National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for additional observer states

  1. State observer for synchronous motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lang, Jeffrey H. (Waltham, MA)

    1994-03-22

    A state observer driven by measurements of phase voltages and currents for estimating the angular orientation of a rotor of a synchronous motor such as a variable reluctance motor (VRM). Phase voltages and currents are detected and serve as inputs to a state observer. The state observer includes a mathematical model of the electromechanical operation of the synchronous motor. The characteristics of the state observer are selected so that the observer estimates converge to the actual rotor angular orientation and velocity, winding phase flux linkages or currents.

  2. Passive States for Essential Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Strich

    2008-01-23

    The aim of this note is to present a unified approach to the results given in \\cite{bb99} and \\cite{bs04} which also covers examples of models not presented in these two papers (e.g. $d$-dimensional Minkowski space-time for $d\\geq 3$). Assuming that a state is passive for an observer travelling along certain (essential) worldlines, we show that this state is invariant under the isometry group, is a KMS-state for the observer at a temperature uniquely determined by the structure constants of the Lie algebra involved and fulfills (a variant of) the Reeh-Schlieder property. Also the modular objects associated to such a state and the observable algebra of an observer are computed and a version of weak locality is examined.

  3. CCD Observing Manual 49 Bay State Road

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zallen, Richard

    Stars 5.6. Supernovae/Novae Patrols 5.7. Designing Your Own: Using AAVSO VSX 6.0 Observing Techniques 6

  4. Core Lithology State of Hawail Scientific Observation Hole 2...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Core Lithology State of Hawail Scientific Observation Hole 2 Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Core Lithology State...

  5. Core Lithology State of Hawaii Scientific Observation Hole 4...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Core Lithology State of Hawaii Scientific Observation Hole 4 Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Core Lithology State...

  6. Observation of excited states in /sup 128/Ba

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Zhi-zheng; Guo Ying-xiang; Pan Zong-you; Xiao Jian-min; Lei Xiang-guo; Liu Hong-ye; Sun Xi-jun

    1987-01-01

    Excited states in /sup 128/Ba have been investigated via the /sup 120/Sn (/sup 12/C, 4n..gamma..) /sup 128/Ba reaction by means of in-beam gamma spectroscopy. A 12/sup +/ state other than the previously reported one is observed according to the properties of the 935.0 keV ..gamma..-ray. It does not belong to the ground-state band. Two new interband transitions, 224.8 keV and 632.7 keV, are observed and assigned to sidefeeding between the negative-parity band and ground-state band.

  7. Core Lithology From the State of Hawaii Scientific Observation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Core Lithology From the State of Hawaii Scientific Observation Hole 1, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Core...

  8. Direct Molecular Dynamics Observation of Protein Folding Transition State Ensemble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    Direct Molecular Dynamics Observation of Protein Folding Transition State Ensemble Feng Ding for the interpretation of experimental results and understanding of protein folding mechanics, which has at- tracted, 1999; Guerois and Serrano, 2000) have been proposed to predict the transition states in protein folding

  9. Empathic Painting: Interactive stylization through observed emotional state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collomosse, John

    Empathic Painting: Interactive stylization through observed emotional state Maria Shugrina Computer. Abstract We present the "empathic painting" -- an interactive painterly ren- dering whose appearance adapts in real time to reflect the perceived emotional state of the viewer. The empathic painting is an ex

  10. Formation and nonlinear dynamics of the squeezed state of a helical electron beam with additional deceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egorov, E. N. Koronovskii, A. A.; Kurkin, S. A.; Hramov, A. E.

    2013-11-15

    Results of numerical simulations and analysis of the formation and nonlinear dynamics of the squeezed state of a helical electron beam in a vircator with a magnetron injection gun as an electron source and with additional electron deceleration are presented. The ranges of control parameters where the squeezed state can form in such a system are revealed, and specific features of the system dynamics are analyzed. It is shown that the formation of a squeezed state of a nonrelativistic helical electron beam in a system with electron deceleration is accompanied by low-frequency longitudinal dynamics of the space charge.

  11. First observation of excited states in {sup 182}Pb.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, D. G.; Muikku, M.; Greenlees, P. T.; Hauschild, K.; Helarjutta, K.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Kankaanpaa, H.; Kelsall, N. S.; Kettunen, H.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Leino, M.; Moore, C. J.; Nieminen, P.; O'Leary, C. D.; Page, R. D.; Rakhila, P.; Reviol, W.; Taylor, M. J.; Uusitalo, J.; Wadsworth, R.; Physics; Univ. of York; Univ. of Jyvaskyla; CEA Saclay; Univ. of Liverpool; Univ. of Tennessee

    2000-01-01

    Excited states in the light lead nucleus, {sup 182}Pb, have been observed for the first time, by means of the recoil-decay tagging technique. A rotational band has been observed which has features in common with bands attributed to a prolate configuration in the heavier neutron deficient lead nuclei, {sup 184-188}Pb. A variable moment of inertia fit to the states in this band suggests that the prolate minimum has risen significantly in energy compared to the next even lead nucleus, {sup 184}Pb. This constitutes firm evidence for the minimization of this configuration with respect to the spherical ground state around N=103.

  12. Direct observation of photoinduced bent nitrosyl excited-state complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sawyer, Karma R.; Steele, Ryan P.; Glascoe, Elizabeth A.; Cahoon, James F.; Schlegel, Jacob P.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Harris, Charles B.

    2008-06-28

    Ground state structures with side-on nitrosyl ({eta}{sup 2}-NO) and isonitrosyl (ON) ligands have been observed in a variety of transition-metal complexes. In contrast, excited state structures with bent-NO ligands have been proposed for years but never directly observed. Here we use picosecond time-resolved infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) modeling to study the photochemistry of Co(CO){sub 3}(NO), a model transition-metal-NO compound. Surprisingly, we have observed no evidence for ON and {eta}{sup 2}-NO structural isomers, but have observed two bent-NO complexes. DFT modeling of the ground and excited state potentials indicates that the bent-NO complexes correspond to triplet excited states. Photolysis of Co(CO){sub 3}(NO) with a 400-nm pump pulse leads to population of a manifold of excited states which decay to form an excited state triplet bent-NO complex within 1 ps. This structure relaxes to the ground triplet state in ca. 350 ps to form a second bent-NO structure.

  13. CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA EQUATIONS OF STATE BASED ON NEUTRON STAR OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steiner, A. W. [Institute for Nuclear Theory, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Hempel, M. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Fischer, T. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Wroclaw, pl. Maxa Borna 9, 50-204, Wroclaw (Poland)

    2013-09-01

    Many of the currently available equations of state for core-collapse supernova simulations give large neutron star radii and do not provide large enough neutron star masses, both of which are inconsistent with some recent neutron star observations. In addition, one of the critical uncertainties in the nucleon-nucleon interaction, the nuclear symmetry energy, is not fully explored by the currently available equations of state. In this article, we construct two new equations of state which match recent neutron star observations and provide more flexibility in studying the dependence on nuclear matter properties. The equations of state are also provided in tabular form, covering a wide range in density, temperature, and asymmetry, suitable for astrophysical simulations. These new equations of state are implemented into our spherically symmetric core-collapse supernova model, which is based on general relativistic radiation hydrodynamics with three-flavor Boltzmann neutrino transport. The results are compared with commonly used equations of state in supernova simulations of 11.2 and 40 M{sub Sun} progenitors. We consider only equations of state which are fitted to nuclear binding energies and other experimental and observational constraints. We find that central densities at bounce are weakly correlated with L and that there is a moderate influence of the symmetry energy on the evolution of the electron fraction. The new models also obey the previously observed correlation between the time to black hole formation and the maximum mass of an s = 4 neutron star.

  14. Accurately Estimating the State of a Geophysical System with Sparse Observations: Predicting the Weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhe An; Daniel Rey; Henry D. I. Abarbanel

    2014-05-11

    Utilizing the information in observations of a complex system to make accurate predictions through a quantitative model when observations are completed at time $T$, requires an accurate estimate of the full state of the model at time $T$. When the number of measurements $L$ at each observation time within the observation window is larger than a sufficient minimum value $L_s$, the impediments in the estimation procedure are removed. As the number of available observations is typically such that $L \\ll L_s$, additional information from the observations must be presented to the model. We show how, using the time delays of the measurements at each observation time, one can augment the information transferred from the data to the model, removing the impediments to accurate estimation and permitting dependable prediction. We do this in a core geophysical fluid dynamics model, the shallow water equations, at the heart of numerical weather prediction. The method is quite general, however, and can be utilized in the analysis of a broad spectrum of complex systems where measurements are sparse. When the model of the complex system has errors, the method still enables accurate estimation of the state of the model and thus evaluation of the model errors in a manner separated from uncertainties in the data assimilation procedure.

  15. Observational constraints on dark energy with a fast varying equation of state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felice, Antonio De; Nesseris, Savvas

    2012-05-01

    We place observational constraints on models with the late-time cosmic acceleration based on a number of parametrizations allowing fast transitions for the equation of state of dark energy. In addition to the model of Linder and Huterer where the dark energy equation of state w monotonically grows or decreases in time, we propose two new parametrizations in which w has an extremum. We carry out the likelihood analysis with the three parametrizations by using the observational data of supernovae type Ia, cosmic microwave background, and baryon acoustic oscillations. Although the transient cosmic acceleration models with fast transitions can give rise to the total chi square smaller than that in the ?-Cold-Dark-Matter (?CDM) model, these models are not favored over ?CDM when one uses the Akaike information criterion which penalizes the extra degrees of freedom present in the parametrizations.

  16. The structure of strongly additive states and Markov triplets on the CAR algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anna Jencova

    2010-08-05

    We find a characterization of states satisfying equality in strong subadditivity of entropy and of Markov triplets on the CAR algebra. For even states, a more detailed structure of the density matrix is given.

  17. Observation of a new charged charmoniumlike state inB¯0?J/?K-?+decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chilikin, K.; Mizuk, R.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D.?M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; et al

    2014-12-16

    We present the results of an amplitude analysis of B¯0?J/?K-?+ decays. A new charged charmoniumlike state Zc(4200)+ decaying to J/??+ is observed with a significance of 6.2?. The mass and width of the Zc(4200)+ are 4196+31-29+17-13 MeV/c2 and 370+70-70+70-132 MeV, respectively; the preferred assignment of the quantum numbers is JP=1+. In addition, we find evidence for Zc(4430)+?J/??+. The analysis is based on a 711 fb-1 data sample collected by the Belle detector at the asymmetric-energy e+e- collider KEKB.

  18. Implications of Export/Import Reporting Requirements in the United States - International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Additional Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killinger, Mark H.; Benjamin, Eugene L.; McNair, Gary W.

    2001-02-20

    The United States has signed but not ratified the US/IAEA Safeguards Additional Protocol. If ratified, the Additional Protocol will require the US to report to the IAEA certain nuclear-related exports and imports to the IAEA. This document identifies and assesses the issues associated with the US making those reports. For example, some regulatory changes appear to be necessary. The document also attempts to predict the impact on the DOE Complex by assessing the historical flow of exports and imports that would be reportable if the Additional Protocol were in force.

  19. Observational constrains on cosmological models with Chaplygin gas and quadratic equation of state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharov, G S

    2015-01-01

    Observational manifestations of accelerated expansion of the universe, in particular, recent data for Type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations and for the Hubble parameter $H(z)$ are described with different cosmological models. We compare the $\\Lambda$CDM, the models with generalized and modified Chaplygin gas and the model with quadratic equation of state. For these models we estimate optimal model parameters and their permissible errors, in particular, for all 4 mentioned models the Hubble parameter and the curvature fraction are $H_0=70.1\\pm0.45$ km\\,c${}^{-1}$Mpc${}^{-1}$ and $-0.13\\le\\Omega_k\\le0.025$. The model with quadratic equation of state yields the minimal value of $\\chi^2$, but this model has 2 additional parameters in comparison with the $\\Lambda$CDM.

  20. Observation of metastable states in a superconducting Josephson circuit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    circuits using a highly sensitive hybrid quantum interfer- ometer as the readout probe. The investigated of the supercurrent flowing in the SNS junction and prevents electron heating of the normal segment. An experimental states exist when the device is biased at the qubit degeneracy point, between which the system makes

  1. Observables can be tailored to change the entanglement of any pure state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harshman, N. L.; Ranade, Kedar S.

    2011-07-15

    We show that, for a finite-dimensional Hilbert space, there exist observables that induce a tensor product structure such that the entanglement properties of any pure state can be tailored. In particular, we provide an explicit, finite method for constructing observables in an unstructured d-dimensional system so that an arbitrary known pure state has any Schmidt decomposition with respect to an induced bipartite tensor product structure. In effect, this article demonstrates that, in a finite-dimensional Hilbert space, entanglement properties can always be shifted from the state to the observables and all pure states are equivalent as entanglement resources in the ideal case of complete control of observables.

  2. Observation of the first iso-spin Charmonium-like State $Z_c(4020)$ }

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji, Qing-Ping; Guo, Ai-Qiang; Yu, Chun-Xu; Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new experimental progress in brief on the recent observation of the charged charmonium-like state Z_c(4020)^{+/-} states and its iso-spin partner Z_c(4020)^{0} in pi pi hc process at the BESIII experiment. The charged Z_{c}(4020) is its decay into \\pi^{+/-} hc final state, and carries electric charge, thus it contains at least four quarks. The observation of both charge and neutral state makes Z_{c}(4020) the first iso-spin triplet Z_{c} state observed in experiment.

  3. Tandem Solar Cells Using GaAs Nanowires on Si: Design, Fabrication, and Observation of Voltage Addition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    for high-efficiency, low-cost multijunction solar cells. KEYWORDS: Tandem solar cell, Ga so that the efficiency advantage is outweighed by the low cost of Si solar cells for manyTandem Solar Cells Using GaAs Nanowires on Si: Design, Fabrication, and Observation of Voltage

  4. Back-and-forth Operation of State Observers and Norm Estimation of Estimation Error

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Back-and-forth Operation of State Observers and Norm Estimation of Estimation Error Hyungbo Shim with the plant, this paper proposes a state estimation algorithm that executes Luenberger observers in a back in the past have employed time-varying gains to over- come this problem [1], where the basic idea is to obtain

  5. A comparison of the additional protocols of the five nuclear weapon states and the ensuing safeguards benefits to international nonproliferation efforts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uribe, Eva C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, M Analisa [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, Marisa N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Leitch, Rosalyn M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    With the 6 January 2009 entry into force of the Additional Protocol by the United States of America, all five declared Nuclear Weapon States that are part of the Nonproliferation Treaty have signed, ratified, and put into force the Additional Protocol. This paper makes a comparison of the strengths and weaknesses of the five Additional Protocols in force by the five Nuclear Weapon States with respect to the benefits to international nonproliferation aims. This paper also documents the added safeguards burden to the five declared Nuclear Weapon States that these Additional Protocols put on the states with respect to access to their civilian nuclear programs and the hosting of complementary access activities as part of the Additional Protocol.

  6. Aerosol loading in the Southeastern United States: reconciling surface and satellite observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, B.

    We investigate the seasonality in aerosols over the Southeastern United States using observations from several satellite instruments (MODIS, MISR, CALIOP) and surface network sites (IMPROVE, SEARCH, AERONET). We find that ...

  7. Observation of a narrow state decaying into XI(c)(+)pi(-)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan

    1995-12-01

    Using data recorded by the CLEO-II detector at Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR), we report the first observation of a narrow state decaying into Xi(c)(+) pi(-). The state has mass difference M(Xi(c)(+) pi(-)) - M(Xi(c)(+)) of 178.2 +/- 0.5 + 1...

  8. Observation of ?cJ decaying into the pp?K?K? final state

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Alberto, D.; An, L.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini, R.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; et al

    2011-06-27

    First measurements of the decays of the three ?cJ states to pp?K?K? final states are presented. Intermediate ??K?K? and ?(1520)?pK? resonance states are observed, and branching fractions for ?cJ?p?K??(1520), ?(1520)?¯¯¯(1520), and ?pp? are reported. We also measure branching fractions for direct ?cJ?pp?K?K? decays. These are first observations of ?cJ decays to unstable baryon resonances and provide useful information about the ?cJ states. The experiment uses samples of ?cJ mesons produced via radiative transitions from 106×10? ?' mesons collected in the BESIII detector at the BEPCII e?e? collider.

  9. Charge state evolution in the solar wind. III. Model comparison with observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landi, E.; Oran, R.; Lepri, S. T.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Fisk, L. A.; Van der Holst, B.

    2014-08-01

    We test three theoretical models of the fast solar wind with a set of remote sensing observations and in-situ measurements taken during the minimum of solar cycle 23. First, the model electron density and temperature are compared to SOHO/SUMER spectroscopic measurements. Second, the model electron density, temperature, and wind speed are used to predict the charge state evolution of the wind plasma from the source regions to the freeze-in point. Frozen-in charge states are compared with Ulysses/SWICS measurements at 1 AU, while charge states close to the Sun are combined with the CHIANTI spectral code to calculate the intensities of selected spectral lines, to be compared with SOHO/SUMER observations in the north polar coronal hole. We find that none of the theoretical models are able to completely reproduce all observations; namely, all of them underestimate the charge state distribution of the solar wind everywhere, although the levels of disagreement vary from model to model. We discuss possible causes of the disagreement, namely, uncertainties in the calculation of the charge state evolution and of line intensities, in the atomic data, and in the assumptions on the wind plasma conditions. Last, we discuss the scenario where the wind is accelerated from a region located in the solar corona rather than in the chromosphere as assumed in the three theoretical models, and find that a wind originating from the corona is in much closer agreement with observations.

  10. First Observation of Vector Boson Pairs in a Hadronic Final State at the Tevatron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paus, Christoph M. E.

    We present the first observation in hadronic collisions of the electroweak production of vector boson pairs (VV, V=W, Z) where one boson decays to a dijet final state. The data correspond to 3.5??fb[superscript -1] of ...

  11. Local observability of state variables and parameters in nonlinear modeling quantified by delay reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parlitz, Ulrich; Luther, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Features of the Jacobian matrix of the delay coordinates map are exploited for quantifying the robustness and reliability of state and parameter estimations for a given dynamical model using an observed time series. Relevant concepts of this approach are introduced and illustrated for discrete and continuous time systems employing a filtered H\\'enon map and a R\\"ossler system.

  12. OBSERVATION OF THE INTERNAL STATES OF A PEMFC ANODE GAS CHANNEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batlle, Carles

    OBSERVATION OF THE INTERNAL STATES OF A PEMFC ANODE GAS CHANNEL J. Luna1 jluna@iri.upc.edu C of the differ- ent species inside a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) anode gas channel. The im of the non-linear one over the linear one can be clearly seen. Keywords: PEMFC, distributed model, non

  13. Implications of Export/Import Reporting Requirements in the United States - International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Additional Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killinger, Mark H; Benjamin, Eugene L; McNair, Gary W

    2001-02-20

    The US has signed but not ratified the US/IAEA Safeguards Additional Protocol. If ratified, the Additional Protocol will require the US to report to the IAEA certain nuclear-related exports and imports to the IAEA. This document identifies and assesses the issues associated with the US making those reports. For example, some regulatory changes appear to be necessary. The document also attempts to predict the impact on the DOE Complex by assessing the historical flow of exports and imports that would be reportable if the Additional Protocol were in force.

  14. Observations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access to scienceSpeedingLightweight MaterialsGasObservation of aof

  15. High Density Neutron Star Equation of State from 4U 1636-53 Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. S. Olson

    2002-01-07

    A bound on the compactness of the neutron star in the low mass x-ray binary 4U 1636-53 is used to estimate the equation of state of neutron star matter at high density. Observations of 580 Hz oscillations during the rising phase of x-ray bursts from this system appear to be due to two antipodal hot spots on the surface of an accreting neutron star rotating at 290 Hz, implying the compactness of the neutron star is less than 0.163 at the 90% confidence level. The equation of state of high density neutron star matter estimated from this compactness limit is significantly stiffer than extrapolations to high density of equations of state determined by fits of experimental nucleon-nucleon scattering data and properties of light nuclei to two- and three-body interaction potentials.

  16. Observation of ?-vibrations and alignments built on non-ground-state configurations in ¹??Dy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, C. -H.; Hartley, D. J.; Riedinger, L. L.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. F.; Almond, J. M.; Beausang, C.; Carpenter, M. P.; Chiara, C. J.; Cooper, N.; Curien, D.; et al

    2015-03-26

    The exact nature of the lowest K?=2? rotational bands in all deformed nuclei remains obscure. Traditionally they are assumed to be collective vibrations of the nuclear shape in the ? degree of freedom perpendicular to the nuclear symmetry axis. Very few such ?-bands have been traced past the usual back-bending rotational alignments of high-j nucleons. We have investigated the structure of positive-parity bands in the N=90 nucleus ¹??Dy, using the ¹??Nd(¹²C,4n)¹??Dy reaction at 65 MeV, observing the resulting ?-ray transitions with the Gammasphere array. The even- and odd-spin members of the ?=2? ?-band are observed to 32? and 31? respectively.more »This rotational band faithfully tracks the ground-state configuration to the highest spins. The members of a possible ?-vibration built on the aligned yrast S-band are observed to spins 28? and 27?. An even-spin positive-parity band, observed to spin 24?, is a candidate for an aligned S-band built on the seniority-zero configuration of the 0?? state at 676 keV. As a result, the crossing of this band with the 0?? band is at hwc = 0.28(1) MeV and is consistent with the configuration of the 0?? band not producing any blocking of the monopole pairing.« less

  17. Observation of high iron charge states at low energies in solar energetic particle events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Z.; Möbius, E.; Bochsler, P.; Connell, J. J.; Popecki, M. A.; Klecker, B.; Kartavykh, Y. Y.; Mason, G. M.

    2014-04-10

    The ionic charge states of solar energetic particles (SEPs) provide direct information about the source plasma, the acceleration environment, and their transport. Recent studies report that both gradual and impulsive SEP events show mean iron charge states (Q {sub Fe}) ? 10-14 at low energies E ? 0.1 MeV nuc{sup –1}, consistent with their origin from typical corona material at temperatures 1-2 MK. Observed increases of (Q {sub Fe}) up to 20 at energies 0.1-0.5 MeV nuc{sup –1} in impulsive SEPs are attributed to stripping during acceleration. However, Q {sub Fe} > 16 is occasionally found in the solar wind, particularly coming from active regions, in contrast to the exclusively reported (Q {sub Fe}) ? 14 for low energy SEPs. Here we report results from a survey of all 89 SEP events observed with Advanced Composition Explorer Solar Energetic Particle Ionic Charge Analyzer (SEPICA) in 1998-2000 for iron charge states augmented at low energy with Solar and Heliospheric Observatory CELIAS suprathermal time-of-flight (STOF). Nine SEP events with (Q {sub Fe}) ? 14 throughout the entire SEPICA and STOF energy range have been identified. Four of the nine events are impulsive events identified through velocity dispersion that are consistent with source temperatures ?2 MK up to ?4 MK. The other five events show evidence of interplanetary acceleration. Four of them involve re-acceleration of impulsive material, whose original energy dependent charge states appear re-distributed to varying extent bringing higher charge states to lower energy. One event, which shows flat but elevated (Q {sub Fe}) ? 14.2 over the entire energy range, can be associated with interplanetary acceleration of high temperature material. This event may exemplify a rare situation when a second shock plows through high temperature coronal mass ejection material.

  18. Observation of excited state charge transfer with fs/ps-CARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blom, Alex Jason

    2009-08-01

    Excited state charge transfer processes are studied using the fs/ps-CARS probe technique. This probe allows for multiplexed detection of Raman active vibrational modes. Systems studied include Michler's Ketone, Coumarin 120, 4-dimethylamino-4{prime}-nitrostilbene, and several others. The vibrational spectrum of the para di-substituted benzophenone Michler's Ketone in the first excited singlet state is studied for the first time. It is found that there are several vibrational modes indicative of structural changes of the excited molecule. A combined experimental and theoretical approach is used to study the simplest 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin, Coumarin 120. Vibrations observed in FTIR and spontaneous Raman spectra are assigned using density functional calculations and a continuum solvation model is used to predict how observed modes are affected upon inclusion of a solvent. The low frequency modes of the excited state charge transfer species 4-dimethylamino-4{prime}-nitrostilbene are studied in acetonitrile. Results are compared to previous work on this molecule in the fingerprint region. Finally, several partially completed projects and their implications are discussed. These include the two photon absorption of Coumarin 120, nanoconfinement in cyclodextrin cavities and sensitization of titania nanoparticles.

  19. Investigation of the oxidation states of Cu additive in colored borosilicate glasses by electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Guang Cheng, Shaodong; Li, Chao; Ma, Chuansheng; Zhong, Jiasong; Xiang, Weidong; Wang, Zhao

    2014-12-14

    Three optically transparent colorful (red, green, and blue) glasses were synthesized by the sol-gel method. Nano-sized precipitates were found in scanning electron microscopy images. The precipitates were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM. The measured lattice parameters of these precipitates were found to fit the metallic copper in red glass but deviate from single valenced Cu oxides in green and blue glasses. The chemistry of these nano-sized particles was confirmed by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). By fitting the EELS spectra obtained from the precipitates with the linear combination of reference spectra from Cu reference compounds, the oxidation states of Cu in the precipitates have been derived. First principle calculations suggested that the Cu nano-particles, which are in the similar oxidation states as our measurement, would show green color in the visible light range.

  20. NuSTAR AND SUZAKU OBSERVATIONS OF THE HARD STATE IN CYGNUS X-1: LOCATING THE INNER ACCRETION DISK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, M. L.

    We present simultaneous Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR ) and Suzaku observations of the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 in the hard state. This is the first time this state has been observed in Cyg X-1 with NuSTAR, ...

  1. Radiative observables for linearized gravity on asymptotically flat spacetimes and their boundary induced states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benini, Marco Dappiaggi, Claudio; Murro, Simone

    2014-08-01

    We discuss the quantization of linearized gravity on globally hyperbolic, asymptotically flat, vacuum spacetimes, and the construction of distinguished states which are both of Hadamard form and invariant under the action of all bulk isometries. The procedure, we follow, consists of looking for a realization of the observables of the theory as a sub-algebra of an auxiliary, non-dynamical algebra constructed on future null infinity ??. The applicability of this scheme is tantamount to proving that a solution of the equations of motion for linearized gravity can be extended smoothly to ??. This has been claimed to be possible provided that a suitable gauge fixing condition, first written by Geroch and Xanthopoulos [“Asymptotic simplicity is stable,” J. Math. Phys. 19, 714 (1978)], is imposed. We review its definition critically, showing that there exists a previously unnoticed obstruction in its implementation leading us to introducing the concept of radiative observables. These constitute an algebra for which a Hadamard state induced from null infinity and invariant under the action of all spacetime isometries exists and it is explicitly constructed.

  2. A BeppoSAX observation of Her X-1 during the first main-on after an anomalous low-state: evidence for rapid spin-down

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Oosterbroek; A. N. Parmar; M. Orlandini; A. Segreto; A. Santangelo; S. Del Sordo

    2001-06-12

    Results of a BeppoSAX observation of Her X-1 in 2000 October during the first main-on state after the longest recorded anomalous low-state are presented. The 0.1-30 keV spectrum, light curve and pulse profile are all consistent with those measured during previous main on-states, indicating that Her X-1 has resumed its regular 35 day cycle with similar on-state properties as before. However, from a comparison of the measured pulse period with that obtained close to the start of the anomalous low-state, it is evident that Her X-1 continued to spin-down strongly during the anomalous low-state such that the pulse period has returned to a similar value as ~15 years ago. Additionally, the occurrence time of the main-on states after the end of the anomalous low-state indicate that a change in the length, or phasing, of the 35-day cycle occurred during the anomalous low-state.

  3. Observation of localized states in atomically thin MoS{sub 2} field effect transistor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghatak, Subhamoy; Pal, Atindra Nath; Ghosh, Arindam

    2013-12-04

    We present electrical transport and low frequency (1/f) noise measurements on mechanically exfoliated single, bi and trilayer MoS{sub 2}-based FET devices on Si/SiO{sub 2} substrate. We find that the electronic states in MoS{sub 2} are localized at low temperatures (T) and conduction happens through variable range hopping (VRH). A steep increase of 1/f noise with decreasing T, typical for localized regime was observed in all of our devices. From gate voltage dependence of noise, we find that the noise power is inversely proportional to square of the number density (? 1/n{sup 2}) for a wide range of T, indicating number density fluctuations to be the dominant source of 1/f noise in these MoS{sub 2} FETs.

  4. Determination of all pure quantum states from a minimal number of observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damien Mondragon; Vladislav Voroninski

    2015-07-05

    We show that for any positive integer $n$, the maps $x \\in \\mathbb{C}^n \\mapsto \\{\\left|\\langle x, z_i \\rangle \\right|^2\\}_{i=1}^{4n} \\in \\mathbb{R}^{4n}$, where $z_i$ are the columns of four $n\\times n$ unitary matrices, are generically injective modulo multiplication by a global phase factor, yielding a family of embeddings of $\\mathbb{C}P^{n-1}$ into $\\mathbb{R}^{4n-4}$. In particular, this implies that distribution measurements about a pure state with four generic full-rank observables are informationally complete, which is sharp for $n \\geq 6$. To complement this information-theoretic study, we establish in a companion paper that the PhaseLift algorithm yields efficient phase retrieval from quadratic measurements with $O(1)$ unitary matrices, with high probability, where the unitaries are iid according to Haar measure.

  5. HZ Her: Stellar radius from X-ray eclipse observations, evolutionary state, and a new distance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leahy, D. A.; Abdallah, M. H. [Department of Physics, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2014-10-01

    Observations of HZ Her/Her X-1 by the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) covering high state eclipses of the neutron star are analyzed here. Models of the eclipse are used to measure the radius and atmospheric scale height of HZ Her, the stellar companion to the neutron star. The radius is 2.58-3.01 × 10{sup 11} cm, depending on system inclination and mass ratio (q), with an accuracy of ?1 part in 1000 for given inclination and q. We fit Kurucz model stellar atmosphere models to archival optical observations. The resulting effective temperature (T {sub eff}) of the unheated face of HZ Her is determined to be in the 2? range of 7720 K-7865 K, and metallicity (log (Z/Z {sub ?})) in the range of –0.27 to +.03. The model atmosphere surface flux and new radius yield a new distance to HZ Her/Her X-1, depending on system inclination and q: a best-fit value of 6.1 kpc with upper and lower limits of 5.7 kpc and 7.0 kpc. We calculate stellar evolution models for the range of allowed masses (from orbital parameters) and allowed metallicities (from optical spectrum fits). The stellar models agree with T {sub eff} and the radius of HZ Her for two narrow ranges of mass: 2.15-2.20 M {sub ?} and 2.35-2.45 M {sub ?}. This lower mass range implies a low neutron star mass (1.3 M {sub ?}), whereas the higher mass range implies a high neutron star mass (1.5-1.7 M {sub ?}).

  6. Phosphazene additives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  7. Observing complex bound states in the spin-1/2 Heisenberg XXZ chain using local quantum quenches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Ganahl; Elias Rabel; Fabian H. L. Essler; Hans Gerd Evertz

    2011-12-19

    We consider the non-equilibrium evolution in the spin-1/2 XXZ Heisenberg chain for fixed magnetization after a local quantum quench. This model is equivalent to interacting spinless fermions. Initially an infinite magnetic field is applied to n consecutive sites and the ground state is calculated. At time t=0 the field is switched off and the time evolution of observables such as the z-component of spin is computed using the Time Evolving Block Decimation (TEBD) algorithm. We find that the observables exhibit strong signatures of linearly propagating spinon and bound state excitations. These persist even when integrability-breaking perturbations are included. Since bound states ("strings") are notoriously difficult to observe using conventional probes such as inelastic neutron scattering, we conclude that local quantum quenches are an ideal setting for studying their properties. We comment on implications of our results for cold atom experiments.

  8. Observation of interference effects via four photon excitation of highly excited Rydberg states in thermal cesium vapor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kondo, Jorge M; Guttridge, Alex; Wade, Christopher G; De Melo, Natalia R; Adams, Charles S; Weatherill, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    We report on the observation of Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT) and Absorption (EIA) of highly-excited Rydberg states in thermal Cs vapor using a 4-step excitation scheme. The advantage of this 4-step scheme is that the final transition to the Rydberg state has a large dipole moment and one can achieve similar Rabi frequencies to 2 or 3 step excitation schemes using two orders of magnitude less laser power. Consequently each step is driven by a relatively low power infra-red diode laser opening up the prospect for new applications. The observed lineshapes are in good agreement with simulations based on multilevel optical Bloch equations.

  9. Transmembrane Helix Orientation and Dynamics: Insights from Ensemble Dynamics with Solid-State NMR Observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jo, Sunhwan; Im, Wonpil

    2011-06-22

    As the major component of membrane proteins, transmembrane helices embedded in anisotropic bilayer environments adopt preferential orientations that are characteristic or related to their functional states. Recent developments ...

  10. Observation of an Excited B[± over c] Meson State with the ATLAS Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search for excited states of the B[± over c] meson is performed using 4.9??fb[superscript ?1] of 7 TeV and 19.2??fb[superscript ?1] of 8 TeV pp collision data collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. A new state is ...

  11. Evaluation of SMOS Retrievals of Soil Moisture over the Central United States with Currently Available In-situ Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Evaluation of SMOS Retrievals of Soil Moisture over the Central United States with Currently in November 2009. Using SMOS soil moisture retrievals for 2010 processed using algorithm3 V4.00, we evaluated apart. Observations10 from different sensors within a SMOS footprint differ from each other by a larger

  12. Practical Observers for Unmeasured States in Turbocharged Gasoline Julia H. Buckland, Jim Freudenberg, J. W. Grizzle and Mrdjan Jankovic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grizzle, Jessy W.

