Sample records for additional observer states

  1. STATE OF CALIFORNIA RESIDENTIAL ADDITIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA RESIDENTIAL ADDITIONS CEC- CF-1R ADD (Revised 03/10) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Prescriptive Certificate of Compliance: CF-1R ADD Residential Additions (Page 1 of 8) Site Address Orientation: N, E, S, W or Degrees ________ Conditioned Floor Area of Addition (CFA): New Addition Size: Less

  2. Correlation additivity relation is superadditive for separable states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhanjun Zhang

    2012-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We deny with a concrete example the generality of the correlation subadditivity relation conjectured by Modi et al's [Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 104}, 080501 (2010)] for any quantum state and point out that the correlation additivity relation is actually super-additive for separable states. This work indicates that any effort on explicitly proving the conjecture and finding the subadditivity source is unnecessary and fruitless.

  3. Additivity of Entangled Channel Capacity for Quantum Input States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. P. Belavkin; X. Dai

    2007-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An elementary introduction into algebraic approach to unified quantum information theory and operational approach to quantum entanglement as generalized encoding is given. After introducing compound quantum state and two types of informational divergences, namely, Araki-Umegaki (a-type) and of Belavkin-Staszewski (b-type) quantum relative entropic information, this paper treats two types of quantum mutual information via entanglement and defines two types of corresponding quantum channel capacities as the supremum via the generalized encodings. It proves the additivity property of quantum channel capacities via entanglement, which extends the earlier results of V. P. Belavkin to products of arbitrary quantum channels for quantum relative entropy of any type.

  4. Dynamical and Observational Constraints on Additional Planets in Highly Eccentric Planetary Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert A. Wittenmyer; Michael Endl; William D. Cochran; Harold F. Levison

    2007-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Long time coverage and high radial velocity precision have allowed for the discovery of additional objects in known planetary systems. Many of the extrasolar planets detected have highly eccentric orbits, which raises the question of how likely those systems are to host additional planets. We investigate six systems which contain a very eccentric (e>0.6) planet: HD 3651, HD 37605, HD 45350, HD 80606, HD 89744, and 16 Cyg B. We present updated radial-velocity observations and orbital solutions, search for additional planets, and perform test particle simulations to find regions of dynamical stability. The dynamical simulations show that short-period planets could exist in the HD 45350 and 16 Cyg B systems, and we use the observational data to set tight detection limits, which rule out additional planets down to a few Neptune masses in the HD 3651, HD 45350, and 16 Cyg B systems.

  5. 1899.] NATURAL SCIENCES OF PHILADELPHIA. 501 ADDITIONAL OBSERVATIONS ON GLACIERS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Dan

    1899.] NATURAL SCIENCES OF PHILADELPHIA. 501 ADDITIONAL OBSERVATIONS ON GLACIERS IN BRITISH Circle, all the principal glaciers of North America lie within the great ranges of the Rocky of glaciers, which are found in places, probably not inferior to the better known ice streams of Switzerland

  6. STATE OF CALIFORNIA NEWLY CONSTRUCTED BUILDINGS AND ADDITIONS GREATER THAN 1,000 FT2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA NEWLY CONSTRUCTED BUILDINGS AND ADDITIONS GREATER THAN 1,000 FT2 CEC- CF-1R Newly Constructed Buildings and Additions Greater Than 1,000 ft2 (Page 1 of 5) Project Name: Climate________ Project Type: New Building Construction New Addition1 greater than 1,000 ft2 1. Additions greater than 1

  7. Strong Super-additivity of the entanglement of formation for pure stabilizer states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Fattal; Keiji Matsumoto

    2007-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove the strong super-additivity of the entanglement of formation for stabilizer pure states, and the set of mixed states which minimize their average entropy of entanglement as a mixture of stabilizer pure states sharing the same stabilizer group up to phases. The implications of the result on the additivity of the Holevo capacity of a quantum channel transmitting stabilizer states with Pauli noise is discussed.

  8. CCD Observing Manual 49 Bay State Road

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    Stars 5.6. Supernovae/Novae Patrols 5.7. Designing Your Own: Using AAVSO VSX 6.0 Observing Techniques 6

  9. A Search for Additional Planets in the Nasa Epoxi Observations of the Exoplanet System Gj 436

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seager, Sara

    We present time series photometry of the M dwarf transiting exoplanet system GJ 436 obtained with the Extrasolar Planet Observation and Characterization (EPOCh) component of the NASA EPOXI mission. We conduct a search of ...

  10. First observation of excited states in {sup 182}Pb.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, D. G.; Muikku, M.; Greenlees, P. T.; Hauschild, K.; Helarjutta, K.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Kankaanpaa, H.; Kelsall, N. S.; Kettunen, H.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Leino, M.; Moore, C. J.; Nieminen, P.; O'Leary, C. D.; Page, R. D.; Rakhila, P.; Reviol, W.; Taylor, M. J.; Uusitalo, J.; Wadsworth, R.; Physics; Univ. of York; Univ. of Jyvaskyla; CEA Saclay; Univ. of Liverpool; Univ. of Tennessee

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Excited states in the light lead nucleus, {sup 182}Pb, have been observed for the first time, by means of the recoil-decay tagging technique. A rotational band has been observed which has features in common with bands attributed to a prolate configuration in the heavier neutron deficient lead nuclei, {sup 184-188}Pb. A variable moment of inertia fit to the states in this band suggests that the prolate minimum has risen significantly in energy compared to the next even lead nucleus, {sup 184}Pb. This constitutes firm evidence for the minimization of this configuration with respect to the spherical ground state around N=103.

  11. CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA EQUATIONS OF STATE BASED ON NEUTRON STAR OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steiner, A. W. [Institute for Nuclear Theory, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Hempel, M. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Fischer, T. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Wroclaw, pl. Maxa Borna 9, 50-204, Wroclaw (Poland)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many of the currently available equations of state for core-collapse supernova simulations give large neutron star radii and do not provide large enough neutron star masses, both of which are inconsistent with some recent neutron star observations. In addition, one of the critical uncertainties in the nucleon-nucleon interaction, the nuclear symmetry energy, is not fully explored by the currently available equations of state. In this article, we construct two new equations of state which match recent neutron star observations and provide more flexibility in studying the dependence on nuclear matter properties. The equations of state are also provided in tabular form, covering a wide range in density, temperature, and asymmetry, suitable for astrophysical simulations. These new equations of state are implemented into our spherically symmetric core-collapse supernova model, which is based on general relativistic radiation hydrodynamics with three-flavor Boltzmann neutrino transport. The results are compared with commonly used equations of state in supernova simulations of 11.2 and 40 M{sub Sun} progenitors. We consider only equations of state which are fitted to nuclear binding energies and other experimental and observational constraints. We find that central densities at bounce are weakly correlated with L and that there is a moderate influence of the symmetry energy on the evolution of the electron fraction. The new models also obey the previously observed correlation between the time to black hole formation and the maximum mass of an s = 4 neutron star.

  12. Observing photonic de Broglie waves without the NOON state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osung Kwon; Young-Sik Ra; Yoon-Ho Kim

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The photonic de Broglie wave, in which an ensemble of $N$ identical photons with wavelength $\\lambda$ reveals $\\lambda/N$ interference fringes, has been known to be a unique feature exhibited by the photon number-path entangled state or the NOON state. Here, we report the observation of the photonic de Broglie wave for a pair of photons, generated by spontaneous parametric down-conversion, that are not photon number-path entangled. We also show that the photonic de Broglie wave can even be observed for a pair of photons that are completely separable (i.e., no entanglement in all degrees of freedom) and distinguishable. The experimental and theoretical results suggest that the photonic de Broglie wave is, in fact, not related to the entanglement of the photons, rather it is related to the indistinguishable pathways established by the measurement scheme.

  13. Proposal for the 2010 Unidata Community Equipment Awards Addition of a Community THREDDS/RAMADDA Server System at Penn State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /RAMADDA Server System at Penn State 2 Project Summary: The Pennsylvania State University (PSU), Department of a Community THREDDS/RAMADDA Server System at Penn State 3 We propose using Unidata Community Equipment Award an additional IDD real server (Figure 1) to increase our ability to function as a reliable IDD data relay

  14. Addition of a Community THREDDS/RAMADDA Server System at Penn State (Final Report for 2010 Unidata Equipment Awards)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Addition of a Community THREDDS/RAMADDA Server System at Penn State (Final Report for 2010 Unidata similarly to the Unidata IDD THREDDS servers. This service also provides access to locally generated to our server such as real-time, experimental forecast model output generated at Penn State

  15. The structure of strongly additive states and Markov triplets on the CAR algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anna Jencova

    2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We find a characterization of states satisfying equality in strong subadditivity of entropy and of Markov triplets on the CAR algebra. For even states, a more detailed structure of the density matrix is given.

  16. additional steady-state acquisition: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    approach greatly reduces eddy-current-induced steady-state distortions. Fig. 3 shows ECG-gated measurements; VENC 150 cms). Results using a standard (GRE) PC acquisition...

  17. X-ray observations during a Her X-1 anomalous low-state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. N. Parmar; T. Oosterbroek; D. Dal Fiume; M. Orlandini; A. Santangelo; A. Segreto; S. Del Sordo

    1999-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of a 1999 July 8-10 BeppoSAX observation during an anomalous low-state of Her X-1 are presented. The standard on-state power-law and blackbody continuum model is excluded at high confidence unless partial covering is included. This gives a power-law photon index of 0.63 +/- 0.02 and implies that 0.28 +/- 0.03 of the flux undergoes additional absorption of (27 +/- 7) 10^22 atom/cm2. 11% of the observed 0.1-10 keV flux is from the 0.068 +/- 0.015 keV blackbody. 1.237747(2) s pulses with a semi-amplitude of 2.1 +/- 0.8% are detected at >99.5% confidence and confirmed by RXTE measurements. This implies that Her X-1 underwent substantial spin-down close to the start of the anomalous low-state. The spectral and temporal changes are similar to those recently reported from 4U1626-67. These may result from a strongly warped disk that produces a spin-down torque. The X-ray source is then mostly viewed through the inner regions of the accretion disk. A similar mechanism could be responsible for the Her X-1 anomalous low-states. Shadowing by such an unusually warped disk could produce observable effects in the optical and UV emission from the companion star.

  18. Implications of Export/Import Reporting Requirements in the United States - International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Additional Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killinger, Mark H.; Benjamin, Eugene L.; McNair, Gary W.

    2001-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States has signed but not ratified the US/IAEA Safeguards Additional Protocol. If ratified, the Additional Protocol will require the US to report to the IAEA certain nuclear-related exports and imports to the IAEA. This document identifies and assesses the issues associated with the US making those reports. For example, some regulatory changes appear to be necessary. The document also attempts to predict the impact on the DOE Complex by assessing the historical flow of exports and imports that would be reportable if the Additional Protocol were in force.

  19. Study of e+e-??+?-J/? and Observation of a Charged Charmoniumlike State at Belle

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Z. Q.; Shen, C. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bala, A.; Belous, K.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bischofberger, M.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bra?ko, M.; Brodzicka, J.; Browder, T. E.; Chang, P.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, D.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Feindt, M.; Ferber, T.; Frey, A.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Ganguly, S.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Joffe, D.; Julius, T.; Kah, D. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Klucar, J.; Ko, B. R.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Libby, J.; Liu, C.; Lukin, P.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Nedelkovska, E.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Oswald, C.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petri?, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Ritter, M.; Röhrken, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sahoo, H.; Saito, T.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santel, D.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seidl, R.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stari?, M.; Steder, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Tanida, K.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Vahsen, S. E.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vorobyev, V.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, Y.; Yashchenko, S.; Yook, Y.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.; Belle Collaboration

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cross section for e+e???+??J/? between 3.8 and 5.5 GeV is measured with a 967??fb?1 data sample collected by the Belle detector at or near the ?(nS) (n=1,2,…,5) resonances. The Y(4260) state is observed, and its resonance parameters are determined. In addition, an excess of ?+??J/? production around 4 GeV is observed. This feature can be described by a Breit-Wigner parametrization with properties that are consistent with the Y(4008) state that was previously reported by Belle. In a study of Y(4260)??+??J/? decays, a structure is observed in the M(?±J/?) mass spectrum with 5.2? significance, with mass M=(3894.5±6.6±4.5)??MeV/c2 and width ?=(63±24±26)??MeV/c2, where the errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. This structure can be interpreted as a new charged charmoniumlike state.

  20. Simultaneous parameter estimation and state smoothing of complex GARCH process in the presence of additive noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Israel

    Simultaneous parameter estimation and state smoothing of complex GARCH process in the presence 2010 Keywords: GARCH Parameter estimation Noisy data Maximum likelihood Recursive maximum likelihood a b s t r a c t ARCH and GARCH models have been used recently in model-based signal processing

  1. A Two Transition State Model for Radical-Molecule Reactions: A Case Study of the Addition of OH to C2H4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North, Simon W.

    A Two Transition State Model for Radical-Molecule Reactions: A Case Study of the Addition of OH; In Final Form: April 6, 2005 A two transition state model is applied to the study of the addition of both inner and outer transition states. The outer transition state is treated with a recently derived

  2. Observational constrains on cosmological models with Chaplygin gas and quadratic equation of state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharov, G S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observational manifestations of accelerated expansion of the universe, in particular, recent data for Type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations and for the Hubble parameter $H(z)$ are described with different cosmological models. We compare the $\\Lambda$CDM, the models with generalized and modified Chaplygin gas and the model with quadratic equation of state. For these models we estimate optimal model parameters and their permissible errors, in particular, for all 4 mentioned models the Hubble parameter and the curvature fraction are $H_0=70.1\\pm0.45$ km\\,c${}^{-1}$Mpc${}^{-1}$ and $-0.13\\le\\Omega_k\\le0.025$. The model with quadratic equation of state yields the minimal value of $\\chi^2$, but this model has 2 additional parameters in comparison with the $\\Lambda$CDM.

  3. Observation of 1 MLCT Excited States in Quadruply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turro, Claudia

    * Contribution from the Department of Chemistry, The Ohio State UniVersity, 100 West 18th AVenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1185 Received July 28, 2005; E-mail: chisholm@chemistry.ohio-state.edu; turro@chemistry.ohio (2-py); M ) W, Ar ) ph, 2-nap] complexes were investigated. The lowest energy absorption

  4. MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS AND MODELING OF 1ES 1959+650 IN A LOW FLUX STATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aliu, E.; Errando, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Archambault, S. [Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Arlen, T.; Aune, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Beilicke, M.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Benbow, W. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Bird, R.; Collins-Hughes, E. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Boettcher, M. [Astrophysical Institute, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Byrum, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Cui, W. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Duke, C. [Department of Physics, Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA 50112-1690 (United States); Dumm, J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); and others

    2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the VERITAS observations of the high-frequency peaked BL Lac object 1ES 1959+650 in the period 2007-2011. This source is detected at TeV energies by VERITAS at 16.4 standard deviation ({sigma}) significance in 7.6 hr of observation in a low flux state. A multiwavelength spectral energy distribution (SED) is constructed from contemporaneous data from VERITAS, Fermi-LAT, RXTE PCA, and Swift UVOT. Swift XRT data is not included in the SED due to a lack of simultaneous observations with VERITAS. In contrast to the orphan {gamma}-ray flare exhibited by this source in 2002, the X-ray flux of the source is found to vary by an order of magnitude, while other energy regimes exhibit less variable emission. A quasi-equilibrium synchrotron self-Compton model with an additional external radiation field is used to describe three SEDs corresponding to the lowest, highest, and average X-ray states. The variation in the X-ray spectrum is modeled by changing the electron injection spectral index, with minor adjustments of the kinetic luminosity in electrons. This scenario produces small-scale flux variability of the order of {approx}< 2 in the high energy (E > 1 MeV) and very high energy (E > 100 GeV) {gamma}-ray regimes, which is corroborated by the Fermi-LAT, VERITAS, and Whipple 10 m telescope light curves.

  5. Observation of metastable states in a superconducting Josephson circuit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    circuits using a highly sensitive hybrid quantum interfer- ometer as the readout probe. The investigated of the supercurrent flowing in the SNS junction and prevents electron heating of the normal segment. An experimental states exist when the device is biased at the qubit degeneracy point, between which the system makes

  6. Observation of the first iso-spin Charmonium-like State $Z_c(4020)$ }

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji, Qing-Ping; Guo, Ai-Qiang; Yu, Chun-Xu; Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we present a new experimental progress in brief on the recent observation of the charged charmonium-like state Z_c(4020)^{+/-} states and its iso-spin partner Z_c(4020)^{0} in pi pi hc process at the BESIII experiment. The charged Z_{c}(4020) is its decay into \\pi^{+/-} hc final state, and carries electric charge, thus it contains at least four quarks. The observation of both charge and neutral state makes Z_{c}(4020) the first iso-spin triplet Z_{c} state observed in experiment.

  7. Observation of the first iso-spin Charmonium-like State $Z_c(4020)$ }

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qing-Ping Ji; Yu-Ping Guo; Ai-Qiang Guo; Chun-Xu Yu; Zhi-Yong Wang

    2015-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we present a new experimental progress in brief on the recent observation of the charged charmonium-like state Z_c(4020)^{+/-} states and its iso-spin partner Z_c(4020)^{0} in pi pi hc process at the BESIII experiment. The charged Z_{c}(4020) is its decay into \\pi^{+/-} hc final state, and carries electric charge, thus it contains at least four quarks. The observation of both charge and neutral state makes Z_{c}(4020) the first iso-spin triplet Z_{c} state observed in experiment.

  8. Back-and-forth Operation of State Observers and Norm Estimation of Estimation Error

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Back-and-forth Operation of State Observers and Norm Estimation of Estimation Error Hyungbo Shim with the plant, this paper proposes a state estimation algorithm that executes Luenberger observers in a back in the past have employed time-varying gains to over- come this problem [1], where the basic idea is to obtain

  9. A comparison of the additional protocols of the five nuclear weapon states and the ensuing safeguards benefits to international nonproliferation efforts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uribe, Eva C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, M Analisa [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, Marisa N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Leitch, Rosalyn M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the 6 January 2009 entry into force of the Additional Protocol by the United States of America, all five declared Nuclear Weapon States that are part of the Nonproliferation Treaty have signed, ratified, and put into force the Additional Protocol. This paper makes a comparison of the strengths and weaknesses of the five Additional Protocols in force by the five Nuclear Weapon States with respect to the benefits to international nonproliferation aims. This paper also documents the added safeguards burden to the five declared Nuclear Weapon States that these Additional Protocols put on the states with respect to access to their civilian nuclear programs and the hosting of complementary access activities as part of the Additional Protocol.

  10. GAMMA-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF CYGNUS X-1 ABOVE 100 MeV IN THE HARD AND SOFT STATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabatini, S.; Tavani, M.; Del Santo, M.; Campana, R.; Evangelista, Y.; Piano, G.; Del Monte, E.; Giusti, M.; Striani, E. [INAF/IAPS-Roma, I-00133 Roma (Italy)] [INAF/IAPS-Roma, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Coppi, P. [Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States)] [Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Pooley, G. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)] [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Chen, A.; Giuliani, A. [INAF/IASF-Milano, I-20133 Milano (Italy)] [INAF/IASF-Milano, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Bulgarelli, A. [INAF/IASF-Bologna, I-40129 Bologna (Italy)] [INAF/IASF-Bologna, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Cattaneo, P. W. [INFN-Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy)] [INFN-Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Colafrancesco, S. [INAF-OAR, I-00040 Monteporzio Catone (Italy)] [INAF-OAR, I-00040 Monteporzio Catone (Italy); Longo, F. [Dip. Fisica and INFN Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy)] [Dip. Fisica and INFN Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Morselli, A. [INFN Roma Tor Vergata, I-00133 Roma (Italy)] [INFN Roma Tor Vergata, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Pellizzoni, A. [INAF-OAC, I-09012 Capoterra (Italy)] [INAF-OAC, I-09012 Capoterra (Italy); Pilia, M. [ASTRON, The Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands)] [ASTRON, The Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); and others

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of multi-year gamma-ray observations by the AGILE satellite of the black hole binary system Cygnus X-1. In a previous investigation we focused on gamma-ray observations of Cygnus X-1 in the hard state during the period mid-2007/2009. Here we present the results of the gamma-ray monitoring of Cygnus X-1 during the period 2010/mid-2012 which includes a remarkably prolonged 'soft state' phase (2010 June-2011 May). Previous 1-10 MeV observations of Cyg X-1 in this state hinted at a possible existence of a non-thermal particle component with substantial modifications of the Comptonized emission from the inner accretion disk. Our AGILE data, averaged over the mid-2010/mid-2011 soft state of Cygnus X-1, provide a significant upper limit for gamma-ray emission above 100 MeV of F{sub soft} < 20 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} , excluding the existence of prominent non-thermal emission above 100 MeV during the soft state of Cygnus X-1. We discuss theoretical implications of our findings in the context of high-energy emission models of black hole accretion. We also discuss possible gamma-ray flares detected by AGILE. In addition to a previously reported episode observed by AGILE in 2009 October during the hard state, we report a weak but important candidate for enhanced emission which occurred at the end of 2010 June (2010 June 30 10:00-2010 July 2 10:00 UT) exactly coinciding with a hard-to-soft state transition and before an anomalous radio flare. An appendix summarizes all previous high-energy observations and possible detections of Cygnus X-1 above 1 MeV.

  11. Aerosol loading in the Southeastern United States: reconciling surface and satellite observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, B.

    We investigate the seasonality in aerosols over the Southeastern United States using observations from several satellite instruments (MODIS, MISR, CALIOP) and surface network sites (IMPROVE, SEARCH, AERONET). We find that ...

  12. OBSERVER DESIGN FOR NONLINEAR SYSTEMS BY USING INPUT-TO-STATE STABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sontag, Eduardo

    OBSERVER DESIGN FOR NONLINEAR SYSTEMS BY USING INPUT-TO-STATE STABILITY A. Alessandri Abstract by solving LMI problems [18]. A. Alessandri is with the Institute of Intelligent Systems for Automation

  13. Observation of ?cJ decaying into the pp?K?K? final state

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Alberto, D.; An, L.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini, R.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J. M.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Bytev, V.; Cai, X.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, X. X.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fan, R. R.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Feng, C. Q.; Fu, C. D.; Fu, J. L.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Greco, M.; Grishin, S.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y. P.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y. P.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jia, L. K.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jing, F. F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kuehn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Leung, J. K. C.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Lei; Li, N. B.; Li, Q. J.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, X. R.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Liao, X. T.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, C. Y.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, G. C.; Liu, H.; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. H.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Y. W.; Liu, Yong; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Z. Q.; Loehner, H.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Q. W.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Ma, C. L.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X.; Ma, X. Y.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, H.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Nefedov, Y.; Ning, Z.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, X. S.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schulze, J.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, X. Y.; Sonoda, S.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, D. H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. D.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tang, X. F.; Tian, H. L.; Toth, D.; Varner, G. S.; Wan, X.; Wang, B. Q.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Wen, Q. G.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, N.; Wu, W.; Wu, Z.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, G. M.; Xu, H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z. R.; Xu, Z. Z.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, M.; Yang, T.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, L.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, T. R.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, Jiawei; Zhao, Jingwei; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, X. H.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhao, Z. L.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zheng, Z. P.; Zhong, B.; Zhong, J.; Zhong, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhu, C.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, X. W.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Zuo, J. X.; Zweber, P.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    First measurements of the decays of the three ?cJ states to pp?K?K? final states are presented. Intermediate ??K?K? and ?(1520)?pK? resonance states are observed, and branching fractions for ?cJ?p?K??(1520), ?(1520)?¯¯¯(1520), and ?pp? are reported. We also measure branching fractions for direct ?cJ?pp?K?K? decays. These are first observations of ?cJ decays to unstable baryon resonances and provide useful information about the ?cJ states. The experiment uses samples of ?cJ mesons produced via radiative transitions from 106×10? ?' mesons collected in the BESIII detector at the BEPCII e?e? collider.

  14. Observation of ?cJ decaying into the pp?K?K? final state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Alberto, D.; An, L.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini, R.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J. M.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Bytev, V.; Cai, X.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, X. X.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fan, R. R.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Feng, C. Q.; Fu, C. D.; Fu, J. L.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Greco, M.; Grishin, S.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y. P.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y. P.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jia, L. K.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jing, F. F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kuehn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Leung, J. K. C.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Lei; Li, N. B.; Li, Q. J.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, X. R.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Liao, X. T.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, C. Y.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, G. C.; Liu, H.; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. H.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Y. W.; Liu, Yong; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Z. Q.; Loehner, H.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Q. W.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Ma, C. L.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X.; Ma, X. Y.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, H.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Nefedov, Y.; Ning, Z.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, X. S.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schulze, J.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, X. Y.; Sonoda, S.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, D. H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. D.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tang, X. F.; Tian, H. L.; Toth, D.; Varner, G. S.; Wan, X.; Wang, B. Q.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Wen, Q. G.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, N.; Wu, W.; Wu, Z.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, G. M.; Xu, H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z. R.; Xu, Z. Z.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, M.; Yang, T.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, L.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, T. R.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, Jiawei; Zhao, Jingwei; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, X. H.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhao, Z. L.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zheng, Z. P.; Zhong, B.; Zhong, J.; Zhong, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhu, C.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, X. W.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Zuo, J. X.; Zweber, P.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    First measurements of the decays of the three ?cJ states to pp?K?K? final states are presented. Intermediate ??K?K? and ?(1520)?pK? resonance states are observed, and branching fractions for ?cJ?p?K??(1520), ?(1520)?¯¯¯(1520), and ?pp? are reported. We also measure branching fractions for direct ?cJ?pp?K?K? decays. These are first observations of ?cJ decays to unstable baryon resonances and provide useful information about the ?cJ states. The experiment uses samples of ?cJ mesons produced via radiative transitions from 106×10? ?' mesons collected in the BESIII detector at the BEPCII e?e? collider.

  15. Observation of off-Hugoniot shocked states with ultrafast time resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, M; Crowhurst, J; Bastea, S; Zaug, J

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply ultrafast single shot interferometry to determine the pressure and density of argon shocked from up to 7.8 GPa static initial pressure in a diamond anvil cell. This method enables the observation of thermodynamic states distinct from those observed in either single shock or isothermal compression experiments, and the observation of ultrafast dynamics in shocked materials. We also present a straightforward method for interpreting ultrafast shock wave data which determines the index of refraction at the shock front, and the particle and shock velocities for shock waves in transparent materials. Based on these methods, we observe shocked thermodynamic states between the room temperature isotherm of argon and the shock adiabat of cryogenic argon at final shock pressures up to 28 GPa.

  16. Implications of Export/Import Reporting Requirements in the United States - International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Additional Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killinger, Mark H; Benjamin, Eugene L; McNair, Gary W

    2001-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The US has signed but not ratified the US/IAEA Safeguards Additional Protocol. If ratified, the Additional Protocol will require the US to report to the IAEA certain nuclear-related exports and imports to the IAEA. This document identifies and assesses the issues associated with the US making those reports. For example, some regulatory changes appear to be necessary. The document also attempts to predict the impact on the DOE Complex by assessing the historical flow of exports and imports that would be reportable if the Additional Protocol were in force.

  17. Observation of chiral edge states with neutral fermions in synthetic Hall ribbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mancini, M; Cappellini, G; Livi, L; Rider, M; Catani, J; Sias, C; Zoller, P; Inguscio, M; Dalmonte, M; Fallani, L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chiral edge states are a hallmark of quantum Hall physics. In electronic systems, they appear as a macroscopic consequence of the cyclotron orbits induced by a magnetic field, which are naturally truncated at the physical boundary of the sample. Here we report on the experimental realization of chiral edge states in a ribbon geometry with an ultracold gas of neutral fermions subjected to an artificial gauge field. By imaging individual sites along a synthetic dimension, we detect the existence of the edge states, investigate the onset of chirality as a function of the bulk-edge coupling, and observe the edge-cyclotron orbits induced during a quench dynamics. The realization of fermionic chiral edge states is a fundamental achievement, which opens the door towards experiments including edge state interferometry and the study of non-Abelian anyons in atomic systems.

  18. Observation of chiral edge states with neutral fermions in synthetic Hall ribbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Mancini; G. Pagano; G. Cappellini; L. Livi; M. Rider; J. Catani; C. Sias; P. Zoller; M. Inguscio; M. Dalmonte; L. Fallani

    2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Chiral edge states are a hallmark of quantum Hall physics. In electronic systems, they appear as a macroscopic consequence of the cyclotron orbits induced by a magnetic field, which are naturally truncated at the physical boundary of the sample. Here we report on the experimental realization of chiral edge states in a ribbon geometry with an ultracold gas of neutral fermions subjected to an artificial gauge field. By imaging individual sites along a synthetic dimension, we detect the existence of the edge states, investigate the onset of chirality as a function of the bulk-edge coupling, and observe the edge-cyclotron orbits induced during a quench dynamics. The realization of fermionic chiral edge states is a fundamental achievement, which opens the door towards experiments including edge state interferometry and the study of non-Abelian anyons in atomic systems.

  19. First Observation of Vector Boson Pairs in a Hadronic Final State at the Tevatron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paus, Christoph M. E.

    We present the first observation in hadronic collisions of the electroweak production of vector boson pairs (VV, V=W, Z) where one boson decays to a dijet final state. The data correspond to 3.5??fb[superscript -1] of ...

  20. Shaping state and time-dependent convergence rates in non-linear control and observer design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfried Lohmiller; Jean-Jacques E. Slotine

    2010-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper derives for non-linear, time-varying and feedback linearizable systems simple controller designs to achieve specified state-and timedependent complex convergence rates. This approach can be regarded as a general gain-scheduling technique with global exponential stability guarantee. Typical applications include the transonic control of an aircraft with strongly Mach or time-dependent eigenvalues or the state-dependent complex eigenvalue placement of the inverted pendulum. As a generalization of the LTI Luenberger observer a dual observer design technique is derived for a broad set of non-linear and time-varying systems, where so far straightforward observer techniques were not known. The resulting observer design is illustrated for non-linear chemical plants, the Van-der-Pol oscillator, the discrete logarithmic map series prediction and the lighthouse navigation problem. These results [23] allow one to shape globally the state- and time-dependent convergence behaviour ideally suited to the non-linear or time-varying system. The technique can also be used to provide analytic robustness guarantees against modelling uncertainties. The derivations are based on non-linear contraction theory [18], a comparatively recent dynamic system analysis tool whose results will be reviewed and extended.

  1. Simultaneous state and unknown inputs estimation with PI and PMI observers for Takagi Sugeno model with unmeasurable premise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Simultaneous state and unknown inputs estimation with PI and PMI observers for Takagi Sugeno model-- In this paper, a proportional integral (PI) and a proportional multiple integral observer (PMI) are proposed and PMI observers developed for linear systems. The state estimation error is written as a perturbed

  2. EUVE Observations of Her X-1 at the End of the Short High State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. A. Leahy; H. Marshall

    1999-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of Her X-1 by the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) at the end of the x-ray Short High state are reported here. Her X-1 is found to exhibit a strong orbital modulation of the EUV flux, with a large dip superposed on a broad peak around orbital phase 0.5 when the neutron star is closest the observer. Alternate mechanisms for producing the observed EUV lightcurve are modeled. We conclude that: i) the x-ray heated surface of the companion is too cool to produce enough emission; ii) the accretion disk can produce enough emission but does not explain the orbital modulation; iii) reflection of x-rays off of the companion can produce the shape and intensity of the observed lightcurve. The only viable cause for the large dip at orbital phase 0.5 is shadowing of the companion by the accretion disk.

  3. Observations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeeding access(SC)Gas and OilPhaseObservation of aof

  4. High Density Neutron Star Equation of State from 4U 1636-53 Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. S. Olson

    2002-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A bound on the compactness of the neutron star in the low mass x-ray binary 4U 1636-53 is used to estimate the equation of state of neutron star matter at high density. Observations of 580 Hz oscillations during the rising phase of x-ray bursts from this system appear to be due to two antipodal hot spots on the surface of an accreting neutron star rotating at 290 Hz, implying the compactness of the neutron star is less than 0.163 at the 90% confidence level. The equation of state of high density neutron star matter estimated from this compactness limit is significantly stiffer than extrapolations to high density of equations of state determined by fits of experimental nucleon-nucleon scattering data and properties of light nuclei to two- and three-body interaction potentials.

