provide decision makers with projections on the 1-5 year time scale over which the most disruptive, high-consequence changes are likely to occur. The greatest short-term impact would be to initiate exploratory simulations to discover new emergent and robust phenomena associated with one or more of the following changing systems: Arctic hydrological cycle, sea ice extent, ocean and atmospheric circulation, permafrost deterioration, carbon mobilization, Greenland ice sheet stability, and coastal erosion. Sandia can also contribute to new technology solutions for improved observations in the Arctic, which is currently a data-sparse region. Sensitivity analyses have the potential to identify thresholds which would enable the collaborative development of 'early warning' sensor systems to seek predicted phenomena that might be precursory to major, high-consequence changes. Much of this work will require improved regional climate models and advanced computing capabilities. Socio-economic modeling tools can help define human and national security consequences. Formal uncertainty quantification must be an integral part of any results that emerge from this work.

Taylor, Mark A.; Zak, Bernard Daniel; Backus, George A.; Ivey, Mark D.; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Storm Studies in the Arctic (STAR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Storm Studies in the Arctic (STAR) network (2007–2010) conducted a major meteorological field project from 10 October–30 November 2007 and in February 2008, focused on southern Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada—a region that experiences intense ...

John Hanesiak; Ronald Stewart; David Barber; George Liu; Justin Gilligan; Danielle Desjardins; Robyn Dyck; Shannon Fargey; Klaus Hochheim; Rebekah Martin; Peter Taylor; Sumita Biswas; Mark Gordon; Marna Albarran Melzer; Kent Moore; Robert Field; Carling Hay; Shunli Zhang; Gordon McBean; Walter Strapp; David Hudak; John Scott; Mengistu Wolde; Ron Goodson; Edward Hudson; Gabrielle Gascon; Heather Greene; William Henson; Alex Laplante

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) was conducted from 27 September through 22 October 2004 over the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) on the North Slope of Alaska. The ...

J. Verlinde; J. Y. Harrington; V. T. Yannuzzi; A. Avramov; S. Greenberg; S. J. Richardson; C. P. Bahrmann; G. M. McFarquhar; G. Zhang; N. Johnson; M. R. Poellot; J. H. Mather; D. D. Turner; E. W. Eloranta; D. C. Tobin; R. Holz; B. D. Zak; M. D. Ivey; A. J. Prenni; P. J. DeMott; J. S. Daniel; G. L. Kok; K. Sassen; D. Spangenberg; P. Minnis; T. P. Tooman; M. Shupe; A. J. Heymsfield; R. Schofield

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

About Ocean Community | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Ocean Community Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean About Ocean Community This...

142

Ocean Technical | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Technical Community of Practice Through a variety of...

143

ORNL DAAC, Arctic Tundra Flux Data, February 2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

atmospheric fluxes in the Arctic tundra are now available on-line. The newly released data set "Arctic Tundra Flux Study in the Kuparuk River Basin (Alaska), 1994-1996" contains...

144

Arctic Climate Change as Manifest in Cyclone Behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arctic region has exhibited dramatic changes in recent times. Many of these are intimately tied up with synoptic activity, but little research has been undertaken on how the characteristics of Arctic cyclones have changed. This paper presents ...

Ian Simmonds; Craig Burke; Kevin Keay

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Comments on “Current GCMs’ Unrealistic Negative Feedback in the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contrasting our expectation of a positive lapse-rate feedback associated with the Arctic inversion, Boé et al. (2009) report that strong present-day Arctic temperature inversions are associated with stronger negative longwave feedbacks and thus ...

Felix Pithan; Thorsten Mauritsen

146

Vertical Motions in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratiform Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characteristics of Arctic mixed-phase stratiform clouds and their relation to vertical air motions are examined using ground-based observations during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) in Barrow, Alaska, during fall 2004. The ...

Matthew D. Shupe; Pavlos Kollias; P. Ola G. Persson; Greg M. McFarquhar

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Is A Sleeping Climate Giant Stirring in the Arctic?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Is A Sleeping Climate Giant Stirring in the Arctic? Print E-mail Is a sleeping climate giant stirring in the arctic? Wednesday, June 12, 2013 Featured by NASA a member of the U.S....

148

Comments on “Current GCMs' Unrealistic Negative Feedback in the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In contrast to prior studies showing a positive lapse-rate feedback associated with the Arctic inversion, Boé et al. reported that strong present-day Arctic temperature inversions are associated with stronger negative longwave feedbacks and thus ...

Felix Pithan; Thorsten Mauritsen

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Tuktoyaktuk : responsive strategies for a new Arctic urbanism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Canadian Arctic is facing a set of compounding crises that will drastically impact the future of its coastal frontier. At a time when climate change is having a detrimental impact on the Arctic landscape, Northern ...

Ritchot, Pamela (Pamela Rae)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

The Western Arctic Linkage Experiment (WALE): Overview and Synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary goal of the Western Arctic Linkage Experiment (WALE) was to better understand uncertainties of simulated hydrologic and ecosystem dynamics of the western Arctic in the context of 1) uncertainties in the data available to drive the ...

A. D. McGuire; J. E. Walsh; J. S. Kimball; J. S. Clein; S. E. Euskirchen; S. Drobot; U. C. Herzfeld; J. Maslanik; R. B. Lammers; M. A. Rawlins; C. J. Vorosmarty; T. S. Rupp; W. Wu; M. Calef

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Dynamical and Microphysical Characteristics of Arctic Clouds during BASE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, observations from aircraft, Doppler radar, and LANDSAT are used to better understand dynamical and microphysical characteristics of low-level Arctic clouds for climate change studies. Observations during the Beaufort and Arctic ...

I. Gultepe; G. Isaac; D. Hudak; R. Nissen; J. W. Strapp

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Ocean Energy Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Oceans cover more than 70% of the Earth's surface. As the world's largest solar collectors, oceans contain thermal energy from the sun and produce mechanical energy from tides and waves. Even...

153

Ocean shell noises  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean shell noises Name: Rick A Cazzato Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Why do you here noises when you put a ocean shell to your ear? Does this happen because of...

154

Mixing by ocean eddies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mesoscale eddies mix and transport tracers such as heat and potential vorticity laterally in the ocean. While this transport plays an important role in the climate system, especially in the Southern Ocean, we lack a, ...

Abernathey, Ryan (Ryan Patrick)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Simulating Future Changes in Arctic and Subarctic Vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arctic is a sensitive system undergoing dramatic changes related to recent warming trends. Vegetation dynamics—increases in the quantity of green vegetation and a northward migration of trees into the arctic tundra—are a component of ... Keywords: Arctic, biogeography, boreal forest, climate change, forest migration, shrub encroachment, subarctic, tundra, vegetation dynamics models

Howard E. Epstein; Jed O. Kaplan; Heike Lischke; Qin Yu

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Ocean | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Ocean Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean Welcome to our COMMUNITY This is the National Ocean Council's portal for data, information, and decision tools to support people engaged in regional marine planning for the future use of the ocean, our coasts, and the Great Lakes. Our goal is to enhance discovery of and access to data and information for planners, stakeholders, and the public. Please visit our Feedback page to tell us what would make the site most useful to you as we expand our content. Start Here! Previous Pause Next PacIOOS - Pacific Islands Voyager PacIOOS - Pacific Islands Voyager View More West Coast Governors Alliance - Regional Data Framework West Coast Governors Alliance - Regional Data Framework View More Mid-Atlantic Ocean Data Portal

157

Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory was created by the University of Alaska Fairbanks in response to a congressionally mandated funding opportunity through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), specifically to encourage research partnerships between the university, the Alaskan energy industry, and the DOE. The enabling legislation permitted research in a broad variety of topics particularly of interest to Alaska, including providing more efficient and economical electrical power generation in rural villages, as well as research in coal, oil, and gas. The contract was managed as a cooperative research agreement, with active project monitoring and management from the DOE. In the eight years of this partnership, approximately 30 projects were funded and completed. These projects, which were selected using an industry panel of Alaskan energy industry engineers and managers, cover a wide range of topics, such as diesel engine efficiency, fuel cells, coal combustion, methane gas hydrates, heavy oil recovery, and water issues associated with ice road construction in the oil fields of the North Slope. Each project was managed as a separate DOE contract, and the final technical report for each completed project is included with this final report. The intent of this process was to address the energy research needs of Alaska and to develop research capability at the university. As such, the intent from the beginning of this process was to encourage development of partnerships and skills that would permit a transition to direct competitive funding opportunities managed from funding sources. This project has succeeded at both the individual project level and at the institutional development level, as many of the researchers at the university are currently submitting proposals to funding agencies, with some success.

Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Charles Chamberlin; Robert Chaney; Gang Chen; Godwin Chukwu; James Clough; Steve Colt; Anthony Covescek; Robert Crosby; Abhijit Dandekar; Paul Decker; Brandon Galloway; Rajive Ganguli; Catherine Hanks; Rich Haut; Kristie Hilton; Larry Hinzman; Gwen Holdman; Kristie Holland; Robert Hunter; Ron Johnson; Thomas Johnson; Doug Kame; Mikhail Kaneveskly; Tristan Kenny; Santanu Khataniar; Abhijeet Kulkami; Peter Lehman; Mary Beth Leigh; Jenn-Tai Liang; Michael Lilly; Chuen-Sen Lin; Paul Martin; Pete McGrail; Dan Miller; Debasmita Misra; Nagendra Nagabhushana; David Ogbe; Amanda Osborne; Antoinette Owen; Sharish Patil; Rocky Reifenstuhl; Doug Reynolds; Eric Robertson; Todd Schaef; Jack Schmid; Yuri Shur; Arion Tussing; Jack Walker; Katey Walter; Shannon Watson; Daniel White; Gregory White; Mark White; Richard Wies; Tom Williams; Dennis Witmer; Craig Wollard; Tao Zhu

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

158

Development of Exhibit on Arctic Climate Change Called The Arctic: A Friend Acting Strangely Exhibition  

SciTech Connect

The exhibition, The Arctic: A Friend Acting Strangely, was developed at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) as a part of the museum’s Forces of Change exhibit series on global change. It opened to the public in Spring 2006, in conjunction with another Forces of Change exhibit on the Earth’s atmosphere called Change Is in the Air. The exhibit was a 2000 square-foot presentation that explored the forces and consequences of the changing Arctic as documented by scientists and native residents alike. Native peoples of the Arctic have always lived with year-to-year fluctuations in weather and ice conditions. In recent decades, they have witnessed that the climate has become unpredictable, the land and sea unfamiliar. An elder in Arctic Canada recently described the weather as uggianaqtuq —an Inuit word that can suggest strange, unexpected behavior, sometimes described as that of “a friend acting strangely.” Scientists too have been documenting dramatic changes in the Arctic. Air temperatures have warmed over most—though not all—of the Arctic since the 1950s; Arctic precipitation may have increased by as much as 8%; seasonal melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet has increased on average by 16% since 1979; polar-orbiting satellites have measured a 15¬–20% decline in sea ice extent since the 1970s; aircraft reconnaissance and ship observations show a steady decrease in sea ice since the 1950s. In response to this warming, plant distributions have begun to shift and animals are changing their migration routes. Some of these changes may have beneficial effects while others may bring hardship or have costly implications. And, many scientists consider arctic change to be a ‘bell-weather’ for large-scale changes in other regions of the world. The exhibition included text, photos artifacts, hands-on interactives and other exhibitry that illustrated the changes being documented by indigenous people and scientists alike.

Stauffer, Barbara W.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Snow Depth on Arctic Sea Ice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Snow depth and density were measured at Soviet drifting stations on multiyear Arctic sea ice. Measurements were made daily at fixed stakes at the weather station and once- or thrice-monthly at 10-m intervals on a line beginning about 500 m from ...

Stephen G. Warren; Ignatius G. Rigor; Norbert Untersteiner; Vladimir F. Radionov; Nikolay N. Bryazgin; Yevgeniy I. Aleksandrov; Roger Colony

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

NOAAINMFS Developments Arctic Marine Research Contracts Awarded  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on tunal porpoise, and the economic and biolog- August 1977 pacts of gas and oil exploration pre- dict the probable ecological impacts of oil and gas development on Alaska's outer continental mammals, and birds, and smaller organisms which oc- cupy the two Arctic coastal areas prior to oil and gas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Arctic Sea Ice Albedo from AVHRR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seasonal cycle of surface albedo of sea ice in the Arctic is estimated from measurements made with the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the polar-orbiting satellites NOAA-10 and NOAA-11. The albedos of 145 200-km-square ...

R. W. Lindsay; D. A. Rothrock

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

oceans - Geodata icon | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

oceans - Geodata icon Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean...

163

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draft Programmaticof ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. Depart~on Ocean TherUial Energy Conversion, June 18, 1979. Ocean

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Oceanic Heat Flux Calculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors review the procedure for the direct calculation of oceanic heat flux from hydrographic measurements and set out the full “recipe” that is required.

Sheldon Bacon; Nick Fofonoff

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Energy Basics: Ocean Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Resources Although the potential for ocean energy technologies is believed to be very large, no comprehensive studies have been conducted to date to determine an accurate resource...

166

Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones Title Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5887E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Hult, Erin L., Darryl J. Dickerhoff, and Phillip N. Price Date Published 09/2012 Keywords infiltration, leakage, residential ventilation Abstract Air leakage between adjacent zones of a building can lead to indoor air quality and energy efficiency concerns, however there is no existing standard for measuring inter-zonal leakage.In this study, synthesized data and field measurements are analyzed in order to explore the uncertainty associated with different methods for collecting and analyzing fan pressurization measurements to calculate inter- zone leakage. The best of the measurement and analysis methods was a method that uses two blower doors simultaneously based on the methods of Herrlin and Modera (1988) to determine the inter-zone leakage to within 16% of the inter-zone leakage flow at 4Pa, over the range of expected conditions for a house and attached garage. Methods were also identified that use a single blower door to determine the inter-zone leakage to within 30% of its value. The test configuration selected can have a large impact on the uncertainty of the results and there are testing configurations and methods that should definitely be avoided. The most rigorous calculation method identified assumes a fixed value for the pressure exponent for the interface between the two zones (rather than determining the interface pressure exponent from the measured data) and then uses an optimization routine to fit a single set of air leakage coefficients and pressure exponents for each of three wall interfaces using both pressurization and depressurization data. Multiple pressure station tests have much less uncertainty than single pressure station approaches. Analyses of field data sets confirm a similar level of variation between test methods as was expected from the analysis of synthesized data sets and confirm the selection of specific test methods to reduce experimental uncertainty.

167

Distribution of the spacing between two adjacent avoided crossings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the frequency at which avoided crossings appear in an energy level structure when an external field is applied to a quantum chaotic system. The distribution of the spacing in the parameter between two adjacent avoided crossings is investigated. Using a random matrix model, we find that the distribution of these spacings is well fitted by a power-law distribution for small spacings. The powers are 2 and 3 for the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble and Gaussian unitary ensemble, respectively. We also find that the distributions decay exponentially for large spacings. The distributions in concrete quantum chaotic systems agree with those of the random matrix model.

Manabu Machida; Keiji Saito

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

168

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Iron, manganese and lead at Hawaii Ocean Time-series stationof beryllium to the oceans, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. , 114,organic carbon fluxes in the ocean based on the quantitative

Han, Qin; Moore, J. Keith; Zender, Charles; Measures, Chris; Hydes, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

EA-1193: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

93: Final Environmental Assessment 93: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1193: Final Environmental Assessment Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Cloud and Radiation Testbed (ARM/CART), North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean. The EA analyzes the impacts on land use, tundra, air quality, cultural resources, socioeconomics, and wildlife. Environmental Assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site, DOE/EA-1193 (February 1997) More Documents & Publications

170

Coexistence Analysis of Adjacent Long Term Evolution (LTE) Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the licensing and deployment of Long term evolution (LTE) systems are ramping up, the study of coexistence of LTE systems is an essential topic in civil and military applications. In this paper, we present a coexistence study of adjacent LTE systems aiming at evaluating the effect of inter-system interference on system capacity and performance as a function of some of the most common mitigation techniques: frequency guard band, base station (BS) antenna coupling loss, and user equipment (UE) antenna spacing. A system model is constructed for two collocated macro LTE networks. The developed model takes into consideration the RF propagation environment, power control scheme, and adjacent channel interference. Coexistence studies are performed for a different combination of time/frequency division duplex (TDD/FDD) systems under three different guard-bands of 0MHz, 5MHz, and 10MHz. Numerical results are presented to advice the minimum frequency guard band, BS coupling loss, and UE antenna isolation required for a healthy system operation.

Aulama, Mohannad M. [University of Jordan; Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Ocean Health and Human Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. 2002. Indicators of ocean health and human health:Nature 423:280–283. Oceans and Human Health Act. 2003. S.Editorial Guest Editorial Ocean Health and Human Health

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Ocean General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect

1. Definition of Subject The purpose of this text is to provide an introduction to aspects of oceanic general circulation models (OGCMs), an important component of Climate System or Earth System Model (ESM). The role of the ocean in ESMs is described in Chapter XX (EDITOR: PLEASE FIND THE COUPLED CLIMATE or EARTH SYSTEM MODELING CHAPTERS). The emerging need for understanding the Earth’s climate system and especially projecting its future evolution has encouraged scientists to explore the dynamical, physical, and biogeochemical processes in the ocean. Understanding the role of these processes in the climate system is an interesting and challenging scientific subject. For example, a research question how much extra heat or CO2 generated by anthropogenic activities can be stored in the deep ocean is not only scientifically interesting but also important in projecting future climate of the earth. Thus, OGCMs have been developed and applied to investigate the various oceanic processes and their role in the climate system.

Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

173

Ocean Thermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Ocean Thermal Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Ocean Thermal Incentives...

174

Energy Basics: Ocean Energy Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy...

175

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Glossary ANILCA: Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act ANS:...

176

Polyethylene Pipe Failure in the Arctic - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the current study, a new high density polyethylene (HDPE) pipe in the Arctic region of ... Heat Tint Effects on General Corrosion Resistance of Stainless Steels .

177

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Analysis Discussion Resource Assessment The USGS most recent assessment of oil and gas resources of ANWR Coastal Plain (The Oil and Gas Resource Potential of the Arctic...

178

Climate-derived tensions in Arctic security.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Globally, there is no lack of security threats. Many of them demand priority engagement and there can never be adequate resources to address all threats. In this context, climate is just another aspect of global security and the Arctic just another region. In light of physical and budgetary constraints, new security needs must be integrated and prioritized with existing ones. This discussion approaches the security impacts of climate from that perspective, starting with the broad security picture and establishing how climate may affect it. This method provides a different view from one that starts with climate and projects it, in isolation, as the source of a hypothetical security burden. That said, the Arctic does appear to present high-priority security challenges. Uncertainty in the timing of an ice-free Arctic affects how quickly it will become a security priority. Uncertainty in the emergent extreme and variable weather conditions will determine the difficulty (cost) of maintaining adequate security (order) in the area. The resolution of sovereignty boundaries affects the ability to enforce security measures, and the U.S. will most probably need a military presence to back-up negotiated sovereignty agreements. Without additional global warming, technology already allows the Arctic to become a strategic link in the global supply chain, possibly with northern Russia as its main hub. Additionally, the multinational corporations reaping the economic bounty may affect security tensions more than nation-states themselves. Countries will depend ever more heavily on the global supply chains. China has particular needs to protect its trade flows. In matters of security, nation-state and multinational-corporate interests will become heavily intertwined.