    Practical Observers for Unmeasured States in Turbocharged Gasoline Engines Julia H. Buckland, Jim Freudenberg, J. W. Grizzle and Mrdjan Jankovic Abstract--Turbocharged gasoline engines are becoming more. Knowledge of exhaust manifold pressure and turbocharger speed can be important to success. Physical

  13. Learning in a State of Confusion: Employing active perception and reinforcement learning in partially observable worlds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crook, Paul A

    In applying reinforcement learning to agents acting in the real world we are often faced with tasks that are non-Markovian in nature. Much work has been done using state estimation algorithms to try to uncover Markovian ...

  14. Observation of abnormally large radii of nuclei in excited states in the vicinity of neutron thresholds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogloblin, A. A., E-mail: ogloblina@bk.ru; Danilov, A. N. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Belyaeva, T. L. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM) (Mexico); Demyanova, A. S. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Goncharov, S. A. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation); Trzaska, W. [University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2011-11-15

    Differential cross sections for inelastic scattering leading to the excitation of some nuclear states situated near neutron-emission thresholds were analyzed. With the aid of a modified diffraction model, abnormally large radii were found for the 1/2{sub 1}{sup +} state of the {sup 13}C nucleus at 3.09 MeV, for the first levels of positive-parity rotational bands in the {sup 9}Be (1/2{sup +} level at 1.68 MeV and 5/2{sup +} level at 3.05 MeV) and {sup 11}Be (5/2{sup +} level at 1.78 MeV and 3/2{sup +} level at 3.41 MeV) nuclei, and for the 2{sub 1}{sup +} state of the {sup 14}Be nucleus at 1.54 MeV and 1{sub 1}{sup -} state of the {sup 12}Be nucleus at 2.7 MeV. All of these states possess signatures typical of neutron halos.

  15. Effelsberg Observations of Excited-State (6.0 GHz) OH in Supernova Remnants and W3(OH)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent L. Fish; Loránt O. Sjouwerman; Ylva M. Pihlström

    2007-10-09

    While masers in the 1720 MHz transition of OH are detected toward many supernova remnants (SNRs), no other OH transition is seen as a maser in SNRs. We present a search for masers at 6049 MHz, which has recently been predicted to produce masers by pure collisional excitation at conditions similar to that required for 1720 MHz masing. The Effelsberg 100 m telescope was used to observe the excited-state 6016, 6030, 6035, and 6049 MHz lines of OH toward selected SNRs, most of which have previously-detected bright 1720 MHz masers. No excited-state masers are found toward SNRs, consistent with previous observations of the 6049 MHz and other excited-state transitions. We do not see clear evidence of absorption toward SNR target positions, although we do see evidence of absorption in the molecular cloud at +50 km/s near Sgr A East. Weak absorption is detected at 6016 MHz toward W3(OH), while stronger, narrower emission is seen at 6049 MHz, suggesting that the 6049 MHz emission is a low-gain maser. We conclude that conditions in SNRs are not conducive to excited-state maser emission, especially in excited-state satellite lines.

  16. Direct observation of spin splitting in bismuth surface states T. Hirahara,1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasegawa, Shuji

    .20. r, 85.75. d Spintronics, which aims at the utilization of the spin de- gree of freedom, has manipulation is the key factor in spintronics, and the conventional style was to develop novel ferromagnetic of the highly metallic surface states of semimetallic Bi films also has importance in application to spintronics

  17. Steady-state laboratory ow laws alone fail to explain postseismic observations Andrew M. Freed a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freed, Andrew

    dislocation creep geodesy nite element modeling We test whether laboratory derived steady-state ow laws- and stress-dependent ow laws for diffusion and dislocation creep of olivine. We primarily concentrate of a number of creep mechanisms and associated constitutive relationships that quantify how viscosity and ow

  18. Persistence of a Non-Equilibrium State: Observation of a Boltzmannian Special Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lobser, D S; Cornell, E A; Lewandowski, H J

    2015-01-01

    Well before the atomistic nature of matter was experimentally established, Ludwig Boltzmann's audacious effort to explain the macroscopic world of human experience in terms of the workings of an unseen microscopic world met with vigorous opposition. A contentious point was the problem of irreversibility: the microscopic equations of motion are reversible, yet friction and viscosity cause things always to slow down and warm up, never to speed up and cool down. What was worse, Boltzmann himself discovered that his transport equation predicts special cases in which gases never come to thermal equilibrium, a particular example being that the monopole "breathe" mode of gas will never damp if it is confined in 3D to a perfectly isotropic harmonic potential. Such absences of damping were not observed in nature. Nondamping of a monopole mode in lower dimensional systems has only very recently been observed, using cold atoms. Kinoshita et al. and Chevy et al. have experimentally observed suppressed relaxation in highl...

  19. Additional/Outside Employment Policy for Salaried Classified and University Staff Page 1 of 3 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University No. 4070 Rev.: 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Additional/Outside Employment Policy for Salaried Classified and University Staff Page 1 of 3: Additional/Outside Employment Policy for Salaried Classified and University Staff employment within the university and outside the university for salaried classified and university staff

  20. First Observation of Excited States in {sup 199}At with the Recoil Filter Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Styczen, J.; Meczynski, W.; Lach, M.; Bednarczyk, P.; Chapman, R.; Courtin, S.; Greboxz, J.; Hannachi, F.; Jones, P.M.; Kownacki, J.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Maier, K.H.; Merdinger, J.C.; Middleton, D.; Palacz, M.; Schulz, N.; Smith, M.B.; Spohr, K.-M; Wolinska, M.; Zieblinski, M.

    1999-12-31

    We have deduced for the first time a level scheme for the {sup 199}At nucleus. The angular distribution data and the conversion electron information have allowed for multipolarity assignments and spin suggestions to be made. The current data and the level systematics of odd At isotopes suggest that the first excited state should be isomeric with a lifetime of the order of a microsecond.

  1. First observation of excited states in {sup 199}At with the recoil filter detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Styczen, J.; Meczynski, W.; Lach, M.; Bednarczyk, P.; Grebosz, J.; Zieblinski, M.; Chapman, R.; Middleton, D.; Smith, M. B.; Spohr, K.-M.; Courtin, S.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Merdinger, J. C.; Schulz, N.; Hannachi, F.; Jones, P. M.; Kownacki, J.; Palacz, M.; Wolinska, M.; Maier, K. H.

    1999-11-16

    We have deduced for the first time a level scheme for the {sup 199}At nucleus. The angular distribution data and the conversion electron information have allowed for multipolarity assignments and spin suggestions to be made. The current data and the level systematics of odd At isotopes suggest that the first excited state should be isomeric with a lifetime of the order of a microsecond.

  2. Direct observation of intermediates in a thermodynamically controlled solid state dynamic covalent reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belenguer, Ana M.; Lampronti, Giulio Isacco; Wales, David J.; Sanders, Jeremy Keith Morris

    2014-10-14

    state process is uncertain, even in the neat case, because of the difficulty in control- ling or measuring the exact reaction conditions such as average and local pressure and temperature.13b Some au- thors propose that the heat generated in the course... data obtained from individual experi- ments, each experiment corresponding to a single grind- ing time. This approach avoids disrupting the delicate equilibrium achieved during grinding between the vapor, the liquid and the solid components...

  3. Observation of a Topological and Parity-Dependent Phase of m=0 Spin States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usami, Koji [PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 3-5, Sanbancho, Chiyodaku, Tokyo 332-0012 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Kozuma, Mikio [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 3-5, Sanbancho, Chiyodaku, Tokyo 332-0012 (Japan)

    2007-10-05

    A Ramsey interrogation scheme was used to measure the phase shift of laser-cooled {sup 87}Rb clock-transition pseudospins arising as a result of a reversal of a bias-magnetic field, i.e., B{yields}-B, during the interrogation. While no phase shift occurred when the reversal was sudden, the Ramsey fringes were shifted by a factor of {pi} when the reversal was adiabatic. We thus verified the prediction that the spin states |F,m=0> acquire a purely topological and parity-dependent phase factor of (-1){sup F} as a result of B{yields}-B.

  4. PSU ARL Additive Manufacturing Capstone Project For the first time the PSU ARL, the IE480W CIMP-3D Group at Penn State showed that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PSU ARL Additive Manufacturing Capstone Project For the first time the PSU ARL, the IE480W CIMP-3D Processing by Direct Digital Deposition (CIMP-3D), is a program utilizing Additive Manufacturing (AM was to develop an understanding of how key operating parameters such as layer thickness, manufacturing

  5. Observation of phononic helical edge states in a mechanical 'topological insulator'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Süsstrunk, Roman

    2015-01-01

    A topological insulator is characterized by a dichotomy between the interior and the edge of a finite system: While the bulk has a non-zero energy gap, the edges are forced to sustain excitations traversing these gaps. Originally proposed for electrons governed by quantum mechanics, it has remained an important open question if the same physics can be observed for systems obeying Newton's equations of motion. Here, we report on measurements that characterize the collective behavior of mechanical oscillators exhibiting the phenomenology of the quantum spin hall effect. The phononic edge modes are shown to be helical and we demonstrate their topological protection via the stability against imperfections. Our results open the door to the design of topological acoustic meta-materials that can capitalize on the stability of the surfaces phonons as reliable wave guides.

  6. NuSTAR and Suzaku observations of the hard state in Cygnus X-1: locating the inner accretion disk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, M L; Miller, J M; Yamaoka, K; Lohfink, A; Nowak, M; Fabian, A C; Alston, W N; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Fuerst, F; Gandhi, P; Grefenstette, B W; Grinberg, V; Hailey, C J; Harrison, F A; Kara, E; King, A L; Stern, D; Walton, D J; Wilms, J; Zhang, W W

    2015-01-01

    We present simultaneous Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR ) and Suzaku observations of the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 in the hard state. This is the first time this state has been observed in Cyg X-1 with NuSTAR, which enables us to study the reflection and broad-band spectra in unprecedented detail. We confirm that the iron line cannot be fit with a combination of narrow lines and absorption features, and instead requires a relativistically blurred profile in combination with a narrow line and absorption from the companion wind. We use the reflection models of Garcia et al. (2014) to simultaneously measure the black hole spin, disk inner radius, and coronal height in a self-consistent manner. Detailed fits to the iron line profile indicate a high level of relativistic blurring, indicative of reflection from the inner accretion disk. We find a high spin, a small inner disk radius, and a low source height, and rule out truncation to greater than three gravitational radii at the 3{\\sigma} confidence le...

  7. Observation of a narrow mass state decaying into ?(1S)+? in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; et al

    2012-08-15

    Using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.3 fb?¹, we observe a narrow mass state decaying into ?(1S)+?, where the ?(1S) meson is detected by its decay into a pair of oppositely charged muons, and the photon is identified through its conversion into an electron-positron pair. The significance of this observation is 5.6 standard deviations. The mass of the state is centered at 10.551±0.014(stat)±0.017(syst) GeV/c², which is consistent with that of the state recently observed by the ATLAS Collaboration.

  8. Observation of a narrow mass state decaying into ?(1S)+? in pp[over ¯] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96??TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; et al.

    2012-08-01

    Using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.3 fb{sup -1}, we observe a narrow mass state decaying into {Upsilon}(1S) + {gamma}, where the {Upsilon}(1S) meson is detected by its decay into a pair of oppositely charged muons, and the photon is identified through its conversion into an electron-positron pair. The significance of this observation is 5.6 standard deviations. The mass of the state is centered at 10.551 {+-} 0.014(stat.) {+-} 0.017(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, which is consistent with that of the state recently observed by the ATLAS Collaboration.

  9. Observation of a narrow mass state decaying into ?(1S)+? in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Stutte, L.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.

    2012-08-01

    Using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.3 fb?¹, we observe a narrow mass state decaying into ?(1S)+?, where the ?(1S) meson is detected by its decay into a pair of oppositely charged muons, and the photon is identified through its conversion into an electron-positron pair. The significance of this observation is 5.6 standard deviations. The mass of the state is centered at 10.551±0.014(stat)±0.017(syst) GeV/c², which is consistent with that of the state recently observed by the ATLAS Collaboration.

  10. Low Temperature Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy. A Strategy for the Direct Observation of Quadrupolar Nuclides of Biological Interest.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, Paul D.; Lipton, Andrew S.

    2007-01-01

    This review presents a self-contained summary of the experimental methods necessary to perform a low temperature solid-state NMR experiment. Specific references are made for Zn²? and Mg²?. However, this is not a comprehensive review of the NMR literature of these nuclides. As the review is concerned with solid-state NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclides, we limit the discussions to odd-half-integral spin systems, i.e. 3/2, 5/2, 7/2, and 9/2 spins. The reason for the limitation is due to the “relative ease” of observing the central transition, which is common to all of these nuclides. The review is divided into two major sections; the first dealing with experimental methods, e.g. use of low temperature, magnetization transfer, spin echo methods, and questions dealing with nonspecific binding. Following those discussions we turn to the introduction of structure into the experiment, i.e. the use triple resonance experiments to selectively introduce dipolar interactions and the use of molecular theory.

  11. INTEGRAL/RossiXTE high-energy observation of a state transition of GX 339-4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Belloni; I. Parolin; M. Del Santo; J. Homan; P. Casella; R. P. Fender; W. H. G. Lewin; M. Mendez; J. M. Miller; M. van der Klis

    2006-01-02

    On 2004 August 15, we observed a fast (shorter than 10 hours) state transition in the bright black-hole transient GX 339-4 simultaneously with RossiXTE and INTEGRAL. This transition was evident both in timing and spectral properties. Combining the data from PCA, HEXTE and IBIS, we obtained good quality broad-band (3-200 keV) energy spectra before and after the transition. These spectra indicate that the hard component steepened. Also, the high-energy cutoff that was present at ~70 keV before the transition was not detected after the transition. This is the first time that an accurate determination of the broad-band spectrum across such a transition has been measured on a short time scale. It shows that, although some spectral parameters do not change abruptly through the transition, the high-energy cutoff increases/disappears rather fast. These results constitute a benchmark on which to test theoretical models for the production of the hard component in these systems.

  12. Observation of the narrow state x (3872) --> j/psi pi+ pi- in pbar p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 tev

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, D.; CDF Collaboration

    2004-02-27

    The authors report the observation of a narrow state decaying into J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and produced in 220 pb{sup -1} of {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV in the CDF II experiment. They observe 730 {+-} 90 decays. The mass is measured to be 3871.3 {+-} 0.7(stat) {+-} 0.4(syst) MeV/c{sup 2}, with an observed width consistent with the detector resolution. This is in agreement with the recent observation by the Belle Collaboration of the X(3872) meson.

  13. Wilson Addition Map 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raiford Stripling Associates, Inc.; Stripling, Raiford L.

    2011-08-29

    Most of the noise models in signal processing are either additive or multiplicative. However, the widely held wavelet shrinkage estimators for signal denoising deal only with additive noise. In this thesis, a new Bayesian wavelet shrinkage model...

  14. REVIEW OF THE NEGOTIATION OF THE MODEL PROTOCOL ADDITIONAL TO THE AGREEMENT(S) BETWEEN STATE(S) AND THE INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY FOR THE APPLICATION OF SAFEGUARDS, INFCIRC/540 (Corrected) VOLUME II/III IAEA COMMITTEE 24, Major Issues Underlying the Model Additional Protocol (1996-1997).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenthal, M.D.; Saum-Manning, L.; Houck, F.

    2010-01-01

    Volume I of this Review traces the origins of the Model Additional Protocol. It covers the period from 1991, when events in Iraq triggered an intensive review of the safeguards system, until 1996, when the IAEA Board of Governors established Committee 24 to negotiate a new protocol to safeguards agreement. The period from 1991-1996 set the stage for this negotiation and shaped its outcome in important ways. During this 5-year period, many proposals for strengthening safeguards were suggested and reviewed. Some proposals were dropped, for example, the suggestion by the IAEA Secretariat to verify certain imports, and others were refined. A rough consensus was established about the directions in which the international community wanted to go, and this was reflected in the draft of an additional protocol that was submitted to the IAEA Board of Governors on May 6, 1996 in document GOV/2863, Strengthening the Effectiveness and Improving the Efficiency of the Safeguards System - Proposals For Implementation Under Complementary Legal Authority, A Report by the Director General. This document ended with a recommendation that, 'the Board, through an appropriate mechanism, finalize the required legal instrument taking as a basis the draft protocol proposed by the Secretariat and the explanation of the measures contained in this document.'

  15. Greenhouse gas emissions trading in U.S. States: observations and lessons from the OTC NOx Budget Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Aulisi; Alexander E. Farrell; Jonathan Pershing; Stacy VanDeveer

    2005-07-01

    A number of U.S. states are considering market-based policies to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs). The experience gained from emissions trading for sulfur dioxide and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) offers a useful body of information and data to draw on to design a GHG emissions trading system. This report examines NOx trading under the Ozone Transport Commission (OTC) NOx Budget Program, which resulted principally from the leadership, decisions, and actions by a group of states, ultimately becoming the first multilateral cap-and-trade system for emissions of air pollutants. 72 refs.

  16. Numerical procedure for analyzing impurity-induced resonant-state STM images observed in high-T-c superconductors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Q.; Hu, Chia-Ren.

    2004-01-01

    been offerred to ex- plain this disagreement.5,6 Namely, finite LDOS are pre- dicted at the Zn or Cu sites only, with no continuous LDOS between these lattice sites. This is of course not what has been observed, which is quasi... two STM images. One is a topographic image (an energy- integrated spatial image), which gives the top BiO layer, showing only the Bi atoms. They are observed to be dis- placed from their ideal orthorhombic lattice sites, forming a supermodulation...

  17. NuSTAR OBSERVATIONS OF THE STATE TRANSITION OF MILLISECOND PULSAR BINARY PSR J1023+0038

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Deepto

    We report NuSTAR observations of the millisecond pulsar-low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) transition system PSR J1023+0038 from 2013 June and October, before and after the formation of an accretion disk around the neutron star. ...

  18. Additive Manufacturing: Going Mainstream

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, is receiving attention from media, investment communities and governments around the world transforming it from obscurity to something to be talked about.

  19. ADDITIONAL MONIES SALARY SACRIFICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mucina, Ladislav

    ADDITIONAL MONIES SALARY SACRIFICE AGREEMENT INFORMATION PACKAGE 1) Overview 2) Agreement 3. Whether this is through working additional hours, performance bonus, salary supplementation or any of the other reasons as shown on the Salary Sacrifice Agreement. The University allows staff to elect to have

  20. Observation of high-spin mixed oxidation state of cobalt in ceramic Co{sub 3}TeO{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Harishchandra E-mail: singh85harish@rrcat.gov.in; Ghosh, Haranath; Sinha, A. K.; Chandrasekhar Rao, T. V.; Rajput, Parasmani

    2014-12-07

    We report coexistence of high spin Co{sup 3+} and Co{sup 2+} in ceramic Co{sub 3}TeO{sub 6} using X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES), DC magnetization, and first principles ab-initio calculations. The main absorption line of cobalt Co K-edge XANES spectra, along with a linear combination fit, led us to estimate relative concentration of Co{sup 2+} and Co{sup 3+}as 60:40. The pre edge feature of XANES spectrum shows crystal field splitting of ?1.26?eV between e{sub g} and t{sub 2g} states, suggesting a mixture of high spin states of both Co{sup 2+} and Co{sup 3+}. Temperature dependent high field DC magnetization measurements reveal dominant antiferromagnetic order with two Neel temperatures (T{sub N1}???29?K and T{sub N2}???18?K), consistent with single crystal study. A larger effective magnetic moment is observed in comparison to that reported for single crystal (which contains only Co{sup 2+}), supports our inference that Co{sup 3+} exists in high spin state. Furthermore, we show that both Co{sup 2+} and Co{sup 3+} being in high spin states constitute a favorable ground state through first principles ab-initio calculations, where Rietveld refined synchrotron X-ray diffraction data are used as input.

  1. Observation of a new high-? and high-density state of a magnetospheric plasma in RT-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saitoh, H.; Yano, Y.; Yoshida, Z.; Nishiura, M.; Morikawa, J.; Kawazura, Y.; Nogami, T.; Yamasaki, M. [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    A new high-? and high-density state is reported for a plasma confined in a laboratory magnetosphere. In order to expand the parameter regime of an electron cyclotron resonance heating experiment, the 8.2?GHz microwave power of the Ring Trap 1 device has been upgraded with the installation of a new waveguide system. The rated input power launched from a klystron was increased from 25 to 50?kW, which enabled the more stable formation of a hot-electron high-? plasma. The diamagnetic signal (the averaged value of four magnetic loops signals) of a plasma reached 5.2 mWb. According to a two-dimensional Grad-Shafranov analysis, the corresponding local ? value is close to 100%.

  2. Simultaneous Observations of PKS 2155--304 with H.E.S.S., Fermi, RXTE and ATOM: Spectral Energy Distributions and Variability in a Low State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A.G.; Anton, G.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Bazer-Bachi, A.R.; Becherini, Y.; Behera, B.; Bernlohr, K.; Boisson, C.; Bochow, A.; Borrel, V.; Brion, E.; Brucker, J.; Brun, P.; Buhler, R.; Bulik, T.; Busching, I.; Boutelier, T.; Chadwick, P.M.; Charbonnier, A.; Chaves, R.C.G.; /more authors..

    2009-05-07

    We report on the first simultaneous observations that cover the optical, X-ray, and high-energy gamma-ray bands of the BL Lac object PKS 2155-304. The gamma-ray bands were observed for 11 days, between 2008 August 25 and 2008 September 6 (MJD 54704-54715), jointly with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and the HESS atmospheric Cherenkov array, providing the first simultaneous MeV-TeV spectral energy distribution (SED) with the new generation of {gamma}-ray telescopes. The ATOM telescope and the RXTE and Swift observatories provided optical and X-ray coverage of the low-energy component over the same time period. The object was close to the lowest archival X-ray and very high energy (VHE; >100 GeV) state, whereas the optical flux was much higher. The light curves show relatively little ({approx}30%) variability overall when compared to past flaring episodes, but we find a clear optical/VHE correlation and evidence for a correlation of the X-rays with the high-energy spectral index. Contrary to previous observations in the flaring state, we do not find any correlation between the X-ray and VHE components. Although synchrotron self-Compton models are often invoked to explain the SEDs of BL Lac objects, the most common versions of these models are at odds with the correlated variability we find in the various bands for PKS 2155-304.

  3. Features of the extreme events observed in the all-solid state laser with a saturable absorber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonazzola, Carlos R; Kovalsky, Marcelo G; Tredicce, Jorge R

    2015-01-01

    Extreme events (sometimes also called optical rogue waves), in the form of pulses of extraordinary intensity, are easily observed in its chaotic regime if the Fresnel number of the cavity is high. This result suggests that the nonlinear interaction among transverse modes is an essential ingredient in the formation of extreme events in this type of lasers, but there is no theoretical description of the phenomenon yet. We report here a set of experimental results on the regularities of these extreme events, to provide a basis for the development of such a description. Among these results, we point out here: i) the decay of the correlation across the transversal section of the laser beam, and ii) the appearance of extreme events even if the time elapsed since the previous pulse is relatively short (in terms of the average inter-pulse separation), what indicates the existence of some unknown mechanism of energy storage. We hypothesize that this mechanism is related with the imperfect depletion of the gain by some...

  4. Additive Manufacturing: Going Mainstream

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and national governments around the world. This attention reached a pinnacle when 3D printing was mentioned by President Barack Obama in his Febru- ary 2013 State of the Union...

  5. Impact of the equation-of-state -- gravity degeneracy on constraining the nuclear symmetry energy from astrophysical observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao-Tao He; F. J. Fattoyev; Bao-An Li; W. G. Newton

    2014-12-16

    There is a degeneracy between the equation of state (EOS) of superdense neutron-rich nuclear matter and the strong-field gravity in understanding properties of neutron stars. While the EOS is still poorly known, there are also longstanding ambiguities in choosing General Relativity or alternative gravity theories in the not-so-well tested strong-field regime. Besides possible appearance of hyperons and new phases, the most uncertain part of the nucleonic EOS is currently the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy. To provide information that may help break the EOS-gravity degeneracy, we investigate effects of symmetry energy within its uncertain range determined by terrestrial nuclear laboratory experiments on the gravitational binding energy and spacetime curvature of neutron stars within GR and the scalar-tensor (ST) theory of gravity. In particular, we focus on effects of the following parameters characterizing the EOS of neutron-rich nucleonic matter: (1) the incompressibility $K_0$ of symmetric nuclear matter, (2) the slope $L$ of symmetry energy at saturation density and (3) the high-density behavior of symmetry energy. We find that the variation of either the density slope $L$ or the high-density behavior of symmetry energy leads to large changes in both the binding energy and curvature of neutron stars while effects of varying the more constrained $K_0$ are negligibly small. The difference in predictions using the GR and the ST theory appears only for massive neutron stars, and is significantly smaller than the differences resulting from variations in the symmetry energy. We conclude that within the ST theory of gravity, the EOS-gravity degeneracy has been broken by the recent relativistic pulsar measurements, and that measurements of neutron star properties sensitive to the compactness constrain mainly the density dependence of the symmetry energy.

  6. INTEGRAL SPI observations of Cygnus X-1 in the soft state: What about the jet contribution in hard X-rays?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jourdain, E.; Roques, J. P.; Chauvin, M.

    2014-07-01

    During the first 7 yr of the INTEGRAL mission (2003-2009), Cyg X-1 has essentially been detected in its hard state (HS), with some incursions in intermediate HSs. This long, spectrally stable period allowed in particular the measurement of the polarization of the high-energy component that has long been observed above 200 keV in this peculiar object. This result strongly suggests that here we see the contribution of the jet, known to emit a strong synchrotron radio emission. In 2010 June, Cyg X-1 underwent a completed transition toward a soft state (SS). It gave us the unique opportunity to study in detail the corona emission in this spectral state, and to investigate in particular the behavior of the jet contribution. Indeed, during the SS, the hard X-ray emission decreases drastically, with its maximum energy shifted toward lower energy and its flux divided by a factor of ?5-10. Interestingly, the radio emission follows a similar drop, supporting the correlation between the jet emission and the hard component, even though the flux is too low to quantify the polarization characteristics.

  7. NGC 2992 in an X-ray high state observed by XMM: Response of the Relativistic Fe K$\\alpha$ Line to the Continuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shu, X W; Murphy, K D; Braito, V; Wang, J X; Zheng, W

    2010-01-01

    We present the analysis of an XMM observation of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 2992. The source was found in its highest level of X-ray activity yet detected, a factor $\\sim 23.5$ higher in 2--10 keV flux than the historical minimum. NGC 2992 is known to exhibit X-ray flaring activity on timescales of days to weeks, and the XMM data provide at least factor of $\\sim 3$ better spectral resolution in the Fe K band than any previously measured flaring X-ray state. We find that there is a broad feature in the \\sim 5-7 keV band which could be interpreted as a relativistic Fe K$\\alpha$ emission line. Its flux appears to have increased in tandem with the 2--10 keV continuum when compared to a previous Suzaku observation when the continuum was a factor of $\\sim 8$ lower than that during the XMM observation. The XMM data are consistent with the general picture that increased X-ray activity and corresponding changes in the Fe K$\\alpha$ line emission occur in the innermost regions of the putative accretion disk. This behavior c...

  8. X-ray observations of XSS J12270-4859 in a new low state: A transformation to a disk-free rotation-powered pulsar binary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Patruno, Alessandro; Archibald, Anne M.; Bassa, Cees; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Janssen, Gemma H.; Stappers, Ben W.

    2014-07-01

    We present XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of the low-mass X-ray binary XSS J12270-4859, which experienced a dramatic decline in optical/X-ray brightness at the end of 2012, indicative of the disappearance of its accretion disk. In this new state, the system exhibits previously absent orbital-phase-dependent, large-amplitude X-ray modulations with a decline in flux at superior conjunction. The X-ray emission remains predominantly non-thermal but with an order of magnitude lower mean luminosity and significantly harder spectrum relative to the previous high flux state. This phenomenology is identical to the behavior of the radio millisecond pulsar (MSP) binary PSR J1023+0038 in the absence of an accretion disk, where the X-ray emission is produced in an intra-binary shock driven by the pulsar wind. This further demonstrates that XSS J12270-4859 no longer has an accretion disk and has transformed to a full-fledged eclipsing 'redback' system that hosts an active rotation-powered MSP. There is no evidence for diffuse X-ray emission associated with the binary that may arise due to outflows or a wind nebula. An extended source situated 1.'5 from XSS J12270-4859 is unlikely to be associated, and is probably a previously uncataloged galaxy cluster.

  9. Assessment of the Effect of Air Pollution Controls on Trends in Shortwave Radiation over the United States from 1995 through 2010 from Multiple Observation Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gan, Chuen-Meei; Pleim, Jonathan; Mathur, Rohit; Hogrefe, Christian; Long, Charles N.; Xing, Jia; Roselle, Shawn; Wei, Chao

    2014-02-14

    Long term datasets of total (all-sky) and clear-sky downwelling shortwave (SW) radiation, cloud cover fraction (cloudiness) and aerosol optical depth (AOD) are analyzed together with aerosol concentration from several networks (e.g. SURFRAD, CASTNET, IMPROVE and ARM) in the United States (US). Seven states with varying climatology are selected to better understand the effect of aerosols and clouds on SW radiation. This analysis aims to test the hypothesis that the reductions in anthropogenic aerosol burden resulting from substantial reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides over the past 15 years across the US has caused an increase in surface SW radiation. We show that the total and clear-sky downwelling SW radiation from seven sites have increasing trends except Penn State which shows no tendency in clear-sky SW radiation. After investigating several confounding factors, the causes can be due to the geography of the site, aerosol distribution, heavy air traffic and increasing cloudiness. Moreover, we assess the relationship between total column AOD with surface aerosol concentration to test our hypothesis. In our findings, the trends of clear-sky SW radiation, AOD, and aerosol concentration from the sites in eastern US agree well with our hypothesis. However, the sites in western US demonstrate increasing AOD associated with mostly increasing trends in surface aerosol concentration. At these sites, the changes in aerosol burden and/or direct aerosol effects alone cannot explain the observed changes in SW radiation, but other factors need to be considered such as cloudiness, aerosol vertical profiles and elevated plumes.

  10. Atomic Collapse Observed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists Observe Atomic Collapse State Quantum Mechanics Prediction Confirmed in Graphene Using NERSC's Hopper April 26, 2013 | Tags: Hopper, Materials Science Contact: Linda...

  11. Scavenging quantum information: Multiple observations of quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Rapcan; John Calsamiglia; Ramon Munoz-Tapia; Emilio Bagan; Vladimir Buzek

    2011-05-26

    Given an unknown state of a qudit that has already been measured optimally, can one still extract any information about the original unknown state? Clearly, after a maximally informative measurement, the state of the system `collapses' into a post-measurement state from which the {\\em{same}} observer cannot obtain further information about the original state of the system. However, the system still encodes a significant amount of information about the original preparation for a second observer who is unaware of the actions of the first one. We study how a series of independent observers can obtain, or scavenge, information about the unknown state of a system (quantified by the fidelity) when they sequentially measure it. We give closed-form expressions for the estimation fidelity, when one or several qudits are available to carry information about the single-qudit state, and study the `classical' limit when an arbitrarily large number of observers can obtain (nearly) complete information on the system. In addition to the case where all observers perform most informative measurements we study the scenario where a finite number of observers estimate the state with equal fidelity,regardless of their position in the measurement sequence; and the scenario where all observers use identical measurement apparata (up to a mutually unknown orientation) chosen so that a particular observer's estimation fidelity is maximized.

  12. Zinc electrode with cement additive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Charkey, Allen (Brookfield, CT)

    1982-06-01

    A zinc electrode having a cement additive, preferably, Portland Cement, distributed in the zinc active material.

  13. Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Blake Marshall, AMO's lead for Additive Manufacturing Technologies, will provide an overview of current R&D activities in additive manufacturing and its application to fuel cell prototyping and...

  14. Additive manufacturing method of producing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Additive manufacturing method of producing silver or copper tracks on polyimide film Problem/stripping) using an additive process support by a novel bio- degradable photo-initiator package. technology. Building on previous work by Hoyd- Gigg Ng et al. [1,2], Heriot-Watt has developed an additive film

  15. Incorporation of additives into polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Yates, Matthew Z.

    2003-07-29

    There has been invented a method for incorporating additives into polymers comprising: (a) forming an aqueous or alcohol-based colloidal system of the polymer; (b) emulsifying the colloidal system with a compressed fluid; and (c) contacting the colloidal polymer with the additive in the presence of the compressed fluid. The colloidal polymer can be contacted with the additive by having the additive in the compressed fluid used for emulsification or by adding the additive to the colloidal system before or after emulsification with the compressed fluid. The invention process can be carried out either as a batch process or as a continuous on-line process.

  16. 2.9 Programming and Platforms (PRO) CENS systems research strives to advance the state of the art in innovative in situ observing systems. To this end,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    in innovative in situ observing systems. To this end, our research efforts have focused on two critical themes that cut across our broad range of observing systems: the development of practical tools and platforms platform efforts have revolved around three activities: participatory sensing mobile to web platform

  17. Self-report and Direct Observer's Perceived Leadership Practices of Chief Student Affairs Officers in Selected Institutions of Higher Education in the United States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rozeboom, David John

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived leadership practices of chief student affairs officers in the United States in order to establish an understanding of current leadership practices and to assist chief ...

  18. Managing water addition to a degraded core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuan, P.; Hanson, D.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Odar, F. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States))

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we present information that can be used in severe accident management by providing an improved understanding of the effects of water addition to a degraded core. This improved understanding is developed using a diagram showing a sequence of core damage states. Whenever possible, a temperature and a time after accident initiation are estimated for each damage state in the sequence diagram. This diagram can be used to anticipate the evolution of events during an accident. Possible responses of plant instruments are described to identify these damage states and the effects of water addition. The rate and amount of water addition needed (1) to remove energy from the core, (2) to stabilize the core or (3) to not adversely affect the damage progression, are estimated. Analysis of the capability to remove energy from large cohesive and particulate debris beds indicates that these beds may not be stabilized in the core region and they may partially relocate to the lower plenum of the reactor vessel.