  5. Observation of ?-vibrations and alignments built on non-ground-state configurations in ¹??Dy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, C. -H.; Hartley, D. J.; Riedinger, L. L.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. F.; Almond, J. M.; Beausang, C.; Carpenter, M. P.; Chiara, C. J.; Cooper, N.; Curien, D.; et al

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The exact nature of the lowest K?=2? rotational bands in all deformed nuclei remains obscure. Traditionally they are assumed to be collective vibrations of the nuclear shape in the ? degree of freedom perpendicular to the nuclear symmetry axis. Very few such ?-bands have been traced past the usual back-bending rotational alignments of high-j nucleons. We have investigated the structure of positive-parity bands in the N=90 nucleus ¹??Dy, using the ¹??Nd(¹²C,4n)¹??Dy reaction at 65 MeV, observing the resulting ?-ray transitions with the Gammasphere array. The even- and odd-spin members of the ?=2? ?-band are observed to 32? and 31? respectively.more »This rotational band faithfully tracks the ground-state configuration to the highest spins. The members of a possible ?-vibration built on the aligned yrast S-band are observed to spins 28? and 27?. An even-spin positive-parity band, observed to spin 24?, is a candidate for an aligned S-band built on the seniority-zero configuration of the 0?? state at 676 keV. The crossing of this band with the 0?? band is at hwc = 0.28(1) MeV and is consistent with the configuration of the 0?? band not producing any blocking of the monopole pairing.« less

  6. Observation of ?-vibrations and alignments built on non-ground-state configurations in ¹??Dy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, C. -H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hartley, D. J. [US Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States); Riedinger, L. L. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Sharpey-Schafer, J. F. [Univ. of Western Cape, Bellville (South Africa); Almond, J. M. [Univ. of Richmond, Richmond, VA (United States); Beausang, C. [Univ. of Richmond, Richmond, VA (United States); Carpenter, M. P. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chiara, C. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cooper, N. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Curien, D. [Univ. de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Gall, B. J. P. [Univ. de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Garrett, P. E. [Univ. of Guelph, ON (Canada); Janssens, R. V. F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kondev, F. G. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kulp, W. D. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lauritsen, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); McCutchan, E. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Miller, D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Piot, J. [Univ. de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Redon, N. [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire Lyon, Villeurbanne (France); Riley, M. A. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Simpson, J. [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Daresbury (United Kingdom). Daresbury Lab.; Stefanescu, I. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Werner, V. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Wang, X. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Wood, J. L. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Majola, S. N. T. [iThemba LABS, National Research Foundation, Somerset-West (South Africa); Univ. of Cape Town, Rondebosch (South Africa); Zhu, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The exact nature of the lowest K?=2? rotational bands in all deformed nuclei remains obscure. Traditionally they are assumed to be collective vibrations of the nuclear shape in the ? degree of freedom perpendicular to the nuclear symmetry axis. Very few such ?-bands have been traced past the usual back-bending rotational alignments of high-j nucleons. We have investigated the structure of positive-parity bands in the N=90 nucleus ¹??Dy, using the ¹??Nd(¹²C,4n)¹??Dy reaction at 65 MeV, observing the resulting ?-ray transitions with the Gammasphere array. The even- and odd-spin members of the ?=2? ?-band are observed to 32? and 31? respectively. This rotational band faithfully tracks the ground-state configuration to the highest spins. The members of a possible ?-vibration built on the aligned yrast S-band are observed to spins 28? and 27?. An even-spin positive-parity band, observed to spin 24?, is a candidate for an aligned S-band built on the seniority-zero configuration of the 0?? state at 676 keV. The crossing of this band with the 0?? band is at hwc = 0.28(1) MeV and is consistent with the configuration of the 0?? band not producing any blocking of the monopole pairing.

  7. Observation of excited state charge transfer with fs/ps-CARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blom, Alex Jason

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Excited state charge transfer processes are studied using the fs/ps-CARS probe technique. This probe allows for multiplexed detection of Raman active vibrational modes. Systems studied include Michler's Ketone, Coumarin 120, 4-dimethylamino-4{prime}-nitrostilbene, and several others. The vibrational spectrum of the para di-substituted benzophenone Michler's Ketone in the first excited singlet state is studied for the first time. It is found that there are several vibrational modes indicative of structural changes of the excited molecule. A combined experimental and theoretical approach is used to study the simplest 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin, Coumarin 120. Vibrations observed in FTIR and spontaneous Raman spectra are assigned using density functional calculations and a continuum solvation model is used to predict how observed modes are affected upon inclusion of a solvent. The low frequency modes of the excited state charge transfer species 4-dimethylamino-4{prime}-nitrostilbene are studied in acetonitrile. Results are compared to previous work on this molecule in the fingerprint region. Finally, several partially completed projects and their implications are discussed. These include the two photon absorption of Coumarin 120, nanoconfinement in cyclodextrin cavities and sensitization of titania nanoparticles.

  8. Constraints on The Dark Energy Equation of State And The Deceleration Parameter From Recent Cosmic Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amirhashchi, Hassan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the constraints on dark energy equation of state $\\omega^{X}$ and the deceleration parameter $q$ from the recent observational data including Hubble data and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation by using a model-independent deceleration parameter $q(z)=1/2-a/(1+z)^b$ and dark energy equation of state $\\omega^{X}=\\omega_{0}+\\omega_{1}z/(1+z)$ in the scope of anisotropic Bianchi type I space-time. For the cases of Hubble dataset, CMB data, and their combination, our results indicate that the constraints on transition redshift $z_{\\ast}$ are $0.62^{+1.45}_{-0.56}$, $0.34^{+0.13}_{-0.06}$, and $0.60^{+0.20}_{-0.10}$ respectively.

  9. A BeppoSAX observation of Her X-1 during the first main-on after an anomalous low-state: evidence for rapid spin-down

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Oosterbroek; A. N. Parmar; M. Orlandini; A. Segreto; A. Santangelo; S. Del Sordo

    2001-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of a BeppoSAX observation of Her X-1 in 2000 October during the first main-on state after the longest recorded anomalous low-state are presented. The 0.1-30 keV spectrum, light curve and pulse profile are all consistent with those measured during previous main on-states, indicating that Her X-1 has resumed its regular 35 day cycle with similar on-state properties as before. However, from a comparison of the measured pulse period with that obtained close to the start of the anomalous low-state, it is evident that Her X-1 continued to spin-down strongly during the anomalous low-state such that the pulse period has returned to a similar value as ~15 years ago. Additionally, the occurrence time of the main-on states after the end of the anomalous low-state indicate that a change in the length, or phasing, of the 35-day cycle occurred during the anomalous low-state.

  10. State observers and Kalman filtering for high performance vibration isolation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beker, M. G., E-mail: M.Beker@Nikhef.nl; Bertolini, A.; Hennes, E.; Rabeling, D. S. [National Institute for Subatomic Physics Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [National Institute for Subatomic Physics Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Brand, J. F. J. van den; Bulten, H. J. [National Institute for Subatomic Physics Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands) [National Institute for Subatomic Physics Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Amsterdam, de Boelelaan 1081, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a strong scientific case for the study of gravitational waves at or below the lower end of current detection bands. To take advantage of this scientific benefit, future generations of ground based gravitational wave detectors will need to expand the limit of their detection bands towards lower frequencies. Seismic motion presents a major challenge at these frequencies and vibration isolation systems will play a crucial role in achieving the desired low-frequency sensitivity. A compact vibration isolation system designed to isolate in-vacuum optical benches for Advanced Virgo will be introduced and measurements on this system are used to present its performance. All high performance isolation systems employ an active feedback control system to reduce the residual motion of their suspended payloads. The development of novel control schemes is needed to improve the performance beyond what is currently feasible. Here, we present a multi-channel feedback approach that is novel to the field. It utilizes a linear quadratic regulator in combination with a Kalman state observer and is shown to provide effective suppression of residual motion of the suspended payload. The application of state observer based feedback control for vibration isolation will be demonstrated with measurement results from the Advanced Virgo optical bench suspension system.

  11. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  12. Phosphazene additives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  13. HZ Her: Stellar Radius from X-ray Eclipse Observations, Evolutionary State and a New Distance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leahy, D A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of HZ Her/ Her X-1 by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) covering high state eclipses of the neutron star are analyzed here. Models of the eclipse are used to measure the radius and atmospheric scale height of HZ Her, the stellar companion to the neutron star. The radius is 2.61 to 3.03 $\\times10^{11}$ cm, depending on system inclination and mass ratio(q), with accuracy of $\\sim$1 part in 1000 for given inclination and q. We fit Kurucz model stellar atmosphere models to archival optical observations. The resulting effective temperature ($T_{eff}$) of the unheated face of HZ Her is determined to be in the 2$\\sigma$ range 7440K to 7620K, and metallicity ($log(Z/Z_{\\odot})$) in the range -0.14 to +.08. The model atmosphere surface flux and new radius yield a new distance to HZ Her/ Her X-1, depending on system inclination and q. We calculate stellar evolution models for the range of allowed masses (from orbital parameters), and allowed metallicities (from optical spectrum fits). The stellar mode...

  14. Observed reductions of surface solar radiation at Sites in the United States and worldwide from 1961 to 1990

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Observed reductions of surface solar radiation at Sites in the United States and worldwide from-20146 Hamburg, Germany). ABSTRACT Surface solar radiation revealed an estimated 7W/m2 or 4% decline in solar radiation in the United States can be explained. It is shown that solar radiation declined below

  15. Study of e+e-??+?-J/? and Observation of a Charged Charmoniumlike State at Belle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Z. Q.; Shen, C. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bala, A.; Belous, K.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bischofberger, M.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bra?ko, M.; Brodzicka, J.; Browder, T. E.; Chang, P.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, D.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Feindt, M.; Ferber, T.; Frey, A.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Ganguly, S.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Joffe, D.; Julius, T.; Kah, D. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Klucar, J.; Ko, B. R.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Libby, J.; Liu, C.; Lukin, P.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Nedelkovska, E.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Oswald, C.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petri?, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Ritter, M.; Röhrken, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sahoo, H.; Saito, T.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santel, D.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seidl, R.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stari?, M.; Steder, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Tanida, K.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Vahsen, S. E.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vorobyev, V.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, Y.; Yashchenko, S.; Yook, Y.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.; Belle Collaboration

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cross section for e+e???+??J/? between 3.8 and 5.5 GeV is measured with a 967??fb?1 data sample collected by the Belle detector at or near the ?(nS) (n=1,2,…,5) resonances. The Y(4260) state is observed, and its resonance parameters are determined. In addition, an excess of ?+??J/? production around 4 GeV is observed. This feature can be described by a Breit-Wigner parametrization with properties that are consistent with the Y(4008) state that was previously reported by Belle. In a study of Y(4260)??+??J/? decays, a structure is observed in the M(?±J/?) mass spectrum with 5.2? significance, with mass M=(3894.5±6.6±4.5)??MeV/c2 and width ?=(63±24±26)??MeV/c2, where the errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. This structure can be interpreted as a new charged charmoniumlike state.

  16. Additivity and non-additivity of multipartite entanglement measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huangjun Zhu; Lin Chen; Masahito Hayashi

    2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the additivity property of three multipartite entanglement measures, i.e. the geometric measure of entanglement (GM), the relative entropy of entanglement and the logarithmic global robustness. First, we show the additivity of GM of multipartite states with real and non-negative entries in the computational basis. Many states of experimental and theoretical interests have this property, e.g. Bell diagonal states, maximally correlated generalized Bell diagonal states, generalized Dicke states, the Smolin state, and the generalization of D\\"{u}r's multipartite bound entangled states. We also prove the additivity of other two measures for some of these examples. Second, we show the non-additivity of GM of all antisymmetric states of three or more parties, and provide a unified explanation of the non-additivity of the three measures of the antisymmetric projector states. In particular, we derive analytical formulae of the three measures of one copy and two copies of the antisymmetric projector states respectively. Third, we show, with a statistical approach, that almost all multipartite pure states with sufficiently large number of parties are nearly maximally entangled with respect to GM and relative entropy of entanglement. However, their GM is not strong additive; what's more surprising, for generic pure states with real entries in the computational basis, GM of one copy and two copies, respectively, are almost equal. Hence, more states may be suitable for universal quantum computation, if measurements can be performed on two copies of the resource states. We also show that almost all multipartite pure states cannot be produced reversibly with the combination multipartite GHZ states under asymptotic LOCC, unless relative entropy of entanglement is non-additive for generic multipartite pure states.

  17. Observation and characterization of chimera states in coupled dynamical systems with nonlocal coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Gopal; V. K. Chandrasekar; A. Venkatesan; M. Lakshmanan

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    By developing the concepts of strength of incoherence and discontinuity measure, we show that a distinct quantitative characterization of chimera and multichimera states which occur in networks of coupled nonlinear dynamical systems admitting nonlocal interactions of finite radius can be made. These measures also clearly distinguish between chimera or multichimera states (both stable and breathing types) and coherent and incoherent as well as cluster states....

  18. First observation of alpha-cluster states in the (14)O+(4)He interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Changbo; Goldberg, V. Z.; Rogachev, G. V.; Tabacaru, G.; Chubarian, G. G.; Skorodumov, B.; McCleskey, M.; Zhai, Y.; Al-Abdullah, T.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the dominant resonances using an R-matrix approach. A resonance at 9.2 MeV excitation energy in (18)Ne is particularly interesting. The spin-parity of the state is found to be 3(-) and the alpha particle reduced width for the state appears to be comparable...

  19. Numerical procedure for analyzing impurity-induced resonant-state STM images observed in high-T-c superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Q.; Hu, Chia-Ren.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical procedure is developed for analyzing impurity-induced resonant-state STM images observed in high-T-c superconductors, and is applied to three sets of higher resolution data provided to us by J. C. Seamus Davis and E. W. Hudson. Each image...

  20. Additional/Outside Employment Policy for Salaried Classified and University Staff Page 1 of 3 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University No. 4070 Rev.: 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    Additional/Outside Employment Policy for Salaried Classified and University Staff Page 1 of 3: Additional/Outside Employment Policy for Salaried Classified and University Staff employment within the university and outside the university for salaried classified and university staff

  1. Whole-Body Magnetic Resonance Angiography with Additional Steady-State Acquisition of the Infragenicular Arteries in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, Yousef W., E-mail: yujwni01@heh.regionh.d [University Hospital at Herlev, Department of Radiology (Denmark); Eiberg, Jonas P. [Rigshospitalet, Department of Vascular Surgery (Denmark); Logager, Vibeke B. [University Hospital at Herlev, Department of Radiology (Denmark); Just, Sven [University Hospital at Gentofte, Department of Radiology (Denmark); Schroeder, Torben V. [Rigshospitalet, Department of Vascular Surgery (Denmark); Thomsen, Henrik S. [University Hospital at Herlev, Department of Radiology (Denmark)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if addition of infragenicular steady-state (SS) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) to first-pass imaging improves diagnostic performance compared with first-pass imaging alone in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) undergoing whole-body (WB) MRA. Twenty consecutive patients with PAD referred to digital-subtraction angiography (DSA) underwent WB-MRA. Using a bolus-chase technique, first-pass WB-MRA was performed from the supra-aortic vessels to the ankles. The blood-pool contrast agent gadofosveset trisodium was used at a dose of 0.03 mmol/kg body weight. Ten minutes after injection of the contrast agent, high-resolution (0.7-mm isotropic voxels) SS-MRA of the infragenicular arteries was performed. Using DSA as the 'gold standard,' sensitivities and specificities for detecting significant arterial stenoses ({>=}50% luminal narrowing) with first-pass WB-MRA, SS-MRA, and combined first-pass and SS-MRA were calculated. Kappa statistics were used to determine intermodality agreement between MRA and DSA. Overall sensitivity and specificity for detecting significant arterial stenoses with first-pass WB-MRA was 0.70 (95% confidence interval 0.61 to 0.78) and 0.97 (0.94 to 0.99), respectively. In first-pass WB-MRA, the lowest sensitivity was in the infragenicular region, with a value of 0.42 (0.23 to 0.63). Combined analysis of first-pass WB-MRA and SS-MRA increased sensitivity to 0.81 (0.60 to 0.93) in the infragenicular region, with specificity of 0.94 (0.88 to 0.97). Sensitivity and specificity for detecting significant arterial stenoses with isolated infragenicular SS-MRA was 0.47 (0.27 to 0.69) and 0.86 (0.78 to 0.91), respectively. Intermodality agreement between MRA and DSA in the infragenicular region was moderate for first-pass WB-MRA ({kappa} = 0.49), fair for SS-MRA ({kappa} = 0.31), and good for combined first-pass/SS-MRA ({kappa} = 0.71). Addition of infragenicular SS-MRA to first-pass WB MRA improves diagnostic performance.

  2. Observation of abnormally large radii of nuclei in excited states in the vicinity of neutron thresholds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogloblin, A. A., E-mail: ogloblina@bk.ru; Danilov, A. N. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Belyaeva, T. L. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM) (Mexico); Demyanova, A. S. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Goncharov, S. A. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation); Trzaska, W. [University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Differential cross sections for inelastic scattering leading to the excitation of some nuclear states situated near neutron-emission thresholds were analyzed. With the aid of a modified diffraction model, abnormally large radii were found for the 1/2{sub 1}{sup +} state of the {sup 13}C nucleus at 3.09 MeV, for the first levels of positive-parity rotational bands in the {sup 9}Be (1/2{sup +} level at 1.68 MeV and 5/2{sup +} level at 3.05 MeV) and {sup 11}Be (5/2{sup +} level at 1.78 MeV and 3/2{sup +} level at 3.41 MeV) nuclei, and for the 2{sub 1}{sup +} state of the {sup 14}Be nucleus at 1.54 MeV and 1{sub 1}{sup -} state of the {sup 12}Be nucleus at 2.7 MeV. All of these states possess signatures typical of neutron halos.

  3. Effelsberg Observations of Excited-State (6.0 GHz) OH in Supernova Remnants and W3(OH)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent L. Fish; Loránt O. Sjouwerman; Ylva M. Pihlström

    2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    While masers in the 1720 MHz transition of OH are detected toward many supernova remnants (SNRs), no other OH transition is seen as a maser in SNRs. We present a search for masers at 6049 MHz, which has recently been predicted to produce masers by pure collisional excitation at conditions similar to that required for 1720 MHz masing. The Effelsberg 100 m telescope was used to observe the excited-state 6016, 6030, 6035, and 6049 MHz lines of OH toward selected SNRs, most of which have previously-detected bright 1720 MHz masers. No excited-state masers are found toward SNRs, consistent with previous observations of the 6049 MHz and other excited-state transitions. We do not see clear evidence of absorption toward SNR target positions, although we do see evidence of absorption in the molecular cloud at +50 km/s near Sgr A East. Weak absorption is detected at 6016 MHz toward W3(OH), while stronger, narrower emission is seen at 6049 MHz, suggesting that the 6049 MHz emission is a low-gain maser. We conclude that conditions in SNRs are not conducive to excited-state maser emission, especially in excited-state satellite lines.

  4. Steady-state laboratory ow laws alone fail to explain postseismic observations Andrew M. Freed a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freed, Andrew

    dislocation creep geodesy nite element modeling We test whether laboratory derived steady-state ow laws- and stress-dependent ow laws for diffusion and dislocation creep of olivine. We primarily concentrate of a number of creep mechanisms and associated constitutive relationships that quantify how viscosity and ow

  5. PSU ARL Additive Manufacturing Capstone Project For the first time the PSU ARL, the IE480W CIMP-3D Group at Penn State showed that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PSU ARL Additive Manufacturing Capstone Project For the first time the PSU ARL, the IE480W CIMP-3D Processing by Direct Digital Deposition (CIMP-3D), is a program utilizing Additive Manufacturing (AM was to develop an understanding of how key operating parameters such as layer thickness, manufacturing

  6. Reconstructing an Agent's Epistemic State from Observations about its Beliefs and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Booth, Richard

    , Germany. E-mail: nittka@informatik.uni-leipzig.de Abstract We look at the problem in belief revision on an observation of how the agent has responded to some sequence of previous belief revision inputs over time. We revision which is based on sequences, we construct a model of the agent that `best explains

  7. On Channel State Inference and Prediction Using Observable Variables in 802.11b Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radha, Hayder

    strength of each individual bit, are not observable at higher layers. Therefore, it is essential/prediction (CSI/CSP). Here, inference specifically refers to estimating the BER in an already received packet that analyzes the utility of SSR and as side-information for CSI/CSP. In this work, we exploit the Method

  8. Transmembrane Helix Orientation and Dynamics: Insights from Ensemble Dynamics with Solid-State NMR Observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jo, Sunhwan; Im, Wonpil

    2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    observables, but important motional information can be missing or misinterpreted in the model. In this work, we have investigated the orientation of the single-pass transmembrane domain of viral protein ”u“ (VpuTM) from HIV-1 by determining an ensemble...

  9. Additivity relations in quantum correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seungho Yang; Hyunseok Jeong; Wonmin Son

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Does the sum of correlations in subsystems constitute the correlation in the total system? Such a concept can be expressed by an additivity relationship of correlations. From a strong subadditivity condition of von Neumann entropy, four different additivity relations in total correlation are derived and quantified. Based upon the classification of the additivity in total correlation, we identify the corresponding additive relationships in entanglement. It is also discussed that similar relationships are satisfied for quantum discord of pure states, but it is not always true for mixed states.

  10. Observation of phononic helical edge states in a mechanical 'topological insulator'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Süsstrunk, Roman

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A topological insulator is characterized by a dichotomy between the interior and the edge of a finite system: While the bulk has a non-zero energy gap, the edges are forced to sustain excitations traversing these gaps. Originally proposed for electrons governed by quantum mechanics, it has remained an important open question if the same physics can be observed for systems obeying Newton's equations of motion. Here, we report on measurements that characterize the collective behavior of mechanical oscillators exhibiting the phenomenology of the quantum spin hall effect. The phononic edge modes are shown to be helical and we demonstrate their topological protection via the stability against imperfections. Our results open the door to the design of topological acoustic meta-materials that can capitalize on the stability of the surfaces phonons as reliable wave guides.

  11. Observation of a narrow mass state decaying into ?(1S)+? in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Stutte, L.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.3 fb?¹, we observe a narrow mass state decaying into ?(1S)+?, where the ?(1S) meson is detected by its decay into a pair of oppositely charged muons, and the photon is identified through its conversion into an electron-positron pair. The significance of this observation is 5.6 standard deviations. The mass of the state is centered at 10.551±0.014(stat)±0.017(syst) GeV/c², which is consistent with that of the state recently observed by the ATLAS Collaboration.

  12. Observation of a narrow mass state decaying into ?(1S)+? in pp[over ¯] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96??TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; et al.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.3 fb{sup -1}, we observe a narrow mass state decaying into {Upsilon}(1S) + {gamma}, where the {Upsilon}(1S) meson is detected by its decay into a pair of oppositely charged muons, and the photon is identified through its conversion into an electron-positron pair. The significance of this observation is 5.6 standard deviations. The mass of the state is centered at 10.551 {+-} 0.014(stat.) {+-} 0.017(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, which is consistent with that of the state recently observed by the ATLAS Collaboration.

  13. Direct observation of the primary state of damage in ion-irradiated platinum and tungsten. Report No. 4300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pramanik, D

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary state of damage in platinum and tungsten caused by ions of varying mass and energy, was investigated using the field ion microscope (FIM). The damage could be classified into three morphological types: (a) depleted zones (DZs); (b) voids; (c) dislocation loops. Platinum specimens of 99.999% purity were irradiated in situ at 60 K with 20 keV Kr/sup +/ ions to a dose of (3 to 5) x 10/sup 12/ ion cm/sup -2/ and examined by the pulse field-evaporation technique at 60 K. The experimental conditions were created such that each depleted zone was created by a single incident ion. All three morphological types were observed.

  14. Extremal transmission through a microwave photonic crystal and the observation of edge states in a rectangular Dirac billiard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Bittner; B. Dietz; M. Miski-Oglu; A. Richter

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents experimental results on properties of waves propagating in an unbounded and a bounded photonic crystal consisting of metallic cylinders which are arranged in a triangular lattice. First, we present transmission measurements of plane waves traversing a photonic crystal. The experiments are performed in the vicinity of a Dirac point, i.e., an isolated conical singularity of the photonic band structure. There, the transmission shows a pseudodiffusive 1/L dependence, with $L$ being the thickness of the crystal, a phenomenon also observed in graphene. Second, eigenmode intensity distributions measured in a microwave analog of a relativistic Dirac billiard, a rectangular microwave billiard that contains a photonic crystal, are discussed. Close to the Dirac point states have been detected which are localized at the straight edge of the photonic crystal corresponding to a zigzag edge in graphene.

  15. Comments on "State observation of a fixed-bed reactor based on reduced bilinear H. RAFARALAHY, M. ZASADZINSKI, M. BOUTAYEB and M. DAROUACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    - 1 - Comments on "State observation of a fixed-bed reactor based on reduced bilinear models" H profiles of a fixed-bed reactor approximated as bilinear system through orthogonal collocation

  16. 1412 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATIC CONTROL, VOL. 54, NO. 6, JUNE 2009 state observers has been developed, which can guarantee the asymp-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindquist, Anders

    of nonlinear uncertain dynamical systems," IEEE Trans. Automat. Control, vol. 32, no. 2, pp. 166­170, Feb. 1987 observer for time lag systems," IEEE Trans. Automat. Control, vol. 34, no. 7, pp. 775­777, Jul. 1989. [6] J1412 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATIC CONTROL, VOL. 54, NO. 6, JUNE 2009 state observers has been

  17. Observation of the {psi}(4415){yields}DD{sub 2}*(2460) Decay Using Initial-State Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pakhlova, G.; Balagura, V.; Chistov, R.; Danilov, M.; Liventsev, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mizuk, R.; Pakhlov, P.; Tikhomirov, I.; Uglov, T. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Adachi, I.; Brodzicka, J.; Haba, J.; Hazumi, M.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kibayashi, A.; Kichimi, H.; Krokovny, P.; Nakao, M. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan)] (and others)

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report measurements of the exclusive cross section for e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}D{sup 0}D{sup -}{pi}{sup +} over the center-of-mass energy range 4.0 GeV to 5.0 GeV with initial-state radiation and the first observation of the decay {psi}(4415){yields}D{sup 0}D{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. From a study of the resonant substructure in {psi}(4415) decay we conclude that the {psi}(4415){yields}D{sup 0}D{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decay is dominated by {psi}(4415){yields}DD{sub 2}*(2460). We obtain B({psi}(4415){yields}D{sup 0}D{sup -}{pi}{sub nonresonant}{sup +})/B({psi}(4415){yields}DD{sub 2}*(24 = 60){yields}D{sup 0}D{sup -}{pi}{sup +})<0.22 at 90% C.L. The analysis is based on a data sample collected with the Belle detector with an integrated luminosity of 673 fb{sup -1}.

  18. First Observation of the P-Wave Spin-Singlet Bottomonium States hb(1P) and hb(2P)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, David M.; Aushev, T.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Belous, K.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bondar, A.; Bracko, Marko; Brodzicka, J.; Browder, Thomas E.; Chang, P.; Chen, A.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, I- S.; Cho, K.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Drasal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Esen, Sevda; Fast, James E.; Feindt, M.; Gaur, Vipin; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Hara, Takanori; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W. S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Iwabuchi, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, Igal; Julius, T.; Kang, J. H.; Katayama, N.; Kawasaki, T.; Kichimi, H.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, Kay; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, N.; Koblitz, S.; Korpar, S.; Krizan, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, S. H.; Li, J.; Libby, J.; Liu, C.; Liventsev, D.; Louvot, R.; Macnaughton, Jimmy N.; Matvienko, D.; McOnie, S.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mussa, R.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Natkaniec, Z.; Neubauer, S.; Nishida, S.; Nishimura, K.; Nitoh, O.; Nozaki, T.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, Stephen L.; Onuki, Y.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, H.; Pedlar, Todd K.; Pestotnik, Rok; Petric, M.; Piilonen, Leo E.; Poluektov, A.; Ritter, M.; Rohrken, M.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, Himansu B.; Sakai, Y.; Sanuki, T.; Schneider, O.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, Martin E.; Shapkin, M.; Shebalin, V.; Shibata, T. A.; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Shwartz, B.; Simon, F.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Young-Soo; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stanic, S.; Stanic, M.; Sumihama, M.; Tatishvili, Gocha; Teramoto, Y.; Tikhomirov, I.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Vahsen, S. E.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vinokurova, A.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, Y.; Wicht, J.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamashita, Y.; Yuan, C. Z.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the observation of the hb(1P) and hb(2P) spin-singlet bottomonium states produced in the reaction e+e? ! hb(nP)*+*? with significances of 5.5 * and 11.2 *, respectively. We find that M[hb(1P)] = (9898.25±1.06+1.03 ?1.07 )MeV/c2 and M[hb(2P)] = (10259.76±0.64+1.43 ?1.03 )MeV/c2, which correspond to measurements of the P-wave hyperfine splittings *MHF = (1.62 ± 1.52)MeV/c2 and (0.48+1.57 ?1.22)MeV/c2, respectively. We also report measurements of the cross sections for e+e? ! hb(nP)*+*? relative to the cross section for the e+e? ! *(2S)*+*? reaction. These results are obtained from a 121.4 fb?1 data sample collected with the Belle detector near the *(5S) resonance at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e? collider.

  19. REVIEW OF THE NEGOTIATION OF THE MODEL PROTOCOL ADDITIONAL TO THE AGREEMENT(S) BETWEEN STATE(S) AND THE INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY FOR THE APPLICATION OF SAFEGUARDS, INFCIRC/540 (Corrected) VOLUME II/III IAEA COMMITTEE 24, Major Issues Underlying the Model Additional Protocol (1996-1997).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenthal, M.D.; Saum-Manning, L.; Houck, F.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume I of this Review traces the origins of the Model Additional Protocol. It covers the period from 1991, when events in Iraq triggered an intensive review of the safeguards system, until 1996, when the IAEA Board of Governors established Committee 24 to negotiate a new protocol to safeguards agreement. The period from 1991-1996 set the stage for this negotiation and shaped its outcome in important ways. During this 5-year period, many proposals for strengthening safeguards were suggested and reviewed. Some proposals were dropped, for example, the suggestion by the IAEA Secretariat to verify certain imports, and others were refined. A rough consensus was established about the directions in which the international community wanted to go, and this was reflected in the draft of an additional protocol that was submitted to the IAEA Board of Governors on May 6, 1996 in document GOV/2863, Strengthening the Effectiveness and Improving the Efficiency of the Safeguards System - Proposals For Implementation Under Complementary Legal Authority, A Report by the Director General. This document ended with a recommendation that, 'the Board, through an appropriate mechanism, finalize the required legal instrument taking as a basis the draft protocol proposed by the Secretariat and the explanation of the measures contained in this document.'

  20. Yet another additivity conjecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keiji Matsumoto

    2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is known that the additivity conjecture of Holevo capacity, output minimum entoropy, and the entanglement of formation (EoF), are equivalent with each other. Among them, the output minimum entropy is simplest, and hence many researchers are focusing on this quantity. Here, we suggest yet another entanglement measure, whose strong superadditivity and additivity are equivalent to the additivity of the quantities mentioned above. This quantity is as simple as the output minimum entropy, and in existing proofs of additivity conjecture of the output minimum entropy for the specific examples, they are essentially proving the strong superadditivity of this quantity.

  1. Research Summary Carbon Additionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the quality assurance of emissions reduction and carbon sequestration activities, but remains a source of muchResearch Summary Carbon Additionality Additionality is widely considered to be a core aspect controversy in national carbon accounting, international regulatory frameworks and carbon markets. A review

  2. Cross-sectional observations by HRTEM of the structure of nickel oxide electrochromic thin films in the as-deposited state and the bleached state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshimura, Kazuki; Miki, Takeshi; Tanemura, Sakae [National Industrial Research Inst. of Nagoya (Japan). Multifunctional Material Science Dept.] [National Industrial Research Inst. of Nagoya (Japan). Multifunctional Material Science Dept.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To investigate the microstructure of nickel oxide electrochromic thin films prepared by reactive DC magnetron sputtering, cross-sectional observations of sputtered nickel oxide films have been performed using a high resolution electron microscope. High resolution images were observed for as-deposited and bleached samples. These images show that the surface morphology of these samples is quite different. The bleached sample consists of needle-like microcrystallites, while the as-deposited sample consists of columnar crystals and has a smooth surface. Diffraction patterns indicate that crystallized NiO is the dominant structure in both samples. The fact that no trace of Ni(OH){sub 2} was observed implies that the boundary and the surface of NiO microcrystallites play important roles in the electrochromic reaction.

  3. CORONA, JET, AND RELATIVISTIC LINE MODELS FOR SUZAKU/RXTE/CHANDRA-HETG OBSERVATIONS OF THE CYGNUS X-1 HARD STATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Michael A.

    Using Suzaku and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), we have conducted a series of four simultaneous observations of the galactic black hole candidate Cyg X-1 in what were historically faint and spectrally hard "low ...

  4. Additions to LAP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, John L.

    1967-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In addition to the description on page 13 of AI Memo 116A LAP has the following features: Current Assembly Location Reference, Assembly Time Arithmetic, Constants, Multiple Entry Routines, and Defined Machine Operations ...