Backus, George A.; Strickland, James Hassler

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Observations of Nonclassical Frontal Propagation and Frontally Forced Gravity Waves Adjacent to Steep Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through the integrated analysis of remote sensing and in situ data taken along the Front Range of Colorado, this study describes the interactions that occurred between a leeside arctic front and topographically modulated flows. These interactions ...

Paul J. Neiman; F. Martin Ralph; Robert L. Weber; Taneil Uttal; Louisa B. Nance; David H. Levinson

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al Qin Han,1 J. Keith Moore,1; accepted 7 December 2007; published 12 April 2008. [1] We use measurements of ocean surface dissolved Al (DEAD) model to constrain dust deposition to the oceans. Our Al database contains all available

Moore, Keith

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Microbial metabolism in the deep ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon flux through the ocean’s twilight zone. Science 316:sinking particle flux in the ocean’s twilight zone. LimnolRespiration in the dark ocean. Geophys Res Lett 30:doi:

Hansman, Roberta Lynn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Microbial Metabollism in the Deep Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon flux through the ocean’s twilight zone. Science 316:sinking particle flux in the ocean’s twilight zone. LimnolRespiration in the dark ocean. Geophys Res Lett 30:doi:

Hansman, Roberta L

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

SOME OCEAN MODEL FUNDAMENTALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of these lectures is to present elements of the equations and algorithms used in numerical models of the large-scale ocean circulation. Such models generally integrate the ocean’s primitive equations, which are based on Newton’s Laws applied to a continuum fluid under hydrostatic balance in a spherical geometry, along with linear irreversible thermodynamics and subgrid scale (SGS) parameterizations. During formulations of both the kinematics and dynamics, we highlight issues related to the use of a generalized vertical coordinate. The vertical coordinate is arguably the most critical element determining how a model is designed and applications to which a model is of use.

Stephen M. Griffies

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Ocean bottom seisometer  

SciTech Connect

An improved ocean bottom seismometer is described comprising: a spherical-shaped main housing having a seismic acquisition portion and a ballast portion below the acquisition portion. The ballast portion controls the ascent and descent of the ocean bottom seismometer; a conical skirt fixed to the main housing elevating the main housing above a horizontal plane coincident with a base of the skirt. The skirt is capable of confining fluid under the main housing when the base rests on an ocean bottom; spherical compartments mounted inside the skirt; and a lifting hook mounted on the outside of the main housing.

Neeley, W.P.

1987-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

185

Nonlinear Midlatitude Ocean Adjustment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ocean adjustment on annual to interdecadal scales to variable forcing is considered for a more nonlinear general circulation than has previously been studied. The nature of the response is a strong function of forcing frequency and importantly ...

William K. Dewar

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Carbon in Atlantic Ocean  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Atlantic Ocean About CARINA NDP-091: CARINA Data Synthesis Project The CARINA Group CARINA Cruise Summary Table and Data CARINA Data Products CARINA Database V1.2 ODV Collection...

187

Tropical Ocean Circulation Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A primitive equation model of the equatorial Pacific Ocean was forced by realistic wind stress distributions over decades. Results were presented for a set of two experiments. In the first experiment the model was forced by an objectively ...

Mojib Latif

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Global Ocean Meridional Overturning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A decade-mean global ocean circulation is estimated using inverse techniques, incorporating air–sea fluxes of heat and freshwater, recent hydrographic sections, and direct current measurements. This information is used to determine mass, heat, ...

Rick Lumpkin; Kevin Speer

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Arctic Sea Ice Decline: Observations, Projections, Mechanisms, and Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or phase space. In this work we con- sider the trajectory of sea ice in the ice thickness phase space. We175 Arctic Sea Ice Decline: Observations, Projections, Mechanisms, and Implications Geophysical Is the Trajectory of Arctic Sea Ice? Harry L. Stern and Ronald W. Lindsay Polar Science Center, Applied Physics

Lindsay, Ron

190

Modeling the Pacific Ocean  

SciTech Connect

Two numerical models utilizing primitive equations (two momentum equations and a mass continuity equation) simulate the oceanography of the Pacific Ocean from 20{degrees}S to 50{degrees}N. The authors examine the abundant model data through visualization , by animating the appropriate model fields and viewing the time history of each model simulation as a color movie. The animations are used to aid understanding of ocean circulation.

Johnson, M.A.; O' Brien, J.J. (Mesoscale Air-Sea Interaction Group, Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Flexible ocean upwelling pipe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Semantic-based web service discovery and chaining for building an Arctic spatial data infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing interests in a global environment and climate change have led to studies focused on the changes in the multinational Arctic region. To facilitate Arctic research, a spatial data infrastructure (SDI), where Arctic data, information, and services ... Keywords: Arctic, Crawler, Hydrology, Knowledge base, Ontology, SDI, Semantic, Service chain

W. Li; C. Yang; D. Nebert; R. Raskin; P. Houser; H. Wu; Z. Li

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Discharge to Ocean  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Discharge to Ocean Discharge to Ocean Fact Sheet - Discharge to Ocean Past Practices In early offshore oil and gas development, drilling wastes were generally discharged from the platforms directly to the ocean. Until several decades ago, the oceans were perceived to be limitless dumping grounds. During the 1970s and 1980s, however, evidence mounted that some types of drilling waste discharges could have undesirable effects on local ecology, particularly in shallow water. When water-based muds (WBMs) were used, only limited environmental harm was likely to occur, but when operators employed oil-based muds (OBMs) on deeper sections of wells, the resulting cuttings piles created impaired zones beneath and adjacent to the platforms. At some North Sea locations, large piles of oil-based cuttings remain on the sea floor near the platforms. Piles of oil-based cuttings can affect the local ecosystem in three ways: by smothering organisms, by direct toxic effect of the drilling waste, and by anoxic conditions caused by microbial degradation of the organic components in the waste. Current regulatory controls minimize the impacts of permitted discharges of cuttings.

194

Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) will raise and lower a heavily instrumented tethered balloon system at regular intervals in the lower 2 kilometers of the atmosphere at Oliktok Point. Data obtained during the ALTOS campaign will provide a statistically significant set of observed in situ cloud properties for validating retrieval algorithms and help scientists reduce the uncertainty in the radiative forcing and heating rates on hourly time scales. The data will also help researchers gain a better understanding of the driving processes that control climate changes and determine the state of the Arctic climate system. Collaborators Science Team: The Pennsylvania State University, Stratton

195

CARINA (Carbon dioxide in the Atlantic Ocean) Data from CDIAC  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The idea for CARINA developed at a workshop (CO2 in the northern North Atlantic) that was held at the HANSE-Wissenschaftskolleg (HANSE Institute for Advanced Study) in Delmenhorst, Germany from June 9 to 11, 1999. While the main scientific focus is the North Atlantic, some data from the South Atlantic have been included in the project, along with data from the Arctic Ocean. Data sets go back to 1972, and more than 100 are currently available. The data are also being used in conjunction with other projects and research groups, such as the Atlantic Ocean Carbon Synthesis Group. See the inventory of data at http://store.pangaea.de/Projects/CARBOOCEAN/carina/data_inventory.htm See a detailed table of information on the cruises at http://cdiac.ornl.gov/oceans/CARINA/Carina_table.html and also provides access to data files. The CARBOOCEAN data portal provides a specialized interface for CARINA data, a reference list for historic carbon data, and password protected access to the "Data Underway Warehouse.".

196

Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

small-scale features in ocean winds. Science, 303, Chelton,of the regional coupled ocean-atmosphere model RCAO. Borealstress dependence on ocean surface velocity: implications

Seo, Hyodae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

small-scale features in ocean winds. Science, 303, Chelton,of the regional coupled ocean-atmosphere model RCAO. Borealstress dependence on ocean surface velocity: implications

Seo, Hyodae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Ocean - Community Practice Block | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Community Practice Block Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean...

199

Mesozooplankton trophic variability in a changing ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

trends in contemporary ocean productivity. Nature 444: 752-Gyre Oscillation links ocean climate and ecosystem change.biomass from satellite ocean colour. J. Mar. Syst. 78: 18-

Décima, Moira

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Ocean Map National | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Featured Maps The following maps are from data...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Ocean Feedback Form | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feedback Form Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Comments or Suggestions Name * Email Topic...

202

Use of ARM/NSA Data to Validate and Improve the Remote Sensing Retrieval of Cloud and Surface Properties in the Arctic from AVHRR Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM/NSA Data to Validate and Improve the ARM/NSA Data to Validate and Improve the Remote Sensing Retrieval of Cloud and Surface Properties in the Arctic from AVHRR Data X. Xiong QSS Group, Inc. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service Office of Research and Applications Camp Springs, Maryland R. Storvold and C. Marty Geophysical Institute University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska K. H. Stamnes Stevens Institute of Technology Hoboken, New Jersey B. D. Zak Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico Introduction Clouds in the Arctic have an important impact on the radiative energy balance. However, the effects of clouds still constitute one of the largest uncertainties in the study of climate change. Because the surface

203

Ocean Eddy Dynamics in a Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of mesoscale oceanic eddies is analyzed in a quasigeostrophic coupled ocean–atmosphere model operating at a large Reynolds number. The model dynamics are characterized by decadal variability that involves nonlinear adjustment of the ...

P. Berloff; W. Dewar; S. Kravtsov; J. McWilliams

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Indian Ocean Intraseasonal Variability in an Ocean General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of atmospheric intraseasonal variability on the tropical Indian Ocean is examined with an ocean general circulation model (OGCM). The model is forced by observation-based wind stresses and surface heat fluxes from an atmospheric ...

A. Schiller; J. S. Godfrey

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Interactions of the Tropical Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have investigated the interactions of the tropical oceans on interannual timescales by conducting a series of uncoupled atmospheric and oceanic general circulation experiments and hybrid-coupled model simulations. The results ...

M. Latif; T. P. Barnett

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Climate and the Tropical Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An attempt is made to determine the role of the ocean in establishing the mean tropical climate and its sensitivity to radiative perturbations. A simple two-box energy balance model is developed that includes ocean heat transports as an ...

Amy Clement; Richard Seager

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Energy Basics: Ocean Energy Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Technologies Photo of low waves in the ocean. A dock is visible in the background. Oceans cover more than 70% of the Earth's surface. As the world's largest solar...

208

On the Climatic Impact of Ocean Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrations of coupled climate models with mixed-layer and fixed-current ocean components are used to explore the climatic response to varying magnitudes of ocean circulation. Four mixed-layer ocean experiments without ocean heat transports are ...

Michael Winton

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Navigating oceans of data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some science domains have the advantage that the bulk of the data comes from a single source instrument, such as a telescope or particle collider. More commonly, big data implies a big variety of data sources. For example, the Center for Coastal Margin ... Keywords: environmental data, ocean observatories, spatial-temporal data management

David Maier; V. M. Megler; António M. Baptista; Alex Jaramillo; Charles Seaton; Paul J. Turner

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

An Ocean Dynamical Thermostat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of ocean dynamics in the regulation of tropical sea surface temperatures (SSTs) is investigated using the Zebiak-Cane coupled occan-atmosphere model. The model is forced with a uniform heating, or cooling, varying between ±40 W m?2 into ...

Amy C. Clement; Richard Seager; Mark A. Cane; Stephen E. Zebiak

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Regional Variations of Moist Static Energy Flux into the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors investigate the climmological heating of the Arctic by the atmospheric moist static energy (MSE) flux from lower latitudes based on 25 years (November 1964–1989) of the GFDL dataset. During the five month winter period (NDJFM) the ...

James E. Overland; Philip Turet; Abraham H. Oort

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Statistical Characterization of Arctic Polar-Night Jet Oscillation Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel diagnostic tool is presented, based on polar-cap temperature anomalies, for visualizing daily variability of the Arctic stratospheric polar vortex over multiple decades. This visualization illustrates the ubiquity of extended-time-scale ...

Peter Hitchcock; Theodore G. Shepherd; Gloria L. Manney

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Twenty-First-Century Arctic Climate Change in CCSM4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors summarize the twenty-first-century Arctic climate simulated by NCAR’s Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4). Under a strong radiative forcing scenario, the model simulates a much warmer, wetter, cloudier, and stormier ...

Stephen J. Vavrus; Marika M. Holland; Alexandra Jahn; David A. Bailey; Benjamin A. Blazey

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Autumnal Mixed-Phase Cloudy Boundary Layers in the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two mixed-phase cloudy boundary layer events observed over the Arctic ice pack in autumn are extensively analyzed. The local dynamic and thermodynamic structure of the boundary layers is determined from aircraft measurements including analysis of ...

James O. Pinto

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Clouds at Arctic Atmospheric Observatories. Part II: Thermodynamic Phase Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud phase defines many cloud properties and determines the ways in which clouds interact with other aspects of the climate system. The occurrence fraction and characteristics of clouds distinguished by their phase are examined at three Arctic ...

Matthew D. Shupe

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 3. Summary The 1.5 million-acre coastal plain of the 19 million-acre...

217

Arctic Tropospheric Winds Derived from TOVS Satellite Retrievals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate three-dimensional wind fields are essential for diagnosing a variety of important climate processes in the Arctic, such as the advection and deposition of heat and moisture, changes in circulation features, and transport of trace ...

Jennifer A. Francis; Elias Hunter; Cheng-Zhi Zou

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Multiparameter AVHRR-Derived Products for Arctic Climate Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Generation and sample applications of an integrated set of remotely sensed products for investigations of Arctic climate are described. Cloud fraction, ice surface temperature, surface albedo, downwelling radiative fluxes, ice motion vectors, and ...

Walter N. Meier; James A. Maslanik; Charles W. Fowler; Jeffrey R. Key

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Stratospheric Forcing of Surface Climate in the Arctic Oscillation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diagnostic results are presented indicating that during the Arctic oscillation surface climate variations are directly forced by changes in the strength of the stratospheric polar vortex. To be specific, large-scale potential vorticity anomalies ...

Robert X. Black

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Relationships between Arctic Sea Ice and Clouds during Autumn  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The connection between sea ice variability and cloud cover over the Arctic seas during autumn is investigated by analyzing the 40-yr ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA-40) products and the Television and Infrared Observation Satellite (TIROS) Operational ...

Axel J. Schweiger; Ron W. Lindsay; Steve Vavrus; Jennifer A. Francis

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Design options for an Arctic-class LNG carrier  

SciTech Connect

Melville Shipping Ltd., with Petro-Canada's Arctic pilot project, is designing the first commercial LNG system for year-round operations in the Canadian Arctic. Economical adaptation to the region will be maximized by the design combination of current icebreaking and LNG-transport technologies, with special concentration on the ship's hull form, hull structure and materials, LNG-containment system, and propulsion and transmission systems.

Dick, R.A.; Laskov, V.; Wainwright, J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Multimodel Combination by a Bayesian Hierarchical Model: Assessment of Ice Accumulation over the Oceanic Arctic Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of general circulation models (GCMs) varies across regions and periods. When projecting into the future, it is therefore not obvious whether to reject or to prefer a certain GCM. Combining the outputs of several GCMs may enhance ...

Malaak Kallache; Elena Maksimovich; Paul-Antoine Michelangeli; Philippe Naveau

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Evaluation of an AVHRR Cloud Detection and Classification Method over the Central Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cloud classification method that uses both multispectral and textural features with a maximum likelihood discriminator is applied to full-resolution AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) data from 100 NOAA polar-orbiter overpasses ...

Dan Lubin; Esther Morrow

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Why Sequence Subarctic Pacific Ocean?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequence Subarctic Pacific Ocean? Sequence Subarctic Pacific Ocean? The subarctic Pacific Ocean is one of the areas considered particularly vulnerable to acidification, which could affect the ocean's ability to act as a carbon sink. Global warming affects the food webs and biodiversity in marine ecosystems, especially in regions known as oxygen minimum zones where key components of the global carbon cycle take place. Oxygen minimum zones are found between 200 and 1,000 meters below sea level in the subarctic Pacific, the eastern South Pacific Ocean, the northern parts of the Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea, and off southwestern Africa. As global warming continues, researchers believe the oxygen levels in the oceans will decrease, a change that will extend the boundaries of the oxygen minimum

225

Ocean Informatics Monograph. Ocean Informatics Initiative: an Ethnographic Study (2002-2006). Part 1: Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collaborative Care and Ocean Informatics. Proceedings of theOceanography: Probing the Oceans, 1936-1978. San Diego, CA:Collaboration: Towards an Ocean Informatics Environment.

Millerand, Florence; Baker, Karen S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Ocean Informatics Monograph. Ocean Informatics Initiative: an Ethnographic Study (2002-2006). Part 2: Appendices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scientific Digital Delivery Ocean Informatics: Shaun HaberResearch Publications about the Ocean Informatics initiativeF. and K.S. Baker (2011). Ocean Informatics Monograph (2002-

Millerand, Florence; Baker, Karen S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

The Influence of Changes in Cloud Cover on Recent Surface Temperature Trends in the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented to assess the influence of changes in Arctic cloud cover on the surface temperature trend, allowing for a more robust diagnosis of causes for surface warming or cooling. Seasonal trends in satellite-derived Arctic surface ...

Yinghui Liu; Jeffrey R. Key; Xuanji Wang

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

An Investigation of an Arctic Front with a Vertically Nested Mesoscale Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A vertically mesoscale regional numerical weather prediction model is used to simulate an arctic front. The front was observed during the Arctic Cyclone Expedition of 1984. The regional model employs a unique vertical nesting scheme in which the ...

William T. Thompson; Stephen D. Burk

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Mechanisms of Decadal Arctic Climate Variability in the Community Climate System Model, Version 2 (CCSM2)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain natural climate variability in the Arctic. These include processes related to the influence of the North Atlantic Oscillation/Arctic Oscillation (NAO/AO), anticyclonic/cyclonic regimes, changes in ...

Hugues Goosse; Marika M. Holland

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Major Cloud Plumes in the Arctic and Their Relation to Fronts and Ice Movement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of the movement of orographic cloud plumes from one island to another in the Svalbard-Novaya Zemlya region of the Barents Sea revealed a close association with similar movements of arctic fronts. Strong northerly winds behind arctic ...

Robert W. Fett

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Do General Circulation Models Underestimate the Natural Variability in the Arctic Climate?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors examine the natural variability of the arctic climate system simulated by two very different models: the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) global climate model, and an area-averaged model of the arctic atmosphere–sea ice–...