  19. Managing water addition to a degraded core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuan, P.; Hanson, D.J. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Odar, F. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1991-12-31

    In this paper we present information that can be used in severe accident management by providing an improved understanding of the effects of water addition to a degraded core. This improved understanding is developed using a diagram showing a sequence of core damage states. Whenever possible, a temperature and a time after accident initiation are estimated for each damage state in the sequence diagram. This diagram can be used to anticipate the evolution of events during an accident. Possible responses of plant instruments are described to identify these damage states and the effects of water addition. The rate and amount of water addition needed (1) to remove energy from the core, (2) to stabilize the core or (3) to not adversely affect the damage progression, are estimated. Analysis of the capability to remove energy from large cohesive and particulate debris beds indicates that these beds may not be stabilized in the core region and they may partially relocate to the lower plenum of the reactor vessel.

  20. A Primer on Food Additives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1979-01-01

    stream_source_info Bull1208a.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 25137 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Bull1208a.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 45.7 8-1208 :08 A Primer... on Food Additives Extension Foods and Nutrition Specialists The Texas A&M University System Consumers today are very concerned about what goes into their food. This primer on food additives describes what food additives do and why modern food...

  1. Additive assembly of digital materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Jonathan (Jonathan Daniel)

    2010-01-01

    This thesis develops the use of additive assembly of press-fit digital materials as a new rapid-prototyping process. Digital materials consist of a finite set of parts that have discrete connections and occupy discrete ...

  2. Electronic states of thiophene/phenylene co-oligomers: Extreme-ultra violet excited photoelectron spectroscopy observations and density functional theory calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawaguchi, Yoshizo; Sasaki, Fumio; Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Ishitsuka, Tomoaki; Tomie, Toshihisa; Ootsuka, Teruhisa; Watanabe, Shuji; Shimoi, Yukihiro; Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu

    2013-02-28

    We have investigated electronic states in the valence electron bands for the thin films of three thiophene/phenylene co-oligomer (TPCO) compounds, 2,5-bis(4-biphenylyl)thiophene (BP1T), 1,4-bis(5-phenylthiophen-2-yl)benzene (AC5), and 1,4-bis{l_brace}5-[4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]thiophen-2-yl{r_brace}benzene (AC5-CF{sub 3}), by using extreme-UV excited photoelectron spectroscopy (EUPS). By comparing both EUPS spectra and secondary electron spectra between AC5 and AC5-CF{sub 3}, we confirm that CF{sub 3} substitution to AC5 deepens valence states by 2 eV, and increases the ionization energy by 3 eV. From the cut-off positions of secondary electron spectra, the work functions of AC5, AC5-CF{sub 3}, and BP1T are evaluated to be 3.8 eV, 4.8 eV, and 4.0 eV, respectively. We calculate molecular orbital (MO) energy levels by the density functional theory and compare results of calculations with those of experiments. Densities of states obtained by broadening MO levels well explain the overall features of experimental EUPS spectra of three TPCOs.

  3. Fight over fuel additive rekindled

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stringer, J.

    1996-03-20

    Ethyl and EPA are trading punches over EPA`s doubts about the safety of Ethyl`s gasoline additive methylcyclopentadienyl manganese (MMT). Late last week, EPA released a statement reaffirming its position that there has not been enough research on health effects of MMT and asking gas stations to label pumps that contain the additive so consumers will be aware they are using it. Responding to that statement, Ethyl has written Administrator Carol Browner asking why she appears to be supporting the Environmental Defense Fund`s (EDF; Washington) campaign against MMT and advocating the delay of the additive use in light of its known emission-reducing characteristics. The tension began in the early `90s, when the EPA refused to allow Ethyl to market MMT and required it to perform more long-term health studies. Last October a court ordered the agency to grant Ethyl approval to use MMT in nonreformulated gasoline.

  4. Designing a Stochastic Adaptive Impulsive Observer for Stochastic Linear and Nonlinear Impulsive Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayati, Moosa [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering, K. N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alwan, Mohamad; Liu Xinzhi [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Khaloozadeh, Hamid [Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering, K. N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-30

    State observation (estimation) is a very important issue in system analysis and control. This paper develops a new observer called Stochastic Adaptive Impulsive Observer (SAIO) for the state estimation of impulsive systems. The proposed observer is applicable to linear and nonlinear stochastic impulsive systems. In addition, the effect of parametric uncertainty is considered and unknown parameters of the system are estimated by suitable adaptation laws. Impulsive system theory, particularly stochastic Lyapunov-like function, is used to analyze the stability and convergence of the state estimations. The main advantages of the proposed observer are: 1) it gives continuous estimation from discrete time measurements of the system output, and 2) it is useful for state estimation when continuous measurements are impossible or expensive. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed observer and we believe that it has many applications in control and estimation theories.

  5. Evaluation of entanglement measures by a single observable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chengjie Zhang; Sixia Yu; Qing Chen; Haidong Yuan; C. H. Oh

    2015-06-04

    We present observable lower bounds for several entanglement measures including entanglement of formation, geometric measure of entanglement, concurrence, and convex-roof extended negativity. The lower bounds facilitate estimates of these entanglement measures for arbitrary finite-dimensional bipartite states. Moreover, these lower bounds can be easily obtained from the expectation value of a single observable, and the optimal lower bounds relate to fully entangled fraction. Based on our results, we use the real experimental measurement data reported by Tonolini \\textit{et al.} [Sci. Rep. \\textbf{4}, 6542 (2014)] to get the lower bounds of entanglement measures for their experimentally realized state. In addition, we also study the relations between entanglement measures.

  6. Characterization of four-qubit states via Bell inequalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hui Zhao; Xing-Hua Zhang; Shao-Ming Fei; Zhi-Xi Wang

    2013-07-25

    A set of Bell inequalities classifying the quantum entanglement of four-qubit states is presented. These inequalities involve only two measurement settings per observer and can characterize fully separable, bi-separable and tri-separable quantum states. In addition, a quadratic inequality of the Bell operators for four-qubit systems is derived.

  7. Energy Department Provides Additional Emergency Fuel Loan to...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Defense with additional ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve in response to a request from the State of Connecticut. The Energy Department...

  8. Tulsa Programs For additional information,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    Tulsa Programs For additional information, please contact: Vickie E. Lake, Ph.D. (918) 660 entirety on the Tulsa campus. Course delivery is typically in the evenings. If enrolled full- time: http://gradweb.ou.edu PROGRAM COORDINATOR Vickie E. Lake, Assistant Professor University of Oklahoma-Tulsa

  9. Out of Bounds Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holshouser, Chris [Lockheed Martin Corporation; Newell, Clint [Lockheed Martin Corporation; Palas, Sid [Lockheed Martin Corporation; Love, Lonnie J [ORNL; Kunc, Vlastimil [ORNL; Lind, Randall F [ORNL; Lloyd, Peter D [ORNL; Rowe, John C [ORNL; Blue, Craig A [ORNL; Duty, Chad E [ORNL; Peter, William H [ORNL; Dehoff, Ryan R [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Lockheed Martin and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working on an additive manufacturing (AM) system capable of manufacturing components measured not in terms of inches or feet, but multiple yards in all dimensions with the potential to manufacture parts that are completely unbounded in size.

  10. Out of bounds additive manufacturing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Holshouser, Chris; Newell, Clint; Palas, Sid; Love, Lonnie J.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Lind, Randall F.; Lloyd, Peter D.; Rowe, John C.; Blue, Craig A.; Duty, Chad E.; et al

    2013-03-01

    Lockheed Martin and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working on an additive manufacturing system capable of manufacturing components measured not in terms of inches or feet, but multiple yards in all dimensions with the potential to manufacture parts that are completely unbounded in size.

  11. Atom addition reactions in interstellar ice analogues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linnartz, Harold; Fedoseev, Gleb

    2015-01-01

    This review paper summarizes the state-of-the-art in laboratory based interstellar ice chemistry. The focus is on atom addition reactions, illustrating how water, carbon dioxide and methanol can form in the solid state at astronomically relevant temperatures, and also the formation of more complex species such as hydroxylamine, an important prebiotic molecule, and glycolaldehyde, the smallest sugar, is discussed. These reactions are particularly relevant during the dark ages of star and planet formation, i.e., when the role of UV light is restricted. A quantitative characterization of such processes is only possible through dedicated laboratory studies, i.e., under full control of a large set of parameters such as temperature, atom-flux, and ice morphology. The resulting numbers, physical and chemical constants, e.g., barrier heights, reaction rates and branching ratios, provide information on the molecular processes at work and are needed as input for astrochemical models, in order to bridge the timescales t...

  12. PMU Deployment for Optimal State Estimation Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Sumit

    PMU Deployment for Optimal State Estimation Performance Yue Yang, Student Member IEEE, and Sumit are anticipated; however, due to the high cost of PMU installation, their deployment will continue to be selective minimal-PMU sets that achieve full observability, affording an additional degree of freedom to select

  13. Decontamination formulation with sorbent additive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tucker; Mark D. (Albuquerque, NM), Comstock; Robert H. (Gardendale, AL)

    2007-10-16

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a bleaching activator, a sorbent additive, and water. The highly adsorbent, water-soluble sorbent additive (e.g., sorbitol or mannitol) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients, such as the liquid bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate) and convert the activator into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

  14. Training program to prepare the U.S. DOE laboratories for the entry into force of the protocol additional to the agreement between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in the United

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, Brian David; Stevens, Rebecca C; Uribe, Eva C; Sandoval, M Analisa; Valente, John N; Valente, John U; Jo, Jae H; Sellen, Joana

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, a joint team from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) consisting of specialists in training IAEA inspectors in the use of complementary access activities formulated a training program to prepare the U.S DOE laboratories for the entry into force of the U.S. Additional Protocol. Since the U.S. Additional Protocol would allow for IAEA access to the DOE laboratories under the aegis of complementary access activities, the DOE laboratories would need to prepare for such visits. The goal of the training was to ensure that the DOE laboratories would successfully host an IAEA complementary access. In doing so, the labs must be able to provide the IAEA with the information that the IAEA would need to resolve its questions about the U.S. Declaration and declared activities at the lab, and also protect certain equities, as provided under the U.S. Additional Protocol Article 1.b and c. which set forth a 'National Security Exclusion.' This 'NSE' states that the AP provisions apply within the United States 'excluding only instances where its application would result in access by the Agency to activities with direct national security significance to the United States or to location or information associated with such activities.' These activities are referred to collectively as DNSS-direct national security significance. Furthermore, the U.S. has a specific right to employ managed access, without prejudice to the right under Article 1.b, in connection with activities of DNSS. The provisions in Articles 1.b and 1.c are unique to the U.S. AP, and are additional to the more general right, under Article 7, to use managed access to protect from disclosure proprietary and/or proliferation-sensitive information, and to meet safety and security requirements, that is incorporated directly from the Model Additional Protocol. The BNL-LANL team performed training at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to cover the situations that these labs, which respectively represent nuclear weapons labs, nuclear energy labs, and science labs and environmental management sites, would encounter during a complementary access. Each of the three labs hosted a mock complementary access activity, which included mock inspectors from the BNL-LANL team. In addition to reviewing the draft declarations from each of the host labs, the BNL-LANL team conducted open source research in a manner similar to what IAEA inspectors would do to research the activities at a location and prepare questions for the location to answer and that would be the focus of a complementary access. The host labs and other labs attending the training found the training to be extremely useful and helpful in making sure that each lab's Additional Protocol team had made correct declarations of nuclear activities, had properly trained staff ready to host and answer IAEA inquiries, and would implement managed access during a complementary access that would provide access by the IAEA team to resolve questions or inconsistencies about a particular declaration and still protect the information addressed by Articles 1 and 7 of the U.S. AP.

  15. Additive Gaussian Processes David Duvenaud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -4 -2 0 2 4 -1 0 1 2 3 4 -4 -2 0 2 4 -4 -2 0 2 4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 f1(x1) f2(x2) f1(x1) + f2(x2) f(x1, xAdditive Gaussian Processes David Duvenaud Department of Engineering Cambridge University dkd23@cam Department of Engineering Cambridge University cer54@cam.ac.uk Abstract We introduce a Gaussian process model

  16. Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Electrolyte Additives Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal & overcharge abuse Advanced Electrolyte Additives for PHEVEV Lithium-ion Battery...

  17. Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Additives that Enhance Thermal and Overcharge Abuse Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives Advanced Electrolyte Additives for PHEVEV Lithium-ion Battery...

  18. Precision and Energy Usage for Additive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemon, Lee; Sudradjat, Anton; Jaquez, Maribel; Krishna, Aditya; Rammah, Marwan; Dornfeld, David

    2013-01-01

    Sustainability of additive manufacturing: measuring theCommittee F42 on Additive Manufacturing Technologies," TheASTM Committee F42 on Additive Manufacturing Technologies. -

  19. Additive manufacturing capabilities expanding | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Additive manufacturing capabilities expanding January 01, 2013 Large-scale polymer additive manufacturing equipment located at the Manufacturing Demonstration Facility. Additive...

  20. CREATION OF THE MODEL ADDITIONAL PROTOCOL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houck, F.; Rosenthal, M.; Wulf, N.

    2010-05-25

    In 1991, the international nuclear nonproliferation community was dismayed to discover that the implementation of safeguards by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) under its NPT INFCIRC/153 safeguards agreement with Iraq had failed to detect Iraq's nuclear weapon program. It was now clear that ensuring that states were fulfilling their obligations under the NPT would require not just detecting diversion but also the ability to detect undeclared materials and activities. To achieve this, the IAEA initiated what would turn out to be a five-year effort to reappraise the NPT safeguards system. The effort engaged the IAEA and its Member States and led to agreement in 1997 on a new safeguards agreement, the Model Protocol Additional to the Agreement(s) between States and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards. The Model Protocol makes explicit that one IAEA goal is to provide assurance of the absence of undeclared nuclear material and activities. The Model Protocol requires an expanded declaration that identifies a State's nuclear potential, empowers the IAEA to raise questions about the correctness and completeness of the State's declaration, and, if needed, allows IAEA access to locations. The information required and the locations available for access are much broader than those provided for under INFCIRC/153. The negotiation was completed in quite a short time because it started with a relatively complete draft of an agreement prepared by the IAEA Secretariat. This paper describes how the Model Protocol was constructed and reviews key decisions that were made both during the five-year period and in the actual negotiation.

  1. Additive Manufacturing: Technology and Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment| DepartmentAL/FAL 99-01 More5,AchievingSeptemberAdditive Manufacturing:

  2. REVIEW OF THE NEGOTIATION OF THE MODEL PROTOCOL ADDITIONAL TO THE AGREEMENT(S) BETWEEN STATE(S) AND THE INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY FOR THE APPLICATION OF SAFEGUARDS,INFCIRC/540 (Corrected) VOLUME I/III SETTING THE STAGE: 1991-1996.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenthal, M.D.; Saum-Manning, L.; Houck, F.; Anzelon, G.

    2010-01-01

    Events in Iraq at the beginning of the 1990s demonstrated that the safeguards system of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) needed to be improved. It had failed, after all, to detect Iraq's clandestine nuclear weapon program even though some of Iraq's's activities had been pursued at inspected facilities in buildings adjacent to ones being inspected by the IAEA. Although there were aspects of the implementation of safeguards where the IAEA needed to improve, the primary limitations were considered to be part of the safeguards system itself. That system was based on the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty of 1970, to which Iraq was a party, and implemented on the basis of a model NPT safeguards agreement, published by the IAEA 1972 as INFCIRC/153 (corrected). The agreement calls for states to accept and for the IAEA to apply safeguards to all nuclear material in the state. Iraq was a party to such an agreement, but it violated the agreement by concealing nuclear material and other nuclear activities from the IAEA. Although the IAEA was inspecting in Iraq, it was hindered by aspects of the agreement that essentially limited its access to points in declared facilities and provided the IAEA with little information about nuclear activities anywhere else in Iraq. As a result, a major review of the NPT safeguards system was initiated by its Director General and Member States with the objective of finding the best means to enable the IAEA to detect both diversions from declared stocks and any undeclared nuclear material or activities in the state. Significant improvements that could be made within existing legal authority were taken quickly, most importantly a change in 1992 in how and when and what design information would be reported to the IAEA. During 1991-1996, the IAEA pursued intensive study, legal and technical analysis, and field trials and held numerous consultations with Member States. The Board of Governors discussed the issue of strengthening safeguards at almost all of its meeting.

  3. Partial Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Marlow

    2006-10-20

    We attempt to dissolve the measurement problem using an anthropic principle which allows us to invoke rational observers. We argue that the key feature of such observers is that they are rational (we need not care whether they are `classical' or `macroscopic' for example) and thus, since quantum theory can be expressed as a rational theory of probabilistic inference, the measurement problem is not a problem.

  4. Recommendation 223: Recommendations on Additional Waste Disposal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3: Recommendations on Additional Waste Disposal Capacity Recommendation 223: Recommendations on Additional Waste Disposal Capacity ORSSAB's recommendations encourage DOE to...

  5. Optimization of the transmission of observable expectation values and observable statistics in Continuous Variable Teleportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Albano Farias; J. Stephany

    2010-09-28

    We analyze the statistics of observables in continuous variable quantum teleportation in the formalism of the characteristic function. We derive expressions for average values of output state observables in particular cumulants which are additive in terms of the input state and the resource of teleportation. Working with Squeezed Bell-like states, which may be optimized in a free parameter for better teleportation performance we discuss the relation between resources optimal for fidelity and for different observable averages. We obtain the values of the free parameter which optimize the central momenta and cumulants up to fourth order. For the cumulants the distortion between in and out states due to teleportation depends only on the resource. We obtain optimal parameters for the second and fourth order cumulants which do not depend on the squeezing of the resource. The second order central momenta which is equal to the second order cumulants and the photon number average are optimized by the same resource. We show that the optimal fidelity resource, found in reference (Phys. Rev. A {\\bf 76}, 022301 (2007)) to depend also on the characteristics of input, tends for high squeezing to the resource which optimizes the second order momenta. A similar behavior is obtained for the resource which optimizes the photon statistics which is treated here using the sum of the squared differences in photon probabilities of input and output states as the distortion measure. This is interpreted to mean that the distortions associated to second order momenta dominates the behavior of the output state for large squeezing of the resource. Optimal fidelity and optimal photon statistics resources are compared and is shown that for mixtures of Fock states they are equivalent.

  6. REVIEW OF THE NEGOTIATION OF THE MODEL PROTOCOL ADDITIONAL TO THE AGREEMENT(S) BETWEEN STATE(S) AND THE INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY FOR THE APPLICATION OF SAFEGUARDS, INFCIRC/540 (Corrected) VOLUME III/III, IAEA COMMITTEE 24, DEVELOPMENT OF INFCIRC/540, ARTICLE-BY-ARTICLE REVIEW (1996-1997).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenthal, M.D.; Houck, F.

    2010-01-01

    In this section of the report, the development of INFCIRC/540 is traced by a compilation of citations from the IAEA documents presented to the Board of Governors and the records of discussions in the Board that took place prior to the establishment of Committee 24 as well as the documents and discussions of that committee. The evolution of the text is presented separately for each article or, for the more complex articles, for each paragraph or group of paragraphs of the article. This section covers all articles, including those involving no issues. Background, issues, interpretations and conclusions, which were addressed in Volumes I, II, and III are not repeated here. The comments by states that are included are generally limited to objections and suggested changes. Requests for clarification or elaboration have been omitted, although it is recognized that such comments were sometimes veiled objections.

  7. Observation of ground-state Ramsey fringes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weel, M.; Kumarakrishnan, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto, Ontario, M3J 1P3 (Canada)

    2003-06-01

    We have used trapped {sup 85}Rb atoms to demonstrate an atom interferometric measurement of atomic recoil in the frequency domain. The measurement uses echo techniques to generate a Ramsey fringe pattern. The pattern exhibits recoil components consistent with theoretical predictions. We find the measurement to be insensitive to magnetic field gradients and discuss the prospects for a precision measurement of the recoil frequency.

  8. Faculty Position in Mechanical Engineering Additive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty Position in Mechanical Engineering Additive Manufacturing University of Kansas of additive manufacturing. Exceptional candidates with outstanding qualifications could be considered using additive manufacturing in applications such as, but not limited to the net shape manufacture of

  9. The Dynamics of Bistable Switching Behavior in Limit Cycle Systems with Additive Noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael A. Schwemmer; Jay M. Newby

    2015-01-23

    Additive noise is known to produce counter-intuitive behaviors in nonlinear dynamical systems. Previously, it was shown that systems with a deterministic limit cycle can display bistable switching between metastable states in the presence of asymmetric additive white noise. Here, we systematically analyze the dynamics of this bistable behavior and show how the vector field away from the limit cycle influences the rate and directionality of the bistable switching. Using stochastic phase reduction methods, we identify mechanisms underlying different rates of switching and predict when the system will rotate in the opposite direction of the deterministic limit cycle. Thus, this work presents an alternative mechanism for generating a range of bistable switch-like behaviors that have been observed in a number of physical systems.

  10. Precision and Energy Usage for Additive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemon, Lee; Sudradjat, Anton; Jaquez, Maribel; Krishna, Aditya; Rammah, Marwan; Dornfeld, David

    2013-01-01

    65688 PRECISION AND ENERGY USAGE FOR ADDITIVE MANUFACTURINGpart quality and energy usage for additive manufacturingfound in this study. Energy usage is quantified by measuring

  11. Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

  12. Development of Advanced Electrolytes and Electrolyte Additives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Component R&D within the ABR Program, 2009 thru 2013 Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives Advanced Electrolyte Additives for PHEVEV Lithium-ion Battery...

  13. Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Additive Manufacturing Workshop Poster Abstract Submission - deadline July 10, 2015 Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Materials using in situ sensors, diagnostics...

  14. Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Workshops Additive Manufacturing Workshop Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Materials Workshop Our goal is to define opportunities and research gaps within...

  15. Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy SHARE Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy As the nation's premier research laboratory, ORNL is one of the world's most capable resources...

  16. Zeroth Law compatibility of non-additive thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. S. Biró; P. Ván

    2011-06-02

    Non-extensive thermodynamics was criticized among others by stating that the Zeroth Law cannot be satisfied with non-additive composition rules. In this paper we determine the general functional form of those non-additive composition rules which are compatible with the Zeroth Law of thermodynamics. We find that this general form is additive for the formal logarithms of the original quantities and the familiar relations of thermodynamics apply to these. Our result offers a possible solution to the longstanding problem about equilibrium between extensive and non-extensive systems or systems with different non-extensivity parameters.

  17. Out of Bounds Additive Manufacturing Christopher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    #12;Out of Bounds Additive Manufacturing Christopher Holshouser, Clint Newell, and Sid Palas, Tenn. The Big Area Additive Manufacturing system has the potential to manufacture parts completely) are working on an additive manufacturing (AM) system (Big Area Additive Manufacturing, or BAAM) capable

  18. ICME & MGI Big Area Additive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ICME & MGI · Big Area Additive Manufacturing · Neutron Characterization for AM · Materials problems in additive manu- facturing (AM). Additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3-D) printing of the world's most advanced neu- tron facilities, the HFIR and SNS, to characterize additive manufactured

  19. For additional information, contact: Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    For additional information, contact: Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry Montana State University 103 Chemistry & Biochemistry Building P.O. Box 173400 Bozeman, MT 59717-3400 Tel: 406-994-4801 Fax of the American Association for the Advancement of Science CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY 1 2 KELLY GORHAM 3 MSSE

  20. For additional information, contact: Department of Agricultural Economics & Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barge, Marcy

    For additional information, contact: Department of Agricultural Economics & Economics Montana State.montana.edu/econ agecon@montana.edu 1 2 AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS & ECONOMICS KELLY GORHAM 1 Austin Owens traveled to Greece as mentors for students in Economics 101 4 Chris Stoddard was the recipient of a MSU Cox Family Faculty

  1. Additional EIPC Study Analysis. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, Stanton W; Gotham, Douglas J.; Luciani, Ralph L.

    2014-12-01

    Between 2010 and 2012 the Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) conducted a major long-term resource and transmission study of the Eastern Interconnection (EI). With guidance from a Stakeholder Steering Committee (SSC) that included representatives from the Eastern Interconnection States Planning Council (EISPC) among others, the project was conducted in two phases. Phase 1 involved a long-term capacity expansion analysis that involved creation of eight major futures plus 72 sensitivities. Three scenarios were selected for more extensive transmission- focused evaluation in Phase 2. Five power flow analyses, nine production cost model runs (including six sensitivities), and three capital cost estimations were developed during this second phase. The results from Phase 1 and 2 provided a wealth of data that could be examined further to address energy-related questions. A list of 14 topics was developed for further analysis. This paper brings together the earlier interim reports of the first 13 topics plus one additional topic into a single final report.

  2. Origin State Destination State

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    rates for coal, state to state, STB data Origin State Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Alabama Alabama W W W W W W W W W W W...

  3. Grand Challenge: Scalable Stateful Stream Processing for Smart Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pietzuch, Peter

    . For the load and work values in the dataset, we observe a large variability in the frequency with which and the option of performing semantic load-shedding. In addition, our solution is fault-tolerant, ensuring that the large processing state of stream operators is not lost after failure. Our experimental results show

  4. Additive Manufacturing: Implications on Research and Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Additive Manufacturing: Implications on Research and Manufacturing With recent developments, etc.), additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to become a transformative technology in innovation-based manufacturing. Agencies such as the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation

  5. Webinar: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled "Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells," originally presented on February 11, 2014.

  6. Towards Mobile Microrobot Swarms for Additive Micromanufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zavlanos, Michael

    of independently controlled microrobots in advanced, additive manufacturing applications. Keywords Mobile Microrobotics, Multi-robot Control, Additive Manufacturing 1. Introduction Flexible manufacturing capabilities, and additive manufacturing has proven to be a disruptive technology at the small- to medium-scale. Many

  7. EFFECTIVE STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING WITH ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    will be presented for components that can be processed by additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing. The origin structures. KEYWORDS : structural health monitoring methodology, 3D printing, additive manufacturing, fatigue, intelligent structure INTRODUCTION Additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D Printing or Rapid

  8. Are Quantum States Subjective?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. K. Pradhan

    2012-02-22

    The subjective nature of the quantum states is brought out and it is argued that the objective state assignment is subsequent to the subjective state of the observer regarding his state of knowledge about the system. The collapse postulate is examined in detail to bring out the inherent subjectivity of the quantum state. The role of doubt and faith in quantum state assignment is examined.

  9. Generating Unit Additions in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price toStocks 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 ViewYearPower of

  10. Generating Unit Additions in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price toStocks 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 ViewYearPower ofRetirement

  11. Entanglement in the states of the Two-Rotor-Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palumbo, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    The eigenfunctions of the Two-Rotors Model are superpositions of states corresponding to precessions of the rotors around two orthogonal axes. In Nuclear Physics such an entanglement has not been directly confirmed. We discuss how it might be observed and compare with the application of the TRM to single domain nanoparticles. In the latter case, in addition to the present indirect evidence there is the possibility of direct observation in experiments at temperatures of the order of 1 K.

  12. Observations of the 6 Centimeter Lines of OH in Evolved (OH/IR) Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent L. Fish; Laura K. Zschaechner; Loránt O. Sjouwerman; Ylva M. Pihlström; Mark J. Claussen

    2006-10-24

    Recent observational and theoretical advances have called into question traditional OH maser pumping models in evolved (OH/IR) stars. The detection of excited-state OH lines would provide additional constraints to discriminate amongst these theoretical models. In this Letter, we report on VLA observations of the 4750 MHz and 4765 MHz lines of OH toward 45 sources, mostly evolved stars. We detect 4765 MHz emission in the star forming regions Mon R2 and LDN 1084, but we do not detect excited-state emission in any evolved stars. The flux density and velocity of the 4765 MHz detection in Mon R2 suggests that a new flaring event has begun.

  13. ,"Maryland Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maryland Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  14. ,"Nebraska Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  15. ,"Wisconsin Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wisconsin Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  16. ,"Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  17. ,"Idaho Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Idaho Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  18. ,"Tennessee Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  19. ,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  20. ,"Nevada Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nevada Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  1. ,"Alaska Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska...

  2. ,"California Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  3. ,"Oregon Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oregon Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  4. ,"Delaware Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Delaware Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  5. ,"Arkansas Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  6. ,"Louisiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  7. ,"Missouri Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Missouri Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  8. ,"Texas Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  9. ,"Washington Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Washington Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  10. ,"Alabama Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  11. ,"Georgia Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Georgia Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  12. ,"Virginia Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  13. ,"Indiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Indiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  14. ,"Minnesota Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Minnesota Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  15. ,"Massachusetts Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Massachusetts Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  16. ,"Maine Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maine Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015"...

  17. Additional Guidance Regarding Application of Current Procedures...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Additional Guidance Regarding Application of Current Procedures for Testing Energy Consumption of Clothes Washers with Warm Rinse Cycles, Issued: June 30, 2010. Draft of DOE...

  18. DOE Announces Additional Energy Efficiency Enforcement Action...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Efficiency Enforcement Action to Protect Consumers DOE Announces Additional Energy Efficiency Enforcement Action to Protect Consumers January 7, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis...

  19. Biomass 2014: Additional Speaker Biographies | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    document outlines the biographies of the additional speakers for Biomass 2014, held July 29-July 30 in Washington, D.C. additionalspeakerbiographiesbiomass2014 More Documents &...

  20. Vacuum pyrolysis of waste tires with basic additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Xinghua; Wang Tiejun Ma Longlong; Chang Jie

    2008-11-15

    Granules of waste tires were pyrolyzed under vacuum (3.5-10 kPa) conditions, and the effects of temperature and basic additives (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, NaOH) on the properties of pyrolysis were thoroughly investigated. It was obvious that with or without basic additives, pyrolysis oil yield increased gradually to a maximum and subsequently decreased with a temperature increase from 450 deg. C to 600 deg. C, irrespective of the addition of basic additives to the reactor. The addition of NaOH facilitated pyrolysis dramatically, as a maximal pyrolysis oil yield of about 48 wt% was achieved at 550 deg. C without the addition of basic additives, while a maximal pyrolysis oil yield of about 50 wt% was achieved at 480 deg. C by adding 3 wt% (w/w, powder/waste tire granules) of NaOH powder. The composition analysis of pyrolytic naphtha (i.b.p. (initial boiling point) {approx}205 deg. C) distilled from pyrolysis oil showed that more dl-limonene was obtained with basic additives and the maximal content of dl-limonene in pyrolysis oil was 12.39 wt%, which is a valuable and widely-used fine chemical. However, no improvement in pyrolysis was observed with Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} addition. Pyrolysis gas was mainly composed of H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. Pyrolytic char had a surface area comparable to commercial carbon black, but its proportion of ash (above 11.5 wt%) was much higher.

  1. Additive manufacturing of metallic tracks on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Additive manufacturing of metallic tracks on green ceramic/dielectrics Problem this technology (note: may require additional tooling/ set up time) · Rapid Prototyping & small scale manufacture microelectronics such as manufacture of LTCC ceramic/ Dielectric antenna and rapid PCB prototyping or repair

  2. Differential Addition in generalized Edwards Coordinates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    and Corollary 1, as explained at the end of section 3. Table 1. Some coordinate choices with fast arithmeticDifferential Addition in generalized Edwards Coordinates Benjamin Justus and Daniel Loebenberger (1 + dx2 y2 ) that omit the x- coordinate. The first parametrization leads to a differential addition

  3. Photoactive devices including porphyrinoids with coordinating additives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zimmerman, Jeramy; Yu, Eric K; Thompson, Mark E; Trinh, Cong; Whited, Matthew; Diev, Vlacheslav

    2015-05-12

    Coordinating additives are included in porphyrinoid-based materials to promote intermolecular organization and improve one or more photoelectric characteristics of the materials. The coordinating additives are selected from fullerene compounds and organic compounds having free electron pairs. Combinations of different coordinating additives can be used to tailor the characteristic properties of such porphyrinoid-based materials, including porphyrin oligomers. Bidentate ligands are one type of coordinating additive that can form coordination bonds with a central metal ion of two different porphyrinoid compounds to promote porphyrinoid alignment and/or pi-stacking. The coordinating additives can shift the absorption spectrum of a photoactive material toward higher wavelengths, increase the external quantum efficiency of the material, or both.

  4. EARLY- AND LATE-TIME OBSERVATIONS OF SN 2008ha: ADDITIONAL CONSTRAINTS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    be weak in such events. It is therefore likely that SN 2008ha was the result of a thermonuclear explosion of a carbon-oxygen WD. Carbon features at maximum light show that...

  5. EARLY- AND LATE-TIME OBSERVATIONS OF SN 2008ha: ADDITIONAL CONSTRAINTS FOR

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech ConnectExperiments (Conference) | SciTechmolecularTHE

  6. Observation of breakup transfer process for the bound states of {sup 16}O populated from {sup 12}C({sup 6}Li,d) reaction at 20 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adhikari, S.; Basu, C.; Thompson, I. J.; Sugathan, P.; Jhinghan, A.; Golda, K. S.; Babu, A.; Singh, D.; Ray, S.; Mitra, A. K.

    2012-10-20

    The deuteron angular distribution for the {sup 12}C({sup 6}Li,d){sup 16}O* has been measured at 20 MeV populating bound and unbound states of {sup 16}O. Analysis shows a dominance of breakup induced alpha transfer in comparison to a direct alpha transfer process for the bound states. The effect increases as the excitation energy of {sup 16}O decreases, maximizing at the ground state.

  7. Nucleophilic Additions to 3-Azido-hexanal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, Chad E.

    2009-04-29

    Sakurai and Mukaiyama aldol additions were carried out with 3-Azido-hexanal under chelation and non-chelation conditions. The reactions were generally found to be diastereofacially selective in favor of the anti stereoisomer and showed simple...