  5. Evaluation of SMOS Retrievals of Soil Moisture over the Central United States with Currently Available In-situ Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    SMOS retrievals by comparing them to in-situ soil moisture observations4 for the top 5 cm at several.01% of the total water on the planet [Prigent et al.,20 2005]. But soil water content is important for many reasons, such as agriculture. Soil water21 content also has an important influence on climate, as it determines

  6. Writing Assessment: Additional Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    29 Appendix A Writing Assessment: Additional Resources #12;30 Where can I find out more into the assessment process. On-campus resources give you with a "real person" to contact should you have questions Resources for Higher Education Outcomes Assessment http://www2.acs.ncsu.edu/UPA/survey/resource.htm Ohio

  7. Carbon Additionality: Discussion Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon Additionality: A review Discussion Paper Gregory Valatin November 2009 Forest Research. Voluntary Carbon Standards American Carbon Registry Forest Carbon Project Standard (ACRFCPS) 27 CarbonFix Standard (CFS) 28 Climate, Community and Biodiversity Standard (CCBS) 28 Forest Carbon Standard (FCS) 28

  8. Simplifying additivity problems using direct sum constructions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motohisa Fukuda; Michael M. Wolf

    2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the additivity problems for the classical capacity of quantum channels, the minimal output entropy and its convex closure. We show for each of them that additivity for arbitrary pairs of channels holds iff it holds for arbitrary equal pairs, which in turn can be taken to be unital. In a similar sense, weak additivity is shown to imply strong additivity for any convex entanglement monotone. The implications are obtained by considering direct sums of channels (or states) for which we show how to obtain several information theoretic quantities from their values on the summands. This provides a simple and general tool for lifting additivity results.

  9. Observation of 1(-)0(-) final states from psi(2S) decays and e(+)e(-) annihilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Besson, David Zeke

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    particle tracking sys- tem operates in a 1.0 T magnetic field along the beam axis and achieves a momentum resolution of .00240:6% at p .0136 1 GeV=c. The cesium iodide (CsI) calorimeter attains photon energy resolutions of 2.2% at E .0013 .0136 1 GeV and 5... particle decay products. To reduce contamination from !f 2 .01331270.0134 [3] and !f 0 .0133600.0134 [12] in b 1 .0025, we exclude M .0025.0025 <1:5 GeV. Similarly, .0026.0017 candi- dates with low mass .0017.0025 .0006 states are avoided with M.0133...

  10. Observation of a new high-? and high-density state of a magnetospheric plasma in RT-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saitoh, H.; Yano, Y.; Yoshida, Z.; Nishiura, M.; Morikawa, J.; Kawazura, Y.; Nogami, T.; Yamasaki, M. [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new high-? and high-density state is reported for a plasma confined in a laboratory magnetosphere. In order to expand the parameter regime of an electron cyclotron resonance heating experiment, the 8.2?GHz microwave power of the Ring Trap 1 device has been upgraded with the installation of a new waveguide system. The rated input power launched from a klystron was increased from 25 to 50?kW, which enabled the more stable formation of a hot-electron high-? plasma. The diamagnetic signal (the averaged value of four magnetic loops signals) of a plasma reached 5.2 mWb. According to a two-dimensional Grad-Shafranov analysis, the corresponding local ? value is close to 100%.

  11. For additional information, contact: Department of Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    For additional information, contact: Department of Physics Montana State University 264 EPS Building P.O. Box 173840 Bozeman, MT 59717-3840 Tel: 406-994-3614 Fax: 406-994-4452 www.physics.montana.edu physics@montana.edu As a physics major at Montana State University, you will study some of the most

  12. For additional information, contact: Department of Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    For additional information, contact: Department of Ecology Montana State University 310 Lewis Hall P.O. Box 173460 Bozeman, MT 59717-3460 Tel: 406-994-4548 Fax: 406-994-3190 www.montana.edu/ecology/ ecology@montana.edu The Department of Ecology at Montana State University offers undergraduate majors

  13. Additive Manufacturing Technology Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of2 ofEmergencyAcrobat PDFMakerAdam GarberAdditive

  14. Impact of the equation-of-state -- gravity degeneracy on constraining the nuclear symmetry energy from astrophysical observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao-Tao He; F. J. Fattoyev; Bao-An Li; W. G. Newton

    2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a degeneracy between the equation of state (EOS) of superdense neutron-rich nuclear matter and the strong-field gravity in understanding properties of neutron stars. While the EOS is still poorly known, there are also longstanding ambiguities in choosing General Relativity or alternative gravity theories in the not-so-well tested strong-field regime. Besides possible appearance of hyperons and new phases, the most uncertain part of the nucleonic EOS is currently the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy. To provide information that may help break the EOS-gravity degeneracy, we investigate effects of symmetry energy within its uncertain range determined by terrestrial nuclear laboratory experiments on the gravitational binding energy and spacetime curvature of neutron stars within GR and the scalar-tensor (ST) theory of gravity. In particular, we focus on effects of the following parameters characterizing the EOS of neutron-rich nucleonic matter: (1) the incompressibility $K_0$ of symmetric nuclear matter, (2) the slope $L$ of symmetry energy at saturation density and (3) the high-density behavior of symmetry energy. We find that the variation of either the density slope $L$ or the high-density behavior of symmetry energy leads to large changes in both the binding energy and curvature of neutron stars while effects of varying the more constrained $K_0$ are negligibly small. The difference in predictions using the GR and the ST theory appears only for massive neutron stars, and is significantly smaller than the differences resulting from variations in the symmetry energy. We conclude that within the ST theory of gravity, the EOS-gravity degeneracy has been broken by the recent relativistic pulsar measurements, and that measurements of neutron star properties sensitive to the compactness constrain mainly the density dependence of the symmetry energy.

  15. VOLUME 82, NUMBER 11 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 15 MARCH 1999 Observation of Metastable States in Spinor Bose-Einstein Condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Metastable States in Spinor Bose-Einstein Condensates H.-J. Miesner, D. M. Stamper-Kurn, J. Stenger, S-Einstein condensates have been prepared in long-lived metastable excited states. Two complementary types of metastable states were observed. The first is due to the immiscibility of multiple components in the condensate

  16. Kalman filter data assimilation: Targeting observations and parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellsky, Thomas, E-mail: bellskyt@asu.edu; Kostelich, Eric J.; Mahalov, Alex [School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)] [School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper studies the effect of targeted observations on state and parameter estimates determined with Kalman filter data assimilation (DA) techniques. We first provide an analytical result demonstrating that targeting observations within the Kalman filter for a linear model can significantly reduce state estimation error as opposed to fixed or randomly located observations. We next conduct observing system simulation experiments for a chaotic model of meteorological interest, where we demonstrate that the local ensemble transform Kalman filter (LETKF) with targeted observations based on largest ensemble variance is skillful in providing more accurate state estimates than the LETKF with randomly located observations. Additionally, we find that a hybrid ensemble Kalman filter parameter estimation method accurately updates model parameters within the targeted observation context to further improve state estimation.

  17. Health risks associated with exposure to gasoline additives-methyl tertiary butyl ether [MTBE]. Hearing before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, Special Hearing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This hearing focuses on an Alaskan study by the Centers for Disease Control which examines possible health risks associated with exposure to gasoline additive know as MTBE. Testimony is given by Dr. William Roper, Director, CDC.

  18. Zinc electrode with cement additive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Charkey, Allen (Brookfield, CT)

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A zinc electrode having a cement additive, preferably, Portland Cement, distributed in the zinc active material.

  19. Atomic Collapse Observed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists Observe Atomic Collapse State Quantum Mechanics Prediction Confirmed in Graphene Using NERSC's Hopper April 26, 2013 | Tags: Hopper, Materials Science Contact: Linda...

  20. Fluid observers and tilting cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Coley; S. Hervik; W. C. Lim

    2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We study perfect fluid cosmological models with a constant equation of state parameter $\\gamma$ in which there are two naturally defined time-like congruences, a geometrically defined geodesic congruence and a non-geodesic fluid congruence. We establish an appropriate set of boost formulae relating the physical variables, and consequently the observed quantities, in the two frames. We study expanding spatially homogeneous tilted perfect fluid models, with an emphasis on future evolution with extreme tilt. We show that for ultra-radiative equations of state (i.e., $\\gamma>4/3$), generically the tilt becomes extreme at late times and the fluid observers will reach infinite expansion within a finite proper time and experience a singularity similar to that of the big rip. In addition, we show that for sub-radiative equations of state (i.e., $\\gamma < 4/3$), the tilt can become extreme at late times and give rise to an effective quintessential equation of state. To establish the connection with phantom cosmology and quintessence, we calculate the effective equation of state in the models under consideration and we determine the future asymptotic behaviour of the tilting models in the fluid frame variables using the boost formulae. We also discuss spatially inhomogeneous models and tilting spatially homogeneous models with a cosmological constant.

  1. Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Blake Marshall, AMO's lead for Additive Manufacturing Technologies, will provide an overview of current R&D activities in additive manufacturing and its application to fuel cell prototyping and...

  2. Lubrication with boric acid additives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erdemir, Ali (Naperville, IL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-lubricating resin compositions including a boric acid additive and a synthetic polymer including those thermoset materials.

  3. Additive manufacturing method of producing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Additive manufacturing method of producing silver or copper tracks on polyimide film Problem/stripping) using an additive process support by a novel bio- degradable photo-initiator package. technology. Building on previous work by Hoyd- Gigg Ng et al. [1,2], Heriot-Watt has developed an additive film

  4. Incorporation of additives into polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Yates, Matthew Z.

    2003-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been invented a method for incorporating additives into polymers comprising: (a) forming an aqueous or alcohol-based colloidal system of the polymer; (b) emulsifying the colloidal system with a compressed fluid; and (c) contacting the colloidal polymer with the additive in the presence of the compressed fluid. The colloidal polymer can be contacted with the additive by having the additive in the compressed fluid used for emulsification or by adding the additive to the colloidal system before or after emulsification with the compressed fluid. The invention process can be carried out either as a batch process or as a continuous on-line process.

  5. Observation of the $\\psi(1^3D_2)$ state in $e^+e^-\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-\\gamma\\chi_{c1}$ at BESIII

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ablikim, M; Ai, X C; Albayrak, O; Albrecht, M; Ambrose, D J; Amoroso, A; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R Baldini; Ban, Y; Bennett, D W; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bettoni, D; Bian, J M; Bianchi, F; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, H Y; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, X K; Cibinetto, G; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dbeyssi, A; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; De Mori, F; Ding, Y; Dong, C; Dong, J; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Duan, P F; Fan, J Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fang, X; Fang, Y; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Felici, G; Feng, C Q; Fioravanti, E; Fritsch, M; Fu, C D; Gao, Q; Gao, Y; Gao, Z; Garzia, I; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, Y; Guo, Y P; Haddadi, Z; Hafner, A; Han, S; Han, Y L; Hao, X Q; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Hu, Y; Huang, G M; Huang, G S; Huang, H P; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y; Hussain, T; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L L; Jiang, L W; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Johansson, T; Julin, A; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kang, X L; Kang, X S; Kavatsyuk, M; Ke, B C; Kliemt, R; Kloss, B; Kolcu, O B; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kuehn, W; Kupsc, A; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Leng, C; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, Jin; Li, K; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, P R; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X M; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Lin, D X; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J P; Liu, J Y; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, L D; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, X X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, R Q; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Lyu, X R; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X N; Ma, X Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Marcello, S; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Morales, C Morales; Moriya, K; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nerling, F; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, S L; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Pu, Y N; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, N; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ren, H L; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Santoro, V; Sarantsev, A; Savrié, M; Schoenning, K; Schumann, S; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, P X; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Sosio, S; Spataro, S; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Tiemens, M; Toth, D; Ullrich, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B L; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, W; Wang, X F; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Weber, T; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, Q N; Xu, X P; Xu, Z R; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yin, J H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, H W; Yu, J S; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Yuncu, A; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J L; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, K; Zhang, L; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y T; Zhang, Z H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, J Y; Zhao, J Z; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, W J; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zotti, L; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the observation of the $X(3823)$ in the process $e^+e^-\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-X(3823) \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\gamma\\chi_{c1}$ with a statistical significance of $6.2\\sigma$, in data samples at center-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s}=$4.230, 4.260, 4.360, 4.420 and 4.600~GeV collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII electron positron collider. The measured mass of the $X(3823)$ is $(3821.7\\pm 1.3\\pm 0.7)$~MeV/$c^2$, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic, and the width is less than $16$~MeV at the 90\\% confidence level. The products of the Born cross sections for $e^+e^-\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-X(3823)$ and the branching ratio $\\mathcal{B}[X(3823)\\to \\gamma\\chi_{c1,c2}]$ are also measured. These measurements are in good agreement with the assignment of the $X(3823)$ as the $\\psi(1^3D_2)$ charmonium state.

  6. A Primer on Food Additives.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    45.7 8-1208 :08 A Primer on Food Additives Extension Foods and Nutrition Specialists The Texas A&M University System Consumers today are very concerned about what goes into their food. This primer on food additives describes what food... additives do and why modern food technology has made them necessary, and recounts how Congress and the Federal Government have responded to con sumer demands for controls. Atter spending many months with the mid European immigrants who found work...

  7. On complementary channels and the additivity problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Holevo

    2005-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore complementarity between output and environment of a quantum channel (or, more generally, CP map), making an observation that the output purity characteristics for complementary CP maps coincide. Hence, validity of the mutiplicativity/additivity conjecture for a class of CP maps implies its validity for complementary maps. The class of CP maps complementary to entanglement-breaking ones is described and is shown to contain diagonal CP maps as a proper subclass, resulting in new class of CP maps (channels) for which the multiplicativity/additivity holds. Covariant and Gaussian channels are discussed briefly in this context.

  8. Decreasing Cloudiness Over China: An Updated Analysis Examining Additional Variables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaiser, D.P.

    2000-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    As preparation of the IPCC's Third Assessment Report takes place, one of the many observed climate variables of key interest is cloud amount. For several nations of the world, there exist records of surface-observed cloud amount dating back to the middle of the 20th Century or earlier, offering valuable information on variations and trends. Studies using such databases include Sun and Groisman (1999) and Kaiser and Razuvaev (1995) for the former Soviet Union, Angel1 et al. (1984) for the United States, Henderson-Sellers (1986) for Europe, Jones and Henderson-Sellers (1992) for Australia, and Kaiser (1998) for China. The findings of Kaiser (1998) differ from the other studies in that much of China appears to have experienced decreased cloudiness over recent decades (1954-1994), whereas the other land regions for the most part show evidence of increasing cloud cover. This paper expands on Kaiser (1998) by analyzing trends in additional meteorological variables for Chi na [station pressure (p), water vapor pressure (e), and relative humidity (rh)] and extending the total cloud amount (N) analysis an additional two years (through 1996).

  9. Comments on Hastings' Additivity Counterexamples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motohisa Fukuda; Christopher King; David Moser

    2009-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Hastings recently provided a proof of the existence of channels which violate the additivity conjecture for minimal output entropy. In this paper we present an expanded version of Hastings' proof. In addition to a careful elucidation of the details of the proof, we also present bounds for the minimal dimensions needed to obtain a counterexample.

  10. Additive angles in H_3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitriy G. Pavlov; Sergey S. Kokarev

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the framework of Berwald-Moor Geometry in H_3, the paper studies the construction of additive poly-angles (bingles and tringles). It is shown that, considering additiveness in the large, there exist an infinity of such poly-angles.

  11. Observing the Inflationary Reheating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerome Martin; Christophe Ringeval; Vincent Vennin

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Reheating is the the epoch which connects inflation to the subsequent hot Big-Bang phase. Conceptually very important, this era is however observationally poorly known. We show that the current Planck satellite measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies constrain the kinematic properties of the reheating era for most of the inflationary models. This result is obtained by deriving the marginalized posterior distributions of the reheating parameter for about 200 models taken in Encyclopaedia Inflationaris. Weighted by the statistical evidence of each model to explain the data, we show that the Planck 2013 measurements induce an average reduction of the posterior-to-prior volume by 40%. Making some additional assumptions on reheating, such as specifying a mean equation of state parameter, or focusing the analysis on peculiar scenarios, can enhance or reduce this constraint. Our study also indicates that the Bayesian evidence of a model can substantially be affected by the reheating properties. The precision of the current CMB data is therefore such that estimating the observational performance of a model now requires to incorporate information about its reheating history.

  12. Additive assembly of digital materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Jonathan (Jonathan Daniel)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis develops the use of additive assembly of press-fit digital materials as a new rapid-prototyping process. Digital materials consist of a finite set of parts that have discrete connections and occupy discrete ...

  13. Feasibility study of the observation of the neutrino accompanied double beta-decay of Ge-76 to the 0+(1) excited state of Se-76 using segmented germanium detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Kroeninger; L. Pandola; V. Tretyak

    2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino accompanied double beta-decay of Ge-76 can populate the ground state and the excited states of Se-76. While the decay to the ground state has been observed with a half-life of 1.74 +0.18 -0.16 10^21 years, decays to the excited states have not yet been observed. Nuclear matrix elements depend on details of the nuclear transitions. A measurement of the half-life of the transition considered here could help to reduce the uncertainties of the calculations of the nuclear matrix element for the neutrinoless double beta decay of Ge-76. This parameter relates the half-life of the process to the effective Majorana neutrino mass. The results of a feasibility study to detect the neutrino accompanied double beta-decay of Ge-76 to the excited states of Se-76 are presented in this paper. Segmented germanium detectors were assumed in this study. Such detectors, enriched in Ge-76 to a level of about 86%, will be deployed in the GERDA experiment located at the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Italy. It is shown that the decay of Ge-76 to the 1122 keV 0+ level of Se-76 can be observed in GERDA provided that the half-life of the process is in the range favoured by the present calculations which is 7.5 10^21 y to 3.1 10^23 y.

  14. Observation of the nuclear magnetic octupole moment of $^{173}$Yb from precise measurements of hyperfine structure in the ${^3P}_2$ state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Alok K; Natarajan, Vasant

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure hyperfine structure in the metastable ${^3P}_2$ state of $^{173}$Yb and extract the nuclear magnetic octupole moment. We populate the state using dipole-allowed transitions through the ${^3P}_1$ and ${^3S}_1$ states. We measure frequencies of hyperfine transitions of the ${^3P}_2 \\rightarrow {^3S}_1$ line at 770 nm using a Rb-stabilized ring cavity resonator with a precision of 200 kHz. Second-order corrections due to perturbations from the nearby ${^3P}_1$ and ${^1P}_1$ states are below 30 kHz. We obtain the hyperfine coefficients as: $A=-742.11(2)$ MHz, $B=1339.2(2)$ MHz, which represent two orders-of-magnitude improvement in precision, and $C=0.54(2)$ MHz. From atomic structure calculations, we obtain the nuclear moments: quadrupole $Q=2.46(12)$ b and octupole $\\Omega=-34.4(21)$ b\\,$\\times \\mu_N$.

  15. Self-report and Direct Observer's Perceived Leadership Practices of Chief Student Affairs Officers in Selected Institutions of Higher Education in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rozeboom, David John

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived leadership practices of chief student affairs officers in the United States in order to establish an understanding of current leadership practices and to assist chief student affairs officers...

  16. Tulsa Programs For additional information,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    Tulsa Programs For additional information, please contact: Vickie E. Lake, Ph.D. (918) 660 entirety on the Tulsa campus. Course delivery is typically in the evenings. If enrolled full- time: http://gradweb.ou.edu PROGRAM COORDINATOR Vickie E. Lake, Assistant Professor University of Oklahoma-Tulsa

  17. The Pennsylvania State University HUB Addition and Renovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · MEP DemoliKon of Bookstore · Storage Trailers at Temporary Bookstore © GilbaneKnue MEP DemoliKon of Bookstore · Temporary Walls on B2 and Ground Floor Levels at Grange Building Ramp & Parking Area · ConKnue Storage Trailers at Temporary

  18. 2007 Penn State Geospatial Technology Summer Camp Additional Registration Forms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    in the space provided below. Respiratory problems--asthma, tuberculosis, persistent cough, etc. Heart problems

  19. Decontamination formulation with sorbent additive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tucker; Mark D. (Albuquerque, NM), Comstock; Robert H. (Gardendale, AL)

    2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a bleaching activator, a sorbent additive, and water. The highly adsorbent, water-soluble sorbent additive (e.g., sorbitol or mannitol) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients, such as the liquid bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate) and convert the activator into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

  20. Observation of the Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov state in {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu(NCS){sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Symington, J. A.; Singleton, J.; Nam, M.-S.; Ardavan, A.; Kurmoo, M.; Schlueter, J. A.; Day, P.

    2000-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic measurements show that the quasi-two-dimensional superconductor {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu(NCS){sub 2} enters a Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) state below {approximately} 5.5 K in exactly in-plane magnetic fields {approximately} 19--24 T.

  1. Designing a Stochastic Adaptive Impulsive Observer for Stochastic Linear and Nonlinear Impulsive Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayati, Moosa [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering, K. N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alwan, Mohamad; Liu Xinzhi [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Khaloozadeh, Hamid [Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering, K. N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    State observation (estimation) is a very important issue in system analysis and control. This paper develops a new observer called Stochastic Adaptive Impulsive Observer (SAIO) for the state estimation of impulsive systems. The proposed observer is applicable to linear and nonlinear stochastic impulsive systems. In addition, the effect of parametric uncertainty is considered and unknown parameters of the system are estimated by suitable adaptation laws. Impulsive system theory, particularly stochastic Lyapunov-like function, is used to analyze the stability and convergence of the state estimations. The main advantages of the proposed observer are: 1) it gives continuous estimation from discrete time measurements of the system output, and 2) it is useful for state estimation when continuous measurements are impossible or expensive. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed observer and we believe that it has many applications in control and estimation theories.

  2. Evaluation of entanglement measures by a single observable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chengjie Zhang; Sixia Yu; Qing Chen; Haidong Yuan; C. H. Oh

    2015-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present observable lower bounds for several entanglement measures including entanglement of formation, geometric measure of entanglement, concurrence, and convex-roof extended negativity. The lower bounds facilitate estimates of these entanglement measures for arbitrary finite-dimensional bipartite states. Moreover, these lower bounds can be easily obtained from the expectation value of a single observable, and the optimal lower bounds relate to fully entangled fraction. Based on our results, we use the real experimental measurement data reported by Tonolini \\textit{et al.} [Sci. Rep. \\textbf{4}, 6542 (2014)] to get the lower bounds of entanglement measures for their experimentally realized state. In addition, we also study the relations between entanglement measures.

  3. New cement additives that eliminate cement body permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talabani, S.; Hareland, G. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental investigation was carried out replacing some currently used cement additives with three new additives. The experiments performed monitored the cement slurry pressure during the setting of the cement. During the setting period of the cement, two time cycles of cement expansion and contraction are observed. This is due to the individual contribution of each component in the cement mixture. To obtain the optimum tightness of the cement, final contraction in the cycle is crucial for blockage of gas migration. In these studies optimum concentrations of the additives were obtained experimentally, where the cyclic pressure behavior of the cement was optimized and the permeability reduced for the best final cement results. The parameters investigated in this study were; change in the applied pressure on the slurry with time, the compressive strength and permeability of the set cement. The major causes of the early microfractures are the in-complete cement-water reaction, low compressive strength of the set cement, and the sudden change in the hydrostatic pressure as the cement changes its phase from liquid to a solid state. The fluid loss and free water content were measured and controlled for each sample. The results of this study is that proper amounts of X-C polymer, Anchorage clay, Ironite Sponge, and Synthetic Rubber can be used to optimize the compressive strength and eliminate both micro-fracture and micro-annulus. There are certain limits to the amount and type of Synthetic Rubber powder which cement will set and the micro-fractures are eliminated. This experimental approach can be used to eliminate gas migration through a cement design that is environmentally safe, inexpensive, and uses recyclable materials.

  4. Precision and Energy Usage for Additive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemon, Lee; Sudradjat, Anton; Jaquez, Maribel; Krishna, Aditya; Rammah, Marwan; Dornfeld, David

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustainability of additive manufacturing: measuring theCommittee F42 on Additive Manufacturing Technologies," TheASTM Committee F42 on Additive Manufacturing Technologies. -

  5. Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Electrolyte Additives Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal & overcharge abuse Advanced Electrolyte Additives for PHEVEV Lithium-ion Battery...

  6. Precision and Energy Usage for Additive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemon, Lee; Sudradjat, Anton; Jaquez, Maribel; Krishna, Aditya; Rammah, Marwan; Dornfeld, David

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hague, "Sustainability of additive manufacturing: measuringASTM Committee F42 on Additive Manufacturing Technologies,"ASTM Committee F42 on Additive Manufacturing Technologies. -

  7. International Development Studies Additional Requirement Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Development Studies Additional Requirement Form The IDS additional program email. You may find additional scheduled possibilities by looking at the International Programs

  8. CREATION OF THE MODEL ADDITIONAL PROTOCOL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houck, F.; Rosenthal, M.; Wulf, N.

    2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1991, the international nuclear nonproliferation community was dismayed to discover that the implementation of safeguards by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) under its NPT INFCIRC/153 safeguards agreement with Iraq had failed to detect Iraq's nuclear weapon program. It was now clear that ensuring that states were fulfilling their obligations under the NPT would require not just detecting diversion but also the ability to detect undeclared materials and activities. To achieve this, the IAEA initiated what would turn out to be a five-year effort to reappraise the NPT safeguards system. The effort engaged the IAEA and its Member States and led to agreement in 1997 on a new safeguards agreement, the Model Protocol Additional to the Agreement(s) between States and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards. The Model Protocol makes explicit that one IAEA goal is to provide assurance of the absence of undeclared nuclear material and activities. The Model Protocol requires an expanded declaration that identifies a State's nuclear potential, empowers the IAEA to raise questions about the correctness and completeness of the State's declaration, and, if needed, allows IAEA access to locations. The information required and the locations available for access are much broader than those provided for under INFCIRC/153. The negotiation was completed in quite a short time because it started with a relatively complete draft of an agreement prepared by the IAEA Secretariat. This paper describes how the Model Protocol was constructed and reviews key decisions that were made both during the five-year period and in the actual negotiation.

  9. Additive Manufacturing: Pursuing the Promise

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of2 ofEmergencyAcrobat PDFMakerAdam GarberAdditive Lower

  10. Electronic states of thiophene/phenylene co-oligomers: Extreme-ultra violet excited photoelectron spectroscopy observations and density functional theory calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawaguchi, Yoshizo [Research Institute for Innovation in Sustainable Chemistry, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Electronics and Photonics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Sasaki, Fumio; Mochizuki, Hiroyuki [Electronics and Photonics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Ishitsuka, Tomoaki; Tomie, Toshihisa [Research Institute of Instrumentation Frontier, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Ootsuka, Teruhisa [Nanoelectronics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Watanabe, Shuji [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamagata University, 1-4-12, Kojirakawa, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Nanosystem Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Shimoi, Yukihiro [Nanosystem Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu [Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)

    2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated electronic states in the valence electron bands for the thin films of three thiophene/phenylene co-oligomer (TPCO) compounds, 2,5-bis(4-biphenylyl)thiophene (BP1T), 1,4-bis(5-phenylthiophen-2-yl)benzene (AC5), and 1,4-bis{l_brace}5-[4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]thiophen-2-yl{r_brace}benzene (AC5-CF{sub 3}), by using extreme-UV excited photoelectron spectroscopy (EUPS). By comparing both EUPS spectra and secondary electron spectra between AC5 and AC5-CF{sub 3}, we confirm that CF{sub 3} substitution to AC5 deepens valence states by 2 eV, and increases the ionization energy by 3 eV. From the cut-off positions of secondary electron spectra, the work functions of AC5, AC5-CF{sub 3}, and BP1T are evaluated to be 3.8 eV, 4.8 eV, and 4.0 eV, respectively. We calculate molecular orbital (MO) energy levels by the density functional theory and compare results of calculations with those of experiments. Densities of states obtained by broadening MO levels well explain the overall features of experimental EUPS spectra of three TPCOs.

  11. Occupational health experience with organic additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiess, A.M.; Wellenreuther, G.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For many decades, interest in occupational medicine has been focused on the wide variety of organic additives, which includes a large number of substances, for example, dyestuffs, pigments, and auxiliaries for the textile, leather, and paper industries. The reason is that, if the recommended precautions are not observed, there is a risk of exposure to most of these substances during both production and use. Moreover, over the years, some additives have caused concern and aroused suspicion regarding adverse effects on health. In order to deal with health problems in this field, it is important to be aware of how, what, and where occupational diseases or accidents arise. Much knowledge has been gained about these, and it would be an impossible task to give a systematic survey of the data that have accumulated, especially since it is necessary to take account of the problem of exposure to more than one substance. Thus an attempt is made to report on occupational health experience in general, and to demonstrate how an industrial hygienist may approach the many and various problems. Some epidemiological studies on organic additives (auramine, anthraquinone dyestuffs, organic dyes, etc.) are discussed.

  12. Nucleophilic Additions to 3-Azido-hexanal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, Chad E.

    2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    , the Aub? group was able to quickly convert ?-azido propanal into an azido diene, and submit it to a tandem Diels-Alder/Schmidt reaction, thus producing a tricyclic lactam diastereoselectively. 7 Another common intramolecular reaction used with linear... and butanal (Scheme 3). 12,13 The authors propose the boat transition state 5 D, in which the nucleophile is reacting with the carbonyl at the B?rgi/Dunitz angle of atack and is relatively fre of strain, as a plausible explanation for the observed...

  13. Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives Develop & Evaluate...

  14. Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Development of Advanced Electrolytes and Electrolyte Additives Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives Develop & evaluate...

  15. REVIEW OF THE NEGOTIATION OF THE MODEL PROTOCOL ADDITIONAL TO THE AGREEMENT(S) BETWEEN STATE(S) AND THE INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY FOR THE APPLICATION OF SAFEGUARDS,INFCIRC/540 (Corrected) VOLUME I/III SETTING THE STAGE: 1991-1996.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenthal, M.D.; Saum-Manning, L.; Houck, F.; Anzelon, G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Events in Iraq at the beginning of the 1990s demonstrated that the safeguards system of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) needed to be improved. It had failed, after all, to detect Iraq's clandestine nuclear weapon program even though some of Iraq's's activities had been pursued at inspected facilities in buildings adjacent to ones being inspected by the IAEA. Although there were aspects of the implementation of safeguards where the IAEA needed to improve, the primary limitations were considered to be part of the safeguards system itself. That system was based on the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty of 1970, to which Iraq was a party, and implemented on the basis of a model NPT safeguards agreement, published by the IAEA 1972 as INFCIRC/153 (corrected). The agreement calls for states to accept and for the IAEA to apply safeguards to all nuclear material in the state. Iraq was a party to such an agreement, but it violated the agreement by concealing nuclear material and other nuclear activities from the IAEA. Although the IAEA was inspecting in Iraq, it was hindered by aspects of the agreement that essentially limited its access to points in declared facilities and provided the IAEA with little information about nuclear activities anywhere else in Iraq. As a result, a major review of the NPT safeguards system was initiated by its Director General and Member States with the objective of finding the best means to enable the IAEA to detect both diversions from declared stocks and any undeclared nuclear material or activities in the state. Significant improvements that could be made within existing legal authority were taken quickly, most importantly a change in 1992 in how and when and what design information would be reported to the IAEA. During 1991-1996, the IAEA pursued intensive study, legal and technical analysis, and field trials and held numerous consultations with Member States. The Board of Governors discussed the issue of strengthening safeguards at almost all of its meeting.

  16. 230 GHz VLBI observations of M87: event-horizon-scale structure at the enhanced very-high-energy $\\rm \\gamma$-ray state in 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akiyama, Kazunori; Fish, Vincent L; Doeleman, Sheperd S; Broderick, Avery E; Dexter, Jason; Hada, Kazuhiro; Kino, Motoki; Nagai, Hiroshi; Honma, Mareki; Johnson, Michael D; Algaba, Juan C; Asada, Keiichi; Brinkerink, Christiaan; Blundell, Ray; Bower, Geoffrey C; Cappallo, Roger; Crew, Geoffrey B; Dexter, Matt; Dzib, Sergio A; Freund, Robert; Friberg, Per; Gurwell, Mark; Ho, Paul T P; Inoue, Makoto; Krichbaum, Thomas P; Loinard, Laurent; MacMahon, David; Marrone, Daniel P; Moran, James M; Nakamura, Masanori; Nagar, Neil M; Ortiz-Leon, Gisela; Plambeck, Richard; Pradel, Nicolas; Primiani, Rurik A; Rogers, Alan E E; Roy, Alan L; SooHoo, Jason; Tavares, Jonathan-Leon; Tilanus, Remo P J; Titus, Michael; Wagner, Jan; Weintroub, Jonathan; Yamaguchi, Paul; Young, Ken H; Zensus, Anton; Ziurys, Lucy M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on 230 GHz (1.3 mm) VLBI observations of M87 with the Event Horizon Telescope using antennas on Mauna Kea in Hawaii, Mt. Graham in Arizona and Cedar Flat in California. For the first time, we have acquired 230 GHz VLBI interferometric phase information on M87 through measurement of closure phase on the triangle of long baselines. Most of the measured closure phases are consistent with 0$^{\\circ}$ as expected by physically-motivated models for 230 GHz structure such as jet models and accretion disk models. The brightness temperature of the event-horizon-scale structure is $\\sim 1 \\times 10^{10}$ K derived from the compact flux density of $\\sim 1$ Jy and the angular size of $\\sim 40 $ $\\rm \\mu$as $\\sim$ 5.5 $R_{{\\rm s}}$, which is broadly consistent with the peak brightness of the radio cores at 1-86 GHz located within $\\sim 10^2$ $R_{{\\rm s}}$. Our observations occurred in the middle of an enhancement in very-high-energy (VHE) $\\rm \\gamma$-ray flux, presumably originating in the vicinity of the centr...