D. S. Battisti; C. M. Bitz; R. E. Moritz

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

The Norwegian IPY–THORPEX: Polar Lows and Arctic Fronts during the 2008 Andøya Campaign  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From a weather forecasting perspective, the Arctic poses particular challenges for mainly two reasons: 1) The observational data are sparse and 2) the weather phenomena responsible for severe weather, such as polar lows, Arctic fronts, and orographic ...

J. E. Kristjánsson; I. Barstad; T. Aspelien; I. Føre; Ø. Godøy; Ø. Hov; E. Irvine; T. Iversen; E. Kolstad; T. E. Nordeng; H. McInnes; R. Randriamampianina; J. Reuder; Ø. Saetra; M. Shapiro; T. Spengler; H. Ólafsson

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The Effects of Different Climate Input Datasets on Simulated Carbon Dynamics in the Western Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Western Arctic Linkage Experiment (WALE), simulations of carbon dynamics in the western Arctic (WALE region) were conducted during two recent decades by driving the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) with three alternative climate ...

Joy Clein; A. David McGuire; Eugenie S. Euskirchen; Monika Calef

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

DOE/SC-ARM-10-034 The Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

since the late 1960s. Inter-model scatter in projected Arctic temperatures is also an order of magnitude larger in the Arctic than in mid- latitudes. Current climate models do...

235

Eggs Show Arctic Mercury Cycling May Be Linked to Ice Cover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... cycling of mercury in the Arctic biosphere. Credit: D. Roseneau, US Fish and Wildlife Service View hi-resolution image. ...

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

236

Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

II Observations of the 2004 and 2006 Indian OceanOceans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .magnitudes determined from ocean-bottom pressure gauge data

Drushka, Kyla

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Modeling the subsurface thermal impact of Arctic thaw lakes in a warming climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Warming air temperatures in the Arctic are modifying the rates of thermokarst processes along Alaska's Arctic Coastal Plain. The Arctic Coastal Plain is dominated by thaw lakes. These kilometer-scale lakes are the most visible surface features in the ... Keywords: MATLAB, Numerical model, Permafrost, Thaw lakes, Thermal model

N. Matell; R. S. Anderson; I. Overeem; C. Wobus; F. E. Urban; G. D. Clow

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Ocean Renewable Power Company LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Renewable Power Company LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Renewable Power Company LLC Place Portland, Maine Zip 4101 Sector Ocean, Renewable Energy Product Ocean...

239

ocean - faq right side block | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ocean - faq right side block Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Frequently Asked Questions...

240

NOS Point Forecast Guidance to Weather and Ocean Conditions ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Point Forecast Guidance to Weather and Ocean Conditions Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Regional Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent Areas in Utah, Nevada, and Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Regional Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent Areas in Utah, Nevada, and Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: From 1957 to 1961 a regional gravity survey was made over the northern part of the Great Salt Lake Desert and adjacent areas in Utah, eastern Nevada, and southeastern Idaho. A total of 1040 stations were taken over an area of about 7000 square miles. The results were compiled as a Bouguer gravity anomaly map with a contour interval of 2 mgal. The Bouguer values ranged from a high of about -120 mgal over the outcrop areas to a

242

Ice at the Interface: Atmosphere-Ice-Ocean Boundary Layer Processes and Their Role in Polar Change---Workshop Report  

SciTech Connect

The atmosphere-ocean boundary layer in which sea ice resides includes many complex processes that require a more realistic treatment in GCMs, particularly as models move toward full earth system descriptions. The primary purpose of the workshop was to define and discuss such coupled processes from observational and modeling points of view, including insight from both the Arctic and Antarctic systems. The workshop met each of its overarching goals, including fostering collaboration among experimentalists, theorists and modelers, proposing modeling strategies, and ascertaining data availability and needs. Several scientific themes emerged from the workshop, such as the importance of episodic or extreme events, precipitation, stratification above and below the ice, and the marginal ice zone, whose seasonal Arctic migrations now traverse more territory than in the past.

Hunke, Elizabeth C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

243

Petrologic-petrophysical-engineering relationships, selected wells near the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the context of the reservoir management and resource assessment programs of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in Alaska, selected stratigraphic horizons were studied in a number of wells adjacent to the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), northeast Alaska. Petrographic analyses were integrated with petrophysical and engineering data, in order to provide a substantive knowledge base from which to infer reservoir potentials elsewhere in the region, using geological and geophysical methods. Of particular interest in the latter regard is the ANWR area. Horizons of concern with regard to reservoir characteristics include Franklinian through Brookian strata. Of particular interest are clastic Ellesmerian 'Break-up/Rift Sequence' sediments such as the Lower Cretaceous Thomson sand, and deeper-water marine clastics, as exemplified by the Brookian Colville Group 'turbidites.' Also of concern are pre-Ellesmerian 'basement' rocks, some of which are hosts to hydrocarbon accumulations in the Point Thomson field. Petrologic-mineralogic characteristics have been keyed to various wireline log responses and related to available engineering data, as feasible, for the wells considered. Synthesis of this information in terms of the regional geological framework, tied in with geophysical data, will facilitate more refined, effective resource assessment and management.

Mowatt, T.C.; Gibson, C.; Seidlitz, A.; Bascle, R.; Dygas, J. (U.S. Bureau of Land Management, Anchorage, AK (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variations in eastern Indian Ocean upper-ocean thermal properties are assessed for the period 1970–2004, with a particular focus on asymmetric features related to opposite phases of Indian Ocean dipole events, using high-resolution ocean model ...

Caroline C. Ummenhofer; Franziska U. Schwarzkopf; Gary Meyers; Erik Behrens; Arne Biastoch; Claus W. Böning

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Evaluation of Arctic Broadband Surface Radiation Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arctic is a challenging environment for making in-situ radiation measurements. A standard suite of radiation sensors is typically designed to measure the total, direct and diffuse components of incoming and outgoing broadband shortwave (SW) and broadband thermal infrared, or longwave (LW) radiation. Enhancements can include various sensors for measuring irradiance in various narrower bandwidths. Many solar radiation/thermal infrared flux sensors utilize protective glass domes and some are mounted on complex mechanical platforms (solar trackers) that rotate sensors and shading devices that track the sun. High quality measurements require striking a balance between locating sensors in a pristine undisturbed location free of artificial blockage (such as buildings and towers) and providing accessibility to allow operators to clean and maintain the instruments. Three significant sources of erroneous data include solar tracker malfunctions, rime/frost/snow deposition on the instruments and operational problems due to limited operator access in extreme weather conditions. In this study, a comparison is made between the global and component sum (direct [vertical component] + diffuse) shortwave measurements. The difference between these two quantities (that theoretically should be zero) is used to illustrate the magnitude and seasonality of radiation flux measurement problems. The problem of rime/frost/snow deposition is investigated in more detail for one case study utilizing both shortwave and longwave measurements. Solutions to these operational problems are proposed that utilize measurement redundancy, more sophisticated heating and ventilation strategies and a more systematic program of operational support and subsequent data quality protocols.

Matsui, N.; Long, Charles N.; Augustine, J. A.; Halliwell, D.; Uttal, Taneil; Longenecker, D.; Niebergale, J.; Wendell, J.; Albee, R.

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

246

ARM - Field Campaign - Arctic Winter Water Vapor IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsArctic Winter Water Vapor IOP govCampaignsArctic Winter Water Vapor IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Arctic Winter Water Vapor IOP 2004.03.09 - 2004.04.09 Lead Scientist : Ed Westwater Data Availability http://www.etl.noaa.gov/programs/2004/wviop/data will contain quicklooks of all of the data. For data sets, see below. Summary During the IOP, the Ground-based Scanning Radiometer of NOAA/ETL, and the ARM MicroWave Radiometer and Microwave Profiler, yielded excellent data over a range of conditions. In all, angular-scanned and calibrated radiometric data from 22.345 to 380 GHz were taken. The Precipitable Water Vapor varied about an order of magnitude from 1 to 10 mm, and surface temperatures varied from about -10 to -40 deg. Celcius. Vaisala RS90

247

Towards a Characterization of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Towards a Characterization of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Towards a Characterization of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Shupe, Matthew CIRES/NOAA/ETL Kollias, Pavlos Brookhaven National Laboratory Category: Cloud Properties Mixed-phase clouds play a unique role in the Arctic, where the delicate balance of phases in these clouds can have a profound impact on the surface radiation balance and various cloud-atmosphere-radiation-surface feedback processes. A better understanding of these clouds is clearly important and has been a recent objective of the ARM program. To this end, multiple sensors including radar, lidar, and temperature soundings, have been utilized in an automated cloud type classification scheme for clouds observed at the North Slope of Alaska site. The performance of this new algorithm at identifying mixed-phase cloud conditions is compared with an

248

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: An Arctic Springtime  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Arctic Springtime Mixed-Phase Cloudy Boundary Layer observed during An Arctic Springtime Mixed-Phase Cloudy Boundary Layer observed during SHEBA Zuidema, Paquita RSMAS/MPO University of Miami Han, Yong NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Intrieri, Janet NOAA/Environmental Technology Laboratory Key, Jeffrey Boston University Lawson, Paul SPEC Inc. Matrosov, Sergey NOAA/Environmental Technology Laboratory Shupe, Matthew CIRES/NOAA/ETL Uttal, Taneil NOAA/Environmental Technology Laboratory The microphysical characteristics, radiative impact, and lifecycle of a long-lived, surface-based mixed-layer, mixed-phase cloud with an average temperature of approximately -20 C are presented and discussed. The cloud was observed during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic experiment from May 1 through May 10, 1998. Vertically-resolved properties of the liquid

249

Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part II: Multi-layered cloud  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a deep, multi-layered, mixed-phase cloud system observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. This cloud system was associated with strong surface turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes as cold air flowed over the open Arctic Ocean, combined with a low pressure system that supplied moisture at mid-level. The simulations, performed by 13 single-column and 4 cloud-resolving models, generally overestimate the liquid water path and strongly underestimate the ice water path, although there is a large spread among the models. This finding is in contrast with results for the single-layer, low-level mixed-phase stratocumulus case in Part I of this study, as well as previous studies of shallow mixed-phase Arctic clouds, that showed an underprediction of liquid water path. The overestimate of liquid water path and underestimate of ice water path occur primarily when deeper mixed-phase clouds extending into the mid-troposphere were observed. These results suggest important differences in the ability of models to simulate Arctic mixed-phase clouds that are deep and multi-layered versus shallow and single-layered. In general, models with a more sophisticated, two-moment treatment of the cloud microphysics produce a somewhat smaller liquid water path that is closer to observations. The cloud-resolving models tend to produce a larger cloud fraction than the single-column models. The liquid water path and especially the cloud fraction have a large impact on the cloud radiative forcing at the surface, which is dominated by the longwave flux for this case.

Morrison, H; McCoy, R B; Klein, S A; Xie, S; Luo, Y; Avramov, A; Chen, M; Cole, J; Falk, M; Foster, M; Genio, A D; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; McFarquhar, G; Poellot, M; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

250

ocean | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ocean ocean Dataset Summary Description This shapefile represents the seasonal winter depth profile to reach water at a temperature of 20ºC. Source NREL Date Released October 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords depth profile hydrokinetic ocean ocean energy ocean thermal energy conversion OTEC seawater cooling thermal Data application/zip icon OTEC Seawater Cooling 20ºC Depth Profile - Winter Average (zip, 1.1 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period March 2009 - February 2011 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"). The user is granted the right, without any fee or cost, to use, copy, modify, alter, enhance and distribute this data for any purpose whatsoever, provided that this entire notice appears in all copies of the data. Further, the user of this data agrees to credit NREL in any publications or software that incorporate or use the data. Access to and use of the GIS data shall further impose the following obligations on the User. The names DOE/NREL may not be used in any advertising or publicity to endorse or promote any product or commercial entity using or incorporating the GIS data unless specific written authorization is obtained from DOE/NREL. The User also understands that DOE/NREL shall not be obligated to provide updates, support, consulting, training or assistance of any kind whatsoever with regard to the use of the GIS data. THE GIS DATA IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL DOE/NREL BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO CLAIMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOSS OF DATA OR PROFITS, WHICH MAY RESULT FROM AN ACTION IN CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS CLAIM THAT ARISES OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE ACCESS OR USE OF THE GIS DATA. The User acknowledges that access to the GIS data is subject to U.S. Export laws and regulations and any use or transfer of the GIS data must be authorized under those regulations. The User shall not use, distribute, transfer, or transmit GIS data or any products incorporating the GIS data except in compliance with U.S. export regulations. If requested by DOE/NREL, the User agrees to sign written assurances and other export-related documentation as may be required to comply with U.S. export regulations.

251

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOE-EPA Working Group on Ocean TherUial Energy Conversion,Sands, M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)r:he comnercialization of ocean thermal energy conversion

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

The bottom of the ocean food chain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The bottom of the ocean food chain 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:July 2013 All Issues submit The bottom of the ocean food chain Global ocean...

253

Strong wind forcing of the ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Geophysical Research-Oceans, 107 (C2). Vanderbilt, V .in the subtropical pacific ocean. Science, 316, 1017^1021.simulations of the upper ocean's response to hurricane felix

Zedler, Sarah E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Connecting Changing Ocean Circulation with Changing Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of changing ocean currents on climate change is evaluated by comparing an earth system model’s response to increased CO2 with and without an ocean circulation response. Inhibiting the ocean circulation response, by specifying a ...

Michael Winton; Stephen M. Griffies; Bonita L. Samuels; Jorge L. Sarmiento; Thomas L. Frölicher

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print Friday, 21 June 2013 10:08 The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the...

256

Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) Summary The COSIM project develops advanced ocean and ice models for evaluating the role of ocean and ice in high-latitude climate...

257

Ocean Tidal and Wave Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

First published in 2000, the annual Renewable Energy Technical Assessment Guide (TAG-RE) provides a consistent basis for evaluating the economic feasibility of renewable generation technologies. This excerpt from the 2005 TAG-RE addresses ocean tidal and wave energy conversion technologies, which offer promise for converting the significant energy potential available in ocean tidal currents and waves to electricity in the future.

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

258

The Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) Campaign  

SciTech Connect

The ALTOS campaign focuses on operating a tethered observing system for routine in situ sampling of low-level (< 2 km) Arctic clouds. It has been a long-term hope to fly tethered systems at Barrow, Alaska, but it is clear that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will not permit in-cloud tether systems at Barrow, even if unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) operations are allowed in the future. We have provided the scientific rationale for long-term, routine in situ measurements of cloud and aerosol properties in the Arctic. The existing restricted air space at Oliktok offers an opportunity to do so.

Verlinde, J

2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

259

Ocean Navitas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Navitas Navitas Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Navitas Address Nursery House Place United Kingdom Zip DN21 5BQ Sector Ocean Product Ocean Navitas was incorporated in May 2006 by experienced engineers, businessmen and sailing enthusiasts David Hunt, James McCague and Simon Condry. Website http://www.oceannavitas.com Region United Kingdom References Ocean NavitasUNIQ75db538f85b32404-ref-000014E2-QINU LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Ocean Navitas NaREC This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Aegir Dynamo This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it.

260

Ocean - FAQ | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FAQ FAQ Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean Frequently Asked Questions Following are some Frequently Asked Questions, we hope to add to this list as we hear from you. Questions What is Ocean.data.gov? How can I use this resource? What data can I expect to find here? Where do these data come from? Can data from State and academic sources be included in this portal? Who can suggest data and information to be included in Ocean.data.gov? Who decides what data are included? How do I get involved? How does this differ from other data efforts such as regional data portals? Where do I find information about data standards, metadata standards, and formats? Can we provide feedback about a particular dataset?

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Arctic Oil and Natural Gas Potential Philip Budzik U.S. Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arctic Oil and Natural Gas Potential Arctic Oil and Natural Gas Potential Philip Budzik U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting Oil and Gas Division October, 2009 Introduction The Arctic is defined as the Northern hemisphere region located north of the Arctic Circle, the circle of latitude where sunlight is uniquely present or absent for 24 continuous hours on the summer and winter solstices, respectively. The Arctic Circle spans the globe at 66.56° (66°34') north latitude (Figure 1). 1 The Arctic could hold about 22 percent of the world's undiscovered conventional oil and natural gas resources. The prospects for Arctic oil and natural gas production are discussed taking into consideration the nature of the resources, the cost of developing them, and the

262

Green Ocean Wave Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Wave Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Ocean Wave Energy Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.greenoceanwa Region United States LinkedIn...

263

Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is...

264

Energy Basics: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy...

265

The Global Impact of Ocean Nourishment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the ocean to sequester atmospheric carbon dioxide and to increase the sustainable fish catch. The present annual level of photosynthetic activity of the upper ocean is...

266

Energy Basics: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermal Energy Conversion A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity. OTEC works best when...

267

Oceanic shipping soundscapes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shipping and wind are key sources in the oceanic soundscape that affects marine mammal habitats. A new method of forming such soundscapes is presented. Frequency and range dependent transmission losses are precomputed from a grid of virtual sources using fast ray computations (BELLHOP) on a specified number of radial lines. Each radial line samples the bathymetry along its bearing out to a given maximum range. A shipping soundscape is then estimated by assigning a source spectral density level (dB re 1 ? Pa2/Hz) and a shipping density (number of ships per unit area per unit time) to the various grid nodes. Such density values are obtained directly from ships carrying an automatic identification system (AIS) that transmit information such as ship type

Christian de Moustier; Michael Porter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Ocean Energy Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ocean Energy Technology Basics Ocean Energy Technology Basics Ocean Energy Technology Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:18pm Addthis Text Version Photo of low waves in the ocean. A dock is visible in the background. Oceans cover more than 70% of the Earth's surface. As the world's largest solar collectors, oceans contain thermal energy from the sun and produce mechanical energy from tides and waves. Even though the sun affects all ocean activity, the gravitational pull of the moon primarily drives tides, and wind powers ocean waves. Learn more about: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy Ocean Resources Addthis Related Articles Energy Department Releases New Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database shows mean current speed of tidal streams. The East Coast, as shown above, has strong tides that could be tapped to produce energy. | Photo courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology

269

Synoptic Activity in the Arctic Basin, 1979–85  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synoptic activity in the Arctic basin from 70°–907deg;N is examined for the period 1979–85, using improved pressure analyses incorporating data from a network of drifting buoys. Geographical and seasonal variations in cyclone and anticyclone ...

Mark C. Serreze; Roger G. Barry

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Cirriform Rotor Cloud Observed on a Canadian Arctic Ice Cap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A thin rotor cloud was observed on the lee side of Penny Ice Cap in the Canadian Arctic on 21 April 1996. The cloud consisted of thin cirriform layers, so that its motion was clearly observed. By means of time-lapse camera photography, the ...

Hisashi Ozawa; Kumiko Goto-Azuma; Koyuru Iwanami; Roy M. Koerner

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Interannual variability of arctic landfast ice between 1976 and 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of weekly sea ice charts produced by the U.S. National Ice Center from 1976 to 2007 indicates large interannual variations in the averaged winter landfast ice extent around the Arctic Basin. During the 32-year period of the record, ...