  8. BIOGEOCHEMISTRY LETTERS Chronic nitrogen additions suppress decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Templer, Pamela

    BIOGEOCHEMISTRY LETTERS Chronic nitrogen additions suppress decomposition and sequester soil carbon dioxide emis- sions, offsetting a substantial portion of greenhouse gas forcing of the climate system. Although a number of factors are responsible for this terrestrial carbon sink, atmospheric nitrogen

  9. Packaging and Transportation of Additional Neptunium Oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watkins, R.; Jordan, J.; Hensel, S.

    2010-05-05

    The Savannah River Site's HB-Line Facility completed a second neptunium oxide production campaign in which nine (9) additional cans of neptunium oxide were produced and shipped to the Idaho National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the 9975 shipping container. These additional cans were from a different feed solution than the first fifty (50) cans of neptunium oxide that were previously produced and shipped via a Letter of Amendment to the 9975 Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) content table. This paper will address the challenges associated with demonstrating the neptunium oxide produced from the additional feed solution was equivalent to the original neptunium oxide and within the content description of the Letter of Amendment.

  10. ARM Observations Projected onto CCSM Results Projected onto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Richard

    ARM Observations Projected onto ARM States CCSM Results Projected onto ARM States 1Oak Ridge to Comparing Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data with Global Climate Model (GCM) Results Atmospheric state contained only in model results Atmospheric states contained only in ARM observations ARM

  11. Stabilization of polyaniline solutions through additives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wrobleski, Debra A. (Los Alamos, NM); Benicewicz, Brian C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01

    A stabilized non-conductive polyaniline solution comprising from about 1 to bout 10 percent by weight polyaniline or a polyaniline derivative, from about 90 to about 99 percent by weight N-methylpyrrolidone, and from about 0.5 percent by weight to about 15 percent by weight of a solution stabilizing additive selected from the group consisting of hindered amine light stabilizers, polymeric amines, and dialkylamines, percent by weight of additive based on the total weight of polyaniline or polyaniline derivative is provided together with a method for stabilizing a polyaniline solution.

  12. Stabilization of polyaniline solutions through additives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.

    1996-12-10

    A stabilized non-conductive polyaniline solution comprising from about 1 to about 10 percent by weight polyaniline or a polyaniline derivative, from about 90 to about 99 percent by weight N-methylpyrrolidone, and from about 0.5 percent by weight to about 15 percent by weight of a solution stabilizing additive selected from the group consisting of hindered amine light stabilizers, polymeric amines, and dialkylamines, percent by weight of additive based on the total weight of polyaniline or polyaniline derivative is provided together with a method for stabilizing a polyaniline solution. 4 figs.

  13. Breaking Barriers in Polymer Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Lonnie J; Duty, Chad E; Post, Brian K; Lind, Randall F; Lloyd, Peter D; Kunc, Vlastimil; Peter, William H; Blue, Craig A

    2015-01-01

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) enables the creation of complex structures directly from a computer-aided design (CAD). There are limitations that prevent the technology from realizing its full potential. AM has been criticized for being slow and expensive with limited build size. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a large scale AM system that improves upon each of these areas by more than an order of magnitude. The Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) system directly converts low cost pellets into a large, three-dimensional part at a rate exceeding 25 kg/h. By breaking these traditional barriers, it is possible for polymer AM to penetrate new manufacturing markets.

  14. CONSTRUCTION ALERT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSTRUCTION ALERT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project TO: Deans, Directors, Chairpersons: November 28 to December 1, 2011 HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION: 6:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. ACCESSIBLE ROUTES: No accessible routes will be affected. ADVISORY: All persons in the vicinity of this construction project

  15. Patent Issued Additional Office Actions Received

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    Patent Issued Additional Office Actions Received 3-12 mo. Respond to Office Action Patent attorney The patent examiner provides notification of which claims in the application have been rejected or accepted determines there are multiple inventions in 1 application. Patent Application Published 6 mo. Non

  16. Colorimetric microanalysis of several organic feed additives 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckman, Herman F.

    1959-01-01

    The energy use and peak load requirements of the addition to Records Storage Building in Austin, Texas were analyzed using the DOE 2.1B building energy simulation program. An analysis was made for the building as specified in schematic designs...

  17. Voluntary Offer Safeguards Agreement and Additional Protocol with the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-12-15

    The Order defines requirements for Department of Energy (DOE) compliance with the Agreement between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the United States, the Protocol to the Agreement, the Additional Protocol to the Agreement, and the Subsidiary Arrangements to the Agreement and Additional Protocol. Cancels DOE O 142.2. Admin Chg 1, 6-27-13.

  18. Voluntary Offer Safeguards Agreement and Additional Protocol with the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-12-15

    The Order defines requirements for Department of Energy (DOE) compliance with the Agreement between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the United States, the Protocol to the Agreement, the Additional Protocol to the Agreement, and the Subsidiary Arrangements to the Agreement and Additional Protocol. Supersedes DOE O 142.2. Admin Chg 1, dated 6-27-13, Supersedes DOE O 142.1A. Certified 12-3-14.

  19. he increasing frequency of detection of the widely used gasoline additive methyl tert-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T he increasing frequency of detection of the widely used gasoline additive methyl tert- butyl, the September 15, 1999, Report of the Blue Ribbon Panel on Oxygenates in Gasoline (1) states that between 5 with large releases (e.g., LUFTs). Unprecedented growth in use Use of MTBE as a gasoline additive began

  20. The addition of disilanes to cumulenes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y.

    1997-10-08

    The syntheses of silicon-containing compounds and the studies of their rearrangements have been active research areas in the Barton research group. Previously, the addition of disilanes to acetylenes was studied in the group and an intramolecular 2S + 2A mechanism has been proposed. In this thesis, the work is focused on the addition of disilanes to cumulenes. The syntheses of the precursors are discussed and the possible mechanisms for their thermal, photochemical and catalytic rearrangements are proposed. Conjugated organic polymers have been studied in the group since 1985 because of their potential for exhibiting high electroconductivity, photoconductivity, strong non-linear optical response and intense fluorescence. In the second section of this dissertation, the synthesis and property studies of poly(phenylene vinylene) analogues are discussed.

  1. Vehicular fuels and additives for the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Interest in automotive fuel is resurging. Automobile fuels must increasingly deal with clean air regulations and ozone problems. Furthermore, feedstocks become heavier,as refinery production changes, as more unleaded is produced, and as an increasing number of pollution regulations must be satisfied greater attention will be paid to better mixtures, solvents, additives, and neat methanol. BCC report analyzes developments technologies, markets, players and the political/regulations aspects of this important market. Study also assesses the advantages and drawbacks of methanol, ethanol, MTBE and other additives which have their place as octane enhancers and fuel substitutes-all now deeply involved in the gasoline modification battle. Other issues addressed are subsidies, farm lobbying, imports, pricing, economics, Detroit's response, neat fuel testing projects, volatility problems vs. fewer ozone-forming hydrocarbon species, and emission ratings.

  2. Energetic additive manufacturing process with feed wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harwell, Lane D. (Albuquerque, NM); Griffith, Michelle L. (Albuquerque, NM); Greene, Donald L. (Corrales, NM); Pressly, Gary A. (Sandia Park, NM)

    2000-11-07

    A process for additive manufacture by energetic wire deposition is described. A source wire is fed into a energy beam generated melt-pool on a growth surface as the melt-pool moves over the growth surface. This process enables the rapid prototyping and manufacture of fully dense, near-net shape components, as well as cladding and welding processes. Alloys, graded materials, and other inhomogeneous materials can be grown using this process.

  3. Chemical Additive Selection in Matrix Acidizing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weidner, Jason 1981-

    2011-05-09

    critical detail of weak acid chemistry. One concern when using any acid in oilfield operations is the corrosion of well tubulars. Thus operators often choose to pump corrosion inhibitor, a chemical additive electrostatically attracted... to the negative charge of the well casing or production tubing, to decrease the rate at which the acid accesses well tubular surfaces (Crowe and Minor 1985). A typical working concentration of corrosion inhibitor is 1-2 wt% of injected acid (Smith et al. 1978...

  4. Anti-friction additives for lubricating oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karol, T.J.; Magaha, H.S.; Schlicht, R.C.

    1987-03-03

    A lubricating oil composition is described comprising (i) a major portion of lubricant oil; and (ii) from about 0.05 to about 10.0 wt.% of, as an additive, a product prepared by reacting a natural oil selected from the group consisting of coconut, babassu, palm, palm kernel, olive, castor, peanut, beef tallow and lard, with a (C/sub 2/-C/sub 10/) hydroxy acid and a polyamine.

  5. High pressure and temperature equations of state: A tool for insight into deep Earth systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armentrout, Matthew Martin

    2012-01-01

    the deep Earth, interpretation of seismic observables, andof state allows interpretation of the seismic observations,

  6. PERMITTING LEADERSHIP IN THE UNITED STATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Nemeth

    2002-09-01

    In accordance with the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) proposal, as incorporated into NETL/DE-FC26-97FT34199, the objective of this agreement is to streamline the environmental technology permitting process site-to-site, state-to-state, and industry-to-industry to achieve remediation and waste processing faster, better and cheaper. SSEB is working with member Governors, legislators and regulators to build consensus on streamlining the permitting process for new and innovative technologies for addressing the legacy of environmental problems from 50 years of weapons research, development and production. This report reviews mechanisms whereby industry consortiums and the Department of Energy (DOE) have been working with State regulators and other officials in technology deployment decisions within the DOE complex. The historic development of relationships with State regulators is reviewed and the current nature of the relationships examined. The report contains observations from internal DOE reviews as well as recommendations from the General Accounting Office (GAO) and other external organizations. The report discusses reorganization initiatives leading up to a DOE Top-to-Bottom review of the Environmental Management (EM) Program and highlights points of consideration for maintaining effective linkages with State regulators. It notes how the proposed changes will place new demands upon the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and how NETL can leverage its resources by refocusing existing EM efforts specifically to states that have DOE facilities within their borders (host-states). Finally, the report discusses how SSEB's Permitting Leadership in the United States (PLUS) program can provide the foundation for elements of NETL's technical assistance program that are delivered to regulators and other decision- makers in host-states. As a regional compact commission, SSEB provides important direct linkages to regulators and stakeholders who need technical assistance to evaluate DOE's cleanup plans. In addition, the PLUS program has facilitated the involvement of key regulators from host-states beyond the Southern region.

  7. S. 2375: a bill to disapprove of certain deferrals of Strategic Petroleum Reserve budget authority, to authorize additional appropriations with respect to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, and to increase oil import fees. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, April 28, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this bill is to disapprove of certain deferrals of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) budget authority, to authorize additional appropriations to the SPR, and to increase oil import fees. The bill authorizes $1 billion for fiscal years 1987, 88, and 89 for crude oil acquisitions for the SPR and $163 million for storage and related facility construction during 1987. It also instructs the Energy Secretary to cease production from the Naval Petroleum Reserve at Elk Hills for six months to allow the reservoir depletion to stabilize.

  8. Quantum Chemical Analysis of the Excited State Dynamics of Hydrated Electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. O. J. Scherer; Sighart F. Fischer

    2006-02-01

    Quantum calculations are performed for an anion water cluster representing the first hydration shell of the solvated electron in solution. The absorption spectra from the ground state, the instant excited states and the relaxed excited states are calculated including CI-SD interactions. Analytic expressions for the nonadiabatic relaxation are presented. It is shown that the 50fs dynamics recently observed after s->p excitation is best accounted for if it is identified with the internal conversion, preceded by an adiabatic relaxation within the excited p state. In addition, transient absorptions found in the infrared are qualitatively reproduced by these calculations .

  9. VOLUME 82, NUMBER 11 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 15 MARCH 1999 Observation of Metastable States in Spinor Bose-Einstein Condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Inouye, A. P. Chikkatur, and W. Ketterle Department of Physics and Research Laboratory of Electronics atoms, spin relaxation, and quantum tunneling was observed. These experiments were done with F 1 spinor Bose-Einstein condensates of sodium confined in an optical dipole trap. [S0031-9007(99)08657-3] PACS

  10. Additive Manufacturing in China: Aviation and Aerospace Applications (Part 2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Analysis May 2013 Additive Manufacturing in China: Aviationan overview of China’s additive manufacturing industry wasmilitary achievements in additive manufacturing. 2 Initial

  11. Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats, Opportunities, and Developments (Part I)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01

    application of additive manufacturing in China’s aviationAnalysis May 2013 Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats,of China’s additive manufacturing industry is presented,

  12. Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsicloudden DocumentationAccommodationsRegisterLithium-based TechnologiesAdvancedAdditive

  13. Lubricant Additives | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EAInvervarLeeds,Asia-Pacific DevelopingLower Valley Energy IncAdditives

  14. Property:AdditionalRef | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2,Information Promoting CleanAdditionalRef Jump to:

  15. Observational learning in an uncertain world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acemoglu, Daron

    We study a model of observational learning in social networks in the presence of uncertainty about agents' type distributions. Each individual receives a private noisy signal about a payoff-relevant state of the world, and ...

  16. Secondary Pollutants from Ozone Reaction with Ventilation Filters and Degradation of Filter Media Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Destaillats, Hugo; Chen, Wenhao; Apte, Michael; Li, Nuan; Spears, Michael; Almosni, Jérémie; Brunner, Gregory; Zhang, Jianshun (Jensen); Fisk, William J.

    2011-05-01

    Prior research suggests that chemical processes taking place on the surface of particle filters employed in buildings may lead to the formation of harmful secondary byproducts. We investigated ozone reactions with fiberglass, polyester, cotton/polyester and polyolefin filter media, as well as hydrolysis of filter media additives. Studies were carried out on unused media, and on filters that were installed for 3 months in buildings at two different locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. Specimens from each filter media were exposed to {approx}150 ppbv ozone in a flow tube under a constant flow of dry or humidified air (50percent RH). Ozone breakthrough was recorded for each sample over periods of {approx}1000 min; the ozone uptake rate was calculated for an initial transient period and for steady-state conditions. While ozone uptake was observed in all cases, we did not observe significant differences in the uptake rate and capacity for the various types of filter media tested. Most experiments were performed at an airflow rate of 1.3 L/min (face velocity = 0.013 m/s), and a few tests were also run at higher rates (8 to 10 L/min). Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, two oxidation byproducts, were quantified downstream of each sample. Those aldehydes (m/z 31 and 45) and other volatile byproducts (m/z 57, 59, 61 and 101) were also detected in real-time using Proton-Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). Low-ppbv byproduct emissions were consistently higher under humidified air than under dry conditions, and were higher when the filters were loaded with particles, as compared with unused filters. No significant differences were observed when ozone reacted over various types of filter media. Fiberglass filters heavily coated with impaction oil (tackifier) showed higher formaldehyde emissions than other samples. Those emissions were particularly high in the case of used filters, and were observed even in the absence of ozone, suggesting that hydrolysis of additives, rather than ozonolysis, is the main formaldehyde source in those filters. Emission rates of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were not found to be large enough to substantially increase indoor concentrations in typical building scenarios. Nevertheless, ozone reactions on HVAC filters cannot be ignored as a source of low levels of indoor irritants.

  17. Complete measurements of quantum observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juha-Pekka Pellonpää

    2012-06-12

    We define a complete measurement of a quantum observable (POVM) as a measurement of the maximally refined version of the POVM. Complete measurements give information from the multiplicities of the measurement outcomes and can be viewed as state preparation procedures. We show that any POVM can be measured completely by using sequential measurements or maximally refinable instruments. Moreover, the ancillary space of a complete measurement can be chosen to be minimal.

  18. Observation of a new charged charmoniumlike state inB¯0?J/?K-?+decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chilikin, K.; Mizuk, R.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D.?M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A.?M.; Bansal, V.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bra?ko, M.; Browder, T.?E.; ?ervenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B.?G.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Danilov, M.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J.?E.; Ferber, T.; Frost, O.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Ganguly, S.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y.?M.; Golob, B.; Grzymkowska, O.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X.?H.; Hou, W.-S.; Huschle, M.; Hyun, H.?J.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, I.; Joo, K.?K.; Julius, T.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D.?Y.; Kim, H.?J.; Kim, J.?H.; Kim, M.?J.; Kim, Y.?J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B.?R.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J.?S.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liu, Y.; Liventsev, D.; Lukin, P.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mohanty, G.?B.; Moll, A.; Mori, T.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nedelkovska, E.; Nisar, N.?K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S.?L.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C.?W.; Park, H.; Pedlar, T.?K.; Petri?, M.; Piilonen, L.?E.; Ribežl, E.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seon, O.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C.?P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stari?, M.; Steder, M.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Tanida, K.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Thorne, F.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Wagner, M.?N.; Wang, C.?H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X.?L.; Watanabe, Y.; Wehle, S.; Williams, K.?M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yashchenko, S.; Zhang, Z.?P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2014-12-16

    We present the results of an amplitude analysis of B¯0?J/?K-?+ decays. A new charged charmoniumlike state Zc(4200)+ decaying to J/??+ is observed with a significance of 6.2?. The mass and width of the Zc(4200)+ are 4196+31-29+17-13 MeV/c2 and 370+70-70+70-132 MeV, respectively; the preferred assignment of the quantum numbers is JP=1+. In addition, we find evidence for Zc(4430)+?J/??+. The analysis is based on a 711 fb-1 data sample collected by the Belle detector at the asymmetric-energy e+e- collider KEKB.

  19. Modeling uranium transport in acidic contaminated groundwater with base addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Fan [Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Luo, Wensui [ORNL; Parker, Jack C. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Jardine, Philip [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Gu, Baohua [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates reactive transport modeling in a column of uranium(VI)-contaminated sediments with base additions in the circulating influent. The groundwater and sediment exhibit oxic conditions with low pH, high concentrations of NO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, U and various metal cations. Preliminary batch experiments indicate that additions of strong base induce rapid immobilization of U for this material. In the column experiment that is the focus of the present study, effluent groundwater was titrated with NaOH solution in an inflow reservoir before reinjection to gradually increase the solution pH in the column. An equilibrium hydrolysis, precipitation and ion exchange reaction model developed through simulation of the preliminary batch titration experiments predicted faster reduction of aqueous Al than observed in the column experiment. The model was therefore modified to consider reaction kinetics for the precipitation and dissolution processes which are the major mechanism for Al immobilization. The combined kinetic and equilibrium reaction model adequately described variations in pH, aqueous concentrations of metal cations (Al, Ca, Mg, Sr, Mn, Ni, Co), sulfate and U(VI). The experimental and modeling results indicate that U(VI) can be effectively sequestered with controlled base addition due to sorption by slowly precipitated Al with pH-dependent surface charge. The model may prove useful to predict field-scale U(VI) sequestration and remediation effectiveness.

  20. Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popple, Richard A. Brezovich, Ivan A.; Fiveash, John B.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. Results: In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. Conclusions: For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify arrangements equivalent to equiangular geometries but using fewer beams. Furthermore, SBA provides the value of the objective function as the number of beams is increased, allowing the planner to select the minimal beam number that achieves the clinical goals. The method is simple to implement and could readily be incorporated into an existing optimization system.

  1. Fact #639: September 6, 2010 Gasoline Tax Rates by State

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Excise Tax on motor gasoline is 18.4 cents per gallon for all states. Each state applies additional taxes which vary from state to state. As of July 2010, Alaska had the lowest overall...

  2. DISCOVERY OF TWO ADDITIONAL JOVIAN IRREGULARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexandersen, M.; Gladman, B.; Veillet, C.; Jacobson, R.; Brozovic, M.; Rousselot, P.

    2012-07-15

    We report on the discovery of two previously undetected irregular satellites of Jupiter (S/2010 J 1 and S/2010 J 2) during recovery observations of other known satellites. S/2010 J 1 was discovered with the Palomar 200 inch Hale telescope on September 7 UT of 2011, while S/2010 J 2 was discovered on September 8 with the 3.5 m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. The satellites have r-band magnitudes of 23.2 {+-} 0.3 and 24.0 {+-} 0.3, for S/2010 J 1 and S/2010 J 2, respectively, indicating diameters of {approx}2-3 km. Both S/2010 J 1 and S/2010 J 2 are on bound retrograde orbits. Time-averaged integrated orbits suggest the association to the Carme and Ananke groups, respectively. Given that the satellites were discovered within a small field during the routine observations of the previously known irregulars, their discovery agrees with predictions that other moons of similar sizes remain undetected in the Jovian Hill sphere.

  3. NMR relaxometry study of plaster mortar with polymer additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jumate, E.; Manea, D. [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Faculty of Civil Engineering. 15 C Daicoviciu Str., 400020, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Faculty of Civil Engineering. 15 C Daicoviciu Str., 400020, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Moldovan, D.; Fechete, R. [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Department of Physics and Chemistry, 25 G. Baritiu Str., 400027, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Department of Physics and Chemistry, 25 G. Baritiu Str., 400027, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    The cement mixed with water forms a plastic paste or slurry which stiffness in time and finally hardens into a resistant stone. The addition of sand aggregates, polymers (Walocel) and/or calcium carbonate will modify dramatically the final mortar mechanic and thermal properties. The hydration processes can be observed using the 1D NMR measurements of transverse T{sub 2} relaxation times distributions analysed by a Laplace inversion algorithm. These distributions were obtained for mortar pasta measured at 2 hours after preparation then at 3, 7 and 28 days after preparation. Multiple components are identified in the T{sub 2} distributions. These can be associated with the proton bounded chemical or physical to the mortar minerals characterized by a short T{sub 2} relaxation time and to water protons in pores with three different pore sizes as observed from SEM images. The evaporation process is faster in the first hours after preparation, while the mortar hydration (bonding of water molecules to mortar minerals) can be still observed after days or months from preparation. Finally, the mechanic resistance was correlated with the transverse T{sub 2} relaxation rates corresponding to the bound water.

  4. RXTE Observations of an Outburst of Recurrent X-ray Nova GS 1354-644

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikhail G. Revnivtsev; Konstantin N. Borozdin; William C. Priedhorsky; Alexey Vikhlinin

    1999-10-13

    We present the results of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer observations of GS 1354-644 during a modest outburst in 1997-1998. The source is one of a handful of black hole X-ray transients that are confirmed to be recurrent in X-rays. A 1987 outburst of the same source observed by Ginga was much brighter, and showed a high/soft spectral state. In contrast the 1997-1998 outburst showed a low/hard spectral state. Both states are typical for black hole binaries. The RXTE All Sky Monitor observed an outburst duration of 150 to 200 days. PCA and HEXTE observations covered ~70 days near the maximum of the light curve and during the flux decline. Throughout the observations, the spectrum can be approximated by Compton upscattering of soft photons by energetic electrons. The hot electron cloud has a temperature kT ~30 keV and optical depth tau~4--5. To fit the data well an additional iron fluorescent line and reflection component are required, which indicates the presence of optically thick cool material, most probably in the outer part of the accretion disk. Dramatic fast variability was observed, and has been analyzed in the context of a shot noise model. The spectrum appeared to be softest at the peaks of the shot-noise variability. The shape of the power spectrum was typical for black hole systems in a low/hard state. We note a qualitative difference in the shape of the dependence of fractional variability on energy, when we compare systems with black holes and with neutron stars. Since it is difficult to discriminate these systems on spectral grounds, at least in their low/hard states, this new difference might be important.

  5. Fourth Generation Bound States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koji Ishiwata; Mark B. Wise

    2011-05-25

    We investigate the spectrum and wave functions of {\\bar q}'q' bound states for heavy fourth generation quarks (q') that have a very small mixing with the three observed generations of standard model quarks. Such bound states come with different color, spin and flavor quantum numbers. Since the fourth generation Yukawa coupling, \\lambda_{q'}, is large we include all perturbative corrections to the potential between the heavy quark and antiquark of order \\lambda_{q'}^2N_c/16\\pi^2 where N_c is the number of colors, as well as relativistic corrections suppressed by (v/c)^2. We find that the lightest fourth generation quark masses for which a bound state exists for color octet states. For the the color singlet states, which always have a bound state, we analyze the influence that the Higgs couplings have on the size and binding energy of the bound states.

  6. Ionic Liquids with Ammonium Cations as Lubricants or Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, Jun; Blau, Peter Julian; Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin; Truhan, Jr., John J

    2006-01-01

    Friction and wear are estimated to cost 6% of the US gross national product, or around $700 billion annually. A new class of more effective lubricants could lead to huge energy savings. Limited recent literature has suggested potential for using room-temperature ionic liquids as lubricants, however only a few out of millions (or more) of species have been evaluated. Recent ORNL work discovered a new category of ionic liquids with ammonium cations that have demonstrated promising lubricating properties as net lubricants or lubricant additives, particularly in lubricating difficult-to-lubricate metals like aluminum. More than 30% friction reduction has been observed on ammonium-based ionic liquids compared to conventional hydrocarbon oils. The inherent polarity of ionic liquids is believed to provide strong adhesion to contact surfaces and form a boundary lubricating film leading to friction and wear reductions. Other advantages of ionic liquids include (1) negligible volatility, (2) high thermal stability, (3) non-flammability, and (4) better intrinsic properties that eliminate the necessity of many expensive lubricant additives. With very flexible molecular structures, this new class of lubricants, particularly ammonium-based ionic liquids, can be tailored to fit a big variety of applications including but not limited to bearings, combustion engines, MEMS, and metal forming.

  7. Developments in Assisting Countries in Implementing the IAEA Additional Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killinger, Mark H.; Hansen, Linda H.; Cain, Ronald A.; Kovacic, Don N.; Apt, Kenneth E.; VanSickle, Matthew

    2010-08-11

    In 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began assisting selected non-nuclear weapon states in planning and preparing for implementation of the International Atomic Energy Agency’s Additional Protocol (AP). Since then, the AP international implementation program has contributed to the substantial progress made by Vietnam, Thailand, Iraq, and Malaysia in preparing for entry-into-force of the AP. An overall engagement plan has been developed with components designed to train government AP implementing agencies, inform policy makers, conduct outreach to industry and universities, make AP reporting software available and useful, and plan a detailed approach for implementing the declaration and complementary access provisions of the AP. DOE recently began collaborating with Indonesia, which has already entered the AP into force, requiring a second method of engagement somewhat different from that taken with countries that have not entered the AP into force. The AP international implementation program, administered by the International Nuclear Safeguards and Engagement Program, is working more closely with DOE’s International Nonproliferation Export Control Program to ensure countries are aware of and prepared to implement the export/import provisions of the AP. As the AP implementation program matures and helps move countries closer to entry-into-force or improved AP implementation, it is identifying characteristics of a country’s “end-state” that indicate that DOE assistance is no longer required. The U.S. AP Implementation Act and Senate Resolution of Ratification require the Administration to report annually to Congress on measures taken to achieve the adoption of the AP in non-nuclear weapon states. DOE’s AP international implementation program is a significant part of these measures. This paper describes recent developments to increase the scope and effectiveness of the program.

  8. NuSTAR OBSERVATIONS AND BROADBAND SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION MODELING OF THE MILLISECOND PULSAR BINARY PSR J1023+0038

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, K. L.; Kong, A. K. H.; Tam, P. H. T.; Jin, Ruolan [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Takata, J.; Cheng, K. S. [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Hui, C. Y., E-mail: lilirayhk@gmail.com, E-mail: akong@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: takata@hku.hk [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-20

    We report the first hard X-ray (3-79 keV) observations of the millisecond pulsar (MSP) binary PSR J1023+0038 using NuSTAR. This system has been shown transiting between a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) state and a rotation-powered MSP state. The NuSTAR observations were taken in both LMXB state and rotation-powered state. The source is clearly seen in both states up to ?79 keV. During the LMXB state, the 3-79 keV flux is about a factor of 10 higher than in the rotation-powered state. The hard X-rays show clear orbital modulation during the X-ray faint rotation-powered state but the X-ray orbital period is not detected in the X-ray bright LMXB state. In addition, the X-ray spectrum changes from a flat power-law spectrum during the rotation-powered state to a steeper power-law spectrum in the LMXB state. We suggest that the hard X-rays are due to the intrabinary shock from the interaction between the pulsar wind and the injected material from the low-mass companion star. During the rotation-powered MSP state, the X-ray orbital modulation is due to Doppler boosting of the shocked pulsar wind. At the LMXB state, the evaporating matter of the accretion disk due to the gamma-ray irradiation from the pulsar stops almost all the pulsar wind, resulting in the disappearance of the X-ray orbital modulation.

  9. MECH 502: Advanced/Additive Manufacturing Engineering COURSE DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connors, Daniel A.

    MECH 502: Advanced/Additive Manufacturing Engineering COURSE DESCRIPTION In this course you product development and innovation. You will develop a rich knowledge of additive manufacturing processes enabling advanced/additive manufacturing and personal fabrication. You will have the opportunity

  10. Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats, Opportunities, and Developments (Part I)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01

    application of additive manufacturing in China’s aviationAnalysis May 2013 Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats,an overview of China’s additive manufacturing industry is

  11. Quantum Residual Correlation: Interpreting through State Merging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indranil Chakrabarty; Abhishek Deshpande; Sourav Chatterjee

    2015-03-03

    In this brief report we revisit the concept of "quantum dissension", which was introduced as a natural extension of quantum discord for three qubit system. Here we bring in new expression for quantum dissensions and more interestingly we name one such expression as \\textit{residual correlation}. The basic objective behind the introduction of such a quantity is to capture the extra amount of correlation generated by doing measurement in a correlated system from a situation where we do not bring in a correlated system in the measurement process. Apart from this we also present an operational interpretation of this correlation in context of state merging. Remarkably, we find that for three qubit system if one discards relevant prior information, the change in the cost of state merging ( merging the quantum information of two parties into one) is captured by the \\textit{residual correlation}. In addition to that we found that this quantity can be negative for mixed states. This indeed opens up a new dimension in the tripartite scenario where we can observe situations where there is a decrease in the cost of state merging on discarding relevant prior information. We claim that this result establishes a re conceptualization of information processing tasks in tripartite situations where we can use suitable measurement and states to bring down the cost of the protocol.

  12. Ionic Liquids as Novel Engine Lubricants or Lubricant Additives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engine Lubricants or Lubricant Additives Ionic Liquids as Novel Engine Lubricants or Lubricant Additives Bench test results showed that compared with fully-formulated engine oils,...

  13. Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Lubricant and Additive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Theoretical Investigation of Lubricant and Additive Effects on Engine Friction Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Lubricant and Additive Effects on Engine Friction...

  14. Department of Energy Announces Plans for Additional Comment Period...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Announces Plans for Additional Comment Period on National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors Department of Energy Announces Plans for Additional Comment...

  15. Ionic Liquids as Multifunctional Ashless Additives for Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multi-Functional Lubricant Additives to Enhance Engine Efficiency Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Can hard coatings and lubricant anti-wear additives work together?...

  16. Army Awards 20 Additional Contracts for Renewable Energy Technologies...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Army Awards 20 Additional Contracts for Renewable Energy Technologies Army Awards 20 Additional Contracts for Renewable Energy Technologies February 26, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis The...

  17. Unlocking the Potential of Additive Manufacturing in the Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Unlocking the Potential of Additive Manufacturing in the Fuel Cells Industry Unlocking the Potential of Additive Manufacturing in the Fuel Cells Industry Download presentation...

  18. Department of Energy Announces Two Additional Loans of Oil from...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Two Additional Loans of Oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Department of Energy Announces Two Additional Loans of Oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve September 2, 2005 -...

  19. The Role of Lubricant Additives in Fuel Efficiency and Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lubricant Additives in Fuel Efficiency and Emission Reductions: Viscosity Effects The Role of Lubricant Additives in Fuel Efficiency and Emission Reductions: Viscosity Effects...

  20. An Overview of Polymer Additive Manufacturing Technologies Peterson...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Polymer Additive Manufacturing Technologies Peterson, Dominic S. Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Materials Science(36) Additive Manufacturing...

  1. Title: Investigation of extraterrestrial construction processes using Additive Manufacturing techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anand, Mahesh

    Title: Investigation of extraterrestrial construction processes using Additive Manufacturing: · To investigate the strengths and weaknesses of existing Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes relevant to lunar

  2. Obama Administration Announces Additional $13,969,700 for Local...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Additional 13,969,700 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Alaska Obama Administration Announces Additional 13,969,700 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Alaska...

  3. Additives and Cathode Materials for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Additives and Cathode Materials for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur Batteries Additives and Cathode Materials for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur Batteries 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

  4. The Role of Additive in Diketopyrrolopyrrole-based Small Molecular...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Role of Additive in Diketopyrrolopyrrole-based Small Molecular Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Role of Additive in...

  5. Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export...

  6. Recommendation 222: Recommendations on Additional Off-site Groundwater...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2: Recommendations on Additional Off-site Groundwater Migration Studies Recommendation 222: Recommendations on Additional Off-site Groundwater Migration Studies ORSSAB recommends...

  7. Controlled Experiments on the Effects of Lubricant/Additive ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Experiments on the Effects of LubricantAdditive (Low-Ash, Ashless) Characteristics on DPF Degradation Controlled Experiments on the Effects of LubricantAdditive (Low-Ash,...

  8. Additive Manufacturing in China: Aviation and Aerospace Applications (Part 2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Analysis May 2013 Additive Manufacturing in China: Aviationof China’s additive manufacturing industry was presented. Inroles in addi- tive manufacturing (AM) development and

  9. The Importance of Carbon Fiber to Polymer Additive Manufacturing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Importance of Carbon Fiber to Polymer Additive Manufacturing Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Importance of Carbon Fiber to Polymer Additive Manufacturing...

  10. DOE Providing Additional Supercomputing Resources to Study Hurricane...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Providing Additional Supercomputing Resources to Study Hurricane Effects on Gulf Coast DOE Providing Additional Supercomputing Resources to Study Hurricane Effects on Gulf Coast...

  11. Geo-neutrino Observation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dye, S. T.; Alderman, M.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Mahoney, J. M.; Pakvasa, S.; Rosen, M.; Smith, S.; Varner, G.; McDonough, W. F.

    2009-12-17

    Observations of geo-neutrinos measure radiogenic heat production within the earth, providing information on the thermal history and dynamic processes of the mantle. Two detectors currently observe geo-neutrinos from underground locations. Other detection projects in various stages of development include a deep ocean observatory. This paper presents the current status of geo-neutrino observation and describes the scientific capabilities of the deep ocean observatory, with emphasis on geology and neutrino physics.