  17. Direct observation of the primary state of damage of ion-irradiated tungsten: I. Three-dimensional spatial distribution of vacancies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, C Y; Current, M I; Seidman, D N

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of an extensive field-ion microscope (FIM) investigation of the primary state of damage of ion-irradiated tungsten are presented. Two-pass zone-refined single crystals of tungsten were irradiated in situ, at less than or equal to 15 K, with a magnetically analyzed beam of various ions at a background pressure of (5 to 10)x10/sup -10/ torr in the absence of the imaging electric field. The value of the standard fluence was small enough (5 x 10/sup 12/cm/sup -2/) to guarantee that each depleted zone (DZ) detected was associated with a single projectile ion. After an irradiation each specimen was examined on an atom-by-atom basis employing the pulse field-evaporation technique.

  18. $?$-Deformed Statistics and Classical Fourmomentum Addition Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Daszkiewicz; J. Lukierski; M. Woronowicz

    2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider $\\kappa$-deformed relativistic symmetries described algebraically by modified Majid-Ruegg bicrossproduct basis and investigate the quantization of field oscillators for the $\\kappa$-deformed free scalar fields on $\\kappa$-Minkowski space. By modification of standard multiplication rule, we postulate the $\\kappa$-deformed algebra of bosonic creation and annihilation operators. Our algebra permits to define the n-particle states with classical addition law for the fourmomenta in a way which is not in contradiction with the nonsymmetric quantum fourmomentum coproduct. We introduce $\\kappa$-deformed Fock space generated by our $\\kappa$-deformed oscillators which satisfy the standard algebraic relations with modified $\\kappa$-multiplication rule. We show that such a $\\kappa$-deformed bosonic Fock space is endowed with the conventional bosonic symmetry properties. Finally we discuss the role of $\\kappa$-deformed algebra of oscillators in field-theoretic noncommutative framework.

  19. New additives for minimizing cement body permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talabani, S. [Western Atlas International, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Hareland, G. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Dept. of Petroleum Engineering; Islam, M.R. [Univ. of Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada). Faculty of Engineering

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental investigation was carried out with a new array of cement additives, replacing some of the currently used ones. In this study, the cement slurry pressure was monitored during the setting of the element. To obtain the optimum tightness of the cement, final contraction in the cycle is crucial for blockage of gas migration. Concentrations of the additives were obtained experimentally in this study for which the cyclic pressure behavior of the cement was optimized and the permeability reduced for the best final cement results. The parameters investigated in this study were as follows: pressure applied on the slurry with time, compressive strength, and permeability of the set cement. The major causes of the early microfractures are the incomplete cement-water reaction, low compressive strength of the set cement, and the sudden change in the hydrostatic pressure as the cement changes its phase from a liquid to a solid state. This paper reports the appropriate amounts of X-C polymer, Anchorage clay, Ironite Sponge, and synthetic rubber needed to optimize the compressive strength and eliminate both microfracture and microannulus. There are certain limits to the amount and type of synthetic rubber powder for which microfractures are eliminated. The article reports an experimental approach that can be used to eliminate gas migration through a cement design that is environmentally safe and inexpensive, using recyclable materials.

  20. An additive Hamiltonian plus Landauer's Principle yields quantum theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris Fields

    2015-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that no-signalling, a quantum of action, unitarity, detailed balance, Bell's theorem, the Hilbert-space representation of physical states and the Born rule all follow from the assumption of an additive Hamiltonian together with Landauer's principle. Common statements of the "classical limit" of quantum theory, as well as common assumptions made by "interpretations" of quantum theory, contradict additivity, Landauer's principle, or both.

  1. The Additional Interpolators Method for Variational Analysis in Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainer W. Schiel

    2015-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, I describe the Additional Interpolators Method, a new technique for variational analysis in lattice QCD. It is shown to be an excellent method which uses additional interpolators to remove backward in time running states that would otherwise contaminate the signal. The proof of principle, which also makes use of the Time-Shift Trick (Generalized Pencil-of-Functions method), will be delivered at an example on a $64^4$ lattice close to the physical pion mass.

  2. Partial Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Marlow

    2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We attempt to dissolve the measurement problem using an anthropic principle which allows us to invoke rational observers. We argue that the key feature of such observers is that they are rational (we need not care whether they are `classical' or `macroscopic' for example) and thus, since quantum theory can be expressed as a rational theory of probabilistic inference, the measurement problem is not a problem.

  3. Faculty Position in Mechanical Engineering Additive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty Position in Mechanical Engineering Additive Manufacturing University of Kansas of additive manufacturing. Exceptional candidates with outstanding qualifications could be considered using additive manufacturing in applications such as, but not limited to the net shape manufacture of

  4. ESTIMATES OF ADDITIONAL ACHIEVABLE ENERGY SAVINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ESTIMATES OF ADDITIONAL ACHIEVABLE ENERGY SAVINGS Supplement to California Energy. There are also likely additional savings from initiatives that are neither finalized nor funded are referred to as additional achievable energy efficiency (AAEE) impacts. Staff developed five AAEE

  5. Aircraft Observations of Aerosol Composition and Ageing in New England and Mid-Atlantic States during the Summer 2002 New England Air Quality Study Field Campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Daum, Peter H.; Lee, Y.- N.; Senum, Gunar; Springston, Stephen R.; Wang, Jian; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Hubbe, John M.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Brechtel, Fred J.; Jayne, J. T.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2007-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerosol chemical composition, size distributions, and optical properties were measured during 17 aircraft flights in New England and Middle Atlantic States as part of the summer 2002 NEAQS field campaign. An Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) was operated with a measurement cycle of 30 s, about an order of magnitude faster than used for ground-based measurements. Noise levels within a single measurement period were sub ?g m-3. Volume data derived from the AMS were compared with volume measurements from a PCASP optical particle detector and an Scanning Mobility Particle Spectrometer (SMPS); calculated light scattering was compared with measured values from an integrating nephelometer. The median ratio for AMS/SMPS volume was 1.25; the median ratio for AMS/nephelometer scattering was 1.18. Size spectra were compared for subsets of samples with different effective diameters (Deff). There is good agreement between the AMS, PCASP, and SMPS spectra for larger values of Deff but an unexplained over-prediction in the AMS for small values. A dependence of the AMS collection efficiency on aerosol acidity was quantified by a comparison between AMS and PCASP volumes in 2 high sulfate plumes. Average aerosol concentrations were 11 ?g m-3. The organic content was high in comparison to monitoring data from the IMPROVE network, varying from 70% in clean air to 40% in high concentration sulfate plumes. The ratio of organic aerosol to CO and light absorption acting were examined as a function of photochemical age. CO is a conservative tracer for urban emissions and light absorption is a surrogate for black carbon which is also conservative. Comparisons were made to surface ratios measured under conditions where there is little secondary organic aerosol (SOA). An increase in these ratios relative to surface values indicates that 70 - 80% of the organic aerosol in polluted air masses was secondary. Most of this SOA is rapidly formed within a few hours. At longer time scales there is a slow accumulation of organic aerosol and a slow increase in light absorption per unit mass of black carbon. Our results demonstrate the utility of the AMS as a rapid response instrument suitable for aircraft operations.

  6. Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy SHARE Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy As the nation's premier research laboratory, ORNL is one of the world's most capable resources...

  7. Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Events Additive Manufacturing Workshop Poster Abstract Submission - deadline July 10, 2015 Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Materials using in situ sensors,...

  8. Development of Advanced Electrolytes and Electrolyte Additives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Component R&D within the ABR Program, 2009 thru 2013 Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives Advanced Electrolyte Additives for PHEVEV Lithium-ion Battery...

  9. Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal & overcharge abuse Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal & overcharge abuse 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program...

  10. Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

  11. The Dynamics of Bistable Switching Behavior in Limit Cycle Systems with Additive Noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael A. Schwemmer; Jay M. Newby

    2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Additive noise is known to produce counter-intuitive behaviors in nonlinear dynamical systems. Previously, it was shown that systems with a deterministic limit cycle can display bistable switching between metastable states in the presence of asymmetric additive white noise. Here, we systematically analyze the dynamics of this bistable behavior and show how the vector field away from the limit cycle influences the rate and directionality of the bistable switching. Using stochastic phase reduction methods, we identify mechanisms underlying different rates of switching and predict when the system will rotate in the opposite direction of the deterministic limit cycle. Thus, this work presents an alternative mechanism for generating a range of bistable switch-like behaviors that have been observed in a number of physical systems.

  12. Zeroth Law compatibility of non-additive thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. S. Biró; P. Ván

    2011-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-extensive thermodynamics was criticized among others by stating that the Zeroth Law cannot be satisfied with non-additive composition rules. In this paper we determine the general functional form of those non-additive composition rules which are compatible with the Zeroth Law of thermodynamics. We find that this general form is additive for the formal logarithms of the original quantities and the familiar relations of thermodynamics apply to these. Our result offers a possible solution to the longstanding problem about equilibrium between extensive and non-extensive systems or systems with different non-extensivity parameters.

  13. REVIEW OF THE NEGOTIATION OF THE MODEL PROTOCOL ADDITIONAL TO THE AGREEMENT(S) BETWEEN STATE(S) AND THE INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY FOR THE APPLICATION OF SAFEGUARDS, INFCIRC/540 (Corrected) VOLUME III/III, IAEA COMMITTEE 24, DEVELOPMENT OF INFCIRC/540, ARTICLE-BY-ARTICLE REVIEW (1996-1997).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenthal, M.D.; Houck, F.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this section of the report, the development of INFCIRC/540 is traced by a compilation of citations from the IAEA documents presented to the Board of Governors and the records of discussions in the Board that took place prior to the establishment of Committee 24 as well as the documents and discussions of that committee. The evolution of the text is presented separately for each article or, for the more complex articles, for each paragraph or group of paragraphs of the article. This section covers all articles, including those involving no issues. Background, issues, interpretations and conclusions, which were addressed in Volumes I, II, and III are not repeated here. The comments by states that are included are generally limited to objections and suggested changes. Requests for clarification or elaboration have been omitted, although it is recognized that such comments were sometimes veiled objections.

  14. Optimization of the transmission of observable expectation values and observable statistics in Continuous Variable Teleportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Albano Farias; J. Stephany

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the statistics of observables in continuous variable quantum teleportation in the formalism of the characteristic function. We derive expressions for average values of output state observables in particular cumulants which are additive in terms of the input state and the resource of teleportation. Working with Squeezed Bell-like states, which may be optimized in a free parameter for better teleportation performance we discuss the relation between resources optimal for fidelity and for different observable averages. We obtain the values of the free parameter which optimize the central momenta and cumulants up to fourth order. For the cumulants the distortion between in and out states due to teleportation depends only on the resource. We obtain optimal parameters for the second and fourth order cumulants which do not depend on the squeezing of the resource. The second order central momenta which is equal to the second order cumulants and the photon number average are optimized by the same resource. We show that the optimal fidelity resource, found in reference (Phys. Rev. A {\\bf 76}, 022301 (2007)) to depend also on the characteristics of input, tends for high squeezing to the resource which optimizes the second order momenta. A similar behavior is obtained for the resource which optimizes the photon statistics which is treated here using the sum of the squared differences in photon probabilities of input and output states as the distortion measure. This is interpreted to mean that the distortions associated to second order momenta dominates the behavior of the output state for large squeezing of the resource. Optimal fidelity and optimal photon statistics resources are compared and is shown that for mixtures of Fock states they are equivalent.

  15. Out of Bounds Additive Manufacturing Christopher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    #12;Out of Bounds Additive Manufacturing Christopher Holshouser, Clint Newell, and Sid Palas, Tenn. The Big Area Additive Manufacturing system has the potential to manufacture parts completely) are working on an additive manufacturing (AM) system (Big Area Additive Manufacturing, or BAAM) capable

  16. ICME & MGI Big Area Additive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ICME & MGI · Big Area Additive Manufacturing · Neutron Characterization for AM · Materials problems in additive manu- facturing (AM). Additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3-D) printing of the world's most advanced neu- tron facilities, the HFIR and SNS, to characterize additive manufactured

  17. For additional information, contact: Department of Agricultural Economics & Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    For additional information, contact: Department of Agricultural Economics & Economics Montana State.montana.edu/econ agecon@montana.edu 1 2 AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS & ECONOMICS KELLY GORHAM 1 Austin Owens traveled to Greece as mentors for students in Economics 101 4 Chris Stoddard was the recipient of a MSU Cox Family Faculty

  18. Additive Manufacturing: Implications on Research and Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Additive Manufacturing: Implications on Research and Manufacturing With recent developments, etc.), additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to become a transformative technology in innovation-based manufacturing. Agencies such as the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation

  19. Webinar: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled "Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells," originally presented on February 11, 2014.

  20. Towards Mobile Microrobot Swarms for Additive Micromanufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zavlanos, Michael

    of independently controlled microrobots in advanced, additive manufacturing applications. Keywords Mobile Microrobotics, Multi-robot Control, Additive Manufacturing 1. Introduction Flexible manufacturing capabilities, and additive manufacturing has proven to be a disruptive technology at the small- to medium-scale. Many

  1. BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES BUILDING ADDITION March 30, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES BUILDING ADDITION March 30, 2012 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: The current concept is for a 33,000 sf addition ­ with approximately 22,000 sf built above ground with an 11,000 sf basement. The addition is proposed to be constructed on the east side of the existing building. The auditorium

  2. EFFECTIVE STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING WITH ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    will be presented for components that can be processed by additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing. The origin structures. KEYWORDS : structural health monitoring methodology, 3D printing, additive manufacturing, fatigue, intelligent structure INTRODUCTION Additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D Printing or Rapid

  3. Health studies indicate MTBE is safe gasoline additive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, E.V.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Implementation of the oxygenated fuels program by EPA in 39 metropolitan areas, including Fairbanks and Anchorage, Alaska, in the winter of 1992, encountered some unexpected difficulties. Complaints of headaches, dizziness, nausea, and irritated eyes started in Fairbanks, jumped to Anchorage, and popped up in various locations in the lower 48 states. The suspected culprit behind these complaints was the main additive for oxygenation of gasoline is methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). A test program, hastily organized in response to these complaints, has indicated that MTBE is a safe gasoline additive. However, official certification of the safety of MTBE is still awaited.

  4. Design of coherent quantum observers for linear quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shanon L. Vuglar; Hadis Amini

    2015-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum versions of control problems are often more difficult than their classical counterparts because of the additional constraints imposed by quantum dynamics. For example, the quantum LQG and quantum H infinity optimal control problems remain open. To make further progress, new, systematic and tractable methods need to be developed. This paper gives three algorithms for designing coherent observers, i.e., quantum systems that are connected to a quantum plant and their outputs provide information about the internal state of the plant. Importantly, coherent observers avoid measurements of the plant outputs. We compare our coherent observers with a classical (measurement-based) observer by way of an example involving an optical cavity with thermal and vacuum noises as inputs.

  5. Origin State Destination State

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data Origin State Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Alabama...

  6. Origin State Destination State

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data Origin State Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Alabama...

  7. Generating Unit Additions in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15 Feb-15 Mar-15 Apr-15Nov-14Power

  8. Generating Unit Additions in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15 Feb-15 Mar-15 Apr-15Nov-14PowerRetirement

  9. Additional Staff Appointments Announced by the Administrator...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Staff Appointments Announced by the Administrator of NNSA Press Release May 31, 2001 Additional Staff Appointments Announced by the Administrator of NNSA (PDF - 0.03Mb)...

  10. Redox Shuttle Additives | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    available for licensing: A series of novel redox shuttle additives for lithium-ion batteries Seven-technology suite helps reduce battery costs Provides overcharge...

  11. Additive Manufacturing Opportunities for Transportation | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Additive Manufacturing Opportunities for Transportation Mar 13 2015 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Lonnie Love, Manufacturing Systems Research Group Transportation Science Seminar Series...

  12. Additive Relation and Algebraic System of Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziqian Wu

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Additive relations are defined over additive monoids and additive operation is introduced over these new relations then we build algebraic system of equations. We can generate profuse equations by additive relations of two variables. To give an equation with several known parameters is to give an additive relation taking these known parameters as its variables or value and the solution of the equation is just the reverse of this relation which always exists. We show a core result in this paper that any additive relation of many variables and their inverse can be expressed in the form of the superposition of additive relations of one variable in an algebraic system of equations if the system satisfies some conditions. This result means that there is always a formula solution expressed in the superposition of additive relations of one variable for any equation in this system. We get algebraic equations if elements of the additive monoid are numbers and get operator equations if they are functions.

  13. Additional Guidance Regarding Application of Current Procedures...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Additional Guidance Regarding Application of Current Procedures for Testing Energy Consumption of Clothes Washers with Warm Rinse Cycles, Issued: June 30, 2010. Draft of DOE...

  14. On Hastings' counterexamples to the minimum output entropy additivity conjecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernando G. S. L. Brandao; Michal Horodecki

    2009-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Hastings recently reported a randomized construction of channels violating the minimum output entropy additivity conjecture. Here we revisit his argument, presenting a simplified proof. In particular, we do not resort to the exact probability distribution of the Schmidt coefficients of a random bipartite pure state, as in the original proof, but rather derive the necessary large deviation bounds by a concentration of measure argument. Furthermore, we prove non-additivity for the overwhelming majority of channels consisting of a Haar random isometry followed by partial trace over the environment, for an environment dimension much bigger than the output dimension. This makes Hastings' original reasoning clearer and extends the class of channels for which additivity can be shown to be violated.

  15. Observations of the 6 Centimeter Lines of OH in Evolved (OH/IR) Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent L. Fish; Laura K. Zschaechner; Loránt O. Sjouwerman; Ylva M. Pihlström; Mark J. Claussen

    2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observational and theoretical advances have called into question traditional OH maser pumping models in evolved (OH/IR) stars. The detection of excited-state OH lines would provide additional constraints to discriminate amongst these theoretical models. In this Letter, we report on VLA observations of the 4750 MHz and 4765 MHz lines of OH toward 45 sources, mostly evolved stars. We detect 4765 MHz emission in the star forming regions Mon R2 and LDN 1084, but we do not detect excited-state emission in any evolved stars. The flux density and velocity of the 4765 MHz detection in Mon R2 suggests that a new flaring event has begun.

  16. Additive manufacturing of metallic tracks on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Additive manufacturing of metallic tracks on green ceramic/dielectrics Problem this technology (note: may require additional tooling/ set up time) · Rapid Prototyping & small scale manufacture microelectronics such as manufacture of LTCC ceramic/ Dielectric antenna and rapid PCB prototyping or repair

  17. Full Additivity of the Entanglement of Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerardo A. Paz-Silva; John H. Reina

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a general strategy that allows a more flexible method for the construction of fully additive multipartite entanglement monotones than the ones so far reported in the literature of axiomatic entanglement measures. Within this framework we give a proof of a conjecture of outstanding implications in information theory: the full additivity of the Entanglement of Formation.

  18. Extending additivity from symmetric to asymmetric channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motohisa Fukuda

    2005-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove a lemma which allows one to extend results about the additivity of the minimal output entropy from highly symmetric channels to a much larger class. A similar result holds for the maximal output $p$-norm. Examples are given showing its use in a variety of situations. In particular, we prove the additivity and the multiplicativity for the shifted depolarising channel.

  19. STATE OF THE STATES: FUEL CELLS IN AMERICA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Incentives for Renewables & Efficiency (DSIRE). It is a follow-up to the 2010 report, State of the States, particularly the State Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Database and North Carolina Solar Center's Database of State this effort. State and national leaders must work together to develop additional strategies and incentives

  20. Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Switzerland Dr. Lyle Levine - NIST Prof. Jyoti Mazumder - University of Michigan Dr. Kalman Migler - NIST Prof. Pan Michaleris - Penn State University Prof. Todd Palmer - Penn...

  1. Chemical Additive Selection in Matrix Acidizing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weidner, Jason 1981-

    2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This work proposes to survey new chemical knowledge, developed since 1984, on fluid additives used in matrix stimulation treatments of carbonate and sandstone petroleum reservoirs and describes one method of organizing this new knowledge in a...

  2. Polymerizable Additive for Passivating High Voltage Cathodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In this research project, we are studying the use of organic monomers as electrolyte additives that will oxidize and polymerize to form stable passivation films on the surface of...

  3. Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    testing Cathode: LiNi13Mn13Co13O2 Anode: MCMB Electrolyte: 1.2M LiPF6 ECEMC 37 with or without additive - Separator: Celgard 2325 Voltage for cycling:...

  4. Performance Limitations of Linear Systems over Additive White Noise Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yiqian

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control over additive white noise channels . . . . . . . 1.3Additive white noise channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Angaussian systems over additive gaussian wireles fading

  5. Composite filter aids for cleanup of additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudenko, L.I.; Sklyar, V.Y.

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article examines the properties of composite filter aids in additive cleanup using two- and three-component filter aid composites based on perlite, kieselguhr, diatomite, asbestos, and wood flour. Filtration tests were run on naphtha solutions of the additive zinc dialkyldithiophosphate. The laboratory studies indicate that composites of perlite and kieselguhr with fibrous materials (wood flour or asbestos) show great promise for the removal of solid contaminants from the zinc disalkydithiophosphate additive. The advantages of the filter aid composite based on perlite, kieselguhr, and wood flour in comparison with the two-component composites are the higher filtration rate (by 26%) and the smaller losses of additive (by a factor of 2.1) and isobutyl alcohol (by a factor of 1.6). It is demonstrated that the filtration rate with the three components is 50-60% higher than with the composite of perlite with kieselguhr. The filtration of the zinc dialkyldithiophosphate additive using the composite filter aid based on perlite, kieselguhr, and wood flour, has been adopted at the Volgograd Petroleum Refinery. Includes 2 tables.

  6. Fuel and Additive Characterization for HCCI Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aceves, S M; Flowers, D; Martinez-Frias, J; Espinosa-Loza, F; Pitz, W J; Dibble, R

    2003-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper shows a numerical evaluation of fuels and additives for HCCl combustion. First, a long list of candidate HCCl fuels is selected. For all the fuels in the list, operating conditions (compression ratio, equivalence ratio and intake temperature) are determined that result in optimum performance under typical operation for a heavy-duty engine. Fuels are also characterized by presenting Log(p)-Log(T) maps for multiple fuels under HCCl conditions. Log(p)-Log(T) maps illustrate important processes during HCCl engine operation, including compression, low temperature heat release and ignition. Log(p)-Log(T) diagrams can be used for visualizing these processes and can be used as a tool for detailed analysis of HCCl combustion. The paper also includes a ranking of many potential additives. Experiments and analyses have indicated that small amounts (a few parts per million) of secondary fuels (additives) may considerably affect HCCl combustion and may play a significant role in controlling HCCl combustion. Additives are ranked according to their capability to advance HCCl ignition. The best additives are listed and an explanation of their effect on HCCl combustion is included.

  7. Breaking Barriers in Polymer Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Lonnie J [ORNL; Duty, Chad E [ORNL; Post, Brian K [ORNL; Lind, Randall F [ORNL; Lloyd, Peter D [ORNL; Kunc, Vlastimil [ORNL; Peter, William H [ORNL; Blue, Craig A [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) enables the creation of complex structures directly from a computer-aided design (CAD). There are limitations that prevent the technology from realizing its full potential. AM has been criticized for being slow and expensive with limited build size. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a large scale AM system that improves upon each of these areas by more than an order of magnitude. The Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) system directly converts low cost pellets into a large, three-dimensional part at a rate exceeding 25 kg/h. By breaking these traditional barriers, it is possible for polymer AM to penetrate new manufacturing markets.

  8. Stabilization of polyaniline solutions through additives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.

    1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A stabilized non-conductive polyaniline solution comprising from about 1 to about 10 percent by weight polyaniline or a polyaniline derivative, from about 90 to about 99 percent by weight N-methylpyrrolidone, and from about 0.5 percent by weight to about 15 percent by weight of a solution stabilizing additive selected from the group consisting of hindered amine light stabilizers, polymeric amines, and dialkylamines, percent by weight of additive based on the total weight of polyaniline or polyaniline derivative is provided together with a method for stabilizing a polyaniline solution. 4 figs.

  9. Stabilization of polyaniline solutions through additives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wrobleski, Debra A. (Los Alamos, NM); Benicewicz, Brian C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A stabilized non-conductive polyaniline solution comprising from about 1 to bout 10 percent by weight polyaniline or a polyaniline derivative, from about 90 to about 99 percent by weight N-methylpyrrolidone, and from about 0.5 percent by weight to about 15 percent by weight of a solution stabilizing additive selected from the group consisting of hindered amine light stabilizers, polymeric amines, and dialkylamines, percent by weight of additive based on the total weight of polyaniline or polyaniline derivative is provided together with a method for stabilizing a polyaniline solution.

  10. Competing interactions in arrested states of colloidal clays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Ruzicka; L. Zulian; E. Zaccarelli; R. Angelini; M. Sztucki; A. Moussaid; G. Ruocco

    2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Using experiments, theory and simulations, we show that the arrested state observed in a colloidal clay at intermediate concentrations is stabilized by the screened Coulomb repulsion (Wigner glass). Dilution experiments allow us to distinguish this high-concentration disconnected state, which melts upon addition of water, from a low-concentration gel state, which does not melt. Theoretical modelling and simulations reproduce the measured Small Angle X-Ray Scattering static structure factors and confirm the long-range electrostatic nature of the arrested structure. These findings are attributed to the different timescales controlling the competing attractive and repulsive interactions.

  11. CONSTRUCTION ALERT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Yingfei

    CONSTRUCTION ALERT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project TO: Deans, Directors, Chairpersons panels on the roof of PBRC. DURATION OF PROJECT: September 20, 2011 HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION: 7:30 a.m. to 4 of this construction project are advised to respect all construction barricades and all posted safety/detour signs

  12. CONSTRUCTION ALERT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSTRUCTION ALERT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project TO: Deans, Directors, Chairpersons: November 28 to December 1, 2011 HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION: 6:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. ACCESSIBLE ROUTES: No accessible routes will be affected. ADVISORY: All persons in the vicinity of this construction project

  13. Internship FBI Fingerprint Procedures and Additional Screenings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    Internship FBI Fingerprint Procedures and Additional Screenings ALL INTERNS: Required by DESE/Full-Year Internship) or August 1st (Spring Internship) o Web application https to get your fingerprints taken for your internship: 4 digit Registration #2301 Cost - $44.80 Valid

  14. Modelling Additive Transport in Metal Halide Lamps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    doctor aan de Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, op gezag van de Rector Magnificus, prof.dr.ir. C.J. van-DATA LIBRARY TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITEIT EINDHOVEN Beks, Mark Louwrens Modelling Additive Transport in Metal Halide Lamps/ door Beks, M.L. - Eindhoven : Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, 2008. Proefschrift. ISBN: 978

  15. Patent Issued Additional Office Actions Received

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    Patent Issued Additional Office Actions Received 3-12 mo. Respond to Office Action Patent attorney The patent examiner provides notification of which claims in the application have been rejected or accepted determines there are multiple inventions in 1 application. Patent Application Published 6 mo. Non

  16. Titanium-Catalyzed Enantioselective Additions of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Patrick J.

    Titanium-Catalyzed Enantioselective Additions of Alkyl Groups to Aldehydes: Mechanistic Studies by zinc- or titanium- based catalysts. While the mechanism of the zinc/amino alcohol catalysts has received significant attention, the titanium-based catalysts have been less studied. This Account

  17. Total correlations as fully additive entanglement monotones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerardo A. Paz-Silva; John H. Reina

    2007-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We generalize the strategy presented in Refs. [1, 2], and propose general conditions for a measure of total correlations to be an entanglement monotone using its pure (and mixed) convex-roof extension. In so doing, we derive crucial theorems and propose a concrete candidate for a total correlations measure which is a fully additive entanglement monotone.

  18. Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Co 13 O 2 , LiNi 0.5 Mn 1.5 O 4 Anode: MCMB, LTO Electrolyte-1: 1.2M LiPF 6 ECEMC 37 with or without additive Electrolyte-2: fully or partially fluorinated...

  19. Observation of breakup transfer process for the bound states of {sup 16}O populated from {sup 12}C({sup 6}Li,d) reaction at 20 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adhikari, S.; Basu, C.; Thompson, I. J.; Sugathan, P.; Jhinghan, A.; Golda, K. S.; Babu, A.; Singh, D.; Ray, S.; Mitra, A. K. [Nuclear Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata-700064 (India); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, L-414, Livermore CA 94551 (United States); Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi 110067 (India); Physics Department, Ramkrishna Vivekananda University, Belur, Howrah (India); Nuclear Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata-700064 (India)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The deuteron angular distribution for the {sup 12}C({sup 6}Li,d){sup 16}O* has been measured at 20 MeV populating bound and unbound states of {sup 16}O. Analysis shows a dominance of breakup induced alpha transfer in comparison to a direct alpha transfer process for the bound states. The effect increases as the excitation energy of {sup 16}O decreases, maximizing at the ground state.

  20. Tailoring the flow of soft glasses by soft additives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Zaccarelli; C. Mayer; A. Asteriadi; C. N. Likos; F. Sciortino; J. Roovers; H. Iatrou; N. Hadjichristidis; P. Tartaglia; H. Löwen; D. Vlassopoulos

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the vitrification and melting of asymmetric star polymers mixtures by combining rheological measurements with mode coupling theory. We identify two types of glassy states, a {\\it single} glass, in which the small component is fluid in the glassy matrix of the big one and a {\\it double} glass, in which both components are vitrified. Addition of small star polymers leads to melting of {\\it both} glasses and the melting curve has a non-monotonic dependence on the star-star size ratio. The phenomenon opens new ways for externally steering the rheological behavior of soft matter systems.

  1. On an additional realization of supersymmetry in orthopositronium lifetime anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. M. Levin; V. I. Sokolov

    2007-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Expansion of Standard Model for the quantitative description of the orthopositronium lifetime anomalies (from QED to supersymmetric QED) allows to formulate experimental tests of supervision of additional realization of the supersymmetry in final state of the positron beta-decay of the nuclei such as Na-22, Ga-68. The expermentum crucis program is based on supervision of the orthopositronium "isotope anomaly", on the quantitative description of the "lifetime anomaly", and will allow to resolve the alternative as results of the last Michigan work (2003).

  2. Voluntary Offer Safeguards Agreement and Additional Protocol with the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order defines requirements for Department of Energy (DOE) compliance with the Agreement between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the United States, the Protocol to the Agreement, the Additional Protocol to the Agreement, and the Subsidiary Arrangements to the Agreement and Additional Protocol. Cancels DOE O 142.2. Admin Chg 1, 6-27-13.

  3. Voluntary Offer Safeguards Agreement and Additional Protocol with the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order defines requirements for Department of Energy (DOE) compliance with the Agreement between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the United States, the Protocol to the Agreement, the Additional Protocol to the Agreement, and the Subsidiary Arrangements to the Agreement and Additional Protocol. Cancels DOE O 142.2. Admin Chg 1, dated 6-27-13, cancels DOE O 142.1A. Certified 12-3-14.

  4. Spin as an additional tool for QGP investigations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Karachuk; S. S. Shimanskiy

    2005-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The nearest two years on experiment STAR the upgrade is planned, which will make it possible to identify particles up to momentum $\\sim$ 3 GeV/c. This will open possibility to carry out new and more detailed researches of properties of a nuclear matter formed in nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC. In this work we offer to carry out of the polarization studies, which can give important additional information about the process of forming the new state of nuclear matter, and also about properties of the formed state. A unique probe of information about all stages of formation and evolution of nuclear matter are dileptons, due to their electromagnetic interaction with the nuclear matter. In this work we pay main attention to the examination of polarization characteristics of dileptons.

  5. MTBE demand as a oxygenated fuel additive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MTBE markets are in the state of flux. In the U.S. the demand has reached a plateau while in other parts of the world, it is increasing. The various factors why MTBE is experiencing a global shift will be examined and future volumes projected.

  6. CONSTRUCTION ALERT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Yingfei

    CONSTRUCTION ALERT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project TO: Deans, Directors, Chairpersons to August 19, 2011 HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION: 4:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. on August 17 and 18 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p of this construction project are advised to respect all construction barricades and all posted safety/detour signs

  7. Energetic additive manufacturing process with feed wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harwell, Lane D. (Albuquerque, NM); Griffith, Michelle L. (Albuquerque, NM); Greene, Donald L. (Corrales, NM); Pressly, Gary A. (Sandia Park, NM)

    2000-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for additive manufacture by energetic wire deposition is described. A source wire is fed into a energy beam generated melt-pool on a growth surface as the melt-pool moves over the growth surface. This process enables the rapid prototyping and manufacture of fully dense, near-net shape components, as well as cladding and welding processes. Alloys, graded materials, and other inhomogeneous materials can be grown using this process.