Yanling Yu; Harry Stern; Charles Fowler; Florence Fetterer; James Maslanik

272

Observation of Ice Crystal Formation in Lower Arctic Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clear sky ice crystals or diamond dust displays are observed in polar regions, both remote and populated; when the temperature falls to ?20°C and where abundant sources of water vapor are present. In remote areas of the Arctic, these ice crystals ...

Takeshi Ohtake; Kolf Jayaweera; Ken-Ichi Sakurai

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

The Water and Energy Budget of the Arctic Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arctic plays a major role in the global circulation, and its water and energy budget is not as well explored as that in other regions of the world. The aim of this study is to calculate the climatological mean water and energy fluxes ...

Tido Semmler; Daniela Jacob; K. Heinke Schlünzen; Ralf Podzun

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

The Gravity Wave–Arctic Stratospheric Vortex Interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four hundred and twenty-two nights of stratospheric gravity wave observations were obtained with a Rayleigh lidar in the High Arctic at Eureka (80°N, 86°W) during six wintertime measurement campaigns between 1992/93 and 1997/98. The measurements ...

Thomas J. Duck; James A. Whiteway; Allan I. Carswell

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Warming Trends in the Arctic from Clear Sky Satellite Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite thermal infrared data on surface temperatures provide pan-Arctic coverage from 1981 to 2001 during cloud-free conditions and reveal large warming anomalies in the 1990s compared to the 1980s and regional variability in the trend. The ...

Josefino C. Comiso

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Estimation of Heat and Mass Fluxes Over Arctic Leads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent work on the turbulent transfer of scalar quantities following a step increase in the surface value of the scalar is directly applicable to the problem of estimating heat and mass transfer from Arctic leads in winter. If the turbulent flux ...

Edgar L. Andreas

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Factors Influencing Simulated Changes in Future Arctic Cloudiness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study diagnoses the changes in Arctic clouds simulated by the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) in a transient 2 × CO2 simulation. Four experiments—one fully coupled and three with prescribed SSTs and/or sea ice cover—are used ...

Stephen J. Vavrus; Uma S. Bhatt; Vladimir A. Alexeev

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: oil field or wilderness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second session of the 100th Congress will see continued debate over the prospect of oil and gas drilling on a 19-million-acre expanse of mountains and tundra known as the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). The arctic refuge, most of which lies above the Arctic Circle, is larger than any refuges in the lower 48 states. Because of its size, the area supports a broad range of linked ecosystems. Of particular concern is the 1.5-million-acre coastal plain, which may be targeted for development. The coastal plain provides a home, at least part of the year, to Alaska's porcupine caribou. The coastal plain also supports many other forms of wildlife-including the wolf, arctic fox, brown bear, polar bear, and arctic peregrine falcon, which is listed as a threatened species. The potential effects of drilling projects extend beyond loss of wildlife; they include desecration of the land itself. Although few members of Congress deny the value of protecting the amazing variety of life on the coastal plain, some insist that limited drilling could be conducted without destroying crucial habitat. Last July, the department tentatively divided some of the targeted lands among native corporations in preparation for leasing to oil companies. In response to what was felt to be an attempt to overstep congressional authority, the House passed HR 2629, banning this kind of land deal without congressional approval. In essence, the measure reiterated congressional authority provided by the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA) of 1980. This act mandated the study of environmental threats and oil potential by the Department of Interior, while putting the ANWR coastal plain off-limits to development without an explicit congressional directive.

Spitler, A.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Potential impacts of the Arctic on interannual and interdecadal summer precipitation over China  

SciTech Connect

After the end of the 1970s, there has been a tendency for enhanced summer precipitation over South China and the Yangtze River valley and drought over North China and Northeastern China. Coincidentally, Arctic ice concentration has decreased since the late 1970s, with larger reduction in summer than spring. However, the Arctic warming is more significant in spring than summer, suggesting that spring Arctic conditions could be more important in their remote impacts. This study investigates the potential impacts of the Arctic on summer precipitation in China. The leading spatial patterns and time coefficients of the unfiltered, interannual, and interdecadal precipitation (1960-2008) modes were analyzed and compared using empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis, which shows that the first three EOFs can capture the principal precipitation patterns (northern, central and southern patterns) over eastern China. Regression of the Arctic spring and summer temperature onto the time coefficients of the leading interannual and interdecadal precipitation modes shows that interdecadal summer precipitation in China is related to the Arctic spring warming, but the relationship with Arctic summer temperature is weak. Moreover, no notable relationships were found between the first three modes of interannual precipitation and Arctic spring or summer temperatures. Finally, correlations between summer precipitation and the Arctic Oscillation (AO) index from January to August were investigated, which indicate that summer precipitation in China correlates with AO only to some extent. Overall, this study suggests important relationships between the Arctic spring temperature and summer precipitation over China at the interdecadal time scale.

Li, Yuefeng; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 158 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany) Institut Français

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 160 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for Ocean Drilling Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany

282

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 160 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for Ocean Drilling Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany

283

Thermodynamic Analysis of Ocean Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculating a streamfunction as function of depth and density is proposed as a new way of analyzing the thermodynamic character of the overturning circulation in the global ocean. The sign of an overturning cell in this streamfunction directly ...

J. Nycander; J. Nilsson; K. Döös; G. Broström

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

The Oceanic Eddy Heat Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rectified eddy heat transport is calculated from a global high-resolution ocean general circulation model. The eddy heat transport is found to be strong in the western boundary currents, the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, and the equatorial ...

Steven R. Jayne; Jochem Marotzke

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Humidity Profiles over the Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The distribution of water vapor in the atmosphere affects climate change through radiative balance and surface evaporation. The variabilities of atmospheric humidity profile over oceans from daily to interannual time scales were examined using ...

W. Timothy Liu; Wenqing Tang; Pearn P. Niiler

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The North Slope of Alaska CART and Arctic Change 2002 The North Slope of Alaska CART and Arctic Change 2002 Zak, B.D., Zirzow, J.A., and Einfeld, W., Sandia National Laboratories Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART), operational since spring of 1998, is maturing just in time for the push to understand the far-reaching changes in the Arctic presently occurring. From the mid 1970s to the mid 1990s, arctic sea ice areal coverage has decreased about 5%, but ice thickness appears to have decreased about 40%. In addition, temperature and salinity patterns in the Arctic Ocean and the associated thermohaline circulation have been affected, as have many other climate-related processes. An Arctic

287

A FIRE-ACE/SHEBA Case Study of Mixed-Phase Arctic Boundary Layer Clouds: Entrainment Rate Limitations on Rapid Primary Ice Nucleation Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of long-lived mixed-phase Arctic boundary layer clouds on 7 May 1998 during the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Regional Experiment (FIRE)–Arctic Cloud Experiment (ACE)/Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic ...

Ann M. Fridlind; Bastiaan van Diedenhoven; Andrew S. Ackerman; Alexander Avramov; Agnieszka Mrowiec; Hugh Morrison; Paquita Zuidema; Matthew D. Shupe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate System Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Primary activities are reported in these areas: climate system component studies via one-way coupling experiments; development of the Regional Arctic Climate System Model (RACM); and physical feedback studies focusing on changes in Arctic sea ice using the fully coupled model.

Lettenmaier, Dennis P

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

289

MPAS-Ocean Development Update  

SciTech Connect

The Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) is a modeling framework developed jointly between NCAR and LANL, built to allow core developers to: rapidly develop new dynamical cores, and leverage improvements made to shared codes. MPAS-Ocean (MPAS-O) is a functioning ocean model capable of high resolution, or highly vairable resolution simulations. The first MPAS-O publication is expected by the end of the year.

Jacobsen, Douglas W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ringler, Todd D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Petersen, Mark R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jones, Philip W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Maltrud, Mathew E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

290

Ocean Tidal Dissipation and its Role in Solar System Satellite Evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Magma ocean dissipation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .of the ocean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Tidally-driven flow in global satellite oceans

Chen, Erinna

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Oceanic Influences on the Seasonal Cycle in Evaporation over the Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual mean and seasonal cycle in latent heating over the Indian Ocean are investigated using a simple, analytical ocean model and a 3D, numerical, ocean model coupled to a prescribed atmosphere, which permits interaction through sea surface ...

Roxana C. Wajsowicz; Paul S. Schopf

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

In a Perfect Ocean: The State of the Fisheries and Ecosystems in the North Atlantic Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: In a Perfect Ocean: The State of the Fisheriesin the North Atlantic Ocean By Daniel Pauly and Jay MacleanJay Maclean. In a Perfect Ocean: The State of the Fisheries

Miller, Ryder W.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

The dynamic response of oceanic hydrate deposits to ocean temperature change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during transit through the ocean water column Geophys. Res.hydrate in the world's oceans. Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 8,of methane hydrate in ocean sediment. Energy and Fuels, 19,

Reagan, Matthew T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Petroleum geochemistry of oils and rocks in Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thirteen oil seeps or oil-stained outcrops in or adjacent to the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) in northeastern Alaska indicate that commercial quantities of hydrocarbons may be present in the subsurface. The area is flanked by two important petroleum provinces: the Prudhoe Bay area on the west and the Mackenzie delta on the east. Organic carbon content (wt. %), organic matter type, and pyrolysis hydrocarbon yield show that rock units such as the Kingak Shale (average 1.3 wt. %), pebble shale unit (2.1 wt. %), and Canning Formation (1.9 wt. %) contain predominantly type III organic matter. The exception is the Hue Shale (5.9 wt. %), which contains type II organic matter. Pre-Cretaceous rocks that crop out in the Brooks Range could not be adequately evaluated because of high thermal maturity. Thermal maturity thresholds for oil, condensate, and gas calculated from vitrinite reflectance gradients in the Point Thomson area are 4000, 7300, and 9330 m, respectively (12,000, 22,500, and 28,000 ft). Time-temperature index (TTI) calculations for the Beli-1 and Point Thomson-1 wells immediately west of ANWR indicate that maturity first occurred in the south and progressed north. The Cretaceous Hue Shale matured in the Beli-1 well during the Eocene and in the Point Thomson-1 well in the late Miocene to early Pliocene. In the Point Thomson area, the condensate and gas recovered from the Thomson sandstone and basement complex based on API gravity and gas/oil ratio (GOR) probably originated from the pebble shale unit, and on the same basis, the oil recovered from the Canning Formation probably originated from the Hue Shale. The gas recovered from the three wells in the Kavik area is probably thermal gas from overmature source rocks in the immediate area.

Magoon, L.B.; Anders, D.E.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Arctic oil and natural gas resources - Today in Energy - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wind › Geothermal › ... seals, whales, and other sea life. The adequacy of existing technology to manage offshore oil spills in an arctic environment is another ...

296

NOS Point Forecast Guidance to Weather and Ocean Conditions ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOS Point Forecast Guidance to Weather and Ocean Conditions Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities ...

297

NREL-Ocean Energy Thermal Conversion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Energy Thermal Conversion Jump to: navigation, search Logo: NREL-Ocean Energy Thermal Conversion Name NREL-Ocean Energy Thermal Conversion AgencyCompany Organization...

298

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft1980 :. i l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTALDevelopment Plan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal Energy Conversion Conference. Ocean Systems Branch,Thermal Energy Conversion Conference. Ocean Systems Branch,thermal energy conversion, June 18, 1979. Ocean Systems

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Mechanisms of the meridional heat transport in the Southern Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

atlas of the Southern Ocean, Natural Environment ResearchMHT. Keywords Southern Ocean . Meridional heat transport .1 Introduction The Southern Ocean (SO) circulation plays an

Volkov, Denis L.; Fu, Lee-Lueng; Lee, Tong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Observation of Physical Fluxes Between an Estuary and the Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between the coastal ocean and a semi-enclosed estuarinebetween the coastal ocean and a semi-enclosed estuarinebetween the coastal ocean and a semi-enclosed estuarine

Stacey, Mark; Powell, Thomas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Depth profiling ambient noise in the deep ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acoustic Ambient Noise in the Ocean: Spectra and Sources,"and Osterhus, S. (1999). "Ocean Ambient Sound Instrumenta Subsurface Package," J. Atmos. Ocean. Tech. 16, 1118-1126.

Barclay, David Readshaw

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Ocean Acidification Impacts on Shellfish Workshop: Findings and Recommendations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The workshop to investigate ocean acidification impacts on Growers Association.   Ocean Acidification Impacts on Proceedings  Integrated Ocean Observing Systems  California 

Dickson, Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo-Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo-affect the dynam- ics and thermodynamics of the upper ocean.

Drushka, Kyla

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Mesoscale Modeling During Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment  

SciTech Connect

Mixed-phase arctic stratus clouds are the predominant cloud type in the Arctic (Curry et al. 2000) and through various feedback mechanisms exert a strong influence on the Arctic climate. Perhaps one of the most intriguing of their features is that they tend to have liquid tops that precipitate ice. Despite the fact that this situation is colloidally unstable, these cloud systems are quite long lived - from a few days to over a couple of weeks. It has been hypothesized that mixed-phase clouds are maintained through a balance between liquid water condensation resulting from the cloud-top radiative cooling and ice removal by precipitation (Pinto 1998; Harrington et al. 1999). In their modeling study Harrington et al. (1999) found that the maintenance of this balance depends strongly on the ambient concentration of ice forming nucleus (IFN). In a follow-up study, Jiang et al. (2002), using only 30% of IFN concentration predicted by Meyers et al. (1992) IFN parameterization were able to obtain results similar to the observations reported by Pinto (1998). The IFN concentration measurements collected during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), conducted in October 2004 over the North Slope of Alaska and the Beaufort Sea (Verlinde et al. 2005), also showed much lower values then those predicted (Prenne, pers. comm.) by currently accepted ice nucleation parameterizations (e.g. Meyers et al. 1992). The goal of this study is to use the extensive IFN data taken during M-PACE to examine what effects low IFN concentrations have on mesoscale cloud structure and coastal dynamics.

Avramov, A.; Harringston, J.Y.; Verlinde, J.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

306

Advancement into the Arctic Region for Bioactive Sponge Secondary Metabolites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Porifera have long been a reservoir for the discovery of bioactive compounds and drug discovery. Most research in the area has focused on sponges from tropical and temperate waters, but more recently the focus has shifted to the less accessible colder waters of the Antarctic and, to a lesser extent, the Arctic. The Antarctic region in particular has been a more popular location for natural products discovery and has provided promising candidates for drug development. This article reviews groups of bioactive compounds that have been isolated and reported from the southern reaches of the Arctic Circle, surveys the known sponge diversity present in the Arctic waters, and details a recent sponge collection by our group in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska. The collection has yielded previously undescribed sponge species along with primary activity against opportunistic infectious diseases, malaria, and HCV. The discovery of new sponge species and bioactive crude extracts gives optimism for the isolation of new bioactive compounds from a relatively unexplored source.

Samuel Abbas; Michelle Kelly; John Bowling; James Sims; A Waters; Mark Hamann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Sea Ice in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago: Modeling the Past (1950–2004) and the Future (2041–60)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considering the recent losses observed in Arctic sea ice and the anticipated future warming due to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, sea ice retreat in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) is expected and indeed is already being observed. ...

Tessa Sou; Gregory Flato

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Ocean - Tools | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools Tools Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean Decision-Support Tools (DSTs): Science and information are fundamental to effective marine planning. Marine planning involves inclusive discussion and analyses of the status and potential uses of 3-dimensional areas of coastal, marine and Great Lakes ecosystems (including the water column) and their potential changes over time. Relevant spatial data and derived interpretive and analytical products (i.e. decision-support tools) help inform all phases of the marine planning process. To date, several decision-support tools have been develop to support marine planning efforts. Marine planners should carefully evaluate which tools best apply to their region or specific issue or project. Below is a list of

309

Approximation of Ocean Heat Storage by Ocean–Atmosphere Energy Exchange: Implications for Seasonal Cycle Mixed Layer Ocean Formulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The approximation of ocean heat storage by the net surface energy flux and the implications for zonal mean SST simulation using mixed layer ocean formulation are examined. The analysis considers both constant and variable depth mixed layers. ...

Robert G. Gallimore; David D. Houghton

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Investigation of Microphysical Parameterizations of Snow and Ice in Arctic Clouds during M-PACE through ModelObservation Comparisons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investigation of Microphysical Parameterizations of Snow and Ice in Arctic Clouds during M the microphysical properties of Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus. Intensive measurements taken during the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M

Solomon, Amy

311

Ocean Color Web | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Color Web Ocean Color Web Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean » Data Ocean Color Web Dataset Summary Description A comprehensive image analysis package for the processing, display, analysis, and quality control of ocean color data. Tags {Ocean,"water color",spectrometer,"sea viewing",MODIS,"marine biology",NASA,GSFC,"Goddard Space Flight Center"} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated 15-Jan-2010 Publisher National Aeronautics and Space Administration Contact Name Contact Email Gene.C.Feldman@nasa.gov Unique Identifier NASA-1547

312

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermal Energy Conversion Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion August 16, 2013 - 4:22pm Addthis A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in...

313

Buoyancy Arrest and Shelf–Ocean Exchange  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When steady flow in a stratified ocean passes between the continental slope and open ocean, its ability to cross isobaths is potentially limited by buoyancy arrest. If the bottom Ekman transport vanishes and there are no interior stresses, then ...

K. H. Brink

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Dynamic and Thermodynamic Regulation of Ocean Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relative roles of clouds, surface evaporation, and ocean heat transport in limiting maximum sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the western Pacific warm pool are investigated by means of simple and intermediate coupled ocean–atmosphere models. ...

Tim Li; Timothy F. Hogan; C-P. Chang

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Dynamics of global ocean heat transport variability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A state-of-the-art, high-resolution ocean general circulation model is used to estimate the time-dependent global ocean heat transport and investigate its dynamics. The north-south heat transport is the prime manifestation ...

Jayne, Steven Robert

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Open Ocean Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Open Ocean Energy Ltd Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.open-ocean-e LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

317

An Ocean Observing System for Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designs and implementation are proceeding for a Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) and a Global Climate Observing System (GCOS). The initial design for the ocean component of the GCOS, which is also the climate module of the GOOS, was completed ...

Worth D. Nowlin Jr.; Neville Smith; George Needler; Peter K. Taylor; Robert Weller; Ray Schmitt; Liliane Merlivat; Alain Vézina; Arthur Alexiou; Michael McPhaden; Massaaki Wakatsuchi

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Assimilation of Altimeter Data into Ocean Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of assimilating satellite altimeter data into an ocean model is considered for the case in which the ocean currents are weak, so that they can be represented by a superposition of linear Rossby waves, and the altimeter measurements ...

D. J. Webb; A. Moore

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

A Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development is described of a Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (COADS)—the result of a cooperative project to collect global weather observations taken near the ocean's surface since 1854, primarily from merchant ships, into a compact and ...

Scott D. Woodruff; Ralph J. Slutz; Roy L. Jenne; Peter M. Steurer

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Transit-Time Distributions in a Global Ocean Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results from a simulation of the ocean “transit-time distribution” (“TTD”) for global and regional ocean surface boundary conditions are presented based on a 5000-yr integration using the Parallel Ocean Program ocean general circulation model. ...

Synte Peacock; Mathew Maltrud

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

OceanEnergyMMS.p65  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minerals Management Service, U.S. Department of the Interior Ocean Energy PAGE 1 Minerals Management Service, U.S. Department of the Interior Ocean Energy PAGE 1 Teacher Guide .......................................................... 2 Related National Science Standards .......................... 3 Introduction to Ocean Energy .................................. 4 Petroleum & Natural Gas ......................................... 5 Natural Oil and Gas Seeps ........................................ 7 Methane Hydrates .................................................... 8 Solar Energy .............................................................. 9 Wind Energy ........................................................... 10 Wave Energy ........................................................... 11 OTEC: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion .............

322

The 1981 ocean tomography experiment: Preliminary results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary results from a 1981 test ocean acoustic tomography experiment are presented. The system deployed in the southern North Atlantic

The Ocean Tomography Group; R. C. Spindel

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 106 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the following agencies: Australia/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche

324

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 201 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the following agencies: Australia/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche

325

LES Simulations of Roll Clouds Observed During Mixed- Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment  

SciTech Connect

Roll clouds, and associated roll convection, are fairly common features of the atmospheric boundary layer. While these organized cumuliform clouds are found over many regions of the planet, they are quite ubiquitous near the edge of the polar ice sheets. In particular, during periods of off-ice flow, when cold polar air flows from the ice pack over the relatively warm ocean water, strong boundary layer convection develops along with frequent rolls. According to Bruemmer and Pohlman (2000), most of the total cloud cover in the Arctic is due to roll clouds. In an effort to examine the influences of mixed-phase microphysics on the boundary layer evolution of roll clouds during off-ice flow, Olsson and Harrington (2000) used a 2D mesoscale model coupled to a bulk microphysical scheme (see Section 2). Their results showed that mixed-phase clouds produced more shallow boundary layers with weaker turbulence than liquid-phase cases. Furthermore, their results showed that because of th e reduced turbulent drag on the atmosphere in the mixed-phase case, regions of mesoscale divergence in the marginal ice-zone were significantly affected. A follow-up 2D study (Harrington and Olsson 2001) showed that the reduced turbulent intensity in mixed-phase cases was due to precipitation. Ice precipitation caused downdraft stabilization which fed back and caused a reduction in the surface heat fluxes. In this work, we extend the work of Olsson and Harrington (2000) and Harrington and Olsson (2001) by examining the impacts of ice microphysics on roll convection. We will present results that illustrate how microphysics alters roll cloud structure and dynamics.

Greenberg, S.D.; Harrington, J.Y.; Prenni, A.; DeMott, P.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

326

Do Changes in the Midlatitude Circulation Have Any Impact on the Arctic Surface Air Temperature Trend?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The warming of the near-surface air in the Arctic region has been larger than the global mean surface warming. There is general agreement that the Arctic amplification of the surface air temperature (SAT) trend to a considerable extent is due to ...

R. G. Graversen

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

TOWARDS A CHARACTERIZATION OF ARCTIC MIXED-PHASE CLOUDS CIRES/NOAA/ETL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, radar-based retrieval methods. On average, mixed-phase cloud ice particle mean diameters increase fromTOWARDS A CHARACTERIZATION OF ARCTIC MIXED-PHASE CLOUDS Shupe, M. CIRES/NOAA/ETL Kollias, P Laboratory P.O. Box, Upton, NY www.bnl.gov ABSTRACT Mixed-phase clouds play a unique role in the Arctic

328

Low-Level Temperature Inversions of the Eurasian Arctic and Comparisons with Soviet Drifting Station Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal and regional variations in characteristics of the Arctic low-level temperature inversion are examined using up to 12 years of twice-daily rawinsonde data from 31 inland and coastal sites of the Eurasian Arctic and a total of nearly six ...

Mark C. Serreze; Russell C. Schnell; Jonathan D. Kahl

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Constraining Oceanic dust deposition using surface 1 ocean dissolved Al 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constraining Oceanic dust deposition using surface 1 ocean dissolved Al 2 Qin Han, J. Keith Moore, Charles Zender, Chris Measures, David Hydes 3 Abstract 4 We use measurements of ocean surface dissolved Al and Deposition 6 (DEAD) model, to constrain dust deposition to the oceans. Our Al database contains 7 all

Zender, Charles

330

The CCSM4 Ocean Component  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ocean component of the Community Climate System Model version 4 (CCSM4) is described, and its solutions from the twentieth-century (20C) simulations are documented in comparison with observations and those of CCSM3. The improvements to the ...

Gokhan Danabasoglu; Susan C. Bates; Bruce P. Briegleb; Steven R. Jayne; Markus Jochum; William G. Large; Synte Peacock; Steve G. Yeager

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Transport of Freshwater by the Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global distribution of freshwater transport in the ocean is presented, based on an integration point at Bering Strait, which connects the Pacific and Atlantic oceans via the Artic Ocean. Through Bering Strait, 0.8 × 106 m3 s?1 of relatively ...

Susan E. Wijffels; Raymond W. Schmitt; Harry L. Bryden; Anders Stigebrandt

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Ocean Circulation Kinetic Energy: Reservoirs, Sources,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The coupling of the generation of different energy forms in the dynamics (in either balanced or wave motions are almost nonexistent in the ocean. www.annualreviews.org · Ocean Circulation Kinetic Energy 255 Annu.Rev.Fluid processes? Are the seemingly different dynamical ranges coupled? 2. THE OCEANIC ENERGY BUDGET We begin

Ferrari, Raffaele

333

EA-1193: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

93: Finding of No Significant Impact 93: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1193: Finding of No Significant Impact Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site The United States Department of Energy has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Cloud and Radiation Testbed (ARM/CART), North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean. The EA analyzes the impacts on land use, tundra, air quality, cultural resources, socioeconomics, and wildlife. Finding of No Significant Impact for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site, DOE/EA-1193 (February 1997) More Documents & Publications

334

Ocean Skeletal Structures Hypotheses and Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss hypotheses on formation of ocean skeletal structures. These structures entered the ocean together with atmospheric precipitation and were assembled from fragments of skeletal structures present in clouds. We base interpretation of this phenomenon on surface tension forces between fundamental tubular blocks of the investigated structures that may also occur beneath the ocean surface. A capillary model is presented to explain formation of a network of interacting tubes. Data about the nature of ocean skeletal structures can be instrumental in modeling many processes associated with physics of the ocean.

Rantsev-Kartinov, V A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Ocean Skeletal Structures Hypotheses and Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss hypotheses on formation of ocean skeletal structures. These structures entered the ocean together with atmospheric precipitation and were assembled from fragments of skeletal structures present in clouds. We base interpretation of this phenomenon on surface tension forces between fundamental tubular blocks of the investigated structures that may also occur beneath the ocean surface. A capillary model is presented to explain formation of a network of interacting tubes. Data about the nature of ocean skeletal structures can be instrumental in modeling many processes associated with physics of the ocean.

V. A. Rantsev-Kartinov; C. G. Parigger

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

336

Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the period 1964 through 1966. This report summarizes the literature and database reviews and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Oil production in the Arctic Natl. Wildlife Refuge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This assessment responds to U.S. House and Senate committee requests for an examination of technical issues concerning potential development of the Arctic Natl. Wildlife Refuge (ANWAR) in northeastern Alaska. The illustrated report presents the results of an assessment of oilfield technology used to develop the Alaskan North Slope, as an analog for technology at ANWR. The report considers prospects for future North Slope oil production, especially the likelihood that oil flowing through the Trans Alaskan Pipeline System will decline dramatically during the next decade.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS) was established by the Census of Marine Life program. It is an evolving strategic alliance of people and organizations sharing a vision to make marine biogeographic data, from all over the world, freely available over the World Wide Web. It is not a project or program, and is not limited to data from CoML-related projects. Any organization, consortium, project or individual may contribute. OBIS provides, on an open access basis through the World Wide Web, taxonomically and geographically resolved data on marine life and the ocean environment, interoperability with similar databases, and software tools for data exploration and analysis. The OBIS secretariat is hosted by Rutgers University, Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences. [Copied, then edited from http://www.iobis.org/about/

340

Method for closing a drift between adjacent in-situ oil shale retorts  

SciTech Connect

A row of horizontally spaced-apart in situ oil shale retorts is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. Each row of retorts is formed by excavating development drifts at different elevations through opposite side boundaries of a plurality of retorts in the row of retorts. Each retort is formed by explosively expanding formation toward one or more voids within the boundaries of the retort site to form a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in each retort. Following formation of each retort, the retort development drifts on the advancing side of the retort are closed off by covering formation particles within the development drift with a layer of crushed oil shale particles having a particle size smaller than the average particle size of oil shale particles in the adjacent retort. In one embodiment, the crushed oil shale particles are pneumatically loaded into the development drift to pack the particles tightly all the way to the top of the drift and throughout the entire cross section of the drift. The closure between adjacent retorts provided by the finely divided oil shale provides sufficient resistance to gas flow through the development drift to effectively inhibit gas flow through the drift during subsequent retorting operations.

Hines, A.E.

1984-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Method for closing a drift between adjacent in situ oil shale retorts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A row of horizontally spaced-apart in situ oil shale retorts is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. Each row of retorts is formed by excavating development drifts at different elevations through opposite side boundaries of a plurality of retorts in the row of retorts. Each retort is formed by explosively expanding formation toward one or more voids within the boundaries of the retort site to form a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in each retort. Following formation of each retort, the retort development drifts on the advancing side of the retort are closed off by covering formation particles within the development drift with a layer of crushed oil shale particles having a particle size smaller than the average particle size of oil shale particles in the adjacent retort. In one embodiment, the crushed oil shale particles are pneumatically loaded into the development drift to pack the particles tightly all the way to the top of the drift and throughout the entire cross section of the drift. The closure between adjacent retorts provided by the finely divided oil shale provides sufficient resistance to gas flow through the development drift to effectively inhibit gas flow through the drift during subsequent retorting operations.

Hines, Alex E. (Grand Junction, CO)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

The effects of geometry and adjacent regenerators on shell-and-tube heat exchangers in oscillating flows.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An experimental study into the effects of geometry and the presence of adjacent screens on the acoustic impedances and heat transfer performance of shell-and-tube heat… (more)

Brady, John

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Status of Wind-Diesel Applications in Arctic Climates: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The rising cost of diesel fuel and the environmental regulation for its transportation, use, and storage, combined with the clear impacts of increased arctic temperatures, is driving remote communities to examine alternative methods of providing power. Over the past few years, wind energy has been increasingly used to reduce diesel fuel consumption, providing economic, environmental, and security benefits to the energy supply of communities from Alaska to Antarctica. This summary paper describes the current state of wind-diesel systems, reviews the operation of wind-diesel plants in cold climates, discusses current research activities pertaining to these systems, and addresses their technical and commercial challenges. System architectures, dispatch strategies, and operating experience from a variety of wind-diesel systems in Alaska will be reviewed. Specific focus will also be given to the control of power systems with large amounts of wind generation and the complexities of replacing diesel engine waste heat with excess wind energy, a key factor in assessing power plants for retrofit. A brief overview of steps for assessing the viability of retrofitting diesel power systems with wind technologies will also be provided. Because of the large number of isolated diesel minigrids, the market for adding wind to these systems is substantial, specifically in arctic climates and on islands that rely on diesel-only power generation.

Baring-Gould, I.; Corbus, D.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

A recent bifurcation in Arctic sea-ice cover  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is ongoing debate over whether Arctic sea-ice has already passed a 'tipping point', or whether it will do so in future, with several recent studies arguing that the loss of summer sea ice does not involve a bifurcation because it is highly reversible in models. Recently developed methods can detect and sometimes forewarn of bifurcations in time-series data, hence we applied them to satellite data for Arctic sea-ice cover. Here we show that a new low ice cover state has appeared from 2007 onwards, which is distinct from the normal state of seasonal sea ice variation, suggesting a bifurcation has occurred from one attractor to two. There was no robust early warning signal of critical slowing down prior to this bifurcation, consistent with it representing the appearance of a new ice cover state rather than the loss of stability of the existing state. The new low ice cover state has been sampled predominantly in summer-autumn and seasonal forcing combined with internal climate variability are likely respons...

Livina, Valerie N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Arctic ocean long-term acoustic monitoring : ambient noise, environmental correlates, and transients north of Barrow, Alaska  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

regions for oil and natural gas exploration. The deviceseismic oil exploration, eventual oil and gas extraction,

Roth, Ethan H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

An Eddy Parameterization Based on Maximum Entropy Production with Application to Modeling of the Arctic Ocean Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An eddy parameterization derived from statistical mechanics of potential vorticity is applied for inviscid shallow-water equations. The solution of a variational problem based on the maximum entropy production (MEP) principle provides, with some ...

Igor Polyakov

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

1 Copyright 2011 by ASME Proceedings of the ASME 2011 30th International Conference on Ocean, Offshore and Arctic Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a controlled underbalanced condition. In retrospect, pressure readings and volume bled were indications

van Gelder, Pieter

348

A Potential Role for Immersion Freezing in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential Role for Immersion Freezing in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratus Potential Role for Immersion Freezing in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratus Gijs de Boer, Edwin W. Eloranta, Tempei Hashino, and Gregory J. Tripoli The University of Wisconsin - Madison (1) Introduction Ice formation appears to a dominant factor controlling the lifecycle of Arctic mixed-phase clouds. To date, our understanding of ice formation in these long-lasting cloud structures does not explain the formation of observed ice amounts. Particularly puzzling are observa-

349

storvold-99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Participation in SHEBA: A Mini-CART Site Operated ARM Participation in SHEBA: A Mini-CART Site Operated in the Arctic Ocean from October 1997 Until October 1998 R. Storvold, J. Delamere, H. A. Eide, H. Lindquist, P. Utley, and K. Stamnes Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska C. R. Turney and K. B. Widener Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington B. D. Zak Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico Introduction The Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) experiment provided a unique opportunity for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to obtain valuable data over the Arctic Ocean by participating in SHEBA through ARM's North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) team. A mini-CART (Cloud and Radiation Testbed) site was operated by the ARM NSA/AAO team at

350

Ocean - Regional Planning Efforts | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Planning Efforts Regional Planning Efforts Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean Regional Planning Efforts Marine planning is a science-based process that provides transparent information about ocean use and guarantees the public and stakeholders a voice early on in decisions affecting the uses of the marine environment. It is an inclusive, bottom-up approach that gives the Federal Government, States, and Tribes, with input from local communities, stakeholders, and the public, the ability to make informed decisions on how best to optimize the use of and protect the ocean, coasts, and Great Lakes. Under the National Ocean Policy, the United States is subdivided into nine regional planning areas. Within each region, Federal, State, and Tribal

351

Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earth, Space Sciences » Earth, Space Sciences » Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) The COSIM project develops advanced ocean and ice models for evaluating the role of ocean and ice in high-latitude climate change and projecting the impacts of high-latitude change on regions throughout the globe. Get Expertise Phil Jones COSIM Email Matthew Hecht COSIM Email Elizabeth Hunke COSIM Email Mat Maltrud COSIM Email Bill Lipscomb COSIM Email Scott Elliott COSIM Email Todd Ringler COSIM Email We are also developing a set of next-generation ocean and ice models with variable resolution horizontal grids to focus resolution on regions of interest or regions where specific processes (like eddies) need to be resolved. Summary The COSIM project develops advanced ocean and ice models for evaluating the

352

Horizontal stirring in the global ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizontal mixing and the distribution of coherent structures in the global ocean are analyzed using Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponents (FSLE), computed for the surface velocity field derived from the Ocean general circulation model For the Earth Simulator (OFES). FSLEs measure horizontal stirring and dispersion; additionally, the transport barriers which organize the oceanic flow can roughly be identified with the ridges of the FSLE field. We have performed a detailed statistical study, particularizing for the behaviour of the two hemispheres and different ocean basins. The computed Probability Distributions Functions (PDFs) of FSLE are broad and asymmetric. Horizontal mixing is generally more active in the northern hemisphere than in the southern one. Nevertheless the Southern Ocean is the most active ocean, and the Pacific the less active one. A striking result is that the main currents can be classified in two 'activity classes': Western Boundary Currents, which have broad PDFs with large FSLE values, and Eas...

Hernández-Carrasco, I; Hernández-García, E; Turiel, A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 155 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 155 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS AMAZON DEEP-SEA FAN Dr. Roger D. Flood Co of Canada P.O. Box 1006 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia Canada B2Y4A2 Dr. Adam Klaus Staff Scientist, Leg l55 Ocean and handling. D I S C L A I M E R This publication was prepared by the Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A

354

On the World-wide Circulation of the Deeper Waters of the World Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

circulation of the Pacific Ocean: Flow patterns, tracers,circulation of the Indian Ocean: Flow patterns, tracers, andthe figures. Fig. 1 Pacific Ocean winds Fig. 2 Pacific Ocean

Reid, Joseph L

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

The Effects of Mesoscale Ocean–Atmosphere Coupling on the Large-Scale Ocean Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small-scale variation in wind stress due to ocean–atmosphere interaction within the atmospheric boundary layer alters the temporal and spatial scale of Ekman pumping driving the double-gyre circulation of the ocean. A high-resolution ...

Andrew Mc C. Hogg; William K. Dewar; Pavel Berloff; Sergey Kravtsov; David K. Hutchinson

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

On the Ocean’s Large-Scale Circulation near the Limit of No Vertical Mixing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By convention, the ocean’s large-scale circulation is assumed to be a thermohaline overturning driven by the addition and extraction of buoyancy at the surface and vertical mixing in the interior. Previous work suggests that the overturning ...

J. R. Toggweiler; B. Samuels

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Mechanisms Governing Interannual Variability of Upper-Ocean Temperature in a Global Ocean Hindcast Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interannual variability in upper-ocean (0–400 m) temperature and governing mechanisms for the period 1968–97 are quantified from a global ocean hindcast simulation driven by atmospheric reanalysis and satellite data products. The ...

Scott C. Doney; Steve Yeager; Gokhan Danabasoglu; William G. Large; James C. McWilliams

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Seasonal Variations of Upper Ocean Transport from the Pacific to the Indian Ocean via Indonesian Straits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal variations of upper-ocean mass transport between the Pacific and Indian Oceans via the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) are examined using numerical experiments with a 1½-layer, reduced-gravity model forced with specific climatological ...

James T. Potemra

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Global Climate and Ocean Circulation on an Aquaplanet Ocean–Atmosphere General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A low-resolution coupled ocean–atmosphere general circulation model (OAGCM) is used to study the characteristics of the large-scale ocean circulation and its climatic impacts in a series of global coupled aquaplanet experiments. Three ...

Robin S. Smith; Clotilde Dubois; Jochem Marotzke

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Observations and Simulations of Upper-Ocean Response to Wind Events during the Ocean Storms Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ocean Storms dataset is used to compile observations of the oceanic response to midlatitude storms. Of particular interest are episodic mixed layer temperature cooling events whose characteristics are reviewed. The data include subsurface ...

W. G. Large; G. B. Crawford

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 103 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 103 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS GALICIA BANK Gilbert Boillot Edward L of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany

362

Sequestration of CO2 by Ocean Fertilization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentation for NETL Conference on Carbon Sequestration May 14-17, 2001 SEQUESTRATION OF CO 2 BY OCEAN FERTILIZATION Authors: Dr. Michael Markels, Jr. (Markels@greenseaventure.com...

363

FOAM:The Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Models Performance User Resources Publications History Developer's Page FOAM The Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model cup2.jpeg (48474 bytes) Image made by Johan Kellum with Vis5D...

364

Strong wind forcing of the ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

high wind speeds in tropical cyclones. Nature, 422, 279-283.response of the tropical cyclone and the ocean. Journal ofinteraction theory for tropical cyclones: Part i : steady-

Zedler, Sarah E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

NIST Aids the National Oceanic and Atmospheric ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ocean Service, Mote Marine Laboratory, Dolphin Quest ... US Fish and Wildlife Service, South Carolina ... blood mercury levels to health parameters in ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

366

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment References Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2000, DOE/EIA-0383(2000) (Washington, DC, December 1999), Table A11. Energy Information Administration, Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, SR/RNGD/87-01 (Washington, DC, September 1987). U.S. Department of Interior, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, Coastal Plain Resource Assessment, (Washington, DC, November, 1986). U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Minerals Management Service. Northeast National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska Final Integrated Activity Plan / Environmental Impact Statement, (Anchorage , Alaska, August, 1998).

367

Regional Variability of the Arctic Heat Budget in Fall and Winter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Arctic atmosphere, the fall cooling cycle involves the evolution of the zonally symmetric circulation in late summer into the asymmetric flow of winter. This paper uses historical reanalysis data to document how the dominant components of ...

Jennifer Miletta Adams; Nicholas A. Bond; James E. Overland

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Modeling the Effects of Lakes and Wetlands on the Water Balance of Arctic Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lakes, ponds, and wetlands are common features in many low-gradient arctic watersheds. Storage of snowmelt runoff in lakes and wetlands exerts a strong influence on both the interannual and interseasonal variability of northern rivers. This ...

Laura C. Bowling; Dennis P. Lettenmaier

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Observed atmospheric response to cold season sea ice variability in the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relation between weekly Arctic sea ice concentrations (SIC) from December to April and sea level pressure (SLP) during 1979-2007 is investigated using Maximum Covariance Analysis (MCA). In the North Atlantic sector, the interaction between the ...

Claude Frankignoul; Nathalie Sennéchael; Pierre Cauchy

370

Climatology and Interannual Variability of Arctic Cyclone Activity: 1948–2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arctic cyclone activity is investigated in the context of climate change and variability by using a modified automated cyclone identification and tracking algorithm, which differs from previously used algorithms by single counting each cyclone. ...

Xiangdong Zhang; John E. Walsh; Jing Zhang; Uma S. Bhatt; Moto Ikeda

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Energy Policy 35 (2007) 47204729 Should we drill in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information and provides original analysis. We apEnergy Policy 35 (2007) 4720­4729 Should we drill in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge $123 billion to extract and bring to market. The difference, $251 billion, would generate social

Kotchen, Matthew J.

372

Variations in Surface Air Temperature Observations in the Arctic, 1979–97  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The statistics of surface air temperature observations obtained from buoys, manned drifting stations, and meteorological land stations in the Arctic during 1979–97 are analyzed. Although the basic statistics agree with what has been published in ...

Ignatius G. Rigor; Roger L. Colony; Seelye Martin

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Seasonal and Regional Variation of Pan-Arctic Surface Air Temperature over the Instrumental Record  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Instrumental surface air temperature (SAT) records beginning in the late 1800s from 59 Arctic stations north of 64°N show monthly mean anomalies of several degrees and large spatial teleconnectivity, yet there are systematic seasonal and regional ...

James E. Overland; Michael C. Spillane; Donald B. Percival; Muyin Wang; Harold O. Mofjeld

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

The Uses and Limitations of Contour Advection as a Technique for Examining Arctic Vortex Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A contour advection technique, contour advection with surgery (CAS), is applied to the Northern Hemisphere Arctic vortex during several dynamically active periods in midwinter and at several different levels in the stratosphere. The ability of ...

Michael N. Baker; Derek M. Cunnold

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

The Representation of Arctic Soils in the Land Surface Model: The Importance of Mosses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mosses dominate the surface cover in high northern latitudes and have the potential to play a key role in modifying the thermal and hydrologic regime of Arctic soils. These modifications in turn feed back to influence surface energy exchanges and ...

Jason Beringer; Amanda H. Lynch; F. Stuart Chapin III; Michelle Mack; Gordon B. Bonan

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Satellite-Derived Surface Energy Balance Estimates in the Alaskan Sub-Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) data for 12 May 1978 were used in an energy balance modelto estimate evapotranspiration in sub-Arctic Alaska following snowmelt. The HCMM scene contained severalareas of melting snow as well as an actively ...

R. J. Gurney; D. K. Hall

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Satellite Retrievals of Arctic and Equatorial Rain and Snowfall Rates Using Millimeter Wavelengths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new global precipitation retrieval algorithm for the millimeter-wave Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit is presented that also retrieves Arctic precipitation rates over surface snow and ice. This algorithm improves upon ...

Surussavadee, Chinnawat

378

A Characterization of the Present-Day Arctic Atmosphere in CCSM4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulation of key features of the Arctic atmosphere in the Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4) is evaluated against observational and reanalysis datasets for the present-day (1981–2005). Surface air temperature, sea level pressure, ...

Gijs de Boer; William Chapman; Jennifer E. Kay; Brian Medeiros; Matthew D. Shupe; Steve Vavrus; John Walsh

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

An Empirical Blowing Snow Forecast Technique for the Canadian Arctic and the Prairie Provinces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Blowing snow has a major impact on transportation and public safety. The goal of this study is to provide an operational technique for forecasting high-impact blowing snow on the Canadian arctic and the Prairie provinces using historical ...

David G. Baggaley; John M. Hanesiak

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Future Projections of Landfast Ice Thickness and Duration in the Canadian Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Projections of future landfast ice thickness and duration were generated for nine sites in the Canadian Arctic and one site on the Labrador coast with a simple downscaling technique that used a one-dimensional sea ice model driven by ...

J. A. Dumas; G. M. Flato; R. D. Brown

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Turbulence Structure of Arctic Stratus Clouds Derived from Measurements and Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented from a detailed case study of an Arctic stratus cloud over the Fram Strait that is based on aircraft measurements and model calculations. The measurements have been performed during MIZEX 1984 (Marginal Ice Zone Experiment) ...

Jörg E. Finger; Peter Wendling

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

On the Relationship between Thermodynamic Structure and Cloud Top, and Its Climate Significance in the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud and thermodynamic characteristics from three Arctic observation sites are investigated to understand the collocation between low-level clouds and temperature inversions. A regime where cloud top was 100–200 m above the inversion base [cloud ...

Joseph Sedlar; Matthew D. Shupe; Michael Tjernström

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Climate Change and Cultural Survival in the Arctic: People of the Whales and Muktuk Politics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article explores the interface of climate change and society in a circumpolar context, particularly experienced among the Iñupiaq people (Iñupiat) of Arctic Alaska. The Iñupiat call themselves the “People of the Whales,” and their physical ...

Chie Sakakibara

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Remote Sensing of Surface and Cloud Properties in the Arctic from AVHRR Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Algorithms to retrieve cloud optical depth and effective radius in the Arctic using Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data are developed, using a comprehensive radiative transfer model in which the atmosphere is coupled to the ...

W. Han; K. Stamnes; Dan Lubin

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Using A-Train Arctic cloud observations to constrain and improve...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

radiation anomalies to the 2007 Arctic sea ice loss Jennifer E. Kay 1,2 Andrew Gettelman 1 , Tristan L'Ecuyer 2 ,Graeme Stephens 2 , and Chris O'Dell 2 1 National Center for...

386

Short-lived pollutants in the Arctic: their climate impact and possible mitigation strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reduced rate of ice formation in mixed- phase Arctic cloudsincreases occur in phase with sea ice melt, potentiallyIce properties of single-layer stratocumulus during the Mixed-Phase

Quinn, P.K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Variations in Surface Air Temperatures: Part 2. Arctic Regions, 1881–1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe annual and seasonal changes in air temperatures over high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere during the period 1881–1980. Trends (that is, fluctuations on time scales greater than 20 years) in the average temperature of the Arctic ...

P. M. Kelly; P. D. Jones; C. B. Sear; B. S. G. Cherry; R. K. Tavakol

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Arctic Cloud Microphysics Retrievals from Surface-Based Remote Sensors at SHEBA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An operational suite of ground-based, remote sensing retrievals for producing cloud microphysical properties is described, assessed, and applied to 1 yr of observations in the Arctic. All measurements were made in support of the Surface Heat ...

Matthew D. Shupe; Taneil Uttal; Sergey Y. Matrosov

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Temporal Variability in the Expression of the Arctic Oscillation in the North Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the Arctic Oscillation (AO) and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) have been identified as important modes of climate variability during the Northern Hemisphere (NH) winter, whether the AO or the NAO is more fundamental to the description ...

Hongxu Zhao; G. W. K. Moore

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Present-Day Arctic Sea Ice Variability in the Coupled ECHAM5/MPI-OM Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a contribution to a detailed evaluation of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)-type coupled climate models against observations, this study analyzes Arctic sea ice parameters simulated by the Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology (...

Nikolay V. Koldunov; Detlef Stammer; Jochem Marotzke

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Instrumentation to Measure the Depth/Time Fluctuations in Acoustic Pulses Propagated through Arctic Internal Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Instrumentation for measuring the evolution of volume-scattered acoustic signals in both depth and time is described. Measurements were taken for 12 days during the spring of 1985 with transmitters and receivers suspended beneath arctic pack ice ...

Terry E. Ewart; Stephen A. Reynolds

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Potential Impacts of the Arctic on Interannual and Interdecadal Summer Precipitation over China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After the end of the 1970s, there has been a tendency for enhanced summer precipitation over south China and the Yangtze River valley and drought over north China and northeastern China. Coincidentally, Arctic ice concentration has decreased since ...

Yuefeng Li; L. Ruby Leung

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Observational and Theoretical Studies of Solar Radiation in Arctic Stratus Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of clouds-radiation experiments was carried out in June 1980 in Arctic stratus clouds occurring over the Beaufort Sea using the NCAR Electra aircraft. This paper is an analysis of the hemispheric radiation fields obtained with Eppley ...

G. F. Herman; J. A. Curry

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

The Changing Cryosphere: Pan-Arctic Snow Trends (1979–2009)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arctic snow presence, absence, properties, and water amount are key components of Earth’s changing climate system that incur far-reaching physical and biological ramifications. Recent dataset and modeling developments permit relatively high-...

Glen E. Liston; Christopher A. Hiemstra

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Sensitivity of CAM5-Simulated Arctic Clouds and Radiation to Ice Nucleation Parameterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sensitivity of Arctic clouds and radiation in the Community Atmospheric Model, version 5, to the ice nucleation process is examined by testing a new physically based ice nucleation scheme that links the variation of ice nuclei (IN) number ...

Shaocheng Xie; Xiaohong Liu; Chuanfeng Zhao; Yuying Zhang

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

A Thermodynamic Analysis of an Intense North American Arctic Air Mass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Northwestern Canada is a genesis region of arctic air masses often considered to be formed primarily through radiative processes. However, the details of their life cycle are poorly understood. This paper examines the formation, maintenance, and ...

Jessica K. Turner; John Gyakum; Shawn M. Milrad

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

The Development of Arctic Air Masses in Northwest Canada and Their Behavior in a Warming Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface observations, soundings, and a thermodynamic budget are used to investigate the formation process of 93 arctic airmass events. The events involve very cold surface temperatures—an average of ?42.8°C at Norman Wells, a centrally located ...

Jessica K. Turner; John R. Gyakum

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Clouds at Arctic Atmospheric Observatories. Part I: Occurrence and Macrophysical Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud observations over the past decade from six Arctic atmospheric observatories are investigated to derive estimates of cloud occurrence fraction, vertical distribution, persistence in time, diurnal cycle, and boundary statistics. Each ...

Matthew D. Shupe; Von P. Walden; Edwin Eloranta; Taneil Uttal; James R. Campbell; Sandra M. Starkweather; Masataka Shiobara

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Observed Relationships between Arctic Longwave Cloud Forcing and Cloud Parameters Using a Neural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A neural network technique is used to quantify relationships involved in cloud–radiation feedbacks based on observations from the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) project. Sensitivities of longwave cloud forcing (CFL) to cloud parameters ...

Yonghua Chen; Filipe Aires; Jennifer A. Francis; James R. Miller

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Subduction over the Southern Indian Ocean in a High-Resolution Atmosphere–Ocean Coupled Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the subduction of the Subantarctic Mode Water in the Indian Ocean in an ocean–atmosphere coupled model in which the ocean component is eddy permitting. The purpose is to assess how sensitive the simulated mode water is to the ...

Mei-Man Lee; A. J. George Nurser; I. Stevens; Jean-Baptiste Sallée

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

A Reanalysis of Ocean Climate Using Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) reanalysis of ocean climate variability. In the assimilation, a model forecast produced by an ocean general circulation model with an average resolution of 0.25° × 0.4° × 40 levels is ...

James A. Carton; Benjamin S. Giese

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools: Arctic and Subarctic Climates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools--Arctic and Subarctic Climates provides school boards, administrators, and design staff with guidance to help them make informed decisions about energy and environmental issues important to school systems and communities. These design guidelines outline high performance principles for the new or retrofit design of your K-12 school in arctic and subarctic climates. By incorporating energy improvements into their construction or renovation plans, schools can significantly reduce energy consumption and costs.

Not Available

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Source Attribution of Light Absorbing Aerosol in Arctic Snow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source Attribution of Light Absorbing Source Attribution of Light Absorbing Aerosol in Arctic Snow (Preliminary analysis of 2008-2009 data) Outline * Receptor modeling overview * Results from 2007 data set * New goals arising from analysis of 2007 data * New data for 2008 * New data for 2009 * Tentative conclusions * Future analysis i Factor profiles from 2007 analysis Source attribution of Black Carbon from 2007 analysis Goals/Issues suggested by the analysis of the 2007 data set * Are there seasonal differences in the source strengths? * Are there other LAA chemical components besides black carbon. What are their sources? * Can the various data sets available (e.g., 2007, 2008, 2009) be combined in a single large PMF analysis 2008 Data Set For Receptor Analysis * 42 samples from Eastern Siberia including 4 depth profiles

404

ocean energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ocean energy ocean energy Dataset Summary Description This shapefile represents the seasonal winter depth profile to reach water at a temperature of 20ºC. Source NREL Date Released October 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords depth profile hydrokinetic ocean ocean energy ocean thermal energy conversion OTEC seawater cooling thermal Data application/zip icon OTEC Seawater Cooling 20ºC Depth Profile - Winter Average (zip, 1.1 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period March 2009 - February 2011 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"). The user is granted the right, without any fee or cost, to use, copy, modify, alter, enhance and distribute this data for any purpose whatsoever, provided that this entire notice appears in all copies of the data. Further, the user of this data agrees to credit NREL in any publications or software that incorporate or use the data. Access to and use of the GIS data shall further impose the following obligations on the User. The names DOE/NREL may not be used in any advertising or publicity to endorse or promote any product or commercial entity using or incorporating the GIS data unless specific written authorization is obtained from DOE/NREL. The User also understands that DOE/NREL shall not be obligated to provide updates, support, consulting, training or assistance of any kind whatsoever with regard to the use of the GIS data. THE GIS DATA IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL DOE/NREL BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO CLAIMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOSS OF DATA OR PROFITS, WHICH MAY RESULT FROM AN ACTION IN CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS CLAIM THAT ARISES OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE ACCESS OR USE OF THE GIS DATA. The User acknowledges that access to the GIS data is subject to U.S. Export laws and regulations and any use or transfer of the GIS data must be authorized under those regulations. The User shall not use, distribute, transfer, or transmit GIS data or any products incorporating the GIS data except in compliance with U.S. export regulations. If requested by DOE/NREL, the User agrees to sign written assurances and other export-related documentation as may be required to comply with U.S. export regulations.

405

Intercomparison of cloud model simulations of Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds observed during SHEBA/FIRE-ACE  

SciTech Connect

An intercomparison of six cloud-resolving and large-eddy simulation models is presented. This case study is based on observations of a persistent mixed-phase boundary layer cloud gathered on 7 May, 1998 from the Surface Heat Budget of Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) and First ISCCP Regional Experiment - Arctic Cloud Experiment (FIRE-ACE). Ice nucleation is constrained in the simulations in a way that holds the ice crystal concentration approximately fixed, with two sets of sensitivity runs in addition to the baseline simulations utilizing different specified ice nucleus (IN) concentrations. All of the baseline and sensitivity simulations group into two distinct quasi-steady states associated with either persistent mixed-phase clouds or all-ice clouds after the first few hours of integration, implying the existence of multiple equilibria. These two states are associated with distinctly different microphysical, thermodynamic, and radiative characteristics. Most but not all of the models produce a persistent mixed-phase cloud qualitatively similar to observations using the baseline IN/crystal concentration, while small increases in the IN/crystal concentration generally lead to rapid glaciation and conversion to the all-ice state. Budget analysis indicates that larger ice deposition rates associated with increased IN/crystal concentrations have a limited direct impact on dissipation of liquid in these simulations. However, the impact of increased ice deposition is greatly enhanced by several interaction pathways that lead to an increased surface precipitation flux, weaker cloud top radiative cooling and cloud dynamics, and reduced vertical mixing, promoting rapid glaciation of the mixed-phase cloud for deposition rates in the cloud layer greater than about 1-2x10-5 g kg-1 s-1. These results indicate the critical importance of precipitation-radiative-dynamical interactions in simulating cloud phase, which have been neglected in previous fixed-dynamical parcel studies of the cloud phase parameter space. Large sensitivity to the IN/crystal concentration also suggests the need for improved understanding of ice nucleation and its parameterization in models.

Morrison, H.; Zuidema, Paquita; Ackerman, Andrew; Avramov, Alexander; de Boer, Gijs; Fan, Jiwen; Fridlind, Ann; Hashino, Tempei; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Luo, Yali; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shipway, Ben

2011-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

406

An Ensemble Ocean Data Assimilation System for Seasonal Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new ensemble ocean data assimilation system, developed for the Predictive Ocean Atmosphere Model for Australia (POAMA), is described. The new system is called PEODAS, the POAMA Ensemble Ocean Data Assimilation System. PEODAS is an approximate ...

Yonghong Yin; Oscar Alves; Peter R. Oke

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

The Volunteer Observing Ship and Future Ocean Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Widespread and sustained in situ ocean measurements are essential to an improved understanding of the state of the ocean and its role in global change. Merchant marine vessels can play a major role in ocean monitoring, yet apart from routine ...

Thomas Rossby; Gerold Siedler; Walter Zenk

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Ocean Dynamics, Thermocline Adjustment, and Regulation of Tropical SST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of tropical Pacific ocean dynamics in regulating the ocean response to thermodynamic forcing is investigated using an ocean general circulation model (GCM) coupled to a model of the atmospheric mixed layer. It is found that the basin ...

Richard Seager; Ragu Murtugudde

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer stability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power distribution over the ocean, Geophys. Res. Lett. , 35,of wind speed over the ocean, J. Appl. Meteorol. , 25,and heat flux over the open ocean in gale force winds, J.

Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the commercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionR. E. Hathaway. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion.of sewage effluent in an ocean current. Inst. of Tech. ,

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Effects of atmospheric inorganic nitrogen deposition on ocean biogeochemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to decadal global forcing for ocean and sea-ice models: Theorganic nitrogen to the oceans, Nature, 376, 243 – 246.trace species to the world ocean, Global Biogeochem. Cycles,

Krishnamurthy, Aparna; Moore, J. Keith; Zender, Charles S; Luo, Chao

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

High Biomass Low Export Regimes in the Southern Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Z.I. , 2004. Southern ocean iron enrichment experiment:in the surface global ocean based on Moderate-Resolutionof Geophysical Research-Oceans 110 (C7). Bé, A.W.H. ,

Lam, Phoebe J.; Bishop, James K.B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Molecular diversity and adaptations of microorganisms from the deep ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the North Pacific ocean. ISME J. 3:1374-1386. DeLong, E.microbial assemblages in the ocean's interior. Science 311:J. 4:159-170. Schlitzer, R. 2010. Ocean Data View. [http://

Eloe, Emiley Ansley

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Effects of Penetrative Radiation on the Upper Tropical Ocean Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of penetrative radiation on the upper tropical ocean circulation have been investigated with an ocean general circulation model (OGCM) with attenuation depths derived from remotely sensed ocean color data. The OGCM is a reduced ...

Raghu Murtugudde; James Beauchamp; Charles R. McClain; Marlon Lewis; Antonio J. Busalacchi

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

The Response of Quasigeostrophic Oceanic Vortices to Tropical Cyclone Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of quasigeostrophic (QG) oceanic vortices to tropical cyclone (TC) forcing is investigated using an isopycnic ocean model. Idealized oceanic currents and wind fields derived from observational data acquired during Hurricane Katrina ...

Benjamin Jaimes; Lynn K. Shay; George R. Halliwell

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

An Observing System Simulation Experiment for the Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated in situ Indian Ocean observing system (IndOOS) is simulated using a high-resolution ocean general circulation model (OGCM) with daily mean forcing, including an estimate of subdaily oceanic variability derived from observations. The ...

Gabriel A. Vecchi; Matthew J. Harrison

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Evaluation of HOAPS-3 Ocean Surface Freshwater Flux Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today, latent heat flux and precipitation over the global ocean surface can be determined from microwave satellite data as a basis for estimating the related fields of the ocean surface freshwater flux. The Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and ...

Axel Andersson; Christian Klepp; Karsten Fennig; Stephan Bakan; Hartmut Grassl; Jörg Schulz

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Effects of variable wind stress on ocean heat content  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean heat content change (ocean heat uptake) has an important role in variability of the Earth's heat balance. The understanding of which methods and physical processes control ocean heat uptake needs improvement in order ...

Klima, Kelly

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Slow Instabilities in Tropical Ocean Basin–Global Atmosphere Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of ocean boundaries on instability in coupled ocean-natmosphere models is determined. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors are calculated for coupled systems featuring an ocean basin bounded zonally by a flat continent. The atmosphere is ...

Anthony C. Hirst

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 153 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA by the Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University, as an account of work performed under the international of the National Science Foundation, the participating agencies, Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc., Texas A&M

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 138 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA, Texas A&M University, as an account of work performed under the international Ocean Drilling Program Foundation, the participating agencies, Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc., Texas A&M University

422

Statistical mechanics and ocean circulation Rick Salmon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Statistical mechanics and ocean circulation Rick Salmon Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD equilibrium statistical mechanics based upon the conservation of energy and potential enstrophy to the mass. The equilibrium state resembles the buoyancy structure actually observed. Key words: statistical mechanics, ocean

Salmon, Rick

423

Upper Ocean Response to a Hurricane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The upper ocean response to a moving hurricane is studied using historical air-sea data and a three-dimensional numerical ocean model. Sea surface temperature (SST) response is emphasized. The model has a surface mixed-layer (ML) that entrains ...

James F. Price

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

The Parallelization of the Princeton Ocean Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present the parallel implementation of the Princeton Ocean Model (POM) using message passing. Domain decomposition techniques are used for the horizontal discretization whereas in the vertical direction each column per grid point is ... Keywords: domain decomposition, message passing, princeton ocean model

L. A. Boukas; N. Th. Mimikou; Nikolaos M. Missirlis; G. L. Mellor; A. Lascaratos; G. Korres

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

The Modular Ocean Data Assimilation System (MODAS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Modular Ocean Data Assimilation System (MODAS) is used by the U.S. Navy for depiction of three-dimensional fields of temperature and salinity over the global ocean. MODAS includes both a static climatology and a dynamic climatology. While the ...

D. N. Fox; W. J. Teague; C. N. Barron; M. R. Carnes; C. M. Lee

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Wind Stress Measurements from the Open Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automatic inertial dissipation system was used during three cruises of the RRS Discovery in the Southern Ocean to obtain a large dataset of open ocean wind stress estimates. The wind speed varied from near calm to 26 m s?1, and the sea-air ...

Margaret Yelland; Peter K. Taylor

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Internal Variability of Indian Ocean SST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 40-yr integration of an eddy-resolving numerical model of the tropical Indian Ocean is analyzed to quantify the interannual variability that is caused by the internal variability of ocean dynamics. It is found that along the equator in the ...

Markus Jochum; Raghu Murtugudde

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Ocean Motion International LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Motion International LLC Ocean Motion International LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Motion International LLC Place Saulsbury, Tennessee Zip 38067 Sector Ocean Product Marine energy technology firm developing ocean/ wave powered generators. Coordinates 35.052242°, -89.083299° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.052242,"lon":-89.083299,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

429

A predictive ocean oil spill model  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Initially, the project focused on creating an ocean oil spill model and working with the major oil companies to compare their data with the Los Alamos global ocean model. As a result of this initial effort, Los Alamos worked closely with the Eddy Joint Industry Project (EJIP), a consortium oil and gas producing companies in the US. The central theme of the project was to use output produced from LANL`s global ocean model to look in detail at ocean currents in selected geographic areas of the world of interest to consortium members. Once ocean currents are well understood this information could be used to create oil spill models, improve offshore exploration and drilling equipment, and aid in the design of semi-permanent offshore production platforms.

Sanderson, J.; Barnette, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Papodopoulos, P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schaudt, K. [Marathon Oil Co., Littleton, CO (United States); Szabo, D. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Clean Cities: Ocean State Clean Cities coalition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ocean State Clean Cities Coalition Ocean State Clean Cities Coalition The Ocean State Clean Cities coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to reduce petroleum use in transportation. Ocean State Clean Cities coalition Contact Information Wendy Lucht 401-874-2792 wlucht@uri.edu Coalition Website Clean Cities Coordinator Wendy Lucht Photo of Wendy Lucht Wendy Lucht has worked as the Ocean State Clean Cities coordinator at the University of Rhode Island (URI) since 2008 but has worked at URI since 1999. Lucht is working to make Rhode Island the first state certified by Project Get Ready, an initiative preparing cities and states for the arrival of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV). As part of this effort, Lucht is serving as chair of the fleet-acquisition committee working on

431

Dynamics of Arctic and Sub-Arctic Climate and Atmospheric Circulation: Diagnosis of Mechanisms and Biases Using Data Assimilation  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of work performed under this grant is to enhance understanding of simulations of present-day climate and greenhouse gas-induced climate change. The examination of present-day climate also includes diagnostic intercomparison of model simulations and observed mean climate and climate variability using reanalysis and satellite datasets. Enhanced understanding is desirable 1) as a prerequisite for improving simulations; 2) for assessing the credibility of model simulations and their usefulness as tools for decision support; and 3) as a means to identify robust behaviors which commonly occur over a wide range of models, and may yield insights regarding the dominant physical mechanisms which determine mean climate and produce climate change. A further objective is to investigate the use of data assimilation as a means for examining and correcting model biases. Our primary focus is on the Arctic, but the scope of the work was expanded to include the global climate system.

Eric T. DeWeaver

2010-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

432

Mercury uptake and dynamics in sea ice algae, phytoplankton and grazing copepods from a Beaufort Sea Arctic marine food web.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mercury (Hg) is one of the primary contaminants of concern in the Arctic marine ecosystem. Methyl Hg (MeHg) is known to biomagnify in food webs.… (more)

Burt, Alexis Emelia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Dynamics of Arctic and Sub-Arctic Climate and Atmospheric Circulation: Diagnosis of Mechanisms and Biases Using Data Assimilation  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report for DOE grant DE-FG02-07ER64434 to Eric DeWeaver at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The overall goal of work performed under this grant is to enhance understanding of simulations of present-day climate and greenhouse gas-induced climate change. Enhanced understanding is desirable 1) as a prerequisite for improving simulations; 2) for assessing the credibility of model simulations and their usefulness as tools for decision support; and 3) as a means to identify robust behaviors which commonly occur over a wide range of models, and may yield insights regarding the dominant physical mechanisms which determine mean climate and produce climate change. A furthe objective is to investigate the use of data assimilation as a means for examining and correcting model biases. Our primary focus is on the Arctic, but the scope of the work was expanded to include the global climate system to the extent that research targets of opportunity present themselves. Research performed under the grant falls into five main research areas: 1) a study of data assimilation using an ensemble filter with the atmospheric circulation model of the National Center for Atmospheric Research, in which both conventional observations and observations of the refraction of radio waves from GPS satellites were used to constrain the atmospheric state of the model; 2) research on the likely future status of polar bears, in which climate model simluations were used to assess the effectiveness of climate change mitigation efforts in preserving the habitat of polar bears, now considered a threatened species under global warming; 3) as assessment of the credibility of Arctic sea ice thickness simulations from climate models; 4) An examination of the persistence and reemergence of Northern Hemisphere sea ice area anomalies in climate model simulations and in observations; 5) An examination of the roles played by changes in net radiation and surface relative humidity in determine the response of the hydrological cycle to global warming.

Eric T. DeWeaver

2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

434

Leading Modes of the Upper-Ocean Temperature Interannual Variability along the Equatorial Atlantic Ocean in NCEP GODAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, the authors analyze the physical mechanisms of interannual variability of the upper-ocean temperature anomaly (OTA) in the equatorial Atlantic Ocean, using ocean reanalysis from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)...

Zeng-Zhen Hu; Arun Kumar; Bohua Huang; Jieshun Zhu

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Development and application of ocean color algorithms for estimating particulate organic carbon in the Southern Ocean from satellite observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and C. R. McClain (1998), Ocean color chlorophyll algorithmsand C. R. McClain (1998), Ocean color chlorophyll algorithmsand M. Culver (2000), Ocean color chlorophyll a algorithms

Allison, David Benjamin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Employing Satellite-Derived Sea Ice Concentration to Constrain Upper-Ocean Temperature in a Global Ocean GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quality of Southern Ocean sea ice simulations in a global ocean general circulation model (GCM) depends decisively on the simulated upper-ocean temperature. This is confirmed by assimilating satellite-derived sea ice concentration to ...

Achim Stössel

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

A Comparative Analysis of Upper-Ocean Heat Content Variability from an Ensemble of Operational Ocean Reanalyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ocean heat content (HC) is one of the key indicators of climate variability and also provides ocean memory critical for seasonal and decadal predictions. The availability of multiple operational ocean analyses (ORAs) now routinely produced around ...

Yan Xue; Magdalena A. Balmaseda; Tim Boyer; Nicolas Ferry; Simon Good; Ichiro Ishikawa; Arun Kumar; Michele Rienecker; Anthony J. Rosati; Yonghong Yin

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENTOcean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft Programmatic Environ-Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE Assistant Secre-

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

EA-1336: Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania EA-1336: Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania...

440

Surface geology of the northern Midway-Sunset Field and adjacent Temblor Range, Kern County, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New surface mapping at a 1:12000 scale adjacent to the 2 billion barrel Midway Sunset Field has revealed complex intraformational stratigraphy within the upper Miocene Santa Margarita Formation (Tms). Locally known as the Potter and Spellacy Formations in the subsurface, these sandstone and conglomerate heavy oil reservoirs produce the majority of Midway Sunset daily production of 164,000 barrels of oil via thermal EOR processes. The Tms consists mostly of conglomerate inserted into the Belridge Diatomite (Tmb) interval. The stratigraphically lower intervals of the Tms clearly fill deeply incised valleys or submarine canyons cut into Tmb and locally into the underlying Antelope Shale (Tma). The basal intervals of Tms; are very coarse grained, containing boulders of granitic and metamorphic rock as large as 4 meters that were derived from the Salinian block west of the San Andreas Fault. The upper intervals of Tms are more sheet-like and interbedded containing clasts less than 50 cm in length. The incised valleys have a spacing of about one mile in outcrop, with a gap located in the area of the older Republic Sandstone (Tmr). Paleocurrents from Tms regionally suggest sediment transport to the northeast. The sedimentary structures of Tms suggest deposition in deep-water conditions, probably a slope (bathyal) setting. Shelf environments should have been present to the southwest (now stripped away by erosion) and submarine-fan and basin-floor environments to the northeast.

Wylie, A.S. Jr.; Sturm, D.H.; Gardiner, R.L.; Mercer, M.F. (Santa Fe Energy Resources, Bakersfield, CA (United States)) (and others)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Trajectory Design and Implementation for Multiple Autonomous Underwater Vehicles Based on Ocean Model Predictions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Multiple Autonomous Underwater Vehicles Based on OceanAUVs) • Autonomous Underwater Vehicles Evolving ocean

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Simulated by a Cloud-Resolving Model: Comparison with ARM Observations and Sensitivity to Microphysics Parameterizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Single-layer mixed-phase stratiform (MPS) Arctic clouds, which formed under conditions of large surface heat flux combined with general subsidence during a subperiod of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program’s Mixed-Phase Arctic ...

Yali Luo; Kuan-Man Xu; Hugh Morrison; Greg McFarquhar

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores January 22, 2013 - 1:14pm Addthis Artist rendering of Ocean Power Technologies' proposed wave park off the coast of Oregon. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Artist rendering of Ocean Power Technologies' proposed wave park off the coast of Oregon. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Verdant testing its tidal energy device in New York's East River. | Photo courtesy of Verdant Power. Verdant testing its tidal energy device in New York's East River. | Photo courtesy of Verdant Power. Ocean Power Technologies wave energy device. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Ocean Power Technologies wave energy device. | Photo courtesy of Ocean

444

Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores January 22, 2013 - 1:14pm Addthis Artist rendering of Ocean Power Technologies' proposed wave park off the coast of Oregon. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Artist rendering of Ocean Power Technologies' proposed wave park off the coast of Oregon. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Verdant testing its tidal energy device in New York's East River. | Photo courtesy of Verdant Power. Verdant testing its tidal energy device in New York's East River. | Photo courtesy of Verdant Power. Ocean Power Technologies wave energy device. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Ocean Power Technologies wave energy device. | Photo courtesy of Ocean

445

Concept Study: Exploration and Production in Environmentally Sensitive Arctic Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Alaska North Slope offers one of the best prospects for increasing U.S. domestic oil and gas production. However, this region faces some of the greatest environmental and logistical challenges to oil and gas production in the world. A number of studies have shown that weather patterns in this region are warming, and the number of days the tundra surface is adequately frozen for tundra travel each year has declined. Operators are not allowed to explore in undeveloped areas until the tundra is sufficiently frozen and adequate snow cover is present. Spring breakup then forces rapid evacuation of the area prior to snowmelt. Using the best available methods, exploration in remote arctic areas can take up to three years to identify a commercial discovery, and then years to build the infrastructure to develop and produce. This makes new exploration costly. It also increases the costs of maintaining field infrastructure, pipeline inspections, and environmental restoration efforts. New technologies are needed, or oil and gas resources may never be developed outside limited exploration stepouts from existing infrastructure. Industry has identified certain low-impact technologies suitable for operations, and has made improvements to reduce the footprint and impact on the environment. Additional improvements are needed for exploration and economic field development and end-of-field restoration. One operator-Anadarko Petroleum Corporation-built a prototype platform for drilling wells in the Arctic that is elevated, modular, and mobile. The system was tested while drilling one of the first hydrate exploration wells in Alaska during 2003-2004. This technology was identified as a potentially enabling technology by the ongoing Joint Industry Program (JIP) Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program. The EFD is headed by Texas A&M University and the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC), and is co-funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EFD participants believe that the platform concept could have far-reaching applications in the Arctic as a drilling and production platform, as originally intended, and as a possible staging area. The overall objective of this project was to document various potential applications, locations, and conceptual designs for the inland platform serving oil and gas operations on the Alaska North Slope. The University of Alaska Fairbanks assisted the HARC/TerraPlatforms team with the characterization of potential resource areas, geotechnical conditions associated with continuous permafrost terrain, and the potential end-user evaluation process. The team discussed the various potential applications with industry, governmental agencies, and environmental organizations. The benefits and concerns associated with industry's use of the technology were identified. In this discussion process, meetings were held with five operating companies (22 people), including asset team leaders, drilling managers, HSE managers, and production and completion managers. Three other operating companies and two service companies were contacted by phone to discuss the project. A questionnaire was distributed and responses were provided, which will be included in the report. Meetings were also held with State of Alaska Department of Natural Resources officials and U.S. Bureau of Land Management regulators. The companies met with included ConcoPhillips, Chevron, Pioneer Natural Resources, Fairweather E&P, BP America, and the Alaska Oil and Gas Association.

Shirish Patil; Rich Haut; Tom Williams; Yuri Shur; Mikhail Kanevskiy; Cathy Hanks; Michael Lilly

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

446

Cities Compared: Cosmopolitanism in the Mediterranean and adjacent Prof. Ulrike Freitag and Dr. Nora Lafi, Zentrum Moderner Orient (ZMO, Berlin)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cities Compared: Cosmopolitanism in the Mediterranean and adjacent regions Prof. Ulrike Freitag The object of this programme is to bring together research on cosmopolitanism in order to compare cities is to confront theories of cosmopolitanism and civil society with concrete historical urban case studies

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

447

Method and Apparatus for Remote Delivery and Manipulation of a Miniature Tool Adjacent a Work Piece in a Restricted Space  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for remote delivery and manipulation of a miniature tool adjacent a work piece in a restricted space, includes a tool camer, a camage for manipulating the tool carrier relative to the work piece, a first actuator for operating the carnage, and an optional remote secondary operating actuator for operating the first actuator.

Sale, Christopher H.; Kaltenbaugh, Daniel R.

2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

448

THE ENERGY CAMPUS The University of Houston is developing the Energy Research Park (ERP) on 74 acres adjacent to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE ENERGY CAMPUS The University of Houston is developing the Energy Research Park (ERP) on 74 acres adjacent to I-45 as a unique campus dedicated to energy research and education. Public partnerships on one site. ENERGY TO MARKET The park's first corporate partner, SuperPower Inc., is working

Bittner, Eric R.

449

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: An overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ocean thermal energy conversion, or OTEC is a technology that extracts power from the ocean's natural thermal gradient. This technology is being pursued by researchers from many nations; in the United States, OTEC research is funded by the US Department of Energy's Ocean Energy Technology program. The program's goal is to develop the technology so that industry can make a competent assessment of its potential -- either as an alternative or as a supplement to conventional energy sources. Federally funded research in components and systems will help OTEC to the threshold of commercialization. This publication provides an overview of the OTEC technology. 47 refs., 25 figs.

Not Available

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

A climatology of springtime convection systems over the Northwest Gulf of Mexico and adjacent coasts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Springtime (March 15-June 15) climatology of Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCS) has been established on the basis of satellite imagery and radar reflectivities over the Northwest Gulf of Mexico and adjacent coastal areas during 1985-1994. The systems are tracked using hourly to half-hourly GOES-7 enhanced infrared satellite imagery. After tracking the storm's upper level cloud shield, radar reflectivities were used to classify the organization of convection within the MCS. The nine primary classes of convective structure were enhanced stratiform rain, embedded unorganized storms, unorganized storms, organized cells, solid line, symmetric line, asymmetric line, multiple convective bands, and embedded line. An examination was performed of the relationship between the synoptic-scale environment with the structure and evolution of these storms. Particular attention was given to synoptic-scale factors that affect convective organization. Climatological attributes such as diurnal characteristics and average durations were extracted from a documentation of more than 3@O meso-systems. Also, severe weather produced by the MCSs was examined. In addition, wind shear and thermodynamic parameters were analyzed during the initial phases of storm development. Since a climatological study has never been recorded for this region, the analysis will be informative for determining what type of interactions there are between synoptic scale forcing and mesoscale weather features in this area. Comparison with similar climatologies conducted in the Central Plains of the US was made to determine if MCS activity in a semi-tropical location was similar to that in more northern latitudes. Moreover, this radar climatology may be used as a resource in the planning of field experiments or operations concerning mesoscale weather throughout the southern portion of the US.

Hashem, Magda Sami

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Mathematical model for ice formation in the Arctic during Alain Pham Ngoc Dinh and Phan Thanh Nam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mathematical model for ice formation in the Arctic during summer Alain Pham Ngoc Dinh and Phan The only source of ice formation in the Arctic during summer is a layer of ice be- tween an under-ice melt-bottoms is governed by both of heat fluxes and salt fluxes. This is a two-phase Stefan problem with two free

452

Ocean Renewable Power Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Company Power Company Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Renewable Power Company LLC Place Portland, Maine Zip 4101 Sector Ocean, Renewable Energy Product Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC was founded in 2004 for the purpose of generating reliable, competitive, emission-free electricity from the energy resources of the oceans. Coordinates 45.511795°, -122.675629° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.511795,"lon":-122.675629,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

453

Ocean Map Regional | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Regional Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean Featured Maps The following maps are from data sources that are regional in scope. These are some of the data sources available in the Ocean Community that are most useful in the identified region. This includes several of the human use atlases now available. Regional/State Maps .view-map-gallery .views-row { float: inherit; margin: 0; } .map-align { float: left; margin: 0 20px; } .map-gallery-thumbnail{width:202px;height:133px;} .pane-map-gallery h2.pane-title { color: #284A78 !important; font: bold 16px Georgia,"Times New Roman",Serif !important; margin-left: 25px !important; } Oregon Submarine Cables Marine Reserves and Protected areas of Oregon

454

Circulation of Tritium in the Pacific Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The input of bomb tritium into the high-latitude Northern Hemisphere waters has demonstrated the spread of a tracer in three dimensions in the North Pacific Ocean. Subsurface tritium maxima in middle and low latitudes clearly show the importance ...

Rana A. Fine; Joseph L. Reid; H. Göte Östlund

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Ocean Radiant Heating. Part I: Optical Influences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiative transfer calculations are used to quantify the effects of physical and biological processes on variations in the transmission of solar radiation through the upper ocean. Results indicate that net irradiance at 10 cm and 5 m can vary by ...

J. Carter Ohlmann; David A. Siegel; Curtis D. Mobley

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Velocity Probability Density Functions for Oceanic Floats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Probability density functions (PDFs) of daily velocities from subsurface floats deployed in the North Atlantic and equatorial Atlantic Oceans are examined. In general, the PDFs are approximately Gaussian for small velocities, but with significant ...

Annalisa Bracco; J. H. LaCasce; Antonello Provenzale

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

An Investigation of Explosively Deepening Oceanic Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The explosively deepening oceanic cyclone or “bomb,” one which has central pressure falls of 12 mb (12 h)?1 or greater, has been studied using composites constructed from North Atlantic and Pacific weather ship rawinsonde data during the period ...

Eric Rogers; Lance F. Bosart

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Wavelet Transforms and Ocean Current Data Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recently advanced approach of wavelet transforms is applied to the analysis of ocean currents. The conventional analyses of time series in the frequency domain can be readily generalized to the frequency.and time domain using wavelet ...

Paul C. Liu; Gerald S. Miller

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Variability of Southern Ocean Jets Near Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of jets with topography in the Southern Ocean is investigated using 19 years of altimetry data. In particular, the “jet jumping” mode of variability, by which two or more jets passing close to the same topographic feature show ...

Christopher C. Chapman; Rosemary Morrow

460

Oceanic Internal Waves Are Not Weak Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is shown that the oceanic internal wave field is too energetic by roughly two orders of magnitude to be treated theoretically as an assemblage of weakly interacting waves. This may be seen both from recent weak wave theoretical calculations ...

Greg Holloway

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

The Thermal Structure of the Upper Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The salient feature of the oceanic thermal structure is a remarkably shallow thermocline, especially in the Tropics and subtropics. What factors determine its depth? Theories for the deep thermohaline circulation provide an answer that depends on ...

Giulio Boccaletti; Ronald C. Pacanowski; S. George; H. Philander; Alexey V. Fedorov

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Thermally Driven Circulations in Small Oceanic Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A linear, steady model of the circulation of a small (f plane) oceanic basin driven by heating or cooling at the surface is considered in order to examine the partition of upwelling (heating) or downwelling (cooling) between the basin's interior ...

Joseph Pedlosky

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Estimating Oceanic Turbulence Dissipation from Seismic Images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seismic images of oceanic thermohaline finestructure record vertical displacements from internal waves and turbulence over large sections at unprecedented horizontal resolution. Where reflections follow isopycnals, their displacements can be used ...

W. Steven Holbrook; Ilker Fer; Raymond W. Schmitt; Daniel Lizarralde; Jody M. Klymak; L. Cody Helfrich; Robert Kubichek

464

Ocean fertilization : ecological cure or calamity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The late John Martin demonstrated the paramount importance of iron for microscopic plant growth in large areas of the world's oceans. Iron, he hypothesized, was the nutrient that limited green life in seawater. Over twenty ...

Ogilvie, Megan Jacqueline, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 199 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-ocean ridge flanks have been investigated. These include the Galapagos mounds, the southern flank of the Costa logging tools are expected to provide little information of direct benefit to the scientific objectives

466

Ocean Boundary Mixing during Ekman Layer Arrest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a water parcel comes into contact with an ocean boundary, energy is dissipated within the boundary layer with some fraction directed into vertical mixing. In a stratified flow this increases the potential energy associated with the density ...

Scott A. Condie

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Ocean Energy Company LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Energy Company LLC Address 505 Fifth Ave 800 Place Des Moines Zip 50309-2426 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Year founded 2011 Phone number (515) 246-1500 Region United States...

468

Ocean Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Energy Ltd Address 3 Casement Square Place Cobh Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number 00353-21-4816779 Website http:www.oceanenergy.ie Region Ireland LinkedIn...

469

On Frontal Dynamics in Two Model Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertically homogeneous variable-temperature layer models are often used to describe upper-ocean variability, the dynamics of jets and fronts included. Frontogenesis is known to have a preference for strong cyclonic shears. When a frontal wave ...

Tor Eldevik

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Ocean Radiant Heating in Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computationally simple, double exponential, chlorophyll-dependent solar transmission parameterization for ocean general circulation models used in climate studies is presented. The transmission parameterization comes from empirical fits to a ...

J. Carter Ohlmann

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Southern Ocean Surface Characteristics from FGGE Buoys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this analysis of satellite-tracked drifting surface buoys released in the Southern Ocean, buoy velocities are averaged along trajectories for 90 days to determine the mean circulation, and eddy kinetic energy is computed using perturbations ...

Mark Andrew Johnson

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Precipitation at Ocean Weather Station “P"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the 27-yr record of precipitation measurements at Ocean Weather Station “P” (50°N, 145°W). The credibility of the rainfall observations is assessed, and the testing of certain extraordinary features of the fall and winter ...

M. A. Jenkins; W. C. Wong; K. Higuchi; J. L. Knox

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Instability Waves in the Equatorial Atlantic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evidence is presented for the generation of planetary waves by barotropic instability within the cyclonic shear region of the Atlantic Ocean's South Equatorial Current (SEC). Immediately following the springtime intensification of the southeast ...

Robert H. Weisberg; Thomas J. Weingartner

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Meridional Heat Transport in the Pacific Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The heat transported meridionally in the Pacific Ocean is calculated from the surface heat budgets of Clark and Weare and others; both budgets were based on Bunker's method with different radiation formulas. The meridional heat transport is also ...

L. D. Talley

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 170 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for Ocean Drilling Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany Cypionka Microbiologist Institut für Chemie und Biologie Des Meeres (ICBM) Carl von Ossietzky Universität

476

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 197 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the following agencies: Australia/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for Ocean Drilling Deutsche.edu Marcel Regelous Petrologist Abteilung Geochemie Max-Planck-Institüt für Chemie Johannes J-Becherweg 27

477

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 176 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for Ocean Drilling Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany Geochemist Institut für Chemie und Biologie des Meeres (ICBM) Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg

478

Atmosphere–Ocean Modeling Exploiting Fluid Isomorphisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mathematical isomorphisms between the hydrostatic equations that govern the evolution of a compressible atmosphere and an incompressible ocean are described and exploited to guide the design of a hydrodynamical kernel for simulation of either ...

John Marshall; Alistair Adcroft; Jean-Michel Campin; Chris Hill; Andy White

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

On Tidal Damping in Laplace's Global Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laplace's tidal equations are augmented by dissipation in a bottom boundary layer that is intermediate in character between those of Ekman and Stokes. Laplace's tidal equation for a global ocean remains second-order and self-adjoint, but the ...

John W. Miles

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

The Energetics of Ocean Heat Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of recent papers have argued that the mechanical energy budget of the ocean places constraints on how the thermohaline circulation is driven. These papers have been used to argue that climate models, which do not specifically account for ...

Anand Gnanadesikan; Richard D. Slater; P. S. Swathi; Geoffrey K. Vallis

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Assessment of ocean thermal energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a promising renewable energy technology to generate electricity and has other applications such as production of freshwater, seawater air-conditioning, marine culture and chilled-soil ...

Muralidharan, Shylesh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coastal ocean to strong offshore winds: With application toand R. L. Smith, 1995: Offshore wind forcing in the Gulf ofwind stress maximum and CCS SST front located roughly 200 km further offshore

Seo, Hyodae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coastal ocean to strong offshore winds: With application toand R. L. Smith, 1995: Offshore wind forcing in the Gulf ofwind stress maximum and CCS SST front located roughly 200 km further offshore

Seo, Hyodae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Ocean Energy Institute | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind energy Product Ocean Energy Institute is a think tank established to accelerate offshore wind technology development that hopes to build a 5GW wind project off the coast...

485

Estimates of Cabbeling in the Global Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Owing to the larger thermal expansion coefficient at higher temperatures, more buoyancy is put into the ocean by heating than is removed by cooling at low temperatures. The authors show that, even with globally balanced thermal and haline surface ...

Julian J. Schanze; Raymond W. Schmitt

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Efficient Inverse Modeling of Barotropic Ocean Tides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computationally efficient relocatable system for generalized inverse (GI) modeling of barotropic ocean tides is described. The GI penalty functional is minimized using a representer method, which requires repeated solution of the forward and ...

Gary D. Egbert; Svetlana Y. Erofeeva

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Global Ocean Warming: An Acoustic Measure?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Explosions of 300 lbs of TNT at 1 km depth off Perth, Australia were recorded on Bermuda hydrophones, demonstrating 30 years age the feasibility of global acoustic transmissions. Climate-induced changes in ocean temperature (and hence in sound ...

W. H. Munk; A. M. G. Forbes

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

A Neutrally Buoyant, Upper Ocean Sediment Trap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have designed and deployed a neutrally buoyant sediment trap (NBST) intended for use in the upper ocean. The aim was to minimize hydrodynamic flow interference by making a sediment trap that drifted freely with the ambient current. ...

James R. Valdes; James F. Price

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Solitons in a Continuously Stratified Equatorial Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The equatorial soliton studies of Boyd are extended to include the effects of continuous vertical stratification. We use vertical profiles of density measured in the equatorial Pacific Ocean and an idealized profile.

Hal G. Marshall; John P. Boyd

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Oceanic Isopycnal Mixing by Coordinate Rotation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current numerical models of oceanic circulation differentiate between the eddy diffusion and viscosity transport along the geopotential horizontal and vertical directions only. In order to model the effect of anisotropic turbulence as diffusive ...

Martha H. Redi

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Closures Used in Zonally Averaged Ocean Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are at least three substantially different closures presently being used in two-dimensional ocean models. The main purpose of this paper is to clarify the assumptions that are implicit in these closures. Two of these formulations arise from ...

Daniel G. Wright; Thomas F. Stocker; Douglas Mercer

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

The Ocean Circulation in Thermohaline Coordinates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermohaline streamfunction is presented. The thermohaline streamfunction is the integral of transport in temperature–salinity space and represents the net pathway of oceanic water parcels in that space. The thermohaline streamfunction is ...

Jan D. Zika; Matthew H. England; Willem P. Sijp

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

On the Stability of Oceanic Rings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oceanic rings tend to have length scales larger than the deformation radius and also to he long-lived. This latter characteristic, in view of the former, is particularly curious as many quasigeostrophic and primitive equation simulations suggest ...

William K. Dewar; Peter D. Killworth

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Mixing Measurements on an Equatorial Ocean Mooring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vaned, internally recording instruments that measure temperature fluctuations using FP07 thermistors, including fluctuations in the turbulence wavenumber band, have been built, tested, and deployed on a Tropical Atmosphere Ocean (TAO) mooring at ...

J. N. Moum; J. D. Nash

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Reservoir quality studies, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reservoir quality studies are part of the reservoir management and resource assessment programs of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in Alaska. Petrographic analyses have been carried out of samples collected from surface exposures in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), Alaska, to evaluate surface materials as to their potential reservoir rock qualities in the subsurface. This entails characterization of relevant petrologic-petrophysical properties, integration with regional geological-geophysical relationships, and synthesis in terms of likely diagenetic, structural, and stratigraphic conditions in the subsurface. There is a paucity of relevant data in this region. Inferences must be predicated largely on general principles and known relationships elsewhere. A spectrum of lithologies were studied, representing a substantial portion of the regional stratigraphic column. In a number of cases, particularly among the pre-Brookian samples, the rocks appear to have low reservoir potential, based on their present high degree of diagenetic maturity. There is always the possibility - deemed somewhat unlikely here - of subsurface equivalents with more favorable characteristics, due to different original compositions, textures, and/or geologic histories. Brookian sandstones and conglomerates feature samples with fair-good reservoir characteristics, with prospects of being equally good or better in the subsurface. The samples studied suggest the likelihood of horizons with viable reservoir qualities in the subsurface within the ANWR region.

Mowatt, T.C.; Banet, A. (U.S. Bureau of Land Management, Anchorage, AK (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Federal Energy Management Program: Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydropower and Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products

497

Ocean Margins Programs, Phase I research summaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During FY 1992, the DOE restructured its regional coastal-ocean programs into a new Ocean Margins Program (OMP), to: Quantify the ecological and biogeochemical processes and mechanisms that affect the cycling, flux, and storage of carbon and other biogenic elements at the land/ocean interface; Define ocean-margin sources and sinks in global biogeochemical cycles, and; Determine whether continental shelves are quantitatively significant in removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and isolating it via burial in sediments or export to the interior ocean. Currently, the DOE Ocean Margins Program supports more than 70 principal and co-principal investigators, spanning more than 30 academic institutions. Research funded by the OMP amounted to about $6.9M in FY 1994. This document is a collection of abstracts summarizing the component projects of Phase I of the OMP. This phase included both research and technology development, and comprised projects of both two and three years duration. The attached abstracts describe the goals, methods, measurement scales, strengths and limitations, and status of each project, and level of support. Keywords are provided to index the various projects. The names, addresses, affiliations, and major areas of expertise of the investigators are provided in appendices.

Verity, P. [ed.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Glossary ANILCA: Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act ANS: Alaskan North Slope ANWR: Arctic National Wildlife Refuge BBbls: billion barrels Bbls: barrels Daily Petroleum Production Rate: The amount of petroleum extracted per day from a well, group of wells, region, etc. (usually expressed in barrels per day) EIA: Energy Information Administration MBbls: thousand barrels MMBbls: million barrels NPR-A: National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska Petroleum Play: A set of known or postulated petroleum accumulations sharing similar geologic, geographic, and temporal properties such as source rock, migration, pathway, timing, trapping mechanism, and hydrocarbon type

499

A 22-Year Dataset of Surface Longwave Fluxes in the Arctic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

22-Year Dataset of Surface Longwave Fluxes 22-Year Dataset of Surface Longwave Fluxes in the Arctic J. Francis and J. Secora Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences Rutgers University New Brunswick, New Jersey Abstract Downwelling longwave fluxes (DLFs) over the Arctic surface have been generated from 22.5 years of radiances and retrievals from the TIROS (television and infrared observation satellite) operational vertical sounder (TOVS). The flux retrieval algorithm has been validated and improved using surface- based radiation and cloud observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site in Barrow, Alaska, and from the Surface Heat Balance of the Arctic (SHEBA) field program (1997-98) in the Beaufort Sea. The DLF product is presented on a 100 x

500

Ocean Heat Uptake in Eddying and Non-Eddying Ocean Circulation Models in a Warming Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ocean heat uptake is explored with non-eddying (2°), eddy-permitting (0.25°), and eddy-resolving (0.125°) ocean circulation models in a domain representing the Atlantic basin connected to a southern circumpolar channel with a flat bottom. The ...

Yu Zhang; Geoffrey K. Vallis

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z