  12. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  13. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  14. Catalyst Additives to Enhance Mercury Oxidation and Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jared W. Cannon; Thomas K. Gale

    2005-06-30

    Preliminary research has shown that SCR catalysts employed for nitrogen-oxide reduction can effectively oxidize mercury. This report discusses initial results from fundamental investigations into the behavior of mercury species in the presence of SCR catalysts at Southern Research Institute. The testing was performed at Southern Research's Catalyst Test Facility, a bench-scale reactor capable of simulating gas-phase reactions occurring in coal-fired utility pollution-control equipment. Three different SCR catalysts are currently being studied in this project--honeycomb-type, plate-type, and a hybrid-type catalyst. The catalysts were manufactured and supplied by Cormetech Inc., Hitachi America Ltd., and Haldor-Topsoe Inc., respectively. Parametric testing was performed to investigate the contribution of flue-gas chemistry on mercury oxidation via SCR catalysts. Methods and procedures for experimental testing continue to be developed to produce the highest quality mercury-oxidation data. During this past quarter, it was discovered that long periods (12 - 24 hours) are required to equilibrate the catalysts in the system. In addition, after the system has been equilibrated, operational changes to temperature, gas concentration, or flow rate shifts the equilibrium, and steady-state must be reestablished, which can require as much as twelve additional hours per condition change. In the last quarter of testing, it was shown that the inclusion of ammonia had a strong effect on the oxidation of mercury by SCR catalysts, both in the short-term (a transitional period of elemental and oxidized mercury off gassing) and the long-term (less steady-state mercury oxidation). All experiments so far have focused on testing the catalysts in a simulated Powder River Basin (PRB) flue-gas environment, which contains lower sulfur and chlorine than produced by other coals. In the next quarter, parametric testing will be expanded to include flue gases simulating power plants burning Midwestern and Eastern coals, which are higher in sulfur and chlorine. Also, the isolation of such gases as hydrogen chloride (HCl), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), and sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}) will be investigated. All of these efforts will be used to examine the kinetics of mercury oxidation across the SCR catalysts with respect to flue gas composition, temperature, and flow rate.

  15. Physical observability of horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matt Visser

    2014-11-25

    Event horizons are (generically) not physically observable. In contrast, apparent horizons (and the closely related trapping horizons) are generically physically observable --- in the sense that they can be detected by observers working in finite-size regions of spacetime. Consequently event horizons are inappropriate tools for defining astrophysical black holes, or indeed for defining any notion of evolving}black hole, (evolving either due to accretion or Hawking radiation). The only situation in which an event horizon becomes physically observable is for the very highly idealized stationary or static black holes, when the event horizon is a Killing horizon which is degenerate with the apparent and trapping horizons; and then it is the physical observability of the apparent/trapping horizons that is fundamental --- the event horizon merely comes along for the ride.

  16. Physical observability of horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Event horizons are (generically) not physically observable. In contrast, apparent horizons (and the closely related trapping horizons) are generically physically observable --- in the sense that they can be detected by observers working in finite-size regions of spacetime. Consequently event horizons are inappropriate tools for defining astrophysical black holes, or indeed for defining any notion of evolving}black hole, (evolving either due to accretion or Hawking radiation). The only situation in which an event horizon becomes physically observable is for the very highly idealized stationary or static black holes, when the event horizon is a Killing horizon which is degenerate with the apparent and trapping horizons; and then it is the physical observability of the apparent/trapping horizons that is fundamental --- the event horizon merely comes along for the ride.

  17. Insights from modeling and observational evaluation of a precipitating continental cumulus event observed during the MC3E field campaign

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mechem, David B.; Giangrande, Scott E.; Wittman, Carly S.; Borque, Paloma; Toto, Tami; Kollias, Pavlos

    2015-03-13

    A case of shallow cumulus and precipitating cumulus congestus sampled at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) supersite is analyzed using a multi-sensor observational approach and numerical simulation. Observations from a new radar suite surrounding the facility are used to characterize the evolving statistical behavior of the precipitating cloud system. This is accomplished using distributions of different measures of cloud geometry and precipitation properties. Large-eddy simulation (LES) with size-resolved (bin) microphysics is employed to determine the forcings most important in producing the salient aspects of the cloud system captured in the radar observations. Our emphasis ismore »on assessing the importance of time-varying vs. steady-state large-scale forcing on the model's ability to reproduce the evolutionary behavior of the cloud system. Additional consideration is given to how the characteristic spatial scale and homogeneity of the forcing imposed on the simulation influences the evolution of cloud system properties. Results indicate that several new scanning radar estimates such as distributions of cloud top are useful to differentiate the value of time-varying (or at least temporally well-matched) forcing on LES solution fidelity.« less

  18. Observability of complex systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yang-Yu

    A quantitative description of a complex system is inherently limited by our ability to estimate the system’s internal state from experimentally accessible outputs. Although the simultaneous measurement of all internal ...

  19. Online Appendix with an Additional Example for Subjective Auxiliary State for Coarse-Grained Concurrency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanevski, Aleksandar

    .nanevski}@imdea.org 1. Buffer Library and Producer/Consumer Client To illustrate separate verification of a library and its client, we adapt another classic example due to Owicki and Gries. The library is a one arrays have identical contents. 1.1 Buffer Library The buffer library BufferLib (Figure 1, left) provides

  20. Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Council Smart Grid Project Western Electricity Coordinating Council Smart Grid Project Salt Lake City Utah Arizona California Colorado Idaho Montana New Mexico Nevada Oregon South...

  1. The PennsylvaniaStateUniversity HUB-RobesonAddition and Renovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprinkler Installation · Install Skylight Framing · Wire Switchgear in Electrical Room Level B4 · Hang

  2. The PennsylvaniaState University HUB-RobesonAddition and Renovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Switchgear · Hang Ductwork in Bookstore · Pour Concrete Footings in Food Service Coolers © Gilbane Building Switchgear · Hang Ductwork in Bookstore · Install Hangers for Hot and Chilled Water in Crawlspace · Form

  3. The PennsylvaniaStateUniversity HUB-RobesonAddition and Renovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Hang Acoustical Ceiling in Food Service · Wire Switchgear in Electrical Room Level B4 © Gilbane in Food Service · Hang Acoustical Ceiling in Food Service · Wire Switchgear in Electrical Room Level B4

  4. The PennsylvaniaStateUniversity HUB-RobesonAddition and Renovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -In · Pour Slab On Deck at Level 1 & 2 · Plumbing in MB018 · Electric Panel and Switchgear Rough in MB018 · 2

  5. Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)Energy Technology JumpWilliamDRAFT REPORTCity of Tallahassee

  6. Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)Energy Technology JumpWilliamDRAFT REPORTCity of

  7. Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLC JumpPhonoSolarProcessingProgress974 JumpLanding New

  8. Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLC JumpPhonoSolarProcessingProgress974 JumpLanding

  9. Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLC JumpPhonoSolarProcessingProgress974

  10. Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLC JumpPhonoSolarProcessingProgress974Tyngsboro

  11. Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLC JumpPhonoSolarProcessingProgress974TyngsboroTexas

  12. Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLC

  13. Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLCALLETE Inc d b a Minnesota Power Smart Grid Project

  14. Technical Options for Processing Additional Light Tight Oil Volumes within the United States

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979 1.988Prices, Sales Volumes &15.14.298 WaterTechnical

  15. Securing Texas water: Experts call for additional planning, policies, expanding "new" water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    and policy for the Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority, said the state no longer has the surplus water it had from SECURING TEXAS WATER Experts call for additional planning, policies, expanding ?new? water Summer 2012 tx H2O 3 ] the reservoirs built a...

  16. Examination of microbial fuel cell start-up times with domestic wastewater and additional amendments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Examination of microbial fuel cell start-up times with domestic wastewater and additional, University Park, PA 16802, USA c State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization, Department of Energy Available online 30 April 2011 Keywords: Microbial fuel cell Domestic wastewater Startup time Substrate a b

  17. Multiagent Resource Allocation in k-additive Domains: Preference Representation and Complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amsterdam, University of

    a utility function mapping "states of affairs" (outcomes of an election, allocations of resourcesMultiagent Resource Allocation in k-additive Domains: Preference Representation and Complexity Yann for multiagent resource allocation where autonomous software agents negotiate over the allocation of bundles

  18. Annals of Operations Research Multiagent Resource Allocation in k-additive Domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endriss, Ulle

    a utility function mapping "states of affairs" (outcomes of an election, allocations of resourcesAnnals of Operations Research To appear Multiagent Resource Allocation in k-additive Domains allocation where autonomous software agents negotiate over the allocation of bundles of indivisible resources

  19. Observables on Quantum Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anatolij Dvure?enskij; Mária Kuková

    2012-04-29

    An observable on a quantum structure is any $\\sigma$-homomorphism of quantum structures from the Borel $\\sigma$-algebra into the quantum structure. We show that our partial information on an observable known only for all intervals of the form $(-\\infty,t)$ is sufficient to determine uniquely the whole observable defined on quantum structures like $\\sigma$-MV-algebras, $\\sigma$-effect algebras, Boolean $\\sigma$-algebras, monotone $\\sigma$-complete effect algebras with the Riesz Decomposition Property, the effect algebra of effect operators of a Hilbert space, and a system of functions, and an effect-tribe.

  20. MARS OBSERVER Mission Failure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    of Mars Observer Mission Failure.. ................... D-12 a. Most Probable Cause: Leakage of NT0 Through Check Valves .................................................................. D-14 b. Potential Cause: Pressure Regulator Failure....................... D-28 c. Potential Cause: Failure of a Pyro Valve Charge

  1. Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jefferson, A

    2011-01-17

    The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

  2. If physics is an information science, what is an observer?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris Fields

    2012-02-11

    Interpretations of quantum theory have traditionally assumed a "Galilean" observer, a bare "point of view" implemented physically by a quantum system. This paper investigates the consequences of replacing such an informationally-impoverished observer with an observer that satisfies the requirements of classical automata theory, i.e. an observer that encodes sufficient prior information to identify the system being observed and recognize its acceptable states. It shows that with reasonable assumptions about the physical dynamics of information channels, the observations recorded by such an observer will display the typical characteristics predicted by quantum theory, without requiring any specific assumptions about the observer's physical implementation.

  3. Hard (State) Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John A. Tomsick

    2008-12-16

    For microquasars, the one time when these systems exhibit steady and powerful jets is when they are in the hard state. Thus, our understanding of this state is key to learning about the disk/jet connection. Recent observational and theoretical results have led to questions about whether we really understand the physical properties of this state, and even our basic picture of this state is uncertain. Here, I discuss some of the recent developments and possible problems with our understanding of this state. Overall, it appears that the strongest challenge to the standard truncated disk picture is the detection of broad iron features in the X-ray spectra, and it seems that either there is a problem with the truncated disk picture or there is a problem with the relativistic reflection models used to explain the broad iron features.

  4. Aided by Simulations, Scientists Observe Atomic Collapse State

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional KnowledgeAgenda Agenda NERSC UserAgustin Mihi and PaulAtomic

  5. Core Lithology State of Hawaii Scientific Observation Hole 4 Kilauea

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)| Open(Evans,Oregon:

  6. Core Lithology State of Hawail Scientific Observation Hole 2 Kilauea

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)| Open(Evans,Oregon:Volcano, Hawaii | Open Energy

  7. Ultrafast observation of shocked states in a precompressed material

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaon and(Conference) |Article) |Fe(phen)free-electron laser

  8. Ultrafast observation of shocked states in a precompressed material

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaon and(Conference) |Article) |Fe(phen)free-electron laser(Journal

  9. Equilibration of hadrons in HICs via Hagedorn States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beitel, M; Greiner, C

    2015-01-01

    Hagedorn states (HS) are a tool to model the hadronization process which occurs in the phase transition region between the quark gluon plasma (QGP) and the hadron resonance gas (HRG). These states are believed to appear near the Hagedorn temperature $T_H$ which in our understanding equals the critical temperature $T_c$. A covariantly formulated bootstrap equation is solved to generate the zoo of these particles characterized baryon number $B$, strangeness $S$ and electric charge $Q$. These hadron-like resonances are characterized by being very massive and by not being limited to quantum numbers of known hadrons. All hadronic properties like masses, spectral functions etc.are taken from the hadronic transport model Ultra Relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD). Decay chains of single Hagedorn states provide a well description of experimentally observed multiplicity ratios of strange and multi-strange particles. In addition, the final energy spectra of resulting hadrons show a thermal-like distribution ...

  10. Highly Selective Acetate Aldol Additions Using Mesityl-Substituted Chiral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    been reported for acetate-type aldol additions involving the use of tin,7 lithium,8 boron,9Highly Selective Acetate Aldol Additions Using Mesityl-Substituted Chiral Auxiliaries Michael T Highly diastereoselective acetate aldol additions using chlorotitanium enolates of mesityl-substituted N

  11. MANUFACTURABILITY ANALYSIS TO COMBINE ADDITIVE AND SUBTRACTIVE PROCESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    MANUFACTURABILITY ANALYSIS TO COMBINE ADDITIVE AND SUBTRACTIVE PROCESSES Authors: Olivier Kerbrat of the tool may advantageously be machined or manufactured by an additive process. Originality/value: Nowadays is proposed to combine additive and subtractive processes, for tooling design and manufacturing

  12. Air Observe System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-10

    This manuscript contains a description and basic principles for observing inaccessible areas using low cost, easily deployed equipment. The basic premise is to suspend a tiny video camera at an altitude of 10 - 200 meters over the area to be surveyed. The TV camera supports at altitude by wind or balloon. The technical challenges regard the means by which the camera is suspended. Such a system may be used by military or police forces or by civil authorities for rescue missions or assessment of natural disasters. The method may be further developed for military applications by integrating the surveillance task with deployment of munitions. Key words: air observer, air suspended system, low altitude video observer.

  13. Observability of Neuronal Network Motifs (Invited Paper)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brennan, Sean

    Observability of Neuronal Network Motifs (Invited Paper) Andrew J. Whalen*t, Sean N. Brennan Engineering, + Engineering Science and Mechanics, Neurosurgery, and Physics, Penn State University, University) neuronal networks as a function of 1) the connection topology and sym metry, 2) the measured nodes, and 3

  14. Quantum Mechanics Without Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. H. Sulis

    2013-03-03

    The measurement problem and the role of observers have plagued quantum mechanics since its conception. Attempts to resolve these have introduced anthropomorphic or non-realist notions into physics. A shift of perspective based upon process theory and utilizing methods from combinatorial games, interpolation theory and complex systems theory results in a novel realist version of quantum mechanics incorporating quasi-local, nondeterministic hidden variables that are compatible with the no-hidden variable theorems and relativistic invariance, and reproduce the standard results of quantum mechanics to a high degree of accuracy without invoking observers.

  15. Additive development for ultra-clean coal slurry fuel: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, M.H.; Swanson, W.W.

    1988-05-24

    AMAX performed research to develop improved quality, cost-effective dispersing additives for coal-water slurry fuels intended for high-intensity combustion systems. Dispersants were identified on the basis of coal surface characteristics and coal-dispersant interactions. Micronized samples of physically and chemically cleaned coal feedstocks from the Eastern and Midwestern regions of the United States were examined using bulk and surface analysis techniques. Utilization of coal surface and dispersant functionality was optimized through multicomponent application of additives, pH control, and control of surface oxidation. A low-cost, low-alkali, sulfur-free dextrin compound was found to be effective in enhancing dispersion when applied to the coal surfaces as a pretreatment or with conventional dispersants as a co-additive. The cleaning method and ash content had minimal direct impact on coal surface functionality. Parameters such as internal moisture, particle size, surface area, surface oxidation, and soluble ions were the primary considerations which influenced slurry loading and additive consumption. The dispersing additive packages functioned over the range of coal types and cleaning levels investigated. The preferred additives were compatible with each other, allowing for blending to optimize performance, cost, and alkali contamination. Each additive was found to be suitable for use in applications which utilize elevated-temperature fuel delivery systems. 17 refs., 8 figs., 27 tabs.

  16. Effects of the vacuum state on the statistics of nonclassical states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alioui, N.; Amroun-Frahi, A.; Bendjaballah, C.

    2007-10-15

    Based on the calculation of the Wigner function, some statistical properties of the superposition of two coherent states with a vacuum state are demonstrated. The distance variation difference function is calculated for these states. Application of homodyne statistics shows that the addition (subtraction) of the vacuum state can improve the classical channel capacity of a noiseless binary symmetric system.

  17. Global Warming Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    Global Warming Observations: 1. Global temperature has been gradually rising in recent years #15 in range 8000 12000 nm { CFC's, methane and N 2 O important for global warming even though concentra- tions in concentration of \\greenhouse gases" like CO 2 What determines global temperature? Energy budget of earth: 1

  18. RECORDS AND OBSERVATIONS FROM PLANKTON GRID STUDIES OFF BAJA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    422 RECORDS AND OBSERVATIONS FROM PLANKTON GRID STUDIES OFF BAJA CALIFORNIA, APRIL 1952 SPECIAL AND OBSERVATIONS FROM PLANKTON GRID STUDIES OFF BAJA CALIFORNIA, APRIL 1952 by David Kramer United States Fish volumes 21 Literature cited 42 Hi #12;#12;RECORDS AND OBSERVATIONS FROM PLANKTON GRID STUDIES OFF BAJA

  19. Tetraquark state and multibody interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng Chengrong [School of Mathematics and Physics, Chongqing Jiaotong University, Chongqing 400074 (China); Department of Physics, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210097 (China); Ping Jialun [Department of Physics, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210097 (China); Wang Fan [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Goldman, T. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2010-10-01

    The tetraquark states with diquark-anti-diquark configuration have been studied in the flux-tube model, in which the multibody confinement is used. In this model approach, the states Y(2175), f{sub 0}(600), f{sub 0}(980), and X(1576) can be assigned as tetraquark states. They are color confinement resonances with three-dimension structure. This study suggests that the multibody confinement should be employed in the quark model study of multiquark states instead of the additive two-body confinement.

  20. Observations of Exoplanet Atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crossfield, Ian J M

    2015-01-01

    Detailed characterization of an extrasolar planet's atmosphere provides the best hope for distinguishing the makeup of its outer layers, and the only hope for understanding the interplay between initial composition, chemistry, dynamics & circulation, and disequilibrium processes. In recent years, some areas have seen rapid progress while developments in others have come more slowly and/or have been hotly contested. This article gives an observer's perspective on the current understanding of extrasolar planet atmospheres prior to the considerable advances expected from the next generation of observing facilities. Atmospheric processes of both transiting and directly-imaged planets are discussed, including molecular and atomic abundances, cloud properties, thermal structure, and planetary energy budgets. In the future we can expect a continuing and accelerating stream of new discoveries, which will fuel the ongoing exoplanet revolution for many years to come.

  1. Observable primordial vector modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antony Lewis

    2004-06-04

    Primordial vector modes describe vortical fluid perturbations in the early universe. A regular solution exists with constant non-zero radiation vorticities on super-horizon scales. Baryons are tightly coupled to the photons, and the baryon velocity only decays by an order unity factor by recombination, leading to an observable CMB anisotropy signature via the Doppler effect. There is also a large B-mode CMB polarization signal, with significant power on scales larger than l~2000. This B-mode signature is distinct from that expected from tensor modes or gravitational lensing, and makes a primordial vector to scalar mode power ratio ~10^(-6) detectable. Future observations aimed at detecting large scale B-modes from gravitational waves will also be sensitive to regular vector modes at around this level.

  2. Observations on European Agriculture. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1911-01-01

    AS ACKICUL-I-uRAL EXPE RIMENT STATIONS bLLETIN No. 14-1 DECEMBER, 1911 Division of Chemistry Observations on European Agriculture BY G. S. FRAPS, Chemist 0 Postoffice : CULLEGE STATION; TEXAS AUSTIN. TEXAS I AUSTIN PRINTING CO:. PRINTERS... ............................................... and Conclusions 35 [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] rrvations on European Agriculture By C. S. FRAPS ie object of this Bulletin is to present such abservadons on :ulture in Europe as may offer suggestions of value to Texas - :ulturists. The writer...

  3. First observation of doubly charmed baryons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. A. Moinester et al.

    2003-09-25

    The SELEX experiment (E781) at Fermilab has observed two statistically compelling high mass states near 3.6 GeV/c{sup 2}, decaying to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +} and {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}. These final states are Cabibbo-allowed decay modes of doubly charmed baryons {Xi}{sub cc}{sup +} and {Xi}{sub cc}{sup ++}, respectively. The masses are in the range expected from theoretical considerations, but the spectroscopy is surprising. SELEX also has weaker preliminary evidence for a state near 3.8 GeV/c{sup 2}, a high mass state decaying to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}, possibly an excited {Xi}{sub cc}{sup ++} (ccu*). Data are presented and discussed.

  4. PERFORMANCE ENHANCEMENT OF COMPRESSION MOLDED KENAF FIBER REINFORCED VINYL ESTER COMPOSITES THROUGH RESIN ADDITIVE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Laddha, Sachin; Kafentzis, Tyler A.

    2010-05-17

    Plant-based bio-fiber has the potential to achieve weight and cost savings over glass fiber in automotive polymer composites if moisture stability and fiber-resin compatibility issues can be solved. This paper describes the compression molding of 50vol% 2 inch random nonwoven mat kenaf fiber vinyl ester composites with and without chemical resin additives intended to improve moisture stability and resin compatibility. The 2wt% addition of n-undecanoyl chloride or 10-undecenoyl chloride to the styrene-based resin prior to molding of the kenaf composites was observed to decrease the 24hr, 25oC moisture uptake of the molded panels by more than 50%. The tensile stiffness and flexural stiffness of the soaked panels containing these additives were seen to increase by more than 30% and 70%, respectively, relative to panels made with no additives. While ‘dry’ panel (50% relative humidity at 25oC) strengths did not significantly change in the presence of the additives, tensile strength was observed to increase by more than 40% and flexural strength more than doubled for the soaked panels.

  5. Granular impact and the critical packing state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umbanhowar, Paul; 10.1103/PhysRevE.82.010301

    2010-01-01

    Impact dynamics during collisions of spheres with granular media reveal a pronounced and non-trivial dependence on volume fraction \\phi. Post impact crater morphology identifies the critical packing state \\phi_{cps}, where sheared grains neither dilate nor consolidate, and indicates an associated change in spatial response. Current phenomenological models fail to capture the observed impact force for most \\phi; only near \\phi_{cps} is force separable into additive terms linear in depth and quadratic in velocity. At fixed depth the quadratic drag coefficient decreases (increases) with depth for \\phi \\phi_{cps}). At fixed low velocity, depth dependence of force shows a Janssen-type exponential response with a length scale that decreases with increasing \\phi; and is nearly constant for \\phi > \\phi_{cps}.

  6. Granular impact and the critical packing state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Umbanhowar; Daniel I. Goldman

    2010-07-16

    Impact dynamics during collisions of spheres with granular media reveal a pronounced and non-trivial dependence on volume fraction \\phi. Post impact crater morphology identifies the critical packing state \\phi_{cps}, where sheared grains neither dilate nor consolidate, and indicates an associated change in spatial response. Current phenomenological models fail to capture the observed impact force for most \\phi; only near \\phi_{cps} is force separable into additive terms linear in depth and quadratic in velocity. At fixed depth the quadratic drag coefficient decreases (increases) with depth for \\phi \\phi_{cps}). At fixed low velocity, depth dependence of force shows a Janssen-type exponential response with a length scale that decreases with increasing \\phi; and is nearly constant for \\phi > \\phi_{cps}.

  7. PONDER - A Real time software backend for pulsar and IPS observations at the Ooty Radio Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naidu, Arun; Manoharan, P K; Krishnakumar, M A

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a new real-time versatile backend, the Pulsar Ooty Radio Telescope New Digital Efficient Receiver (PONDER), which has been designed to operate along with the legacy analog system of the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT). PONDER makes use of the current state of the art computing hardware, a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) and sufficiently large disk storage to support high time resolution real-time data of pulsar observations, obtained by coherent dedispersion over a bandpass of 16 MHz. Four different modes for pulsar observations are implemented in PONDER to provide standard reduced data products, such as time-stamped integrated profiles and dedispersed time series, allowing faster avenues to scientific results for a variety of pulsar studies. Additionally, PONDER also supports general modes of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements and very long baseline interferometry data recording. The IPS mode yields a single polarisation correlated time series of solar wind scintillation over a b...

  8. Fourth generation bound states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishiwata, Koji; Wise, Mark B. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, 91125 (United States)

    2011-04-01

    We investigate the spectrum and wave functions of q{sup '}q{sup '} bound states for heavy fourth generation quarks (q{sup '}) that have a very small mixing with the three observed generations of standard model quarks. Such bound states come with different color, spin and flavor quantum numbers. Since the fourth generation Yukawa coupling, {lambda}{sub q}{sup '}, is large we include all perturbative corrections to the potential between the heavy quark and antiquark of order {lambda}{sub q}{sup '2}N{sub c}/16{pi}{sup 2} where N{sub c} is the number of colors, as well as relativistic corrections suppressed by (v/c){sup 2}. We find that the lightest fourth generation quark masses for which a bound state exists for color octet states. For the color singlet states, which always have a bound state, we analyze the influence that the Higgs couplings have on the size and binding energy of the bound states.

  9. DOE Announces Additional Steps in Developing Sustainable Biofuels...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Developing Sustainable Biofuels Industry DOE Announces Additional Steps in Developing Sustainable Biofuels Industry October 7, 2008 - 4:14pm Addthis Releases Results from...

  10. Large-Scale Manufacturing of Nanoparticulate-Based Lubrication Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-06-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to design, develop, manufacture, and scale up boron-based nanoparticulate lubrication additives.

  11. ,"New Hampshire Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Hampshire Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  12. ,"New Jersey Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Jersey Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  13. ,"New York Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  14. ,"North Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  15. ,"Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  16. ,"South Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  17. ,"South Dakota Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Dakota...

  18. Friction Stir Additive Manufacturing for High Structural Performance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Friction Stir Additive Manufacturing as a potential route to achieve high performing structures James Withers MER Corporation Rajiv S. Mishra Center for Friction Stir Processing,...

  19. Develop and Evaluate Materials and Additives that Enhance Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal & overcharge abuse Cell Comp't Thermal Reactivity & Improvements Develop & Evaluate...

  20. NNSA Awards Additional Support to Accelerate the Development...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Additional Support to Accelerate the Development of Domestic Mo-99 in the U.S. without the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook...

  1. Department of Energy Announces Two Additional Loans of Oil from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    announced today that the Department of Energy has approved two additional loans of crude oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). "We are committed to doing everything in...

  2. Friction Stir Additive Manufacturing for High Structural Performance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of other potential applications for aerospace & energy industries Laser-FSAM hybrid & mini-sample testing capabilites 2 3 Chronological evolution of metal based additive...

  3. NMAC 17.5.440 Extensions, Improvements, Additions, and Cooperative...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Extensions, Improvements, Additions, and Cooperative Agreements between or among Utilities Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  4. Upcoming Webinar February 11: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Tuesday, February 11, the Energy Department will present a live webinar on additive manufacturing to stimulate discussion in the hydrogen and fuel cell community on the application...

  5. Meso-Scale during Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing Chen,...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Thermal Properties and Beam-Particle Interaction at Meso-Scale during Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing Chen, Jian ORNL ORNL; Zheng, Lili ORNL ORNL; Feng, Zhili...

  6. Additive Manufacturing for Ceramics Peterson, Dominic S. [Los...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additive Manufacturing for Ceramics Peterson, Dominic S. Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Materials Science(36) 3d printing 3d printing Abstract...

  7. Silica 'spiky screws' could enhance industrial coatings, additive...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hill Communications 865.241.0709 Silica 'spiky screws' could enhance industrial coatings, additive manufacturing The screw-like spikes grown from a spherical silica particle...

  8. Correlations Between Metallic Lubricant Additive Species in the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Correlations Between Metallic Lubricant Additive Species in the Ring Pack and Ash Emissions and Their Dependence on Crankcase Oil Properties Correlations Between Metallic Lubricant...

  9. Obama Administration Announces Additional $11,072,300 for Local...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1,072,300 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Delaware Obama Administration Announces Additional 11,072,300 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Delaware March 26,...

  10. Measurement of $\\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} } $ production with additional...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    mathrm t bart production with additional jet activity, including b quark jets, in the dilepton decay channel using pp collisions at sqrts 8 TeV Citation Details...

  11. OAR 340-120 - Additional Siting and Permitting Requirements for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Page Edit with form History OAR 340-120 - Additional Siting and Permitting Requirements for Hazardous Waste and PCB Treatment and Disposal Facilities Jump to: navigation, search...

  12. Scale-dependent hemispherical asymmetry from general initial state during inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassan Firouzjahi; Jinn-Ouk Gong; Mohammad Hossein Namjoo

    2014-11-21

    We consider a general initial state for inflation as the mechanism for generating scale-dependent hemispherical asymmetry. An observable scale-dependent non-Gaussianity is generated that leads to observable hemispherical asymmetry from the super-horizon long mode modulation. We show that the amplitude of dipole asymmetry falls off exponentially on small angular scales which can address the absence of dipole asymmetry at these scales.In addition, depending on the nature of non-vaccum initial state, the amplitude of the dipole asymmetry has oscillatory features which can be detected in a careful CMB map analysis. Furthermore, we show that the non-vacuum initial state provides a natural mechanism for enhancing the super horizon long mode perturbation as required to generate the dipole asymmetry.

  13. Spectrum of Controlling and Observing Complex Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Gang; Barzel, Baruch; Slotine, Jean-Jacques; Liu, Yang-Yu; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2015-01-01

    Observing and controlling complex networks are of paramount interest for understanding complex physical, biological and technological systems. Recent studies have made important advances in identifying sensor or driver nodes, through which we can observe or control a complex system. Yet, the observation uncertainty induced by measurement noise and the energy cost required for control continue to be significant challenges in practical applications. Here we show that the control energy cost and the observation uncertainty vary widely in different directions of the state space. In particular, we find that if all nodes are directly driven, control is energetically feasible, as the maximum energy cost increases sublinearly with the system size. If, however, we aim to control a system by driving only a single node, control in some directions is energetically prohibitive, increasing exponentially with the system size. For the cases in between, the maximum energy decays exponentially if we increase the number of driv...

  14. Observed Asymptotic Differences in Energies of Stable and Minimal Point Configurations on $\\mathbb{S}^2$ and the Role of Defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Calef; W. Griffiths; A. Schulz; C. Fichtl; D. Hardin

    2013-10-02

    Observations suggest that configurations of points on a sphere that are stable with respect to a Riesz potential distribute points uniformly over the sphere. Further, these stable configurations have a local structure that is largely hexagonal. Minimal configurations differ from stable configurations in the arrangement of defects within the hexagonal structure. This paper reports the asymptotic difference between the average energy of stable states and the lowest reported energies. We use this to infer the energy scale at which defects in the hexagonal structure are manifest. We report results for the Riesz potentials for s=0, s=1, s=2 and s=3. Additionally we compare existing theory for the asymptotic expansion in N of the minimal $N$-point energy with experimental results. We report a case of two distinct stable states that have the same Voronoi structure. Finally, we report the observed growth of the number of stable states as a function of N.

  15. Fluctuations of fragment observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Gulminelli; M. D'Agostino

    2006-11-09

    This contribution presents a review of our present theoretical as well as experimental knowledge of different fluctuation observables relevant to nuclear multifragmentation. The possible connection between the presence of a fluctuation peak and the occurrence of a phase transition or a critical phenomenon is critically analyzed. Many different phenomena can lead both to the creation and to the suppression of a fluctuation peak. In particular, the role of constraints due to conservation laws and to data sorting is shown to be essential. From the experimental point of view, a comparison of the available fragmentation data reveals that there is a good agreement between different data sets of basic fluctuation observables, if the fragmenting source is of comparable size. This compatibility suggests that the fragmentation process is largely independent of the reaction mechanism (central versus peripheral collisions, symmetric versus asymmetric systems, light ions versus heavy ion induced reactions). Configurational energy fluctuations, that may give important information on the heat capacity of the fragmenting system at the freeze out stage, are not fully compatible among different data sets and require further analysis to properly account for Coulomb effects and secondary decays. Some basic theoretical questions, concerning the interplay between the dynamics of the collision and the fragmentation process, and the cluster definition in dense and hot media, are still open and are addressed at the end of the paper. A comparison with realistic models and/or a quantitative analysis of the fluctuation properties will be needed to clarify in the next future the nature of the transition observed from compound nucleus evaporation to multi-fragment production.

  16. ARM Observations Projected

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsicloudden Documentation Data Management Facility PlotsProductsObservations Projected

  17. Observation of ?cJ decays to ??¯¯¯????

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ambrose, D. J.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Bennett, J. V.; et al

    2012-09-13

    Decays of the ?cJ states (J=0, 1, 2) to ??¯¯¯????, including processes with intermediate ?(1385), are studied through the E1 transition ?'???cJ using 106×10? ?' events collected with the BESIII detector at BEPCII. This is the first observation of ?cJ decays to the final state ??¯¯¯????. The branching ratio of the intermediate process ?cJ??(1385)±?¯¯¯(1385)? is also measured for the first time, and the results agree with the theoretical predictions based on the color-octet effect.

  18. Integer Arithmetic without Arithmetic Addition Applications: Discriminant Analysis, Cryptographic Primitives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    the quintessential operation of addition. We propose an arithmetic constructed over a fundamental mapping of one set integer, and further limit our investigation to a mapping procedure that views the input integers as a set The arithmetic addition belies the subsequent range of mathematical operations: subtraction, multiplication

  19. Supersonic Energy Addition for Improving Electrothermal Thruster Performance :Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . In addition to an electric arc other approaches for creating a plasma in the plenum that use a source temperature and complex chemistry of a fully ionized plasma. Supersonic energy addition can be achieved using propulsion has been to heat the flow by creating a plasma in the plenum, which is sustained in one of several

  20. Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 19982000 tropical ozone climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Anne

    Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 1998­2000 tropical ozone climatology 1. Comparison with Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and ground-based measurements Anne M. Thompson,1 Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) project and established from operational sites, provided over 1000 ozone

  1. Observers and the AdS/CFT correspondence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Dance

    2010-12-18

    The paper \\cite{Dance0601} tentatively suggested a physical picture that might underlie string theories. The string parameters $\\tau $ and $\\sigma_i $ were interpreted as spacetime dimensions which a simple quantum mechanical observer can observe, while symmetries of the relevant observer states could limit the observability of other dimensions. The present paper extends the discussion by outlining how consideration of different observers, at least one of which is quantum mechanical, might provide insights into the nature of the AdS/CFT correspondence. It is suggested that such correspondences might arise as different forms of theories about the world as perceived by different observers.

  2. Observations of Accreting Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lars Bildsten; Deepto Chakrabarty; John Chiu; Mark H. Finger; Danny T. Koh; Robert W. Nelson; Thomas A. Prince; Bradley C. Rubin; D. Matthew Scott; Mark Stollberg; Brian A. Vaughan; Colleen A. Wilson; Robert B. Wilson

    1997-07-22

    We summarize five years of continuous monitoring of accretion-powered pulsars with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. Our 20-70 keV observations have determined or refined the orbital parameters of 13 binaries, discovered 5 new transient accreting pulsars, measured the pulsed flux history during outbursts of 12 transients (GRO J1744-28, 4U 0115+634, GRO J1750-27, GS 0834-430, 2S 1417-624, GRO J1948+32, EXO 2030+375, GRO J1008-57, A 0535+26, GRO J2058+42, 4U 1145-619 and A 1118-616), and also measured the accretion torque history of during outbursts of 6 of those transients whose orbital parameters were also known. We have also continuously measured the pulsed flux and spin frequency for eight persistently accreting pulsars (Her X-1, Cen X-3, Vela X-1, OAO 1657-415, GX 301-2, 4U 1626-67, 4U 1538-52, and GX 1+4). Because of their continuity and uniformity over a long baseline, BATSE observations have provided new insights into the long-term behavior of accreting magnetic stars. We have found that all accreting pulsars show stochastic variations in their spin frequencies and luminosities, including those displaying secular spin-up or spin-down on long time scales, blurring the conventional distinction between disk-fed and wind-fed binaries. Pulsed flux and accretion torque are strongly correlated in outbursts of transient accreting pulsars, but uncorrelated, or even anticorrelated, in persistent sources.

  3. Observations of Radio Giant Pulses with GAVRT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Radio giant pulses provide a unique opportunity to study the pulsar radio emission mechanism in exquisite detail. Previous studies have revealed a wide range of properties and phenomena, including extraordinarily high brightness temperatures, sub-nanosecond emission features, and banded dynamic spectra. New measurements of giant pulse characteristics can help guide and test theoretical emission models. To this end, an extensive observation campaign has begun which will provide more than 500 hours on the Crab with a 34-meter antenna located in California, USA. The observations are being done as part of an educational outreach program called the Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT). This antenna has a novel wide bandwidth receiver which provides up to 8 GHz of instantaneous bandwidth in the range of 2.5 to 14 GHz. These observations will provide detailed information about the variability, amplitude distribution, and detailed frequency structure of radio giant pulses. In addition, a database of pulses ...

  4. Lubricant additives, friend or foe: What the equipment design engineer needs to know

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nixon, H.P.; Zantopulos, H.

    1995-10-01

    Lubricant formulations and lubricant additives have been slanted heavily toward protecting gear concentrated contacts from galling and wear. Much of the performance differentiation of these lubricants has been dependent on highly accelerated standardized laboratory testing. The area of contact fatigue has played a less important role in shaping lubricant formulations, but new test results for several commercially available gear lubricants suggest this area warrants a closer examination. The performance effects of fully and partially additized lubricants were studied using standard bearing industry rolling contact fatigue and wear testing procedures for tapered roller bearings. These test results indicate significant detrimental effects to wear, and fatigue life performance can occur with some additized lubricant formulations. Observations of functional surfaces, before and after testing, are made and examined for several lubricant formulations. The implications of these findings for equipment applications are discussed, and suggestions are made for ways to minimize or avoid potential detrimental performance effects. 10 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Effect of argon addition on plasma parameters and dust charging in hydrogen plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kakati, B. Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Saxena, Y. C.

    2014-10-28

    Experimental results on effect of adding argon gas to hydrogen plasma in a multi-cusp dusty plasma device are reported. Addition of argon modifies plasma density, electron temperature, degree of hydrogen dissociation, dust current as well as dust charge. From the dust charging profile, it is observed that the dust current and dust charge decrease significantly up to 40% addition of argon flow rate in hydrogen plasma. But beyond 40% of argon flow rate, the changes in dust current and dust charge are insignificant. Results show that the addition of argon to hydrogen plasma in a dusty plasma device can be used as a tool to control the dust charging in a low pressure dusty plasma.

  6. Solar neutrino spectrum, sterile neutrinos and additional radiation in the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. C. de Holanda; A. Yu. Smirnov

    2011-02-01

    Recent results from the SNO, Super-Kamiokande and Borexino experiments do not show the expected upturn of the energy spectrum of events (the ratio $R \\equiv N_{obs}/N_{SSM}$) at low energies. At the same time, cosmological observations testify for possible existence of additional relativistic degrees of freedom in the early Universe: $\\Delta N_{eff} = 1 - 2$. These facts strengthen the case of very light sterile neutrino, $\

  7. Observations of Solids in Protoplanetary Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Sean M

    2015-01-01

    This review addresses the state of research that employs astronomical (remote sensing) observations of solids ("dust") in young circumstellar disks to learn about planet formation. The intention is for it to serve as an accessible, introductory, pedagogical resource for junior scientists interested in the subject. After some historical background and a basic observational primer, the focus is shifted to the three fundamental topics that broadly define the field: (1) demographics -- the relationships between disk properties and the characteristics of their environments and hosts; (2) structure -- the spatial distribution of disk material and its associated physical conditions and composition; and (3) evolution -- the signposts of key changes in disk properties, including the growth and migration of solids and the impact of dynamical interactions with young planetary systems. Based on the state of the art results in these areas, suggestions are made for potentially fruitful lines of work in the near future.

  8. Obama Administration Announces Additional $56,099,900 for Local...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    American tribes. This includes 56,099,900 for state, county and city efforts in Washington. A detailed breakdown is below. Today's announcement builds on an investment of...

  9. Obama Administration Announces Additional $208,759,900 for Local...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    American tribes. This includes 208,759,900 for state, county and city efforts in Texas. A detailed breakdown is below. Today's announcement builds on an investment of...

  10. Observation of interference fringes in Autler-Townes line shapes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkinson, S. R.; Smith, A. V.; Scully, Marlan O.; Fry, Edward

    1996-01-01

    We observe Ramsey fringes in the absorption line shape for a weak optical field probing the transition between an unperturbed quantum state and one that is dynamically Stark shifted by a strong pump field....

  11. The effect of additives on lime dissolution rates. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khang, S.J.

    1996-07-31

    Based on the previous years` studies concerning the efficiency of SO{sub 2} removal by spray dryers with high sulfur coal flue gas, the work for year five included investigations of lime dissolution rates at different slaking conditions and with the effect of additives. The prominent additives that have significant effects on lime dissolution rates were tested with the mini pilot spray drying absorber to see their effects on spray drying desulfurization applications. The mechanisms of these additive effects along with the properties of hygroscopic additives have been discussed and incorporated into the spray drying desulfurization model ``SPRAYMOD-M.`` Slaking conditions are very important factors in producing high quality lime slurry in spray drying desulfurization processes. At optimal slaking conditions, the slaked lime particles are very fine (3-5{mu}m) and the slaked lime has high BET surface areas which are beneficial to the desulfurization. The slaked lime dissolution rate experiments in our study are designed to determine how much lime can dissolve in a unit time if the initial lime surface area is kept constant. The purpose of the dissolution rate study for different additives is to find those effective additives that can enhance lime dissolution rates and to investigate the mechanisms of the dissolution rate enhancement properties for these additives. The applications of these additives on spray drying desulfurization are to further verify the theory that dissolution rate is a rate limiting step in the whole spray drying desulfurization process as well as to test the feasibility of these additives on enhancing SO{sub 2} removal in spray dryers.

  12. Zinc halogen battery electrolyte composition with lead additive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henriksen, Gary L. (Troy, MI)

    1981-01-01

    This disclosure relates to a zinc halogen battery electrolyte composition containing an additive providing improved zinc-on-zinc recyclability. The improved electrolyte composition involves the use of a lead additive to inhibit undesirable irregular plating and reduce nodular or dendritic growth on the electrode surface. The lead-containing electrolyte composition of the present invention appears to influence not only the morphology of the base plate zinc, but also the morphology of the zinc-on-zinc replate. In addition, such lead-containing electrolyte compositions appear to reduce hydrogen formation.

  13. Corn fiber hulls as a food additive or animal feed

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbas, Charles (Champaign, IL); Beery, Kyle E. (Decatur, IN); Cecava, Michael J. (Decatur, IN); Doane, Perry H. (Decatur, IN)

    2010-12-21

    The present invention provides a novel animal feed or food additive that may be made from thermochemically hydrolyzed, solvent-extracted corn fiber hulls. The animal feed or food additive may be made, for instance, by thermochemically treating corn fiber hulls to hydrolyze and solubilize the hemicellulose and starch present in the corn fiber hulls to oligosaccharides. The residue may be extracted with a solvent to separate the oil from the corn fiber, leaving a solid residue that may be prepared, for instance by aggolmerating, and sold as a food additive or an animal feed.

  14. Beyond 3D Printing: The New Dimensions of Additive Fabrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keating, Steven John

    Additive fabrication, often referred to as 3D printing, is the construction of objects by adding material. This stands in contrast to subtractive methods, which involve removing material by means of milling or cutting. ...

  15. All Eyes on Additive Manufacturing Methods | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    All Eyes on Additive Manufacturing Methods Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click...

  16. South High Rises Renovation and Addition Program of Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,714,286 Total Construction Cost Teams 24 - 27 SECTION VI Master Policy Index 28 - 29 SECTION VII Site Map & Floor Plans 30 - 37 #12 Siebert, Stradley, Park, Smith, and Steeb Halls. There will also be constructed two additions

  17. Improvements in floating point addition/subtraction operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farmwald, P.M.

    1984-02-24

    Apparatus is described for decreasing the latency time associated with floating point addition and subtraction in a computer, using a novel bifurcated, pre-normalization/post-normalization approach that distinguishes between differences of floating point exponents.

  18. Ionic Liquids as Multifunctional Ashless Additives for Engine Lubrication

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A group of oil-miscible ionic liquids has been developed by an ORNL-GM team as candidate lubricant additives with promising physical/chemical properties and potential multiple functionalities.

  19. The Selection and Use of Fireside Additives on Industrial Boilers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radway, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    As energy prices have escalated and fuel quality deteriorated, fuel chemicals have found increasing acceptance as tools for improving efficiency and reliability of combustion systems. Though application of fuel additives is not new, their use has...

  20. Obama Administration Announces Additional $9,593,500 for Local...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guam Obama Administration Announces Additional 9,593,500 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Guam March 26, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - Vice President Joe Biden...

  1. Approaches to Maintaining Provenance throughout the Additive Manufacturing Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    prototyping and 3D printing by users both in engineering and the humanities. The proposed digital signing--Digital Signing; 3D printing; 3D objects; provenance. I.INTRODUCTION Additive manufacturing as a process has been

  2. INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICAL NEURODYNAMICS: EFFECTS OF ADDITIVE AND PARAMETRIC NOISE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milton, John G.

    Department of Neurology Committees on Neurobiology & Computational Neuroscience The University of ChicagoINTRODUCTION TO STATISTICAL NEURODYNAMICS: EFFECTS OF ADDITIVE AND PARAMETRIC NOISE John Milton current first attracted the attention of neurobiologists to the presence of ion channels, or pores

  3. Non-Traditional Soil Additives: Can They Improve Crop Production? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFarland, Mark L.; Stichler, Charles; Lemon, Robert G.

    2002-06-26

    Non-traditional soil additives include soil conditioners such as organic materials and minerals, soil activators that claim to stimulate soil microbes or inoculate soil with new beneficial organisms, and wetting agents that may be marketed...

  4. Cyanoethylated compounds as additives in lithium/lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nagasubramanian, Ganesan (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01

    The power loss of lithium/lithium ion battery cells is significantly reduced, especially at low temperatures, when about 1% by weight of an additive is incorporated in the electrolyte layer of the cells. The usable additives are organic solvent soluble cyanoethylated polysaccharides and poly(vinyl alcohol). The power loss decrease results primarily from the decrease in the charge transfer resistance at the interface between the electrolyte and the cathode.

  5. Control of pyrite addition in coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmid, Bruce K. (Englewood, CO); Junkin, James E. (Englewood, CO)

    1982-12-21

    Pyrite addition to a coal liquefaction process (22, 26) is controlled (118) in inverse proportion to the calcium content of the feed coal to maximize the C.sub.5 --900.degree. F. (482.degree. C.) liquid yield per unit weight of pyrite added (110). The pyrite addition is controlled in this manner so as to minimize the amount of pyrite used and thus reduce pyrite contribution to the slurry pumping load and disposal problems connected with pyrite produced slag.

  6. Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricants and /or Lubricant Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, J.; Viola, M. B.

    2013-10-31

    This ORNL-GM CRADA developed ionic liquids (ILs) as novel lubricants or oil additives for engine lubrication. A new group of oil-miscible ILs have been designed and synthesized with high thermal stability, non-corrosiveness, excellent wettability, and most importantly effective anti-scuffing/anti-wear and friction reduction characteristics. Mechanistic analysis attributes the superior lubricating performance of IL additives to their physical and chemical interactions with metallic surfaces. Working with a leading lubricant formulation company, the team has successfully developed a prototype low-viscosity engine oil using a phosphonium-phosphate IL as an anti-wear additive. Tribological bench tests of the IL-additized formulated oil showed 20-33% lower friction in mixed and elastohydrodynamic lubrication and 38-92% lower wear in boundary lubrication when compared with commercial Mobil 1 and Mobil Clean 5W-30 engine oils. High-temperature, high load (HTHL) full-size engine tests confirmed the excellent anti-wear performance for the IL-additized engine oil. Sequence VID engine dynamometer tests demonstrated an improved fuel economy by >2% for this IL-additized engine oil benchmarked against the Mobil 1 5W-30 oil. In addition, accelerated catalyst aging tests suggest that the IL additive may potentially have less adverse impact on three-way catalysts compared to the conventional ZDDP. Follow-on research is needed for further development and optimization of IL chemistry and oil formulation to fully meet ILSAC GF-5 specifications and further enhance the automotive engine efficiency and durability.

  7. Design of Extended Warranties in Supply Chains under Additive Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Kumpeg; Mallik, Suman; Chhajed, Dilip

    2012-01-01

    Li, Kumpeg, Suman Mallik, and Dilip Chhajed. "Design of Extended Warranties in Supply Chains under Additive Demand." Production and Operations Management 21.4 (2012): 730-46. Publisher’s official version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1937- 5956... of this document.] Paper citation: Li, Kumpeg, Suman Mallik, and Dilip Chhajed. "Design of Extended Warranties in Supply Chains under Additive Demand." Production and Operations Management 21.4 (2012): 730-46. Keywords: extended warranty, supply chain...

  8. Blast furnace coke quality in relation to petroleum coke addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez, R.; Diez, M.A.; Menendez, J.A.; Barriocanal, C.; Pis, J.J. [CSIC, Oviedo (Spain). Inst. Nacional del Carbon; Sirgado, M. [ENSIDESA, Aviles (Spain)

    1995-12-01

    The incorporation of petroleum coke as an additive in industrial coking coal blends is a practice often used by steel companies. A suitable blast furnace coke produced by replacing part of the coking coal blend with a suitable petroleum coke (addition of 5 to 15%), was made by Great Lakes Carbon Corporation and successfully tested at several blast furnaces. This coke had lower reactivity, less ash and slightly higher sulfur content than coke made without the addition of petroleum coke. In contrast with these results, it has been reported in a BCRA study that additions of petroleum coke to a strong coking coal, above 5 wt%, increased coke reactivity. These differences may be explained on the basis of the coal or blend characteristics to which petroleum coke is added. Petroleum coke addition seems to give better results if the coal/blend has high fluidity. The present situation in Spain is favorable for the use of petroleum coke. So, a study of laboratory and semi-industrial scale was made to assess the possibility of using petroleum coke as an additive to the typical industrial coal blend coked by the Spanish Steel Company, ENSIDESA. The influence of the petroleum coke particle size was also studied to semi-industrial scale.

  9. Polydimethylsiloxane as a Macromolecular Additive for Enhanced Performance of Molecular Bulk Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, Kenneth R.; Mei, Jianguo; Stalder, Romain; Shim, Jae Won; Cheun, Hyeunseok; Steffy, Fred; So, Franky; Kippelen, Bernard; Reynolds, John R.

    2011-03-15

    The effect of the macromolecular additive, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), on the performance of solution processed molecular bulk heterojunction solar cells is investigated, and the addition of PDMS is shown to improve device power conversion efficiency by ~70% and significantly reduce cell-to-cell variation, from a power conversion efficiency of 1.25 ± 0.37% with no PDMS to 2.16 ± 0.09% upon the addition of 0.1 mg/mL PDMS to the casting solution. The cells are based on a thiophene and isoindigo containing oligomer as the electron donor and [6,6]-phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) as the electron acceptor. PDMS is shown to have a strong influence on film morphology, with a significant decrease in film roughness and feature size observed. The morphology change leads to improved performance parameters, most notably an increase in the short circuit current density from 4.3 to 6.8 mA/cm2 upon addition of 0.1 mg/mL PDMS. The use of PDMS is of particular interest, as this additive appears frequently as a lubricant in plastic syringes commonly used in device fabrication; therefore, PDMS may unintentionally be incorporated into device active layers.

  10. State Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool FitsProjectDataSecretaryDepartment7 Annual2InformationState Energy RevolvingState

  11. Montana State University 1 Cell Biology and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Montana State University 1 Cell Biology and Neuroscience The department participates: MSU's programs in the biological sciences are distributed across multiple departments. MSU does not have a single Department of Biology. For additional options see Biological Sciences (http

  12. United States Industrial Motor Systems Market Opportunities Assessment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Motor Systems Market Opportunities Assessment: Executive Summary United States Industrial Motor Systems Market Opportunities Assessment: Executive Summary In addition to serving...

  13. Obama Administration Awards More than $162 Million for State...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The state also will use Recovery Act funds to provide additional rebates for solar photovoltaic and solar hot water systems, small wind applications, and geothermal...

  14. Observations of the Temperature Dependent Response of Ozone to NOx Reductions in an Urban Plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFranchi, B W; Goldstein, A H; Cohen, R C

    2011-01-25

    Observations of NO{sub x} in the Sacramento, CA region show that mixing ratios decreased by 30% between 2001 and 2008. Here we use an observation-based method to quantify net ozone production rates in the outflow from the Sacramento metropolitan region and examine the O{sub 3} decrease resulting from reductions in NO{sub x} emissions. This observational method does not rely on assumptions about detailed chemistry of ozone production, rather it is an independent means to verify and test these assumptions. We use an instantaneous steady-state model as well as a detailed 1-D plume model to aid in interpretation of the ozone production inferred from observations. In agreement with the models, the observations show that early in the plume, the NO{sub x} dependence for O{sub x} (O{sub x} = O{sub 3}+NO{sub 2}) production is strongly coupled with temperature, suggesting that temperature dependent biogenic VOC emissions can drive O{sub x} production between NO{sub x}-limited and NO{sub x}-suppressed regimes. As a result, NO{sub x} reductions were found to be most effective at higher temperatures over the 7 year period. We show that violations of the California 1-hour O{sub 3} standard (90 ppb) in the region have been decreasing linearly with decreases in NO{sub x} (at a given temperature) and predict that reductions of NO{sub x} concentrations (and presumably emissions) by an additional 30% (relative to 2007 levels) will eliminate violations of the state 1 hour standard in the region. If current trends continue, a 30% decrease in NO{sub x} is expected by 2012, and an end to violations of the 1 hour standard in the Sacramento region appears to be imminent.

  15. Quantum correlations of helicity entangled states in non-inertial frames beyond single mode approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harsij, Zeynab Mirza, Behrouz

    2014-12-15

    A helicity entangled tripartite state is considered in which the degree of entanglement is preserved in non-inertial frames. It is shown that Quantum Entanglement remains observer independent. As another measure of quantum correlation, Quantum Discord has been investigated. It is explicitly shown that acceleration has no effect on the degree of quantum correlation for the bipartite and tripartite helicity entangled states. Geometric Quantum Discord as a Hilbert–Schmidt distance is computed for helicity entangled states. It is shown that living in non-inertial frames does not make any influence on this distance, either. In addition, the analysis has been extended beyond single mode approximation to show that acceleration does not have any impact on the quantum features in the limit beyond the single mode. As an interesting result, while the density matrix depends on the right and left Unruh modes, the Negativity as a measure of Quantum Entanglement remains constant. Also, Quantum Discord does not change beyond single mode approximation. - Highlights: • The helicity entangled states here are observer independent in non-inertial frames. • It is explicitly shown that Quantum Discord for these states is observer independent. • Geometric Quantum Discord is also not affected by acceleration increase. • Extending to beyond single mode does not change the degree of entanglement. • Beyond single mode approximation the degree of Quantum Discord is also preserved.

  16. Observational Tests and Predictive Stellar Evolution II: Non-standard Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick A. Young; David Arnett

    2004-09-27

    We examine contributions of second order physical processes to results of stellar evolution calculations amenable to direct observational testing. In the first paper in the series (Young et al. 2001) we established baseline results using only physics which are common to modern stellar evolution codes. In the current paper we establish how much of the discrepancy between observations and baseline models is due to particular elements of new physics. We then consider the impact of the observational uncertainties on the maximum predictive accuracy achievable by a stellar evolution code. The sun is an optimal case because of the precise and abundant observations and the relative simplicity of the underlying stellar physics. The Standard Model is capable of matching the structure of the sun as determined by helioseismology and gross surface observables to better than a percent. Given an initial mass and surface composition within the observational errors, and no additional constraints for which the models can be optimized, it is not possible to predict the sun's current state to better than ~7%. Convectively induced mixing in radiative regions, seen in multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations, dramatically improves the predictions for radii, luminosity, and apsidal motions of eclipsing binaries while simultaneously maintaining consistency with observed light element depletion and turnoff ages in young clusters (Young et al. 2003). Systematic errors in core size for models of massive binaries disappear with more complete mixing physics, and acceptable fits are achieved for all of the binaries without calibration of free parameters. The lack of accurate abundance determinations for binaries is now the main obstacle to improving stellar models using this type of test.

  17. Organogermanium Chemistry: Germacyclobutanes and digermane Additions to Acetylenes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Michael Chubb

    2003-12-12

    This dissertation comprises two main research projects. The first project, presented in Chapter 1, involves the synthesis and thermochemistry of germacyclobutanes (germetanes). Four new germetanes (spirodigermetane, diallylgermetane, dichlorogermetane, and germacyclobutane) have been synthesized using a modified di-Grignard synthesis. Diallylgermetane is shown to be a useful starting material for obtaining other germetanes, particularly the parent germetane, germacyclobutane. The gas-phase thermochemistries of spirodigermetane, diallylgermetane and germacyclobutane have been explored via pulsed stirred-flow reactor (SFR) studies, showing remarkable differences in decomposition, depending on the substitution at the germanium atom. The second project investigates the thermochemical, photochemical, and catalytic additions of several digermanes to acetylenes. The first examples of thermo- and photochemical additions of Ge-Ge bonds to C{triple_bond}C are demonstrated. Mechanistic investigations are described and comparisons are made to analogous disilane addition reactions, previously studied in their group.

  18. Accretion Disc Turbulence and the X-Ray Power Spectra of Black Hole High States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael A. Nowak; Robert V. Wagoner

    1994-10-06

    The high state of black hole candidates is characterized by a quasi- thermal emission component at $kT \\sim 1$ keV. In addition, this state tends to have very low variability which indicates that it is relatively stable, at least on {\\it short} time scales. Most models of the high state imply that the bulk of the emission comes from an optically thick accretion disc; therefore, this state may be an excellent laboratory for testing our ideas about the physics of accretion discs. In this work we consider the implications of assuming that accretion disc viscosity arises from some form of turbulence. Specifically, we consider the simple case of three dimensional hydrodynamic turbulence. It is found that the coupling of such turbulence to acoustic modes in the disc can alter the disc emission. We calculate the amplitude and frequencies of this modulation, and we express our results in terms of the X-ray power spectral density. We compare our calculations with observations of the black hole candidate GS 1124-683, and show that for certain parameters we can reproduce some of the high frequency power. We then briefly explore mechanisms for producing the low frequency power, and note the difficulty that a single variability mechanism has in reproducing the full range of observed variability. In addition, we outline ways in which future spacecraft missions -- such as USA and XTE -- can further constrain our model, especially at frequencies above $\\sim 10^2$ Hz.

  19. State coal profiles, January 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-02

    The purpose of State Coal Profiles is to provide basic information about the deposits, production, and use of coal in each of the 27 States with coal production in 1992. Although considerable information on coal has been published on a national level, there is a lack of a uniform overview for the individual States. This report is intended to help fill that gap and also to serve as a framework for more detailed studies. While focusing on coal output, State Coal Profiles shows that the coal-producing States are major users of coal, together accounting for about three-fourths of total US coal consumption in 1992. Each coal-producing State is profiled with a description of its coal deposits and a discussion of the development of its coal industry. Estimates of coal reserves in 1992 are categorized by mining method and sulfur content. Trends, patterns, and other information concerning production, number of mines, miners, productivity, mine price of coal, disposition, and consumption of coal are detailed in statistical tables for selected years from 1980 through 1992. In addition, coal`s contribution to the State`s estimated total energy consumption is given for 1991, the latest year for which data are available. A US summary of all data is provided for comparing individual States with the Nation as a whole. Sources of information are given at the end of the tables.

  20. Characteristics of yttrium oxide laser ceramics with additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osipov, V V; Solomonov, V I; Orlov, A N; Shitov, V A; Maksimov, R N; Spirina, A V

    2013-03-31

    Neodymium- or ytterbium-doped laser ceramics with a disordered crystal-field structure formed by introduction of iso- and heterovalent elements into yttrium oxide are studied. It is shown that these additives broaden the spectral band of laser transitions, which makes it possible to use ceramics as active laser media emitting ultrashort pulses. Lasing was obtained in several samples of this ceramics. At the same time, it is shown that addition of zirconium and hafnium stimulates the Foerster quenching of upper laser levels and pump levels. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  1. Catalyst Additives to Enhance Mercury Oxidation and Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas K. Gale

    2006-06-30

    Catalysis is the key fundamental ingredient to convert elemental mercury in coal-fired power stations into its oxidized forms that are more easily captured by sorbents, ESPs, baghouses, and wet scrubbers, whether the catalyst be unburned carbon (UBC) in the ash or vanadium pentoxide in SCR catalysts. This project has investigated several different types of catalysts that enhance mercury oxidation in several different ways. The stated objective of this project in the Statement of Objectives included testing duct-injection catalysts, catalyst-sorbent hybrids, and coated low-pressure-drop screens. Several different types of catalysts were considered for duct injection, including different forms of iron and carbon. Duct-injection catalysts would have to be inexpensive catalysts, as they would not be recycled. Iron and calcium had been shown to catalyze mercury oxidation in published bench-scale tests. However, as determined from results of an on-going EPRI/EPA project at Southern Research, while iron and calcium did catalyze mercury oxidation, the activity of these catalysts was orders of magnitude below that of carbon and had little impact in the short residence times available for duct-injected catalysts or catalyst-sorbent hybrids. In fact, the only catalyst found to be effective enough for duct injection was carbon, which is also used to capture mercury and remove it from the flue gas. It was discovered that carbon itself is an effective catalyst-sorbent hybrid. Bench-scale carbon-catalyst tests were conducted, to obtain kinetic rates of mercury adsorption (a key step in the catalytic oxidation of mercury by carbon) for different forms of carbon. All carbon types investigated behaved in a similar manner with respect to mercury sorption, including the effect of temperature and chlorine concentration. Activated carbon was more effective at adsorbing mercury than carbon black and unburned carbon (UBC), because their internal surface area of activated carbon was greater. Catalyst coating of low-pressure-drop screens was of particular interest as this project was being developed. However, it was discovered that URS was already heavily involved in the pursuit of this same technology, being funded by DOE, and reporting significant success. Hence, testing of SCR catalysts became a major focus of the project. Three different commercial SCR catalysts were examined for their ability to oxidize mercury in simulated flue-gas. Similar performance was observed from each of the three commercial catalysts, both in terms of mercury oxidation and SO{sub 3} generation. Ammonia injection hindered mercury oxidation at low HCl concentrations (i.e., {approx}2 ppmv), yet had little impact on mercury oxidation at higher HCl concentrations. On the other hand, SO{sub 2} oxidation was significantly reduced by the presence of ammonia at both low and high concentrations of HCl.

  2. EFFECTS OF QUARTZ PARTICLE SIZE AND SUCROSE ADDITION ON MELTING BEHAVIOR OF A MELTER FEED FOR HIGH-LEVEL GLASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MARCIAL J; KRUGER AA; HRMA PR; SCHWEIGER MJ; SWEARINGEN KJ; TEGROTENHUIS WE; HENAGER SH

    2010-07-28

    The behavior of melter feed (a mixture of nuclear waste and glass-forming additives) during waste-glass processing has a significant impact on the rate of the vitrification process. We studied the effects of silica particle size and sucrose addition on the volumetric expansion (foaming) of a high-alumina feed and the rate of dissolution of silica particles in feed samples heated at 5 C/min up to 1200 C. The initial size of quartz particles in feed ranged from 5 to 195 {micro}m. The fraction of the sucrose added ranged from 0 to 0.20 g per g glass. Extensive foaming occurred only in feeds with 5-{micro}m quartz particles; particles {ge}150 {micro}m formed clusters. Particles of 5 {micro}m completely dissolved by 900 C whereas particles {ge}150 {micro}m did not fully dissolve even when the temperature reached 1200 C. Sucrose addition had virtually zero impact on both foaming and the dissolution of silica particles. Over 100 sites in the United States are currently tasked with the storage of nuclear waste. The largest is the Hanford Site located in southeastern Washington State with 177 subterranean tanks containing over fifty-million gallons of nuclear waste from plutonium production from 1944 through 1987. This waste will be vitrified at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. In the vitrification process, feed is charged into a melter and converted into glass to be ultimately stored in a permanent repository. The duration of waste-site cleanups by the vitrification process depends on the rate of melting, i.e., on the rate of the feed-to-glass conversion. Foaming associated with the melting process and the rate of dissolution of quartz particles (silica being the major glass-forming additive) are assumed to be important factors that influence the rate of melting. Previous studies on foaming of high-alumina feed demonstrated that varying the makeup of a melter feed has a significant impact on foaming. The volume of feeds that contained 5-{micro}m quartz particles substantially increased because of foaming. The extent of foaming decreased as the particle size of quartz increased. Moreover, samples containing quartz particles 195 {micro}m formed agglomerates at temperatures above 900 C that only slowly dissolved in the melt. This study continues previous work on the feed-melting process, specifically on the effects of the size of silica particles on the formation of nuclear-waste glasses to determine a suitable range of silica particle sizes that causes neither excessive foaming nor undesirable agglomeration. Apart from varying the silica-particle size, carbon was added in the form of sucrose. Sucrose has been used to accelerate the rate of melting. In this study, we have observed its impact on feed foaming and quartz dissolution.

  3. Numerical Model Construction with Closed Observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felix Dietrich; Gerta Köster; Hans-Joachim Bungartz

    2015-10-18

    Performing analysis, optimization and control using simulations of many-particle systems is computationally demanding when no macroscopic model for the dynamics of the variables of interest is available. In case observations on the macroscopic scale can only be produced via legacy simulator code or live experiments, finding a model for these macroscopic variables is challenging. In this paper, we employ time-lagged embedding theory to construct macroscopic numerical models from output data of a black box, such as a simulator or live experiments. Since the state space variables of the constructed, coarse model are dynamically closed and observable by an observation function, we call these variables closed observables. The approach is an online-offline procedure, as model construction from observation data is performed offline and the new model can then be used in an online phase, independent of the original. We illustrate the theoretical findings with numerical models constructed from time series of a two-dimensional ordinary differential equation system, and from the density evolution of a transport-diffusion system. Applicability is demonstrated in a real-world example, where passengers leave a train and the macroscopic model for the density flow onto the platform is constructed with our approach. If only the macroscopic variables are of interest, simulation runtimes with the numerical model are three orders of magnitude lower compared to simulations with the original fine scale model. We conclude with a brief discussion of possibilities of numerical model construction in systematic upscaling, network optimization and uncertainty quantification.

  4. Manual for Implementation of the Voluntary Offer Safeguards Agreement and Additional Protocol with the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1998-06-12

    This Manual provides detailed information for implementing the requirements of DOE O 142.2A, dated 12-15-06; the Agreement Between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for the Application of Safeguards in the United States; the Original Protocol to the Agreement; the Additional Protocol to the Agreement signed by the United States and the IAEA on June 12, 1998; and the Interagency Procedures for the Implementation of the U.S.-IAEA Safeguards Agreement. No cancellation. Admin Chg 1, dated 6-27-13, supersedes DOE M 142.2-1. Certified 12-3-14.

  5. Manual for Implementation of the Voluntary Offer Safeguards Agreement and Additional Protocol with the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1998-06-12

    This Manual provides detailed information for implementing the requirements of DOE O 142.2A, dated 12-15-06; the Agreement Between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for the Application of Safeguards in the United States; the Original Protocol to the Agreement; the Additional Protocol to the Agreement signed by the United States and the IAEA on June 12, 1998; and the Interagency Procedures for the Implementation of the U.S.-IAEA Safeguards Agreement. No cancellation. Admin Chg 1, 6-27-13

  6. Titanium addition practice, and maintenance for the hearths in AHMSA`s blast furnaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boone, A.G.; Jimenez, G.; Castillo, J. [Altos Hornos de Mexico, Monclova (Mexico)

    1997-12-31

    Altos Hornos de Mexico (AHMSA) is a steel company located in Northern Mexico, in the state of Coahuila. Currently there are three blast furnaces in operation and one more about to finish its general repair. This last one is to remain as a back-up unit. Because of blast furnace hearth wear outs AHMSA has developed some maintenance procedures. These procedures are based on titanium ore additions and hearth thermic control monitoring. There are also some other maintenance practices adopted to the working operations to assure that such operations detect and avoid in time hearth wear outs that place personnel and/or the unit in danger (due to hearth leaks). This paper describes titanium ore addition to No. 2 blast furnace during the final campaign and it also illustrates maintenance practices and continuous monitoring of temperature trends both of which were implemented at AHMSA`s No. 5 blast furnace.

  7. Physically Observable Cryptography Silvio Micali

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyzin, Leonid

    Physically Observable Cryptography Silvio Micali Leonid Reyzin November 29, 2003 Abstract.) inherent in the physical execution of any cryptographic algorithm. Such "physical observation attacks mathematically impregnable systems. The great practicality and the inherent availability of physical attacks

  8. Precipitation in aqueous mixtures with addition of a strongly hydrophilic or hydrophobic solute Ryuichi Okamoto and Akira Onuki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Precipitation in aqueous mixtures with addition of a strongly hydrophilic or hydrophobic solute ions, preferential solvation can stabilize water domains enriched with ions. This precipitation occurs the mixture solvent would be in a one-phase state without solute. The volume fraction of precipitated domains

  9. STATE of the STATE Survey State of the State SurveyState of the State Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riley, Shawn J.

    8White 8.3 9.8 Black 5.7 12.4 Democrat 2.4 15.4 Republican 12.2 2.8 Detroit 3.9 9.2 Southeast Michigan (excluding Detroit) 9.8 10.8 #12;STATE of the STATE Survey Percent of Michigan Residents Who Rate.3 Black 33.5 12.8 53.7 Democrat 14.6 15.8 69.7 Republican 34.1 22.3 43.6 Detroit 32 4 14 0 53 7Detroit 32

  10. On the Context-Freeness Problem for Vector Addition Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , or equivalently vector addition systems (VAS), are widely recognized as a central model for concurrent systems one of the most studied formalisms for the modeling and analysis of concurrent systems. Despite their fairly large expressive power, many verification problems are decidable for VAS: boundedness

  11. CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project TO: Deans, Directors on the roof to June 30, 2011. DURATION OF PROJECT: May 21, 2011 to June 30, 2011 HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION: Monday persons in the vicinity of this construction project are advised to respect all construction barricades

  12. CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project TO: Deans, Directors. DURATION OF PROJECT: May 31, 2011 to June 21, 2011 HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION: Monday to Friday 7:30 a.m. to 4. The loading area will be closed on May 31, 2011. ADVISORY: All persons in the vicinity of this construction

  13. HIGH-PERFORMANCE PARALLEL ADDITION USING HYBRID WAVE-PIPELINING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nyathi, Jabulani

    HIGH-PERFORMANCE PARALLEL ADDITION USING HYBRID WAVE-PIPELINING James Levy, Jabulani Nyathi, jabu, jdelgado)@eecs.wsu.edu Abstract-- Pipelining digital systems has been shown to provide significant performance gains over non-pipelined systems and remains a standard in microprocessor design

  14. *Additional SOPs available, see: Labeling Experiments or Bottles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodall, Jerry M.

    Materials: -- Acceptable Locations For Use: Refer to chemical specific SOPs. Additional Process Notes email) and when you will return. If the chemical is particularly hazardous, make sure to represent Acids (Very hazardous! Do not approach.) Dirk Pitt Tue (May 5?) 530-752-2241 Overnight bath will clean

  15. Additives and method for controlling clathrate hydrates in fluid systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sloan, E.D. Jr.; Christiansen, R.L.; Lederhos, J.P.; Long, J.P.; Panchalingam, V.; Du, Y.; Sum, A.K.W.

    1997-06-17

    Discussed is a process for preventing clathrate hydrate masses from detrimentally impeding the possible flow of a fluid susceptible to clathrate hydrate formation. The process is particularly useful in the natural gas and petroleum production, transportation and processing industry where gas hydrate formation can cause serious problems. Additives preferably contain one or more five member, six member and/or seven member cyclic chemical groupings. Additives include polymers having lactam rings. Additives can also contain polyelectrolytes that are believed to improve conformance of polymer additives through steric hindrance and/or charge repulsion. Also, polymers having an amide on which a C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} group is attached to the nitrogen and/or the carbonyl carbon of the amide may be used alone, or in combination with ring-containing polymers for enhanced effectiveness. Polymers having at least some repeating units representative of polymerizing at least one of an oxazoline, an N-substituted acrylamide and an N-vinyl alkyl amide are preferred.

  16. Additives and method for controlling clathrate hydrates in fluid systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sloan, Jr., Earle Dendy (Golden, CO); Christiansen, Richard Lee (Littleton, CO); Lederhos, Joseph P. (Wheatridge, CO); Long, Jin Ping (Dallas, TX); Panchalingam, Vaithilingam (Lakewood, CO); Du, Yahe (Golden, CO); Sum, Amadeu Kun Wan (Golden, CO)

    1997-01-01

    Discussed is a process for preventing clathrate hydrate masses from detrimentally impeding the possible flow of a fluid susceptible to clathrate hydrate formation. The process is particularly useful in the natural gas and petroleum production, transportation and processing industry where gas hydrate formation can cause serious problems. Additives preferably contain one or more five member, six member and/or seven member cyclic chemical groupings. Additives include polymers having lactam rings. Additives can also contain polyelectrolytes that are believed to improve conformance of polymer additives through steric hinderance and/or charge repulsion. Also, polymers having an amide on which a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 group is attached to the nitrogen and/or the carbonyl carbon of the amide may be used alone, or in combination with ring-containing polymers for enhanced effectiveness. Polymers having at least some repeating units representative of polymerizing at least one of an oxazoline, an N-substituted acrylamide and an N-vinyl alkyl amide are preferred.

  17. Request for Addition or Change to SPP Submitted By

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Recycled Content % Pre-Consumer % Post-Consumer Locally Harvested/ Extracted Materials Within 500 Mi assembly of components)? Where is the product extracted, harvested or recovered from? Additional Comments? Product Disposal Recyclable? Hazardous Disposal? Energy Efficiency R-value: COP: Reduced Water Consumption

  18. Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 19982000 tropical ozone climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Anne

    Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 1998­2000 tropical ozone climatology 2; published 31 January 2003. [1] The first view of stratospheric and tropospheric ozone variability in the Southern Hemisphere tropics is provided by a 3-year record of ozone soundings from the Southern Hemisphere

  19. Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 19982004 tropical ozone climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Anne

    Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 1998­2004 tropical ozone climatology: 3 more than 3000 ozone profiles from 14 tropical and subtropical sites using balloon- borne technique might cause small station-to-station biases in the total ozone measurement. We present further

  20. Faculty Summer Research Salary Additional Compensation Pay Request

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Paul R.

    Faculty Summer Research Salary Additional Compensation Pay Request Faculty are eligible to receive up to 1/3 of their 9-month academic salary as compensation for time spent working on research projects during the summer term. Salary is paid directly from funds awarded for the sponsored project

  1. Managing Milk Composition: Feed Additives and Production Enhancers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokes, Sandra R.; Jordan, Ellen R.; Looper, Mike; Waldner, Dan

    2000-12-14

    Additivies and Production Enhancers Sandra R. Stokes, Dan N. Waldner, Ellen R. Jordan, and Michael L. Looper* L-5390 12/00 Feed additives and management tools such as bST (bovine somatotropin) play an essential role in enhanc- ing production and yield of milk...

  2. SHORT COMMUNICATION Oxidation processes on conducting carbon additives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    window Á Solid electrolyte interphase 1 Introduction Lithium-ion batteries are now used in a wide range of a more stable solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) [13, 14], becomes a challenge. Although the typical different types of typical carbon additives for lithium-ion batteries and carbonates electrolyte above 5 V

  3. Carbon Dioxide Addition to Microbial Fuel Cell Cathodes Maintains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    Carbon Dioxide Addition to Microbial Fuel Cell Cathodes Maintains Sustainable Catholyte p losses and, therefore, power losses. Here, we report that adding carbon dioxide (CO2) gas to the cathode and sustainable energy from wastewaters, replace energy intensive wastewater treatment processes, and produce

  4. A mesoscopic approach on stability and phase transition between different traffic flow states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Wei-Liang; Lin, Kai; Machado, Romuel F; Hama, Yogiro

    2015-01-01

    It is understood that congestion in traffic can be interpreted in terms of the instability of the equation of dynamic motion. The evoltuion of a traffic system from an unstable or metastable state to a globally stable state bears a strong resemblance to the phase transition in thermodynamics. In this work, we explore the underlying physics of the traffic system, by examing closely the physical properties and mathematical constraints of the phase transitons therein. By using a mesoscopic approach, one entitles the catastrophe model the same physical content as in the Landau's theory, and uncovers its close connection to the instability and phase transitions. In addition to the one-dimensional configuration space, we generalize our discussion to the higher-dimensional case, where the observed temporal oscillation in traffic flow data is attributed to the curl of a vector field. We exhibit that our model can reproduce main features of the observed fundamental diagram including the inverse-$\\lambda$ shape and the...

  5. Improvement of mechanical properties by additive assisted laser sintering of PEEK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kroh, M., E-mail: michael.kroh@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de; Bonten, C., E-mail: michael.kroh@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de [Institut für Kunststofftechnik, University of Stuttgart (Germany); Eyerer, P., E-mail: peter.eyerer@ict.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology (ICT) (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    The additive assisted laser sintering was recently developed at IKT: A carbon black (CB) additive is used to adjust the polymer's laser absorption behavior with the aim to improve the interconnection of sintered powder layers. In this paper a parameter study, Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) samples were prepared with different contents of carbon black and were laser sintered with varying thermal treatment. The samples were mechanically tested and investigated by optical light and transmission electron microscopy. An influence on the morphology at the border areas of particles and intersections of laser sintered layers was found. Depending on the viscosity of the raw material and CB content, different shapes of lamellae were observed. These (trans-) crystalline or polymorph structures, respectively, influence the thermal and mechanical behavior of the virgin PEEK. Moreover, the thermal treatment during the sintering process caused an improvement of mechanical properties like tensile strength and elongation at break.

  6. Temperature Dependent Interaction Non-Additivity in the Inorganic Ionic Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaban, Vitaly V

    2015-01-01

    Interaction non-additivity in the chemical context means that binding of certain atom to a reference atom cannot be fully predicted from the interactions of these two atoms with other atoms. This constitutes one of key phenomena determining an identity of our world, which would have been much poorer otherwise. Ionic systems provide a good example of the interaction non-additivity in most cases due to electron transfer and delocalization effects. We report Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) simulations of LiCl, NaCl, and KCl at 300, 1500, and 2000 K. We show that our observations originate from interplay of thermal motion during BOMD and cation nature. In the case of alkali cations, ionic nature plays a more significant role than temperature. Our results bring fundamental understanding of electronic effects in the condensed phase of ionic systems and foster progress in physical chemistry and engineering.

  7. Lithium difluoro(oxalato)borate as additive to Improve the thermal stability of llithiated graphite.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Z.; Qin, Y.; Liu, J.; Amine, K.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2009-01-21

    The reaction of lithiated graphite with a nonaqueous electrolyte of 1.2 M LiPF{sub 6} in ethylene carbonate/ethyl methyl carbonate (3:7 by weight) was investigated using differential scanning calorimetry. The decomposition of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) took place at about 100 C and was followed by a continuous formation/decomposition of the SEI up to 250 C. Another two peaks were observed at temperatures above 250 C. These peaks were attributed to the major reaction of lithiated graphite with the nonaqueous electrolyte. With the addition of lithium difluoro(oxalato)borate as an electrolyte additive, the onset temperatures of the three peaks were pushed higher, as confirmed by the activation energies obtained.

  8. Do $??$ bound states exist?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Haidenbauer; Ulf-G. Meißner; S. Petschauer

    2014-12-09

    The existence of baryon-baryon bound states in the strangeness sector is examined in the framework of SU(3) chiral effective field theory. Specifically, the role of SU(3) symmetry breaking contact terms that arise at next-to-leading order in the employed Weinberg power counting scheme is explored. We focus on the 1S0 partial wave and on baryon-baryon channels with maximal isospin since in this case there are only two independent SU(3) symmetry breaking contact terms. At the same time, those are the channels where most of the bound states have been predicted in the past. Utilizing $pp$ phase shifts and $\\Sigma^+ p$ cross section data allows us to pin down one of the SU(3) symmetry breaking contact terms and a clear indication for the decrease of attraction when going from the NN system to strangeness S=-2 is found, which rules out a bound state for $\\Sigma\\Sigma$ with isospin I=2. Assuming that the trend observed for S=0 to S=-2 is not reversed when going to $\\Xi\\Sigma$ and $\\Xi\\Xi$ makes also bound states in those systems rather unlikely.

  9. Magnetic Edge States in Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriela Murguia

    2010-08-29

    Magnetic confinement in graphene has been of recent and growing interest because its potential applications in nanotechnology. In particular, the observation of the so called magnetic edge states in graphene has opened the possibility to deepen into the generation of spin currents and its applications in spintronics. We study the magnetic edge states of quasi-particles arising in graphene monolayers due to an inhomogeneous magnetic field of a magnetic barrier in the formalism of the two-dimensional massless Dirac equation. We also show how the solutions of such states in each of both triangular sublattices of the graphene are related through a supersymmetric transformation in the quantum mechanical sense.

  10. Magnetic Edge States in Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murguia, Gabriela

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic confinement in graphene has been of recent and growing interest because its potential applications in nanotechnology. In particular, the observation of the so called magnetic edge states in graphene has opened the possibility to deepen into the generation of spin currents and its applications in spintronics. We study the magnetic edge states of quasi-particles arising in graphene monolayers due to an inhomogeneous magnetic field of a magnetic barrier in the formalism of the two-dimensional massless Dirac equation. We also show how the solutions of such states in each of both triangular sublattices of the graphene are related through a supersymmetric transformation in the quantum mechanical sense.

  11. State Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyThe U.S. Department ofEnergy(Department orAn exampleThe StartupagendaitsState million

  12. State Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyThe U.S. Department ofEnergy(Department orAn exampleThe StartupagendaitsState

  13. State Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyThe U.S. Department ofEnergy(Department orAn exampleThe StartupagendaitsState83

  14. State Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyThe U.S. Department ofEnergy(Department orAn exampleThe StartupagendaitsState8333

  15. State Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyThe U.S. Department ofEnergy(Department orAn exampleThe StartupagendaitsState83337

  16. State Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyThe U.S. Department ofEnergy(Department orAn exampleThe StartupagendaitsState8333755

  17. United States

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowing YouNeedof EnergyMeeting - MarchUSPS:1 United States

  18. United States

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowing YouNeedof EnergyMeeting - MarchUSPS:1 United States7

  19. United States

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowing YouNeedof EnergyMeeting - MarchUSPS:1 United States78

  20. Objectivity of Quantum Measurement in Many-Observer World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng-Wen Li; C. Y. Cai; X. F. Liu; C. P. Sun

    2015-08-06

    The objectivity of quantum measurement is treated as an emergent phenomenon with $N$ observers who can agree to the same result of measurement, and meanwhile, they can identify their records with each other. In this many-observer world (MOW), an objective quantum measurement is dealt with as a multipartite [$(N+1)$-body] quantum correlation among the measured system and $N$ observers when its bipartite reductions are the same classical correlations. With this conceptual clarification, we find that, an objective quantum measurement is implemented if and only if the MOW is initially factorized in a pure state and then the total system can evolve into a generalized GHZ state with respect to the orthogonal basis preferred by each observer. Especially, such objective quantum measurement is recast in ideal classical correlation when the observer world is macroscopic for $N\\rightarrow\\infty$.

  1. Signatures of initial state modifications on bispectrum statistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meerburg, P Daniel; Schaar, Jan Pieter van der; Corasaniti, Pier Stefano E-mail: j.p.vanderschaar@uva.nl

    2009-05-15

    Modifications of the initial-state of the inflaton field can induce a departure from Gaussianity and leave a testable imprint on the higher order correlations of the CMB and large scale structures in the Universe. We focus on the bispectrum statistics of the primordial curvature perturbation and its projection on the CMB. For a canonical single-field action the three-point correlator enhancement is localized, maximizing in the collinear limit, corresponding to enfolded or squashed triangles in comoving momentum space. We show that the available local and equilateral template are very insensitive to this localized enhancement and do not generate noteworthy constraints on initial-state modifications. On the other hand, when considering the addition of a dimension 8 higher order derivative term, we find a dominant rapidly oscillating contribution, which had previously been overlooked and whose significantly enhanced amplitude is independent of the triangle under consideration. Nevertheless, the oscillatory nature of (the sign of) the correlation function implies the signal is nearly orthogonal to currently available observational templates, strongly reducing the sensitivity to the enhancement. Constraints on departures from the standard Bunch-Davies vacuum state can be derived, but also depend on the next-to-leading terms. We emphasize that the construction and application of especially adapted templates could lead to CMB bispectrum constraints on modified initial states already competing with those derived from the power spectrum.

  2. A new DFM approach to combine machining and additive manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerbrat, Olivier; Hascoët, Jean-Yves; 10.1016/j.compind.2011.04.003

    2011-01-01

    Design For Manufacturing (DFM) approaches aim to integrate manufacturability aspects during the design stage. Most of DFM approaches usually consider only one manufacturing process, but products competitiveness may be improved by designing hybrid modular products, in which products are seen as 3-D puzzles with modules realized aside by the best manufacturing process and further gathered. A new DFM system is created in order to give quantitative information during the product design stage of which modules will benefit in being machined and which ones will advantageously be realized by an additive process (such as Selective Laser Sintering or laser deposition). A methodology for a manufacturability evaluation in case of a subtractive or an additive manufacturing process is developed and implemented in a CAD software. Tests are carried out on industrial products from automotive industry.

  3. Quantum coherent states in cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houri Ziaeepour

    2015-02-15

    Coherent states consist of superposition of infinite number of particles and do not have a classical analogue. We study their evolution in a FLRW cosmology and show that only when full quantum corrections are considered, they may survive the expansion of the Universe and form a global condensate. This state of matter can be the origin of accelerating expansion of the Universe, generally called dark energy, and inflation in the early universe. Additionally, such a quantum pool may be the ultimate environment for decoherence at shorter distances. If dark energy is a quantum coherent state, its dominant contribution to the total energy of the Universe at present provides a low entropy state which may be necessary as an initial condition for a new Big Bang in the framework of bouncing cosmology models.

  4. Additive for iron disulfide cathodes used in thermal batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1982-03-23

    The invention comprises thermal batteries employing an FeS/sub 2/ depolarizer itself. A minor amount of CaSi/sub 2/ preferably 1-3% by weight is provided as an additive in the FeS/sub 2/ depolarizer to eliminate the voltage transient (spike) which normally occurs upon activation of batteries of this type. The amount of FeS/sub 2/ by weight generally comprises 64 to 90%.

  5. Additive for iron disulfide cathodes used in thermal batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armijo, James R. (Albuquerque, NM); Searcy, Jimmie Q. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1983-01-01

    The invention comprises thermal batteries employing an FeS.sub.2 depolarizer, i.e. cathode material, and the depolarizer itself. A minor amount of CaSi.sub.2 preferably, 1-3% by weight is provided as an additive in the FeS.sub.2 depolarizer to eliminate the voltage transient (spike) which normally occurs upon activation of batteries of this type. The amount of FeS.sub.2 by weight generally comprises 64-90%.

  6. Economic Implications of Additive Manufacturing and the Contribution of MIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thiesse, Frédéric; Wirth, Marco; Kemper, Hans-Georg; Moisa, Michelle; Morar, Dominik; Lasi, Heiner; Piller, Frank; Buxmann, Peter; Mortara, Letizia; Ford, Simon; Minshall, Tim

    2015-03-03

    and automotive industries. In addition, logistics processes can be digitalized through location-independent manufacturing. Thus, the physical flow of material can be reduced significantly. This would initiate massive changes in the logistics industry which... – and particular platforms like Thingiverse – allows sharing ideas with other individuals worldwide. Active participants of the movement related to Digital Fabrication often call themselves “makers” (Anderson 2012). This “makers movement” consists of user...

  7. Evaluation of Additive Manufacturing for Composite Part Molds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duty, Chad E.; Springfield, Robert M.

    2015-02-01

    The ORNL Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) collaborated with Tru-Design to test the quality and durability of molds used for making fiber reinforced composites using additive manufacturing. The partners developed surface treatment techniques including epoxy coatings and machining to improve the quality of the surface finish. Test samples made using the printed and surface finished molds demonstrated life spans suitable for one-of-a-kind and low-volume applications, meeting the project objective.

  8. Does the Use of Diamond-Like Carbon Coating and Organophosphate Lubricant Additive Together Cause Excessive Tribochemical Material Removal?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Yan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Meyer, Harry M.; Luo, Huimin; Qu, Jun

    2015-08-22

    We observe unexpected wear increase on a steel surface that rubbed against diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings only when lubricated by phosphate-based antiwear additives. Contrary to the literature hypothesis of a competition between zinc dialkyldithiophosphate produced tribofilms and DLC-induced carbon transfer, here a new wear mechanism based on carbon-catalyzed tribochemical interactions supported by surface characterization is proposed

  9. Observation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access to scienceSpeedingLightweight MaterialsGas and OilPublictearing

  10. Observation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access to scienceSpeedingLightweight MaterialsGas and

  11. Observation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLEDSpeeding accessSpeeding access

  12. NS&T MANAGEMENT OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianotto, David

    2014-06-01

    The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

  13. NS&T Management Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianotto, David

    2014-09-01

    The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

  14. State-to-state photodissociation of carbonyl sulfide ({nu}{sub 2}=0,1|JlM). II. The effect of initial bending on coherence of S({sup 1}D{sub 2}) polarization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brom, Alrik J. van den; Rakitzis, T. Peter; Janssen, Maurice H. M. [Laser Center and Department of Chemistry, Vrije Universiteit, de Boelelaan 1083, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Physics, University of Crete, Heraklion 71110, Greece and Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser of the Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (IESL-FORTH), P.O. Box 1527, 71110 Heraklion (Greece); Laser Center and Department of Chemistry, Vrije Universiteit, de Boelelaan 1083, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2005-10-22

    Photodissociation studies using ion imaging are reported, measuring the coherence of the polarization of the S({sup 1}D{sub 2}) fragment from the photolysis of single-quantum state-selected carbonyl sulfide (OCS) at 223 and 230 nm. A hexapole state-selector focuses a molecular beam of OCS parent molecules in the ground state ({nu}{sub 2}=0 vertical bar JM=10) or in the first excited bending state ({nu}{sub 2}=1 vertical bar JlM=111). At 230 nm photolysis the Im[a{sub 1}{sup (1p}{sub arallel}{sup ,perpendicular})] moment for the fast S({sup 1}D{sub 2}) channel increases by about 50% when the initial OCS parent state changes from the vibrationless ground state to the first excited bending state. No dependence on the initial bending state is found for photolysis at 223 nm. We observe separate rings in the slow channel of the velocity distribution of S({sup 1}D{sub 2}) correlating to single CO(J) rotational states. The additional available energy for photolysis at 223 nm is found to be channeled mostly into the CO(J) rotational motion. An improved value for the OC-S bond energy D{sub 0}=4.292 eV is reported.

  15. Accelerated Expansion: Theory and Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Polarski

    2001-09-20

    The present paradigm in cosmology is the usual Big-Bang Cosmology in which two stages of accelerated expansion are incorporated: the inflationary phase in the very early universe which produces the classical inhomogeneities observed in the universe, and a second stage of acceleration at the present time as the latest Supernovae observations seem to imply. Both stages could be produced by a scalar field and observations will strongly constrain the microscopic lagrangian of any proposed model.

  16. VISUALIZING THE SPREAD OF WEST NILE VIRUS Jurgen Symanzik , Utah State University,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Symanzik, Jürgen

    was rst recognized in the United States in 1999 as the cause of severe and fatal human illness, there were only a few states in the Western United States where the virus had not been observed. However, indications are that the virus will be observed in every state of the contiguous United States by the end

  17. Portland State University Shattuck Hall

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Portland, OR Portland State's Shattuck hall was originally constructed as an elementary school in 1915. In 2007 the university undertook extensive renovations of the building to bring it up to current seismic requirements. In addition to structural improvements, the design team was able to upgraded the building's aging mechanical and electrical systems, upgrade plumbing, and restore the large light wells that bring daylight into the U-shaped building. The resulting building houses Portland State's Architecture department, where students are able to learn from the exposed building systems.

  18. BPS States, Crystals, and Matrices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Su?kowski, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    We review free fermion, melting crystal, and matrix model representations of wall-crossing phenomena on local, toric Calabi-Yau manifolds. We consider both unrefined and refined BPS counting of closed BPS states involving D2- and D0-branes bound to a D6-brane, as well as open BPS states involving open D2-branes ending on an additional D4-brane. Appropriate limit of these constructions provides, among the others, matrix model representation of refined and unrefined topological string amplitudes.

  19. Effects of Additive Elements on the Phase Formation and Morphological Stability of Nickel Monosilicide Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lavoie,C.; Detavernier, C.; Cabral, Jr. , C.; d'Heurle, F.; Kellock, A.; Jordan-Sweet, J.; Harper, J.

    2006-01-01

    Alloying elements can substantially affect the formation and morphological stability of nickel monosilicide. A comprehensive study of phase formation was performed on 24 Ni alloys with varying concentrations of alloying elements. Silicide films have been used for more than 15 years to contact the source, drain and gate of state-of-the-art complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices. In the past, the addition of alloying elements was shown to improve the transformation from the high resistivity C49 to the low resistivity C54-TiSi{sub 2} phase and to allow for the control of surface and interface roughness of CoSi{sub 2} films as well as produce significant improvements with respect to agglomeration of the films. Using simultaneous time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD), resistance and light scattering measurements, we follow the formation of the silicide phases in real time during rapid thermal annealing. Additions to the Ni-Si system lead to modifications in the phase formation sequence at low temperatures (metal-rich phases), to variations in the formation temperatures of NiSi and NiSi{sub 2}, and to changes in the agglomeration behavior of the films formed. Of the 24 elements studied, additions of Mo, Re, Ta and W are amongst the most efficient to retard agglomeration while elements such as Pd, Pt and Rh are most efficient to retard the formation of NiSi{sub 2}.

  20. Systems simulation of oil additives to grain at terminal elevators 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goforth, Kerry James

    1985-01-01

    Negligible colorless, odorless stable, inert From: McIlveen, 1984 12 Previous Research Dust suppression characteristics of mineral oil have been evaluated at the United States Grain Marketing Research Laboratory in Manhatten, Kansas. Lai et al. (1981... and are not separated out by normal grain inspection procedures. Foreign matter reductions of up to 1. 5 percent have been reported in informal experiments (Hegadorn, 1984). Country elevators that have no dust collection systems are realizing savings from oil...

  1. Comparing Environmental Impacts of Additive Manufacturing vs. Traditional Machining via Life-Cycle Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faludi, Jeremy; Bayley, Cindy; Bhogal, Suraj; Iribarne, Myles

    2014-01-01

    Impacts of Additive Manufacturing vs. Traditional Machiningcutting! Impacts of Additive Manufacturing in LiteratureSocial Impacts of Additive Manufacturing vs CNC Machining

  2. Analysis of The Anomalous Orbital-Energy Changes Observed in Spacecraft Flybys of Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roger Ellman

    2008-12-01

    In March 2008 anomalous behavior in spacecraft flybys of Earth was reported in Physical Review Letters, Volume 100, Issue 9, March 7, 2008, in an article entitled "Anomalous Orbital-Energy Changes Observed during Spacecraft Flybys of Earth". The data indicate unaccounted for changes in spacecraft speed, both increases and decreases, for six different spacecraft involved in Earth flybys from December 8, 1990 to August 2, 2005. The article states that, "All ... potential sources of systematic error .... [have been] modeled. None can account for the observed anomalies.... Like the Pioneer anomaly ... the Earth flybys anomaly is a real effect .... Its source is unknown." In the present article it is shown that the Earth flybys anomaly would be caused by a very small acceleration [in addition to that of natural gravitation], centrally directed and independent of distance, the same effect as that which the Pioneer anomaly exhibits. How that effect operates to produce the observed results is analyzed. A cause of the centrally directed accelerations is presented.

  3. Additional nuclear criticality safety calculations for small-diameter containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hone, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    This report documents additional criticality safety analysis calculations for small diameter containers, which were originally documented in Reference 1. The results in Reference 1 indicated that some of the small diameter containers did not meet the criteria established for criticality safety at the Portsmouth facility (K{sub eff} +2{sigma}<.95) when modeled under various contingency assumptions of reflection and moderation. The calculations performed in this report reexamine those cases which did not meet the criticality safety criteria. In some cases, unnecessary conservatism is removed, and in other cases mass or assay limits are established for use with the respective containers.

  4. Alabama Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade Year-0Cubic(MillionDecade Year-0 Year-1Additions

  5. Arkansas Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948 2,724 2,570MonthThousand8 2 2 2Additions (Million

  6. California Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948 2,724perSales (BillionFeet)Feet)Additions

  7. Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugAdditions (Million Cubic Feet)

  8. Delaware Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugAdditions1 0 0 02009 2010 20113 -2 -31

  9. Delaware Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugAdditions1 0 0 02009Decade

  10. Louisiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012 2013(MillionYear Jan Feb Mar AprAdditions

  11. Minnesota Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012DecadeTotal19 15 15May-15DecadeAdditions (Million

  12. Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment| DepartmentAL/FAL 99-01 More5,AchievingSeptember 9,ActivitiesAdditional|

  13. Additional Verification Bodies Now Available for SEP | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment| DepartmentAL/FAL 99-01 More5,AchievingSeptember 9,ActivitiesAdditional|

  14. North Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr721,507 836,698 867,922247,047Additions

  15. Loop quantum gravity and observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Barrau; J. Grain

    2015-10-28

    Quantum gravity has long been thought to be completely decoupled from experiments or observations. Although it is true that smoking guns are still missing, there are now serious hopes that quantum gravity phenomena might be tested. We review here some possible ways to observe loop quantum gravity effects either in the framework of cosmology or in astroparticle physics.

  16. Observational Study PAUL R. ROSENBAUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Edward I.

    . Howell John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, 2005 #12;Observational Study Observational Studies Defined describing the subjects before treatment. As a consequence, random assignment tends to make the groups comparable both in terms of measured char- acteristics and characteristics that were not or could

  17. State Energy Program Helps States Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Program Helps States Plan and Implement Energy Efficiency The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) State Energy Program (SEP) provides grants and technical assis- tance to states...

  18. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2004-10-31

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

  19. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2005-04-30

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

  20. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2005-01-31

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

  1. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2004-07-28

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

  2. Biooptical observations of the 2004 Labrador Sea phytoplankton bloom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    showed an additional midJune peak in zooplankton biomass which was attributed to egglaying copepods increasingly important as these deployments become more commonplace via ocean observing systems. Moreover that during the bloom, 47 mmol C m-2 d-1 was assimilated into biomass and was rapidly exported, and that all

  3. Magnetic Force Microscopy Study of Zr2Co11 -Based Nanocrystalline Materials: Effect of Mo Addition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yue, Lanping; Jin, Yunlong; Zhang, Wenyong; Sellmyer, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The addition of Molybdenum was used to modify the nanostructure and enhance coercivity of rare-earth-free Zr2Co11-based nanocrystalline permanent magnets. The effect of Mo addition on magnetic domain structures of melt spun nanocrystalline Zr16Co84-xMox(x=0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2.0) ribbons has been investigated. It was found that magnetic properties and local domain structures are strongly influenced by Mo doping. The coercivity of the samples increases with the increase in Mo content (x?1.5). The maximum energy product(BH)maxincreases with increasingxfrom 0.5?MGOe forx=0to a maximum value of 4.2?MGOe forx=1.5. The smallest domain size with a relativelymore »short magnetic correlation length of 128?nm and largest root-mean-square phase shift?rmsvalue of 0.66° are observed for thex=1.5. The optimal Mo addition promotes magnetic domain structure refinement and thus leads to a significant increase in coercivity and energy product in this sample.« less

  4. Fuel, lubricant and additive effects in combustion chamber deposit formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelemen, S.R.; Homan, H.S.

    1996-10-01

    CCD causes octane requirement increase (ORI) and can potentially contributes to exhaust emissions and combustion chamber deposit interference (CCDI). Experiments were conducted to identify the separate fuel, lubricant and additive contributions to the amount and composition of CCD. CCD originates from multiple sources. Gasoline hydrocarbon components, gasoline additives, engine lubricant, and atmospheric nitrogen contribute to CCD in different ways. With some fuels the engine lubricant is the main contributor to CCD and this is shown by the high ash level in the CCD. For other fuels CCD is predominantly organic. Significant amounts of nitrogen were found in the CCD even when the fuel and lubricant were nitrogen free. The pyrolysis reactivity of different CCDs was studied to gain an understanding about the transformations that potentially happen over longer times and lower temperatures on the combustion chamber walls. In all cases during mild pyrolysis (375{degrees}C) there was a substantial increase in the level of aromatic carbon and a decrease in the level of organic oxygen. The largest increases in the amount of aromatic carbon occurred for CCDs that were the least aromatic.

  5. Strong Integer Additive Set-valued Graphs: A Creative Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. K. Sudev; K. A. Germina; K. P. Chithra

    2015-04-23

    For a non-empty ground set $X$, finite or infinite, the {\\em set-valuation} or {\\em set-labeling} of a given graph $G$ is an injective function $f:V(G) \\to \\mathcal{P}(X)$, where $\\mathcal{P}(X)$ is the power set of the set $X$. A set-indexer of a graph $G$ is an injective set-valued function $f:V(G) \\to \\mathcal{P}(X)$ such that the function $f^{\\ast}:E(G)\\to \\mathcal{P}(X)-\\{\\emptyset\\}$ defined by $f^{\\ast}(uv) = f(u){\\ast} f(v)$ for every $uv{\\in} E(G)$ is also injective., where $\\ast$ is a binary operation on sets. An integer additive set-indexer is defined as an injective function $f:V(G)\\to \\mathcal{P}({\\mathbb{N}_0})$ such that the induced function $g_f:E(G) \\to \\mathcal{P}(\\mathbb{N}_0)$ defined by $g_f (uv) = f(u)+ f(v)$ is also injective, where $\\mathbb{N}_0$ is the set of all non-negative integers and $\\mathcal{P}(\\mathbb{N}_0)$ is its power set. An IASI $f$ is said to be a strong IASI if $|f^+(uv)|=|f(u)|\\,|f(v)|$ for every pair of adjacent vertices $u,v$ in $G$. In this paper, we critically and creatively review the concepts and properties of strong integer additive set-valued graphs.

  6. International Workshops to Foster Implementation of the IAEA Additional Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killinger, Mark H.; Coates, Cameron W.; Bedke, Michael L.

    2003-07-14

    A country’s adherence to the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) Additional Protocol is an important statement to the world of that country’s commitment to nuclear nonproliferation. Without the Additional Protocol (AP) it is possible, as demonstrated in Iraq, for a country party to the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) to clandestinely work toward nuclear weapons and be undetected by the IAEA. This is because classical safeguards under the NPT are directed at diversion of nuclear material from declared activities. But a country may instead build undeclared activities to produce weapons-grade nuclear material. The AP is directed at detecting those undeclared activities. As of May 2003, 73 countries had signed the AP, but only 35 have entered into force. To further adherence to the AP, the IAEA has held regional, high-level seminars in Japan, South Africa, Kazakhstan, Peru, Romania, and Malaysia to explain AP provisions. To supplement these policy-level seminars, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has undertaken to develop a set of modules of technical competencies required to implement the AP. The intent is to work closely with the IAEA by providing these technical competencies to countries as well as to complement the IAEA’s regional seminars and other outreach efforts. This paper briefly describes the technical competency modules.

  7. Cytotoxic Effects of Temozolomide and Radiation are Additive- and Schedule-Dependent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chalmers, Anthony J., E-mail: a.j.chalmers@sussex.ac.u [Brighton and Sussex Medical School, University of Sussex, Falmer (United Kingdom); Genome Damage and Stability Centre, University of Sussex, Falmer (United Kingdom); Ruff, Elliot M. [Royal Sussex County Hospital, Eastern Road, Brighton (United Kingdom); Martindale, Christine [UCL Cancer Institute, Paul O'Gorman Building, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Lovegrove, Nadia [Genome Damage and Stability Centre, University of Sussex, Falmer (United Kingdom); Short, Susan C. [UCL Cancer Institute, Paul O'Gorman Building, University College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Despite aggressive therapy comprising radical radiation and temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy, the prognosis for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains poor, particularly if tumors express O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT). The interactions between radiation and TMZ remain unclear and have important implications for scheduling and for developing strategies to improve outcomes. Methods and Materials: Factors determining the effects of combination therapy on clonogenic survival, cell-cycle checkpoint signaling and DNA repair were investigated in four human glioma cell lines (T98G, U373-MG, UVW, U87-MG). Results: Combining TMZ and radiation yielded additive cytotoxicity, but only when TMZ was delivered 72 h before radiation. Radiosensitization was not observed. TMZ induced G2/M cell-cycle arrest at 48-72 h, coincident with phosphorylation of Chk1 and Chk2. Additive G2/M arrest and Chk1/Chk2 phosphorylation was only observed when TMZ preceded radiation by 72 h. The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) inhibitor KU-55933 increased radiation sensitivity and delayed repair of radiation-induced DNA breaks, but did not influence TMZ effects. The multiple kinase inhibitor caffeine enhanced the cytotoxicity of chemoradiation and exacerbated DNA damage. Conclusions: TMZ is not a radiosensitizing agent but yields additive cytotoxicity in combination with radiation. Our data indicate that TMZ treatment should commence at least 3 days before radiation to achieve maximum benefit. Activation of G2/M checkpoint signaling by TMZ and radiation has a cytoprotective effect that can be overcome by dual inhibition of ATM and ATR. More specific inhibition of checkpoint signaling will be required to increase treatment efficacy without exacerbating toxicity.

  8. Probing the Sun with ALMA: observations and simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loukitcheva, Maria; White, Stephen M; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-01-01

    ALMA will open a new chapter in the study of the Sun by providing a leap in spatial resolution and sensitivity compared to currently available mm wave- length observations. In preparation of ALMA, we have carried out a large number of observational tests and state-of-the-art radiation MHD simulations. Here we review the best available observations of the Sun at millimeter wavelengths.Using state of the art radiation MHD simulations of the solar atmosphere we demonstrate the huge potential of ALMA observations for uncovering the nature of the solar chromosphere. We show that ALMA will not only provide a reliable probe of the thermal structure and dynamics of the chromosphere, it will also open up a powerful new diagnostic of magnetic field at chromospheric heights, a fundamentally important, but so far poorly known parameter.

  9. Hawking radiation as perceived by different observers (ERE2011 proceedings)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbado, Luis C; Garay, Luis J

    2012-01-01

    We study the perception of Hawking radiation by different observers outside a black hole. The analysis is done in terms of an effective-temperature function that varies along the trajectory of each observer. The vacuum state of the radiation field is chosen to be non-stationary, so as to mimic the switching-on of Hawking radiation that would appear in a real black hole collapse. We analyse how this vacuum is perceived by observers staying at a fixed radius, by observers coming in free-fall from radial infinity at different times, and by observers in free-fall released from finite radial positions. Results found have a compelling physical interpretation. One main result, at first unexpected, is that in general free-falling observers do perceive particle emission by the black hole when crossing the event horizon. This happens because of a diverging Doppler shift at the event horizon.

  10. Hawking radiation as perceived by different observers (ERE2011 proceedings)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luis C. Barbado; Carlos Barceló; Luis J. Garay

    2012-10-01

    We study the perception of Hawking radiation by different observers outside a black hole. The analysis is done in terms of an effective-temperature function that varies along the trajectory of each observer. The vacuum state of the radiation field is chosen to be non-stationary, so as to mimic the switching-on of Hawking radiation that would appear in a real black hole collapse. We analyse how this vacuum is perceived by observers staying at a fixed radius, by observers coming in free-fall from radial infinity at different times, and by observers in free-fall released from finite radial positions. Results found have a compelling physical interpretation. One main result, at first unexpected, is that in general free-falling observers do perceive particle emission by the black hole when crossing the event horizon. This happens because of a diverging Doppler shift at the event horizon.

  11. United States Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Faruque, Mohammad Abdullah

    Protect Your Family From Lead in Your Home United States Environmental Protection Agency United States Consumer Product Safety Commission United States Department of Housing and Urban Development

  12. DOE Announces Additional Public Comment Meetings for Draft National

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i pState Efficiency, Renewables Initiatives | Department ofCorridor

  13. Advanced Electrolyte Additives for PHEV/EV Lithium-ion Battery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Advanced Electrolyte Additives for PHEVEV Lithium-ion Battery Development of Advanced Electrolytes and Electrolyte Additives Electrolytes -...

  14. Decontamination formulation with additive for enhanced mold remediation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tucker, Mark D. (Albuquerque, NM); Irvine, Kevin (Huntsville, AL); Berger, Paul (Rome, NY); Comstock, Robert (Bel Air, MD)

    2010-02-16

    Decontamination formulations with an additive for enhancing mold remediation. The formulations include a solubilizing agent (e.g., a cationic surfactant), a reactive compound (e.g., hydrogen peroxide), a carbonate or bicarbonate salt, a water-soluble bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate), a mold remediation enhancer containing Fe or Mn, and water. The concentration of Fe.sup.2+ or Mn.sup.2+ ions in the aqueous mixture is in the range of about 0.0001% to about 0.001%. The enhanced formulations can be delivered, for example, as a foam, spray, liquid, fog, mist, or aerosol for neutralization of chemical compounds, and for killing certain biological compounds or agents and mold spores, on contaminated surfaces and materials.

  15. Improving properties of Mg with Al–Cu additions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rashad, Muhammad; Pan, Fusheng; Asif, Muhammad; Hussain, Shahid; Saleem, Muhammad

    2014-09-15

    The present work reports improvement in tensile properties of the Mg matrix reinforced with micron-sized copper–aluminum particulate hybrids. The Al–Cu particulate hybrids were incorporated into the Mg matrix through powder metallurgy method. The synthesized alloys exhibited homogeneously dispersed Mg{sub 2}Cu particles in the matrix, therefore leading to a 110% increase in yield strength (221 MPa) and a 72% enhancement in ultimate tensile strength (284 MPa) by addition of 1.0 wt.%Al–0.6 wt.%Cu particle hybrids. Optical microscopy, scanning election microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to investigate the microstructure and intermetallic phases of the synthesized alloys. - Highlights: • Mg matrix is reinforced with Al–Cu particulate hybrids. • Powder metallurgic method is used to fabricate the alloys. • Tensile strength and ductility were increased simultaneously.

  16. Motor stator using corner scraps for additional electrical components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S.; Su, Gui-Jia; Adams, Donald J.; Nagashima, James M.; Stancu, Constantin; Carlson, Douglas S.; Smith, Gregory S.

    2004-03-16

    A method for making a motor and auxiliary devices with a unified stator body comprises providing a piece of material (10) having an area larger than a cross section of the stator (11), removing material from the piece of material (10) to form a pattern for a cross section of a core (11) for the stator, and removing material from the piece of material (10) outside the cross section of the core of the stator (11) to allow positioning of cores (22, 23, 24) for supporting windings (25, 26, 27) of least one additional electromagnetic device, such as a transformer (62) in a dc-to-dc converter (61, 62) that provides a low. voltage dc output. An article of manufacture made according to the invention is also disclosed and apparatus made with the method and article of manufacture are also disclosed.

  17. Observation of an Interedge Magnetoplasmon Mode in a Degenerate Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hohls, Frank

    detection of edge states in the quantum Hall regime. At filling factors close to 3 we observe two densities was experimentally observed up to now only in a classical system of surface electrons on helium [9 magnetoplasmons. Using selective detection of edge states we can distinguish two wave packets of edge excitations

  18. Jet observables without jet algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertolini, Daniele

    We introduce a new class of event shapes to characterize the jet-like structure of an event. Like traditional event shapes, our observables are infrared/collinear safe and involve a sum over all hadrons in an event, but ...

  19. Baryon Resonances Observed at BES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. S. Zou

    2008-02-01

    The $\\psi$ decays provide a novel way to explore baryon spectroscopy and baryon structure. The baryon resonances observed from $\\psi$ decays at BES are reviewed. The implications and prospects at upgraded BESIII/BEPCII are discussed.

  20. How do two observers pool their knowledge about a quantum system?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurt Jacobs

    2002-09-13

    In the theory of classical statistical inference one can derive a simple rule by which two or more observers may combine {\\em independently} obtained states of knowledge together to form a new state of knowledge, which is the state which would be possessed by someone having the combined information of both observers. Moreover, this combined state of knowledge can be found without reference to the manner in which the respective observers obtained their information. However, in this note we show that in general this is not possible for quantum states of knowledge; in order to combine two quantum states of knowledge to obtain the state resulting from the combined information of both observers, these observers must also possess information about how their respective states of knowledge were obtained. Nevertheless, we emphasize this does not preclude the possibility that a unique, well motivated rule for combining quantum states of knowledge without reference to a measurement history could be found. We examine both the direct quantum analogue of the classical problem, and that of quantum state-estimation, which corresponds to a variant in which the observers share a specific kind of prior information.

  1. Towards the theory of control in observable quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V P Belavkin

    2004-08-02

    An operational description of the controlled Markov dynamics of quantum-mechanical system is introduced. The feedback control strategies with regard to the dynamical reduction of quantum states in the course of quantum real-time measurements are discribed in terms of quantum filtering of these states. The concept of sufficient coordinates for the description of the a posteriori quantum states from a given class is introduced, and it is proved that they form a classical Markov process with values in either state operators or state vector space. The general problem of optimal control of a quantum-mechanical system is discussed and the corresponding Bellman equation in the space of sufficient coordinates is derived. The results are illustrated in the example of control of the semigroup dynamics of a quantum system that is instantaneously observed at discrete times and evolves between measurement times according to the Schroedinger equation.

  2. Additional EIPC Study Analysis: Interim Report on High Priority Topics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, Stanton W

    2013-11-01

    Between 2010 and 2012 the Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) conducted a major long-term resource and transmission study of the Eastern Interconnection (EI). With guidance from a Stakeholder Steering Committee (SSC) that included representatives from the Eastern Interconnection States Planning Council (EISPC) among others, the project was conducted in two phases. Phase 1 involved a long-term capacity expansion analysis that involved creation of eight major futures plus 72 sensitivities. Three scenarios were selected for more extensive transmission- focused evaluation in Phase 2. Five power flow analyses, nine production cost model runs (including six sensitivities), and three capital cost estimations were developed during this second phase. The results from Phase 1 and 2 provided a wealth of data that could be examined further to address energy-related questions. A list of 13 topics was developed for further analysis; this paper discusses the first five.

  3. Modified Inverse First Order Reliability Method (I-FORM) for Predicting Extreme Sea States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckert-Gallup, Aubrey Celia; Sallaberry, Cedric Jean-Marie; Dallman, Ann Renee; Neary, Vincent Sinclair

    2014-09-01

    Environmental contours describing extreme sea states are generated as the input for numerical or physical model simulation s as a part of the stand ard current practice for designing marine structure s to survive extreme sea states. Such environmental contours are characterized by combinations of significant wave height ( ) and energy period ( ) values calculated for a given recurrence interval using a set of data based on hindcast simulations or buoy observations over a sufficient period of record. The use of the inverse first - order reliability method (IFORM) i s standard design practice for generating environmental contours. In this paper, the traditional appli cation of the IFORM to generating environmental contours representing extreme sea states is described in detail and its merits and drawbacks are assessed. The application of additional methods for analyzing sea state data including the use of principal component analysis (PCA) to create an uncorrelated representation of the data under consideration is proposed. A reexamination of the components of the IFORM application to the problem at hand including the use of new distribution fitting techniques are shown to contribute to the development of more accurate a nd reasonable representations of extreme sea states for use in survivability analysis for marine struc tures. Keywords: In verse FORM, Principal Component Analysis , Environmental Contours, Extreme Sea State Characteri zation, Wave Energy Converters

  4. New Mexico State University Campus geothermal demonstration project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuniff, R.A.; Fisher, K.P.; Chintawongvanich, P.

    1984-04-01

    This report presents the design, construction highlights, and performance of the New Mexico State University Campus Geothermal Demonstration Project at Las Cruces, New Mexico. Construction started in July 1981, first system use was January 1982, and the system was dedicated on April 21, 1982. Included herein are summary observations after two years of use. The geothermal hot water from New Mexico State University wells is used to heat potable water, which in turn provides 83 percent of the domestic hot water on the New Mexico State University campus, as well as space heat to two buildings, and for two heated swimming pools. The original system is providing service to 30 total buildings, with two additional buildings (150,000 square feet) in process of geothermal conversion.) The system overall performance has been excellent, except for geothermal well pump problems. In terms of operating efficiency, the system has exceeded the design parameters. In spite of abnormally high costs for well and pump repairs, the system has shown a positive cost avoidance of more than $118,000 for the first year of operation. For the first two full years of operation, the system has produced a net positive cost avoidance of more than $200,000. Payback on the total investment of $1,670,000 is projected to be 6 to 10 years, depending on the future prices of natural gas and electricity.

  5. Sloan Digital Sky Survey observing time tracking and efficiency measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric H. Neilsen, Jr.; Richard G. Kron; William N. Boroski

    2002-10-16

    Accurate and consistent time tracking is essential for evaluating the efficiency of survey observing operations and identifying areas that need improvement. Off the shelf time tracking software, which requires users to enter activities by hand, proved tedious to use and insufficiently exible. In this paper, we present an alternate time tracking system developed specifically for Sloan Digital Sky Survey observing. This system uses an existing logging system, murmur, to log the beginning and ending times of tracked circumstances, including activities, weather, and problems which effect observing. Operations software automatically generates most entries for routine observing activities; in a night of routine observing, time tracking requires little or no attention from the observing staff. A graphical user interface allows observers to make entries marking time lost to weather and equipment, and to correct inaccurate entries made by the observing software. The last is necessary when the change in activity is not marked by a change in the state of the software or instruments, or when the time is used for engineering or other observing not part of routine survey data collection. A second utility generates reports of time usage from these logs. These reports include totals for the time spent for each observing task, time lost to weather and problems, efficiency statistics for comparison with the survey baseline, and a detailed listing of what activities and problems were present in any covered time period.

  6. Cosmological inference using gravitational wave observations alone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter Del Pozzo; Tjonnie G. F. Li; Chris Messenger

    2015-06-22

    Gravitational waves emitted during the coalescence of binary neutron star systems are self-calibrating signals. As such they can provide a direct measurement of the luminosity distance to a source without the need for a cosmic distance scale ladder. In general, however, the corresponding redshift measurement needs to be obtained electromagnetically since it is totally degenerate with the total mass of the system. Nevertheless, recent Fisher matrix studies has shown that if information about the equation of state of the neutron stars is available, it is indeed possible to extract redshift information from the gravitational wave signal alone. Therefore, measuring the cosmological parameters in pure gravitational wave fashion is possible. Furthermore, the huge number of sources potentially observable by the Einstein Telescope has led to speculations that the gravitational wave measurement is potentially competitive with traditional methods. The Einstein telescope is a conceptual study for a third generation gravitational wave detector which is designed to yield detections of $10^3-10^7$ binary neutron star systems per year. This study presents the first Bayesian investigation of the accuracy with which the cosmological parameters can be measured using observations of binary neutron star systems by the Einstein Telescope with the one year of observations. We find by direct simulation of $10^3$ detections of binary neutron stars that, within our simplifying assumptions, $H_0,\\Omega_m,\\Omega_\\Lambda,w_0$ and $w_1$ can be measured at the $95\\%$ level with an accuracy of $\\sim 8\\%,65\\%,39\\%,80\\%$ and $90\\%$, respectively. We also find, by extrapolation, that a measurement accuracy comparable with current measurements by Planck is reached for a number of observed events $O(10^{6-7})$

  7. Soil microbial responses to nitrogen addition in arid ecosystems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sinsabaugh, Robert L.; Belnap, Jayne; Rudgers, Jennifer; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Martinez, Noelle; Sandquist, Darren

    2015-08-14

    The N cycle of arid ecosystems is influenced by low soil organic matter, high soil pH, and extremes in water potential and temperature that lead to open canopies and development of biological soil crusts (biocrusts). We investigated the effects of N amendment on soil microbial dynamics in a Larrea tridentata-Ambrosia dumosa shrubland site in southern Nevada USA. Sites were fertilized with a NO3-NH4 mix at 0, 7, and 15 kg N ha-1 y-1 from March 2012 to March 2013. In March 2013, biocrust (0–0.5 cm) and bulk soils (0–10 cm) were collected beneath Ambrosia canopies and in the interspaces betweenmore »plants. Biomass responses were assessed as bacterial and fungal SSU rRNA gene copy number and chlorophyll a concentration. Metabolic responses were measured by five ecoenzyme activities and rates of N transformation. With most measures, nutrient availability, microbial biomass, and process rates were greater in soils beneath the shrub canopy compared to the interspace between plants, and greater in the surface biocrust horizon compared to the deeper 10 cm soil profile. Most measures responded positively to experimental N addition. Effect sizes were generally greater for bulk soil than biocrust. Results were incorporated into a meta-analysis of arid ecosystem responses to N amendment that included data from 14 other studies. Effect sizes were calculated for biomass and metabolic responses. Regressions of effect sizes, calculated for biomass, and metabolic responses, showed similar trends in relation to N application rate and N load (rate × duration). The critical points separating positive from negative treatment effects were 88 kg ha-1 y-1 and 159 kg ha-1, respectively, for biomass, and 70 kg ha-1 y-1 and 114 kg ha-1, respectively, for metabolism. These critical values are comparable to those for microbial biomass, decomposition rates and respiration reported in broader meta-analyses of N amendment effects in mesic ecosystems. The large effect sizes at low N addition rates indicate that arid ecosystems are sensitive to modest increments in anthropogenic N deposition.« less

  8. Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric telescope automation and observing software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric H. Neilsen, Jr. et al.

    2002-10-16

    The photometric telescope (PT) provides observations necessary for the photometric calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Because the attention of the observing staff is occupied by the operation of the 2.5 meter telescope which takes the survey data proper, the PT must reliably take data with little supervision. In this paper we describe the PT's observing program, MOP, which automates most tasks necessary for observing. MOP's automated target selection is closely modeled on the actions a human observer might take, and is built upon a user interface that can be (and has been) used for manual operation. This results in an interface that makes it easy for an observer to track the activities of the automating procedures and intervene with minimum disturbance when necessary. MOP selects targets from the same list of standard star and calibration fields presented to the user, and chooses standard star fields covering ranges of airmass, color, and time necessary to monitor atmospheric extinction and produce a photometric solution. The software determines when additional standard star fields are unnecessary, and selects survey calibration fields according to availability and priority. Other automated features of MOP, such as maintaining the focus and keeping a night log, are also built around still functional manual interfaces, allowing the observer to be as active in observing as desired; MOP's automated features may be used as tools for manual observing, ignored entirely, or allowed to run the telescope with minimal supervision when taking routine data.

  9. Bubble formation in water with addition of a hydrophobic solute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryuichi Okamoto; Akira Onuki

    2015-05-29

    We show that phase separation can occur in a one-component liquid outside its coexistence curve (CX) with addition of a small amount of a solute. The solute concentration at the transition decreases with increasing the difference of the solvation chemical potential between liquid and gas. As a typical bubble-forming solute, we consider ${\\rm O}_2$ in ambient liquid water, which exhibits mild hydrophobicity and its critical temperature is lower than that of water. Such a solute can be expelled from the liquid to form gaseous domains while the surrounding liquid pressure is higher than the saturated vapor pressure $p_{cx}$. This solute-induced bubble formation is a first-order transition in bulk and on a partially dried wall, while a gas film grows continuously on a completely dried wall. We set up a bubble free energy $\\Delta G$ for bulk and surface bubbles with a small volume fraction $\\phi$. It becomes a function of the bubble radius $R$ under the Laplace pressure balance. Then, for sufficiently large solute densities above a threshold, $\\Delta G$ exhibits a local maximum at a critical radius and a minimum at an equilibrium radius. We also examine solute-induced nucleation taking place outside CX, where bubbles larger than the critical radius grow until attainment of equilibrium.

  10. Viscosity index improver-dispersant additive useful in oil compositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardiner, J.B.; Dick, M.N.

    1988-10-25

    A process comprising grafting in the substantial absence of solvent a hydrocarbon polymer of C/sub 2/ to C/sub 28/ olefin, the polymer having a number average molecular weight in the range of about 5,000 to 500,000 with an unsaturated material selected from the group consisting of: (A) ethylenically unsaturated C/sub 3/ to C/sub 10/ carboxylic acid having 1 to 2 carboxylic acid groups or an anhydride group, and (B) nitrogen-containing ethylenically unsaturated monomers containing 6 to 30 carbon atoms and 1 to 4 nitrogen atoms, in the presence of a free radical initiator and a chain stopping agent comprising at least one member selected from the group consisting of alphatic mercaptans having 4 to 24 carbon atoms, deithyl hydroxyl amine cumene and phenols, the grafting being conducted in a manner and under conditions sufficient to form a substantially oil soluble graft copolymer useful as a viscosity index improver-dispersant additive for lubricating oil compositions.

  11. ADDITIVE TESTING FOR IMPROVED SULFUR RETENTION: PRELIMINARY REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amoroso, J.; Fox, K.

    2011-09-07

    The Savannah River National Laboratory is collaborating with Alfred University to evaluate the potential for additives in borosilicate glass to improve sulfur retention. This preliminary report provides further background on the incorporation of sulfur in glass and outlines the experiments that are being performed by the collaborators. A simulated waste glass composition has been selected for the experimental studies. The first phase of experimental work will evaluate the impacts of BaO, PbO, and V{sub 2}O{sub 5} at concentrations of 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0 wt % on sulfate retention in simulated high level waste borosilicate glass. The second phase of experimental work will evaluate the effects of time at the melt temperature on sulfur retention. The resulting samples will be characterized to determine the amount of sulfur remaining as well as to identify the formation of any crystalline phases. The results will be used to guide the future selection of frits and glass forming chemicals in vitrifying Department of Energy wastes containing high sulfur concentrations.

  12. Catalyst Additives to Enhance Mercury Oxidation and Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jared W. Cannon; Thomas K. Gale

    2004-12-31

    Preliminary research has shown that SCR catalysts employed for nitrogen-oxide reduction can effectively oxidize mercury. This report discusses initial results from fundamental investigations into the behavior of mercury species in the presence of SCR catalysts at Southern Research Institute. Three different SCR catalysts are being studied. These are honeycomb-type, plate-type, and a hybrid-type catalyst. The catalysts are manufactured and supplied by Cormetech Inc., Hitachi America Ltd., and Haldor-Topsoe Inc., respectively. Test methods and experimental procedures were developed for current and future testing. The methods and procedures equalize factors influencing mercury adsorption and oxidation (surface area, catalyst activity, and pore structure) that normally differ for each catalyst type. Initial testing was performed to determine the time necessary for each catalyst to reach surface-adsorption equilibrium. In addition, the fraction of Hg oxidized by each of the SCR catalyst types is being investigated, for a given amount of catalyst and flow rate of mercury and flue gas. The next major effort will be to examine the kinetics of mercury oxidation across the SCR catalysts with respect to changes in mercury concentration and with respect to HCl concentration. Hg-sorption equilibrium times will also be investigated with respect to ammonia concentration in the simulated flue gas.

  13. Additional resonant contribution to the potential model for the 12C(alpha,gamma)16O reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Katsuma

    2014-04-15

    The additional resonant contribution to the potential model is examined in $\\alpha$+$^{12}$C elastic scattering and the low-energy $^{12}$C($\\alpha$,$\\gamma$)$^{16}$O reaction. The excitation function of elastic scattering below $E_{c.m.}= 5$ MeV seems to be reproduced by the potential model satisfactorily, and it is not profoundly disturbed by the additional resonances. The weak coupling is good enough to describe the $^{16}$O structure in the vicinity of the $\\alpha$-particle threshold, especially below $E_{c.m.}= 8$ MeV, corresponding to the excitation energy $E_x \\approx 15$ MeV. The additional resonances give the complement of the astrophysical $S$-factors from the simple potential model. The $S$-factor of $^{12}$C($\\alpha$,$\\gamma$)$^{16}$O at $E_{c.m.}=300$ keV is dominated by the $E$2 transition, which is enhanced by the subthreshold 2$^+_1$ state at $E_x= 6.92$ MeV. The contribution from the subthreshold 1$^-_1$ state at $E_x= 7.12$ MeV is predicted to be small. The additional resonances do not give the large contribution to the thermonuclear reaction rates of $^{12}$C($\\alpha$,$\\gamma$)$^{16}$O at helium burning temperatures.

  14. A cooperative control algorithm for camera based observational systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Joseph G.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last several years, there has been considerable growth in camera based observation systems for a variety of safety, scientific, and recreational applications. In order to improve the effectiveness of these systems, we frequently desire the ability to increase the number of observed objects, but solving this problem is not as simple as adding more cameras. Quite often, there are economic or physical restrictions that prevent us from adding additional cameras to the system. As a result, we require methods that coordinate the tracking of objects between multiple cameras in an optimal way. In order to accomplish this goal, we present a new cooperative control algorithm for a camera based observational system. Specifically, we present a receding horizon control where we model the underlying optimal control problem as a mixed integer linear program. The benefit of this design is that we can coordinate the actions between each camera while simultaneously respecting its kinematics. In addition, we further improve the quality of our solution by coupling our algorithm with a Kalman filter. Through this integration, we not only add a predictive component to our control, but we use the uncertainty estimates provided by the filter to encourage the system to periodically observe any outliers in the observed area. This combined approach allows us to intelligently observe the entire region of interest in an effective and thorough manner.

  15. Observation of B ->phi K and B ->phi K

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke

    2001-04-01

    We have studied two-body charmless hadronic decays of R mesons into the final states phiK and phiK(*). Using 9.7 million B (B) over bar pairs collected with the CLEO II detector, we observe the decays B- --> phiK(-) and ...

  16. Bait Loss From Halibut Longline Gear Observed From a Submersible

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bait Loss From Halibut Longline Gear Observed From a Submersible WILLIAM L. HIGH Introduction Demersal longline gear is fished along the west coast of the United States for Pacific halibut is avail- able on the behavior of fish around the gear and bait, bait durability on hooks, predators other

  17. Technology Transfer: Observations from the TIPSTER Text Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Some Technology Transfer: Observations from the TIPSTER Text Program Dr. Sarah M. Taylor Office. Introduction Technology Transfer has been an important part of the TIPSTER Text Program from the beginning stated as a reason for the emphasis on technology transfer in the TIPSTER Program, nonetheless I think

  18. EARTH OBSERVATION 400M Indians Endangered By Ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Ramesh P.

    has been linked to increases in skin cancer rates. All rights reserved. © 2004 United Press using satellite and limited ground observations, the Press Trust of India reported Tuesday. The rate the reasons for the depletion, th e report states. Ozone is an important atmospheric trace gas that blocks

  19. THE USE OF DI WATER TO MITIGATE DUSTING FOR ADDITION OF DWPF FRIT TO THE SLURRY MIX EVAPORATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, E.

    2010-07-21

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DPWF) presently is in the process to determine means to reduce water utilization in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process, thus reducing effluent and processing times. The frit slurry addition system mixes the dry frit with water, yielding approximately a 50 weight percent slurry containing frit and the other fraction water. This slurry is discharged into the SME and excess water is removed via boiling. To reduce this water load to the SME, DWPF has proposed using a pneumatic system in conveying the frit to the SME, in essence a dry delivery system. The problem associated with utilizing a dry delivery system with the existing frit is the generation of dust when discharged into the SME. The use of water has been shown to be effective in the mining industry as well in the DOE complex to mitigate dusting. The method employed by SRNL to determine the quantity of water to mitigate dusting in dry powders was effective, between a lab and bench scale tests. In those tests, it was shown that as high as five weight percent (wt%) of water addition was required to mitigate dust from batches of glass forming minerals used by the Waste Treatment Plant at Hanford, Washington. The same method used to determine the quantity of water to mitigate dusting was used in this task to determine the quantity of water to mitigate this dusting using as-received frit. The ability for water to mitigate dusting is due to its adhesive properties as shown in Figure 1-1. Wetting the frit particles allows for the smaller frit particles (including dust) to adhere to the larger frit particles or to agglomerate into large particles. Fluids other than water can also be used, but their adhesive properties are different than water and the quantity required to mitigate dusting is different, as was observed in reference 1. Excessive water, a few weight percentages greater than that required to mitigate dusting can cause the resulting material not to flow. The primary objective of this task is to perform bench scale testing on various frits that have been used at DWPF or in test programs at SRNL to determine the quantity of de-ionized (DI) water required to mitigate dusting per mass basis of frit. The quantity of DI water required was determined visually by observing the effluent port of the mixer, and DI water addition was made to the point where no visible dust was observed leaving the effluent port. A total of eight different frits were selected for testing. Secondary objectives in this task include the following: (1) Video taping of the de-dusting procedure, (2) Particle size distribution analyses of the dry and wetted frits at the weight fraction of water required for de-dusting, (3) Plate flow tests to determine angle of flow and quantity of material remaining on plate at 90 degrees, (4) Microscopy of dry and wetted frit, and (5) Effect of excess water for selected frits on plate flow. The above analyses were performed within one hour of water addition, to minimize the effect of evaporative water losses. To better understand the size of dust particles, perform settling tests on selected frits and capture the fines. Analyze the fines for particle size distribution. Finally, it is expected that the surface area of frit is an important parameter in the quantity of water required for dust mitigation. An analysis of particle size distribution (PSD) data of as-received frit analyzed by SRNL over the past two to three years will be performed to determine the variation in the distribution of as-received frit. The following objectives were stated in the Technical Task Request4 as objectives that given adequate time would provide insight in helping DWPF in assessing equipment or processes for de-dusting and processing of dry frit. Due to time constraints, commercial methods for dedusting are provided. These results are detailed in section 3.7. Obtain design information from Hanford with respective to equipment used for dedusting. Suggestions on enhanced design features, such as flush water, pipe air purges, humidified compresse

  20. Dark Energy: Observational Evidence and Theoretical Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Novosyadlyj; V. Pelykh; Yu. Shtanov; A. Zhuk

    2015-02-14

    The book elucidates the current state of the dark energy problem and presents the results of the authors, who work in this area. It describes the observational evidence for the existence of dark energy, the methods and results of constraining of its parameters, modeling of dark energy by scalar fields, the space-times with extra spatial dimensions, especially Kaluza---Klein models, the braneworld models with a single extra dimension as well as the problems of positive definition of gravitational energy in General Relativity, energy conditions and consequences of their violation in the presence of dark energy. This monograph is intended for science professionals, educators and graduate students, specializing in general relativity, cosmology, field theory and particle physics.