  8. Chemical Additive Selection in Matrix Acidizing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weidner, Jason 1981-

    2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    critical detail of weak acid chemistry. One concern when using any acid in oilfield operations is the corrosion of well tubulars. Thus operators often choose to pump corrosion inhibitor, a chemical additive electrostatically attracted... to the negative charge of the well casing or production tubing, to decrease the rate at which the acid accesses well tubular surfaces (Crowe and Minor 1985). A typical working concentration of corrosion inhibitor is 1-2 wt% of injected acid (Smith et al. 1978...

  9. Additive Manufacturing in China: Aviation and Aerospace Applications (Part 2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis May 2013 Additive Manufacturing in China: Aviationan overview of China’s additive manufacturing industry wasmilitary achievements in additive manufacturing. 2 Initial

  10. Redox shuttle additives for overcharge protection in lithium batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Thomas J.; Ross Jr., P.N.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No. 5,763,119. “Redox Shuttle Additives for Overchargeprotection, electrolytes, additives, redox shuttleREDOX SHUTTLE ADDITIVES FOR OVERCHARGE PROTECTION IN LITHIUM

  11. Additive Manufacturing in China: Aviation and Aerospace Applications (Part 2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bulletin Analysis May 2013 Additive Manufacturing in China:an overview of China’s additive manufacturing industry wasmilitary achievements in additive manufacturing. 2 Initial

  12. Radio Observations of Supernova Remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Reich

    2002-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Supernovae release an enormous amount of energy into the interstellar medium. Their remnants can observationally be traced up to several ten-thousand years. So far more than 230 Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs) have been identified in the radio range. Detailed studies of the different types of SNRs give insight into the interaction of the blast wave with the interstellar medium. Shock accelerated particles are observed, but also neutron stars left from the supernova explosion make their contribution. X-ray observations in conjunction with radio data constrain models of supernova evolution. A brief review of the origin and evolution of SNRs is given, which are compared with supernova statistics and observational limitations. In addition the morphology and characteristics of the different types of SNRs are described, including some recent results and illustrated by SNRs images mostly obtained with the Effelsberg 100-m telescope.

  13. Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP Related LinksATHENA AccountManagement |ARQOfficeNationalAdditive

  14. Additive Manufacturing: Going Mainstream | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is alwaysISO 50001 Energy26.1U.S.-BrazilAdditive Manufacturing: Going

  15. S. 2375: a bill to disapprove of certain deferrals of Strategic Petroleum Reserve budget authority, to authorize additional appropriations with respect to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, and to increase oil import fees. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, April 28, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this bill is to disapprove of certain deferrals of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) budget authority, to authorize additional appropriations to the SPR, and to increase oil import fees. The bill authorizes $1 billion for fiscal years 1987, 88, and 89 for crude oil acquisitions for the SPR and $163 million for storage and related facility construction during 1987. It also instructs the Energy Secretary to cease production from the Naval Petroleum Reserve at Elk Hills for six months to allow the reservoir depletion to stabilize.

  16. Quintom Cosmology: Theoretical implications and observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Fu Cai; Emmanuel N. Saridakis; Mohammad R. Setare; Jun-Qing Xia

    2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the paradigm of quintom cosmology. This scenario is motivated by the observational indications that the equation of state of dark energy across the cosmological constant boundary is mildly favored, although the data are still far from being conclusive. As a theoretical setup we introduce a no-go theorem existing in quintom cosmology, and based on it we discuss the conditions for the equation of state of dark energy realizing the quintom scenario. The simplest quintom model can be achieved by introducing two scalar fields with one being quintessence and the other phantom. Based on the double-field quintom model we perform a detailed analysis of dark energy perturbations and we discuss their effects on current observations. This type of scenarios usually suffer from a manifest problem due to the existence of a ghost degree of freedom, and thus we review various alternative realizations of the quintom paradigm. The developments in particle physics and string theory provide potential clues indicating that a quintom scenario may be obtained from scalar systems with higher derivative terms, as well as from non-scalar systems. Additionally, we construct a quintom realization in the framework of braneworld cosmology, where the cosmic acceleration and the phantom divide crossing result from the combined effects of the field evolution on the brane and the competition between four and five dimensional gravity. Finally, we study the outsets and fates of a universe in quintom cosmology. In a scenario with null energy condition violation one may obtain a bouncing solution at early times and therefore avoid the Big Bang singularity. Furthermore, if this occurs periodically, we obtain a realization of an oscillating universe. Lastly, we comment on several open issues in quintom cosmology and their connection to future investigations.

  17. Secondary Pollutants from Ozone Reaction with Ventilation Filters and Degradation of Filter Media Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Destaillats, Hugo; Chen, Wenhao; Apte, Michael; Li, Nuan; Spears, Michael; Almosni, Jérémie; Brunner, Gregory; Zhang, Jianshun (Jensen); Fisk, William J.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior research suggests that chemical processes taking place on the surface of particle filters employed in buildings may lead to the formation of harmful secondary byproducts. We investigated ozone reactions with fiberglass, polyester, cotton/polyester and polyolefin filter media, as well as hydrolysis of filter media additives. Studies were carried out on unused media, and on filters that were installed for 3 months in buildings at two different locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. Specimens from each filter media were exposed to {approx}150 ppbv ozone in a flow tube under a constant flow of dry or humidified air (50percent RH). Ozone breakthrough was recorded for each sample over periods of {approx}1000 min; the ozone uptake rate was calculated for an initial transient period and for steady-state conditions. While ozone uptake was observed in all cases, we did not observe significant differences in the uptake rate and capacity for the various types of filter media tested. Most experiments were performed at an airflow rate of 1.3 L/min (face velocity = 0.013 m/s), and a few tests were also run at higher rates (8 to 10 L/min). Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, two oxidation byproducts, were quantified downstream of each sample. Those aldehydes (m/z 31 and 45) and other volatile byproducts (m/z 57, 59, 61 and 101) were also detected in real-time using Proton-Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). Low-ppbv byproduct emissions were consistently higher under humidified air than under dry conditions, and were higher when the filters were loaded with particles, as compared with unused filters. No significant differences were observed when ozone reacted over various types of filter media. Fiberglass filters heavily coated with impaction oil (tackifier) showed higher formaldehyde emissions than other samples. Those emissions were particularly high in the case of used filters, and were observed even in the absence of ozone, suggesting that hydrolysis of additives, rather than ozonolysis, is the main formaldehyde source in those filters. Emission rates of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were not found to be large enough to substantially increase indoor concentrations in typical building scenarios. Nevertheless, ozone reactions on HVAC filters cannot be ignored as a source of low levels of indoor irritants.

  18. PERMITTING LEADERSHIP IN THE UNITED STATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Nemeth

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) proposal, as incorporated into NETL/DE-FC26-97FT34199, the objective of this agreement is to streamline the environmental technology permitting process site-to-site, state-to-state, and industry-to-industry to achieve remediation and waste processing faster, better and cheaper. SSEB is working with member Governors, legislators and regulators to build consensus on streamlining the permitting process for new and innovative technologies for addressing the legacy of environmental problems from 50 years of weapons research, development and production. This report reviews mechanisms whereby industry consortiums and the Department of Energy (DOE) have been working with State regulators and other officials in technology deployment decisions within the DOE complex. The historic development of relationships with State regulators is reviewed and the current nature of the relationships examined. The report contains observations from internal DOE reviews as well as recommendations from the General Accounting Office (GAO) and other external organizations. The report discusses reorganization initiatives leading up to a DOE Top-to-Bottom review of the Environmental Management (EM) Program and highlights points of consideration for maintaining effective linkages with State regulators. It notes how the proposed changes will place new demands upon the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and how NETL can leverage its resources by refocusing existing EM efforts specifically to states that have DOE facilities within their borders (host-states). Finally, the report discusses how SSEB's Permitting Leadership in the United States (PLUS) program can provide the foundation for elements of NETL's technical assistance program that are delivered to regulators and other decision- makers in host-states. As a regional compact commission, SSEB provides important direct linkages to regulators and stakeholders who need technical assistance to evaluate DOE's cleanup plans. In addition, the PLUS program has facilitated the involvement of key regulators from host-states beyond the Southern region.

  19. Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popple, Richard A., E-mail: rpopple@uabmc.edu; Brezovich, Ivan A.; Fiveash, John B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama 35294 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama 35294 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. Results: In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. Conclusions: For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify arrangements equivalent to equiangular geometries but using fewer beams. Furthermore, SBA provides the value of the objective function as the number of beams is increased, allowing the planner to select the minimal beam number that achieves the clinical goals. The method is simple to implement and could readily be incorporated into an existing optimization system.

  20. High pressure and temperature equations of state: A tool for insight into deep Earth systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armentrout, Matthew Martin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the deep Earth, interpretation of seismic observables, andof state allows interpretation of the seismic observations,

  1. Quantum Chemical Analysis of the Excited State Dynamics of Hydrated Electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. O. J. Scherer; Sighart F. Fischer

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum calculations are performed for an anion water cluster representing the first hydration shell of the solvated electron in solution. The absorption spectra from the ground state, the instant excited states and the relaxed excited states are calculated including CI-SD interactions. Analytic expressions for the nonadiabatic relaxation are presented. It is shown that the 50fs dynamics recently observed after s->p excitation is best accounted for if it is identified with the internal conversion, preceded by an adiabatic relaxation within the excited p state. In addition, transient absorptions found in the infrared are qualitatively reproduced by these calculations .

  2. Non-additive entropy: Reason and conclusions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miriam Lemanska

    2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work the non-additive entropy is examined. It appears in isolated particle systems composed of few components. Therefore, the mixing of isolated particle systems S=S1+S2 has been studied. Two cases are considered T1=T2 and T1\\leqT2, where T1,T2 are the initial temperatures of the system S1 and S2 respectively. The concept of similar systems containing interacting particles is introduced. These systems are defined by a common temperature and an identical time evolution process, i.e. the approach to the same thermodynamic equilibrium. The main results are: 1) The properties of the similar particle systems yield the non-additive entropy and free energy. The Gibbs Paradox is not a paradox. 2) The relation between the initial temperatures T1 and T2 governs the mixing process. 3) In the two cases T1=T2, T1\\leqT2 mixing of the systems S1, S2 results in a uniform union system S=S1+S2. The systems S, S1, S2 are similar one to the other. 4) The mixing process is independent of the extensive quantities (volume, particle number, energy) and of the particle type. Only the mean energy plays an important role in the mixing of the systems S1, S2. 5) Mixing in the case T1\\leqT2 is in essence a thermalization process, but mixing in the case T1=T2 is not a thermodynamic process. 6)Mixing is an irreversible process. Keywords: Entropy; Similar systems of interacting particles; Mixing of systems; Thermal equilibrium

  3. Probing the ladder of dressed states and nonclassical light generation in quantum dot-cavity QED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arka Majumdar; Michal Bajcsy; Jelena Vuckovic

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the photon induced tunneling phenomena in a photonic crystal cavity containing a strongly coupled quantum dot and describe how this tunneling can be used to generate photon states consisting mainly of a particular Fock state. Additionally, we study experimentally the photon-induced tunneling as a function of excitation laser power and frequency and show the signature of second rung of the Jaynes-Cummings Hamiltonian in the observed photon-statistics.

  4. NMR relaxometry study of plaster mortar with polymer additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jumate, E.; Manea, D. [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Faculty of Civil Engineering. 15 C Daicoviciu Str., 400020, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Faculty of Civil Engineering. 15 C Daicoviciu Str., 400020, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Moldovan, D.; Fechete, R. [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Department of Physics and Chemistry, 25 G. Baritiu Str., 400027, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Department of Physics and Chemistry, 25 G. Baritiu Str., 400027, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The cement mixed with water forms a plastic paste or slurry which stiffness in time and finally hardens into a resistant stone. The addition of sand aggregates, polymers (Walocel) and/or calcium carbonate will modify dramatically the final mortar mechanic and thermal properties. The hydration processes can be observed using the 1D NMR measurements of transverse T{sub 2} relaxation times distributions analysed by a Laplace inversion algorithm. These distributions were obtained for mortar pasta measured at 2 hours after preparation then at 3, 7 and 28 days after preparation. Multiple components are identified in the T{sub 2} distributions. These can be associated with the proton bounded chemical or physical to the mortar minerals characterized by a short T{sub 2} relaxation time and to water protons in pores with three different pore sizes as observed from SEM images. The evaporation process is faster in the first hours after preparation, while the mortar hydration (bonding of water molecules to mortar minerals) can be still observed after days or months from preparation. Finally, the mechanic resistance was correlated with the transverse T{sub 2} relaxation rates corresponding to the bound water.

  5. Capacity additions ease tight methanol supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greek, B.F. (C and EN, Houston, TX (US))

    1988-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Two menthanol plants now in operation - one in the U.S., the other in Chile - will boost global supplies of methanol more than 375 million gal annually. This large capacity addition and smaller expansions in other parts of the world will exceed demand growth during 1988 and 1989, easing the squeeze on supplies. As the result of increased supplies, methanol prices could slip slightly in the fourth quarter. They are more likely to decline next year, however. The two plants, which started up in August, are owned and operated by Tenneco Oil Co. Processing and Marketing and by Cape Horn Methanol (CHM). The Tenneco plant, located in Pasadena, Tex., was restarted after a shutdown in 1982 when prices for methanol were low. It now is running at full capacity of 125 million gal per year. The plant uses the low-pressure process technology of Lurgi, reportedly requiring for feedstock and energy between 100,000 and 125,000 cu ft of methane per gallon. Global trade in methanol smooths out the supply and demand inconsistencies. Surging methanol demand in the U.S. and in Western Europe has been met by imports from areas where methanol production is most economical - that is, where natural gas is readily available and has no other application as high in value. Canada, Chile, and Trinidad are examples of those areas.

  6. Thermochemical Kinetics for Multireference Systems: Addition Reactions of Ozone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Yan; Tishchenko, Oksana; Gour, Jeffrey R.; Li, Wei; Lutz, Jesse; Piecuch, Piotr; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions of ozone to ethyne and ethene provide extreme examples of multireference singlet-state chemistry, and they are examined here to test the applicability of several approaches to thermochemical kinetics of systems with large static correlation. Four different multireference diagnostics are applied to measure the multireference characters of the reactants, products, and transition states; all diagnostics indicate significant multireference character in the reactant portion of the potential energy surfaces. We make a more complete estimation of the effect of quadruple excitations than was previously available, and we use this with CCSDT/CBS estimation of Wheeler et al. (Wheeler, S. E.; Ess, D. H.; Houk, K. N. J. Phys. Chem. A 2008, 112, 1798.) to make new best estimates of the van der Waals association energy, the barrier height, and the reaction energy to form the cycloadduct for both reactions. Comparing with these best estimates, we present comprehensive mean unsigned errors for a variety of coupled cluster, multilevel, and density functional methods. Several computational aspects of multireference reactions are considered: (i) the applicability of multilevel theory, (ii) the convergence of coupled cluster theory for reaction barrier heights, (iii) the applicability of completely renormalized coupled cluster methods to multireference systems, (iv) the treatment by density functional theory, (v) the multireference perturbation theory for multireference reactions, and (vi) the relative accuracy of scaling-type multilevel methods as compared with additive ones. It is found that scaling-type multilevel methods do not perform better than the additive-type multilevel methods. Among the 48 tested density functionals, only M05 reproduces the best estimates within their uncertainty. Multireference perturbation theory based on the complete-active-space reference wave functions constructed using a small number of reaction-specific active orbitals gives accurate forward barrier heights; however, it significantly underestimates reaction energies.

  7. Compatibility of quantum states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poulin, David; Blume-Kohout, Robin [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS-B210, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a measure of compatibility between quantum states--the likelihood that two density matrices describe the same object. Our measure is motivated by two elementary requirements, which lead to a natural definition. We list some properties of this measure, and discuss its relation to the problem of combining two observers' states of knowledge.

  8. Developments in Assisting Countries in Implementing the IAEA Additional Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killinger, Mark H.; Hansen, Linda H.; Cain, Ronald A.; Kovacic, Don N.; Apt, Kenneth E.; VanSickle, Matthew

    2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began assisting selected non-nuclear weapon states in planning and preparing for implementation of the International Atomic Energy Agency’s Additional Protocol (AP). Since then, the AP international implementation program has contributed to the substantial progress made by Vietnam, Thailand, Iraq, and Malaysia in preparing for entry-into-force of the AP. An overall engagement plan has been developed with components designed to train government AP implementing agencies, inform policy makers, conduct outreach to industry and universities, make AP reporting software available and useful, and plan a detailed approach for implementing the declaration and complementary access provisions of the AP. DOE recently began collaborating with Indonesia, which has already entered the AP into force, requiring a second method of engagement somewhat different from that taken with countries that have not entered the AP into force. The AP international implementation program, administered by the International Nuclear Safeguards and Engagement Program, is working more closely with DOE’s International Nonproliferation Export Control Program to ensure countries are aware of and prepared to implement the export/import provisions of the AP. As the AP implementation program matures and helps move countries closer to entry-into-force or improved AP implementation, it is identifying characteristics of a country’s “end-state” that indicate that DOE assistance is no longer required. The U.S. AP Implementation Act and Senate Resolution of Ratification require the Administration to report annually to Congress on measures taken to achieve the adoption of the AP in non-nuclear weapon states. DOE’s AP international implementation program is a significant part of these measures. This paper describes recent developments to increase the scope and effectiveness of the program.

  9. MECH 502: Advanced/Additive Manufacturing Engineering COURSE DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schumacher, Russ

    MECH 502: Advanced/Additive Manufacturing Engineering COURSE DESCRIPTION In this course you product development and innovation. You will develop a rich knowledge of additive manufacturing processes enabling advanced/additive manufacturing and personal fabrication. You will have the opportunity

  10. Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats, Opportunities, and Developments (Part I)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    application of additive manufacturing in China’s aviationAnalysis May 2013 Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats,an overview of China’s additive manufacturing industry is

  11. Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats, Opportunities, and Developments (Part I)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    examine the application of additive manufacturing in China’sBulletin Analysis May 2013 Additive Manufacturing in China:an overview of China’s additive manufacturing industry is

  12. States with NEPA-like Environmental Planning Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Several states have environmental planning requirements that are similar to NEPA. These requirements are either State laws, regulations, or executive orders. Please click below for additional...

  13. Upcoming Webinar February 11: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    February 11: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells Upcoming Webinar February 11: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells February 6, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis On Tuesday, February 11,...

  14. Fuel Additive Strategies for Enhancing the Performance of Engines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Additive Strategies for Enhancing the Performance of Engines and Engine Oils Fuel Additive Strategies for Enhancing the Performance of Engines and Engine Oils 2003 DEER Conference...

  15. Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency and Durability in Engines Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency and...

  16. Obama Administration Announces Additional $13,969,700 for Local...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Additional 13,969,700 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Alaska Obama Administration Announces Additional 13,969,700 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Alaska...

  17. Controlled Experiments on the Effects of Lubricant/Additive ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on the Effects of LubricantAdditive (Low-Ash, Ashless) Characteristics on DPF Degradation Controlled Experiments on the Effects of LubricantAdditive (Low-Ash, Ashless)...

  18. Energy Department Makes Additional $4 Billion in Loan Guarantees...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Makes Additional 4 Billion in Loan Guarantees Available for Innovative Renewable Energy and Efficient Energy Projects Energy Department Makes Additional 4 Billion in Loan...

  19. Effects of Tungsten Oxide Addition on the Electrochemical Performance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tungsten Oxide Addition on the Electrochemical Performance of Nanoscale Tantalum Oxide-Based Electrocatalysts for Effects of Tungsten Oxide Addition on the Electrochemical...

  20. Surface and Structural Stabilities of Carbon Additives in High...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structural Stabilities of Carbon Additives in High Voltage Lithium Ion Batteries. Surface and Structural Stabilities of Carbon Additives in High Voltage Lithium Ion Batteries....

  1. The Role of Lubricant Additives in Fuel Efficiency and Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lubricant Additives in Fuel Efficiency and Emission Reductions: Viscosity Effects The Role of Lubricant Additives in Fuel Efficiency and Emission Reductions: Viscosity Effects...

  2. Effect of Nitrogen Additives on Flame Retardant Action of Tributyl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nitrogen Additives on Flame Retardant Action of Tributyl Phosphate: Phosphorus – Nitrogen Synergism. Effect of Nitrogen Additives on Flame Retardant Action of Tributyl...

  3. Ionic Liquids as Multifunctional Ashless Additives for Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multifunctional Ashless Additives for Engine Lubrication Ionic Liquids as Multifunctional Ashless Additives for Engine Lubrication A group of oil-miscible ionic liquids has been...

  4. Novel electrolytes and electrolyte additives for PHEV applications...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    electrolytes and electrolyte additives for PHEV applications Novel electrolytes and electrolyte additives for PHEV applications 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies...

  5. Develop and Evaluate Materials and Additives that Enhance Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse High Voltage Electrolyte for Lithium Batteries...

  6. Department of Energy Announces Two Additional Loans of Oil from...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Additional Loans of Oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Department of Energy Announces Two Additional Loans of Oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve September 2, 2005 -...

  7. Energy Department Provides Additional Emergency Fuel Loan to...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Additional Emergency Fuel Loan to Department of Defense as Part of Hurricane Sandy and Nor'easter Recovery Energy Department Provides Additional Emergency Fuel Loan to Department...

  8. Recommendation 222: Recommendations on Additional Off-site Groundwater...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2: Recommendations on Additional Off-site Groundwater Migration Studies Recommendation 222: Recommendations on Additional Off-site Groundwater Migration Studies ORSSAB recommends...

  9. Markov property and strong additivity of von Neumann entropy for graded quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajime Moriya

    2006-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    It is easy to verify the equivalence of the quantum Markov property and the strong additivity of entropy for graded quantum systems as well. However, the structure of Markov states for graded systems is different from that for tensor product systems. For three-composed graded systems there are U(1)-gauge invariant Markov states whose restriction to the pair of marginal subsystems is non-separable.

  10. The Observers' Paradox: Apparent Computational Complexity in Physical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollack, Jordan B.

    The Observers' Paradox: Apparent Computational Complexity in Physical Systems John F. Kolen Research Department of Computer and Information Sciences The Ohio State University Columbus, OH 43210 kolen

  11. STATE OF CALIFORNIA REFRIGERATED WAREHOUSE INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA REFRIGERATED WAREHOUSE INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CEC-RWH-INST (Revised 08 # BUILDING TYPE Refrigerated Warehouse PHASE OF CONSTRUCTION New Construction Addition Alteration If more By the Enforcement Agency #12;STATE OF CALIFORNIA REFRIGERATED WAREHOUSE INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CEC

  12. Quantum capacity of lossy channel with additive classical Gaussian noise : a perturbation approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao-yu Chen

    2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    For a quantum channel of additive Gaussian noise with loss, in the general case of $n$ copies input, we show that up to first order perturbation, any non-Gaussian perturbation to the product thermal state input has a less quantum information transmission rate when the input energy tend to infinitive.

  13. Department of Energy Announces Plans for Additional Comment Period on National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department has decided that, prior to issuing a report that designates any national interest electric transmission corridor, the Department will first issue any designation that it is considering in draft form, so as to allow additional opportunities for review and comment by affected States, regional entities, and the general public.

  14. Observations of the Icy Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boogert, Adwin; Whittet, Douglas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Freeze-out of the gas phase elements onto cold grains in dense interstellar and circumstellar media builds up ice mantles consisting of molecules that are mostly formed in situ (H2O, NH3, CO2, CO, CH3OH, and more). This review summarizes the detected infrared spectroscopic ice features and compares the abundances across Galactic, extragalactic, and solar system environments. A tremendous amount of information is contained in the ice band profiles. Laboratory experiments play a critical role in the analysis of the observations. Strong evidence is found for distinct ice formation stages, separated by CO freeze out at high densities. The ice bands have proven to be excellent probes of the thermal history of their environment. The evidence for the long-held idea that processing of ices by energetic photons and cosmic rays produces complex molecules is weak. Recent state of the art observations show promise for much progress in this area with planned infrared facilities.

  15. Observation of an Antimatter Hypernucleus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear collisions recreate conditions in the universe microseconds after the Big Bang. Only a very small fraction of the emitted fragments are light nuclei, but these states are of fundamental interest. We report the observation of antihypertritons - composed of an antiproton, antineutron, and antilambda hyperon - produced by colliding gold nuclei at high energy. Our analysis yields 70 {+-} 17 antihypertritons ({sub {bar {Lambda}}}{sup 3}{bar H}) and 157 {+-} 30 hypertritons ({sub {Lambda}}{sup 3}H). The measured yields of {sub {Lambda}}{sup 3}H ({sub {bar {Lambda}}}{sup 3}{bar H}) and {sup 3}He ({sup 3}{ovr He}) are similar, suggesting an equilibrium in coordinate and momentum space populations of up, down, and strange quarks and antiquarks, unlike the pattern observed at lower collision energies. The production and properties of antinuclei, and nuclei containing strange quarks, have implications spanning nuclear/particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology.

  16. The PennsylvaniaStateUniversity HUB-RobesonAddition and Renovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Install Bookstore Lights · Prime Paint in Bookstore · Bookstore Café Piping & Hot Water Heater · HangGLevel StairBuild-out forATMs #12;© Gilbane Building Co., Inc. BookstoreCaféPiping&DomesticWater Heater #12., Inc. EastExteriorConcreteStair #12;© Gilbane Building Co., Inc. HotWaterPipingUnderMonumental Stair

  17. The Effect of Zn Addition on the Oxidation State of Cobalt in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    effect of Zn promotion on the activity and selectivity of CoZrO2 catalysts for ethanol steam reforming was investigated. The catalysts were synthesized by incipient wetness...

  18. The PennsylvaniaState University HUB-RobesonAddition and Renovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Building Co., Inc. #12;Work In Progress · Pour Concrete Tie-in at Green Roof · Pour Electrical Room;© Gilbane Building Co., Inc. BookstoreGreenRoofSlabInfills #12;© Gilbane Building Co., Inc. ConcreteWorkatthe BookstoreGreenRoof #12;© Gilbane Building Co., Inc. RetainingWallinCourtyard #12;© Gilbane Building Co., Inc

  19. The PennsylvaniaStateUniversity HUB-RobesonAddition and Renovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Waterproof Green Roof · Sealing B4 Level Concrete © Gilbane Building Co., Inc. #12;© Gilbane Building Co. BookstoreGreenRoof Cleaning #12;© Gilbane Building Co., Inc. Level1ConcretePourPrep #12;© Gilbane Building Building Co., Inc. August8,2014 #12;Work In Progress · Painting in Food Service · Hanging Light Fixtures

  20. The PennsylvaniaStateUniversity HUB-RobesonAddition and Renovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glass in Bookstore Curtain Wall Frames · Millwork in Food Service · Hang Wood Ceiling in Food ServiceServiceWood Ceiling #12;© Gilbane Building Co., Inc. ElectricalRoom #12;© Gilbane Building Co., Inc. BookstoreCurtainWall Curtain Wall · Lay Brick on East Façade · Barnes & Noble Cafe Rough-In · B2 Level Sprinkler Installation

  1. The PennsylvaniaStateUniversity HUB-RobesonAddition and Renovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roof Curtain Wall · Install Skylight Glass and Metal Panels · Install Storefront at Tech Lounge · Lay Building Co., Inc. EastWallBrick #12;Planned Work © Gilbane Building Co., Inc. · Install Skylight Glass

  2. The PennsylvaniaStateUniversity HUB-RobesonAddition and Renovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bookstore Duct Work · Install Green Roof Curtain Wall · Install Skylight Framing · Lay Brick on East Façade Co., Inc. EastEntryConcretePour #12;© Gilbane Building Co., Inc. GreenRoof CurtainWall #12;© Gilbane and Stair · Acoustical Decking · Install Mechanical Control Valves · Install Green Roof Curtain Wall

  3. The PennsylvaniaStateUniversity HUB-RobesonAddition and Renovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Insulate Bookstore Duct Work · Waterproof Bookstore Green Roof · Install Green Roof Curtain Wall · Lay. GreenRoof CurtainWall #12;© Gilbane Building Co., Inc. SkylightFraming #12;© Gilbane Building Co., Inc Bookstore Duct Work · Install Green Roof Curtain Wall · Lay Brick on East Façade · Barnes & Noble Cafe Rough

  4. The PennsylvaniaStateUniversity HUB-RobesonAddition and Renovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green Roof Curtain Wall Glass · Lay Brick on East Façade and Parapet · Barnes & Noble Cafe Rough · Insulate Bookstore Duct Work · Install Green Roof Curtain Wall · Lay Brick on East Façade and Parapet Building Co., Inc. GreenRoof CurtainWall #12;© Gilbane Building Co., Inc. GreenRoof CurtainWall #12

  5. Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc Smart Grid Project Entergy Services Inc Smart Grid Project New Orleans Louisiana ISO New England Incorporated Smart Grid Project ISO New England Incorporated Smart Grid...

  6. Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroupPerfectenergyInformationProject Management DevelopmentProject NoMays

  7. Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroupPerfectenergyInformationProject Management DevelopmentProject

  8. Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroupPerfectenergyInformationProject Management DevelopmentProjectSmart

  9. Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroupPerfectenergyInformationProject Management

  10. Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroupPerfectenergyInformationProject ManagementTexas Columbus Southern

  11. Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroupPerfectenergyInformationProject ManagementTexas Columbus

  12. Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroupPerfectenergyInformationProject ManagementTexas ColumbusALLETE Inc d

  13. Technical Options for Processing Additional Light Tight Oil Volumes within the United States

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota" ,"FullWestQuantityReporting Entities,

  14. Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:Precourt Institute for EnergyWister|ProductionProfitCatalystReadyHQ

  15. Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:Precourt Institute for

  16. The Compactification Problems of Additional Dimensions in Multidimensional Cosmological Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamerlan Saidov

    2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Multidimensionality of our Universe is one of the most intriguing assumption in modern physics. It follows naturally from theories unifying different fundamental interactions with gravity, e.g. M/string theory. The idea has received a great deal of renewed attention over the last few years. However, it also brings a row of additional questions. According to observations the internal space should be static or nearly static at least from the time of primordial nucleosynthesis, otherwise the fundamental physical constants would vary. This means that at the present evolutionary stage of the Universe there are two possibilities: slow variation or compactification of internal space scale parameters. In many recent studies the problem of extra dimensions stabilization was studied for so-called ADD. Under these approaches a massive scalar fields (gravitons or radions) of external space-time can be presented as conformal excitations. In above mentioned works it was assumed that multidimensional action to be linear with respect to curvature. Although as follows from string theory, the gravity action needs to be extended to nonlinear one. In order to investigate effects of nonlinearity, in this Thesis a multidimensional Lagrangian will be studied, having the form L = f(R), where f(R) is an arbitrary smooth function of the scalar curvature.

  17. Faraday Rotation Observations of Magnetic Fields in galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tracy E. Clarke

    2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of magnetic fields in the intracluster medium in clusters of galaxies has been revealed through several different observational techniques. These fields may be dynamically important in clusters as they will provide additional pressure support to the intracluster medium as well as inhibit transport mechanisms such as thermal conduction. Here, we review the current observational state of Faraday rotation measure studies of the cluster fields. The fields are generally found to be a few to 10 microG in non-cooling core clusters and ordered on scales of 10-20 kpc. Studies of sources at large impact parameters show that the magnetic fields extend from cluster cores to radii of at least 500 kpc. In central regions of cooling core systems the field strengths are often somewhat higher (10-40 microG) and appear to be ordered on smaller scales of a few to 10 kpc. We also review some of the recent work on interpreting Faraday rotation measure observations through theory and numerical simulations. These techniques allow us to build up a much more detailed view of the strength and topology of the fields.

  18. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  19. Hot Pot Field Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  20. Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats, Opportunities, and Developments (Part I)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wang Huaming Laser additive manufacturing (LAM) Huanglaser metal deposition (LMD), a type of additive manufacturing,Manufacturing Center) http://mat.hust.edu.cn:8080/3d/ Wuhan Yu Shengshi Selective laser

  1. ORNL/TM-2013/108 Beyond Guaranteed Savings: Additional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    ORNL/TM-2013/108 Beyond Guaranteed Savings: Additional Cost Savings Associated With ESPC Projects BEYOND GUARANTEED SAVINGS: ADDITIONAL COST SAVINGS ASSOCIATED WITH ESPC PROJECTS John Shonder Date ......................................................................................................................... 3 ESPC Cost Model

  2. Effects of additives on the stability of electrolytes for all...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Effects of additives on the stability of electrolytes for all-vanadium redox flow batteries. Effects of additives on the stability of electrolytes for all-vanadium redox flow...

  3. additional reserve recovery: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Additive Loss Reserving for Dependent Lines of Business By Klaus D. Schmidt Lehrstuhl f models for loss reserving and study their impact on extensions of the additive method and...

  4. Managing Milk Composition: Feed Additives and Production Enhancers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokes, Sandra R.; Jordan, Ellen R.; Looper, Mike; Waldner, Dan

    2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Feed additives play an essential role in enhancing production and yield of milk and milk components. Producers should, however, evaluate the cost-to-benefit ratio of each feed additive in their management systems. This publication explains how...

  5. Multi component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency and Durability in Engines ITP Nanomanufacturing:...

  6. Magellan additional information | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Miscellaneous ASCR Recovery Act Projects Magellan additional information Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights...

  7. MANUFACTURABILITY ANALYSIS TO COMBINE ADDITIVE AND SUBTRACTIVE PROCESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    MANUFACTURABILITY ANALYSIS TO COMBINE ADDITIVE AND SUBTRACTIVE PROCESSES Authors: Olivier Kerbrat of the tool may advantageously be machined or manufactured by an additive process. Originality/value: Nowadays is proposed to combine additive and subtractive processes, for tooling design and manufacturing

  8. LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES WITH ADDITION OF ETHANOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES WITH ADDITION OF ETHANOL P. Dirrenberger1 , P.A. Glaude*1 WITH ADDITION OF ETHANOL P. Dirrenberger1 , P.A. Glaude*1 , R. Bounaceur1 , H. Le Gall1 , A. Pires da Cruz2 , A. The influence of ethanol as an oxygenated additive has been investigated for these two fuels and has been found

  9. A Search for Additional Planets in Five of the Exoplanetary Systems Studied by the Nasa Epoxi Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballard, Sarah

    We present time series photometry and constraints on additional planets in five of the exoplanetary systems studied by the EPOCh (Extrasolar Planet Observation and Characterization) component of the NASA EPOXI mission: ...

  10. Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jefferson, A

    2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

  11. If physics is an information science, what is an observer?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris Fields

    2012-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Interpretations of quantum theory have traditionally assumed a "Galilean" observer, a bare "point of view" implemented physically by a quantum system. This paper investigates the consequences of replacing such an informationally-impoverished observer with an observer that satisfies the requirements of classical automata theory, i.e. an observer that encodes sufficient prior information to identify the system being observed and recognize its acceptable states. It shows that with reasonable assumptions about the physical dynamics of information channels, the observations recorded by such an observer will display the typical characteristics predicted by quantum theory, without requiring any specific assumptions about the observer's physical implementation.

  12. State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA): State Tax Incentives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Doris, E.

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a policy tool, state tax incentives can be structured to help states meet clean energy goals. Policymakers often use state tax incentives in concert with state and federal policies to support renewable energy deployment or reduce market barriers. This analysis used case studies of four states to assess the contributions of state tax incentives to the development of renewable energy markets. State tax incentives that are appropriately paired with complementary state and federal policies generally provide viable mechanisms to support renewable energy deployment. However, challenges to successful implementation of state tax incentives include serving project owners with limited state tax liability, assessing appropriate incentive levels, and differentiating levels of incentives for technologies with different costs. Additionally, state tax incentives may result in moderately higher federal tax burdens. These challenges notwithstanding, state tax incentives that consider certain policy design characteristics can support renewable energy markets and state clean energy goals.The scale of their impact though is directly related to the degree to which they support the renewable energy markets for targeted sectors and technologies. This report highlights important policy design considerations for policymakers using state tax incentives to meet clean energy goals.

  13. Observational learning in horses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baer, Katherine Louise

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . One group served as control subjects while the other group functioned as a treated group (observers). The observers were allowed to watch a correctly performed discrimination task prior to testing of a learning response using the same task.... Discrimination testing was conducted on all horses daily for 14 days with criterion set at seven out of eight responses correct with the last five consecutively correct. The maximum number of trials performed without reaching set criterion was limited...

  14. United States

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    - I United States Department of Energy D lSCk Al M E R "This book was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United...

  15. Additivity and multiplicativity properties of some Gaussian channels for Gaussian inputs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tohya Hiroshima

    2006-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove multiplicativity of maximal output $p$ norm of classical noise channels and thermal noise channels of arbitrary modes for all $p>1$ under the assumption that the input signal states are Gaussian states. As a direct consequence, we also show the additivity of the minimal output entropy and that of the energy-constrained Holevo capacity for those Gaussian channels under Gaussian inputs. To the best of our knowledge, newly discovered majorization relation on symplectic eigenvalues, which is also of independent interest, plays a central role in the proof.

  16. Robustness of chimera states for coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iryna Omelchenko; Astero Provata; Johanne Hizanidis; Eckehard Schoell; Philipp Hoevel

    2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Chimera states are complex spatio-temporal patterns that consist of coexisting domains of spatially coherent and incoherent dynamics. This counterintuitive phenomenon was first observed in systems of identical oscillators with symmetric coupling topology. Can one overcome these limitations? To address this question, we discuss the robustness of chimera states in networks of FitzHugh-Nagumo oscillators. Considering networks of inhomogeneous elements with regular coupling topology, and networks of identical elements with irregular coupling topologies, we demonstrate that chimera states are robust with respect to these perturbations, and analyze their properties as the inhomogeneities increase. We find that modifications of coupling topologies cause qualitative changes of chimera states: additional random links induce a shift of the stability regions in the system parameter plane, gaps in the connectivity matrix result in a change of the multiplicity of incoherent regions of the chimera state, and hierarchical geometry in the connectivity matrix induces nested coherent and incoherent regions.

  17. www.goviks.com For additional information about

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Idaho State, Montana, Sacramento State, Montana State and Northern Colorado. Viking Home Events take-725-8585 Cheerleading & Dance (M/W), Darlene Brady, 503-725-5604 Scholarships Scholarships are determined by each coach quarterly fee. Personal Fitness Students may use the Stott Center exercise facilities including a weight

  18. OCEANOGRAPHIC OBSERVATIONS, 1957, EAST COAST OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ttie Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Supported by U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Contract no. 14

  19. Stochastic Search with an Observable State Variable Lauren A. Hannah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Warren B.

    is an example: a wind farm manager must pledge how much energy she will provide to a utility company an hour, the difference is lost. The objective function depends on the future wind and market price, both unknown. The last 24 hours of wind and market prices, time of day and time of year all contain information about

  20. Core Lithology State of Hawaii Scientific Observation Hole 4 Kilauea

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers| Open EnergyAl., 1987)

  1. Core Lithology State of Hawail Scientific Observation Hole 2 Kilauea

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers| Open EnergyAl., 1987)Volcano,

  2. additional thermomechanical treatment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Treatments Subsequent to Addition of the CiteSeer Summary: The development and testing of word-retrieval treatments for aphasia has generally focused on approaches that...

  3. OAR 340-120 - Additional Siting and Permitting Requirements for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Disposal Facilities Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: OAR 340-120 - Additional Siting and...

  4. Unlocking the Potential of Additive Manufacturing in the Fuel...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Manufacturing in the Fuel Cells Industry Download presentation slides from the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells" held on...

  5. ORNL, CINCINNATI partner to develop commercial large-scale additive...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory 865-574-7308 ORNL, CINCINNATI partner to develop commercial large-scale additive manufacturing system (From left) David Danielson, the Energy Department's...

  6. additive main effect: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be presented for components that can be processed by additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing. The origin structures. KEYWORDS : structural health monitoring methodology, 3D...

  7. additional effective dose: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be presented for components that can be processed by additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing. The origin structures. KEYWORDS : structural health monitoring methodology, 3D...

  8. additive effect catalyseurs: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be presented for components that can be processed by additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing. The origin structures. KEYWORDS : structural health monitoring methodology, 3D...

  9. NNSA Awards Additional Support to Accelerate the Development...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Additional Support to Accelerate the Development of Domestic Mo-99 in the U.S. without the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook...

  10. Characteristics and Effects of Lubricant Additive Chemistry and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on the Effects of LubricantAdditive (Low-Ash, Ashless) Characteristics on DPF Degradation Key Parameters Affecting DPF Performance Degradation and Impact on Lifetime Fuel...

  11. Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - The Energy Department announced today that it has conditionally authorized Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC (Freeport) to export additional volumes of...

  12. additional experimental information: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Last Name First Name Middle Initial UT EID B. Childcare Expense Information Number 92 Method of Additional Structures on the Objects of a Monoidal Kleisli Category as...

  13. additional information relating: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Last Name First Name Middle Initial UT EID B. Childcare Expense Information Number 137 Method of Additional Structures on the Objects of a Monoidal Kleisli Category...

  14. accident additional information: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Last Name First Name Middle Initial UT EID B. Childcare Expense Information Number 66 Method of Additional Structures on the Objects of a Monoidal Kleisli Category as...

  15. additional oxygenated functional: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    will be presented for components that can be processed by additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing. The origin structures. KEYWORDS : structural health monitoring methodology, 3D...

  16. EIS-0250: Notice of Public Comment Period Extension and Additional...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Period Extension and Additional Public Meeting Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, NV...

  17. Backbone Additivity in the Transfer Model of Protein Solvation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solvation. Abstract: The transfer model implying additivity of the peptide backbone free energy of transfer is computationally tested. Molecular dynamics simulations are used...

  18. Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Lubricant and Additive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Performance of Engine Lube Oils, Ionic Liquids as Lubricants andor Lubricant Additives, Opportunities for Engine Friction Reduction and Durable Design Fuel and Lubricant...

  19. Obama Administration Announces Additional $11,072,300 for Local...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    13,167,500 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in South Dakota Obama Administration Announces Additional 33,977,000 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Puerto Rico...

  20. Obama Administration Announces Additional $33,977,000 for Local...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3,977,000 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Puerto Rico Obama Administration Announces Additional 33,977,000 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Puerto Rico...

  1. ,"New York Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","2272015"...

  2. What's an Alternative Fuel? Energy Department Proposes Additional...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    IMMEDIATE RELEASE Jayne Brady, 202586-5806 July 28, 1998 WHAT'S AN ALTERNATIVE FUEL? Energy Department Proposes Additional Substitute for Gasoline The Department of Energy today...

  3. Develop and Evaluate Materials and Additives that Enhance Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal & overcharge abuse Cell Comp't Thermal Reactivity & Improvements Develop & Evaluate...

  4. DOE Announces Additional Public Comment Meetings for Draft National...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in which transmission congestion may addressed, including enhanced energy efficiency, demand response, more local generation, and additional transmission capacity. To submit...

  5. Observability of Neuronal Network Motifs (Invited Paper)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brennan, Sean

    Observability of Neuronal Network Motifs (Invited Paper) Andrew J. Whalen*t, Sean N. Brennan Engineering, + Engineering Science and Mechanics, Neurosurgery, and Physics, Penn State University, University) neuronal networks as a function of 1) the connection topology and sym metry, 2) the measured nodes, and 3

  6. Addition of photosensitive dopants to the D0 liquid argon calorimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amos, N.A.; Anderson, D.F.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The addition of photosensitive dopants to liquid argon greatly enhances the signal from heavily ionizing particles. Since binding energy losses we correlated with the heavily ionizing component in hadronic showers, the addition of photosensitive dopants has been suggested as a mechanism to tune the e/[pi] ratio in liquid argon calorimeters. A measurement was performed at the FNAL test beam, adding 4 ppM tetramethylgermanium to the D[phi] uranium-liquid argon calorimeter. An increase in response for electromagnetic and hadronic showers was observed, with no net change in the e/[pi] ratio.

  7. Observing Massive Galaxy Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher J. Conselice

    2002-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A major goal of contemporary astrophysics is understanding the origin of the most massive galaxies in the universe, particularly nearby ellipticals and spirals. Theoretical models of galaxy formation have existed for many decades, although low and high redshift observations are only beginning to put constraints on different ideas. We briefly describe these observations and how they are revealing the methods by which galaxies form by contrasting and comparing fiducial rapid collapse and hierarchical formation model predictions. The available data show that cluster ellipticals must have rapidly formed at z > 2, and that up to 50% of all massive galaxies at z ~ 2.5 are involved in major mergers. While the former is consistent with the monolithic collapse picture, we argue that hierarchal formation is the only model that can reproduce all the available observations.

  8. Air Observe System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This manuscript contains a description and basic principles for observing inaccessible areas using low cost, easily deployed equipment. The basic premise is to suspend a tiny video camera at an altitude of 10 - 200 meters over the area to be surveyed. The TV camera supports at altitude by wind or balloon. The technical challenges regard the means by which the camera is suspended. Such a system may be used by military or police forces or by civil authorities for rescue missions or assessment of natural disasters. The method may be further developed for military applications by integrating the surveillance task with deployment of munitions. Key words: air observer, air suspended system, low altitude video observer.

  9. Effect of linear lumping on controllability and observability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tóth, János

    Effect of linear lumping on controllability and observability Zs´ofia Horv´ath October 2006 Email to reduce the number of state variables on controllability and observability of linear differential the effect of linear lumping on such properties of the system as controllability and observability and apply

  10. AN ALTERNATIVE OBSERVER FOR ZERO DEFICIENCY CHEMICAL NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaves, Madalena

    for detectability, and went on to explicitly construct a full-state observer that is guaranteed to converge 1 Email by a construction di#11;erent from the one employed in a previous paper. The new observer exhibits slower (Sontag, 2001) for background material on stability), which dealt with the construction of observers

  11. A Radically Configurable Six-State Compound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    experimentally accessible redox states (0, 2+, 4+, 6+, 7+, and 8+) from within the total of nine states evaluated by quantum mechanical methods. All six of the observable redox states have been identified by electrochemical cationic state is low and the lifetimes of these radical viologen derivatives is short as a result

  12. additional energy savings: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    additional energy savings First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 ESTIMATES OF ADDITIONAL...

  13. Remark on the additivity conjecture for the quantum depolarizing channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Amosov

    2005-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider bistochastic quantum channels generated by unitary representations of the discret group. The proof of the additivity conjecture for the quantum depolarizing channel $\\Phi$ based on the decreasing property of the relative entropy is given. We show that the additivity conjecture is true for the channel $\\Xi =\\Psi \\circ \\Phi $, where $\\Psi $ is the phase damping.

  14. New addition formula for the little $q$-Bessel functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fethi Bouzeffour

    2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting from the addition formula for little $q$-Jacobi polynomials, we derive a new addition formula for the little $q$-Bessel functions. The result is obtained by the use of a limit transition. We also establish a product formula for little $q$-Bessel functions with a positive and symmetric kernel.

  15. Simplification of additivity conjecture in quantum information theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motohisa Fukuda

    2007-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We simplify some conjectures in quantum information theory; the additivity of minimal output entropy, the multiplicativity of maximal output p-norm and the superadditivity of convex closure of output entropy. We construct a unital channel for a given channel so that they share the above additivity properties; we can reduce the conjectures for all channels to those for unital channels.

  16. Particle addition and subtraction as a test of bosonic quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawel Kurzynski; Ravishankar Ramanathan; Akihito Soeda; Tan Kok Chuan; Dagomir Kaszlikowski

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a test to measure the bosonic quality of particles with respect to physical operations of single-particle addition and subtraction. We apply our test to investigate bosonic properties of composite particles made of an even number of fermions and suggest its experimental implementation. Furthermore, we discuss features of the processes of particle addition and subtraction in terms of optimal quantum operations.

  17. South High Rise Renovation and Addition Project OSU-109000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South High Rise Renovation and Addition Project OSU-109000 Program of Requirements February 16 Mission Project Objectives Project Budget #12;Program of Requirements South High Rises Renovation Rises Renovation & Addition Project OSU-109000 February 2010 Project Overview February 2010 Page 4

  18. South High Rises Renovation and Addition Program of Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South High Rises Renovation and Addition OSU-109000 Program of Requirements October 2009 234 N Project Objectives Project Budget #12;Program of Requirements South High Rises Renovation and Addition are considered to be part of the Program of Requirements. #12;Program of Requirements South High Rises Renovation

  19. Measurement enhancement for state estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jian

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    in the power system. A robust state estimation should have the capability of keeping the system observable during different contingencies, as well as detecting and identifying the gross errors in measurement set and network topology. However, this capability...

  20. Smooth quantum-classical transition in photon subtraction and addition processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Dodonov; S. S. Mizrahi

    2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently Parigi et al. [Science 317, 1890 (2007)] implemented experimentally the photon subtraction and addition processes from/to a light field in a conditional way, when the required operations were produced successfully only upon the positive outcome of a separate measurement. It was verified that for a low intensity beam (quantum regime) the bosonic annihilation operator does indeed describe a single photon subtraction, while the creation operator describes a photon addition. Nonetheless, the exact formal expressions for these operations do not always reduce to these simple identifications, and in this connection here we deduce the general superoperators for multiple photons subtraction and addition processes and analyze the statistics of the resulting states for classical field states having an arbitrary intensity. We obtain closed analytical expressions and verify that for classical fields with high intensity (classical regime) the operators that describe photon subtraction and addition processes deviate significantly from simply annihilation and creation operators. Complementarily, we analyze in details such a smooth quantum-classical transition as function of beam intensity for both processes.

  1. Academic Writing Observation Papers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a particular action and did not notice something about the people involved. Note what you did not notice observations. People: If the setting is crowded, choose a particular group (or groups) or focus on random paper around a research question: For example, you may be interested in power relations, interactions

  2. Academic Writing Observation Papers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a particular action and did not notice something about the people involved. Note what you did not notice observations. People: If the setting is crowded, choose a particular group (or groups) or focus on random in power relations, interactions between interpersonal communication processes and other media, or other

  3. Global Warming Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    Global Warming Observations: 1. Global temperature has been gradually rising in recent years #15 in range 8000 12000 nm { CFC's, methane and N 2 O important for global warming even though concentra- tions in concentration of \\greenhouse gases" like CO 2 What determines global temperature? Energy budget of earth: 1

  4. Single electron states in polyethylene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Y. [State Key Lab. of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, No. 28 Xianning West Road, Xi'an 710049, Shaanxi (China) [State Key Lab. of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, No. 28 Xianning West Road, Xi'an 710049, Shaanxi (China); School of Physics and Complex Adaptive Systems Laboratory, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); MacKernan, D. [School of Physics and Complex Adaptive Systems Laboratory, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)] [School of Physics and Complex Adaptive Systems Laboratory, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Cubero, D., E-mail: dcubero@us.es, E-mail: n.quirke@imperial.ac.uk [State Key Lab. of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, No. 28 Xianning West Road, Xi'an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Departmento de Física Aplicada I, Universidad de Sevilla, Calle Virgen de Africa 7, 41011 Seville (Spain); Coker, D. F. [School of Physics and Complex Adaptive Systems Laboratory, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland) [School of Physics and Complex Adaptive Systems Laboratory, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Department of Chemistry, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Quirke, N., E-mail: dcubero@us.es, E-mail: n.quirke@imperial.ac.uk [State Key Lab. of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, No. 28 Xianning West Road, Xi'an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Department of Chemistry, Imperial College, London SW7 2AY (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report computer simulations of an excess electron in various structural motifs of polyethylene at room temperature, including lamellar and interfacial regions between amorphous and lamellae, as well as nanometre-sized voids. Electronic properties such as density of states, mobility edges, and mobilities are computed on the different phases using a block Lanczos algorithm. Our results suggest that the electronic density of states for a heterogeneous material can be approximated by summing the single phase density of states weighted by their corresponding volume fractions. Additionally, a quantitative connection between the localized states of the excess electron and the local atomic structure is presented.

  5. Conformal Relativity: Theory and Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Pervushin; V. Zinchuk; A. Zorin

    2004-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical and observational arguments are listed in favor of a new principle of relativity of units of measurements as the basis of a conformal-invariant unification of General Relativity and Standard Model by replacement of all masses with a scalar (dilaton) field. The relative units mean conformal observables: the coordinate distance, conformal time, running masses, and constant temperature. They reveal to us a motion of a universe along its hypersurface in the field space of events like a motion of a relativistic particle in the Minkowski space, where the postulate of the vacuum as a state with minimal energy leads to arrow of the geometric time. In relative units, the unified theory describes the Cold Universe Scenario, where the role of the conformal dark energy is played by a free minimal coupling scalar field in agreement with the most recent distance-redshift data from type Ia supernovae. In this Scenario, the evolution of the Universe begins with the effect of intensive creation of primordial W-Z-bosons explaining the value of CMBR temperature, baryon asymmetry, tremendous deficit of the luminosity masses in the COMA-type superclusters and large-scale structure of the Universe.

  6. Exhibit D, Additional Products and Special Provisions FINAL BILLING...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    not defined in this Agreement shall have the meaning stated in Customer Name's Energy Conservation Agreement. .1 Customer Name's Independent Conservation Funding...

  7. Carbon Dioxide Addition to Microbial Fuel Cell Cathodes Maintains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service (ARS), National Center for Agricultural and sustainable energy from wastewaters, replace energy intensive wastewater treatment processes, and produce

  8. PONDER - A Real time software backend for pulsar and IPS observations at the Ooty Radio Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naidu, Arun; Manoharan, P K; Krishnakumar, M A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a new real-time versatile backend, the Pulsar Ooty Radio Telescope New Digital Efficient Receiver (PONDER), which has been designed to operate along with the legacy analog system of the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT). PONDER makes use of the current state of the art computing hardware, a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) and sufficiently large disk storage to support high time resolution real-time data of pulsar observations, obtained by coherent dedispersion over a bandpass of 16 MHz. Four different modes for pulsar observations are implemented in PONDER to provide standard reduced data products, such as time-stamped integrated profiles and dedispersed time series, allowing faster avenues to scientific results for a variety of pulsar studies. Additionally, PONDER also supports general modes of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements and very long baseline interferometry data recording. The IPS mode yields a single polarisation correlated time series of solar wind scintillation over a b...

  9. Experimental Observation of Simultaneous Wave and Particle Behaviors in a Narrowband Single Photon's Wave Packe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Yan; K. Liao; Z. Deng; J. He; Z. Y. Xue; Z. M. Zhang; S. L. Zhu

    2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Light's wave-particle duality is at the heart of quantum mechanics and can be well illustrated by Wheeler's delayed-choice experiment. The choice of inserting or removing the second classical (quantum) beam splitter in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer determines the classical (quantum) wave-particle behaviors of a photon. In this paper, we report our experiment using the classical beam splitter to observe the simultaneous wave-particle behaviors in the wave-packet of a narrowband single photon. This observation suggests that it is necessary to generalize the current quantum wave-particle duality theory. Our experiment demonstrates that the produced wave-particle state can be considered an additional degree of freedom and can be utilized in encoding quantum information.

  10. Effect of argon addition on plasma parameters and dust charging in hydrogen plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kakati, B., E-mail: bharatkakati15@gmail.com; Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K. [Centre of Plasma Physics-Institute for Plasma Research, Nazirakhat, Sonapur, Kamrup 782402, Assam (India); Bandyopadhyay, M.; Saxena, Y. C. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results on effect of adding argon gas to hydrogen plasma in a multi-cusp dusty plasma device are reported. Addition of argon modifies plasma density, electron temperature, degree of hydrogen dissociation, dust current as well as dust charge. From the dust charging profile, it is observed that the dust current and dust charge decrease significantly up to 40% addition of argon flow rate in hydrogen plasma. But beyond 40% of argon flow rate, the changes in dust current and dust charge are insignificant. Results show that the addition of argon to hydrogen plasma in a dusty plasma device can be used as a tool to control the dust charging in a low pressure dusty plasma.

  11. The effect of additives on lime dissolution rates. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khang, S.J.

    1996-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the previous years` studies concerning the efficiency of SO{sub 2} removal by spray dryers with high sulfur coal flue gas, the work for year five included investigations of lime dissolution rates at different slaking conditions and with the effect of additives. The prominent additives that have significant effects on lime dissolution rates were tested with the mini pilot spray drying absorber to see their effects on spray drying desulfurization applications. The mechanisms of these additive effects along with the properties of hygroscopic additives have been discussed and incorporated into the spray drying desulfurization model ``SPRAYMOD-M.`` Slaking conditions are very important factors in producing high quality lime slurry in spray drying desulfurization processes. At optimal slaking conditions, the slaked lime particles are very fine (3-5{mu}m) and the slaked lime has high BET surface areas which are beneficial to the desulfurization. The slaked lime dissolution rate experiments in our study are designed to determine how much lime can dissolve in a unit time if the initial lime surface area is kept constant. The purpose of the dissolution rate study for different additives is to find those effective additives that can enhance lime dissolution rates and to investigate the mechanisms of the dissolution rate enhancement properties for these additives. The applications of these additives on spray drying desulfurization are to further verify the theory that dissolution rate is a rate limiting step in the whole spray drying desulfurization process as well as to test the feasibility of these additives on enhancing SO{sub 2} removal in spray dryers.

  12. Scale-dependent hemispherical asymmetry from general initial state during inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassan Firouzjahi; Jinn-Ouk Gong; Mohammad Hossein Namjoo

    2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a general initial state for inflation as the mechanism for generating scale-dependent hemispherical asymmetry. An observable scale-dependent non-Gaussianity is generated that leads to observable hemispherical asymmetry from the super-horizon long mode modulation. We show that the amplitude of dipole asymmetry falls off exponentially on small angular scales which can address the absence of dipole asymmetry at these scales.In addition, depending on the nature of non-vaccum initial state, the amplitude of the dipole asymmetry has oscillatory features which can be detected in a careful CMB map analysis. Furthermore, we show that the non-vacuum initial state provides a natural mechanism for enhancing the super horizon long mode perturbation as required to generate the dipole asymmetry.

  13. Observed Asymptotic Differences in Energies of Stable and Minimal Point Configurations on $\\mathbb{S}^2$ and the Role of Defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Calef; W. Griffiths; A. Schulz; C. Fichtl; D. Hardin

    2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations suggest that configurations of points on a sphere that are stable with respect to a Riesz potential distribute points uniformly over the sphere. Further, these stable configurations have a local structure that is largely hexagonal. Minimal configurations differ from stable configurations in the arrangement of defects within the hexagonal structure. This paper reports the asymptotic difference between the average energy of stable states and the lowest reported energies. We use this to infer the energy scale at which defects in the hexagonal structure are manifest. We report results for the Riesz potentials for s=0, s=1, s=2 and s=3. Additionally we compare existing theory for the asymptotic expansion in N of the minimal $N$-point energy with experimental results. We report a case of two distinct stable states that have the same Voronoi structure. Finally, we report the observed growth of the number of stable states as a function of N.

  14. A pairwise additive strategy for quantifying multipartite entanglement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerardo A. Paz-Silva; John H. Reina

    2007-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the idea of measuring the factorizability of a given density matrix, we propose a pairwise analysis strategy for quantifying and understanding multipartite entanglement. The methodology proves very effective as it immediately guarantees, in addition to the usual entanglement properties, additivity and strong super additivity. We give a specific set of quantities that fulfill the protocol and which, according to our numerical calculations, make the entanglement measure an LOCC non-increasing function. The strategy allows a redefinition of the structural concept of global entanglement.

  15. Solar neutrino spectrum, sterile neutrinos and additional radiation in the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. C. de Holanda; A. Yu. Smirnov

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results from the SNO, Super-Kamiokande and Borexino experiments do not show the expected upturn of the energy spectrum of events (the ratio $R \\equiv N_{obs}/N_{SSM}$) at low energies. At the same time, cosmological observations testify for possible existence of additional relativistic degrees of freedom in the early Universe: $\\Delta N_{eff} = 1 - 2$. These facts strengthen the case of very light sterile neutrino, $\

  16. Observational Mishaps - a Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaspar von Braun; Kristin Chiboucas; Denise Hurley-Keller

    1999-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a World-Wide-Web-accessible database of astronomical images which suffer from a variety of observational problems, ranging from common occurences, such as dust grains on filters and/or the dewar window, to more exotic phenomena, such as loss of primary mirror support due to the deflation of the support airbags. Apart from its educational usefulness, the purpose of this database is to assist astronomers in diagnosing and treating errant images at the telescope, thus saving valuable telescope time. Every observational mishap contained in this on-line catalog is presented in the form of a GIF image, a brief explanation of the problem, and, when possible, a suggestion for improving the image quality.

  17. Can Remote Observing be Good Observing? Reflections on Procrustes and Antaeus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felix J. Lockman

    2005-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote observing seeks to simulate the presence of the astronomer at the telescope. While this is useful, and necessary in some circumstances, simulation is not reality. The drive to abstract the astronomer from the instrument can have unpleasant consequences, some of which are prefigured in the ancient tales of Procrustes and Antaeus. This article, written in 1992 for a conference proceedings on remote observing, is reprinted here with only slight editorial changes and the addition of a short Afterword. I consider some of the human factors involved in remote observing, and suggest that our aim be to enhance rather than supplant the astronomer at the telescope.

  18. Sulfurized olefin lubricant additives and compositions containing same

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braid, M.

    1980-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Lubricant additives having substantially improved extreme pressure characteristics are provided by modifying certain sulfurized olefins by reacting said olefins with a cyclic polydisulfide under controlled reaction conditions and at a temperature of at least about 130/sup 0/ C.

  19. Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricant Additives for Next-Generation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricant Additives for Next-Generation Fuel-Efficient Engines May 15 2015 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Jun Qu, Materials Science and Technology Division ORNL...

  20. Prediction of additive filtration rate from slurry properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudenko, L.I.; Urusova, N.P.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors study the porosity, specific surface area, and certain other characteristics of solid contaminants and suspensions of commercial lube oil additives, and also the possibility of using the results from these studies to determine the rate of additive filtration through a layer of the solid contaminants. For investigation, the authors took the solid contaminants in the additive VNII NP-360 (a mixture of zinc dialkylphenyldithiophosphate and barium alkylphenolate), AFK (calcium trialkylphenolate), EFO (solvent extract from residual lube stocks successively treated with P/sub 2/S/sub 5/, an alcohol, ZnO, and Ba(OH)/sub 2/), MASK (overbased calcium alkylsalicylate), PMS (overbased calcium sulfonate), VNII NP-370 (calcium salt of product obtained by condensation of alkylphenols with formaldehyde), and the boron component of the additive A-9250 (boron-containing Mannich base).

  1. additive gene effects: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gustavo Glusman; Shizhen Qin; M. Raafat El-gewely; Andrew F. Siegel; Jared C. Roach; Leroy Hood; Arian F. A. Smit 19 EFFECTS OF ADDITIVE NOISE ON THE THROUGHPUT OF CDMA...

  2. alcohol gas additives: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Additives That Prevent Or Reverse Cathode Aging In Drift Chambers With Helium-Isobutane Gas HEP - Experiment (arXiv) Summary: Noise and Malter breakdown have been studied at high...

  3. Enhancing quantum entanglement by photon addition and subtraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navarrete-Benlloch, Carlos

    The non-Gaussian operations effected by adding or subtracting a photon on entangled optical beams emerging from a parametric down-conversion process have been suggested to enhance entanglement. Heralded photon addition or ...

  4. Addition of First Generation Leptons to the External Flux Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaron J. Roy

    2009-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In an extra dimensional EW model in M_4 X S_1 there is no distinction mathematically with the standard model analog as far as the degrees of freedom of the two models along with the masses and more importantly the mass ratio relation in the zero mode limit. In this paper we present a theoretical construct of the same geometry but with the addition of an external magnetic flux permeating the extra coordinate. This will give all of the charged fields in the model an additional phase with nontrivial periodicity. This rather important addition leads to very interesting and mathematically rich physics. Here we will present the generalized theory for the addition of first generation leptons to this theory.

  5. Infinite-dimensional symmetry for wave equation with additional condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irina Yehorchenko; Alla Vorobyova

    2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Symmetries for wave equation with additional conditions are found. Some conditions yield infinite-dimensional symmetry algebra for the nonlinear equation. Ansatzes and solutions corresponding to the new symmetries were constructed.

  6. Beyond 3D Printing: The New Dimensions of Additive Fabrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keating, Steven John

    Additive fabrication, often referred to as 3D printing, is the construction of objects by adding material. This stands in contrast to subtractive methods, which involve removing material by means of milling or cutting. ...

  7. Approaches to Maintaining Provenance throughout the Additive Manufacturing Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    prototyping and 3D printing by users both in engineering and the humanities. The proposed digital signing--Digital Signing; 3D printing; 3D objects; provenance. I.INTRODUCTION Additive manufacturing as a process has been

  8. The Selection and Use of Fireside Additives on Industrial Boilers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radway, J. E.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As energy prices have escalated and fuel quality deteriorated, fuel chemicals have found increasing acceptance as tools for improving efficiency and reliability of combustion systems. Though application of fuel additives is not new, their use has...

  9. additive antioxidant therapy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 The Study of Variations in the Properties of Biodiesel on Addition of Antioxidants. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary:...

  10. INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICAL NEURODYNAMICS: EFFECTS OF ADDITIVE AND PARAMETRIC NOISE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milton, John G.

    Department of Neurology Committees on Neurobiology & Computational Neuroscience The University of ChicagoINTRODUCTION TO STATISTICAL NEURODYNAMICS: EFFECTS OF ADDITIVE AND PARAMETRIC NOISE John Milton current first attracted the attention of neurobiologists to the presence of ion channels, or pores

  11. Novel electrolytes and electrolyte additives for PHEV applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    diagnostics. Some of these electrolytes contained the following: - Solvents: EC, PC, EMC, etc. - Salts: LiPF 6 , LiBF 4 , LiB(C 2 O 4 ) 2 , LiF 2 BC 2 O 4 , etc. - Additives:...

  12. Control of pyrite addition in coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmid, Bruce K. (Englewood, CO); Junkin, James E. (Englewood, CO)

    1982-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyrite addition to a coal liquefaction process (22, 26) is controlled (118) in inverse proportion to the calcium content of the feed coal to maximize the C.sub.5 --900.degree. F. (482.degree. C.) liquid yield per unit weight of pyrite added (110). The pyrite addition is controlled in this manner so as to minimize the amount of pyrite used and thus reduce pyrite contribution to the slurry pumping load and disposal problems connected with pyrite produced slag.

  13. Systems simulation of oil additives to grain at terminal elevators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goforth, Kerry James

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SYSTEMS SIMULATION OF OIL ADDITIVES TO GRAIN AT TERMINAL ELEVATORS A Thesis by Kerry James Goforth Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1985 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering SYSTEMS SIMULATION OF OIL ADDITIVES TO GRAIN AT TERMINAL ELEVATORS A Thesis by KERRY J. GOFORTH Approved as to style and content by: Calvin B. Parne 1, Jr. (Chairman of Committee) tto R. Kunze...

  14. Cyanoethylated compounds as additives in lithium/lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nagasubramanian, Ganesan (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The power loss of lithium/lithium ion battery cells is significantly reduced, especially at low temperatures, when about 1% by weight of an additive is incorporated in the electrolyte layer of the cells. The usable additives are organic solvent soluble cyanoethylated polysaccharides and poly(vinyl alcohol). The power loss decrease results primarily from the decrease in the charge transfer resistance at the interface between the electrolyte and the cathode.

  15. Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricants and /or Lubricant Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, J. [ORNL; Viola, M. B. [General Motors Company

    2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This ORNL-GM CRADA developed ionic liquids (ILs) as novel lubricants or oil additives for engine lubrication. A new group of oil-miscible ILs have been designed and synthesized with high thermal stability, non-corrosiveness, excellent wettability, and most importantly effective anti-scuffing/anti-wear and friction reduction characteristics. Mechanistic analysis attributes the superior lubricating performance of IL additives to their physical and chemical interactions with metallic surfaces. Working with a leading lubricant formulation company, the team has successfully developed a prototype low-viscosity engine oil using a phosphonium-phosphate IL as an anti-wear additive. Tribological bench tests of the IL-additized formulated oil showed 20-33% lower friction in mixed and elastohydrodynamic lubrication and 38-92% lower wear in boundary lubrication when compared with commercial Mobil 1 and Mobil Clean 5W-30 engine oils. High-temperature, high load (HTHL) full-size engine tests confirmed the excellent anti-wear performance for the IL-additized engine oil. Sequence VID engine dynamometer tests demonstrated an improved fuel economy by >2% for this IL-additized engine oil benchmarked against the Mobil 1 5W-30 oil. In addition, accelerated catalyst aging tests suggest that the IL additive may potentially have less adverse impact on three-way catalysts compared to the conventional ZDDP. Follow-on research is needed for further development and optimization of IL chemistry and oil formulation to fully meet ILSAC GF-5 specifications and further enhance the automotive engine efficiency and durability.

  16. Blast furnace coke quality in relation to petroleum coke addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez, R.; Diez, M.A.; Menendez, J.A.; Barriocanal, C.; Pis, J.J. [CSIC, Oviedo (Spain). Inst. Nacional del Carbon; Sirgado, M. [ENSIDESA, Aviles (Spain)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The incorporation of petroleum coke as an additive in industrial coking coal blends is a practice often used by steel companies. A suitable blast furnace coke produced by replacing part of the coking coal blend with a suitable petroleum coke (addition of 5 to 15%), was made by Great Lakes Carbon Corporation and successfully tested at several blast furnaces. This coke had lower reactivity, less ash and slightly higher sulfur content than coke made without the addition of petroleum coke. In contrast with these results, it has been reported in a BCRA study that additions of petroleum coke to a strong coking coal, above 5 wt%, increased coke reactivity. These differences may be explained on the basis of the coal or blend characteristics to which petroleum coke is added. Petroleum coke addition seems to give better results if the coal/blend has high fluidity. The present situation in Spain is favorable for the use of petroleum coke. So, a study of laboratory and semi-industrial scale was made to assess the possibility of using petroleum coke as an additive to the typical industrial coal blend coked by the Spanish Steel Company, ENSIDESA. The influence of the petroleum coke particle size was also studied to semi-industrial scale.

  17. Spectrum of Controlling and Observing Complex Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Gang; Barzel, Baruch; Slotine, Jean-Jacques; Liu, Yang-Yu; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observing and controlling complex networks are of paramount interest for understanding complex physical, biological and technological systems. Recent studies have made important advances in identifying sensor or driver nodes, through which we can observe or control a complex system. Yet, the observation uncertainty induced by measurement noise and the energy cost required for control continue to be significant challenges in practical applications. Here we show that the control energy cost and the observation uncertainty vary widely in different directions of the state space. In particular, we find that if all nodes are directly driven, control is energetically feasible, as the maximum energy cost increases sublinearly with the system size. If, however, we aim to control a system by driving only a single node, control in some directions is energetically prohibitive, increasing exponentially with the system size. For the cases in between, the maximum energy decays exponentially if we increase the number of driv...

  18. INTEGRAL observations of HER X-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Klochkov; R. Staubert; S. Tsygankov; A. Lutovinov; K. P. Postnov; N. I. Shakura; S. A. Potanin; C. Ferrigno; I. Kreykenbohm; J. Wilms

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    First results of observations of the low mass X-ray binary Her X-1/HZ Her performed by the INTEGRAL satellite in July-August 2005 are presented. A significant part of one 35 day main-on state was covered. The cyclotron line in the X-ray spectrum is well observed and its position and shape, as well as its variability with time and phase of the 1.24 s pulsation are explored. X-ray pulse profiles for different energy bands are studied throughout the observation. The pulse period is found to vary on short time scales revealing a dynamical spin-up/spin-down behavior. Results of simultaneous optical observations of HZ Her are also discussed.

  19. Additional degrees of freedom associated with position measurements in non-commutative quantum mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CM Rohwer; FG Scholtz

    2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis we shall demonstrate that a measurement of position alone in non-commutative space cannot yield complete information about the quantum state of a particle. Indeed, the formalism used entails a description that is non-local in that it requires all orders of positional derivatives through the star product that is used ubiquitously to map operator multiplication onto function multiplication in non-commutative systems. It will be shown that there exist several equivalent local descriptions, which are arrived at via the introduction of additional degrees of freedom. Consequently non-commutative quantum mechanical position measurements necessarily confront us with some additional structure which is necessary to specify quantum states completely. The remainder of the thesis, will involve investigations into the physical interpretation of these additional degrees of freedom. For one particular local formulation, the corresponding classical theory will be used to demonstrate that the concept of extended, structured objects emerges quite naturally and unavoidably there. This description will be shown to be equivalent to one describing a two-charge harmonically interacting composite in a strong magnetic field found by Susskind. It will be argued that these notions also extend naturally to the quantum level, and constraints will be shown to arise there. A further local formulation will be introduced, with an interpretation in terms of objects located at a point with a certain angular momentum about that point. This again enforces the idea of particles that are not point-like. Both local descriptions make explicit the additional structure which is encoded more subtly in the non-local description. Additional degrees of freedom introduced by local descriptions may also be thought of as gauge degrees of freedom in a gauge-invariant formulation of the theory.

  20. Excited Charm States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shukla, S.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Characteristics of mass spectra and decays of orbitally excited charm mesons and baryons, expected on the basis of quark models and Heavy Quark Symmetry, are briefly described. The difficulties associated with measurements on these excited states are discussed. The accuracy and reliability of currently available experimental information is examined. The reasons, for the widely accepted spin-parity assignments to the observed excited mesons and baryons, are stated. Finally, the experimental data, with the accepted spin-parity assignments, is compared with expectations based on quark models and Heavy Quark Symmetry.

  1. Observation of ?cJ decays to ??¯¯¯????

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ambrose, D. J.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Bennett, J. V.; et al

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decays of the ?cJ states (J=0, 1, 2) to ??¯¯¯????, including processes with intermediate ?(1385), are studied through the E1 transition ?'???cJ using 106×10? ?' events collected with the BESIII detector at BEPCII. This is the first observation of ?cJ decays to the final state ??¯¯¯????. The branching ratio of the intermediate process ?cJ??(1385)±?¯¯¯(1385)? is also measured for the first time, and the results agree with the theoretical predictions based on the color-octet effect.

  2. actinium additions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    protactinium, and uranium isotopes CERN Preprints Summary: Currently, 31 actinium, 31 thorium, 28 protactinium, and 23 uranium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of...

  3. ARM Observations Projected

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP Update Information on new, existing, andObservations Projected

  4. Observations of Edge Turbulence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeeding access(SC)Gas and OilPhaseObservation ofEdge

  5. Effect of conductive additives in LiFePO4 cathode for lithium-ion batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shim, J.; Guerfi, A.; Zaghib, K.; Striebel, K.A.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effect of Conductive Additives in LiFePO 4 Cathode forcapacity on conductive additive content and specificthe amount of conductive additive increases. The addition of

  6. When Nonlocal Coupling Between Oscillators Becomes Stronger: Patched Synchrony or Multi-Chimera States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iryna Omelchenko; Oleh E. Omel'chenko; Philipp Hövel; Eckehard Schöll

    2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems of nonlocally coupled oscillators can exhibit complex spatio-temporal patterns, called chimera states, which consist of coexisting domains of spatially coherent (synchronized) and incoherent dynamics. We report on a novel form of these states, found in a widely used model of a limit-cycle oscillator if one goes beyond the limit of weak coupling typical for phase oscillators. Then patches of synchronized dynamics appear within the incoherent domain giving rise to a multi-chimera state. We find that, depending on the coupling strength and range, different multi-chimeras arise in a transition from classical chimera states. The additional spatial modulation is due to strong coupling interaction and thus cannot be observed in simple phase-oscillator models.

  7. Obama Administration Announces Additional $27,777,600 for Local...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Chu today announced plans to invest 3.2 billion in energy efficiency and conservation projects in U.S. cities, counties, states, territories, and Native American tribes. This...

  8. First observation of top quark production in the forward region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Demmer, Moritz; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fohl, Klaus; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gastaldi, Ugo; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Geraci, Angelo; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Top quark production in the forward region in proton-proton collisions is observed for the first time. The $W\\!+\\!b$ final state with $W\\to\\mu\

  9. BOWHUNTER OBSERVATIONS VERSUS SPOTLIGHTING AS AN INDEX TO DEER ABUNDANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arboretum (MFCA) in southeastern New York State since 1970 (Davis 1975, Winchcombe 1993). The objective and observations of deer by bowhunters) were used at the MFCA to assess effectiveness in reaching the objective

  10. Characteristics of yttrium oxide laser ceramics with additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osipov, V V; Solomonov, V I; Orlov, A N; Shitov, V A; Maksimov, R N; Spirina, A V [Institute of Electrophysics, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Neodymium- or ytterbium-doped laser ceramics with a disordered crystal-field structure formed by introduction of iso- and heterovalent elements into yttrium oxide are studied. It is shown that these additives broaden the spectral band of laser transitions, which makes it possible to use ceramics as active laser media emitting ultrashort pulses. Lasing was obtained in several samples of this ceramics. At the same time, it is shown that addition of zirconium and hafnium stimulates the Foerster quenching of upper laser levels and pump levels. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  11. Undeformed (additive) energy conservation law in Doubly Special Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gianluca Mandanici

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    All the Doubly Special Relativity (DSR) models studied in literature so far involve a deformation of the energy conservation rule that forces us to release the hypothesis of the additivity of the energy for composite systems. In view of the importance of the issue for a consistent formulation of a DSR statistical mechanics and a DSR thermodynamics, we show that DSR models preserving the usual (i.e. additive) energy conservation rule can be found. These models allow the construction of a DSR-covariant extensive energy. The implications of the analysis for the dynamics of DSR-covariant multiparticle systems are also briefly discussed.

  12. Catalyst Additives to Enhance Mercury Oxidation and Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas K. Gale

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Catalysis is the key fundamental ingredient to convert elemental mercury in coal-fired power stations into its oxidized forms that are more easily captured by sorbents, ESPs, baghouses, and wet scrubbers, whether the catalyst be unburned carbon (UBC) in the ash or vanadium pentoxide in SCR catalysts. This project has investigated several different types of catalysts that enhance mercury oxidation in several different ways. The stated objective of this project in the Statement of Objectives included testing duct-injection catalysts, catalyst-sorbent hybrids, and coated low-pressure-drop screens. Several different types of catalysts were considered for duct injection, including different forms of iron and carbon. Duct-injection catalysts would have to be inexpensive catalysts, as they would not be recycled. Iron and calcium had been shown to catalyze mercury oxidation in published bench-scale tests. However, as determined from results of an on-going EPRI/EPA project at Southern Research, while iron and calcium did catalyze mercury oxidation, the activity of these catalysts was orders of magnitude below that of carbon and had little impact in the short residence times available for duct-injected catalysts or catalyst-sorbent hybrids. In fact, the only catalyst found to be effective enough for duct injection was carbon, which is also used to capture mercury and remove it from the flue gas. It was discovered that carbon itself is an effective catalyst-sorbent hybrid. Bench-scale carbon-catalyst tests were conducted, to obtain kinetic rates of mercury adsorption (a key step in the catalytic oxidation of mercury by carbon) for different forms of carbon. All carbon types investigated behaved in a similar manner with respect to mercury sorption, including the effect of temperature and chlorine concentration. Activated carbon was more effective at adsorbing mercury than carbon black and unburned carbon (UBC), because their internal surface area of activated carbon was greater. Catalyst coating of low-pressure-drop screens was of particular interest as this project was being developed. However, it was discovered that URS was already heavily involved in the pursuit of this same technology, being funded by DOE, and reporting significant success. Hence, testing of SCR catalysts became a major focus of the project. Three different commercial SCR catalysts were examined for their ability to oxidize mercury in simulated flue-gas. Similar performance was observed from each of the three commercial catalysts, both in terms of mercury oxidation and SO{sub 3} generation. Ammonia injection hindered mercury oxidation at low HCl concentrations (i.e., {approx}2 ppmv), yet had little impact on mercury oxidation at higher HCl concentrations. On the other hand, SO{sub 2} oxidation was significantly reduced by the presence of ammonia at both low and high concentrations of HCl.

  13. United States Industrial Motor Systems Market Opportunities Assessment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Motor Systems Market Opportunities Assessment: Executive Summary United States Industrial Motor Systems Market Opportunities Assessment: Executive Summary In addition to serving...

  14. Does nitrate deposition following astrophysical ionizing radiation events pose an additional threat to amphibians?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian C. Thomas; Michelle D. Honeyman

    2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    It is known that amphibians are especially susceptible to the combination of heightened UVB radiation and increased nitrate concentrations. Various astrophysical events have been suggested as sources of ionizing radiation that could pose a threat to life on Earth, through destruction of the ozone layer and subsequent increase in UVB, followed by deposition of nitrate. In this study, we investigate whether the nitrate deposition following an ionizing event is sufficiently large to cause an additional stress beyond that of the heightened UVB previously considered. We have converted predicted nitrate depositions to concentration values, utilizing data from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Acid Rain Monitoring Network web site. Our results show that the increase in nitrate concentration in bodies of water following the most intense ionization event likely in the last billion years would not be sufficient to cause a serious additional stress on amphibian populations and may actually provide some benefit by acting as fertilizer.

  15. Titanium addition practice, and maintenance for the hearths in AHMSA`s blast furnaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boone, A.G.; Jimenez, G.; Castillo, J. [Altos Hornos de Mexico, Monclova (Mexico)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Altos Hornos de Mexico (AHMSA) is a steel company located in Northern Mexico, in the state of Coahuila. Currently there are three blast furnaces in operation and one more about to finish its general repair. This last one is to remain as a back-up unit. Because of blast furnace hearth wear outs AHMSA has developed some maintenance procedures. These procedures are based on titanium ore additions and hearth thermic control monitoring. There are also some other maintenance practices adopted to the working operations to assure that such operations detect and avoid in time hearth wear outs that place personnel and/or the unit in danger (due to hearth leaks). This paper describes titanium ore addition to No. 2 blast furnace during the final campaign and it also illustrates maintenance practices and continuous monitoring of temperature trends both of which were implemented at AHMSA`s No. 5 blast furnace.

  16. Manual for Implementation of the Voluntary Offer Safeguards Agreement and Additional Protocol with the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1998-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual provides detailed information for implementing the requirements of DOE O 142.2A, dated 12-15-06; the Agreement Between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for the Application of Safeguards in the United States; the Original Protocol to the Agreement; the Additional Protocol to the Agreement signed by the United States and the IAEA on June 12, 1998; and the Interagency Procedures for the Implementation of the U.S.-IAEA Safeguards Agreement. No cancellation. Admin Chg 1, dated 6-27-13, cancels DOE M 142.2-1. Certified 12-3-14.

  17. Manual for Implementation of the Voluntary Offer Safeguards Agreement and Additional Protocol with the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1998-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual provides detailed information for implementing the requirements of DOE O 142.2A, dated 12-15-06; the Agreement Between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for the Application of Safeguards in the United States; the Original Protocol to the Agreement; the Additional Protocol to the Agreement signed by the United States and the IAEA on June 12, 1998; and the Interagency Procedures for the Implementation of the U.S.-IAEA Safeguards Agreement. No cancellation. Admin Chg 1, 6-27-13

  18. EFFECTS OF QUARTZ PARTICLE SIZE AND SUCROSE ADDITION ON MELTING BEHAVIOR OF A MELTER FEED FOR HIGH-LEVEL GLASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MARCIAL J; KRUGER AA; HRMA PR; SCHWEIGER MJ; SWEARINGEN KJ; TEGROTENHUIS WE; HENAGER SH

    2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of melter feed (a mixture of nuclear waste and glass-forming additives) during waste-glass processing has a significant impact on the rate of the vitrification process. We studied the effects of silica particle size and sucrose addition on the volumetric expansion (foaming) of a high-alumina feed and the rate of dissolution of silica particles in feed samples heated at 5 C/min up to 1200 C. The initial size of quartz particles in feed ranged from 5 to 195 {micro}m. The fraction of the sucrose added ranged from 0 to 0.20 g per g glass. Extensive foaming occurred only in feeds with 5-{micro}m quartz particles; particles {ge}150 {micro}m formed clusters. Particles of 5 {micro}m completely dissolved by 900 C whereas particles {ge}150 {micro}m did not fully dissolve even when the temperature reached 1200 C. Sucrose addition had virtually zero impact on both foaming and the dissolution of silica particles. Over 100 sites in the United States are currently tasked with the storage of nuclear waste. The largest is the Hanford Site located in southeastern Washington State with 177 subterranean tanks containing over fifty-million gallons of nuclear waste from plutonium production from 1944 through 1987. This waste will be vitrified at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. In the vitrification process, feed is charged into a melter and converted into glass to be ultimately stored in a permanent repository. The duration of waste-site cleanups by the vitrification process depends on the rate of melting, i.e., on the rate of the feed-to-glass conversion. Foaming associated with the melting process and the rate of dissolution of quartz particles (silica being the major glass-forming additive) are assumed to be important factors that influence the rate of melting. Previous studies on foaming of high-alumina feed demonstrated that varying the makeup of a melter feed has a significant impact on foaming. The volume of feeds that contained 5-{micro}m quartz particles substantially increased because of foaming. The extent of foaming decreased as the particle size of quartz increased. Moreover, samples containing quartz particles 195 {micro}m formed agglomerates at temperatures above 900 C that only slowly dissolved in the melt. This study continues previous work on the feed-melting process, specifically on the effects of the size of silica particles on the formation of nuclear-waste glasses to determine a suitable range of silica particle sizes that causes neither excessive foaming nor undesirable agglomeration. Apart from varying the silica-particle size, carbon was added in the form of sucrose. Sucrose has been used to accelerate the rate of melting. In this study, we have observed its impact on feed foaming and quartz dissolution.

  19. Recycling of quantum information: Multiple observations of quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Rapcan; John Calsamiglia; Ramon Munoz-Tapia; Emilio Bagan; Vladimir Buzek

    2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Given a finite number of copies of an unknown qubit state that have already been measured optimally, can one still extract any information about the original unknown state? We give a positive answer to this question and quantify the information obtainable by a given observer as a function of the number of copies in the ensemble, and of the number of independent observers that, one after the other, have independently measured the same ensemble of qubits before him. The optimality of the protocol is proven and extensions to other states and encodings are also studied. According to the general lore, the state after a measurement has no information about the state before the measurement. Our results manifestly show that this statement has to be taken with a grain of salt, specially in situations where the quantum states encode confidential information.

  20. Local cloning of Bell states and distillable entanglement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibasish Ghosh; Guruprasad Kar; Anirban Roy

    2004-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The necessary and sufficient amount of entanglement required for cloning of orthogonal Bell states by local operation and classical communication is derived, and using this result, we provide here some additional examples of reversible, as well as irreversible states.

  1. Service Contract Addition Please type or print information clearly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wlodawer, Alexander

    Service Contract Addition Please type or print information clearly Purchasing Department, Building for the service contract. If the item is part of an equipment system, all accessories must be listed. When adding 18. Serial Number 19. Location (Bldg./Rm.) 20. Requested Start Date 21. Service Contract Vendor 22

  2. CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Yingfei

    CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project TO: Deans, Directors 23, 2011 HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION: Monday to Friday 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ACCESSIBLE ROUTES: Accessible routes shall be maintained. ADVISORY: All persons in the vicinity of this construction project

  3. CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project TO: Deans, Directors on the roof to June 30, 2011. DURATION OF PROJECT: May 21, 2011 to June 30, 2011 HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION: Monday persons in the vicinity of this construction project are advised to respect all construction barricades

  4. CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project TO: Deans, Directors. DURATION OF PROJECT: May 31, 2011 to June 21, 2011 HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION: Monday to Friday 7:30 a.m. to 4. The loading area will be closed on May 31, 2011. ADVISORY: All persons in the vicinity of this construction

  5. Additional reductions in the k-constrained modified KP hierarchy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleksandr Chvartatskyi; Yuriy Sydorenko

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Additional reductions in the modified k-constrained KP hierarchy are proposed. As a result we obtain generalizations of Kaup-Broer system, Korteweg-de Vries equation and a modification of Korteweg-de Vries equation that belongs to modified k-constrained KP hierarchy. We also propose solution generating technique based on binary Darboux transformations for the obtained equations.

  6. Submitted to the Annals of Statistics FUNCTIONAL ADDITIVE REGRESSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radchenko, Peter

    extends beyond the standard linear regression setting to fit general non-linear additive models. We extending the classical functional regression model. [25] proposed an index model to implement a non-linear extends the usual linear regression model involving a functional predictor, X(t), and a scalar response, Y

  7. additional energy losses: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    additional energy losses First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Comparing energy loss...

  8. additional test positions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    additional test positions First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Testing complete positivity...

  9. On abelian and additive complexity in infinite words

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ardal, Hayri; Jungi?, Veselin; Sahasrabudhe, Julian

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of the structure of infinite words having bounded abelian complexity was initiated by G. Richomme, K. Saari, and L. Q. Zamboni. In this note we define bounded additive complexity for infinite words over a finite subset of Z^m. We provide an alternative proof of one of the results of Richomme, Saari, and Zamboni.

  10. France at War: Additions to the War Poster Collection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    France at War: Additions to the War Poster Collection In the summer of 2004, the library acquired a collection of eighty-five French posters from the First and Second World Wars. These add to Yale's extensive War Poster Collection, which has over 500 French posters from World War I but very few from World War

  11. *Additional SOPs available, see: Labeling Experiments or Bottles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodall, Jerry M.

    Materials: -- Acceptable Locations For Use: Refer to chemical specific SOPs. Additional Process Notes email) and when you will return. If the chemical is particularly hazardous, make sure to represent Acids (Very hazardous! Do not approach.) Dirk Pitt Tue (May 5?) 530-752-2241 Overnight bath will clean

  12. Enclosure 1 Additional Information on Hanford Tank Wastes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    established by the Atomic Energy Commission in 1969 that cladding hulls (removed from spent fuel by mechanical, 1969, Siting of Commercial Fuel Reprocessing Plants and Related Waste Management Facilities; StatementEnclosure 1 Additional Information on Hanford Tank Wastes Introduction The U. S. Nuclear Regulatory

  13. On the Context-Freeness Problem for Vector Addition Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , or equivalently vector addition systems (VAS), are widely recognized as a central model for concurrent systems one of the most studied formalisms for the modeling and analysis of concurrent systems. Despite their fairly large expressive power, many verification problems are decidable for VAS: boundedness

  14. Non-Traditional Soil Additives: Can They Improve Crop Production?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    or no nutrient content. Unlike fertilizers, additives are commonly not mar- keted with, nor are they required these materials to the soil will enhance crop production by improving water and/or nutrient availability such as evaporated sea water or sulfates, which may be com- bined with organic extracts of materials such as kelp

  15. A Counterexample to Additivity of Minimum Output Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. B. Hastings

    2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a random construction of a pair of channels which gives, with non-zero probability for sufficiently large dimensions, a counterexample to the minimum output entropy conjecture. As shown by Shor, this implies a violation of the additivity conjecture for the classical capacity of quantum channels. The violation of the minimum output entropy conjecture is relatively small.

  16. Relativistic addition of parallel velocities from time dilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernhard Rothenstein; Stefan Popescu

    2006-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The relativistic addition of parallel velocities is derived involving relativity only via the time dilation formula, avoiding the length contraction used by many authors in conjunction with time dilation. The followed scenario involves a machine gun that fires successive bullets, considered from its rest frame and from the rest frame of the target, the bullets hit.

  17. Request for Addition or Change to SPP Submitted By

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Request for Addition or Change to SPP UM AEC Submitted By: Phone: E-mail: General Product Information Manufacturer/Product Name List of Installations within 50 Miles of Ann Arbor Years Product in Use Certification Certified wood Green Seal Standard GS-11 and Green Seal Plus (iaq) Greenguard Primarily indoor air

  18. Original article Addition of urea to lucernes before industrial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Addition of urea to lucernes before industrial dehydration: Effect on nutritional and at the end of the third cycle: lucernes 1, 2 and 3. These three samples were submitted to an industrial) digestibility measured in sheep using the three dehydrated lucernes; and ii) on ruminal degradation

  19. additive contents crada: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    additive contents crada First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 NIMH CRADAs Review and Approval...

  20. Microcosmos In addition to the regular physics major, we

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Physics II (1) Physics 309 Modern Physics (3) Physics 270 Computational Physics (3) or 370 Physics 317 Thermodynamics (3) Physics 409 Modern Physics Lab* (3) Physics 411 Mechanics (4) Physics 420 ElectricityCosmos to Microcosmos In addition to the regular physics major, we also offer a physics major

  1. Additives and method for controlling clathrate hydrates in fluid systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sloan, E.D. Jr.; Christiansen, R.L.; Lederhos, J.P.; Long, J.P.; Panchalingam, V.; Du, Y.; Sum, A.K.W.

    1997-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Discussed is a process for preventing clathrate hydrate masses from detrimentally impeding the possible flow of a fluid susceptible to clathrate hydrate formation. The process is particularly useful in the natural gas and petroleum production, transportation and processing industry where gas hydrate formation can cause serious problems. Additives preferably contain one or more five member, six member and/or seven member cyclic chemical groupings. Additives include polymers having lactam rings. Additives can also contain polyelectrolytes that are believed to improve conformance of polymer additives through steric hindrance and/or charge repulsion. Also, polymers having an amide on which a C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} group is attached to the nitrogen and/or the carbonyl carbon of the amide may be used alone, or in combination with ring-containing polymers for enhanced effectiveness. Polymers having at least some repeating units representative of polymerizing at least one of an oxazoline, an N-substituted acrylamide and an N-vinyl alkyl amide are preferred.

  2. Additives and method for controlling clathrate hydrates in fluid systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sloan, Jr., Earle Dendy (Golden, CO); Christiansen, Richard Lee (Littleton, CO); Lederhos, Joseph P. (Wheatridge, CO); Long, Jin Ping (Dallas, TX); Panchalingam, Vaithilingam (Lakewood, CO); Du, Yahe (Golden, CO); Sum, Amadeu Kun Wan (Golden, CO)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discussed is a process for preventing clathrate hydrate masses from detrimentally impeding the possible flow of a fluid susceptible to clathrate hydrate formation. The process is particularly useful in the natural gas and petroleum production, transportation and processing industry where gas hydrate formation can cause serious problems. Additives preferably contain one or more five member, six member and/or seven member cyclic chemical groupings. Additives include polymers having lactam rings. Additives can also contain polyelectrolytes that are believed to improve conformance of polymer additives through steric hinderance and/or charge repulsion. Also, polymers having an amide on which a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 group is attached to the nitrogen and/or the carbonyl carbon of the amide may be used alone, or in combination with ring-containing polymers for enhanced effectiveness. Polymers having at least some repeating units representative of polymerizing at least one of an oxazoline, an N-substituted acrylamide and an N-vinyl alkyl amide are preferred.

  3. Apollo Rock Reveals Moon Had Molten Core | Universe Additional Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Benjamin P.

    Apollo Rock Reveals Moon Had Molten Core | Universe Today Subscribe Podcast Home Additional Apollo Rock Reveals Moon Had Molten Core Written by Nancy Atkinson If you're new here, you may want to subscribe to my RSS feed. Thanks for visiting! Apollo Rock Reveals Moon Had Molten Core | Universe Today

  4. additional crop yield: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mills make as fine a flour as could be desired." Taylor (log), who went by horseback from San Antonio to El Paso and on to California in 1876, observed wheat..., he reports (1876)...

  5. Interference Channel with State Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Lili

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    the state is additive and symmetric at both receivers, we study both strong and weak interference scenarios and characterize the theoretical gap between the achievable symmetric rate and the upper bound, which is shown to be less than 1/4 bit for the strong...

  6. Observing alternatives to inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Peter

    2009-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the possibility that the inflationary paradigm, undoubtfully today's best framework to understand all the present cosmological data, may still have some viable challengers. The underlying idea for such discussions is that although inflation already passed quite a large number of tests, indeed enough to make it part of the so-called ``standard model'' of cosmology, it has always been through indirect measurements: there is not a chance that we may ever directly check its validity, and therefore, in order to assert its factuality with increasing level of confidence, it is required that we compare its predictions not only to observations, but also to as many contenders as possible. Among other categories of possible models, we wish to put the emphasis in particular on bouncing cosmologies that, however not as complete as the inflation paradigm might be, could still represent a reasonnable way of explaining the current data. Hopefully, future data will be able to discriminate between these various sets of theories.

  7. New observations of the extended hydrogen exosphere of the extrasolar planet HD209458b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Ehrenreich; Alain Lecavelier des Etangs; Guillaume Hébrard; Jean-Michel Désert; Alfred Vidal-Madjar; John C. McConnell; Christopher D. Parkinson; Gilda E. Ballester

    2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic hydrogen escaping from the planet HD209458b provides the largest observational signature ever detected for an extrasolar planet atmosphere. However, the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) used in previous observational studies is no longer available, whereas additional observations are still needed to better constrain the mechanisms subtending the evaporation process, and determine the evaporation state of other `hot Jupiters'. Here, we aim to detect the extended hydrogen exosphere of HD209458b with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and to find evidence for a hydrogen comet-like tail trailing the planet, which size would depend on the escape rate and the amount of ionizing radiation emitted by the star. These observations also provide a benchmark for other transiting planets, in the frame of a comparative study of the evaporation state of close-in giant planets. Eight HST orbits are used to observe two transits of HD209458b. Transit light curves are obtained by performing photometry of the unresolved stellar Lyman-alpha emission line during both transits. Absorption signatures of exospheric hydrogen during the transit are compared to light curve models predicting a hydrogen tail. Transit depths of (9.6 +/- 7.0)% and (5.3 +/- 10.0)% are measured on the whole Lyman-alpha line in visits 1 and 2, respectively. Averaging data from both visits, we find an absorption depth of (8.0 +/- 5.7)%, in good agreement with previous studies. The extended size of the exosphere confirms that the planet is likely loosing hydrogen to space. Yet, the photometric precision achieved does not allow us to better constrain the hydrogen mass loss rate.

  8. Observations of the Temperature Dependent Response of Ozone to NOx Reductions in an Urban Plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFranchi, B W; Goldstein, A H; Cohen, R C

    2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of NO{sub x} in the Sacramento, CA region show that mixing ratios decreased by 30% between 2001 and 2008. Here we use an observation-based method to quantify net ozone production rates in the outflow from the Sacramento metropolitan region and examine the O{sub 3} decrease resulting from reductions in NO{sub x} emissions. This observational method does not rely on assumptions about detailed chemistry of ozone production, rather it is an independent means to verify and test these assumptions. We use an instantaneous steady-state model as well as a detailed 1-D plume model to aid in interpretation of the ozone production inferred from observations. In agreement with the models, the observations show that early in the plume, the NO{sub x} dependence for O{sub x} (O{sub x} = O{sub 3}+NO{sub 2}) production is strongly coupled with temperature, suggesting that temperature dependent biogenic VOC emissions can drive O{sub x} production between NO{sub x}-limited and NO{sub x}-suppressed regimes. As a result, NO{sub x} reductions were found to be most effective at higher temperatures over the 7 year period. We show that violations of the California 1-hour O{sub 3} standard (90 ppb) in the region have been decreasing linearly with decreases in NO{sub x} (at a given temperature) and predict that reductions of NO{sub x} concentrations (and presumably emissions) by an additional 30% (relative to 2007 levels) will eliminate violations of the state 1 hour standard in the region. If current trends continue, a 30% decrease in NO{sub x} is expected by 2012, and an end to violations of the 1 hour standard in the Sacramento region appears to be imminent.

