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1

CCD Observing Manual 49 Bay State Road  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stars 5.6. Supernovae/Novae Patrols 5.7. Designing Your Own: Using AAVSO VSX 6.0 Observing Techniques 6

Ellingson, Steven W.

2

E-Print Network 3.0 - additional steady-state acquisition Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: additional steady-state acquisition Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 IEEE TRANS. BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING 52 (8), 1450-1460, 2005 1 Automated Correction of Spin-History Related...

3

Core Lithology State of Hawail Scientific Observation Hole 2...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Core Lithology State of Hawail Scientific Observation Hole 2 Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii...

4

Core Lithology State of Hawaii Scientific Observation Hole 4...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Core Lithology State of Hawaii Scientific Observation Hole 4 Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii...

5

REALITY AND GEOMETRY OF STATES AND OBSERVABLES IN QUANTUM THEORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The determination of the quantum state of a single system by protective observation is used to justify operationally a formulation of quantum theory on the quantum state space (projective Hilbert space) $\\cal P$. Protective observation is extended to a more general quantum theory in which the Schrodinger evolution is generalized so that it preserves the symplectic structure but not necessarily the metric in $\\cal P$. The relevance of this more general evolution to the apparant collapse of the state vector during the usual measurement, and its possible connection to gravity is suggested. Some criticisms of protective observation are answered. A comparison is made between the determination of quantum states using the geometry of $\\cal P$ by protective measurements, via a reconstruction theorem, and the determination of space-time points by means of the space-time geometry, via Einstein's hole argument. It is argued that a protective measurement may not determine a time average.

J. Anandan

1995-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

6

A Search for Additional Planets in the Nasa Epoxi Observations of the Exoplanet System Gj 436  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present time series photometry of the M dwarf transiting exoplanet system GJ 436 obtained with the Extrasolar Planet Observation and Characterization (EPOCh) component of the NASA EPOXI mission. We conduct a search of ...

Seager, Sara

7

Observing photonic de Broglie waves without the NOON state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The photonic de Broglie wave, in which an ensemble of $N$ identical photons with wavelength $\\lambda$ reveals $\\lambda/N$ interference fringes, has been known to be a unique feature exhibited by the photon number-path entangled state or the NOON state. Here, we report the observation of the photonic de Broglie wave for a pair of photons, generated by spontaneous parametric down-conversion, that are not photon number-path entangled. We also show that the photonic de Broglie wave can even be observed for a pair of photons that are completely separable (i.e., no entanglement in all degrees of freedom) and distinguishable. The experimental and theoretical results suggest that the photonic de Broglie wave is, in fact, not related to the entanglement of the photons, rather it is related to the indistinguishable pathways established by the measurement scheme.

Osung Kwon; Young-Sik Ra; Yoon-Ho Kim

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

8

CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA EQUATIONS OF STATE BASED ON NEUTRON STAR OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many of the currently available equations of state for core-collapse supernova simulations give large neutron star radii and do not provide large enough neutron star masses, both of which are inconsistent with some recent neutron star observations. In addition, one of the critical uncertainties in the nucleon-nucleon interaction, the nuclear symmetry energy, is not fully explored by the currently available equations of state. In this article, we construct two new equations of state which match recent neutron star observations and provide more flexibility in studying the dependence on nuclear matter properties. The equations of state are also provided in tabular form, covering a wide range in density, temperature, and asymmetry, suitable for astrophysical simulations. These new equations of state are implemented into our spherically symmetric core-collapse supernova model, which is based on general relativistic radiation hydrodynamics with three-flavor Boltzmann neutrino transport. The results are compared with commonly used equations of state in supernova simulations of 11.2 and 40 M{sub Sun} progenitors. We consider only equations of state which are fitted to nuclear binding energies and other experimental and observational constraints. We find that central densities at bounce are weakly correlated with L and that there is a moderate influence of the symmetry energy on the evolution of the electron fraction. The new models also obey the previously observed correlation between the time to black hole formation and the maximum mass of an s = 4 neutron star.

Steiner, A. W. [Institute for Nuclear Theory, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Hempel, M. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Fischer, T. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Wroclaw, pl. Maxa Borna 9, 50-204, Wroclaw (Poland)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

One component metal sintering additive for {beta}-SiC based on thermodynamic calculation and experimental observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: . Standard Gibbs formation free energies vs. temperature for various metal carbides. The heavy line represents the standard Gibbs free energy for {beta}-SiC. The hatched area denotes the typical liquid phase hot pressing temperature of {beta}-SiC (1973-2123 K). Highlights: {yields} Various metal elements were examined as a sintering additive for {beta}-SiC. {yields} Al and Mg enhanced the density significantly without decomposing {beta}-SiC, as predicted by thermodynamic simulation. {yields} Cr, Fe, Ta, Ti, V and W additives formed metal carbide and/or silicide compounds by decomposing {beta}-SiC. {yields} This approach would be useful for selecting effective sintering additive for high temperature ceramics. -- Abstract: Various types of metals were examined as sintering additives for {beta}-SiC by considering the standard Gibbs formation free energy and vapor pressure under hot pressing conditions (1973-2123 K), particularly for applications in nuclear reactors. Metallic elements having the low long-term activation under neutron irradiation condition, such as Cr, Fe, Ta, Ti, V and W, as well as widely used elements, Al, Mg and B, were considered. The conclusions drawn from thermodynamic considerations were compared with the experimental observations. Al and Mg were found to be effective sintering additives, whereas the others were not due to the formation of metal carbides or silicides from the decomposition of SiC under hot pressing conditions.

Noviyanto, Alfian [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Dang-Hyok, E-mail: dhyoon@ynu.ac.kr [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

10

Accurately Estimating the State of a Geophysical System with Sparse Observations: Predicting the Weather  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilizing the information in observations of a complex system to make accurate predictions through a quantitative model when observations are completed at time $T$, requires an accurate estimate of the full state of the model at time $T$. When the number of measurements $L$ at each observation time within the observation window is larger than a sufficient minimum value $L_s$, the impediments in the estimation procedure are removed. As the number of available observations is typically such that $L \\ll L_s$, additional information from the observations must be presented to the model. We show how, using the time delays of the measurements at each observation time, one can augment the information transferred from the data to the model, removing the impediments to accurate estimation and permitting dependable prediction. We do this in a core geophysical fluid dynamics model, the shallow water equations, at the heart of numerical weather prediction. The method is quite general, however, and can be utilized in the analysis of a broad spectrum of complex systems where measurements are sparse. When the model of the complex system has errors, the method still enables accurate estimation of the state of the model and thus evaluation of the model errors in a manner separated from uncertainties in the data assimilation procedure.

Zhe An; Daniel Rey; Henry D. I. Abarbanel

2014-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

11

The structure of strongly additive states and Markov triplets on the CAR algebra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We find a characterization of states satisfying equality in strong subadditivity of entropy and of Markov triplets on the CAR algebra. For even states, a more detailed structure of the density matrix is given.

Anna Jencova

2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

12

X-ray observations during a Her X-1 anomalous low-state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results of a 1999 July 8-10 BeppoSAX observation during an anomalous low-state of Her X-1 are presented. The standard on-state power-law and blackbody continuum model is excluded at high confidence unless partial covering is included. This gives a power-law photon index of 0.63 +/- 0.02 and implies that 0.28 +/- 0.03 of the flux undergoes additional absorption of (27 +/- 7) 10^22 atom/cm2. 11% of the observed 0.1-10 keV flux is from the 0.068 +/- 0.015 keV blackbody. 1.237747(2) s pulses with a semi-amplitude of 2.1 +/- 0.8% are detected at >99.5% confidence and confirmed by RXTE measurements. This implies that Her X-1 underwent substantial spin-down close to the start of the anomalous low-state. The spectral and temporal changes are similar to those recently reported from 4U1626-67. These may result from a strongly warped disk that produces a spin-down torque. The X-ray source is then mostly viewed through the inner regions of the accretion disk. A similar mechanism could be responsible for the Her X-1 anomalous low-states. Shadowing by such an unusually warped disk could produce observable effects in the optical and UV emission from the companion star.

A. N. Parmar; T. Oosterbroek; D. Dal Fiume; M. Orlandini; A. Santangelo; A. Segreto; S. Del Sordo

1999-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

13

Implications of Export/Import Reporting Requirements in the United States - International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Additional Protocol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States has signed but not ratified the US/IAEA Safeguards Additional Protocol. If ratified, the Additional Protocol will require the US to report to the IAEA certain nuclear-related exports and imports to the IAEA. This document identifies and assesses the issues associated with the US making those reports. For example, some regulatory changes appear to be necessary. The document also attempts to predict the impact on the DOE Complex by assessing the historical flow of exports and imports that would be reportable if the Additional Protocol were in force.

Killinger, Mark H.; Benjamin, Eugene L.; McNair, Gary W.

2001-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

14

Study of e+e-??+?-J/? and Observation of a Charged Charmoniumlike State at Belle  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

The cross section for e+e???+??J/? between 3.8 and 5.5 GeV is measured with a 967??fb?1 data sample collected by the Belle detector at or near the ?(nS) (n=1,2,…,5) resonances. The Y(4260) state is observed, and its resonance parameters are determined. In addition, an excess of ?+??J/? production around 4 GeV is observed. This feature can be described by a Breit-Wigner parametrization with properties that are consistent with the Y(4008) state that was previously reported by Belle. In a study of Y(4260)??+??J/? decays, a structure is observed in the M(?±J/?) mass spectrum with 5.2? significance, with mass M=(3894.5±6.6±4.5)??MeV/c2 and width ?=(63±24±26)??MeV/c2, where the errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. This structure can be interpreted as a new charged charmoniumlike state.

Liu, Z. Q.; Shen, C. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bala, A.; Belous, K.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bischofberger, M.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bra?ko, M.; Brodzicka, J.; Browder, T. E.; Chang, P.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, D.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Feindt, M.; Ferber, T.; Frey, A.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Ganguly, S.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Joffe, D.; Julius, T.; Kah, D. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Klucar, J.; Ko, B. R.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Libby, J.; Liu, C.; Lukin, P.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Nedelkovska, E.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Oswald, C.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petri?, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Ritter, M.; Röhrken, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sahoo, H.; Saito, T.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santel, D.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seidl, R.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stari?, M.; Steder, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Tanida, K.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Vahsen, S. E.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vorobyev, V.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, Y.; Yashchenko, S.; Yook, Y.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.; Belle Collaboration

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Stability of autonomous systems The pole placement problem Stabilization by state feedback State observers Pole placement and Stability, Pole Placement, Observers and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stability of autonomous systems The pole placement problem Stabilization by state feedback State University of Groningen Stability, Pole Placement, Observers and Stabilization #12;Stability of autonomous and Outline 1 Stability of autonomous systems 2 The pole placement problem 3 Stabilization by state feedback 4

Trentelman, Harry L.

16

Simultaneous parameter estimation and state smoothing of complex GARCH process in the presence of additive noise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simultaneous parameter estimation and state smoothing of complex GARCH process in the presence 2010 Keywords: GARCH Parameter estimation Noisy data Maximum likelihood Recursive maximum likelihood a b s t r a c t ARCH and GARCH models have been used recently in model-based signal processing

Cohen, Israel

17

MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS AND MODELING OF 1ES 1959+650 IN A LOW FLUX STATE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the VERITAS observations of the high-frequency peaked BL Lac object 1ES 1959+650 in the period 2007-2011. This source is detected at TeV energies by VERITAS at 16.4 standard deviation ({sigma}) significance in 7.6 hr of observation in a low flux state. A multiwavelength spectral energy distribution (SED) is constructed from contemporaneous data from VERITAS, Fermi-LAT, RXTE PCA, and Swift UVOT. Swift XRT data is not included in the SED due to a lack of simultaneous observations with VERITAS. In contrast to the orphan {gamma}-ray flare exhibited by this source in 2002, the X-ray flux of the source is found to vary by an order of magnitude, while other energy regimes exhibit less variable emission. A quasi-equilibrium synchrotron self-Compton model with an additional external radiation field is used to describe three SEDs corresponding to the lowest, highest, and average X-ray states. The variation in the X-ray spectrum is modeled by changing the electron injection spectral index, with minor adjustments of the kinetic luminosity in electrons. This scenario produces small-scale flux variability of the order of {approx}< 2 in the high energy (E > 1 MeV) and very high energy (E > 100 GeV) {gamma}-ray regimes, which is corroborated by the Fermi-LAT, VERITAS, and Whipple 10 m telescope light curves.

Aliu, E.; Errando, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Archambault, S. [Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Arlen, T.; Aune, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Beilicke, M.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Benbow, W. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Bird, R.; Collins-Hughes, E. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Boettcher, M. [Astrophysical Institute, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Byrum, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Cui, W. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Duke, C. [Department of Physics, Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA 50112-1690 (United States); Dumm, J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); and others

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

18

Observation of the first iso-spin Charmonium-like State $Z_c(4020)$ }  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we present a new experimental progress in brief on the recent observation of the charged charmonium-like state Z_c(4020)^{+/-} states and its iso-spin partner Z_c(4020)^{0} in pi pi hc process at the BESIII experiment. The charged Z_{c}(4020) is its decay into \\pi^{+/-} hc final state, and carries electric charge, thus it contains at least four quarks. The observation of both charge and neutral state makes Z_{c}(4020) the first iso-spin triplet Z_{c} state observed in experiment.

Ji, Qing-Ping; Guo, Ai-Qiang; Yu, Chun-Xu; Wang, Zhi-Yong

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Observation of the first iso-spin Charmonium-like State $Z_c(4020)$ }  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we present a new experimental progress in brief on the recent observation of the charged charmonium-like state Z_c(4020)^{+/-} states and its iso-spin partner Z_c(4020)^{0} in pi pi hc process at the BESIII experiment. The charged Z_{c}(4020) is its decay into \\pi^{+/-} hc final state, and carries electric charge, thus it contains at least four quarks. The observation of both charge and neutral state makes Z_{c}(4020) the first iso-spin triplet Z_{c} state observed in experiment.

Qing-Ping Ji; Yu-Ping Guo; Ai-Qiang Guo; Chun-Xu Yu; Zhi-Yong Wang

2015-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

20

Observation of Additional Calcium Ion in the Crystal Structure of the Triple Mutant K56,120,121M of Bovine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; calcium ion; phospholipid binding; surface loop residues*Corresponding author Introduction Phospholipase A in the conformation and dynamics of the surface loop residues could be related to binding of a second calcium ionObservation of Additional Calcium Ion in the Crystal Structure of the Triple Mutant K56,120,121M

Tsai, Ming-Daw

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional observer states" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A comparison of the additional protocols of the five nuclear weapon states and the ensuing safeguards benefits to international nonproliferation efforts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the 6 January 2009 entry into force of the Additional Protocol by the United States of America, all five declared Nuclear Weapon States that are part of the Nonproliferation Treaty have signed, ratified, and put into force the Additional Protocol. This paper makes a comparison of the strengths and weaknesses of the five Additional Protocols in force by the five Nuclear Weapon States with respect to the benefits to international nonproliferation aims. This paper also documents the added safeguards burden to the five declared Nuclear Weapon States that these Additional Protocols put on the states with respect to access to their civilian nuclear programs and the hosting of complementary access activities as part of the Additional Protocol.

Uribe, Eva C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, M Analisa [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, Marisa N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Leitch, Rosalyn M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

OBSERVER DESIGN FOR NONLINEAR SYSTEMS BY USING INPUT-TO-STATE STABILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OBSERVER DESIGN FOR NONLINEAR SYSTEMS BY USING INPUT-TO-STATE STABILITY A. Alessandri Abstract by solving LMI problems [18]. A. Alessandri is with the Institute of Intelligent Systems for Automation

Sontag, Eduardo

23

First Observation of Vector Boson Pairs in a Hadronic Final State at the Tevatron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the first observation in hadronic collisions of the electroweak production of vector boson pairs (VV, V=W, Z) where one boson decays to a dijet final state. The data correspond to 3.5??fb[superscript -1] of ...

Paus, Christoph M. E.

24

EUVE Observations of Her X-1 at the End of the Short High State  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observations of Her X-1 by the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) at the end of the x-ray Short High state are reported here. Her X-1 is found to exhibit a strong orbital modulation of the EUV flux, with a large dip superposed on a broad peak around orbital phase 0.5 when the neutron star is closest the observer. Alternate mechanisms for producing the observed EUV lightcurve are modeled. We conclude that: i) the x-ray heated surface of the companion is too cool to produce enough emission; ii) the accretion disk can produce enough emission but does not explain the orbital modulation; iii) reflection of x-rays off of the companion can produce the shape and intensity of the observed lightcurve. The only viable cause for the large dip at orbital phase 0.5 is shadowing of the companion by the accretion disk.

D. A. Leahy; H. Marshall

1999-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

25

Simultaneous state and unknown inputs estimation with PI and PMI observers for Takagi Sugeno model with unmeasurable premise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simultaneous state and unknown inputs estimation with PI and PMI observers for Takagi Sugeno model-- In this paper, a proportional integral (PI) and a proportional multiple integral observer (PMI) are proposed and PMI observers developed for linear systems. The state estimation error is written as a perturbed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

26

Observations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeedingUnder Well-ControlledObservation ofof Multiple

27

High Density Neutron Star Equation of State from 4U 1636-53 Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A bound on the compactness of the neutron star in the low mass x-ray binary 4U 1636-53 is used to estimate the equation of state of neutron star matter at high density. Observations of 580 Hz oscillations during the rising phase of x-ray bursts from this system appear to be due to two antipodal hot spots on the surface of an accreting neutron star rotating at 290 Hz, implying the compactness of the neutron star is less than 0.163 at the 90% confidence level. The equation of state of high density neutron star matter estimated from this compactness limit is significantly stiffer than extrapolations to high density of equations of state determined by fits of experimental nucleon-nucleon scattering data and properties of light nuclei to two- and three-body interaction potentials.

T. S. Olson

2002-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

28

Observation of excited state charge transfer with fs/ps-CARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Excited state charge transfer processes are studied using the fs/ps-CARS probe technique. This probe allows for multiplexed detection of Raman active vibrational modes. Systems studied include Michler's Ketone, Coumarin 120, 4-dimethylamino-4{prime}-nitrostilbene, and several others. The vibrational spectrum of the para di-substituted benzophenone Michler's Ketone in the first excited singlet state is studied for the first time. It is found that there are several vibrational modes indicative of structural changes of the excited molecule. A combined experimental and theoretical approach is used to study the simplest 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin, Coumarin 120. Vibrations observed in FTIR and spontaneous Raman spectra are assigned using density functional calculations and a continuum solvation model is used to predict how observed modes are affected upon inclusion of a solvent. The low frequency modes of the excited state charge transfer species 4-dimethylamino-4{prime}-nitrostilbene are studied in acetonitrile. Results are compared to previous work on this molecule in the fingerprint region. Finally, several partially completed projects and their implications are discussed. These include the two photon absorption of Coumarin 120, nanoconfinement in cyclodextrin cavities and sensitization of titania nanoparticles.

Blom, Alex Jason

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Constraints on The Dark Energy Equation of State And The Deceleration Parameter From Recent Cosmic Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the constraints on dark energy equation of state $\\omega^{X}$ and the deceleration parameter $q$ from the recent observational data including Hubble data and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation by using a model-independent deceleration parameter $q(z)=1/2-a/(1+z)^b$ and dark energy equation of state $\\omega^{X}=\\omega_{0}+\\omega_{1}z/(1+z)$ in the scope of anisotropic Bianchi type I space-time. For the cases of Hubble dataset, CMB data, and their combination, our results indicate that the constraints on transition redshift $z_{\\ast}$ are $0.62^{+1.45}_{-0.56}$, $0.34^{+0.13}_{-0.06}$, and $0.60^{+0.20}_{-0.10}$ respectively.

Amirhashchi, Hassan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

First observation of alpha-cluster states in the (14)O+(4)He interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW C 77, 064314 (2008) First observation of ?-cluster states in the 14O+ 4He interaction Changbo Fu,1 V. Z. Goldberg,1,2,* G. V. Rogachev,3 G. Tabacaru,1 G. G. Chubarian,1 B. Skorodumov,4 M. McCleskey,1 Y. Zhai,1 T. Al-Abdullah,1 L... impinging on a H2 gas target cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature (see [11] for a more detailed description). The measurement of the 14O+ 4He *Corresponding author: goldberg@comp.tamu.edu elastic-scattering excitation function was carried out using...

Fu, Changbo; Goldberg, V. Z.; Rogachev, G. V.; Tabacaru, G.; Chubarian, G. G.; Skorodumov, B.; McCleskey, M.; Zhai, Y.; Al-Abdullah, T.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Multi-wavelength observations of blazar AO 0235+164 in the 2008-2009 flaring state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The blazar AO 0235+164 (z = 0.94) has been one of the most active objects observed by Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) since its launch in Summer 2008. In addition to the continuous coverage by Fermi, contemporaneous observations were carried out from the radio to {\\gamma} -ray bands between 2008 September and 2009 February. In this paper, we summarize the rich multi-wavelength data collected during the campaign (including F-GAMMA, GASP- WEBT, Kanata, OVRO, RXTE, SMARTS, Swift, and other instruments), examine the cross-correlation between the light curves measured in the different energy bands, and interpret the resulting spectral energy distributions in the context of well-known blazar emission models. We find that the {\\gamma} -ray activity is well correlated with a series of near-IR/optical flares, accompanied by an increase in the optical polarization degree. On the other hand, the X-ray light curve shows a distinct 20 day high state of unusually soft spectrum, which does not match the extrapolation of th...

Ackermann, M; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bellazzini, R; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bottacini, E; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cavazzuti, E; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; Silva, E do Couto e; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Dubois, R; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Fuhrmann, L; Fukazawa, Y; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Hayashida, M; Hughes, R E; Itoh, R; Johannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Knodlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Larsson, S; Lee, S -H; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Mehault, J; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Naumann-Godo, M; Nishino, S; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Pelassa, V; Pesce-Rollins, M; Pierbattista, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Raino, S; Rando, R; Rastawicki, D; Razzano, M; Readhead, A; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reyes, L C; Richards, J L; Sbarra, C; Sgro, C; Siskind, E J; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Szostek, A; Takahashi, H; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J G; Thayer, J B; Thompson, D J; Tinivella, M; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Troja, E; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Yang, Z; Zimmer, S; Moderski, R; Nalewajko, K; Sikora, M; Villata, M; Raiteri, C M; Aller, H D; Aller, M F; Arkharov, A A; Benitez, E; Berdyugin, A; Blinov, D A; Boettcher, M; Calle, O J A Bravo; Buemi, C S; Carosati, D; Chen, W P; Diltz, C; Di Paola, A; Dolci, M; Efimova, N V; Forn\\', E; Gurwell, M A; Heidt, J; Hiriart, D; Jordan, B; Kimeridze, G; Konstantinova, T S; Kopatskaya, E N; Koptelova, E; Kurtanidze, O M; Lahteenmaki, A; Larionova, E G; Larionova, L V; Larionov, V M; Leto, P; Lindfors, E; Lin, H C; Morozova, D A; Nikolashvili, M G; Nilsson, K; Oksman, M; Roustazadeh, P; Sievers, A; Sigua, L A; Sillanpaa, A; Takahashi, T; Takalo, L O; Tornikoski, M; Trigilio, C; Troitsky, I S; Umana, G; Angelakis, E; Krichbaum, T P; Nestoras, I; Riquelme, D; Krips, M; Trippe, S; Arai, A; Kawabata, K S; Sakimoto, K; Sasada, M; Sato, S; Uemura, M; Yamanaka, M; Yoshida, M; Belloni, T; Tagliaferri, G; Bonning, E W; Isler, J; Urry, C M; Hoversten, E; Falcone, A; Pagani, C; Stroh, M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

A BeppoSAX observation of Her X-1 during the first main-on after an anomalous low-state: evidence for rapid spin-down  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results of a BeppoSAX observation of Her X-1 in 2000 October during the first main-on state after the longest recorded anomalous low-state are presented. The 0.1-30 keV spectrum, light curve and pulse profile are all consistent with those measured during previous main on-states, indicating that Her X-1 has resumed its regular 35 day cycle with similar on-state properties as before. However, from a comparison of the measured pulse period with that obtained close to the start of the anomalous low-state, it is evident that Her X-1 continued to spin-down strongly during the anomalous low-state such that the pulse period has returned to a similar value as ~15 years ago. Additionally, the occurrence time of the main-on states after the end of the anomalous low-state indicate that a change in the length, or phasing, of the 35-day cycle occurred during the anomalous low-state.

T. Oosterbroek; A. N. Parmar; M. Orlandini; A. Segreto; A. Santangelo; S. Del Sordo

2001-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

33

Thermodynamic Expression for Nonequilibrium Steady-State Distribution of Macroscopic Observables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A longstanding goal of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics has been to extend the conceptual power of the Boltzmann distribution to driven systems. We report some new progress towards this goal. We first derive an expression for the probability distribution of a macroscopic observable in a generic driven steady state, in terms of the statistics of work done on the system by the external driving fields. By comparison with a simulation of a sheared Brownian colloid, we then provide evidence that a simplified form of this distribution can closely approximate the behavior of real systems arbitrarily far from equilibrium. This simplified form has a straightforward thermodynamic interpretation, which we explain in detail for the case of the sheared colloid. We also discuss the general circumstances in which we expect this approximation to be valid, and suggest some further tests for the new formalism.

Marsland, Robert

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

HZ Her: Stellar Radius from X-ray Eclipse Observations, Evolutionary State and a New Distance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observations of HZ Her/ Her X-1 by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) covering high state eclipses of the neutron star are analyzed here. Models of the eclipse are used to measure the radius and atmospheric scale height of HZ Her, the stellar companion to the neutron star. The radius is 2.61 to 3.03 $\\times10^{11}$ cm, depending on system inclination and mass ratio(q), with accuracy of $\\sim$1 part in 1000 for given inclination and q. We fit Kurucz model stellar atmosphere models to archival optical observations. The resulting effective temperature ($T_{eff}$) of the unheated face of HZ Her is determined to be in the 2$\\sigma$ range 7440K to 7620K, and metallicity ($log(Z/Z_{\\odot})$) in the range -0.14 to +.08. The model atmosphere surface flux and new radius yield a new distance to HZ Her/ Her X-1, depending on system inclination and q. We calculate stellar evolution models for the range of allowed masses (from orbital parameters), and allowed metallicities (from optical spectrum fits). The stellar mode...

Leahy, D A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Observed reductions of surface solar radiation at Sites in the United States and worldwide from 1961 to 1990  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observed reductions of surface solar radiation at Sites in the United States and worldwide from-20146 Hamburg, Germany). ABSTRACT Surface solar radiation revealed an estimated 7W/m2 or 4% decline in solar radiation in the United States can be explained. It is shown that solar radiation declined below

36

Phosphazene additives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

37

Potlining Additives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

Rudolf Keller

2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

38

Observations of nonmethane hydrocarbons and oxygenated volatile organic compounds at a rural site in the southeastern United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of an extensive range of nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) including alkanes, alkenes, and aromatics, and oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) including alcohols, ketones, and aldehydes were conducted for several weeks during the summer of 1995 as part of the Southern Oxidants Study (SOS) at a rural experimental site (Youth, Inc.) 32 km southeast of Nashville, Tennessee, in the southeastern United States. These measurements were conducted to (1) determine the absolute magnitude and variability of oxygenated compounds found in a contemporary rural region; (2) assess the importance of the measured ambient levels of OVOCs on a photochemical reactivity basis relative to the more commonly determined NMHCs; and (3) to evaluate our ability to accurately measure oxygenates by the current techniques employed under a field study scenario. Several other physical (temperature, insolation, etc.), meteorological (wind velocity, wind direction, atmospheric structure, and boundary layer height), and chemical (criterion pollutants, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, CO, O{sub 3}, etc.) parameters were measured concurrently with the NMHC and OVOC measurements. During the study period, OVOCs were consistently the dominant compounds present, and methanol and acetone had the highest mixing ratios. Although OVOCs made up the majority of the volatile organic compound component on a mass basis, a substantial sink for OH was isoprene and its immediate oxidation products, methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone. In combination with CO and formaldehyde, these compounds comprised about 85{percent} of the observed OH reactivity at the site. Acetaldehyde and methanol were responsible for an additional 10{percent}, with the NMHCs and remaining OVOCs making up the final 5{percent} of the measured OH reactivity at the site. These observed patterns reinforce recent studies which find OVOCs to be an important component of the rural troposphere. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

Riemer, Daniel; Pos, Willer; Milne, Peter; Farmer, Charlesk; Zika, Rod [Division of Marine and Atmospheric Chemistry, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States)] [Atmospheric Chemistry Division, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado (United States)] [Atmospheric Sciences, Tennessee Valley Authority, Muscle Shoals, Alabama (United States)] Apel, Eric [Atmospheric Chemistry Group, Mantech Environmental Research Triangle Park, North Carolina (United States)] Olszyna, Ken [National Environmental Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA. Research Triangle Park, North Carolina (United States)] Kliendienst, Tad [Department of Chemistry, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan (United States)] Lonneman, William [Departments of Chemistry, and Earth and Atmospheric Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana (United States); Shepson, Paul; Starn, Tim

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Study of e+e-??+?-J/? and Observation of a Charged Charmoniumlike State at Belle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cross section for e+e???+??J/? between 3.8 and 5.5 GeV is measured with a 967??fb?1 data sample collected by the Belle detector at or near the ?(nS) (n=1,2,…,5) resonances. The Y(4260) state is observed, and its resonance parameters are determined. In addition, an excess of ?+??J/? production around 4 GeV is observed. This feature can be described by a Breit-Wigner parametrization with properties that are consistent with the Y(4008) state that was previously reported by Belle. In a study of Y(4260)??+??J/? decays, a structure is observed in the M(?±J/?) mass spectrum with 5.2? significance, with mass M=(3894.5±6.6±4.5)??MeV/c2 and width ?=(63±24±26)??MeV/c2, where the errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. This structure can be interpreted as a new charged charmoniumlike state.

Liu, Z. Q.; Shen, C. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bala, A.; Belous, K.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bischofberger, M.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bra?ko, M.; Brodzicka, J.; Browder, T. E.; Chang, P.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, D.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Feindt, M.; Ferber, T.; Frey, A.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Ganguly, S.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Joffe, D.; Julius, T.; Kah, D. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Klucar, J.; Ko, B. R.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Libby, J.; Liu, C.; Lukin, P.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Nedelkovska, E.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Oswald, C.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petri?, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Ritter, M.; Röhrken, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sahoo, H.; Saito, T.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santel, D.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seidl, R.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stari?, M.; Steder, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Tanida, K.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Vahsen, S. E.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vorobyev, V.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, Y.; Yashchenko, S.; Yook, Y.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.; Belle Collaboration

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Observation and characterization of chimera states in coupled dynamical systems with nonlocal coupling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By developing the concepts of strength of incoherence and discontinuity measure, we show that a distinct quantitative characterization of chimera and multichimera states which occur in networks of coupled nonlinear dynamical systems admitting nonlocal interactions of finite radius can be made. These measures also clearly distinguish between chimera or multichimera states (both stable and breathing types) and coherent and incoherent as well as cluster states....

R. Gopal; V. K. Chandrasekar; A. Venkatesan; M. Lakshmanan

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional observer states" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Climate Extremes in the Southeast United States: Observed Variability, Spatial Classification, and Related Planning.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Spatial and temporal trends in temperature and precipitation extremes were investigated for the Southeast United States for the period 1948 to 2012 using 27 extreme… (more)

Powell, Emily J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Numerical procedure for analyzing impurity-induced resonant-state STM images observed in high-T-c superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical procedure is developed for analyzing impurity-induced resonant-state STM images observed in high-T-c superconductors, and is applied to three sets of higher resolution data provided to us by J. C. Seamus Davis and E. W. Hudson. Each image...

Wang, Q.; Hu, Chia-Ren.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Practical Observers for Unmeasured States in Turbocharged Gasoline Julia H. Buckland, Jim Freudenberg, J. W. Grizzle and Mrdjan Jankovic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Practical Observers for Unmeasured States in Turbocharged Gasoline Engines Julia H. Buckland, Jim Freudenberg, J. W. Grizzle and Mrdjan Jankovic Abstract--Turbocharged gasoline engines are becoming more with a significant reduction in calibration complexity. I. INTRODUCTION Turbocharged gasoline engines are becoming

Grizzle, Jessy W.

44

ECG Denoising using Angular Velocity as a State and an Observation in an Extended Kalman Filter Framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECG Denoising using Angular Velocity as a State and an Observation in an Extended Kalman Filter of synthetic ECG signals. The proposed method considers the angular velocity of ECG signal, as one Terms-- Extended Kalman Filter (EKF), Angular velocity, Electrocardiogram (ECG), ECG Dynamical Model

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

45

Whole-Body Magnetic Resonance Angiography with Additional Steady-State Acquisition of the Infragenicular Arteries in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this investigation was to determine if addition of infragenicular steady-state (SS) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) to first-pass imaging improves diagnostic performance compared with first-pass imaging alone in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) undergoing whole-body (WB) MRA. Twenty consecutive patients with PAD referred to digital-subtraction angiography (DSA) underwent WB-MRA. Using a bolus-chase technique, first-pass WB-MRA was performed from the supra-aortic vessels to the ankles. The blood-pool contrast agent gadofosveset trisodium was used at a dose of 0.03 mmol/kg body weight. Ten minutes after injection of the contrast agent, high-resolution (0.7-mm isotropic voxels) SS-MRA of the infragenicular arteries was performed. Using DSA as the 'gold standard,' sensitivities and specificities for detecting significant arterial stenoses ({>=}50% luminal narrowing) with first-pass WB-MRA, SS-MRA, and combined first-pass and SS-MRA were calculated. Kappa statistics were used to determine intermodality agreement between MRA and DSA. Overall sensitivity and specificity for detecting significant arterial stenoses with first-pass WB-MRA was 0.70 (95% confidence interval 0.61 to 0.78) and 0.97 (0.94 to 0.99), respectively. In first-pass WB-MRA, the lowest sensitivity was in the infragenicular region, with a value of 0.42 (0.23 to 0.63). Combined analysis of first-pass WB-MRA and SS-MRA increased sensitivity to 0.81 (0.60 to 0.93) in the infragenicular region, with specificity of 0.94 (0.88 to 0.97). Sensitivity and specificity for detecting significant arterial stenoses with isolated infragenicular SS-MRA was 0.47 (0.27 to 0.69) and 0.86 (0.78 to 0.91), respectively. Intermodality agreement between MRA and DSA in the infragenicular region was moderate for first-pass WB-MRA ({kappa} = 0.49), fair for SS-MRA ({kappa} = 0.31), and good for combined first-pass/SS-MRA ({kappa} = 0.71). Addition of infragenicular SS-MRA to first-pass WB MRA improves diagnostic performance.

Nielsen, Yousef W., E-mail: yujwni01@heh.regionh.d [University Hospital at Herlev, Department of Radiology (Denmark); Eiberg, Jonas P. [Rigshospitalet, Department of Vascular Surgery (Denmark); Logager, Vibeke B. [University Hospital at Herlev, Department of Radiology (Denmark); Just, Sven [University Hospital at Gentofte, Department of Radiology (Denmark); Schroeder, Torben V. [Rigshospitalet, Department of Vascular Surgery (Denmark); Thomsen, Henrik S. [University Hospital at Herlev, Department of Radiology (Denmark)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Global-to-local incompatibility, monogamy of entanglement, and ground-state dimerization: Theory and observability of quantum frustration in systems with competing interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Frustration in quantum many body systems is quantified by the degree of incompatibility between the local and global orders associated, respectively, to the ground states of the local interaction terms and the global ground state of the total many-body Hamiltonian. This universal measure is bounded from below by the ground-state bipartite block entanglement. For many-body Hamiltonians that are sums of two-body interaction terms, a further inequality relates quantum frustration to the pairwise entanglement between the constituents of the local interaction terms. This additional bound is a consequence of the limits imposed by monogamy on entanglement shareability. We investigate the behavior of local pair frustration in quantum spin models with competing interactions on different length scales and show that valence bond solids associated to exact ground-state dimerization correspond to a transition from generic frustration, i.e. geometric, common to classical and quantum systems alike, to genuine quantum frustration, i.e. solely due to the non-commutativity of the different local interaction terms. We discuss how such frustration transitions separating genuinely quantum orders from classical-like ones are detected by observable quantities such as the static structure factor and the interferometric visibility.

S. M. Giampaolo; B. C. Hiesmayr; F. Illuminati

2015-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

47

Effelsberg Observations of Excited-State (6.0 GHz) OH in Supernova Remnants and W3(OH)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While masers in the 1720 MHz transition of OH are detected toward many supernova remnants (SNRs), no other OH transition is seen as a maser in SNRs. We present a search for masers at 6049 MHz, which has recently been predicted to produce masers by pure collisional excitation at conditions similar to that required for 1720 MHz masing. The Effelsberg 100 m telescope was used to observe the excited-state 6016, 6030, 6035, and 6049 MHz lines of OH toward selected SNRs, most of which have previously-detected bright 1720 MHz masers. No excited-state masers are found toward SNRs, consistent with previous observations of the 6049 MHz and other excited-state transitions. We do not see clear evidence of absorption toward SNR target positions, although we do see evidence of absorption in the molecular cloud at +50 km/s near Sgr A East. Weak absorption is detected at 6016 MHz toward W3(OH), while stronger, narrower emission is seen at 6049 MHz, suggesting that the 6049 MHz emission is a low-gain maser. We conclude that conditions in SNRs are not conducive to excited-state maser emission, especially in excited-state satellite lines.

Vincent L. Fish; Loránt O. Sjouwerman; Ylva M. Pihlström

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

48

Reconstructing an Agent's Epistemic State from Observations about its Beliefs and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Germany. E-mail: nittka@informatik.uni-leipzig.de Abstract We look at the problem in belief revision on an observation of how the agent has responded to some sequence of previous belief revision inputs over time. We revision which is based on sequences, we construct a model of the agent that `best explains

Booth, Richard

49

On Channel State Inference and Prediction Using Observable Variables in 802.11b Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

strength of each individual bit, are not observable at higher layers. Therefore, it is essential/prediction (CSI/CSP). Here, inference specifically refers to estimating the BER in an already received packet that analyzes the utility of SSR and as side-information for CSI/CSP. In this work, we exploit the Method

Radha, Hayder

50

Observation of the Upsilon(13DJ ) Bottomonium State through Decays to pi+pi-Upsilon(1S)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on 122X10{sup 6} {upsilon}(3S) events collected with the BABAR detector, we have observed the {upsilon}(1{sup 3}D{sub J}) bottomonium state through the {upsilon}(3S){yields}{gamma}{gamma}{upsilon}(1{sup 3}D{sub J}){yields}{gamma}{gamma}{pi}{sub +}{pi}{sub -}{upsilon}(1S) decay chain. The significance is 6.2 standard deviations including systematic uncertainties. The mass of the J = 2 member of the {upsilon}(1{sup 3}D{sub J}) triplet is determined to be 10164.5{-+}0.8 (stat.) {-+} 0.5 (syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}. We use the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} invariant mass and decay angular distributions to confirm the consistency of the observed state with the orbital angular momentum and parity assignments of the {upsilon}(1{sup 3}D{sub J}).

del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

51

Observation of State of Charge Distributions in Lithium-ion Battery Electrodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current lithium-ion battery technology is gearing towards meeting the robust demand of power and energy requirements for all-electric transportation without compromising on the safety, performance, and cycle life. The state-of-charge (SOC) of a Li-ion cell can be a macroscopic indicator of the state-of-health of the battery. The microscopic origin of the SOC relates to the local lithium content in individual electrode particles and the effective ability of Li-ions to transport or shuttle between the redox couples through the cell geometric boundaries. Herein, micrometer-resolved Raman mapping of a transition-metal-based oxide positive electrode, Li{sub 1-x}(Ni{sub y}Co{sub z}Al{sub 1-y-z})O{sub 2}, maintained at different SOCs, is shown. An attempt has been made to link the underlying changes to the composition and structural integrity at the individual particle level. Furthermore, an SOC distribution at macroscopic length scale of the electrodes is presented.

Remillard, Jeffrey [Ford Research and Advanced Engineering, Ford Motor Company; O'Neil, Ann E [Ford Research and Advanced Engineering, Ford Motor Company; Bernardi, Dawn [Ford Research and Advanced Engineering, Ford Motor Company; Ro, Tina J [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Miller, Ted [Ford Motor Company; Neitering, Ken [Ford Research and Advanced Engineering, Ford Motor Company; Go, Joo-Young [SB Limotive, Korea; Nanda, Jagjit [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

PSU ARL Additive Manufacturing Capstone Project For the first time the PSU ARL, the IE480W CIMP-3D Group at Penn State showed that  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PSU ARL Additive Manufacturing Capstone Project For the first time the PSU ARL, the IE480W CIMP-3D Processing by Direct Digital Deposition (CIMP-3D), is a program utilizing Additive Manufacturing (AM was to develop an understanding of how key operating parameters such as layer thickness, manufacturing

Demirel, Melik C.

53

Observation of phononic helical edge states in a mechanical 'topological insulator'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A topological insulator is characterized by a dichotomy between the interior and the edge of a finite system: While the bulk has a non-zero energy gap, the edges are forced to sustain excitations traversing these gaps. Originally proposed for electrons governed by quantum mechanics, it has remained an important open question if the same physics can be observed for systems obeying Newton's equations of motion. Here, we report on measurements that characterize the collective behavior of mechanical oscillators exhibiting the phenomenology of the quantum spin hall effect. The phononic edge modes are shown to be helical and we demonstrate their topological protection via the stability against imperfections. Our results open the door to the design of topological acoustic meta-materials that can capitalize on the stability of the surfaces phonons as reliable wave guides.

Süsstrunk, Roman

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Additional Information You can find additional information about  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/default.htm For additional Information contact: Quality Assurance & Audit Coordinator at414-456-8844 or Research Subject are members of IRBs. All IRBs must follow federal rules and state laws in their review of research studies

55

Courses: Astronomy (ASTR) Page 259Sonoma State University 2012-2013 Catalog ASTR 482 Adv ObSeRvATiOnAl ASTROnOmy (2)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Courses: Astronomy (ASTR) Page 259Sonoma State University 2012-2013 Catalog ASTR 482 Adv ObSeRvATiOnAl ASTROnOmy (2) Lecture, 1 hour; laboratory, 3 hours. A study of advanced observing techniques including astronomy. Both written and oral presentations (including a demonstration of the experiment or activity

Ravikumar, B.

56

Page 262 Courses: Astronomy (ASTR) Sonoma State University 2010-2011 Catalog AStr 482 AdV OBSerVAtiOnAl AStrOnOMy (2)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 262 Courses: Astronomy (ASTR) Sonoma State University 2010-2011 Catalog AStr 482 AdV OBSerVAtiOnAl AStrOnOMy (2) Lecture, 1 hour; laboratory, 3 hours. A study of advanced observing techniques including astronomy. Both written and oral presentations (including a demonstration of the experiment or activity

Ravikumar, B.

57

Page 258 Courses: Astronomy (ASTR) Sonoma State University 2011-2012 Catalog AStr 482 AdV ObSerVAtiOnAl AStrOnOMy (2)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 258 Courses: Astronomy (ASTR) Sonoma State University 2011-2012 Catalog AStr 482 AdV ObSerVAtiOnAl AStrOnOMy (2) Lecture, 1 hour; laboratory, 3 hours. A study of advanced observing techniques including astronomy. Both written and oral presentations (including a demonstration of the experiment or activity

Ravikumar, B.

58

First Observation of the P-Wave Spin-Singlet Bottomonium States hb(1P) and hb(2P)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the observation of the hb(1P) and hb(2P) spin-singlet bottomonium states produced in the reaction e+e? ! hb(nP)*+*? with significances of 5.5 * and 11.2 *, respectively. We find that M[hb(1P)] = (9898.25±1.06+1.03 ?1.07 )MeV/c2 and M[hb(2P)] = (10259.76±0.64+1.43 ?1.03 )MeV/c2, which correspond to measurements of the P-wave hyperfine splittings *MHF = (1.62 ± 1.52)MeV/c2 and (0.48+1.57 ?1.22)MeV/c2, respectively. We also report measurements of the cross sections for e+e? ! hb(nP)*+*? relative to the cross section for the e+e? ! *(2S)*+*? reaction. These results are obtained from a 121.4 fb?1 data sample collected with the Belle detector near the *(5S) resonance at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e? collider.

Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, David M.; Aushev, T.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Belous, K.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bondar, A.; Bracko, Marko; Brodzicka, J.; Browder, Thomas E.; Chang, P.; Chen, A.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, I- S.; Cho, K.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Drasal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Esen, Sevda; Fast, James E.; Feindt, M.; Gaur, Vipin; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Hara, Takanori; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W. S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Iwabuchi, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, Igal; Julius, T.; Kang, J. H.; Katayama, N.; Kawasaki, T.; Kichimi, H.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, Kay; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, N.; Koblitz, S.; Korpar, S.; Krizan, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, S. H.; Li, J.; Libby, J.; Liu, C.; Liventsev, D.; Louvot, R.; Macnaughton, Jimmy N.; Matvienko, D.; McOnie, S.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mussa, R.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Natkaniec, Z.; Neubauer, S.; Nishida, S.; Nishimura, K.; Nitoh, O.; Nozaki, T.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, Stephen L.; Onuki, Y.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, H.; Pedlar, Todd K.; Pestotnik, Rok; Petric, M.; Piilonen, Leo E.; Poluektov, A.; Ritter, M.; Rohrken, M.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, Himansu B.; Sakai, Y.; Sanuki, T.; Schneider, O.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, Martin E.; Shapkin, M.; Shebalin, V.; Shibata, T. A.; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Shwartz, B.; Simon, F.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Young-Soo; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stanic, S.; Stanic, M.; Sumihama, M.; Tatishvili, Gocha; Teramoto, Y.; Tikhomirov, I.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Vahsen, S. E.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vinokurova, A.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, Y.; Wicht, J.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamashita, Y.; Yuan, C. Z.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.

2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

59

Observation of the {psi}(4415){yields}DD{sub 2}*(2460) Decay Using Initial-State Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report measurements of the exclusive cross section for e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}D{sup 0}D{sup -}{pi}{sup +} over the center-of-mass energy range 4.0 GeV to 5.0 GeV with initial-state radiation and the first observation of the decay {psi}(4415){yields}D{sup 0}D{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. From a study of the resonant substructure in {psi}(4415) decay we conclude that the {psi}(4415){yields}D{sup 0}D{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decay is dominated by {psi}(4415){yields}DD{sub 2}*(2460). We obtain B({psi}(4415){yields}D{sup 0}D{sup -}{pi}{sub nonresonant}{sup +})/B({psi}(4415){yields}DD{sub 2}*(24 = 60){yields}D{sup 0}D{sup -}{pi}{sup +})<0.22 at 90% C.L. The analysis is based on a data sample collected with the Belle detector with an integrated luminosity of 673 fb{sup -1}.

Pakhlova, G.; Balagura, V.; Chistov, R.; Danilov, M.; Liventsev, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mizuk, R.; Pakhlov, P.; Tikhomirov, I.; Uglov, T. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Adachi, I.; Brodzicka, J.; Haba, J.; Hazumi, M.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kibayashi, A.; Kichimi, H.; Krokovny, P.; Nakao, M. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan)] (and others)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

REVIEW OF THE NEGOTIATION OF THE MODEL PROTOCOL ADDITIONAL TO THE AGREEMENT(S) BETWEEN STATE(S) AND THE INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY FOR THE APPLICATION OF SAFEGUARDS, INFCIRC/540 (Corrected) VOLUME II/III IAEA COMMITTEE 24, Major Issues Underlying the Model Additional Protocol (1996-1997).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume I of this Review traces the origins of the Model Additional Protocol. It covers the period from 1991, when events in Iraq triggered an intensive review of the safeguards system, until 1996, when the IAEA Board of Governors established Committee 24 to negotiate a new protocol to safeguards agreement. The period from 1991-1996 set the stage for this negotiation and shaped its outcome in important ways. During this 5-year period, many proposals for strengthening safeguards were suggested and reviewed. Some proposals were dropped, for example, the suggestion by the IAEA Secretariat to verify certain imports, and others were refined. A rough consensus was established about the directions in which the international community wanted to go, and this was reflected in the draft of an additional protocol that was submitted to the IAEA Board of Governors on May 6, 1996 in document GOV/2863, Strengthening the Effectiveness and Improving the Efficiency of the Safeguards System - Proposals For Implementation Under Complementary Legal Authority, A Report by the Director General. This document ended with a recommendation that, 'the Board, through an appropriate mechanism, finalize the required legal instrument taking as a basis the draft protocol proposed by the Secretariat and the explanation of the measures contained in this document.'

Rosenthal, M.D.; Saum-Manning, L.; Houck, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional observer states" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

&p.1:Abstract Numerous observations have been reported in the literature of enhanced mass transport and solid-state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the development of materials technologies employing microwave radiation. For exam- ple, heat processing it was discovered that microwave energy from radar could dry large ceram- ic bodies. However, serious efforts and solid-state reaction rates during microwave heating or processing of a variety of ceramic, glass

Cooper, Reid F.

62

Acoustics by additive manufacturing:.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study focuses on exploring the merging field of additive manufacturing and acoustics and introduces a new type of sound absorber which is regulating performance… (more)

Setaki, F.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Additive Manufacturing: Going Mainstream  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, is receiving attention from media, investment communities and governments around the world transforming it from obscurity to something to be talked about.

64

First in-beam observation of excited states in {sup 156}{sub 72}Hf{sub 84} using the recoul-decay tagging method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Excited states in the proton rich nuclide {sup 156}{sub 72}Hf{sub 84} were observed for the first time using the {sup 102}({sup 58}Ni, 2p2n){sup 156}Hf reaction at 270 MeV. Gamma rays were detected with the AYEBALL array of Compton suppressed Ge detectors, placed in front of the Fragment Mass Analyzer, and were assigned to individual reaction charmers using the Recoil-Decay Tagging Method. Prompt {gamma}-ray cascades were associated with the alpha decay of both the ground state and the 8{sup +} isomeric state in {sup 156}Hf. The level scheme constructed for {sup 156}Hf is compared with level schemes of lighter even-even N=84 isotones and is discussed within the framework of the Shell Model.

Seweryniak, D.; Ahmad, H.; Amro, D.J. [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

Observation of high-j quasiparticle states in {sup 249}Cm by in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy using heavy-ion transfer reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have measured de-excitation {gamma} rays in {sup 249}Cm populated by one-neutron stripping reactions with a {sup 248}Cm target and 162-MeV {sup 16}O, 162-MeV {sup 18}O, and 120-MeV {sup 13}C beams. {gamma} rays in {sup 249}Cm were identified by measuring kinetic energies of outgoing particles using Si {delta}E-E detectors. It was demonstrated that high-j orbitals were selectively populated in the ({sup 16}O, {sup 15}O) reaction having a large negative Q value. We have observed eight quasiparticle states above the deformed shell gap of N=152. The 1/2{sup +}[620], 1/2{sup -}[750], and 7/2{sup +}[613] bands were extended up to 19/2{sup +}, 19/2{sup -}, and 13/2{sup +} states, respectively. We have established the 9/2 9/2{sup +}[615] state at 526 keV, the 9/2 9/2{sup +}[604] state with a short life of T{sub 1/2}<<2 ps at 1030 keV, and the 11/2 11/2{sup -}[725] state with T{sub 1/2}=19(1) ns at 375 keV. Furthermore, the 17/2 1/2{sup +}[880] state, having a large component of the k{sub 17/2} spherical single-particle state, has been identified at 1505 keV. We discuss the properties of those quasiparticle states in the framework of a deformed shell model.

Ishii, T. [Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Makii, H. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Asai, M.; Tsukada, K.; Toyoshima, A. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Matsuda, M. [Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Makishima, A. [Department of Liberal Arts and Sciences, National Defense Medical College, Tokorozawa, Saitama 359-8513 (Japan); Shigematsu, S.; Kohno, T. [Department of Energy Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Kaneko, J.; Ogawa, M. [Department of Radiological Sciences, Komazawa University, Setagaya, Tokyo 154-8525 (Japan); Shizuma, T. [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Toume, H. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); College of Science, Ibaraki University, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); Hossain, I. [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Research Summary Carbon Additionality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the quality assurance of emissions reduction and carbon sequestration activities, but remains a source of much/reporting additionality rules. Technological Application of specific technology. Term Abatement arises within a specified

67

Writing Assessment: Additional Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

29 Appendix A Writing Assessment: Additional Resources #12;30 Where can I find out more into the assessment process. On-campus resources give you with a "real person" to contact should you have questions Resources for Higher Education Outcomes Assessment http://www2.acs.ncsu.edu/UPA/survey/resource.htm Ohio

Schweik, Charles M.

68

Carbon Additionality: Discussion Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ahead, and identifying the carbon pools and other green house gas emissions sources and savings coveredCarbon Additionality: A review Discussion Paper Gregory Valatin November 2009 Forest Research. Voluntary Carbon Standards American Carbon Registry Forest Carbon Project Standard (ACRFCPS) 27 Carbon

69

Impact of the equation-of-state -- gravity degeneracy on constraining the nuclear symmetry energy from astrophysical observables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There is a degeneracy between the equation of state (EOS) of superdense neutron-rich nuclear matter and the strong-field gravity in understanding properties of neutron stars. While the EOS is still poorly known, there are also longstanding ambiguities in choosing General Relativity or alternative gravity theories in the not-so-well tested strong-field regime. Besides possible appearance of hyperons and new phases, the most uncertain part of the nucleonic EOS is currently the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy. To provide information that may help break the EOS-gravity degeneracy, we investigate effects of symmetry energy within its uncertain range determined by terrestrial nuclear laboratory experiments on the gravitational binding energy and spacetime curvature of neutron stars within GR and the scalar-tensor (ST) theory of gravity. In particular, we focus on effects of the following parameters characterizing the EOS of neutron-rich nucleonic matter: (1) the incompressibility $K_0$ of symmetric nuclear matter, (2) the slope $L$ of symmetry energy at saturation density and (3) the high-density behavior of symmetry energy. We find that the variation of either the density slope $L$ or the high-density behavior of symmetry energy leads to large changes in both the binding energy and curvature of neutron stars while effects of varying the more constrained $K_0$ are negligibly small. The difference in predictions using the GR and the ST theory appears only for massive neutron stars, and is significantly smaller than the differences resulting from variations in the symmetry energy. We conclude that within the ST theory of gravity, the EOS-gravity degeneracy has been broken by the recent relativistic pulsar measurements, and that measurements of neutron star properties sensitive to the compactness constrain mainly the density dependence of the symmetry energy.

Xiao-Tao He; F. J. Fattoyev; Bao-An Li; W. G. Newton

2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

70

Effect of random perturbations on adaptive observation techniques M. J. Hossen1, I. M. Navon2,, and D. N. Daescu3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-1212, Bangladesh 2Department of Scientific Computing, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 number of additional observational resources must be deployed to improve a specific forecast aspect, see

Navon, Michael

71

VOLUME 82, NUMBER 11 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 15 MARCH 1999 Observation of Metastable States in Spinor Bose-Einstein Condensates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Metastable States in Spinor Bose-Einstein Condensates H.-J. Miesner, D. M. Stamper-Kurn, J. Stenger, S-Einstein condensates have been prepared in long-lived metastable excited states. Two complementary types of metastable states were observed. The first is due to the immiscibility of multiple components in the condensate

72

For additional information, contact: Department of Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For additional information, contact: Department of Ecology Montana State University 310 Lewis Hall P.O. Box 173460 Bozeman, MT 59717-3460 Tel: 406-994-4548 Fax: 406-994-3190 www.montana.edu/ecology/ ecology@montana.edu The Department of Ecology at Montana State University offers undergraduate majors

Maxwell, Bruce D.

73

Assessment of the Effect of Air Pollution Controls on Trends in Shortwave Radiation over the United States from 1995 through 2010 from Multiple Observation Networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long term datasets of total (all-sky) and clear-sky downwelling shortwave (SW) radiation, cloud cover fraction (cloudiness) and aerosol optical depth (AOD) are analyzed together with aerosol concentration from several networks (e.g. SURFRAD, CASTNET, IMPROVE and ARM) in the United States (US). Seven states with varying climatology are selected to better understand the effect of aerosols and clouds on SW radiation. This analysis aims to test the hypothesis that the reductions in anthropogenic aerosol burden resulting from substantial reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides over the past 15 years across the US has caused an increase in surface SW radiation. We show that the total and clear-sky downwelling SW radiation from seven sites have increasing trends except Penn State which shows no tendency in clear-sky SW radiation. After investigating several confounding factors, the causes can be due to the geography of the site, aerosol distribution, heavy air traffic and increasing cloudiness. Moreover, we assess the relationship between total column AOD with surface aerosol concentration to test our hypothesis. In our findings, the trends of clear-sky SW radiation, AOD, and aerosol concentration from the sites in eastern US agree well with our hypothesis. However, the sites in western US demonstrate increasing AOD associated with mostly increasing trends in surface aerosol concentration. At these sites, the changes in aerosol burden and/or direct aerosol effects alone cannot explain the observed changes in SW radiation, but other factors need to be considered such as cloudiness, aerosol vertical profiles and elevated plumes.

Gan, Chuen-Meei; Pleim, Jonathan; Mathur, Rohit; Hogrefe, Christian; Long, Charles N.; Xing, Jia; Roselle, Shawn; Wei, Chao

2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

74

Health risks associated with exposure to gasoline additives-methyl tertiary butyl ether [MTBE]. Hearing before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, Special Hearing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This hearing focuses on an Alaskan study by the Centers for Disease Control which examines possible health risks associated with exposure to gasoline additive know as MTBE. Testimony is given by Dr. William Roper, Director, CDC.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Observation of the $\\psi(1^3D_2)$ state in $e^+e^-\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-\\gamma\\chi_{c1}$ at BESIII  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the observation of the $X(3823)$ in the process $e^+e^-\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-X(3823) \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\gamma\\chi_{c1}$ with a statistical significance of $6.2\\sigma$, in data samples at center-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s}=$4.230, 4.260, 4.360, 4.420 and 4.600~GeV collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII electron positron collider. The measured mass of the $X(3823)$ is $(3821.7\\pm 1.3\\pm 0.7)$~MeV/$c^2$, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic, and the width is less than $16$~MeV at the 90\\% confidence level. The products of the Born cross sections for $e^+e^-\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-X(3823)$ and the branching ratio $\\mathcal{B}[X(3823)\\to \\gamma\\chi_{c1,c2}]$ are also measured. These measurements are in good agreement with the assignment of the $X(3823)$ as the $\\psi(1^3D_2)$ charmonium state.

Ablikim, M; Ai, X C; Albayrak, O; Albrecht, M; Ambrose, D J; Amoroso, A; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R Baldini; Ban, Y; Bennett, D W; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bettoni, D; