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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Woodgate, Arctic Ocean Circulation Page 1:13 February 2012 ARCTIC OCEAN CIRCULATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deep) Bering Strait, through which about 0.8Sv (1Sv=106 m3 s-1 ) of water enters the Arctic. Properties: 206-221-3268 Accepted for Nature Education Knowledge Project, May 2012 Welcome to the Arctic Ocean Circle, contains deep (~ 4500m) basins, the slowest spreading ridges in the world, and about 15

Washington at Seattle, University of

2

arctic ocean experiment: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arctic Geosciences Websites Summary: Model predicted warming per century, Bitz et al In a global warming scenario, the Poles warm faster1 2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E497E -...

3

arctic ocean sediments: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Is the central Arctic Ocean a sediment starved basin, University of Bergen, Norway d Byrd Polar Research Center, Ohio State University, USA Abstract Numerous short...

4

arctic ocean sediment: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Is the central Arctic Ocean a sediment starved basin, University of Bergen, Norway d Byrd Polar Research Center, Ohio State University, USA Abstract Numerous short...

5

ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN A THESISSUBMITTEDTO THE GRADUATE Section(1994)cruiseswere analyzed for their aluminum (Al) content; these two data setswere then combined

Luther, Douglas S.

6

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ocean archaeal Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Andy Casper... : eukaryotic flagellates as a major component of the Arctic Ocean food web Sebastien Roy: Life in the dark... AND IN THE ARCTIC OCEAN CATHERINE VALLIRES ......

7

arctic ocean freshwater: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geosciences Websites Summary: Model predicted warming per century, Bitz et al In a global warming scenario, the Poles warm faster1 2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E497E -...

8

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ocean expedition Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arctic will lead to a better understanding of how the Summary: between the U.S. and Russia began with the expedition of the Bering and Chukchi Seas ( Arctic Ocean... . Arctic...

9

2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E/497E -Lecture 17 -Woodgate Global models in the Arctic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;2 2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E/497E - Lecture 17 - Woodgate Deep waters of the Atlantic from http://sam://iodp.tamu.edu/publications/PR/303PR/images/Fig01.jpg Dickson et al, refs Denmark Strait ~ 650m deep Iceland Scotland Ridge ~ 400

Washington at Seattle, University of

10

Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

11

Preliminary Geospatial Analysis of Arctic Ocean Hydrocarbon Resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean is predicted to become thinner and to cover less area with time. The combination of more ice-free waters for exploration and navigation, along with increasing demand for hydrocarbons and improvements in technologies for the discovery and exploitation of new hydrocarbon resources have focused attention on the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Basin and its margins. The purpose of this document is to 1) summarize results of a review of published hydrocarbon resources in the Arctic, including both conventional oil and gas and methane hydrates and 2) develop a set of digital maps of the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Ocean. These maps can be combined with predictions of ice-free areas to enable estimates of the likely regions and sequence of hydrocarbon production development in the Arctic. In this report, conventional oil and gas resources are explicitly linked with potential gas hydrate resources. This has not been attempted previously and is particularly powerful as the likelihood of gas production from marine gas hydrates increases. Available or planned infrastructure, such as pipelines, combined with the geospatial distribution of hydrocarbons is a very strong determinant of the temporal-spatial development of Arctic hydrocarbon resources. Significant unknowns decrease the certainty of predictions for development of hydrocarbon resources. These include: 1) Areas in the Russian Arctic that are poorly mapped, 2) Disputed ownership: primarily the Lomonosov Ridge, 3) Lack of detailed information on gas hydrate distribution, and 4) Technical risk associated with the ability to extract methane gas from gas hydrates. Logistics may control areas of exploration more than hydrocarbon potential. Accessibility, established ownership, and leasing of exploration blocks may trump quality of source rock, reservoir, and size of target. With this in mind, the main areas that are likely to be explored first are the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea, in spite of the fact that these areas do not have highest potential for future hydrocarbon reserves. Opportunities for improving the mapping and assessment of Arctic hydrocarbon resources include: 1) Refining hydrocarbon potential on a basin-by-basin basis, 2) Developing more realistic and detailed distribution of gas hydrate, and 3) Assessing the likely future scenarios for development of infrastructure and their interaction with hydrocarbon potential. It would also be useful to develop a more sophisticated approach to merging conventional and gas hydrate resource potential that considers the technical uncertainty associated with exploitation of gas hydrate resources. Taken together, additional work in these areas could significantly improve our understanding of the exploitation of Arctic hydrocarbons as ice-free areas increase in the future.

Long, Philip E.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Sullivan, E. C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bradley, Donald J.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

An energy-diagnostics intercomparison of coupled ice-ocean Arctic models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An energy-diagnostics intercomparison of coupled ice-ocean Arctic models Petteri Uotila a,*, David. Understanding the Arctic Ocean energy balance is important because it can strengthen our understanding for Atmosphere-Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, NYU, 200 Water

Zhang, Jinlun

13

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ocean supplementary Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

November 3, 2009 Rules and Regulations DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Summary: . Global climate change is reducing the extent of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean, providing greater...

14

Surface salinity fields in the Arctic Ocean and statistical approaches to predicting anomalies and patterns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to changing environmental conditions. Its surface layer is a key component of the Arctic climate system, which. In this context, the Arctic Ocean surface layer is a critical indicator of climate change in the Arctic [Zaharov. Petersburg, Russia. Ivan Sudakov, Department of Mathematics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA

Golden, Kenneth M.

15

The Arctic Ocean carbon sink G.A. MacGilchrist a,n  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon sequestration Biological pump a b s t r a c t We present observation based estimatesThe Arctic Ocean carbon sink G.A. MacGilchrist a,n , A.C. Naveira Garabato a , T. Tsubouchi b , S January 2014 Keywords: Arctic Ocean Dissolved inorganic carbon Carbon budget Air­sea carbon dioxide flux

Naveira Garabato, Alberto

16

Seasonal predictions of ice extent in the Arctic Ocean R. W. Lindsay,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Service and the U. S. National Ice Center) produces summer outlooks of ice conditions for specific regionsSeasonal predictions of ice extent in the Arctic Ocean R. W. Lindsay,1 J. Zhang,1 A. J. Schweiger,1 29 February 2008. [1] How well can the extent of arctic sea ice be predicted for lead periods of up

Zhang, Jinlun

17

Warming of the arctic ice-ocean system is faster than the global average since the 1960s  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, downward longwave radiation, and therefore net heat flux. The faster warming of the arctic ice­ocean systemWarming of the arctic ice-ocean system is faster than the global average since the 1960s Jinlun Zhang Polar Science Center, Applied Physics Laboratory, College of Ocean and Fishery Sciences

Zhang, Jinlun

18

Megatides in the Arctic Ocean under glacial conditions Stephen D. Griffiths,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Megatides in the Arctic Ocean under glacial conditions Stephen D. Griffiths,1 and W. R. Peltier1's climate and ocean circulation. Citation: Griffiths, S. D., and W. R. Peltier (2008), Megatides occurred approx- imately 26,000 years ago, since the bathymetric changes are now well constrained [Peltier

Peltier, W. Richard

19

Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vast quantities of methane are trapped in oceanic hydrate deposits, and there is concern that a rise in the ocean temperature will induce dissociation of these hydrate accumulations, potentially releasing large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. Because methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, such a release could have dramatic climatic consequences. The recent discovery of active methane gas venting along the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) on the shallow continental slope (150 m - 400 m) west of Svalbard suggests that this process may already have begun, but the source of the methane has not yet been determined. This study performs 2-D simulations of hydrate dissociation in conditions representative of the Arctic Ocean margin to assess whether such hydrates could contribute to the observed gas release. The results show that shallow, low-saturation hydrate deposits, if subjected to recently observed or future predicted temperature changes at the seafloor, can release quantities of methane at the magnitudes similar to what has been observed, and that the releases will be localized near the landward limit of the GHSZ. Both gradual and rapid warming is simulated, along with a parametric sensitivity analysis, and localized gas release is observed for most of the cases. These results resemble the recently published observations and strongly suggest that hydrate dissociation and methane release as a result of climate change may be a real phenomenon, that it could occur on decadal timescales, and that it already may be occurring.

Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Greenland's Island Rule and the Arctic Ocean circulation by Terrence M. Joyce1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenland's Island Rule and the Arctic Ocean circulation by Terrence M. Joyce1,2 and Andrey made for the flow around Greenland. Godfrey's theory has been extended to permit inclusion of Bering Archipelago in the modeled flow west of Greenland. In both models, the forcing has been applied in a quasi

Joyce, Terrence M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Atlantic meridional overturning and climate response to Arctic Ocean W. R. Peltier,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atlantic meridional overturning and climate response to Arctic Ocean freshening W. R. Peltier,1 G to the response to North Atlantic freshening. Citation: Peltier, W. R., G. Vettoretti, and M. Stastna (2006 of the Atlantic by Heinrich Event 1 [Peltier, 2005]. Simi- larly, the onset of the Younger Dryas (Y-D) cold

Peltier, W. Richard

22

255FEBRUARY 2002AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | he Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that determine the surface energy budget and the seaice mass balance in the Arctic (Moritz et al. 1993; Perovich of the vertical and horizontal energy exchanges within the oceaniceatmosphere system. The SHEBA pro- gram for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado; TURENNE--Canadian Coast Guard, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada; SERREZE

Shupe, Matthew

23

Influence of transport and ocean ice extent on biogenic aerosol sulfur in the Arctic atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Influence of transport and ocean ice extent on biogenic aerosol sulfur in the Arctic atmosphere S, such as methanesulfonic acid (MSA). This study examines relationships between changes in total sea ice extent north of 70. These results suggest that a decrease in seasonal ice cover influencing other mechanisms of DMS production could

24

Radiocarbon in particulate matter from the eastern sub-arctic Pacific Ocean; evidence of a source of terrestrial carbon to the deep sea.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EASTERN SUB-ARCTIC PACIFIC OCEAN: EVIDENCE OF A SOURCEfrom the deep Northeast Pacific Ocean. Due to the largeMap of the North Pacific Ocean (after Favorite, Dodimead &

Druffel, Ellen R M; Honju, Susumu; Griffin, Sheila; Wong, C S

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

A Comparison of Atmospheric Reanalysis Products for the Arctic Ocean and Implications for Uncertainties in AirSea Fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The uncertainties related to atmospheric fields in the Arctic Ocean from commonly used and recently available reanalysis products are investigated. Fields from the 1) ECMWF Interim Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim), 2) Common ...

Chaudhuri, Ayan H.

26

Session Papers North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean Cloud  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) SrEvaluatingconstructionSession Name: WorkflowsSession Papers

27

Sea ice loss and the changing atmospheric CO2 uptake capacity of the Arctic Ocean: Insights1 from the southeastern Canada Basin2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sea ice loss and the changing atmospheric CO2 uptake capacity of the Arctic Ocean: Insights1 from (Arctic Ocean) to act as an atmospheric CO2 sink under the summertime ice-free conditions12 expected in the near future. Beneath a heavily decayed ice cover, we found surprisingly high13 pCO2sw (~290-320 atm

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

28

The Arctic Ocean--a Canadian perspective from IPY H. Melling & R. Francois & P. G. Myers & W. Perrie &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resulting from ice melt. Careful experiments have revealed that Arctic phytoplankton growth is constrained with the atmosphere is dramatically reduced by its ice cap. Sea ice inhibits transfers of vapour and heat reflectivity and latent heat reduce the ocean's absorption of sunshine, and slow ice melting until insolation

Long, Bernard

29

Modeling the formation and fate of the nearsurface temperature maximum in the Canadian Basin of the Arctic Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the end of summer 2007, using both model output (described in section 2) and observed data. [3] Jackson et of the Arctic Ocean over the years 20002009. The NSTM is formed from local summertime absorption of solar., 2008; Nghiem et al., 2007]. This allowed 500% more solar energy into the surface layers of the Beaufort

Zhang, Jinlun

30

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ocean ice Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Will) This chart shows the drop in ... Source: Strayer, David L. - Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 14 Rapid reduction of Arctic...

31

2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E/497E -Lecture 1 -Woodgate What makes the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"? Decreasing Ice cover Local communities subsistence Arctic Shipping Routes? Oil/Gas Exploration Links - follows slopes and ridges - quite weak (strongest flows=eddies) - separates from slopes .. somehow - cools penetration into Arctic except through North Atlantic due to fairly zonal steering and blocking by land masses

Washington at Seattle, University of

32

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic environmental change Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Service for Hydrometeorology and Environmental Monitoring (Roshydomet) and, Arctic... Ocean Currents in the Arctic Basin International ... Source: Washington at Seattle,...

33

Microbial and viral genomics of surface ocean communities within the Southern California Bight and adjacent California Current Ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Williamson, S.J. Single Virus Genomics: A New Tool for VirusMicrobial and viral genomics of surface ocean communitiesa sequencing simulator for genomics and metagenomics. PloS

Zeigler, Lisa Ann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic animals-a review Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ROTHROCK... and the intensification of the cyclonic circulation in the eastern Arctic Ocean. The response of Arctic sea ice... into the eastern Arctic from the Canada Basin,...

35

Autonomous buoy for seismic reflection data acquisition in the inaccessible parts of the Arctic Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Autonomous buoy for seismic reflection data acquisition in the inaccessible parts of the Arctic Instrumentation, Bergen, Norway An autonomous buoy which collects seismic reflection data and transmits to shore of the seismic buoy (thick red, green and black lines). - we have successfully developed an autonomous buoy

Kristoffersen, Yngve

36

Comparison of surface radiative flux data sets over the Arctic Ocean Jiping Liu,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The reduced surface heat loss is partly offset by the reduction of solar heating due to much higher snow of these surface parameters was compared to the high-quality in situ measurements from the Surface Heat Budget; Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2001]. However, physical processes in the Arctic are not well understood

37

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic sediments implies Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Luminescence dating supports central Arctic Ocean cm-scale sedimentation rates... sediment cores from the central Arctic Ocean and by using an independent absolute dating...

38

Basalt petrogenesis beneath slow- and ultraslow-spreading Arctic mid-ocean ridges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To explore the ability of melting mafic lithologies to produce alkaline ocean-island basalts (OIB), an experimental study was carried out measuring clinopyroxene (Cpx)melt and garnet (Gt)-melt partition coefficients during ...

Elkins, Lynne J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the modeling work by Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. to simulate the biochemical effects of of the nutrient-enhanced seawater plumes that are discharged by one or several 100 megawatt OTEC plants. The modeling is needed to properly design OTEC plants that can operate sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. In order to quantify the effect of discharge configuration and phytoplankton response, Makai Ocean Engineering implemented a biological and physical model for the waters surrounding O`ahu, Hawai`i, using the EPA-approved Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). Each EFDC grid cell was approximately 1 square kilometer by 20 meters deep, and used a time step of three hours. The biological model was set up to simulate the biochemical response for three classes of organisms: Picoplankton (< 2 um) such as prochlorococccus, nanoplankton (2-20 um), and microplankton (> 20 um) e.g., diatoms. The dynamic biological phytoplankton model was calibrated using chemical and biological data collected for the Hawaii Ocean Time Series (HOTS) project. Peer review of the biological modeling was performed. The physical oceanography model uses boundary conditions from a surrounding Hawai'i Regional Ocean Model, (ROM) operated by the University of Hawai`i and the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration. The ROM provided tides, basin scale circulation, mesoscale variability, and atmospheric forcing into the edges of the EFDC computational domain. This model is the most accurate and sophisticated Hawai'ian Regional Ocean Model presently available, assimilating real-time oceanographic observations, as well as model calibration based upon temperature, current and salinity data collected during 2010 near the simulated OTEC site. The ROM program manager peer-reviewed Makai's implementation of the ROM output into our EFDC model. The supporting oceanographic data was collected for a Naval Facilities Engineering Command / Makai project. Results: The model was run for a 100 MW OTEC Plant consisting of four separate ducts, discharging a total combined flow rate of 420 m3/s of warm water and 320 m3/s of cold water in a mixed discharge at 70 meters deep. Each duct was assumed to have a discharge port diameter of 10.5m producing a downward discharge velocity of about 2.18 m/s. The natural system, as measured in the HOTS program, has an average concentration of 10-15 mgC/m3. To calibrate the biological model, we first ran the model with no OTEC plant and varied biological parameters until the simulated data was a good match to the HOTS observations. This modeling showed that phytoplankton concentration were patchy and highly dynamic. The patchiness was a good match with the data variability observed within the HOTS data sets. We then ran the model with simulated OTEC intake and discharge flows and associated nutrients. Directly under the OTEC plant, the near-field plume has an average terminal depth of 172 meters, with a volumetric dilution of 13:1. The average terminal plume temperature was 19.8oC. Nitrate concentrations are 1 to 2 umol/kg above ambient. The advecting plume then further dilutes to less than 1 umol/kg above ambient within a few kilometers downstream, while remaining at depth. Because this terminal near-field plume is well below the 1% light limited depths (~120m), no immediate biological utilization of the nutrients occurs. As the nitrate is advected and dispersed downstream, a fraction of the deep ocean nutrients (< 0.5 umol/kg perturbation) mix upward where they are utilized by the ambient phytoplankton population. This occurs approximately twenty-five kilometers downstream from the plant at 110 - 70 meters depth. For pico-phytoplankton, modeling results indicate that this nutrient perturbation causes a phytoplankton perturbation of approximately 1 mgC/m3 (~10% of average ambient concentrations) that covers an area 10x5 km in size at the 70 to 90m depth. Thus, the perturbations are well within the natural variability of the system, generally corresponding to a 10 to 15% increase above the a

PAT GRANDELLI, P.E.; GREG ROCHELEAU; JOHN HAMRICK, Ph.D.; MATT CHURCH, Ph.D.; BRIAN POWELL, Ph.D.

2012-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

40

arctic ice islands: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

analogous to the effects of the Arctic region; KEYWORDS: Arctic Ocean, ice rafting, climate change Citation: Darby, D. A., and J. F. Bischof (2004), A Holocene record of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Z .Chemical Geology 158 1999 173188 Grain size separation and sediment mixing in Arctic Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

' FBE . At the land­ocean transition the reduction of the particle velocity causes a deposition ages from the FBE reflect the age of the Siberian flood Z .basalt of about 220 Ma and the initial ratio samples from the western Laptev Sea Z . 143 144 west of 1208E fall between LME and FBE. Mixing

Schöne, Bernd R.

42

Model-Data Fusion Studies of Pacific Arctic Climate and Ice-Ocean Processes Jia Wang1, Hajo Eicken2, Yanling Yu3, X. Bai4, Jinlun Zhang3, H. Hu4, Moto Ikeda5, Kohei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Ecosystems Research (CILER), School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, 4840 South1 Model-Data Fusion Studies of Pacific Arctic Climate and Ice-Ocean Processes Jia Wang1, Hajo. Tel: 734-741-2281; Email: Jia.Wang@noaa.gov 2. University of Alaska Fairbanks, Geophysical Institute

Zhang, Jinlun

43

The area and volume of sea ice in the Arc-tic Ocean is decreasing, with some predict-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, while loss of sea ice could cause stress for polar bears. Moreover, global climate may be affected ice forms in winter,which melts and/or gets exported out of the Arctic. The recent decrease in summer of this community is evi- dence that the sea ice cap has not disap- peared during the Quaternary. The remains

Long, Bernard

44

APPLICATION OF CARBOHYDRATES AND PHENOLS AS BIOMARKERS TO STUDY DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER RESERVOIRS IN ARCTIC RIVERS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arctic rivers are the dominant pathways for the transport of terrestrial dissolved organic carbon to the Arctic Ocean, but knowledge of sources, transformations and transfer of organic carbon and nitrogen in Arctic river watersheds is extremely...

McMahon, Rachel

2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

45

Arctic ocean long-term acoustic monitoring : ambient noise, environmental correlates, and transients north of Barrow, Alaska  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean namely the thickness and concentration of perennial ice coverage is crucial in allowing the water column to retain thermal energy

Roth, Ethan H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic freshwater sediments Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;2 Holocene sedimentation in the deep Arctic Ocean... prominently in the overall sediment budget of the Arctic Ocean. While a detailed analysis of the processes... with these...

47

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic offshore oil Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

damage assessment. As the Arctic Ocean becomes seasonally passable and tourism, oil and gas... forecasting of ocean storms which have serious potential to threaten marine ......

48

Arctic ice islands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic reduces root Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

surface albedo, leading to amplified ice melting. The Arctic... , the total ice production over the Arctic Ocean is reduced (Figure 3e). In summer, a decrease in ice... What...

50

NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region Aixue Hu National Center of the net sea ice production and the sea ice exchanges between the Arctic and its adjacent seas are studied) is the major factor controlling the net sea ice production in the Arctic region since a thinning ice cover

Hu, Aixue

51

NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region: a numerical study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region: a numerical study Aixue The variability of net sea ice production and sea ice exchange between the Arctic and its adjacent seas export) is the major factor controlling the net sea ice production in the Arctic region since a thinning

Hu, Aixue

52

ShoreZone in the Arctic 8,000 km of Coastal Habitat Mapping Cathy Coon, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, catherine.coon@boem.gov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deadhorse Kotzebue Sound BOEM North Slope Imagery - 1,900 km BOEM North Slope Shore Stations National Park a continental-scale characterization of the arctic shoreline and support planning efforts related to oils spills Krusenstern, north of Kotzebue #12;Point Lay Wales Kotzebue Wainwright Cape Lisburne Kaktovik BARROW Point

53

Arctic house  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Currently available housing in the Arctic is limited to solutions that have been adapted from designs for less severe climates. This thesis has developed a new manner of residential construction designed specifically for ...

Turkel, Joel A. (Joel Abram), 1969-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic valley findings Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Weingartner Summary: The 2007 Bering Strait Oceanic Heat Flux and anomalous Arctic Sea-ice Retreat Rebecca A. Woodgate... Abstract: To illuminate the role of Pacific Waters in...

55

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic mammalian carnivore Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: locality Arctic Ocean, Si- Ur.w polaris Shaw, 1792:7. Renaming of marinus Pallas. Thallassnrctos... (Manning, 1971). Presumably the cline is similar across the Soviet...

56

Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. Otec Plume Biochemical Simulation of a 100MW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent

57

2006 Nature Publishing Group Episodic fresh surface waters in the Eocene Arctic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and heat supply owing to the influx of waters from adjacent oceans. We suggest that onset and termination

Jakobsson, Martin

58

Estimating sea ice area flux across the Canadian Arctic Archipelago using enhanced AMSR-E  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This produced a net loss of sea ice area of about 122 ? 103 km2 or roughly 174 km3 a?1 which is presumedEstimating sea ice area flux across the Canadian Arctic Archipelago using enhanced AMSR-E T. Agnew is used to estimate daily sea ice area fluxes between the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and the Arctic Ocean

Long, David G.

59

Fiscal Year 2007 Annual Report Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INDIAN OCEAN PACIFIC OCEAN ATLANTIC OCEAN ARCTIC OCEAN SOUTHERN OCEAN 0° 120°E 150° 87°30' 88°00' N M0001Fiscal Year 2007 Annual Report Integrated Ocean Drilling Program · U.S. Implementing Organization­M0004 180° ESO USIO IODP Phase 1 Drill Sites, Expeditions 301­312 #12;Integrated Ocean Drilling

60

Moisture budget of the Arctic atmosphere from TOVS satellite data David G. Groves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and radiative heating of the atmosphere. These, in turn, affect surface temperature, ice growth and melt and hemispheric atmospheric processes affect the Arctic Ocean. The lack of humidity data over the Arctic Ocean. Our method yields an average annual net precipitation of 15.1 cm yr1 over the polar cap (poleward

Francis, Jennifer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Further observations of a decreasing atmospheric CO2 uptake capacity in the Canada Basin (Arctic Ocean) due to sea ice loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean) due to sea ice loss Brent G.T. Else,1 R.J. Galley,1 B. Lansard,2 D.G. Barber,1 K. Brown,3 L as an atmospheric CO2 sink under the summertime ice-free conditions expected in the near future. Beneath a heavily decayed ice cover, we found surprisingly high pCO2sw (~290320 matm), considering that surface water

Boyer, Edmond

62

ArcticN O A A ' s A r c t i c A c t i O N P l A N Supporting the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Service Kate Clark National Ocean Service Pablo Clemente-Colon National Environmental Satellite directly supports the National Strategy. Advancing U.s. security interests in the Arctic requires improvedArcticN O A A ' s A r c t i c A c t i O N P l A N Supporting the national Strategy for the arctic

63

Simulated Arctic atmospheric feedbacks associated with late summer sea ice anomalies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulated Arctic atmospheric feedbacks associated with late summer sea ice anomalies A. Rinke,1,2 K depend on regional and decadal variations in the coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea ice system. Citation: Rinke to investigate feedbacks between September sea ice anomalies in the Arctic and atmospheric conditions in autumn

Moore, John

64

Impact of underwater-ice evolution on Arctic summer sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of underwater-ice evolution on Arctic summer sea ice Dirk Notz,1,4 Miles G. McPhee,2 M. Grae the simultaneous growth and ablation of a layer of ice between an under-ice melt pond and the underlying ocean. Such ``false bottoms'' are the only significant source of ice formation in the Arctic during summer. Analytical

Worster, M. Grae

65

Carbon dynamics in arctic vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rapid climate change in Arctic regions is of concern due to important feedbacks between the Arctic land surface and the global climate system. A large amount of organic carbon (C) is currently stored in Arctic soils; if ...

Street, Lorna Elizabeth

2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

66

EA-1193: Final Environmental Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site

67

EA-1193: Finding of No Significant Impact  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site

68

A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo and cloud radiative forcing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo surface and sea-ice energy budgets were measured near 87.5°N during the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study regimes, characterized by varying cloud, thermody- namic and solar properties. An initial warm, melt

Brooks, Ian M.

69

Arctic energy resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Arctic is a vulnerable region with immense resources. These range from the replenishable (tidal energy, hydroelectricity, wood, biomass, fish, game, and geothermal energy) to the non-replenishable (coal, minerals, natural gas, hydrocarbon deposits). But the problems of exploiting such resources without damaging the environment of the Arctic are formidable. In this book all aspects are considered: occurrence of energy resources; the technological and economic aspects of exploration and exploitation; the environmental and social impact of technological development.

Rey, L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

6, 96559722, 2006 Arctic smoke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discussions Arctic smoke ­ record high air pollution levels in the European Arctic due to agricultural fires into the European Arctic and caused the most severe air pollution episodes ever recorded there. This paper confirms that biomass burning (BB) was in-5 deed the source of the observed air pollution, studies the transport

Boyer, Edmond

71

Arctic sea ice modeling with the material-point method.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arctic sea ice plays an important role in global climate by reflecting solar radiation and insulating the ocean from the atmosphere. Due to feedback effects, the Arctic sea ice cover is changing rapidly. To accurately model this change, high-resolution calculations must incorporate: (1) annual cycle of growth and melt due to radiative forcing; (2) mechanical deformation due to surface winds, ocean currents and Coriolis forces; and (3) localized effects of leads and ridges. We have demonstrated a new mathematical algorithm for solving the sea ice governing equations using the material-point method with an elastic-decohesive constitutive model. An initial comparison with the LANL CICE code indicates that the ice edge is sharper using Materials-Point Method (MPM), but that many of the overall features are similar.

Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic Using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary research task completed for this project was the development of the Regional Arctic Climate Model (RACM). This involved coupling existing atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land models using the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) coupler (CPL7). RACM is based on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model, the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) ocean model, the CICE sea ice model, and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land model. A secondary research task for this project was testing and evaluation of WRF for climate-scale simulations on the large pan-Arctic model domain used in RACM. This involved identification of a preferred set of model physical parameterizations for use in our coupled RACM simulations and documenting any atmospheric biases present in RACM.

Cassano, John [Principal Investigator

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

73

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004: Part I. Database of the Barents, Kara, and Information Service #12;World Data Center for Oceanography, Silver Spring International Ocean Atlas and Information Series, Volume 9 NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 2004: I

74

This chapter describes observations of continuing change in the Arctic environmental system. It is or-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the longest period and largest area of ice sheet melt since at least 1978, and the highest melt rate since in the Canadian Arctic, where the rate of mass loss from small glaciers and ice caps continued to increase system. It is or- ganized into five broad sections: atmosphere, ocean, sea ice cover, land, and Greenland

Bhatt, Uma

75

On the Relationship between Thermodynamic Structure and Cloud Top, and Its Climate Significance in the Arctic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inside inversion (CII)] was frequently observed at central Arctic Ocean sites, while observations from- nitudes of surface cloud warming and cooling are de- pendent upon the solar zenith angle, surface albedo-D-11-00186.1 ? 2012 American Meteor

Shupe, Matthew

76

Arctic Sea Ice Retreat in 2007 Follows Thinning Trend R. W. LINDSAY, J. ZHANG, A. SCHWEIGER, M. STEELE, AND H. STERN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arctic Sea Ice Retreat in 2007 Follows Thinning Trend R. W. LINDSAY, J. ZHANG, A. SCHWEIGER, M ice extent in the summer of 2007 was unprecedented in the historical record. A coupled iceocean model is used to determine the state of the ice and ocean over the past 29 yr to investigate the causes

Zhang, Jinlun

77

Non-nuclear submarine tankers could cost-effectively move Arctic oil and gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Before the advent of nuclear propulsion for U.S. Navy submarines, fuel cells were considered to be the next logical step forward from battery powered submarines which required recharging. But with the launching of the USS Nautilus (SSN-571) in 1954, the development of fuel-cell propulsion was sidelined by the naval community. Nearly 30 years later fuel-cell propulsion on board submarines is actually more cost-effective than the use of nuclear propulsion. In the Artic Ocean, the use of the submarine tanker has long been considered commercially appropriate because of the presence of the polar ice cap, which inhibits surface ship transport. The technical difficulty and high operating cost of Arctic icebreaking tankers are strong arguments in favor of the cheaper, more efficient submarine tanker. Transiting under the polar ice cap, the submarine tanker is not an ''Arctic'' system, but merely a submerged system. It is a system usable in any ocean around the globe where sufficient depth exists (about 65% of the global surface). Ice breakers are another story; their design only makes them useful for transit through heavy sea ice in coastal environments. Used anywhere else, such as in the open ocean or at the Arctic ice cap, they are not a cost-effective means of transport. Arctic sea ice conditions require the Arctic peculiar icebreaking tanker system to do the job the hard way-on the surface. But on the other hand, Arctic sea ice conditions are neatly set aside by the submarine tanker, which does it the energy-efficient, elegant way submerged. The submarine tanker is less expensive to build, far less expensive to operate, and does not need to be nuclear propelled.

Kumm, W.H.

1984-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

78

Development, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty quantification of high-fidelity arctic sea ice models.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and due to feedback effects the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice to model physical parameters. A new sea ice model that has the potential to improve sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code and the MPM sea ice code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness, and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana S.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Fundamental problems of modeling the dynamics of internal gravity waves with applications to the Arctic Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we consider fundamental problems of the dynamics of internal gravity waves. We present analytical and numerical algorithms for calculating the wave fields for a set of values of the parameters, as observed in the ocean. We show that our mathematical models can describe the wave dynamics of the Arctic Basin, taking into account the actual physical characteristics of sea water, topography of its floor, etc. The numerical and analytical results show that the internal gravity waves have a significant effect on underwater sea objects in the Arctic Basin.

Vitaly V. Bulatov; Yuriy V. Vladimirov

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

80

Recent Arctic Sea Ice Variability: Connections to the Arctic Oscillation and the ENSO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nin~o- Southern Oscillation (ENSO) produce similar ice changes in the western Arctic, but opposite iceRecent Arctic Sea Ice Variability: Connections to the Arctic Oscillation and the ENSO Jiping Liu; accepted 20 April 2004; published 13 May 2004. [1] Trends in the satellite-derived Arctic sea ice

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Final Technical Report Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters DOE AWARD NO. DE sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) uses large flowsFinal Technical Report Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy

82

Time varying arctic climate change amplification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past 130 years the global mean surface air temperature has risen by about 0.75 K. Due to feedbacks -- including the snow/ice albedo feedback -- the warming in the Arctic is expected to proceed at a faster rate than the global average. Climate model simulations suggest that this Arctic amplification produces warming that is two to three times larger than the global mean. Understanding the Arctic amplification is essential for projections of future Arctic climate including sea ice extent and melting of the Greenland ice sheet. We use the temperature records from the Arctic stations to show that (a) the Arctic amplification is larger at latitudes above 700 N compared to those within 64-70oN belt, and that, surprisingly; (b) the ratio of the Arctic to global rate of temperature change is not constant but varies on the decadal timescale. This time dependence will affect future projections of climate changes in the Arctic.

Chylek, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dubey, Manvendra K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lesins, Glen [DALLHOUSIE U; Wang, Muyin [NOAA/JISAO

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Decline in ice thickness from sub data 1 10/16/07 The decline in arctic sea-ice thickness: separating the spatial, annual, and1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Decline in ice thickness from sub data 1 10/16/07 The decline in arctic sea-ice thickness/14/07 & 10/16/079 10 11 #12;Decline in ice thickness from sub data 2 10/16/07 Abstract11 Naval submarines have collected operational data of sea-ice draft (90% of thickness) in the12 Arctic Ocean since 1958

Percival, Don

84

Variations in the age of Arctic sea-ice and summer sea-ice extent Ignatius G. Rigor1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. On time scales of days to weeks, wind stresses from storms produce ridges of sea-ice and areas of openVariations in the age of Arctic sea-ice and summer sea-ice extent Ignatius G. Rigor1,2 and John M] Three of the past six summers have exhibited record low sea-ice extent on the Arctic Ocean. These minima

Rigor, Ignatius G.

85

Canada's Arctic Gateway: Discussion Paper Summary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Canada's Arctic Gateway: Discussion Paper Summary September 2010 The following summarizes key Canada's Arctic Gateway a reality in terms of both national public policy and international presence the Government of Canada's national gateway policy framework. This discussion paper's use of the term "Arctic

Martin, Jeff

86

Analysis of two independent methods for retrieving liquid water profiles in spring and summer Arctic boundary clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-based remote sensing, optimal estimation, LES model with explicit microphysics, cloud liquid water algorithms Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) project. An algorithm developed by Frisch et al. [1995, 1998 matrix of the LWC profile is calculated, an optimal estimation method is applied to the SHEBA data

Shupe, Matthew

87

Comprehensive Ocean Drilling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comprehensive Ocean Drilling Bibliography containing citations related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, and International Ocean Discovery Program Last updated: May 2014 #12;Comprehensive Bibliography Comprehensive Ocean Drilling Bibliography

88

Understanding Complex Network Attack Graphs through Clustered Adjacency Matrices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding Complex Network Attack Graphs through Clustered Adjacency Matrices Steven Noel}@gmu.edu Abstract We apply adjacency matrix clustering to network attack graphs for attack correlation, prediction, and hypothesizing. We self-multiply the clustered adjacency matrices to show attacker reachability across

Noel, Steven

89

Seismicity in Azerbaijan and Adjacent Caspian Sea  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

So far no general view on the geodynamic evolution of the Black Sea to the Caspian Sea region is elaborated. This is associated with the geological and structural complexities of the region revealed by geophysical, geochemical, petrologic, structural, and other studies. A clash of opinions on geodynamic conditions of the Caucasus region, sometimes mutually exclusive, can be explained by a simplified interpretation of the seismic data. In this paper I analyze available data on earthquake occurrences in Azerbaijan and the adjacent Caspian Sea region. The results of the analysis of macroseismic and instrumental data, seismic regime, and earthquake reoccurrence indicate that a level of seismicity in the region is moderate, and seismic event are concentrated in the shallow part of the lithosphere. Seismicity is mostly intra-plate, and spatial distribution of earthquake epicenters does not correlate with the plate boundaries.

Panahi, Behrouz M. [Geology Institute, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, 29-A H. Javid Ave., Baku 1143 (Azerbaijan)

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

90

Air monitoring in the Arctic: Results for selected persistent organic pollutants for 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Arctic is generally considered to be a pristine environment and has few direct inputs of organochlorine compounds (OCs), including pesticides, herbicides, polychlorinated biphenyls, or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In spite of this, airborne concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are comparable to those in more populated and industrialized regions of North America and Europe. Atmospheric transport and condensation of compounds at low temperature conditions are important factors contributing to the presence of contaminants in the Arctic. A long-term program has been established to measure the airborne concentrations of POPs in the Arctic. The first station at Alert was established in January 1992. The concentrations measured in the first year of monitoring for 18 compounds that are representative of different compound classes are presented. Seasonal variations for PAHs are similar to those for Arctic haze and peak during winter. For example, in the coldest period, october to April, benzo[a]pyrene concentrations were found to average 20 pg/m{sup 3}, whereas, in contrast, during the relatively warm May to September period, average levels were 1.0 pg/m{sup 3}. For OCs, the seasonal cycle was not as pronounced as that for PAH compounds. For example, {alpha}-hexachlorocyclohexane was found at Alert at average concentrations of 62 and 57 pg/m{sup 3}, respectively, during cold and warm periods. It is postulated that air concentrations are influenced by advection from distant source regions as well as exchange with local (Arctic Ocean) surfaces.

Fellin, P.; Dougherty, D. [BOVAR Environmental, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Barrie, L.A.; Toom, D. [Environment Canada, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Muir, D.; Grift, N.; Lockhart, L.; Billeck, B. [Freshwater Inst., Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

65J.M. Grebmeier and W. Maslowski (eds.), The Pacific Arctic Region: Ecosystem Status and Trends in a Rapidly Changing Environment, DOI 10.1007/978-94-017-8863-2_4,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Sapporo, Japan K. Mizobata Department of Ocean Sciences, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Tokyo, Japan J.E. Overland Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric mechanisms responsible for the diminishing sea ice cannot be explained by the leading Arctic Oscillation (AO

Zhang, Jinlun

92

arctic ocean: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

climate connection, total solar irradiance, Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, climate variability. Willie W. -h. Soon 2009-01-01 324 Geographic muting of changes in the...

93

arctic ocean hydrocarbon: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

climate connection, total solar irradiance, Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, climate variability. Willie W. -h. Soon 2009-01-01 340 Geographic muting of changes in the...

94

IEEE JOURNAL OF OCEANIC ENGINEERING, VOL. 34, NO. 4, OCTOBER 2009 617 Extension of the Rotated Elastic Parabolic Equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE JOURNAL OF OCEANIC ENGINEERING, VOL. 34, NO. 4, OCTOBER 2009 617 Extension of the Rotated into adjacent regions. This approach is extended to solve problems involving variable topography (above-ocean-dependent fluid-solid interfaces is one of the prominent issues in underwater acoustics. Realistic ocean bottoms

95

arctic ecosystems dominated: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by: Arctic Institute of North America Stable URL: http Vermont, University of 7 Improved Climate Prediction through a System Level Understanding of Arctic Terrestrial Ecosystems...

96

airborne arctic stratospheric: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

97

arctic cloudy boundary: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

98

arctic ground squirrel: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

99

alesund arctic base: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

100

arctic stratospheric expedition: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

arctic ground squirrels: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Arctic System Reanalysis Natalia Tilinina1 , Sergey, Vienna MOTIVATION Key role of cyclone activity in the Arctic energy and hydrological cycles Cyclones impact on sea ice...

102

Arctic sea ice extent small as never before Alerting message from the Arctic: The extent the the Arctic sea ice has reached on Sep. 8  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arctic sea ice extent small as never before Alerting message from the Arctic: The extent the the Arctic sea ice has reached on Sep. 8 with 4.240 million km2 a new historic minimum (Figure 1). Physicists of the University of Bremen now confirm the apprehension existing since July 2011 that the ice melt in the Arctic

Bremen, Universitt

103

Relative importance of multiple factors on terrestrial loading of DOC to Arctic river networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Terrestrial carbon dynamics influence the contribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to river networks in addition to controlling carbon fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere. In this study, we use a biogeochemical process model to simulate the lateral transfer of DOC from land to the Arctic Ocean via riverine transport. We estimate that the pan-arctic watershed has contributed, on average, 32 Tg C/yr of DOC to the Arctic Ocean over the 20th century with most coming from the extensive area of boreal deciduous needle-leaved forests and forested wetlands in Eurasian watersheds. We also estimate that the rate of terrestrial DOC loading has been increasing by 0.037 Tg C/yr2 over the 20th century primarily as a result of increases in air temperatures and precipitation. These increases have been partially compensated by decreases in terrestrial DOC loading caused by wildfires. Other environmental factors (CO2 fertilization, ozone pollution, atmospheric nitrogen deposition, timber harvest, agriculture) are estimated to have relatively small effects on terrestrial DOC loading to arctic rivers. The effects of the various environmental factors on terrestrial carbon dynamics have both compensated and enhanced concurrent effects on hydrology to influence terrestrial DOC loading. Future increases in riverine DOC concentrations and export may occur from warming-induced increases in terrestrial DOC production associated with enhanced microbial metabolism and the exposure of additional organic matter from permafrost degradation along with decreases in water yield associated with warming-induced increases in evapotranspiration. Improvements in simulating terrestrial DOC loading to pan-arctic rivers in the future will require better information on the spatial distribution of precipitation and its temporal trends, carbon dynamics of larch-dominated ecosystems in eastern Siberia, and the role of industrial organic effluents on carbon budgets of rivers in western Russia.

Kicklighter, David W. [Ecosystem Center, The] [Ecosystem Center, The; Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL] [ORNL; Mcclelland, James W [University of Texas] [University of Texas; Peterson, Bruce [Marine Biological Laboratory] [Marine Biological Laboratory; Mcguire, David [University of Alaska] [University of Alaska; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory] [Marine Biological Laboratory

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Geological Setting, Mineral Resources and ancient works of Samos and adjacent islands of the Aegean Sea, 26-30 August 2013, Karlovassi, Samos Island, Greece  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological Setting, Mineral Resources and ancient works of Samos and adjacent islands of the Aegean (modified from Vigil and Tilling, 2006). #12;Geological Setting, Mineral Resources and ancient works spreading centers compose a global ridge system where new ocean crust is formed (divergent boundary

105

COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: TOWARDS ADVANCED UNDERSTANDING AND PREDICTIVE CAPABILITY OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE ARCTIC USING A HIGH-RESOLUTION REGIONAL ARCTIC CLIMATE SYSTEM MODEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The motivation for this project was to advance the science of climate change and prediction in the Arctic region. Its primary goals were to (i) develop a state-of-the-art Regional Arctic Climate system Model (RACM) including high-resolution atmosphere, land, ocean, sea ice and land hydrology components and (ii) to perform extended numerical experiments using high performance computers to minimize uncertainties and fundamentally improve current predictions of climate change in the northern polar regions. These goals were realized first through evaluation studies of climate system components via one-way coupling experiments. Simulations were then used to examine the effects of advancements in climate component systems on their representation of main physics, time-mean fields and to understand variability signals at scales over many years. As such this research directly addressed some of the major science objectives of the BER Climate Change Research Division (CCRD) regarding the advancement of long-term climate prediction.

Gutowski, William J.

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

106

Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to improve representation of the Arctic in Earth System Models Topography influences snow cover, thermal

107

NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-2008) Arctic Fall Temperature Anomalies Greater Than +5 C 2. CAUSES for Reduced Sea Ice #12;[Woodgate et al to the Beaufort Sea Marbled eelpout Walleye pollock Salmon snailfishBigeye sculpin Pacific cod Bering flounder Baseline Observatory Barrow Arctic Haze Air Pollution (Decrease Since the Fall of the USSR) >50% Decrease

Kuligowski, Bob

108

Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous evolution of the eastern Indian Ocean adjacent to northwest Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Australia. (December 1987) Lawrence Gill i am Ful1erton, B. S. , University of South Dakota Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. William W. Sager Existing National Geophysical Data Center and Project MAGNET data were utilized along with 9, 700 km of new..., but allows significant refinements to these models. The new data in the Argo Abyssal Plain confirm a complete sequence of magnetic isochrons, trending N70'E, from anomaly M-26 to at least anomaly M-16. The M-26 to M-16 sequence can be extended...

Fullerton, Lawrence Gilliam

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Arctic Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300AlgoilEnergy InformationArcata, California: EnergyArco EnergyArctic Solar

110

ARM - Arctic Meetings of Interest  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |NovemberARMContactsARM Engineering andPlansAmountResearchArctic

111

Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential distribution of methane hydrate in the world'sisotopic evidence for methane hydrate instability duringHendy, L.L. , and R.J. Behl, Methane hydrates in quaternary

Reagan, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

V.A. Soloviev, Submarine Gas Hydrates. St. Petersburg, 1998.and stability of gas hydrate-related bottom-simulatingPotential effects of gas hydrate on human welfare, Proc.

Reagan, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

adjacent pericarcinomatous foci: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

many nets, those using them were doingwell. The schooner Sarah 350 Geological Setting, Mineral Resources and ancient works of Samos and adjacent islands of the Aegean Sea, 26-30...

114

Bazaar [+] : addressing critical adjacencies in Mumbai's urban farm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis focuses on the city of Mumbai, and evolves the notion of how "critical adjacency" has been instrumental in guiding the city's urban transformations into modernity. Presently, Mumbai experiences some of the ...

Bhat, Arjun (Arjun Devadas)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Springtime Arctic haze contributions of submicron organic particles from European and Asian combustion sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The composition of Arctic aerosol, especially during the springtime Arctic haze, may play an important role in the radiative balance of the Arctic. The contribution of organic components to Arctic haze has only recently ...

Kroll, Jesse

116

Ocean Observing Ocean Observing Systems (OOS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, national, and global scales. · Ocean Observing Systems serve: Fishing industry National security Coastal properties, such as salinity, temperature, and waves Satellite maps of sea surface temperature NATIONAL Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) 11 REGIONAL Systems, including: MANY LOCAL Systems

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

117

The Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Arctic region is rapidly changing in a way that will affect the rest of the world. Parts of Alaska, western Canada, and Siberia are currently warming at twice the global rate. This warming trend is accelerating permafrost deterioration, coastal erosion, snow and ice loss, and other changes that are a direct consequence of climate change. Climatologists have long understood that changes in the Arctic would be faster and more intense than elsewhere on the planet, but the degree and speed of the changes were underestimated compared to recent observations. Policy makers have not yet had time to examine the latest evidence or appreciate the nature of the consequences. Thus, the abruptness and severity of an unfolding Arctic climate crisis has not been incorporated into long-range planning. The purpose of this report is to briefly review the physical basis for global climate change and Arctic amplification, summarize the ongoing observations, discuss the potential consequences, explain the need for an objective risk assessment, develop scenarios for future change, review existing modeling capabilities and the need for better regional models, and finally to make recommendations for Sandia's future role in preparing our leaders to deal with impacts of Arctic climate change on national security. Accurate and credible regional-scale climate models are still several years in the future, and those models are essential for estimating climate impacts around the globe. This study demonstrates how a scenario-based method may be used to give insights into climate impacts on a regional scale and possible mitigation. Because of our experience in the Arctic and widespread recognition of the Arctic's importance in the Earth climate system we chose the Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security. Sandia can make a swift and significant contribution by applying modeling and simulation tools with internal collaborations as well as with outside organizations. Because changes in the Arctic environment are happening so rapidly, a successful program will be one that can adapt very quickly to new information as it becomes available, and can provide decision makers with projections on the 1-5 year time scale over which the most disruptive, high-consequence changes are likely to occur. The greatest short-term impact would be to initiate exploratory simulations to discover new emergent and robust phenomena associated with one or more of the following changing systems: Arctic hydrological cycle, sea ice extent, ocean and atmospheric circulation, permafrost deterioration, carbon mobilization, Greenland ice sheet stability, and coastal erosion. Sandia can also contribute to new technology solutions for improved observations in the Arctic, which is currently a data-sparse region. Sensitivity analyses have the potential to identify thresholds which would enable the collaborative development of 'early warning' sensor systems to seek predicted phenomena that might be precursory to major, high-consequence changes. Much of this work will require improved regional climate models and advanced computing capabilities. Socio-economic modeling tools can help define human and national security consequences. Formal uncertainty quantification must be an integral part of any results that emerge from this work.

Taylor, Mark A.; Zak, Bernard Daniel; Backus, George A.; Ivey, Mark D.; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Economic feasibility of shipping containers through the Arctic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As the Arctic ice cover continues to retreat, the possibility of regular transit through the Arctic becomes an increasing reality. Liner companies could take advantage of distance savings (up to 4000 nautical miles less ...

Pollock, Russell (Russell Clayton)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Tuktoyaktuk : responsive strategies for a new Arctic urbanism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Canadian Arctic is facing a set of compounding crises that will drastically impact the future of its coastal frontier. At a time when climate change is having a detrimental impact on the Arctic landscape, Northern ...

Ritchot, Pamela (Pamela Rae)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Anthropogenic Impacts on Polar Bear Biology and the Arctic Ecosystem.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Despite its relative distance from most populated regions of the world, the Arctic has been significantly impacted by anthropogenic contamination and climate change. The entire Arctic ecosystem has been affected, with upper trophic level predators...

Jordan, John E.

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

NGEE Arctic Webcam Photographs, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow, Alaska  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The NGEE Arctic Webcam (PTZ Camera) captures two views of seasonal transitions from its generally south-facing position on a tower located at the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Alaska. Images are captured every 30 minutes. Historical images are available for download. The camera is operated by the U.S. DOE sponsored Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments - Arctic (NGEE Arctic) project.

Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman

122

Lesson Summary Students will learn about the Arctic Beaufort Sea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lesson Summary Students will learn about the Arctic Beaufort Sea and research the adaptations of people and animals in the arctic regions. They will also learn about how their actions can affect the Arctic and learn about the International Polar Year. Prior Knowledge & Skills · Research skills

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

123

Simulating Arctic Climate Warmth and Icefield Retreat in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Devon, and Meighen ice caps in the Canadian Arctic, and possibly in Camp Century (northwest Greenland the entire western Arctic from 57-N to 85-N, including Greenland and smaller scale ice caps in Iceland Project members In the future, Arctic warming and the melting of polar glaciers will be considerable

Inglfsson, lafur

124

OPTIMAL ALGORITHM FOR FINDING DNA MOTIFS WITH NUCLEOTIDE ADJACENT DEPENDENCY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OPTIMAL ALGORITHM FOR FINDING DNA MOTIFS WITH NUCLEOTIDE ADJACENT DEPENDENCY FRANCIS Y.L. CHIN that the occurrence of a nucleotide in a binding site is independent of other nucleotides. More complicated representations, such as HMM or regular expression, exist that can capture the nucleotide dependency

Chin, Francis Y.L.

125

Radionuclides in the Arctic seas from the former Soviet Union: Potential health and ecological risks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of the assessment reported here is to evaluate the health and environmental threat to coastal Alaska posed by radioactive-waste dumping in the Arctic and Northwest Pacific Oceans by the FSU. In particular, the FSU discarded 16 nuclear reactors from submarines and an icebreaker in the Kara Sea near the island of Novaya Zemlya, of which 6 contained spent nuclear fuel (SNF); disposed of liquid and solid wastes in the Sea of Japan; lost a {sup 90}Sr-powered radioisotope thermoelectric generator at sea in the Sea of Okhotsk; and disposed of liquid wastes at several sites in the Pacific Ocean, east of the Kamchatka Peninsula. In addition to these known sources in the oceans, the RAIG evaluated FSU waste-disposal practices at inland weapons-development sites that have contaminated major rivers flowing into the Arctic Ocean. The RAIG evaluated these sources for the potential for release to the environment, transport, and impact to Alaskan ecosystems and peoples through a variety of scenarios, including a worst-case total instantaneous and simultaneous release of the sources under investigation. The risk-assessment process described in this report is applicable to and can be used by other circumpolar countries, with the addition of information about specific ecosystems and human life-styles. They can use the ANWAP risk-assessment framework and approach used by ONR to establish potential doses for Alaska, but add their own specific data sets about human and ecological factors. The ANWAP risk assessment addresses the following Russian wastes, media, and receptors: dumped nuclear submarines and icebreaker in Kara Sea--marine pathways; solid reactor parts in Sea of Japan and Pacific Ocean--marine pathways; thermoelectric generator in Sea of Okhotsk--marine pathways; current known aqueous wastes in Mayak reservoirs and Asanov Marshes--riverine to marine pathways; and Alaska as receptor. For these waste and source terms addressed, other pathways, such as atmospheric transport, could be considered under future-funded research efforts for impacts to Alaska. The ANWAP risk assessment does not address the following wastes, media, and receptors: radioactive sources in Alaska (except to add perspective for Russian source term); radioactive wastes associated with Russian naval military operations and decommissioning; Russian production reactor and spent-fuel reprocessing facilities nonaqueous source terms; atmospheric, terrestrial and nonaqueous pathways; and dose calculations for any circumpolar locality other than Alaska. These other, potentially serious sources of radioactivity to the Arctic environment, while outside the scope of the current ANWAP mandate, should be considered for future funding research efforts.

Layton, D W; Edson, R; Varela, M; Napier, B

1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

Final Technical Report for Project "Improving the Simulation of Arctic Clouds in CCSM3"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project has focused on the simulation of Arctic clouds in CCSM3 and how the modeled cloud amount (and climate) can be improved substantially by altering the parameterized low cloud fraction. The new formula, dubbed 'freeezedry', alleviates the bias of excessive low clouds during polar winter by reducing the cloud amount under very dry conditions. During winter, freezedry decreases the low cloud amount over the coldest regions in high latitudes by over 50% locally and more than 30% averaged across the Arctic (Fig. 1). The cloud reduction causes an Arctic-wide drop of 15 W m{sup -2} in surface cloud radiative forcing (CRF) during winter and about a 50% decrease in mean annual Arctic CRF. Consequently, wintertime surface temperatures fall by up to 4 K on land and 2-8 K over the Arctic Ocean, thus significantly reducing the model's pronounced warm bias (Fig. 1). While improving the polar climate simulation in CCSM3, freezedry has virtually no influence outside of very cold regions (Fig. 2) or during summer (Fig. 3), which are space and time domains that were not targeted. Furthermore, the simplicity of this parameterization allows it to be readily incorporated into other GCMs, many of which also suffer from excessive wintertime polar cloudiness, based on the results from the CMIP3 archive (Vavrus et al., 2008). Freezedry also affects CCSM3's sensitivity to greenhouse forcing. In a transient-CO{sub 2} experiment, the model version with freezedry warms up to 20% less in the North Polar and South Polar regions (1.5 K and 0.5 K smaller warming, respectively) (Fig. 4). Paradoxically, the muted high-latitude response occurs despite a much larger increase in cloud amount with freezedry during non-summer months (when clouds warm the surface), apparently because of the colder modern reference climate. These results of the freezedry parameterization have recently been published (Vavrus and D. Waliser, 2008: An improved parameterization for simulating Arctic cloud amount in the CCSM3 climate model. J. Climate, 21, 5673-5687.). The article also provides a novel synthesis of surface- and satellite-based Arctic cloud observations that show how much the new freezedry parameterization improves the simulated cloud amount in high latitudes (Fig. 3). Freezedry has been incorporated into the CCSM3.5 version, in which it successfully limits the excessive polar clouds, and may be used in CCSM4. Material from this work is also appearing in a synthesis article on future Arctic cloud changes (Vavrus, D. Waliser, J. Francis, and A. Schweiger, 'Simulations of 20th and 21st century Arctic cloud amount in the global climate models assessed in the IPCC AR4', accepted in Climate Dynamics) and was used in a collaborative paper on Arctic cloud-sea ice coupling (Schweiger, A., R. Lindsay, S. Vavrus, and J. Francis, 2008: Relationships between Arctic sea ice and clouds during autumn. J. Climate, 21, 4799-4810.). This research was presented at the 2007 CCSM Annual Workshop, as well as the CCSM's 2007 Atmospheric Model Working Group and Polar Working Group Meetings. The findings were also shown at the 2007 Climate Change Prediction Program's Science Team Meeting. In addition, I served as an instructor at the International Arctic Research Center's (IARC) Summer School on Arctic Climate Modeling in Fairbanks this summer, where I presented on the challenges and techniques used in simulating polar clouds. I also contributed to the development of a new Arctic System Model by attending a workshop in Colorado this summer on this fledgling project. Finally, an outreach activity for the general public has been the development of an interactive web site () that displays Arctic cloud amount in the CMIP3 climate model archive under present and future scenarios. This site allows users to make polar and global maps of a variety of climate variables to investigate the individual and ensemble-mean GCM response to greenhouse warming and the extent to which models adequately represent Arctic clouds in the modern clima

Stephen J. Vavrus

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Remote Sensing and In-Situ Observations of Arctic Mixed-Phase and Cirrus Clouds Acquired During Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Uninhabited Aerospace Vehicle Participation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Monitor (ARM) uninhabited aerospace vehicle (UAV) program aims to develop measurement techniques and instruments suitable for a new class of high altitude, long endurance UAVs while supporting the climate community with valuable data sets. Using the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft, ARM UAV participated in Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), obtaining unique data to help understand the interaction of clouds with solar and infrared radiation. Many measurements obtained using the Proteus were coincident with in-situ observations made by the UND Citation. Data from M-PACE are needed to understand interactions between clouds, the atmosphere and ocean in the Arctic, critical interactions given large-scale models suggest enhanced warming compared to lower latitudes is occurring.

McFarquhar, G.M.; Freer, M.; Um, J.; McCoy, R.; Bolton, W.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

128

Ocean Engineering Development Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Engineering Hydrofoil Development Team Justin Eickmeier Mirela Dalanaj Jason Gray Matt test bed for future hydrofoil designs. 5) To create future student interest in the Ocean Engineering Efficiency and Acceleration. #12;Design Team Justin Eickmeier Team Leader Major: Ocean Engineering, Junior

Wood, Stephen L.

129

Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory was created by the University of Alaska Fairbanks in response to a congressionally mandated funding opportunity through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), specifically to encourage research partnerships between the university, the Alaskan energy industry, and the DOE. The enabling legislation permitted research in a broad variety of topics particularly of interest to Alaska, including providing more efficient and economical electrical power generation in rural villages, as well as research in coal, oil, and gas. The contract was managed as a cooperative research agreement, with active project monitoring and management from the DOE. In the eight years of this partnership, approximately 30 projects were funded and completed. These projects, which were selected using an industry panel of Alaskan energy industry engineers and managers, cover a wide range of topics, such as diesel engine efficiency, fuel cells, coal combustion, methane gas hydrates, heavy oil recovery, and water issues associated with ice road construction in the oil fields of the North Slope. Each project was managed as a separate DOE contract, and the final technical report for each completed project is included with this final report. The intent of this process was to address the energy research needs of Alaska and to develop research capability at the university. As such, the intent from the beginning of this process was to encourage development of partnerships and skills that would permit a transition to direct competitive funding opportunities managed from funding sources. This project has succeeded at both the individual project level and at the institutional development level, as many of the researchers at the university are currently submitting proposals to funding agencies, with some success.

Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Charles Chamberlin; Robert Chaney; Gang Chen; Godwin Chukwu; James Clough; Steve Colt; Anthony Covescek; Robert Crosby; Abhijit Dandekar; Paul Decker; Brandon Galloway; Rajive Ganguli; Catherine Hanks; Rich Haut; Kristie Hilton; Larry Hinzman; Gwen Holdman; Kristie Holland; Robert Hunter; Ron Johnson; Thomas Johnson; Doug Kame; Mikhail Kaneveskly; Tristan Kenny; Santanu Khataniar; Abhijeet Kulkami; Peter Lehman; Mary Beth Leigh; Jenn-Tai Liang; Michael Lilly; Chuen-Sen Lin; Paul Martin; Pete McGrail; Dan Miller; Debasmita Misra; Nagendra Nagabhushana; David Ogbe; Amanda Osborne; Antoinette Owen; Sharish Patil; Rocky Reifenstuhl; Doug Reynolds; Eric Robertson; Todd Schaef; Jack Schmid; Yuri Shur; Arion Tussing; Jack Walker; Katey Walter; Shannon Watson; Daniel White; Gregory White; Mark White; Richard Wies; Tom Williams; Dennis Witmer; Craig Wollard; Tao Zhu

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

130

Circumpolar Arctic Tundra Vegetation Change Is Linked  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Plant Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan Received 7 December 2009; accepted 4Circumpolar Arctic Tundra Vegetation Change Is Linked to Sea Ice Decline Uma S. Bhatt*,1 Donald A Institute, and Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska

Bhatt, Uma

131

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic wind technology Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

arctic wind technology Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic wind technology Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 NOAA's Arctic VisiON &...

132

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM 2011 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM 2011 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT covering citations related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from Geo Drilling Program Publication Services September 2011 #12;OVERVIEW OF THE OCEAN DRILLING CITATION DATABASE

133

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic marine mammals Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: of Arctic ships include ship strikes on marine mammals, the introduction of alien species, disruption... . G. Addressing Impacts on Marine Mammals: That the Arctic...

134

Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic Aerosols on Clouds . Abstract: A comprehensive dataset of microphysical and radiative properties of aerosols and clouds in the arctic...

135

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic marine food Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Assessment Summary: long term effects from these changes on the Arctic marine ecosystem. Concerned over potential effects... change in the Arctic region, and determined...

136

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic springtail megaphorura Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Fish Resources of the Arctic Management Area... (Arctic FMP) and Amendment 29 to the Fishery Management Plan for Bering Sea Aleutian Islands King Source: NOAA Marine...

137

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic marine environment Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Assessment Summary: long term effects from these changes on the Arctic marine ecosystem. Concerned over potential effects... change in the Arctic region, and determined...

138

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic slope annual Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

& Permafrost Salinity Vegetation Arctic... Storage Change P + Gin -(Q + ET + Gout) S Rn - G Le + H 12;Arctic Land Water Cycle: key features Source: Houser, Paul R....

139

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic cooling silentium Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;Abstract The Arctic is melting ...fast. 12;IMPACTS OF A WARMING ARCTIC... 's Greenhouse Effect Thesur face cools by radiating heat energyupward. ... Source: Zender, Charles -...

140

arctic flora origins: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

combustion of fossil fuels and biomass, may have a severe impact on the sensitive Arctic climate, possibly altering the temperature profile, cloud temperature and amount, the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

arctic marine ecosystem: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Bamboung marine protected area social-ecosystem. Key words Social-ecological system, climate Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 6 Perfluoroalkyl Contaminants in an Arctic Marine...

142

alaskan arctic tundra: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alaskan arctic lake Sally MacIntyre,a,b* Geosciences Websites Summary: . In summers with cold surface temperatures, the surface energy fluxes which induce mixing by heat loss...

143

arctic charr salvelinus: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

have raised concern over potential responses of Arctic charr, Salvelinus alpinus, a cold-adapted freshwateranadromous fish species in (more) Sinnatamby, Ramila Niloshini...

144

arctic char salvelinus: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

have raised concern over potential responses of Arctic charr, Salvelinus alpinus, a cold-adapted freshwateranadromous fish species in (more) Sinnatamby, Ramila Niloshini...

145

arctic research station: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Rocky Mountain Research Sta- tion is one of five 19 Z .Atmospheric Research 51 1999 4575 Cloud resolving simulations of Arctic stratus Geosciences Websites Summary: Z...

146

arctic climate system: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alaskan arctic lake Sally MacIntyre,a,b* Geosciences Websites Summary: . In summers with cold surface temperatures, the surface energy fluxes which induce mixing by heat loss...

147

alaskan arctic coastal: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alaskan arctic lake Sally MacIntyre,a,b* Geosciences Websites Summary: . In summers with cold surface temperatures, the surface energy fluxes which induce mixing by heat loss...

148

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Analysis ANWR Coastal Plain Assessment 3. Summary Glossary References Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated...

149

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Executive Summary This Service Report, Potential Oil Production from the...

150

arctic populations differential: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

climate connection, total solar irradiance, Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, climate variability. Willie W. -h. Soon 2009-01-01 168 Arctic catastrophes in an idealized...

151

arctas arctic research: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arctic. It often serves as the measuring stick for global climate change. It is where warming has been strongest in the past century, Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

152

arctic study area: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Explosion At The Polar Arctic Sunrise Physics (arXiv) Summary: We attempt is to provide accumulated evidence and qualitative understanding of the associated atmospheric phenomena...

153

arctic polar vortex: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Explosion At The Polar Arctic Sunrise Physics (arXiv) Summary: We attempt is to provide accumulated evidence and qualitative understanding of the associated atmospheric phenomena...

154

Climate-derived tensions in Arctic security.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Globally, there is no lack of security threats. Many of them demand priority engagement and there can never be adequate resources to address all threats. In this context, climate is just another aspect of global security and the Arctic just another region. In light of physical and budgetary constraints, new security needs must be integrated and prioritized with existing ones. This discussion approaches the security impacts of climate from that perspective, starting with the broad security picture and establishing how climate may affect it. This method provides a different view from one that starts with climate and projects it, in isolation, as the source of a hypothetical security burden. That said, the Arctic does appear to present high-priority security challenges. Uncertainty in the timing of an ice-free Arctic affects how quickly it will become a security priority. Uncertainty in the emergent extreme and variable weather conditions will determine the difficulty (cost) of maintaining adequate security (order) in the area. The resolution of sovereignty boundaries affects the ability to enforce security measures, and the U.S. will most probably need a military presence to back-up negotiated sovereignty agreements. Without additional global warming, technology already allows the Arctic to become a strategic link in the global supply chain, possibly with northern Russia as its main hub. Additionally, the multinational corporations reaping the economic bounty may affect security tensions more than nation-states themselves. Countries will depend ever more heavily on the global supply chains. China has particular needs to protect its trade flows. In matters of security, nation-state and multinational-corporate interests will become heavily intertwined.

Backus, George A.; Strickland, James Hassler

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

BLM Arctic Field Office | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCT BiomassArnprior,Aurantia SACitas Jump Logo: BLM Arctic Field

156

Adjacent-Channel Interference in Frequency-Hopping Ad Hoc Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adjacent-Channel Interference in Frequency-Hopping Ad Hoc Networks M. C. Valenti 1 D. Torrieri 2 S, 2013 Salvatore Talarico (shortinst)Adjacent-Channel Interference in Frequency-Hopping Ad Hoc Networks June 11, 2013 1 / 23 #12;Outline 1 Frequency-Hopping Ad Hoc Networks 2 Outage Probability with Adjacent

Valenti, Matthew C.

157

Arnold Schwarzenegger CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE ENERGY ASSESSMENT Prepared For: California this report as follows: Previsic, Mirko. 2006. California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment. California Energy Systems Integration · Transportation California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment is the final report

158

Radioactive contamination of the Arctic Region, Baltic Sea, and the Sea of Japan from activities in the former Soviet Union  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contamination of the Arctic regions of northern Europe and Russia, as well as the Sea of Japan, may become a potential major hazard to the ecosystem of these large areas. Widespread poor radioactive waste management practices from nuclear fuel cycle activities in the former Soviet Union have resulted in direct discharges to this area as well as multiple sources that may continue to release additional radioactivity. Information on the discharges of radioactive materials has become more commonplace in the last year, and a clearer picture is emerging of the scale of the contamination. Radioactivity in the Arctic oceans is now reported to be four times higher than would be derived from fallout from weapons tests. Although the characteristics and extent of the contamination are not well known, it has been stated that the contamination in the Arctic may range from 1 to 3.5 billion curies. As yet, no scientific sampling or measurement program has occurred that can verify the amount or extent of the contamination, or its potential impact on the ecosystem.

Bradley, D.J.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Ocean General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

1. Definition of Subject The purpose of this text is to provide an introduction to aspects of oceanic general circulation models (OGCMs), an important component of Climate System or Earth System Model (ESM). The role of the ocean in ESMs is described in Chapter XX (EDITOR: PLEASE FIND THE COUPLED CLIMATE or EARTH SYSTEM MODELING CHAPTERS). The emerging need for understanding the Earths climate system and especially projecting its future evolution has encouraged scientists to explore the dynamical, physical, and biogeochemical processes in the ocean. Understanding the role of these processes in the climate system is an interesting and challenging scientific subject. For example, a research question how much extra heat or CO2 generated by anthropogenic activities can be stored in the deep ocean is not only scientifically interesting but also important in projecting future climate of the earth. Thus, OGCMs have been developed and applied to investigate the various oceanic processes and their role in the climate system.

Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

160

Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

net C uptake by terrestrial Arctic ecosystems. Predicting the fate of permafrost- sequestered carbon of these changes in the carbon cycle will depend on climate-driven changes in Arctic biogeochemical, vegetation, and hydrological processes, creating a critical feedback loop. A goal of the NGEE project is to assess the CO2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Tourism: A Growing Presence in an Ice Diminishing Arctic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tourism: A Growing Presence in an Ice Diminishing Arctic Dr. John Snyder Strategic Studies, Inc. Centennial, Colorado #12;The Significance of Arctic Tourism · Tourism is the single largest human presence economies rely on tourism for revenue, jobs, personal income, and public finance. It's future is thus

Kuligowski, Bob

162

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic fjord sediment Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sediment Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic fjord sediment...

163

THE SHRINKING ARCTIC ICE CAP From the IPCC* Summary For Policymakers...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE SHRINKING ARCTIC ICE CAP From the IPCC* Summary For Policymakers... "Sea ice is projected] - a phenomenon sometimes referred to as "Arctic amplification". As Arctic temperatures rise, sea ice melts for the 20th century. The rate at which the modeled 21st century Arctic warming and sea ice melting occurs

164

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al Qin Han,1 J. Keith Moore,1; accepted 7 December 2007; published 12 April 2008. [1] We use measurements of ocean surface dissolved Al (DEAD) model to constrain dust deposition to the oceans. Our Al database contains all available

Zender, Charles

165

A review of global ocean temperature observations: Implications for ocean heat content estimates and climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and communications, in Ocean Engineering Planning and Designmicropro?ler, Engineering in the Ocean Environment, Ocean engineering diagnostic data will be transmitted. 5. GLOBAL OCEAN

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Microbial and viral genomics of surface ocean communities within the Southern California Bight and adjacent California Current Ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Current Ecosystem by Lisa Ann Zeigler Doctor of Philosophyin Oceanography by Lisa Ann Zeigler Committee in Charge:Subramaniam Copyright Lisa Ann Zeigler, 2011 All rights

Zeigler, Lisa Ann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

The relationship of sea surface temperatures of the Gulf of Mexico and adjacent Atlantic Ocean to precipitation in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

+?&1 -24 +23 -39 +39 -36 9 36 -30 -I-30 -57 +58 -28 +30 -31 r32 -48 +48 -29 +29 -54 +53 -28 +27 -35 +35 ? 39 +40 -43 +43 -2. 3 -2. 8 -2. 2 +0. 2 +0. 4 +0. 3 -62. 2 +3. 5 +2. 5 +0. 5 -0. 2 -1. 9 -2. 4 +0. 3 +?. 7 -0. 5 -28.... ACKNOVLEDGNENTS TABI, E OF CONTENTS LIST OP TABLES. I. IST OF FIGURES 1NTRODUCTION. viii Identiix ing thc Investivat ion. ~Oh 'oct ives Lit r: t?rc Pcview, DATA SOURCES AND ACCURACY Sea Surfac e Temperature Data 18 Accurac~ of Sca Surface Te~m erarurc...

Hamberger, Lawrence Wayne

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Microbial and viral genomics of surface ocean communities within the Southern California Bight and adjacent California Current Ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Helicobacter Helicobacter pylori 26695 Bacteria;Helicobacter Helicobacter pylori HPAG1 Bacteria;Helicobacter Helicobacter pylori J99 Bacteria;

Zeigler, Lisa Ann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Hydrocarbon provinces and productive trends in Libya and adjacent areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

According to the age of major reservoirs, hydrocarbon occurrences in Libya and adjacent areas can be grouped into six major systems which, according to their geographic locations, can be classified into two major hydrocarbon provinces: (1) Sirte-Pelagian basins province, with major reservoirs ranging from middle-late Mesozoic to early Tertiary, and (2) Murzog-Ghadames basins province, with major reservoirs ranging from early Paleozoic to early Mesozoic. In the Sirte-Pelagian basins province, hydrocarbons have been trapped in structural highs or in stratigraphic wedge-out against structural highs and in carbonate buildups. Here, hydrocarbon generation is characterized by the combined effect of abundant structural relief and reservoir development in the same hydrocarbon systems of the same age, providing an excellent example of hydrocarbon traps in sedimentary basins that have undergone extensive tensional fracturing in a shallow marine environment. In the Murzog-Ghadames basins province, hydrocarbons have been trapped mainly in structural highs controlled by paleostructural trends as basement arches which acted as focal points for oil migration and accumulation.

Missallati, A.A. (Agip (N.A.M.E.)Ltd., Tripoli (Libya))

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Simple ocean carbon cycle models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simple ocean carbon cycle models can be used to calculate the rate at which the oceans are likely to absorb CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere. For problems involving steady-state ocean circulation, well calibrated ocean models produce results that are very similar to results obtained using general circulation models. Hence, simple ocean carbon cycle models may be appropriate for use in studies in which the time or expense of running large scale general circulation models would be prohibitive. Simple ocean models have the advantage of being based on a small number of explicit assumptions. The simplicity of these ocean models facilitates the understanding of model results.

Caldeira, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hoffert, M.I. [New York Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Earth System Sciences; Siegenthaler, U. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Physik

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Arctic Energy Summit | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartment of4 Federal RegisterPowerPA00133 -Archer Daniels MidlandArctic

172

Flexible ocean upwelling pipe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Using Radar, Lidar and Radiometer Data from NSA and SHEBA to Quantify Cloud Property Effects on the Surface Heat Budget in the Arctic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cloud and radiation data from two distinctly different Arctic areas are analyzed to study the differences between coastal Alaskan and open Arctic Ocean region clouds and their respective influence on the surface radiation budget. The cloud and radiation datasets were obtained from (1) the DOE North Slope of Alaska (NSA) facility in the coastal town of Barrow, Alaska, and (2) the SHEBA field program, which was conducted from an icebreaker frozen in, and drifting with, the sea-ice for one year in the Western Arctic Ocean. Radar, lidar, radiometer, and sounding measurements from both locations were used to produce annual cycles of cloud occurrence and height, atmospheric temperature and humidity, surface longwave and shortwave broadband fluxes, surface albedo, and cloud radiative forcing. In general, both regions revealed a similar annual trend of cloud occurrence fraction with minimum values in winter (60-75%) and maximum values during spring, summer and fall (80-90%). However, the annual average cloud occurrence fraction for SHEBA (76%) was lower than the 6-year average cloud occurrence at NSA (92%). Both Arctic areas also showed similar annual cycle trends of cloud forcing with clouds warming the surface through most of the year and a period of surface cooling during the summer, when cloud shading effects overwhelm cloud greenhouse effects. The greatest difference between the two regions was observed in the magnitude of the cloud cooling effect (i.e., shortwave cloud forcing), which was significantly stronger at NSA and lasted for a longer period of time than at SHEBA. This is predominantly due to the longer and stronger melt season at NSA (i.e., albedo values that are much lower coupled with Sun angles that are somewhat higher) than the melt season observed over the ice pack at SHEBA. Longwave cloud forcing values were comparable between the two sites indicating a general similarity in cloudiness and atmospheric temperature and humidity structure between the two regions.

Janet Intrieri; Mathhew Shupe

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

CARINA (Carbon dioxide in the Atlantic Ocean) Data from CDIAC  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The idea for CARINA developed at a workshop (CO2 in the northern North Atlantic) that was held at the HANSE-Wissenschaftskolleg (HANSE Institute for Advanced Study) in Delmenhorst, Germany from June 9 to 11, 1999. While the main scientific focus is the North Atlantic, some data from the South Atlantic have been included in the project, along with data from the Arctic Ocean. Data sets go back to 1972, and more than 100 are currently available. The data are also being used in conjunction with other projects and research groups, such as the Atlantic Ocean Carbon Synthesis Group. See the inventory of data at http://store.pangaea.de/Projects/CARBOOCEAN/carina/data_inventory.htm See a detailed table of information on the cruises at http://cdiac.ornl.gov/oceans/CARINA/Carina_table.html and also provides access to data files. The CARBOOCEAN data portal provides a specialized interface for CARINA data, a reference list for historic carbon data, and password protected access to the "Data Underway Warehouse.".

175

E-Print Network 3.0 - adjacent continental margin Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

adjacent to the margin. The lack of these features is also characteristic of modern transform margins... -early Paleozoic southern Lau- rentian continental ... Source: Huerta,...

176

E-Print Network 3.0 - adjacent offshore area Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

offshore area Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: adjacent offshore area Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Travel Characteristics of Marine...

177

E-Print Network 3.0 - adjacent natural forest Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

... Source: Forest Research Agency of the UK Forestry Commission Collection: Renewable Energy 5 Ecology 2001 89, 325338 Summary: occurred directly adjacent to old-woods (forest...

178

E-Print Network 3.0 - adjacent compression fractures Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and triangular columns formed by column-bounding fractures adjacent to inflation-fracture walls... the cooling rate, caus- ing increased fracturing ... Source: Kattenhorn,...

179

E-Print Network 3.0 - adjacent marine waters Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SEMINAR Diatom Based Quantitative Reconstructions of Summary: . The bay ecosystem is affected by changes in water quality and quantity in the adjacent marine... and freshwater...

180

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Report about the Ocean Thermal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftin Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology haveThe Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) 2rogrammatic

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Sea ice floes dissipate the energy of steep ocean waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave attenuation by ice floes is an important parameter for modelling the Arctic Oceans. At present, attenuation coefficients are extracted from linear models as a function of the incident wave period and floe thickness. Recent explorations in the Antarctic Mixed Ice Zone (MIZ) revealed a further dependence on wave amplitude, suggesting that nonlinear contributions are non-negligible. An experimental model for wave attenuation by a single ice floe in a wave flume is here presented. Observations are compared with linear predictions based on wave scattering. Results indicate that linear models perform well under the effect of gently sloping waves. For more energetic wave fields, however, transmitted wave height is normally over predicted. Deviations from linearity appear to be related to an enhancement of wave dissipation induced by unaccounted wave-ice interaction processes, including the floe over wash.

Toffoli, Alessandro; Meylan, Michael H; Cavaliere, Claudio; Alberello, Alberto; Elsnab, John; Monty, Jason P

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

arctic cloud experiment: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

low-level Arctic clouds in cold seasons and have a significant impact on the surface energy budget. However, the treatment of mixed-phase clouds in most current climate models...

184

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

energy deployment in the Arctic Region. The purpose of this round is to give feedback on the elements of the draft plan. DOE encourages stakeholders to provide comments on...

185

National Strategy for the Arctic Tribal Consultation Session: Fairbanks  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well...

186

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Kotzebue  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well...

187

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Bethel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well...

188

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Barrow  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well...

189

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Nome  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well...

190

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Bethel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well...

191

arctic haze: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Srinivas 7 NASA ARCTAS PROJECT The Arctic. It often serves as the measuring stick for global climate change. It is where warming has been strongest in the past century,...

192

Massachusetts Ocean Management Plan (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Massachusetts Ocean Act of 2008 required the states Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs to develop a comprehensive ocean management plan for the state by the end of 2009. That plan...

193

Ninth Annual Ocean Renewable Energy Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The future of clean, renewable ocean wave energy will be discussed in depth at the 2014 Ocean Renewable Energy Conference.

194

November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 208 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS EARLY CENOZOIC EXTREME CLIMATES -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

195

February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 204 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING GAS HYDRATES ON HYDRATE -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Richter Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

196

December 2001 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

December 2001 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 203 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING AT THE EQUATORIAL -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Bauldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University. Acton Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

197

90E 120 150E 180 150W 120 90 60 30W 0 30E 60 DSDP Legs 196 ( ), ODP Legs 100210 ( ), IODP Expeditions 301352 ( )  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GREENLAND EUROPE AFRICA SOUTH AMERICA NORTH AMERICA ASIA AUSTRALIA ANTARCTICA INDIAN OCEAN PACIFIC ASIA AUSTRALIA ANTARCTICA INDIAN OCEAN PACIFIC OCEAN ATLANTIC OCEAN ARCTIC OCEAN SOUTHERN OCEAN AMERICA NORTH AMERICA ASIA AUSTRALIA ANTARCTICA INDIAN OCEAN PACIFIC OCEAN ATLANTIC OCEAN ARCTIC OCEAN

198

Proceedings of the ASME 28th International Conference on Ocean, Offshore and Arctic Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-based design and optimization methodology to improve the energy efficiency of self-adapting composite marine- ficiency. This problem can be avoided or minimized by using blades made of carbon fiber reinforced plastics

Baker, Jack W.

199

Proceedings of the ASME 28th International Conference on Ocean, Offshore and Arctic Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNDERWATER VEHICLES IN THE PRESENCE OF DISTURBANCE INPUTS S. Singh , A. Sanyal , R. Smith , N. Nordkvist , M University of Southern California Email: ryannsmi@usc.edu ABSTRACT An autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV as 200m. Thus unmanned underwater robots prove to be an ideal platform to perform deep sea research

Smith, Ryan N.

200

Sources and Fate of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter in the Arctic Ocean and Surrounding Watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drift UHW Upper halocline water layer WGC West Greenland Current ix TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT... .................................................................................................. vii TABLE OF CONTENTS .......................................................................................... ix LIST OF FIGURES ................................................................................................... xii LIST...

Walker, Sally Annette

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

ARM - Field Campaign - Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [Facility News]January 18,(GOAMAZON

202

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic european russia Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

european russia Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic european russia Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 NOAA's Arctic VisiON & strAtegy...

203

A Climatology of the Arctic on Mid-Tropospheric Temperature Regulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Arctic is a unique and complex environment. Many factors play a role in determining the long-term climate of the Arctic, including mesoscale weather systems and many complex ice-albedo feedback mechanisms. Previous studies determined using real...

Anthony, Jeremy Patrick

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

204

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic alaska r4d Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: arctic alaska r4d Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 revised 122010 Alaska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit Summary: . 1966. The recreational potential of the Arctic...

205

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic tundra vegetation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in arctic tundra reduced by long-term nutrient fertilization Michelle C. Mack1... in soil compared with temperate and tropical ecosystems14 . In arctic tundra, as much as 90%...

206

Small Thaw Ponds: An Unaccounted Source of Methane in the Canadian High Arctic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

other Archaea in high Arctic peat. ISME J 2: 3748. 38. Hjmethanogenic pathways in a peat from subarctic permafrost.Canadian Arctic tundra leads to peat erosion and slumping in

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic regions Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

et G... in some Arctic regions in the late 1980s and early 1990s during the decline of industrial activity... of Representatives October 18, 2007 Arctic Climate Effects of Black...

208

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic food web Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

food web Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic food web Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Lesson Plan Arctic Biome Summary: in the...

209

UPb and geochemical evidence for a Cryogenian magmatic arc in central Novaya Zemlya, Arctic Russia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U­Pb and geochemical evidence for a Cryogenian magmatic arc in central Novaya Zemlya, Arctic Russia-0349 Oslo, Norway Introduction The High Arctic of Scandinavia and Russia consists of a collage

Svensen, Henrik

210

Review of technology for Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery. Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains appendices of the following: US Geological Survey Arctic operating orders, 1979; Det Noske Vertas', rules for the design, construction and inspection of offshore technology, 1977; Alaska Oil and Gas Association, industry research projects, March 1980; Arctic Petroleum Operator's Association, industry research projects, January 1980; selected additional Arctic offshore bibliography on sea ice, icebreakers, Arctic seafloor conditions, ice-structures, frost heave and structure icing.

Sackinger, W. M.

1980-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

211

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic petroleum operators Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conferences Covered Petroleum Abstracts, HH 101 Summary: PETROLEUM PRODUCTION & EXPLORATION ASSOCIATION LTD. (APPEA) ARCTIC AND MARINE OILSPILL PROGRAM (AMOP... GEOLOGICAL...

212

Spatial patterns of cadmium and lead deposition on and adjacent to National Park Service lands in the vicinity of Red Dog Mine, Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heavy metal escapement associated with ore trucks is known to affect the DeLong Mountain Regional Transportation System (DMTS) haul road corridor in Cape Krusenstern National Monument, northwest Alaska. Tissue concentrations in Hylocomium splendens moss (n = 226) were used to determine the extent and pattern of airborne heavy metal deposition on Monument lands. A stratified grid-based sample design was used with more intensive sampling near mining-related activities. Spatial predictions using geostatistical models were employed to produce maps of depositional patterns, and to estimate the geographic area affected above various thresholds. Spatial regression analyses indicated that heavy metal deposition decreased with the log of distance from the DMTS haul road and the DMTS port site. Analysis of subsurface soil demonstrated that observed patterns of heavy metal deposition reflected in moss tissue concentrations were not attributable to local subsurface lithology. Based on comparisons with regional background data from arctic Alaska, deposition of airborne heavy metals related to mining activities appears to affect the northern half of the Monument. The affected area extends northward (beyond Monument boundaries) through the Kisimilot/Iyikrok hills (north of the Wulik River), and possibly beyond. South of the DMTS haul road, airborne deposition appears to be constrained by the Tahinichok Mountains. Moss tissue concentrations were highest immediately adjacent to the DMTS haul road (Cd > 24 mg/kg dw; Pb > 900 mg/kg dw). The influence of the mine site was not studied.

Hasselbach, L; Ver Hoef, J M.; Ford, Jesse; Neitlich, P; Crecelius, Eric A.; Berryman, Shanti D.; Wolk, B; Boehle, T

2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

213

Distant origins of Arctic black carbon: A Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[Wallace and Thompson, 2002]. The Arctic climate is especially sensitive to changes in the hydrological005296. 1. Introduction [2] The Arctic is a particularly sensitive region to global climate change. Observations and models indicate that as the climate warms, the Arctic warms most and fastest [e.g., Manabe et

214

ORIGINAL PAPER Arctic fisheries catches in Russia, USA, and Canada: baselines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Arctic fisheries catches in Russia, USA, and Canada: baselines for neglected northern Siberia (Russia), Arctic Alaska (USA), and the Canadian Arctic, extends over seven coastal Large.e., 770,000, 89,000, and 94,000 t by Russia, USA, and Canada, respectively for the same time period

Pauly, Daniel

215

This Page Intentionally Left Blank Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lincoln #12;This Page Intentionally Left Blank #12;#12;Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments--Arctic iv#12;This Page Intentionally Left Blank #12;Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic This Page Intentionally Left Blank #12;Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments--Arctic Contents v CONTENTS

216

September Arctic sea ice predicted to disappear near 2 warming above present  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

September Arctic sea ice predicted to disappear near 2 C global warming above present Irina; published 24 March 2012. [1] The decline of Arctic sea ice is one of the most visible signs of climate change over the past several decades. Arctic sea ice area shows large interannual variability due

Fischlin, Andreas

217

Arctic sea ice velocity field: General circulation and turbulent-like fluctuations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arctic sea ice velocity field: General circulation and turbulent-like fluctuations P. Rampal,1,2 J the Arctic sea ice velocity field as the superposition of a mean field and fluctuations. We study how subtracting the mean field, are analyzed in terms of diffusion properties. Although the Arctic sea ice cover

Boyer, Edmond

218

E-Print Network 3.0 - adjacent antarctic areas Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by the Society for Marine Mammalogy Summary: , 2010 Figure 1. The Antarctic and Southern Ocean, showing locations mentioned in the text: IWC Areas I... the Antarctic industrial...

219

adjacent non-cancerous ductal: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

many nets, those using them were doingwell. The schooner Sarah 312 Geological Setting, Mineral Resources and ancient works of Samos and adjacent islands of the Aegean Sea, 26-30...

220

E-Print Network 3.0 - adjacent genetic loci Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: adjacent genetic loci Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Introductory Biology Genetics Problems Do NOT use a Punnett square to solve any of these problems (except...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic environments adjacent Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: aquatic environments adjacent Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Journal of Animal Ecology 2009, 78, 338345 doi: 10.1111j.1365-2656.2008.01498.x 2008 The Authors. Journal...

222

Thermal buckling of metal oil tanks subject to an adjacent fire  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fire is one of the main hazards associated with storage tanks containing flammable liquids. These tanks are usually closely spaced and in large groups, so where a petroleum fire occurs, adjacent tanks are susceptible to ...

Liu, Ying

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Thermal buckling of metal oil tanks subject to an adjacent fire  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fire is one of the main hazards associated with storage tanks containing flammable liquids. These tanks are usually closely spaced and in large groups, so where a petroleum fire occurs, adjacent tanks are susceptible to ...

Liu, Ying

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

224

Ice at the Interface: Atmosphere-Ice-Ocean Boundary Layer Processes and Their Role in Polar Change---Workshop Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The atmosphere-ocean boundary layer in which sea ice resides includes many complex processes that require a more realistic treatment in GCMs, particularly as models move toward full earth system descriptions. The primary purpose of the workshop was to define and discuss such coupled processes from observational and modeling points of view, including insight from both the Arctic and Antarctic systems. The workshop met each of its overarching goals, including fostering collaboration among experimentalists, theorists and modelers, proposing modeling strategies, and ascertaining data availability and needs. Several scientific themes emerged from the workshop, such as the importance of episodic or extreme events, precipitation, stratification above and below the ice, and the marginal ice zone, whose seasonal Arctic migrations now traverse more territory than in the past.

Hunke, Elizabeth C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

225

Evaluation of Arctic Broadband Surface Radiation Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Arctic is a challenging environment for making in-situ radiation measurements. A standard suite of radiation sensors is typically designed to measure the total, direct and diffuse components of incoming and outgoing broadband shortwave (SW) and broadband thermal infrared, or longwave (LW) radiation. Enhancements can include various sensors for measuring irradiance in various narrower bandwidths. Many solar radiation/thermal infrared flux sensors utilize protective glass domes and some are mounted on complex mechanical platforms (solar trackers) that rotate sensors and shading devices that track the sun. High quality measurements require striking a balance between locating sensors in a pristine undisturbed location free of artificial blockage (such as buildings and towers) and providing accessibility to allow operators to clean and maintain the instruments. Three significant sources of erroneous data include solar tracker malfunctions, rime/frost/snow deposition on the instruments and operational problems due to limited operator access in extreme weather conditions. In this study, a comparison is made between the global and component sum (direct [vertical component] + diffuse) shortwave measurements. The difference between these two quantities (that theoretically should be zero) is used to illustrate the magnitude and seasonality of radiation flux measurement problems. The problem of rime/frost/snow deposition is investigated in more detail for one case study utilizing both shortwave and longwave measurements. Solutions to these operational problems are proposed that utilize measurement redundancy, more sophisticated heating and ventilation strategies and a more systematic program of operational support and subsequent data quality protocols.

Matsui, N.; Long, Charles N.; Augustine, J. A.; Halliwell, D.; Uttal, Taneil; Longenecker, D.; Niebergale, J.; Wendell, J.; Albee, R.

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

226

Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pacific Oceans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .currents in the tropical Pacific Ocean. J. Phys. Oceanogr. ,in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean associated with the

Drushka, Kyla

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean: National Science Foundation _______________________________ David L. Divins Director, Ocean Drilling

228

Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part II: Multi-layered cloud  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a deep, multi-layered, mixed-phase cloud system observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. This cloud system was associated with strong surface turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes as cold air flowed over the open Arctic Ocean, combined with a low pressure system that supplied moisture at mid-level. The simulations, performed by 13 single-column and 4 cloud-resolving models, generally overestimate the liquid water path and strongly underestimate the ice water path, although there is a large spread among the models. This finding is in contrast with results for the single-layer, low-level mixed-phase stratocumulus case in Part I of this study, as well as previous studies of shallow mixed-phase Arctic clouds, that showed an underprediction of liquid water path. The overestimate of liquid water path and underestimate of ice water path occur primarily when deeper mixed-phase clouds extending into the mid-troposphere were observed. These results suggest important differences in the ability of models to simulate Arctic mixed-phase clouds that are deep and multi-layered versus shallow and single-layered. In general, models with a more sophisticated, two-moment treatment of the cloud microphysics produce a somewhat smaller liquid water path that is closer to observations. The cloud-resolving models tend to produce a larger cloud fraction than the single-column models. The liquid water path and especially the cloud fraction have a large impact on the cloud radiative forcing at the surface, which is dominated by the longwave flux for this case.

Morrison, H; McCoy, R B; Klein, S A; Xie, S; Luo, Y; Avramov, A; Chen, M; Cole, J; Falk, M; Foster, M; Genio, A D; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; McFarquhar, G; Poellot, M; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

229

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean. ______________________________ David L. Divins Director, Ocean Drilling Programs Consortium for Ocean Leadership, Inc. Washington, D

230

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean. _______________________________ David L. Divins Director, Ocean Drilling Programs Consortium for Ocean Leadership, Inc. Washington, D

231

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean _______________________________ David L. Divins Director, Ocean Drilling Programs Consortium for Ocean Leadership, Inc. Washington, D

232

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, Februarythe Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference. OceanSixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference. June 19-

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) Campaign  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ALTOS campaign focuses on operating a tethered observing system for routine in situ sampling of low-level (< 2 km) Arctic clouds. It has been a long-term hope to fly tethered systems at Barrow, Alaska, but it is clear that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will not permit in-cloud tether systems at Barrow, even if unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) operations are allowed in the future. We have provided the scientific rationale for long-term, routine in situ measurements of cloud and aerosol properties in the Arctic. The existing restricted air space at Oliktok offers an opportunity to do so.

Verlinde, J

2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

234

MID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL OCEAN RESEARCH PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................................................................. 24 #12;v ASMFC Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission BOEM Bureau of Ocean Energy Management BMPMID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL OCEAN RESEARCH PLAN SEPTEMBER 2012 Sea Grant Mid-Atlantic Ocean Research #12;MID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL OCEAN RESEARCH PLAN SEPTEMBER 2012 Sea Grant Mid-Atlantic Ocean Research

235

ARM - Oceanic Properties  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearchWarmingMethane Background InformationNewsMediaAlaskaNewsOceanic

236

Ocean Engineering at UNH THE OCEAN ENGINEERING program at UNH provides students with hands-on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-on opportunities for research in ocean renewable energy, remotely operated vehicles, ocean mapping, ocean acousticsOcean Engineering at UNH THE OCEAN ENGINEERING program at UNH provides students with hands, and coastal processes. The Jere A. Chase Ocean Engineering Laboratory is equipped with state

Pringle, James "Jamie"

237

Modeling Ocean Ecosystems: The PARADIGM Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The role of the oceans in Earth systems ecology, and the effects of climate variability on the ocean and its ecosystems, can be understood only by observing, describing, and ultimately predicting the state of the ocean as ...

Rothstein, Lewis M.

238

Pelagic Polychaetes of the Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean CLAPARtDE,E. 1868. LesPolyc'haetes of the Pacific Ocean KINBERG, J. G. H. 1866.Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean TREADWELL, A. L. 1906.

Dales, K Phillips

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 190 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

164 Japan __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling under the international Ocean Drilling Program, which is managed by Joint Oceanographic Institutions) Natural Environment Research Council (United Kingdom) European Science Foundation Consortium for the Ocean

240

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftof ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. Depart~June 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftr:he comnercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionJune 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sands, M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)r:he comnercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionJune 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy Resources IN SUPPORT OF THE 2005 INTEGRATED....................................................................................................................... 9 Ocean Wave Energy................................................................. 21 #12;ii List of Tables Table 1 California Small Hydropower And Ocean Wave Energy Resources Table 2

244

November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 209 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING MANTLE PERIDOTITE ALONG Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA -------------------------------- Dr. D. Jay Miller Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University

245

January 2003 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

January 2003 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 210 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING THE NEWFOUNDLAND HALF OF THE NEWFOUNDLAND­IBERIA TRANSECT: THE FIRST CONJUGATE MARGIN DRILLING IN A NON-VOLCANIC RIFT Brian E. Tucholke Co Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

246

The Plastic Ocean Michael Gonsior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Plastic Ocean Michael Gonsior Bonnie Monteleone, William Cooper, Jennifer O'Keefe, Pamela Seaton, and Maureen Conte #12;#12;#12;Plastic does not biodegrade it photo-degrades breaking down is the plastic cheese wrap? Unfortunately, marine creatures mistake plastics in the ocean for food #12

Boynton, Walter R.

247

GENERATING ELECTRICITY USING OCEAN WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GENERATING ELECTRICITY USING OCEAN WAVES A RENEWABLE SOURCE OF ENERGY REPORT FOR THE HONG KONG ELECTRIC COMPANY LIMITED Dr L F Yeung Mr Paul Hodgson Dr Robin Bradbeer July 2007 #12;Ocean Waves and construction of equipment that could measure and log wave conditions and tide levels at Hoi Ha Wan. Prototypes

Bradbeer, Robin Sarah

248

arctic van test: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

arctic van test First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Action Refinement in Testing with uioco...

249

Arctic EnginEEring College of Engineering and Mines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arctic EnginEEring College of Engineering and Mines Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Management. See Environmental Engineering and Environmental Quality Science. See Science Engineering 907-474-7241 http://cem.uaf.edu/cee/ MS Degree Minimum Requirements for Degree: 30 credits

Hartman, Chris

250

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Unalaska  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well as other DOE-related activities in the region. DOE, in conjunction with several other federal agencies, will host seven consultation sessions between October and December 2014.

251

A new way to study the changing Arctic ecosystem  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Berkeley Lab scientists Susan Hubbard and Margaret Torn discuss the proposed Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment, which is designed to answer one of the most urgent questions facing researchers today: How will a changing climate impact the Arctic, and how will this in turn impact the planet's climate? More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/09/14/alaska-climate-change/

Hubbard, Susan

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

252

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Barrow  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well as other DOE-related activities in the region. DOE, in conjunction with several other federal agencies, will host seven consultation sessions between October and December 2014.

253

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation Session: Nome  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well as other DOE-related activities in the region. DOE, in conjunction with several other federal agencies, will host seven consultation sessions between October and December 2014.

254

Global warming and Arctic climate. Raymond S. Bradley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global warming and Arctic climate. Raymond S. Bradley Climate System Research Center University of Massachusetts Amherst #12;How have global temperatures changed & why? 1. Average instrumental records from around the world; express all as anomalies from 1961-90 average #12;#12;Overall trend is upward ("global

Mountziaris, T. J.

255

Scaling StudieS in arctic SyStem Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science (jgrebmei@umces.edu) *Lawrence Hamilton, university of new hampshire (lawrence during the april 2006 u.S. fish and Wildlife Service (uSfWS) Walrus Survey (photo by uSfWS/brad benter in 1984 by the arctic research and Policy act (Public law 98-373, July 31, 1984; amended as Public law 101

Wagner, Diane

256

arctic energy technology: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

arctic energy technology First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Energy distribution in an...

257

UnderSea Solutions, Inc. Arctic AUV Proposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the conceptual design and analysis of an AUV, Autonomous Underwater Vehicle, for Arctic under-ice water sampling Electrical Design: ? Power Consumption ? Battery Requirements & Selection ? Thrust Motor Requirements for nose cone Lift points Hull Form The hydrodynamic form of the AUV determines the propulsion energy

Wood, Stephen L.

258

Modeling of Oceanic Gas Hydrate Instability and Methane Release in Response to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating global climate, implicating global oceanic deposits of methane gas hydrate as the main culprit in instances of rapid climate change that have occurred in the past. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those predicted under future climate change scenarios, is poorly understood. To determine the fate of the carbon stored in these hydrates, we performed simulations of oceanic gas hydrate accumulations subjected to temperature changes at the seafloor and assessed the potential for methane release into the ocean. Our modeling analysis considered the properties of benthic sediments, the saturation and distribution of the hydrates, the ocean depth, the initial seafloor temperature, and for the first time, estimated the effect of benthic biogeochemical activity. The results show that shallow deposits--such as those found in arctic regions or in the Gulf of Mexico--can undergo rapid dissociation and produce significant methane fluxes of 2 to 13 mol/yr/m{sup 2} over a period of decades, and release up to 1,100 mol of methane per m{sup 2} of seafloor in a century. These fluxes may exceed the ability of the seafloor environment (via anaerobic oxidation of methane) to consume the released methane or sequester the carbon. These results will provide a source term to regional or global climate models in order to assess the coupling of gas hydrate deposits to changes in the global climate.

Reagan, Matthew; Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

Review of technology for Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technical background briefing report is the first step in the preparation of a plan for engineering research oriented toward Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery. A five-year leasing schedule for the ice-prone waters of the Arctic offshore is presented, which also shows the projected dates of the lease sale for each area. The estimated peak production rates for these areas are given. There is considerable uncertainty for all these production estimates, since no exploratory drilling has yet taken place. A flow chart is presented which relates the special Arctic factors, such as ice and permafrost, to the normal petroleum production sequence. Some highlights from the chart and from the technical review are: (1) in many Arctic offshore locations the movement of sea ice causes major lateral forces on offshore structures, which are much greater than wave forces; (2) spray ice buildup on structures, ships and aircraft will be considerable, and must be prevented or accommodated with special designs; (3) the time available for summer exploratory drilling, and for deployment of permanent production structures, is limited by the return of the pack ice. This time may be extended by ice-breaking vessels in some cases; (4) during production, icebreaking workboats will service the offshore platforms in most areas throughout the year; (5) transportation of petroleum by icebreaking tankers from offshore tanker loading points is a highly probable situation, except in the Alaskan Beaufort; and (6) Arctic pipelines must contend with permafrost, making instrumentation necessary to detect subtle changes of the pipe before rupture occurs.

Sackinger, W. M.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Good morning, everyone. I'm Martin Jeffries, Principal Editor of the Arctic Report Card and a science advisor to the U.S. Arctic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the University of Virginia, and Dr. Don Perovich of Dartmouth College. They will talk about vegetation and sea to independent peer-review organized by the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) of the Arctic Council. Key highlights from the essays are presented on the front page of the Web site, where you'll also

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate System Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Primary activities are reported in these areas: climate system component studies via one-way coupling experiments; development of the Regional Arctic Climate System Model (RACM); and physical feedback studies focusing on changes in Arctic sea ice using the fully coupled model.

Lettenmaier, Dennis P

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

262

A REVIEW OF GLOBAL OCEAN TEMPERATURE OBSERVATIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR OCEAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by taking an inventory of changes in energy storage. The main storage is in the ocean, the latest values, Energy Sustainable Economic, Earth's energy imbalance, and thermosteric sea level rise. Up-to-date estimates are provided

263

Irreversible Electroporation Adjacent to the Rectum: Evaluation of Pathological Effects in a Pig Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To evaluate the effects of irreversible electroporation (IRE) on the rectum wall after IRE applied adjacent to the rectum. CT-guided IRE adjacent to the rectum wall was performed in 11 pigs; a total of 44 lesions were created. In five pigs, ablations were performed without a water-filled endorectal coil (group A); in six pigs, ablation was performed with the coil to avoid displacement of the rectum wall (group B). The pigs were killed after 7-15 days and the rectums were harvested for pathological evaluation. There was no evidence of perforation on gross postmortem examination. Perirectal muscle lesions were observed in 18 of 20 ablations in group A and in 21 of 24 ablations in group B. Inflammation and fibrosis of the muscularis propria was observed in ten of 18 lesions in group A and in ten of 21 lesions in group B. In group A, findings were limited to the external layer of the muscularis propria except for one lesion; in group B, findings were transmural in all cases. Transmural necrosis with marked suppurative mucosal inflammation was observed in seven of 21 lesions in group B and in no lesion in group A. IRE-ablation adjacent to the rectum may be uneventful if the rectum wall is mobile and able to contract. IRE-ablation of the rectum may be harmful if the rectum wall is fixed adjacent to the IRE-probe.

Schoellnast, Helmut [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States)] [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Monette, Sebastien [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, Rockefeller University, Laboratory of Comparative Pathology (United States)] [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, Rockefeller University, Laboratory of Comparative Pathology (United States); Ezell, Paula C. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, Rockefeller University, Research Animal Resource Center (United States)] [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, Rockefeller University, Research Animal Resource Center (United States); Single, Gordon [AngioDynamics Inc. (United States)] [AngioDynamics Inc. (United States); Maybody, Majid [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States)] [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Weiser, Martin R.; Fong Yuman [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Surgery (United States)] [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Surgery (United States); Solomon, Stephen B., E-mail: solomons@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

Differences in potassium forms between cutans and adjacent soil matrix in a Grey Clay Soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Differences in potassium forms between cutans and adjacent soil matrix in a Grey Clay Soil Fan Liu1 , R. J. Gilkes, R. D. Hart, and A. Bruand2 Department of Soil Science and Plant Nutrition, Faculty are common fabric features in soil and represent foci of chemical and biological reactions. The influence

Boyer, Edmond

265

Advancements in accuracy of the alanine EPR dosimetry Part III: Usefulness of an adjacent reference sample  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advancements in accuracy of the alanine EPR dosimetry system Part III: Usefulness of an adjacent Instruments, Inc, EPR Division, Billerica, MA 01821-3957, USA Received 26 January 2000; accepted 28 February Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectral analysis. Small uncontrollable variations of the EPR spectrometer

266

2D and 3D mesh graphs, 39 adjacency matrix, 5, 13  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

maximal independent set, 35 memory hierarchy, 290 minimum paths, 26 minimum spanning tree, 55 monotype deterministic, 161 fast generation, 157 generation, 143 interpretation, 155 real, 161 stochastic, 152, 161 multiplication, 31 sparse reference, 291 sparsity, 220, 226 spherical projection, 246 stochastic adjacency matrix

Kepner, Jeremy

267

Successes, Challenges, Lessons Learned in Land Use Planning Efforts Adjacent to an LRT Station  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Successes, Challenges, Lessons Learned in Land Use Planning Efforts Adjacent to an LRT Station interest in "new outreach methods" ·!Demonstrated value added in more collaborative process #12;Lessons Learned 1.! Begin internal & external outreach earlier 2.! Our "good ideas" were not necessarily good

Minnesota, University of

268

Hybrid male sterility in rice controlled by interaction between divergent alleles of two adjacent genes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hybrid male sterility in rice controlled by interaction between divergent alleles of two adjacent, Kobe, Japan, October 9, 2008 (received for review July 27, 2008) Sterility is common in hybrids between). Although multiple loci for plant hybrid sterility have been identified, it remains unknown how alleles

Nachman, Michael

269

composition of putative oceans on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Results: Oceanic water composition · Oceanic water is a NaCl-CaCl2 solution · Large Cl mass · Cl in a "soda ocean" Temperature, o C 100 200 300 400 500 Concentration,mole/kgH2O 0.01 0.1 1 Cl- CaCl2 CaCl+ Na calcite · Quartz · Na-K feldspars · Anhydrite · Pyrite · Hematite/magnetite · Evaporites: NaCl+CaCl2 350o

Treiman, Allan H.

270

arctic pteropod limacina: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

could be very sensitive to ocean acidification driven by the increase of anthropogenic CO2 emissions. The effect of changes in the seawater chemistry was investigated on...

271

Ocean Studies Board annual report 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Activities of the Ocean Studies Board fall into three broad categories: promoting the health of ocean sciences in the United States, encouraging the protection and wise use of the ocean and its resources, and applying ocean science to improve national security.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

Ocean Studies Board annual report 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Activities of the Ocean Studies Board fall into three broad categories: promoting the health of ocean sciences in the United States, encouraging the protection and wise use of the ocean and its resources, and applying ocean science to improve national security.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean The Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Cli- mate (ATOC assimilating ocean observations and changes expected from surface heat fluxes as measured by the daily National are a result of advection of heat by ocean currents. We calculate that the most likely cause of the discrepancy

Frandsen, Jannette B.

274

OCEAN-ATMOSPHERE INTERACTION AND TROPICAL CLIMATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiation is the ultimate source of energy for motions in the atmosphere and ocean. Most absorption of solar radiation takes place on the Earth surface, the majority of which is occupied by oceans. Thus oceanic modulate surface radiative flux. Thus, the ocean and atmosphere are a coupled system and their interaction

Xie, Shang-Ping

275

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 165 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 165 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS CARIBBEAN OCEAN HISTORY AND THE CRETACEOUS Scientist, Leg 165 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College of any portion requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University

276

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 104 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 104 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS NORWEGIAN SEA Olav Eldholm Co-Chief Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, Texas 77843-3469 Pni±ip o Rabinowitz Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Louis E

277

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 110 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 110 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LESSER ANTILLES FOREARC J. Casey Moore Staff Science Representative, Leg 110 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843-3469 Philip D. Direct* Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean

278

INSTRUCTIONS INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM (IODP)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM (IODP) MANUSCRIPT AND PHOTOGRAPH COPYRIGHT, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, 1000 Discovery Drive, College Station, Texas 77845, USA A signed copyright of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program or any other publications of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program. Author

279

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 109 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 109 PRELIMINARY REPORT BARE ROCK DRILLING IN THE MID-ATLANTIC RIDGE RIFT 109 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, TX 77843-3469 Philip D. Rabinowitz Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Louis E

280

n CAPABILITY STATEMENT Centre for Ocean Engineering,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

n CAPABILITY STATEMENT Centre for Ocean Engineering, Science and Technology Overview The Centre for Ocean Engineering, Science and Technology (COEST) is dedicated to the ocean, the most fascinating and the most challenging environment for human endeavour. COEST brings together the disciplines of ocean

Liley, David

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

4, 709732, 2007 Ice-shelf ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OSD 4, 709732, 2007 Ice-shelf ocean interactions at Fimbul Ice Shelf M. R. Price Title Page published in Ocean Science Discussions are under open-access review for the journal Ocean Science Ice-shelf ocean interactions at Fimbul Ice Shelf, Antarctica from oxygen isotope ratio measurements M. R. Price 1

Boyer, Edmond

282

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion LUIS A. VEGA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion LUIS A. VEGA Hawaii Natural Energy Institute, School of Ocean depths of 20 m (surface water) and 1,000 m. OTEC Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, the process of converting the ocean thermal energy into electricity. OTEC transfer function The relationship between

283

Exploring the Deep... Exploring the Ocean Environment Unit 1The Ocean Basins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEO/OC 103 Exploring the Deep... Lab 2 #12;Exploring the Ocean Environment Unit 1­The Ocean Basins Ocean origins 19 How did the oceans form? Scientists believe that the oceans developed early ). This early atmosphere reflected much of the solar radiation striking Earth, allowing the surface to cool

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

284

Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters in the upper ocean, the vertical distribution of solar radiation (ESR) in the shortwave domain plays (2005), Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal

Lee, Zhongping

285

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic russia sedimentology Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

russia sedimentology Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic russia sedimentology Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 CURRICULUM VITAE Julie...

286

Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems, 1960-2012  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

A synthesis of the available literature on tundra root distribution and dynamics, and their role in key ecosystem processes in the Arctic.

Sullivan, Paddy; Sloan, Victoria; Warren, Jeff; McGuire, Dave; Euskirchen, Eugenie; Norby, Richard; Iversen, Colleen; Walker, Anthony; Wullschleger, Stan

287

Radiocarbon Content of CO 2 Respired from High Arctic Tundra in Northwest Greenland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. E. , 2002: Survey of Greenland instrumental temperaturetypes in northwestern Greenland. Arctic, Antarctic, andfen ecosystem in NE-Greenland. Theoretical and Applied

Czimczik, Claudia I; Welker, Jeffrey M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ozone loss Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry Summary: stratospheric ozone losses during cold Arctic Januaries, M. Rex, R. J. Salaw- itch, M. L. Santee, J. W. Waters... , and UARS MLS to demonstrate that the...

289

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic marine sediments Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Cycle in Summary: through the Arctic system, with implications for the marine sediment record. Quantitatively, sea... account for a major fraction of the 12;2 Holocene...

290

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic shorebird system Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plan for Fish Resources of the Arctic Management ... Source: NOAA Marine Fisheries Review Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 29 Bulletin 112 April 2007 45Jorgensen et...

291

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic wind energy Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic wind energy Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 OLA PERSSON PRINCIPAL RESEARCH TOPICS Summary:...

292

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic endemic brown Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: arctic endemic brown Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Southeast Alaska Conservation Assessment -Chapter 6.7 Page 1 Endemic Mammals of the Alexander Archipelago...

293

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic mutant peptides Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mutant peptides Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic mutant peptides Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Discrete Molecular Dynamics...

294

arctic-breeding glaucous gulls: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

stress. Norwegian Polar Institute, Polar Environmental Centre, NO-9296 Troms, Norway. Tel.: 47 7775 0500; fax: 47 Bech, Claus 8 ARCTIC Sabines Gull (Xema...

295

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic spring site Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Faculty Office: 109 Steele Hall. Arctic Studies Office: 147 Haldeman Center ORC Source: Lotko, William - Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College Collection:...

296

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic fox alopex Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Owl ( Nyctea scandiaca ) Repr oduction in Relation to Lemming Summary: . Competition for food between snowy owls , Nyctea scandiaca, and arctic foxes, Alopex lagopus. Zoological...

297

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic foxes alopex Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Owl ( Nyctea scandiaca ) Repr oduction in Relation to Lemming Summary: . Competition for food between snowy owls , Nyctea scandiaca, and arctic foxes, Alopex lagopus. Zoological...

298

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic seabird colony Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Sciences and Ecology 5 Latitudinal gradients in sea ice and primary production determine Arctic seabird colony Summary: Latitudinal gradients in sea ice and...

299

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic sponge haliclona Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: arctic sponge haliclona Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Summary: ). The sponges Clathrina canariensis,...

300

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic populations affects Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

prohibit, commercial fishing for Arctic fish and to ensure subsistence fishing is not affected... and uncertain population dynamics and abundance. Under the ... Source: NOAA Marine...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic levels sources Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National... rule that implements the Fishery Management Plan for Fish Resources of the Arctic ... Source: NOAA Marine Fisheries...

302

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic marine oil Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Management Area are likely to occur from oil, gas, and mineral exploration... marine ecosystem. Concerned over potential effects on fish populations in the Arctic region, the...

303

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic fox pups Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. Mortality of arctic ... Source: Hayssen, Virginia - Department of Biological Sciences, Smith College Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 2 Leashing the AlphaWolves:...

304

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic troposphere northeast Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the arctic front then produced an incipient surface low. Next a jet streak in the middle troposphere crossed... January-February 1991 Published by Sigma Xi ... Source:...

305

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic fisheries working Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Co-Editor AMSA 2009 Report Managing Director, Institute of the North Summary: Marine Tourism Key Fisheries 12;Today's Arctic Marine Use High Grade Iron Ore?? Zinc & Coal...

306

Arctic daily temperature and precipitation extremes: Observed and simulated physical behavior.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??ARCTIC DAILY TEMPERATURE AND PRECIPITATION EXTREMES: OBSERVED AND SIMULATED PHYSICAL BEHAVIOR Justin M. Glisan Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa (more)

Glisan, Justin Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Mercury in the Anthropocene Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The toxic metal mercury is present only at trace levels in the ocean, but it accumulates in fish at concentrations high enough to pose a threat to human and environmental health. Human activity has dramatically altered the ...

Lamborg, Carl

308

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Unalaska  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well as other DOE-related activities in the region. DOE, in conjunction with several other federal agencies, will host seven tribal consultation sessions and seven stakeholder outreach meetings between October and December 2014.

309

Mesoscale Modeling During Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mixed-phase arctic stratus clouds are the predominant cloud type in the Arctic (Curry et al. 2000) and through various feedback mechanisms exert a strong influence on the Arctic climate. Perhaps one of the most intriguing of their features is that they tend to have liquid tops that precipitate ice. Despite the fact that this situation is colloidally unstable, these cloud systems are quite long lived - from a few days to over a couple of weeks. It has been hypothesized that mixed-phase clouds are maintained through a balance between liquid water condensation resulting from the cloud-top radiative cooling and ice removal by precipitation (Pinto 1998; Harrington et al. 1999). In their modeling study Harrington et al. (1999) found that the maintenance of this balance depends strongly on the ambient concentration of ice forming nucleus (IFN). In a follow-up study, Jiang et al. (2002), using only 30% of IFN concentration predicted by Meyers et al. (1992) IFN parameterization were able to obtain results similar to the observations reported by Pinto (1998). The IFN concentration measurements collected during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), conducted in October 2004 over the North Slope of Alaska and the Beaufort Sea (Verlinde et al. 2005), also showed much lower values then those predicted (Prenne, pers. comm.) by currently accepted ice nucleation parameterizations (e.g. Meyers et al. 1992). The goal of this study is to use the extensive IFN data taken during M-PACE to examine what effects low IFN concentrations have on mesoscale cloud structure and coastal dynamics.

Avramov, A.; Harringston, J.Y.; Verlinde, J.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

310

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Fairbanks  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well as other DOE-related activities in the region. DOE, in conjunction with several other federal agencies, will host seven tribal consultation sessions and seven stakeholder outreach meetings between October and December 2014.

311

Planning the Next Generation of Arctic Ecosystem Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate Change Experiments in High-Latitude Ecosystems; Fairbanks, Alaska, 13-14 October 2010; A 2-day climate change workshop was held at the International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks. The workshop, sponsored by Biological and Environmental Research, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), was attended by 45 subject matter experts from universities, DOE national laboratories, and other federal and nongovernmental organizations. The workshop sought to engage the Arctic science community in planning for a proposed Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE-Arctic) project in Alaska (http:// ngee.ornl.gov/). The goal of this activity is to provide data, theory, and models to improve representations of high-latitude terrestrial processes in Earth system models. In particular, there is a need to better understand the processes by which warming may drive increased plant productivity and atmospheric carbon uptake and storage in biomass and soils, as well as those processes that may drive an increase in the release of methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) through microbial decomposition of soil carbon stored in thawing permafrost. This understanding is required to quantify the important feedback mechanisms that define the role of terrestrial processes in regional and global climate.

Hinzman, Larry D [International Arctic Research Center; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Open ocean DMS air/sea fluxes over the eastern South Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

over the North Pacific Ocean, J. Geophys. Res. - Atmos. ,air/sea fluxes over S. Pacific Ocean References Asher, W.in the equa- torial Pacific Ocean ( 1982 to 1996): Evidence

Marandino, C. A; De Bruyn, W. J; Miller, S. D; Saltzman, E. S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Conformation of Adjacent Self-expanding Stents: A Cross-Sectional In Vitro Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examined the proximal conformation of three commonly used self-expanding stents when the stents were deployed adjacent to one another in a tubular model, simulating a 'kissing' stent technique. The stent pairs were evaluated by computed tomogrphy to determine the cross-sectional area excluded by the stents within the model. The mean areas associated with each stent pair were compared and significance evaluated by a t-test. A statistically significant difference was found when the area excluded by adjacent Wallstents was compared with both the Luminexx and SMART stents (p < 0.001 and p < 0.002, respectively). The difference in the area excluded and differences in conformation might play a role in the lower patencies that have been observed in 'kissing' stent series.

Hughes, Marion; Forauer, Andrew R. [University of Michigan Medical Center, Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States)], E-mail: andrew.r.forauer@hitchcock.org; Lindh, Mats [University Hospital MAS, Radiology Department (Sweden); Cwikiel, Wojciech [University of Michigan Medical Center, Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States)

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

Investigation of Microphysical Parameterizations of Snow and Ice in Arctic Clouds during M-PACE through ModelObservation Comparisons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigation of Microphysical Parameterizations of Snow and Ice in Arctic Clouds during M the microphysical properties of Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus. Intensive measurements taken during the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M

Solomon, Amy

315

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean. _______________________________ Steven R. Bohlen President, Joint Oceanographic Institutions Division Executive Director, Ocean Drilling

316

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean. Bohlen President, Joint Oceanographic Institutions Division Executive Director, Ocean Drilling Programs

317

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants byand M.D. Sands. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotfield of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. DOE.Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminaryof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotCommercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants byof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, FebruarySixth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, June 19-Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, February

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, FebruaryFifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, FebruarySixth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference. June 19-

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1980 :. i l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTALM.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion DraftDevelopment Plan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants byof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. DOE.Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminaryCompany. Ocean thermal energy conversion mission analysis

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries Christina M Comfort Institute #12;Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) · Renewable energy ­ ocean thermal gradient · Large

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

326

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants byfield of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.II of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants bySands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotof the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,development of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plant-impact assessment ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants bySands. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot plantof the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)field of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.II of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)of the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft1980 :. i l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTALDevelopment Plan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the commercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionE. Hathaway. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. AElectric Company. Ocean thermal energy conversion mission

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)the intermediate field of ocean thermal energy conversionII of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)of the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,and M.D. Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Duffy et al.: Arctic Tern migration over Patagonia 155 Marine Ornithology 41: 155159 (2013)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Duffy et al.: Arctic Tern migration over Patagonia 155 Marine Ornithology 41: 155­159 (2013 productive offshore waters of Argentinian Patagonia. We then explore possible reasons for this behavior-ANDEAN PASSAGE OF MIGRATING ARCTIC TERNS OVER PATAGONIA DAVID CAMERON DUFFY1 , ALY MCKNIGHT2 & DAVID B. IRONS2 1

Duffy, David Cameron

337

Interannual variability of Arctic sea ice export into the East Greenland Current  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interannual variability of Arctic sea ice export into the East Greenland Current K. A. Cox,1 J. D cycle, Arctic sea ice decline, and increasing Greenland glacial melt. Here we use new d18 O data from the East Greenland Current system at Cape Farewell and Denmark Strait to determine the relative proportions

Rohling, Eelco

338

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004: Part I. Database of the Barents, Kara and Information Series, Volume 9 NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004: Part I. Database. INTRODUCTION................................................................................. 33 2. HISTORY

339

The Atmospheric Response to Realistic Reduced Summer Arctic Sea Ice Anomalies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the continued ice melt [Polyakov et al., 2005], and recent work shows that heat from the Atlantic layer can91 The Atmospheric Response to Realistic Reduced Summer Arctic Sea Ice Anomalies Uma S. Bhatt,1 and Robert A. Tomas3 The impact of reduced Arctic summer sea ice on the atmosphere is investigated by forcing

Bhatt, Uma

340

Arctic sea ice declined rapidly to unprec-edented low extents in the summer of 2007,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cooling, ice extent remains far below normal. Understanding Sea Ice Loss Key factors behind this recordArctic sea ice declined rapidly to unprec- edented low extents in the summer of 2007, raising concern that the Arctic may be on the verge of a fundamental transition toward a seasonal ice cover

Clements, Craig

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

ORIGINAL PAPER Sedimentary pellets as an ice-cover proxy in a High Arctic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Sedimentary pellets as an ice-cover proxy in a High Arctic ice-covered lake Jessica-cover extent and dynamics on this perennially ice-covered, High Arctic lake. These pellets are interpreted growth. The pellets remain frozen in the ice until a summer or series of summers with reduced ice cover

Vincent, Warwick F.

342

REGULAR ARTICLE Soil nitrogen cycling rates in low arctic shrub tundra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the soil microbial community in both ecosystems indicat- ed similar fungal dominance (epifluorescence landscape. Keywords 15 Nitrogen . Gross N mineralization . Arctic tundra . Litter. Soil microbial community). For example, remote sensing studies have characterized an increase in peak-season biomass across the Arctic

Grogan, Paul

343

Be production-rate calibration for the Arctic NICOLA S E. YOUNG,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A 10 Be production-rate calibration for the Arctic NICOLA´ S E. YOUNG,1,2 * JOERG M. SCHAEFER,1 2013; Accepted 18 April 2013 ABSTRACT: We present a Baffin Bay 10 Be production-rate calibration published 10 Be calibration datasets to develop an Arctic 10 Be production rate. Our calibration comprises

Briner, Jason P.

344

A model of the threedimensional evolution of Arctic melt ponds on firstyear and multiyear sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ice. In the summer the upper layers of sea ice and snow melts producing meltwater that accumulatesA model of the threedimensional evolution of Arctic melt ponds on firstyear and multiyear sea ice F in Arctic melt ponds on the surface of sea ice. An accurate estimate of the fraction of the sea ice surface

Feltham, Daniel

345

Scale Dependence and Localization of the Deformation of Arctic Sea Ice David Marsan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and internal stress gradients, producing spatial gradients in the ice velocity that we refer to as deformationScale Dependence and Localization of the Deformation of Arctic Sea Ice David Marsan Laboratoire de of Arctic sea ice over a 3-day time period is performed for scales of 10 to 1000 km. The deformation field

346

Multiple equilibria and abrupt transitions in Arctic summer sea ice extent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, version 3 (CCSM3). The resulting nonlinear equations produce abrupt sea ice transitions resembling thoseMultiple equilibria and abrupt transitions in Arctic summer sea ice extent William J. Merryfield monograph "Arctic Sea Ice Decline", 19 October 2007 Corresponding author address: Dr. William Merryfield

Monahan, Adam Hugh

347

On the Microphysical Representation of Observed Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Microphysical Representation of Observed Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Paquita Zuidema, Paul Lawson, Hugh Morrison U of Miami/SPEC, Inc. Boulder CO/NCAR #12;Arctic clouds are often: mixed-phase (ie. both ice + supercooled water) yet long-lasting (despite disequilibrium) #12;why? - are ice nuclei over

Zuidema, Paquita

348

Melting of small Arctic ice caps observed from ERS scatterometer time series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Melting of small Arctic ice caps observed from ERS scatterometer time series Laurence C. Smith,1 of melt onset can be observed over small ice caps, as well as the major ice sheets and multi-year sea ice for 14 small Arctic ice caps from 19922000. Interannual and regional variability in the timing of melt

Smith, Laurence C.

349

The Arctic Oscillation, climate change and the effects on precipitation in Israel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Mediterranean basin. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Climate change Arctic Oscillation) investigated the effect of climate change on water resources of Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East regionThe Arctic Oscillation, climate change and the effects on precipitation in Israel Amir Givati b

Daniel, Rosenfeld

350

JP2.3 CLOUD RADIATIVE HEATING RATE FORCING FROM PROFILES OF RETRIEVED ARCTIC CLOUD MICROPHYSICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JP2.3 CLOUD RADIATIVE HEATING RATE FORCING FROM PROFILES OF RETRIEVED ARCTIC CLOUD MICROPHYSICS surface. In 1997-1998, a large multi-agency effort made the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA with the ice pack in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas for one year. Surface-based remote sensors generated

Shupe, Matthew

351

U.S. Arctic Research Policy: What do we need to know now?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;11 September 2007 Arctic ice retreat ­ minimum coverage and thickness #12;Carbon dioxide climbs #12;Methane: mitigation, adaptation, Arctic feedbacks, alternative energy, sequestration, Black Carbon Task Force · Involve indigenous communities in decisions · Enhance scientific monitoring and research into local

Kuligowski, Bob

352

LES Simulations of Roll Clouds Observed During Mixed- Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Roll clouds, and associated roll convection, are fairly common features of the atmospheric boundary layer. While these organized cumuliform clouds are found over many regions of the planet, they are quite ubiquitous near the edge of the polar ice sheets. In particular, during periods of off-ice flow, when cold polar air flows from the ice pack over the relatively warm ocean water, strong boundary layer convection develops along with frequent rolls. According to Bruemmer and Pohlman (2000), most of the total cloud cover in the Arctic is due to roll clouds. In an effort to examine the influences of mixed-phase microphysics on the boundary layer evolution of roll clouds during off-ice flow, Olsson and Harrington (2000) used a 2D mesoscale model coupled to a bulk microphysical scheme (see Section 2). Their results showed that mixed-phase clouds produced more shallow boundary layers with weaker turbulence than liquid-phase cases. Furthermore, their results showed that because of th e reduced turbulent drag on the atmosphere in the mixed-phase case, regions of mesoscale divergence in the marginal ice-zone were significantly affected. A follow-up 2D study (Harrington and Olsson 2001) showed that the reduced turbulent intensity in mixed-phase cases was due to precipitation. Ice precipitation caused downdraft stabilization which fed back and caused a reduction in the surface heat fluxes. In this work, we extend the work of Olsson and Harrington (2000) and Harrington and Olsson (2001) by examining the impacts of ice microphysics on roll convection. We will present results that illustrate how microphysics alters roll cloud structure and dynamics.

Greenberg, S.D.; Harrington, J.Y.; Prenni, A.; DeMott, P.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

353

Mechanistic models of oceanic nitrogen fixation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oceanic nitrogen fixation and biogeochemical interactions between the nitrogen, phosphorus and iron cycles have important implications for the control of primary production and carbon storage in the ocean. The biological ...

Monteiro, Fanny

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 207 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3E3 Canada -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Bauldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations the international Ocean Drilling Program, which is managed by Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc., under contract Foundation (United States) Natural Environment Research Council (United Kingdom) Ocean Research Institute

355

Oceanic nutrient and oxygen transports and bounds on export production during the World Ocean Circulation Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of intense climate interest. A large fraction of the carbon fixed in the oceanic surface waters is recycledOceanic nutrient and oxygen transports and bounds on export production during the World Ocean are estimated from selected hydrographic sections from the World Ocean Circulation Experiment spanning the world

Wunsch, Carl

356

Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C. UMMENHOFER*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C is restricted to the Indian or Pacific Ocean only, support the interpretation of forcing mechanisms for large Indian Ocean atmospheric forcing versus remote influences from Pacific wind forcing: low events develop

Ummenhofer, Caroline C.

357

Ocean Sci., 5, 313327, 2009 www.ocean-sci.net/5/313/2009/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The role of the penetration length scale of short- wave radiation into the surface ocean and its impact of the shortwave radiation hitting the ocean sur- face is absorbed and scattered at depths considerably shal- lowerOcean Sci., 5, 313­327, 2009 www.ocean-sci.net/5/313/2009/ © Author(s) 2009. This work

Gnanadesikan, Anand

358

AANNUALNNUAL RREPORTEPORT Integrated Ocean Drilling ProgramIntegrated Ocean Drilling Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AANNUALNNUAL RREPORTEPORT Integrated Ocean Drilling ProgramIntegrated Ocean Drilling Program U ANNUAL REPORT #12;#12;Integrated Ocean Drilling Program United States Implementing Organization JOI T his Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP)-U.S. Implementing Organization (USIO) Fiscal Year 2006

359

Constraining Oceanic dust deposition using surface 1 ocean dissolved Al 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constraining Oceanic dust deposition using surface 1 ocean dissolved Al 2 Qin Han, J. Keith Moore, Charles Zender, Chris Measures, David Hydes 3 Abstract 4 We use measurements of ocean surface dissolved Al and Deposition 6 (DEAD) model, to constrain dust deposition to the oceans. Our Al database contains 7 all

Zender, Charles

360

Oceanic processes associated with anomalous events in the Indian Ocean with relevance to 19971998  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oceanic processes associated with anomalous events in the Indian Ocean with relevance to 1997 Abstract. An anomalous climatic event occurred in the Indian Ocean (IO) region during 1997­1998, which 1997, warm SSTAs appeared in the western IO, and they peaked in February 1998. An ocean general

Wang, Yuqing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Oceans and Human Health Initiative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. We receive many benefits from the oceans from seafood, recreation and transportation industriesNational Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Oceans and Human Health Initiative (OHHI) is taking a new look at how the health of our ocean impacts our own health and well- being, and in turn how

362

Ocean and Resources Engineering is the application of ocean science and engineering to the challenging conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

engineering, mixing and transport, water quality, ocean thermal energy conversion, hydrogen. GENO PAWLAK

Frandsen, Jannette B.

363

A review of global ocean temperature observations: Implications for ocean heat content estimates and climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oceans; their extensive total volume and large thermal capacity require a larger injection of energy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Oceans and ClimateOceans and Climate PeterPeter RhinesRhines 11  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

say, the ocean is a great thermometer/thermometer/halometerhalometer Levitus, Antonov, Boyer+ Stephens

365

Career Opportunity in Ocean Energy POSITION TITLE: Director of Renewable Ocean Energy Research Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Career Opportunity in Ocean Energy POSITION TITLE: Director of Renewable Ocean Energy Research: The Coastal Studies Institute (CSI) is seeking a dynamic individual to lead its Renewable Ocean Energy Program for a multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary renewable ocean energy research program. The position

366

Ocean Sci., 3, 337344, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/337/2007/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1/3 of the total tidal energy dissipation, in the ocean basins through "internal" waves breaking, eOcean Sci., 3, 337­344, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/337/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science Unpredictability of internal M2 H. van Haren Netherlands

Boyer, Edmond

367

Ocean Sci., 3, 461482, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/461/2007/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Sci., 3, 461­482, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/461/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science Effects of mesoscale eddies on global ocean Environment Laboratories, International Atomic Energy Agency, Monaco *now at: Institute of Biogeochemistry

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

368

Call title: "The ocean of tomorrow" Call identifier: FP7-OCEAN-2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

challenges in ocean management Theme 5 ­ Energy Area ENERGY.10.1 Call "The ocean of tomorrow" ­ Joining1 Call title: "The ocean of tomorrow" · Call identifier: FP7-OCEAN-2010 · Date of publication: 30, and Biotechnology (KBBE) - EUR 6 million from Theme 5 ­ Energy - EUR 10.5 million from Theme 6 ­ Environment

Milano-Bicocca, Università

369

The effect of ocean mixed layer depth on climate in slab ocean aquaplanet experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a severely reduced (&50 %) meridi- onal energy transport relative to the deep ocean runs. As a resultThe effect of ocean mixed layer depth on climate in slab ocean aquaplanet experiments Aaron Donohoe online: 28 June 2013 ? Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013 Abstract The effect of ocean mixed layer

Battisti, David

370

Development and Demonstration of a Relocatable Ocean OSSE System: Optimizing Ocean Observations for Hurricane Forecast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

forecasts for individual storms and improved seasonal forecast of the ocean thermal energy availableDevelopment and Demonstration of a Relocatable Ocean OSSE System: Optimizing Ocean Observations in the Gulf of Mexico is being extended to provide NOAA the ability to evaluate new ocean observing systems

371

The 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 and NbSe2 .2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter

372

ARM - Field Campaign - FIRE-Arctic Cloud Experiment/SHEBA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3,Cloud ODgovCampaignsFIRE-Arctic Cloud Experiment/SHEBA ARM

373

Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

The economic effects of elevated and depressed freeways on adjacent property owners  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT The Economic EfFects of Elevated and Depressed Freeways on The Adjacent Property Owners. (May 1995) Floyd David Sentry, B. S. , Texas AkM University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Daniel B. Fambro An econonuc assessment of a comnunity... 322, 095 283, 680 283, 680 260, 040 3, 327, 330 $5, 005, 770 Net Effect of Highway on Property Values $4, 275 139, 635 185, 310 262, 145 254, 800 271, 680 257, 840 3, 327, 330 $4, 703, 095 23 The resale of homes at all levels showed...

Scurry, Floyd David

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 205 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 205 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS FLUID FLOW AND SUBDUCTION FLUXES ACROSS __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College

376

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 202 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 202 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS SOUTHEAST PACIFIC PALEOCEANOGRAPHIC TRANSECTS __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College

377

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 195 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 195 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS MARIANA CONVERGENT MARGIN/ WEST PHILIPPINE SEA Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX

378

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 185 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 185 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS IZU-MARIANA MARGIN Dr. Terry Plank Co France Dr. Carlota Escutia Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park, 1000

379

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS SHAKEDOWN AND SEA TRIALS CRUISE Philip D. Rabinowitz Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 William J. Merrell Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station

380

SHIPBOARD SCIENTISTS1 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SHIPBOARD SCIENTISTS1 HANDBOOK OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY TECHNICAL NOTE 3 portion requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University be obtained from the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A & M University Research Park, 1000 Discovery

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 REPORT NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO Philip D Rabinowitz Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 William J. Merrell Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843

382

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 200 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 200 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING AT THE H2O LONG-TERM SEAFLOOR Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA

383

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 159 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 159 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS THE COTE D'IVOIRE - GHANA TRANSFORM MARGIN, Leg 159 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College Station requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park

384

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 140 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 140 PRELIMINARY REPORT HOLE 504B Dr. Henry Dick Dr. Jörg Erzinger Co Giessen Federal Republic of Germany Dr. Laura Stokking Staff Scientist, Leg 140 Ocean Drilling Program Copies of this publication may be obtained from the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A

385

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 199 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 199 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS PALEOGENE EQUATORIAL TRANSECT Dr. Mitchell __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive

386

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 196 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 196 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LOGGING WHILE DRILLING AND ADVANCED CORKS Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA

387

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 105 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 105 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LABRADOR SEA - BAFFIN BAY Dr. Michael A. Bradford Clement Staff Science Representative, Leg 105 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, TX 77843-3469" Philip Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science

388

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 108 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 108 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS NORTHWEST AFRICA Dr. William Ruddiman Co Federal Republic of Germany Dr. Jack G. Baldauf Staff Scientist, Leg 108 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, Texas 77843-3469 Philip W Rabin Direct Ocean Drilling Program

389

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 118 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 118 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS FRACTURE ZONE DRILLING ON THE SOUTHWEST INDIAN Oceanographic Institution Woods Hole, MA 02543 Andrew C. Adamson Staff Scientist, Leg 118 Ocean Drilling Program the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park, 1000

390

Ocean Optics Environmental Optics, Nanoscience Division  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

suspended solids swept up from the floor of the Gulf of Mexico The right picture shows a phytoplankton bloom and changes observed. This can be used to monitor pollution in our oceans and methods taken when levels become such as ocean pollution, currents and warming, and to see how the oceans are affecting the health of our planet

Strathclyde, University of

391

www.hboi.fau.edu Ocean Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

www.hboi.fau.edu Ocean Energy Collaboration: A Charge for Engineers BULLETIN Summer 2012 Beginning the State of Florida provided $5 million to establish the Center for Ocean Energy Technology at FAU. In 2010 to ocean energy research; the others are in Hawaii and the Pacific Northwest. Bill Baxley is the SNMREC

Fernandez, Eduardo

392

Method for closing a drift between adjacent in-situ oil shale retorts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A row of horizontally spaced-apart in situ oil shale retorts is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. Each row of retorts is formed by excavating development drifts at different elevations through opposite side boundaries of a plurality of retorts in the row of retorts. Each retort is formed by explosively expanding formation toward one or more voids within the boundaries of the retort site to form a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in each retort. Following formation of each retort, the retort development drifts on the advancing side of the retort are closed off by covering formation particles within the development drift with a layer of crushed oil shale particles having a particle size smaller than the average particle size of oil shale particles in the adjacent retort. In one embodiment, the crushed oil shale particles are pneumatically loaded into the development drift to pack the particles tightly all the way to the top of the drift and throughout the entire cross section of the drift. The closure between adjacent retorts provided by the finely divided oil shale provides sufficient resistance to gas flow through the development drift to effectively inhibit gas flow through the drift during subsequent retorting operations.

Hines, A.E.

1984-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

393

Method for closing a drift between adjacent in situ oil shale retorts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A row of horizontally spaced-apart in situ oil shale retorts is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. Each row of retorts is formed by excavating development drifts at different elevations through opposite side boundaries of a plurality of retorts in the row of retorts. Each retort is formed by explosively expanding formation toward one or more voids within the boundaries of the retort site to form a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in each retort. Following formation of each retort, the retort development drifts on the advancing side of the retort are closed off by covering formation particles within the development drift with a layer of crushed oil shale particles having a particle size smaller than the average particle size of oil shale particles in the adjacent retort. In one embodiment, the crushed oil shale particles are pneumatically loaded into the development drift to pack the particles tightly all the way to the top of the drift and throughout the entire cross section of the drift. The closure between adjacent retorts provided by the finely divided oil shale provides sufficient resistance to gas flow through the development drift to effectively inhibit gas flow through the drift during subsequent retorting operations.

Hines, Alex E. (Grand Junction, CO)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Nest predation, predator abundance, and avian diversity in transmission line corridors and adjacent habitats in east central Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

corridors may have differential effects on wildlife communities in adjacent vegetation types in a heterogeneous landscape. I evaluated the effects of ROW corridors on avian and nest predator communities in forests and pastures in east central Texas in 1998...

Hubbard, Tani Ann

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Age characteristics in a multidecadal Arctic sea ice simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results from adding a tracer for age of sea ice to a sophisticated sea ice model that is widely used for climate studies are presented. The consistent simulation of ice age, dynamics, and thermodynamics in the model shows explicitly that the loss of Arctic perennial ice has accelerated in the past three decades, as has been seen in satellite-derived observations. Our model shows that the September ice age average across the Northern Hemisphere varies from about 5 to 8 years, and the ice is much younger (about 2--3 years) in late winter because of the expansion of first-year ice. We find seasonal ice on average comprises about 5% of the total ice area in September, but as much as 1.34 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} survives in some years. Our simulated ice age in the late 1980s and early 1990s declined markedly in agreement with other studies. After this period of decline, the ice age began to recover, but in the final years of the simulation very little young ice remains after the melt season, a strong indication that the age of the pack will again decline in the future as older ice classes fail to be replenished. The Arctic ice pack has fluctuated between older and younger ice types over the past 30 years, while ice area, thickness, and volume all declined over the same period, with an apparent acceleration in the last decade.

Hunke, Elizabeth C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bitz, Cecllia M [UNIV. OF WASHINGTON

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Heavy Metal Contamination in the Taimyr Peninsula, Siberian Arctic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Taimyr Peninsula is directly north of the world's largest heavy metal smelting complex (Norilsk, Russia). Despite this proximity, there has been little research to examine the extent of contamination of the Taimyr Peninsula. We analyzed heavy metal concentrations in lichen (Cetraria cucullata), moss (Hylocomium splendens), soils, lake sediment, freshwater fish (Salvelinus alpinus, Lota lota, and Coregonus spp.) and collared lemming (Dicrostonyx torquatus) from 13 sites between 30 and 300 km from Norilsk. Element concentrations were low in both C. cucullata and H. splendens, although concentrations of Al, Fe, Cu, Ni, and Pb were significantly higher than those in Arctic Alaska, probably due to natural differences in the geochemical environments. Inorganic surface soils had significantly higher concentrations of Cd, Zn, Pb, and Mg than inorganic soils at depth, although a lake sediment core from the eastern Taimyr Peninsula indicated no recent enrichment by atmospherically transported elements. Tissue concentrations of heavy metals in fish and lemming were not elevated relative to other Arctic sites. Our results show that the impact of the Norilsk smelting complex is primarily localized rather than regional, and does not extend northward beyond 100 km.

Allen-Gil, Susan M.; Ford, Jesse; Lasorsa, Brenda K.; Monetti, Matthew; Vlasova, Tamara; Landers, Dixon H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Status of Wind-Diesel Applications in Arctic Climates: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rising cost of diesel fuel and the environmental regulation for its transportation, use, and storage, combined with the clear impacts of increased arctic temperatures, is driving remote communities to examine alternative methods of providing power. Over the past few years, wind energy has been increasingly used to reduce diesel fuel consumption, providing economic, environmental, and security benefits to the energy supply of communities from Alaska to Antarctica. This summary paper describes the current state of wind-diesel systems, reviews the operation of wind-diesel plants in cold climates, discusses current research activities pertaining to these systems, and addresses their technical and commercial challenges. System architectures, dispatch strategies, and operating experience from a variety of wind-diesel systems in Alaska will be reviewed. Specific focus will also be given to the control of power systems with large amounts of wind generation and the complexities of replacing diesel engine waste heat with excess wind energy, a key factor in assessing power plants for retrofit. A brief overview of steps for assessing the viability of retrofitting diesel power systems with wind technologies will also be provided. Because of the large number of isolated diesel minigrids, the market for adding wind to these systems is substantial, specifically in arctic climates and on islands that rely on diesel-only power generation.

Baring-Gould, I.; Corbus, D.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Arctic ocean long-term acoustic monitoring : ambient noise, environmental correlates, and transients north of Barrow, Alaska  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the entire data set. The LTSA provides a time series ofzoom in on an event in the LTSA and view its spectrogram -

Roth, Ethan H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Arctic ocean long-term acoustic monitoring : ambient noise, environmental correlates, and transients north of Barrow, Alaska  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ice floes. Figure 4.6 Thermal fracturing due to atmospheric coolingsea ice prior to the onset of heat loss and rapid cooling (atmospheric cooling. Wind-Driven Noise During fall, the ice

Roth, Ethan H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Distribution and Validation of Cloud Cover Derived from AVHRR Data Over the Arctic Ocean During the SHEBA Year  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesDataTranslocation oftheAmperometricEnergyDISTRIBUTEDAtomic, Water

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Proceedings of the 28th International Conference on Ocean, Offshore and Arctic Engineering May 31 -June 5 , 2009, Honolulu, Hawaii  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of wind versus waves in long-term load prediction. INTRODUCTION The calculation of long-term extreme loads. One can then establish the distribution of load extremes using multiple simulations for each wind IN RELIABILITY STUDIES FOR OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES P. Agarwal Stress Engineering Services Houston, TX 77041, USA

Manuel, Lance

402

Ion Mobility Separation of Isomeric Phosphopeptides from a Protein with Variant Modification of Adjacent Residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), and particularly differential IMS or field asymmetric waveform IMS (FAIMS), was recently shown capable of separating post-translationally modified peptides with variant PTM localization. However, that work was limited to a model peptide with serine phosphorylation on fairly distant alternative sites. Here, we demonstrate that FAIMS (coupled to ESI/MS) can broadly baseline-resolve variant phosphopeptides from a biologically modified human protein, including those involving phosphorylation of different residues and adjacent sites that existing MS/MS methods are most challenged to distinguish. Singly and doubly phosphorylated variants can be resolved equally well and identified without dissociation, based on accurate separation properties. The results are unchanged over a range of infusion solvent pH, hence present approach should work in conjunction with chromatographic separations using a mobile phase gradient.

Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Singer, David; Smith, Richard D.; Hoffmann, Ralf

2011-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

403

Impact of the Southern ocean winds on sea-ice - ocean interaction and its associated global ocean circulation in a warming world  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation discusses a linkage between the Southern Ocean (SO) winds and the global ocean circulation in the framework of a coarse-resolution global ocean general circulation model coupled to a sea-ice model. In addition to reexamination...

Cheon, Woo Geunn

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

SEISMIC RESPONSE PREDICTION OF NUPEC'S FIELD MODEL TESTS OF NPP STRUCTURES WITH ADJACENT BUILDING EFFECT.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a verification test program for seismic analysis computer codes for Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) structures, the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan has conducted a series of field model tests to address the dynamic cross interaction (DCI) effect on the seismic response of NPP structures built in close proximity to each other. The program provided field data to study the methodologies commonly associated with seismic analyses considering the DCI effect. As part of a collaborative program between the United States and Japan on seismic issues related to NPP applications, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsored a program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to perform independent seismic analyses which applied common analysis procedures to predict the building response to recorded earthquake events for the test models with DCI effect. In this study, two large-scale DCI test model configurations were analyzed: (1) twin reactor buildings in close proximity and (2) adjacent reactor and turbine buildings. This paper describes the NUPEC DCI test models, the BNL analysis using the SASSI 2000 program, and comparisons between the BNL analysis results and recorded field responses. To account for large variability in the soil properties, the conventional approach of computing seismic responses with the mean, mean plus and minus one-standard deviation soil profiles is adopted in the BNL analysis and the three sets of analysis results were used in the comparisons with the test data. A discussion is also provided in the paper to address (1) the capability of the analysis methods to capture the DCI effect, and (2) the conservatism of the practice for considering soil variability in seismic response analysis for adjacent NPP structures.

XU,J.COSTANTINO,C.HOFMAYER,C.ALI,S.

2004-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

405

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic science conference Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

science conference Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic science conference Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 RECIEL 17 (1) 2008. ISSN...

406

arctic mixed-phase clouds: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

low-level Arctic clouds in cold seasons and have a significant impact on the surface energy budget. However, the treatment of mixed-phase clouds in most current climate models...

407

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic offshore drilling Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic offshore drilling Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Free & open to the public For more information,...

408

Assessing the Predictability of the Beaufort Sea Minimum Ice Extent in a Changing Arctic Climate Regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding the climatic drivers of changes in sea ice extent in the Arctic has become increasingly important as record minima in the September sea ice extent continue to be reached. This research therefore addresses the question of which synoptic...

Quirk, Laura Marie

2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

409

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic foxes vulpes Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 the american naturalist february 2008 Spatial Patterns and Dynamic Responses of Arctic Food Webs Summary: ) and the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) are present in low numbers. The most...

410

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic fox vulpes Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 the american naturalist february 2008 Spatial Patterns and Dynamic Responses of Arctic Food Webs Summary: ) and the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) are present in low numbers. The most...

411

Building skills : a construction trades training facility for the eastern Canadian Arctic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On April 1, 1999, the Inuit of the Eastern Canadian Arctic achieved sovereignty over a new territory, Nunavut, envisioning economic self-reliance, political self-determination, and renewal of confidence in Inuit community. ...

Roszler, Sarah Katherine, 1977-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Black carbon in Arctic snow and its effect on surface albedo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

large areas of snow are exposed to significant solar energy (snow albedo is less important in winter Sheet in both spring and summer Non-Arctic snow - Great Plains of North America - Steppes of Asia

413

Recent Changes in Arctic Vegetation: Satellite Observations and Simulation Model Predictions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 2 Recent Changes in Arctic Vegetation: Satellite Observations and Simulation Model with a combination of satellite observations (Fig. 2.1) and field mea- surements, as projected by simulation modeling

Bhatt, Uma

414

Real-time processing of remote sensor data as applied to Arctic ice classification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REAL-TIME PROCESSING OF REMOTE SENSOR DATA AS APPLIED TO ARCTIC ICE CLASSIFICATION A Thesis by JAMES AUSTIN PERMENTER partial ! Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A)M University in fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1973 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering REAL-TIME PROCESSING OF REMOTE SENSOR DATA AS APPLIED TO ARCTIC ICE CLASSIFICATION A Thesis by James Austin Permenter Approved as to style and content by: ] ( rman of Commi...

Permenter, James Austin

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

On the World-wide Circulation of the Deeper Waters of the World Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

circulation of the Pacific Ocean: Flow patterns, tracers,in preparing the figures. Fig. 1 Pacific Ocean winds Fig.2 Pacific Ocean circulation Fig. 4 Pacific Ocean potential

Reid, Joseph L

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Horizontal stirring in the global ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Horizontal mixing and the distribution of coherent structures in the global ocean are analyzed using Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponents (FSLE), computed for the surface velocity field derived from the Ocean general circulation model For the Earth Simulator (OFES). FSLEs measure horizontal stirring and dispersion; additionally, the transport barriers which organize the oceanic flow can roughly be identified with the ridges of the FSLE field. We have performed a detailed statistical study, particularizing for the behaviour of the two hemispheres and different ocean basins. The computed Probability Distributions Functions (PDFs) of FSLE are broad and asymmetric. Horizontal mixing is generally more active in the northern hemisphere than in the southern one. Nevertheless the Southern Ocean is the most active ocean, and the Pacific the less active one. A striking result is that the main currents can be classified in two 'activity classes': Western Boundary Currents, which have broad PDFs with large FSLE values, and Eas...

Hernndez-Carrasco, I; Hernndez-Garca, E; Turiel, A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Intercomparison of cloud model simulations of Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds observed during SHEBA/FIRE-ACE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An intercomparison of six cloud-resolving and large-eddy simulation models is presented. This case study is based on observations of a persistent mixed-phase boundary layer cloud gathered on 7 May, 1998 from the Surface Heat Budget of Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) and First ISCCP Regional Experiment - Arctic Cloud Experiment (FIRE-ACE). Ice nucleation is constrained in the simulations in a way that holds the ice crystal concentration approximately fixed, with two sets of sensitivity runs in addition to the baseline simulations utilizing different specified ice nucleus (IN) concentrations. All of the baseline and sensitivity simulations group into two distinct quasi-steady states associated with either persistent mixed-phase clouds or all-ice clouds after the first few hours of integration, implying the existence of multiple equilibria. These two states are associated with distinctly different microphysical, thermodynamic, and radiative characteristics. Most but not all of the models produce a persistent mixed-phase cloud qualitatively similar to observations using the baseline IN/crystal concentration, while small increases in the IN/crystal concentration generally lead to rapid glaciation and conversion to the all-ice state. Budget analysis indicates that larger ice deposition rates associated with increased IN/crystal concentrations have a limited direct impact on dissipation of liquid in these simulations. However, the impact of increased ice deposition is greatly enhanced by several interaction pathways that lead to an increased surface precipitation flux, weaker cloud top radiative cooling and cloud dynamics, and reduced vertical mixing, promoting rapid glaciation of the mixed-phase cloud for deposition rates in the cloud layer greater than about 1-2x10-5 g kg-1 s-1. These results indicate the critical importance of precipitation-radiative-dynamical interactions in simulating cloud phase, which have been neglected in previous fixed-dynamical parcel studies of the cloud phase parameter space. Large sensitivity to the IN/crystal concentration also suggests the need for improved understanding of ice nucleation and its parameterization in models.

Morrison, H.; Zuidema, Paquita; Ackerman, Andrew; Avramov, Alexander; de Boer, Gijs; Fan, Jiwen; Fridlind, Ann; Hashino, Tempei; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Luo, Yali; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shipway, Ben

2011-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

418

Arctic catastrophes in an idealized sea ice model Ian Eisenman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thermodynamics, varying open water fraction, an energy balance atmosphere, and scalable CO2. We find that summer.e., reflectiveness) between sea ice and the open water that is exposed when it melts. Bare or snow-covered sea ice reflects most sunlight back to space, while the dark ocean surface absorbs most incident light. Global

Eisenman, Ian

419

Effects of simulated natural variability on Arctic temperature projections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- sea ice-ocean model is used to examine the effects of natural variability on climate projections starting from different strengths and phases of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and cryosphere give rise to a variety of climate feedbacks as such as ice- albedo and cloud feedbacks. The direct

Drange, Helge

420

Introduction to the Ocean Drilling Program JOIDES RESOLUTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction to the Ocean Drilling Program JOIDES RESOLUTION OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM TECHNICAL NOTE 11 1989 #12;TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY #12;INTRODUCTION TO THE OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Technical Note No. 11 Anne Gilbert Graham Ocean Drilling Program Texas A

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

2007 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Deep Sea Drilling Project-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Deep Sea Drilling Project- and Ocean Drilling Program Services on behalf of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program September 2007 #12;#12;OVERVIEW OF THE OCEAN DRILLING CITATION DATABASE The Ocean Drilling Citation Database, which in February 2007 contained

422

Short Communication Three ocean state indices implemented in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), the tropical cyclone heat potential, showing the thermal energy available in the ocean to enhance or decreaseShort Communication Three ocean state indices implemented in the Mercator-Ocean operational suite L., and Soulat, F. 2008. Three ocean state indices implemented in the Mercator-Ocean operational suite. ­ ICES

Ribes, Aurélien

423

Ocean Viral Metagenomics (2010 JGI User Meeting)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Forest Rohwer from San Diego State University talks about "Ocean Viral Metagenomics" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

Rohwer, Forest

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

424

Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This page provides a brief overview of hydropower and ocean energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply these technologies within the Federal sector.

425

OceanObs 1999 G GRIFFITHS et al. OceanObs 99  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, telecoms, defence, science, monitoring Hugin, Odyssey, OE X, R-One Robot, Martin, LDUUV, Autosub #12;Ocean

Griffiths, Gwyn

426

90 4,000 Meters under the Ice The Arctic is one of the habitats undergoing the most  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PlanckResearch 89 RUSSIA Special RUSSIA Special #12;#12;TEXT MAREN EMMERICH The Arctic is one of the habitats

427

Author's personal copy A novel ocean color index to detect oating algae in the global oceans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author's personal copy A novel ocean color index to detect oating algae in the global oceans December 2008 Received in revised form 15 May 2009 Accepted 23 May 2009 Keywords: Floating Algae Index (FAI Remote sensing Ocean color Climate data record Various types of oating algae have been reported in open

Meyers, Steven D.

428

2006 Ocean Drilling Citation Report Overview of the Ocean Drilling Citation Database  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2006 Ocean Drilling Citation Report Overview of the Ocean Drilling Citation Database The Ocean Drilling Citation Database, which contained almost 22,000 citation records related to the Deep Sea Drilling Institute (AGI). The database has been on line since August 2002. Beginning in 2006, citation records

429

Summer Courses in Ocean Optics and Biogeochemistry: "Monitoring the Oceans with Coastal Observatories" and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summer Courses in Ocean Optics and Biogeochemistry: "Monitoring the Oceans with Coastal integration of optical approaches into oceanographic research in general. OBJECTIVES These two courses created and optical oceanography and ocean color remote sensing to learn the fundamentals of optics in a coastal

Boss, Emmanuel S.

430

Ocean Sci., 3, 299310, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/299/2007/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and industrial fisheries, are experiencing a constant increase, significantly affecting the marine ecosystemOcean Sci., 3, 299­310, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/299/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science Observing the Mediterranean Sea from space: 21 years

Boyer, Edmond

431

Research on Ocean Resources, Marine Geo-Engineering and Climate Change -New Regulations: Implications for Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research on Ocean Resources, Marine Geo-Engineering and Climate Change - New Regulations: Implications for Ocean Engineers Dr. Philomène Verlaan Visiting Colleague, Department of Oceanography & Senior Framework for Scientific Research Involving Ocean Fertilization", a definition of marine geo-engineering

Frandsen, Jannette B.

432

Ocean Thermal Resource and Site Selection Criteria (January 2011) luisvega@hawaii.edu Ocean Thermal Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Thermal Resource and Site Selection Criteria (January 2011) luisvega@hawaii.edu 1 Ocean Thermal Resources The vast size of the ocean thermal resource and the baseload capability of OTEC systems of Hawaii throughout the year and at all times of the day. This is an indigenous renewable energy resource

433

ARM - Lesson Plans: Ocean Currents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Related InformationAcid Rain OutreachMoving Water andOcean

434

Ocean Thermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico:CommunityNorthwest BasinOahu, Hawaii:EnergyOpenTheOceanThermal

435

Dynamics of Arctic and Sub-Arctic Climate and Atmospheric Circulation: Diagnosis of Mechanisms and Biases Using Data Assimilation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of work performed under this grant is to enhance understanding of simulations of present-day climate and greenhouse gas-induced climate change. The examination of present-day climate also includes diagnostic intercomparison of model simulations and observed mean climate and climate variability using reanalysis and satellite datasets. Enhanced understanding is desirable 1) as a prerequisite for improving simulations; 2) for assessing the credibility of model simulations and their usefulness as tools for decision support; and 3) as a means to identify robust behaviors which commonly occur over a wide range of models, and may yield insights regarding the dominant physical mechanisms which determine mean climate and produce climate change. A further objective is to investigate the use of data assimilation as a means for examining and correcting model biases. Our primary focus is on the Arctic, but the scope of the work was expanded to include the global climate system.

Eric T. DeWeaver

2010-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

436

Dynamics of Arctic and Sub-Arctic Climate and Atmospheric Circulation: Diagnosis of Mechanisms and Biases Using Data Assimilation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report for DOE grant DE-FG02-07ER64434 to Eric DeWeaver at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The overall goal of work performed under this grant is to enhance understanding of simulations of present-day climate and greenhouse gas-induced climate change. Enhanced understanding is desirable 1) as a prerequisite for improving simulations; 2) for assessing the credibility of model simulations and their usefulness as tools for decision support; and 3) as a means to identify robust behaviors which commonly occur over a wide range of models, and may yield insights regarding the dominant physical mechanisms which determine mean climate and produce climate change. A furthe objective is to investigate the use of data assimilation as a means for examining and correcting model biases. Our primary focus is on the Arctic, but the scope of the work was expanded to include the global climate system to the extent that research targets of opportunity present themselves. Research performed under the grant falls into five main research areas: 1) a study of data assimilation using an ensemble filter with the atmospheric circulation model of the National Center for Atmospheric Research, in which both conventional observations and observations of the refraction of radio waves from GPS satellites were used to constrain the atmospheric state of the model; 2) research on the likely future status of polar bears, in which climate model simluations were used to assess the effectiveness of climate change mitigation efforts in preserving the habitat of polar bears, now considered a threatened species under global warming; 3) as assessment of the credibility of Arctic sea ice thickness simulations from climate models; 4) An examination of the persistence and reemergence of Northern Hemisphere sea ice area anomalies in climate model simulations and in observations; 5) An examination of the roles played by changes in net radiation and surface relative humidity in determine the response of the hydrological cycle to global warming.

Eric T. DeWeaver

2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

437

I n f o r m a t i o n e n H a u s d r u c k e r e i  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montag bis 7 - 12 Uhr Donnerstag 13 - 16 Uhr Freitag 7 - 12 Uhr A1 #12;South Atlantic OceanSouth Pacific Ocean North Pacific Ocean North Atlantic Ocean Indian Ocean Arctic Ocean Arctic OceanArctic Ocean North Pacific Ocean United States of America U.S.A. Canada Mexico Brazil U. S. A. French Polynesia (Fr

Ullmann, G. Matthias

438

Biological and physical regulation of the oceanic fixed nitrogen reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 in the subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Nature 412: 635-38in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. Marine Chemistry 16:and N 2 fixation in the Pacific Ocean. Global Biogeochemical

Weber, Thomas Smith

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Seismic and Biological Sources of Ambient Ocean Sound /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the most efficient radiation in the ocean. Sounds of seismicmost efficient radiation in the ocean. Of any remote sensingRadiation of Sound The underwater world is never silent. Even a hydrophone placed in the ocean

Freeman, Simon Eric

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization JOI Alliance Joint _______________________________ Steven R. Bohlen President, Joint Oceanographic Institutions Executive Director, Ocean Drilling Programs of work for Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) activities and deliverables for the current fiscal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Oceanic alkyl nitrates as a natural source of tropospheric ozone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

over the equatorial Pacific Ocean during Saga 3, J. Geophys.the troposphere over the Pacific Ocean during PEM- Tropics Ain the tropical Pacific Ocean, Geophys. Res. Lett. , 32,

Neu, Jessica L; Lawler, Michael J; Prather, Michael J; Saltzman, Eric S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Jere Chase Ocean Engineering Lab, Durham, NH Directions & Parking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jere Chase Ocean Engineering Lab, Durham, NH Directions & Parking Jere Chase Ocean Engineering Lab of the University of New Hampshire. Parking is available at the Jere A. Chase Ocean Engineering Building. Directions

443

Graduate Study and Research in Ocean and Resources Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guide to Graduate Study and Research in Ocean and Resources Engineering University of Hawaii REQUIREMENTS ............................................... 16 Ocean and Resources Engineering Page 3 #12;Page 4 Ocean and Resources Engineering BACKGROUND Hawaii's unique location, climate and marine

Frandsen, Jannette B.

444

ORE 601 Ocean and Resources Engineering Laboratory Designation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORE 601 Ocean and Resources Engineering Laboratory Designation Core course Catalog Description This course aims to provide ocean and resources engineering students with the fundamentals necessary Program Outcome 2: Basic science, mathematics, & engineering Program Outcome 3: Ocean engineering core

Frandsen, Jannette B.

445

Distribution and diversity of fungal species in and adjacent to the Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fungi have demonstrated their ability to diversify and specialize to take advantage of new environments (Murphy 1996). These species are essential to the normal functioning of ecosystems and the impacts of human activities may be harmful to fungi. There is a need to inventory fungi throughout the range of their environments. Previously archived information representing 43 sample locations was used to perform a preliminary evaluation of the distributions and diversity of fungal species at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and in adjacent environments. Presence-absence data for 71 species of fungi in five habitats, pinon-juniper, canyon-bottom ponderosa pine, ponderosa pine, canyon-bottom mixed conifer, and mixed conifer were analyzed. The results indicate that even though fungi occur in each of the habitats, fungal species are not distributed evenly among these habitats. The richness of fungal species is greater in the canyon-bottom mixed conifer and mixed conifer habitats than in the pinon-juniper, canyon-bottom ponderosa pine or ponderosa pine habitats. All but three of the fungal species were recorded in either the canyon-bottom mixed conifer or the mixed conifer habitats, and all but seven of the fungal species were found in the mixed conifer habitat.

Balice, R.G.; Jarmie, N.; Rogers, F.J.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Ocean Conditions, Salmon, and Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Conditions, Salmon, and Climate Change John Ferguson1 NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries're finding - adult forecasts and climate change) #12;1. Past (for context) · The coastal pelagic ecosystem/survival #12;NE Pacific Ocean fisheries productivity, 200 BC to 2000 AD (by Finney et al. 2002 Nature) Main

447

Legal Implications of CO2 Ocean Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

role in naturally removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, the ocean is considered an essential dioxide in addition to the vast quantities already stored naturally. A few recent research to contradict each other regarding the use of the ocean as a "sink" or disposal area for carbon dioxide. On one

448

Automated Sensor Networks to Advance Ocean Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

satellite telecom- munications. A regional cabled observa- tory will "wire" a single region in the north- eastern Pacific Ocean with a high-speed optical and power grid. The coastal com- ponent will expand ocean- observing network in the Mid-Atlantic Bight waters (MAB, spanning offshore regions from

449

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 179 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 179 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS HAMMER DRILLING and NERO Dr. Jack Casey Chief.S.A. Tom Pettigrew Chief Engineer, Leg 179 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College Station, Texas 77845

450

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 132 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 132 PRELIMINARY REPORT ENGINEERING II: WESTERN AND CENTRAL PACIFIC Mr. Michael A. Storms Supervisor of Development Engineering Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University and Drilling Operations ODP/TAMU Timothy J.G. Francis Deputy Director ODP/TAMU September 1990 #12;This informal

451

ESF Consortium for Ocean Drilling White Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESF Consortium for Ocean Drilling (ECOD) White Paper An ESF Programme September 2003 #12;The, maintains the ship over a specific location while drilling into water depths up to 27,000 feet. A seven Amsterdam, The Netherlands #12;1 ESF Consortium for Ocean Drilling (ECOD) White Paper Foreword 3

Purkis, Sam

452

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 191 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 191 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS NORTHWEST PACIFIC SEISMIC OBSERVATORY AND HAMMER DRILL ENGINEERING TESTS Dr. Toshihiko Kanazawa Co-Chief Scientist Earthquake Research Institute Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College

453

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 192 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 192 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS BASEMENT DRILLING OF THE ONTONG JAVA PLATEAU of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station, TX Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station, TX 77845-9547 U.S.A. May 2000

454

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 120 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 120 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS CENTRAL KERGUELEN PLATEAU Dr. Roland Schlich Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77841 Philip D.VRabinowitz Director ^^~-- ODP of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park, 1000 Discovery Drive, College Station

455

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 106 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 106 PRELIMINARY REPORT BARE ROCK DRILLING IN THE MID-ATLANTIC RIDGE RIFT 106 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, TX 77843-3469 ±nuwiLZ" ector ODP Drilling Program, Texas A & M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3469. In some cases, orders

456

LEG 142 PRELIMINARY REPORT OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LEG 142 PRELIMINARY REPORT OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM ENGINEERING PRELIMINARY REPORT NO. 3 EAST PACIFIC RISE 1992 #12;OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 142 PRELIMINARY REPORT East Pacific Rise Dr. Rodey Batiza Co 96822 Mr. Michael A. Storms Operations Superintendent/ Assistant Manager of Engineering and Drilling

457

Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic Tomography, Satellite Altimetry, and Modeling The ATOC to thermal expansion. Interpreting climate change signals from fluctuations in sea level is therefore in the advective heat flux. Changes in oceanic heat storage are a major expected element of future climate shifts

Frandsen, Jannette B.

458

Statistical mechanics and ocean circulation Rick Salmon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statistical mechanics and ocean circulation Rick Salmon Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD equilibrium statistical mechanics based upon the conservation of energy and potential enstrophy to the mass. The equilibrium state resembles the buoyancy structure actually observed. Key words: statistical mechanics, ocean

Salmon, Rick

459

Wavelet Spectrum Analysis and Ocean Wind Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wavelet Spectrum Analysis and Ocean Wind Waves Paul C. Liu Abstract. Wavelet spectrum analysis is applied to a set of measured ocean wind waves data collected during the 1990 SWADE {Surface Wave Dynamics Experi- ment) program. The results reveal significantly new and previously unexplored Insights on wave

460

Ocean and Sea Ice SAF Technical Note  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean and Sea Ice SAF Technical Note SAF/OSI/CDOP/KNMI/TEC/RP/147 Validation of ASCAT 12.5-km winds The Ocean and Sea Ice Satellite Application Facility (OSI SAF) delivers an operational level 2 wind product produces a level 1 product with 12.5-km WVC spacing that has a resolution of approximately 25 km. Since

Stoffelen, Ad

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Ocean and Sea Ice SAF Technical Note  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean and Sea Ice SAF Technical Note SAF/OSI/CDOP2/KNMI/TEC/RP/194 Quality Control of Ku. The OSCAT level 2a data are available in near-real time and OWDP is used at KNMI to produce the Ocean and Sea Ice (OSI) SAF wind product which is made available to users. A beta version of OWDP is also

Stoffelen, Ad

462

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 180 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 180 PRELIMINARY REPORT ACTIVE CONTINENTAL EXTENSION IN THE WESTERN WOODLARK BASIN, PAPUA NEW GUINEA Dr. Philippe Huchon CNRS, Laboratoire de Géologie ?cole Normale Supérieure and Technology University of Hawaii at Manoa 2525 Correa Road Honolulu, HI 96822-2285 U.S.A. Dr. Adam Klaus Ocean

463

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 136 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Operations ODP/TAI Timothy J.G. Francis Deputy Director ODP/TAMU May 1991 #12;This informal report Ocean Drilling Program, which is managed by Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc., under contract Environment Research Council (United Kingdom) Ocean Research Institute of the University of Tokyo (Japan) Any

464

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 132 ENGINEERING PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 132 ENGINEERING PROSPECTUS WESTERN AND CENTRAL PACIFIC Mr. Michael A. Storms Supervisor of Development Engineering Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Manager of Engineering and Drilling Operations ODP/TAMU Louis E. Garrison Deputy Director ODP

465

Ocean Engineering 33 (2006) 22092223 Technical Note  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Engineering 33 (2006) 2209­2223 Technical Note Pulsatile vortex generators for low-speed maneuvering of small underwater vehicles Kamran Mohseni? Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences, science writer). #12;1. Introduction Oceans hold the key to the origin and continuity of life on the Earth

Mohseni, Kamran

466

Aquantis Ocean Current Turbine Development Project Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Aquantis Current Plane (C-Plane) technology developed by Dehlsen Associates, LLC (DA) and Aquantis, Inc. is an ocean current turbine designed to extract kinetic energy from ocean currents. The technology is capable of achieving competitively priced base-load, continuous, and reliable power generation from a source of renewable energy not before possible in this scale or form.

Fleming, Alex J.

2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

467

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 111 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

under the international Ocean Drilling Program which is managed by Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc by the following agencies: Department of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche ForschungsgemeinschaftOCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 111 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DSDP HOLE 504B REVISITED Keir Becker

468

Published by the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States 3535 College Road Suite 101 Fairbanks, AK 99709 Arctic Research at the University of Northern British Columbia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Fairbanks, AK 99709 Arctic Research at the University of Northern British Columbia Establishedin1994 Columbia Prince George Campus 3333 University Way Prince George, BC V2N 4Z9 Canada 250-960-5555 sderywithconsiderablepublicendorsementandenthusiasm,theUniver- sity of Northern British Columbia (UNBC) has grown into one of Canada's premier

Dery, Stephen

469

Assistant Professor, Ocean Engineering The Department of Ocean Engineering at the University of Rhode Island (URI) invites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assistant Professor, Ocean Engineering The Department of Ocean Engineering at the University of Rhode Island (URI) invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position in ocean energy systems

Frandsen, Jannette B.

470

Concept Study: Exploration and Production in Environmentally Sensitive Arctic Areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Alaska North Slope offers one of the best prospects for increasing U.S. domestic oil and gas production. However, this region faces some of the greatest environmental and logistical challenges to oil and gas production in the world. A number of studies have shown that weather patterns in this region are warming, and the number of days the tundra surface is adequately frozen for tundra travel each year has declined. Operators are not allowed to explore in undeveloped areas until the tundra is sufficiently frozen and adequate snow cover is present. Spring breakup then forces rapid evacuation of the area prior to snowmelt. Using the best available methods, exploration in remote arctic areas can take up to three years to identify a commercial discovery, and then years to build the infrastructure to develop and produce. This makes new exploration costly. It also increases the costs of maintaining field infrastructure, pipeline inspections, and environmental restoration efforts. New technologies are needed, or oil and gas resources may never be developed outside limited exploration stepouts from existing infrastructure. Industry has identified certain low-impact technologies suitable for operations, and has made improvements to reduce the footprint and impact on the environment. Additional improvements are needed for exploration and economic field development and end-of-field restoration. One operator-Anadarko Petroleum Corporation-built a prototype platform for drilling wells in the Arctic that is elevated, modular, and mobile. The system was tested while drilling one of the first hydrate exploration wells in Alaska during 2003-2004. This technology was identified as a potentially enabling technology by the ongoing Joint Industry Program (JIP) Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program. The EFD is headed by Texas A&M University and the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC), and is co-funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EFD participants believe that the platform concept could have far-reaching applications in the Arctic as a drilling and production platform, as originally intended, and as a possible staging area. The overall objective of this project was to document various potential applications, locations, and conceptual designs for the inland platform serving oil and gas operations on the Alaska North Slope. The University of Alaska Fairbanks assisted the HARC/TerraPlatforms team with the characterization of potential resource areas, geotechnical conditions associated with continuous permafrost terrain, and the potential end-user evaluation process. The team discussed the various potential applications with industry, governmental agencies, and environmental organizations. The benefits and concerns associated with industry's use of the technology were identified. In this discussion process, meetings were held with five operating companies (22 people), including asset team leaders, drilling managers, HSE managers, and production and completion managers. Three other operating companies and two service companies were contacted by phone to discuss the project. A questionnaire was distributed and responses were provided, which will be included in the report. Meetings were also held with State of Alaska Department of Natural Resources officials and U.S. Bureau of Land Management regulators. The companies met with included ConcoPhillips, Chevron, Pioneer Natural Resources, Fairweather E&P, BP America, and the Alaska Oil and Gas Association.

Shirish Patil; Rich Haut; Tom Williams; Yuri Shur; Mikhail Kanevskiy; Cathy Hanks; Michael Lilly

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

471

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization JOI Alliance Joint _______________________________ Steven R. Bohlen President, Joint Oceanographic Institutions Executive Director, Ocean Drilling Programs

472

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization JOI Alliance Joint, Ocean Drilling Programs Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc. Washington DC 20005 19 July 2005 #12

473

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization JOI Alliance Joint President, Joint Oceanographic Institutions Executive Director, Ocean Drilling Programs Joint Oceanographic

474

Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

States Ocean Wave Energy Resource Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource This report describes the analysis and results of a rigorous assessment of...

475

The Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

The Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee on Natural Resources The Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee on Natural Resources Testimony of...

476

Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans - House Natural...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Water, Power, and Oceans - House Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans - House Natural Resources Committee Testimony of Kenneth E. Legg,...

477

Method and Apparatus for Remote Delivery and Manipulation of a Miniature Tool Adjacent a Work Piece in a Restricted Space  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for remote delivery and manipulation of a miniature tool adjacent a work piece in a restricted space, includes a tool camer, a camage for manipulating the tool carrier relative to the work piece, a first actuator for operating the carnage, and an optional remote secondary operating actuator for operating the first actuator.

Sale, Christopher H.; Kaltenbaugh, Daniel R.

2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

478

VASCULAR PLANTS OF ADJACENT SERPENTINE AND GRANITE OUTCROPS ON THE DEER ISLES, MAINE, U.S.A.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VASCULAR PLANTS OF ADJACENT SERPENTINE AND GRANITE OUTCROPS ON THE DEER ISLES, MAINE, U study of the vascular flora of a serpentine outcrop, Pine Hill, and that of a granite outcrop from serpentine and 89 from granite. Fifty-seven taxa were shared by both sites. Species richness (a

Rajakaruna, Nishanta

479

Spatial relationships between nitrogen status and pitch canker disease in slash pine planted adjacent to a poultry operation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

adjacent to a poultry operation Isabel Lopez-Zamora a , Christine Bliss a , Eric J. Jokela b,*, N June 2006; accepted 18 August 2006 Local emissions from poultry production appear to significantly to nutrient imbalances. Poultry houses with forced-air ventilation systems produce nitrogen (N) emissions

Grunwald, Sabine

480

Self-adaptive processes for the mitigation of coherent multipath in ocean acoustics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrical Engineering (Applied Ocean Sciences) Universityin Electrical Engineering (Applied Ocean Sciences) by

Higley, William J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "adjacent arctic ocean" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

J. Ocean Univ. China (Oceanic and Coastal Sea Research) DOI 10.1007/s11802-011-1700-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. Ocean Univ. China (Oceanic and Coastal Sea Research) DOI 10.1007/s11802-011-1700-1 ISSN 1672-5182

Morandini, Andre C.

482

Ice Mass Balance Buoys: A tool for measuring and attributing changes in the thickness of the Arctic sea ice cover  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice Mass Balance Buoys: A tool for measuring and attributing changes in the thickness of the Arctic sea ice cover Jacqueline A. Richter-Menge1 , Donald K. Perovich1 , Bruce C. Elder1 , Keran Claffey1 Abstract Recent observational and modeling studies indicate that the Arctic sea ice cover is undergoing

Rigor, Ignatius G.

483

UiT The Arctic University of Norway Fakultet for biovitenskap, fiskeri og konomi -Inst. for arktisk og marin biologi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UiT The Arctic University of Norway Fakultet for biovitenskap, fiskeri og økonomi - Inst/616 The Faculty of Biosciences, Fishery and Economics, UiT The Arctic University of Norway has a PhD position and participate in field work in Norway and Russia. The candidate must have a god command of written and spoken

Uppsala Universitet

484

Effects of Changes in Arctic Lake and River Ice Terry Prowse, Knut Alfredsen, Spyros Beltaos, Barrie R. Bonsal,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ice in the Arctic are projected to produce a variety of effects on hydrologic, ecological, and socio impacts that are directly produced by changes in freshwater ice. The details and diversityEffects of Changes in Arctic Lake and River Ice Terry Prowse, Knut Alfredsen, Spyros Beltaos

Vincent, Warwick F.

485

Modelling the impact of superimposed ice on the mass balance of an Arctic glacier under scenarios of future climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). A consequence of climatic warming in the high Arctic will be an increase in surface melting of glaciers and ice component of the mass accumulation of many glaciers and ice caps in thModelling the impact of superimposed ice on the mass balance of an Arctic glacier under scenarios

486

Atmospheric Circulation and Its Effect on Arctic Sea Ice in CCSM3 Simulations at Medium and High Resolution*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Canadian archipelago, where the T85 winds produce thicker ice than their T42 counterparts. Seasonal forcingAtmospheric Circulation and Its Effect on Arctic Sea Ice in CCSM3 Simulations at Medium and High) ABSTRACT The simulation of Arctic sea ice and surface winds changes significantly when Community Climate

Bitz, Cecilia

487

1. Department, course number, title ORE 603 Oceanography for Ocean Engineers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. Department, course number, title ORE 603 Oceanography for Ocean Engineers 2. Designation Core for ocean engineers. Introduction to ocean dynamical processes and general circulation. Ocean measurement Program Outcome 3: Ocean engineering core Program Outcome 6: Problem formulation & solution Program

Frandsen, Jannette B.

488

Decadal to seasonal variability of Arctic sea ice albedo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A controlling factor in the seasonal and climatological evolution of the sea ice cover is its albedo $\\alpha$. Here we analyze Arctic data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Polar Pathfinder and assess the seasonality and variability of broadband albedo from a 23 year daily record. We produce a histogram of daily albedo over ice covered regions in which the principal albedo transitions are seen; high albedo in late winter and spring, the onset of snow melt and melt pond formation in the summer, and fall freeze up. The bimodal late summer distribution demonstrates the combination of the poleward progression of the onset of melt with the coexistence of perennial bare ice with melt ponds and open water, which then merge to a broad peak at $\\alpha \\gtrsim $ 0.5. We find the interannual variability to be dominated by the low end of the $\\alpha$ distribution, highlighting the controlling influence of the ice thickness distribution and large-scale ice edge dynamics. The statistics obtained pro...

Agarwal, S; Wettlaufer, J S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Reconstructing Past Ocean Salinity ((delta)18Owater)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature and salinity are two of the key properties of ocean water masses. The distribution of these two independent but related characteristics reflects the interplay of incoming solar radiation (insolation) and the uneven distribution of heat loss and gain by the ocean, with that of precipitation, evaporation, and the freezing and melting of ice. Temperature and salinity to a large extent, determine the density of a parcel of water. Small differences in temperature and salinity can increase or decrease the density of a water parcel, which can lead to convection. Once removed from the surface of the ocean where 'local' changes in temperature and salinity can occur, the water parcel retains its distinct relationship between (potential) temperature and salinity. We can take advantage of this 'conservative' behavior where changes only occur as a result of mixing processes, to track the movement of water in the deep ocean (Figure 1). The distribution of density in the ocean is directly related to horizontal pressure gradients and thus (geostrophic) ocean currents. During the Quaternary when we have had systematic growth and decay of large land based ice sheets, salinity has had to change. A quick scaling argument following that of Broecker and Peng [1982] is: the modern ocean has a mean salinity of 34.7 psu and is on average 3500m deep. During glacial maxima sea level was on the order of {approx}120m lower than present. Simply scaling the loss of freshwater (3-4%) requires an average increase in salinity a similar percentage or to {approx}35.9psu. Because much of the deep ocean is of similar temperature, small changes in salinity have a large impact on density, yielding a potentially different distribution of water masses and control of the density driven (thermohaline) ocean circulation. It is partly for this reason that reconstructions of past salinity are of interest to paleoceanographers.

Guilderson, T P; Pak, D K

2005-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

490

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic aerosol burden Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and surface... generally exhibits low aerosol ... Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Atmopsheric Chemistry and...

491

Trophic understanding of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trophic understanding of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean WEALTH FROM OCEANS FLAGSHIP Jock of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean| JWY3 | Thunnus tonggol Thunnus obesus Thunnus albacares Thunnus of the Southwest Pacific Ocean| JWY4 | Species SCA DR SIA SFA Thunnus alalunga + + + 0 Thunnus albacares + + + 0

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

492

Distribution of anthropogenic CO2 in the Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Distribution of anthropogenic CO2 in the Pacific Ocean C. L. Sabine,1 R. A. Feely,2 R. M. Key,3 J] This work presents an estimate of anthropogenic CO2 in the Pacific Ocean based on measurements from the WOCE tracers; 9355 Information Related to Geographic Region: Pacific Ocean; KEYWORDS: Pacific Ocean

493

2010 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2009 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

494

2009 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2008 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

495

2013 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2013 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2012 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

496

Acronyms and Abbreviations Used in the Ocean Drilling Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stone Soup Acronyms and Abbreviations Used in the Ocean Drilling Program Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Technical Note No. 13 Compiled by Elizabeth A. Heise Ocean Drilling Program Texas A orpersonalresearchpurposes; however,republicationof any portion requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling

497

2008 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2008 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2007 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

498

2012 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2012 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2011 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

499

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM U.S. IMPLEMENTING ORGANIZATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM U.S. IMPLEMENTING ORGANIZATION FISCAL YEAR 2008 ANNUAL REPORT #12;#12;INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM UNITED STATES IMPLEMENTING ORGANIZATION CONSORTIUM FOR OCEAN LEADERSHIP FOUNDATION CONTRACT OCE-0352500 1 OCTOBER 2007­30 SEPTEMBER 2008 #12;INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM ii

500

Characterization of Prochlorococcus clades from iron-depleted oceanic regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

trace metal values (22). Nitrate and phosphate were monthly averages derived from the World Ocean Atlas (

Rusch, D. B; Martiny, A. C; Dupont, C. L; Halpern, A. L; Venter, J. C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z