  9. Temperature Dependent Interaction Non-Additivity in the Inorganic Ionic Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaban, Vitaly V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interaction non-additivity in the chemical context means that binding of certain atom to a reference atom cannot be fully predicted from the interactions of these two atoms with other atoms. This constitutes one of key phenomena determining an identity of our world, which would have been much poorer otherwise. Ionic systems provide a good example of the interaction non-additivity in most cases due to electron transfer and delocalization effects. We report Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) simulations of LiCl, NaCl, and KCl at 300, 1500, and 2000 K. We show that our observations originate from interplay of thermal motion during BOMD and cation nature. In the case of alkali cations, ionic nature plays a more significant role than temperature. Our results bring fundamental understanding of electronic effects in the condensed phase of ionic systems and foster progress in physical chemistry and engineering.

  10. Drag Reduction by Laser-Plasma Energy Addition in Hypersonic Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliveira, A. C. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, 12630-000 Cachoeira Paulista (Brazil); Instituto de Estudos Avancados, 12228-001 Sao Jose dos Campos (Brazil); Minucci, M. A. S.; Toro, P. G. P.; Chanes, J. B. Jr [Instituto de Estudos Avancados, 12228-001 Sao Jose dos Campos (Brazil); Myrabo, L. N. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180-3590 (United States)

    2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the drag reduction by laser-plasma energy addition in a low density Mach 7 hypersonic flow. The experiments were conducted in a shock tunnel and the optical beam of a high power pulsed CO{sub 2} TEA laser operating with 7 J of energy and 30 MW peak power was focused to generate the plasma upstream of a hemispherical model installed in the tunnel test section. The non-intrusive schlieren optical technique was used to visualize the effects of the energy addition to hypersonic flow, from the plasma generation until the mitigation of the shock wave profile over the model surface. Aside the optical technique, a piezoelectric pressure transducer was used to measure the impact pressure at stagnation point of the hemispherical model and the pressure reduction could be observed.

  11. Accretion Disc Turbulence and the X-Ray Power Spectra of Black Hole High States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael A. Nowak; Robert V. Wagoner

    1994-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The high state of black hole candidates is characterized by a quasi- thermal emission component at $kT \\sim 1$ keV. In addition, this state tends to have very low variability which indicates that it is relatively stable, at least on {\\it short} time scales. Most models of the high state imply that the bulk of the emission comes from an optically thick accretion disc; therefore, this state may be an excellent laboratory for testing our ideas about the physics of accretion discs. In this work we consider the implications of assuming that accretion disc viscosity arises from some form of turbulence. Specifically, we consider the simple case of three dimensional hydrodynamic turbulence. It is found that the coupling of such turbulence to acoustic modes in the disc can alter the disc emission. We calculate the amplitude and frequencies of this modulation, and we express our results in terms of the X-ray power spectral density. We compare our calculations with observations of the black hole candidate GS 1124-683, and show that for certain parameters we can reproduce some of the high frequency power. We then briefly explore mechanisms for producing the low frequency power, and note the difficulty that a single variability mechanism has in reproducing the full range of observed variability. In addition, we outline ways in which future spacecraft missions -- such as USA and XTE -- can further constrain our model, especially at frequencies above $\\sim 10^2$ Hz.

  12. Is there evidence for additional neutrino species from cosmology?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feeney, Stephen M.; Peiris, Hiranya V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Verde, Licia, E-mail: stephen.feeney.09@ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: h.peiris@ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: liciaverde@icc.ub.edu [ICREA and ICC, Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, Barcelona 08028 (Spain)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been suggested that recent cosmological and flavor-oscillation data favor the existence of additional neutrino species beyond the three predicted by the Standard Model of particle physics. We apply Bayesian model selection to determine whether there is indeed any evidence from current cosmological datasets for the standard cosmological model to be extended to include additional neutrino flavors. The datasets employed include cosmic microwave background temperature, polarization and lensing power spectra, and measurements of the baryon acoustic oscillation scale and the Hubble constant. We also consider other extensions to the standard neutrino model, such as massive neutrinos, and possible degeneracies with other cosmological parameters. The Bayesian evidence indicates that current cosmological data do not require any non-standard neutrino properties.

  13. Mass spectral characterization of petroleum dyes, tracers, and additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youngless, T.L.; Swansiger, J.T.; Danner, D.A.; Greco, M.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petroleum dyes, additives, and tracers are important for identifying gasolines in spill and contamination problems. High-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) was used for the characterization of 21 commercial petroleum dyes. Many contained common chromophores, typically azo or anthraquinone groups, and often differed only in their degree of alkyl substitution. Few dyes were pure and typically contained several chromogens with homologous series of substituents. A separation method was developed to concentrate the polar fractions containing the additives. Subsequent characterization of the polar fraction by GC/MS showed distinct differences between different gasolines. Various colorless tracers were evaluated in terms of detectability, soil adsorption, and cost. Many tracers exhibited soil adsorption and interferences which limited their detectability. Alcohols in the C8-C10 range were found to be the most suitable tracers with GC/MS detection limits of 1 ppm. 22 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  14. A new DFM approach to combine machining and additive manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerbrat, Olivier; Hascoët, Jean-Yves; 10.1016/j.compind.2011.04.003

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design For Manufacturing (DFM) approaches aim to integrate manufacturability aspects during the design stage. Most of DFM approaches usually consider only one manufacturing process, but products competitiveness may be improved by designing hybrid modular products, in which products are seen as 3-D puzzles with modules realized aside by the best manufacturing process and further gathered. A new DFM system is created in order to give quantitative information during the product design stage of which modules will benefit in being machined and which ones will advantageously be realized by an additive process (such as Selective Laser Sintering or laser deposition). A methodology for a manufacturability evaluation in case of a subtractive or an additive manufacturing process is developed and implemented in a CAD software. Tests are carried out on industrial products from automotive industry.

  15. Additive for iron disulfide cathodes used in thermal batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1982-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention comprises thermal batteries employing an FeS/sub 2/ depolarizer itself. A minor amount of CaSi/sub 2/ preferably 1-3% by weight is provided as an additive in the FeS/sub 2/ depolarizer to eliminate the voltage transient (spike) which normally occurs upon activation of batteries of this type. The amount of FeS/sub 2/ by weight generally comprises 64 to 90%.

  16. Quantum Gaussian Channels with Additive Correlated Classical Noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanna Ruggeri; Stefano Mancini

    2006-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a model to study memory effects in quantum Gaussian channels with additive classical noise over an arbitrary number of uses. The correlation among different uses is introduced by contiguous two-mode interactions. Numerical results for few modes are presented. They confirm the possibility to enhance the classical information rate with the aid of entangled inputs, and show a likely asymptotic behavior that should lead to the full capacity of the channel.

  17. Pennsylvania Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYearAdditions (Million Cubic Feet)

  18. State coal profiles, January 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of State Coal Profiles is to provide basic information about the deposits, production, and use of coal in each of the 27 States with coal production in 1992. Although considerable information on coal has been published on a national level, there is a lack of a uniform overview for the individual States. This report is intended to help fill that gap and also to serve as a framework for more detailed studies. While focusing on coal output, State Coal Profiles shows that the coal-producing States are major users of coal, together accounting for about three-fourths of total US coal consumption in 1992. Each coal-producing State is profiled with a description of its coal deposits and a discussion of the development of its coal industry. Estimates of coal reserves in 1992 are categorized by mining method and sulfur content. Trends, patterns, and other information concerning production, number of mines, miners, productivity, mine price of coal, disposition, and consumption of coal are detailed in statistical tables for selected years from 1980 through 1992. In addition, coal`s contribution to the State`s estimated total energy consumption is given for 1991, the latest year for which data are available. A US summary of all data is provided for comparing individual States with the Nation as a whole. Sources of information are given at the end of the tables.

  19. Quantum Addition Circuits and Unbounded Fan-Out

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasuhiro Takahashi; Seiichiro Tani; Noboru Kunihiro

    2009-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We first show how to construct an O(n)-depth O(n)-size quantum circuit for addition of two n-bit binary numbers with no ancillary qubits. The exact size is 7n-6, which is smaller than that of any other quantum circuit ever constructed for addition with no ancillary qubits. Using the circuit, we then propose a method for constructing an O(d(n))-depth O(n)-size quantum circuit for addition with O(n/d(n)) ancillary qubits for any d(n)=\\Omega(log n). If we are allowed to use unbounded fan-out gates with length O(n^c) for an arbitrary small positive constant c, we can modify the method and construct an O(e(n))-depth O(n)-size circuit with o(n) ancillary qubits for any e(n)=\\Omega(log* n). In particular, these methods yield efficient circuits with depth O(log n) and with depth O(log* n), respectively. We apply our circuits to constructing efficient quantum circuits for Shor's discrete logarithm algorithm.

  20. First Ever STEREO Images of the Entire Sun These presentations give additional information on how STEREO's first ever

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    STEREO 360 1 First Ever STEREO Images of the Entire Sun These presentations give additional information on how STEREO's first ever views of the entire sun will advance the study of solar and space years the STEREO spacecrafts and SDO will be able to observe the entire 360 degrees of the Sun. Credit

  1. Impact of Acid Additives on Elastic Modulus of Viscoelastic Surfactants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Waqar Ahmad

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In live acid solutions at concentrations of HCl namely 15-20 wt% HCl, elastic modulus remained quite low as compared to 10-12 wt% HCl concentrations. At 10 wt% HCl concentration, elastic modulus was 3.4 Pa observed whereas at 20 wt% HCl...

  2. Electron Cloud observation in the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rumolo, G; Baglin, V; Bartosik, H; Biancacci, N; Baudrenghien, P; Bregliozzi, G; Chiggiato, P; Claudet, S; De Maria, R; Esteban-Muller, J; Favier, M; Hansen, C; Höfle, W; Jimenez, J M; Kain, V; Lanza, G; Li, K S B; Maury Cuna, G H I; Métral, E; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Roncarolo, F; Salvant, B; Shaposhnikova, E N; Steinhagen, R J; Tavian, L J; Valuch, D; Venturini Delsolaro, W; Zimmermann, F; Iriso, U; Dominguez, O; Koukovini-Platia, E; Mounet, N; Zannini, C; Bhat, C M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operation of LHC with bunch trains at different spacings has revealed the formation of an electron cloud inside the machine. The main observations of electron cloud build up are the pressure rise measured at the vacuum gauges in the warm regions, as well as the increase of the beam screen temperature in the cold regions due to an additional heat load. The effects of the electron cloud were also visible as instability and emittance growth affecting the last bunches of longer trains, which could be improved running with higher chromaticity or larger transverse emittances. A summary of the 2010 and 2011 observations and measurements and a comparison with models will be presented. The efficiency of scrubbing to improve the machine running performance will be briefly discussed.

  3. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2003-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  4. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  5. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  6. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  7. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  8. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  9. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  10. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  11. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  12. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

  13. Comparing Environmental Impacts of Additive Manufacturing vs. Traditional Machining via Life-Cycle Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faludi, Jeremy; Bayley, Cindy; Bhogal, Suraj; Iribarne, Myles

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Impacts of Additive Manufacturing vs. Traditional MachiningSocial Impacts of Additive Manufacturing vs CNC Machiningcutting! Impacts of Additive Manufacturing in Literature

  14. Comparing Environmental Impacts of Additive Manufacturing vs. Traditional Machining via Life-Cycle Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faludi, Jeremy; Bayley, Cindy; Bhogal, Suraj; Iribarne, Myles

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Social Impacts of Additive Manufacturing vs CNC MachiningImpacts of Additive Manufacturing vs. Traditional Machiningcutting! Impacts of Additive Manufacturing in Literature

  15. Additive effect of propranolol and pulsed dye laser for infantile hemangioma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herschthal, Jordana; Wulkan, Adam; George, Manju; Waibel, Jill

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    6 Month 2013 Case Report Additive effect of propranolol andreport illustrates the additive effect of propranolol andPDL treatments illustrating additive effect between PDL and

  16. Secondary Pollutants from Ozone Reaction with Ventilation Filters and Degradation of Filter Media Additives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Destaillats, Hugo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and degradation of filter media additives H. Destaillats, W.and Degradation of Filter Media Additives Hugo Destaillatsand degradation of filter media additives Hugo Destaillats

  17. Common genetic variants, acting additively, are a major source of risk for autism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    can be explained by additive genetic effects, known asthe assumptions of the additive model and partition familiespolymorphism exerts substantial additive genetic effects on

  18. High Resolution Additive Patterning of Nanoparticles and Polymers Enabled by Vapor Permeable Polymer Templates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demko, Michael Thomas

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High Resolution Additive Patterning of Nanoparticles andHigh Resolution Additive Patterning of Nanoparticles andareas, and in a completely additive manner. In this work, a

  19. Individual-level space-time analyses of emergency department data using generalized additive modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vieira, Veronica M.; Weinberg, Janice M.; Webster, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    data using generalized additive modeling. BMC Public HealthTibshirani R: Generalized Additive Models. London: Chapmanapplication using generalized additive models. Int J Health

  20. Immobilization of uranium in contaminated soil by natural apatite addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mrdakovic Popic, Jelena; Stojanovic, Mirjana; Milosevic, Sinisa; Iles, Deana; Zildzovic, Snezana [Institute for Technology of Nuclear and other Mineral Raw Materials, Franche d' Epere 86, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Serbian natural mineral apatite as soil additive for reducing the migration of uranium from contaminated sediments. In laboratory study we investigated the sorption properties of domestic apatite upon different experimental conditions, such as pH, adsorbent mass, reaction period, concentration of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} in apatite, solid/liquid ratio. In second part of study, we did the quantification of uranium in soil samples, taken from uranium mine site 'Kalna', by sequential extraction method. The same procedure was, also, used for uranium determination in contaminated soil samples after apatite addition, in order to determine the changes in U distribution in soil fraction. The obtained results showed the significant level of immobilization (96.7%) upon certain conditions. Increase of %P{sub 2}O{sub 5} in apatite and process of mechano-chemical activation led to increase of immobilization capacity from 17.50% till 91.64%. The best results for uranium binding were obtained at pH 5.5 and reaction period 60 days (98.04%) The sequential extraction showed the presence of uranium (48.2%) in potentially available soil fractions, but with the apatite addition uranium content in these fractions decreased (30.64%), what is considering environmental aspect significant fact. In situ immobilization of radionuclide using inexpensive sequestering agents, such as apatite, is very adequate for big contaminated areas of soil with low level of contamination. This investigation study on natural apatite from deposit 'Lisina' Serbia was the first one of this type in our country. Key words: apatite, uranium, immobilization, soil, contamination. (authors)

  1. A dynamical perspective on additional planets in 55 Cancri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean N. Raymond; Rory Barnes; Noel Gorelick

    2008-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Five planets are known to orbit the star 55 Cancri. The recently-discovered planet f at 0.78 AU (Fischer et al. 2008) is located at the inner edge of a previously-identified stable zone that separates the three close-in planets from planet d at 5.9 AU. Here we map the stability of the orbital space between planets f and d using a suite of n-body integrations that include an additional, yet-to-be-discovered planet g with a radial velocity amplitude of 5 m/s (planet mass = 0.5-1.2 Saturn masses). We find a large stable zone extending from 0.9 to 3.8 AU at eccentricities below 0.4. For each system we quantify the probability of detecting planets b-f on their current orbits given perturbations from hypothetical planet g, in order to further constrain the mass and orbit of an additional planet. We find that large perturbations are associated with specific mean motion resonances (MMRs) with planets f and d. We show that two MMRs, 3f:1g (the 1:3 MMR between planets g and f) and 4g:1d cannot contain a planet g. The 2f:1g MMR is unlikely to contain a planet more massive than about 20 Earth masses. The 3g:1d and 5g:2d MMRs could contain a resonant planet but the resonant location is strongly confined. The 3f:2g, 2g:1d and 3g:2d MMRs exert a stabilizing influence and could contain a resonant planet. Furthermore, we show that the stable zone may in fact contain 2-3 additional planets, if they are ~50 Earth masses each. Finally, we show that any planets exterior to planet d must reside beyond 10 AU.

  2. Iowa Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building FloorspaceThousandWithdrawals0.0Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-20 0Additions

  3. Louisiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 0 0 1569 0 0Year JanAdditions (Million

  4. Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubic Feet) Yeara3,663 3,430 4,062Additions

  5. Tennessee Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet)4. U.S.Decade Year-0 Year-1Additions

  6. Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain,606,602andDecade Year-0207Additions

  7. Washington Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (Million Cubic58 810 0Cubic Feet)Feet)Additions

  8. Additive Manufacturing: Pursuing the Promise | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of2 ofEmergencyAcrobat PDFMakerAdam GarberAdditive

  9. Idaho Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOWYear-MonthExports toAdditions

  10. New Hampshire Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYearWithdrawalsYear Jan Feb Mar Apr8PriceAdditions

  11. New Jersey Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYearWithdrawalsYear Jan1 0.2 0.1 0.1DecadeAdditions

  12. Oregon Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanAdditions

  13. Field observations and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, Joh B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation outlines observations and lessons learned from the Megaports program. It provides: (1) details of field and technical observations collected during LANL field activities at ports around the world and details of observations collected during radiation detections system testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (2) provides suggestions for improvement and efficiency; and (3) discusses possible program execution changes for more effective operations.

  14. International Workshops to Foster Implementation of the IAEA Additional Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killinger, Mark H.; Coates, Cameron W.; Bedke, Michael L.

    2003-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A country’s adherence to the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) Additional Protocol is an important statement to the world of that country’s commitment to nuclear nonproliferation. Without the Additional Protocol (AP) it is possible, as demonstrated in Iraq, for a country party to the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) to clandestinely work toward nuclear weapons and be undetected by the IAEA. This is because classical safeguards under the NPT are directed at diversion of nuclear material from declared activities. But a country may instead build undeclared activities to produce weapons-grade nuclear material. The AP is directed at detecting those undeclared activities. As of May 2003, 73 countries had signed the AP, but only 35 have entered into force. To further adherence to the AP, the IAEA has held regional, high-level seminars in Japan, South Africa, Kazakhstan, Peru, Romania, and Malaysia to explain AP provisions. To supplement these policy-level seminars, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has undertaken to develop a set of modules of technical competencies required to implement the AP. The intent is to work closely with the IAEA by providing these technical competencies to countries as well as to complement the IAEA’s regional seminars and other outreach efforts. This paper briefly describes the technical competency modules.

  15. Strong Integer Additive Set-valued Graphs: A Creative Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. K. Sudev; K. A. Germina; K. P. Chithra

    2015-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    For a non-empty ground set $X$, finite or infinite, the {\\em set-valuation} or {\\em set-labeling} of a given graph $G$ is an injective function $f:V(G) \\to \\mathcal{P}(X)$, where $\\mathcal{P}(X)$ is the power set of the set $X$. A set-indexer of a graph $G$ is an injective set-valued function $f:V(G) \\to \\mathcal{P}(X)$ such that the function $f^{\\ast}:E(G)\\to \\mathcal{P}(X)-\\{\\emptyset\\}$ defined by $f^{\\ast}(uv) = f(u){\\ast} f(v)$ for every $uv{\\in} E(G)$ is also injective., where $\\ast$ is a binary operation on sets. An integer additive set-indexer is defined as an injective function $f:V(G)\\to \\mathcal{P}({\\mathbb{N}_0})$ such that the induced function $g_f:E(G) \\to \\mathcal{P}(\\mathbb{N}_0)$ defined by $g_f (uv) = f(u)+ f(v)$ is also injective, where $\\mathbb{N}_0$ is the set of all non-negative integers and $\\mathcal{P}(\\mathbb{N}_0)$ is its power set. An IASI $f$ is said to be a strong IASI if $|f^+(uv)|=|f(u)|\\,|f(v)|$ for every pair of adjacent vertices $u,v$ in $G$. In this paper, we critically and creatively review the concepts and properties of strong integer additive set-valued graphs.

  16. Magnetic Edge States in Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriela Murguia

    2010-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic confinement in graphene has been of recent and growing interest because its potential applications in nanotechnology. In particular, the observation of the so called magnetic edge states in graphene has opened the possibility to deepen into the generation of spin currents and its applications in spintronics. We study the magnetic edge states of quasi-particles arising in graphene monolayers due to an inhomogeneous magnetic field of a magnetic barrier in the formalism of the two-dimensional massless Dirac equation. We also show how the solutions of such states in each of both triangular sublattices of the graphene are related through a supersymmetric transformation in the quantum mechanical sense.

  17. Expansion-contraction cycles for cement optimized as a function of additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talabani, S.; Hareland, G. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate the addition of specific additives to cement in order to eliminate the micro-fractures and micro-annuli that cause gas migration. The experiments performed monitored the change in the cement slurry pressure during the setting of the cement. During the setting period of the cement, two time cycles of cement expansion and contraction were observed. This is due to the individual contributions of each part of the cement mixture. To obtain the optimum tightness of the cement, final optimum concentrations of the additives were obtained experimentally, where the cyclic pressure behavior of the cement was optimized for the best final cement results. By utilizing the correct amount of Anchorage Clay, XC-Polymer, Ironite Scavenger, Ultrafine cement and Synthetic Rubber powder in a class G mixture at a given temperature and confining pressure, an impermeable cement mixture can be obtained. The correct amount of Synthetic Rubber used for cyclic pressure reduction is a function of cement setting temperature and pressure as well as the elastic properties of the rubber. By using laboratory testing at different pressure and temperature with different rubber concentrations and elastic properties, it is estimated that the entire annulus can have an impermeable cement from surface to total depth. The difference in temperature and pressure with depth dictates the concentration and elastic properties of the rubber as the required expansion and contraction changes with depth.

  18. Solar-wind minor ions: recent observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bame, S.J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the years following the Solar Wind Four Conference at Burghausen our knowledge of the solar wind ion composition and dynamics has grown. There have been some surprises, and our understanding of the evolution of the solar wind has been improved. Systematic studies have shown that the minor ions generally travel with a common bulk speed and have temperatures roughly proportional to their masses. It has been determined that the /sup 3/He/sup + +/ content varies greatly; /sup 3/He/sup + +///sup 4/He/sup + +/ ranges from as high as 10/sup 2/ values to below 2 x 10/sup -4/. In some solar wind flows which can be related to energetic coronal events, the minor ions are found in unusual ionization states containing Fe/sup 16 +/ as a prominent ion, showing that the states were formed at unusually high temperatures. Unexpectedly, in a few flows substantial quantities of /sup 4/He/sup +/ have been detected, sometimes with ions identifiable as O/sup 2 +/ and O/sup 3 +/. Surprisingly, in some of these examples the ionization state is mixed showing that part of the plasma escaped the corona without attaining the usual million-degree temperatures while other parts were heated more nearly in the normal manner. Additionally, detailed studies of the minor ions have increased our understanding of the coronal expansion. For example, such studies have contributed to identifying near equatorial coronal streamers as the source of solar wind flows between high speed streams.

  19. VISUALIZING THE SPREAD OF WEST NILE VIRUS Jurgen Symanzik , Utah State University,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Symanzik, Jürgen

    was rst recognized in the United States in 1999 as the cause of severe and fatal human illness, there were only a few states in the Western United States where the virus had not been observed. However, indications are that the virus will be observed in every state of the contiguous United States by the end

  20. United States

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrinceton Plasma Physics Lab Unique PPPL-ledStates Department of

  1. Constraining the Braneworld with Gravitational Wave Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McWilliams, Sean T. [Gravitational Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt Maryland 20771 (United States)

    2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Some braneworld models may have observable consequences that, if detected, would validate a requisite element of string theory. In the infinite Randall-Sundrum model (RS2), the AdS radius of curvature, l, of the extra dimension supports a single bound state of the massless graviton on the brane, thereby reproducing Newtonian gravity in the weak-field limit. However, using the AdS/CFT correspondence, it has been suggested that one possible consequence of RS2 is an enormous increase in Hawking radiation emitted by black holes. We utilize this possibility to derive two novel methods for constraining l via gravitational wave measurements. We show that the EMRI event rate detected by LISA can constrain l at the {approx}1 {mu}m level for optimal cases, while the observation of a single galactic black hole binary with LISA results in an optimal constraint of l{<=}5 {mu}m.

  2. Advanced Electrolyte Additives for PHEV/EV Lithium-ion Battery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Advanced Electrolyte Additives for PHEVEV Lithium-ion Battery Development of Advanced Electrolytes and Electrolyte Additives...

  3. Decontamination formulation with additive for enhanced mold remediation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tucker, Mark D. (Albuquerque, NM); Irvine, Kevin (Huntsville, AL); Berger, Paul (Rome, NY); Comstock, Robert (Bel Air, MD)

    2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Decontamination formulations with an additive for enhancing mold remediation. The formulations include a solubilizing agent (e.g., a cationic surfactant), a reactive compound (e.g., hydrogen peroxide), a carbonate or bicarbonate salt, a water-soluble bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate), a mold remediation enhancer containing Fe or Mn, and water. The concentration of Fe.sup.2+ or Mn.sup.2+ ions in the aqueous mixture is in the range of about 0.0001% to about 0.001%. The enhanced formulations can be delivered, for example, as a foam, spray, liquid, fog, mist, or aerosol for neutralization of chemical compounds, and for killing certain biological compounds or agents and mold spores, on contaminated surfaces and materials.

  4. Motor stator using corner scraps for additional electrical components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S.; Su, Gui-Jia; Adams, Donald J.; Nagashima, James M.; Stancu, Constantin; Carlson, Douglas S.; Smith, Gregory S.

    2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for making a motor and auxiliary devices with a unified stator body comprises providing a piece of material (10) having an area larger than a cross section of the stator (11), removing material from the piece of material (10) to form a pattern for a cross section of a core (11) for the stator, and removing material from the piece of material (10) outside the cross section of the core of the stator (11) to allow positioning of cores (22, 23, 24) for supporting windings (25, 26, 27) of least one additional electromagnetic device, such as a transformer (62) in a dc-to-dc converter (61, 62) that provides a low. voltage dc output. An article of manufacture made according to the invention is also disclosed and apparatus made with the method and article of manufacture are also disclosed.

  5. From Additional Symmetries to Linearization of Virasoro Symmetries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao-Zhong Wu

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct the additional symmetries and derive the Adler-Shiota-van Moerbeke formula for the two-component BKP hierarchy. We also show that the Drinfeld-Sokolov hierarchies of type D, which are reduced from the two-component BKP hierarchy, possess symmetries written as the action of a series of linear Virasoro operators on the tau function. It results in that the Drinfeld-Sokolov hierarchies of type D coincide with Dubrovin and Zhang's hierarchies associated to the Frobenius manifolds for Coxeter groups of type D, and that every solution of such a hierarchy together with the string equation is annihilated by certain combinations of the Virasoro operators and the time derivations of the hierarchy.

  6. INTEGRAL observations of Her X-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Klochkov; R. Staubert; K. Postnov; N. Shakura; A. Santangelo; S. Tsygankov; A. Lutovinov; I. Kreykenbohm; J. Wilms

    2008-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims: We investigate the X-ray spectral and timing properties of the accreting X-ray pulsar Her X-1 observed with the INTEGRAL satellite in July-August 2005. Methods: The data analyzed in this work cover a substantial part of one main-on state of the source. The short-time scale pulse period development is measured. X-ray pulse profiles for different energy ranges and time intervals are constructed. Pulse-averaged and pulse-phase resolved broad band X-ray spectra are studied. Spectral changes during X-ray dips are explored. Results: The X-ray pulse profiles are found to change significantly during the period of observations. For the first time a strong spinup is measured within one 35 d cycle. Spectral characteristics observed during the X-ray dips are consistent with their interpretaion as due to partial covering as has been reported by several authors. The fundamental cyclotron absorption line is firmly observed in both pulse-averaged and pulse-phase resolved X-ray spectra. The energy, width, and the depth of the line are found to vary significantly with pulse phase.

  7. Portland State University Shattuck Hall

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Portland, OR Portland State's Shattuck hall was originally constructed as an elementary school in 1915. In 2007 the university undertook extensive renovations of the building to bring it up to current seismic requirements. In addition to structural improvements, the design team was able to upgraded the building's aging mechanical and electrical systems, upgrade plumbing, and restore the large light wells that bring daylight into the U-shaped building. The resulting building houses Portland State's Architecture department, where students are able to learn from the exposed building systems.

  8. Observation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found TheHotSpeedingSpeedingSpeedingSpeedingSpeedingSpeedingOTYa

  9. Observation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found

  10. Observation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeeding access(SC)Gas and Oil ResearchPublictearing mode

  11. Observation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeeding access(SC)Gas and Oil ResearchPublictearing

  12. NS&T MANAGEMENT OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianotto, David

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

  13. Analysis of The Anomalous Orbital-Energy Changes Observed in Spacecraft Flybys of Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roger Ellman

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 2008 anomalous behavior in spacecraft flybys of Earth was reported in Physical Review Letters, Volume 100, Issue 9, March 7, 2008, in an article entitled "Anomalous Orbital-Energy Changes Observed during Spacecraft Flybys of Earth". The data indicate unaccounted for changes in spacecraft speed, both increases and decreases, for six different spacecraft involved in Earth flybys from December 8, 1990 to August 2, 2005. The article states that, "All ... potential sources of systematic error .... [have been] modeled. None can account for the observed anomalies.... Like the Pioneer anomaly ... the Earth flybys anomaly is a real effect .... Its source is unknown." In the present article it is shown that the Earth flybys anomaly would be caused by a very small acceleration [in addition to that of natural gravitation], centrally directed and independent of distance, the same effect as that which the Pioneer anomaly exhibits. How that effect operates to produce the observed results is analyzed. A cause of the centrally directed accelerations is presented.

  14. Tensor network states and geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Evenbly; G. Vidal

    2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Tensor network states are used to approximate ground states of local Hamiltonians on a lattice in D spatial dimensions. Different types of tensor network states can be seen to generate different geometries. Matrix product states (MPS) in D=1 dimensions, as well as projected entangled pair states (PEPS) in D>1 dimensions, reproduce the D-dimensional physical geometry of the lattice model; in contrast, the multi-scale entanglement renormalization ansatz (MERA) generates a (D+1)-dimensional holographic geometry. Here we focus on homogeneous tensor networks, where all the tensors in the network are copies of the same tensor, and argue that certain structural properties of the resulting many-body states are preconditioned by the geometry of the tensor network and are therefore largely independent of the choice of variational parameters. Indeed, the asymptotic decay of correlations in homogeneous MPS and MERA for D=1 systems is seen to be determined by the structure of geodesics in the physical and holographic geometries, respectively; whereas the asymptotic scaling of entanglement entropy is seen to always obey a simple boundary law -- that is, again in the relevant geometry. This geometrical interpretation offers a simple and unifying framework to understand the structural properties of, and helps clarify the relation between, different tensor network states. In addition, it has recently motivated the branching MERA, a generalization of the MERA capable of reproducing violations of the entropic boundary law in D>1 dimensions.

  15. Additional EIPC Study Analysis: Interim Report on High Priority Topics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 2010 and 2012 the Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) conducted a major long-term resource and transmission study of the Eastern Interconnection (EI). With guidance from a Stakeholder Steering Committee (SSC) that included representatives from the Eastern Interconnection States Planning Council (EISPC) among others, the project was conducted in two phases. Phase 1 involved a long-term capacity expansion analysis that involved creation of eight major futures plus 72 sensitivities. Three scenarios were selected for more extensive transmission- focused evaluation in Phase 2. Five power flow analyses, nine production cost model runs (including six sensitivities), and three capital cost estimations were developed during this second phase. The results from Phase 1 and 2 provided a wealth of data that could be examined further to address energy-related questions. A list of 13 topics was developed for further analysis; this paper discusses the first five.

  16. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

  17. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

  18. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2004-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

  19. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

  20. Bubble formation in water with addition of a hydrophobic solute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryuichi Okamoto; Akira Onuki

    2015-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that phase separation can occur in a one-component liquid outside its coexistence curve (CX) with addition of a small amount of a solute. The solute concentration at the transition decreases with increasing the difference of the solvation chemical potential between liquid and gas. As a typical bubble-forming solute, we consider ${\\rm O}_2$ in ambient liquid water, which exhibits mild hydrophobicity and its critical temperature is lower than that of water. Such a solute can be expelled from the liquid to form gaseous domains while the surrounding liquid pressure is higher than the saturated vapor pressure $p_{cx}$. This solute-induced bubble formation is a first-order transition in bulk and on a partially dried wall, while a gas film grows continuously on a completely dried wall. We set up a bubble free energy $\\Delta G$ for bulk and surface bubbles with a small volume fraction $\\phi$. It becomes a function of the bubble radius $R$ under the Laplace pressure balance. Then, for sufficiently large solute densities above a threshold, $\\Delta G$ exhibits a local maximum at a critical radius and a minimum at an equilibrium radius. We also examine solute-induced nucleation taking place outside CX, where bubbles larger than the critical radius grow until attainment of equilibrium.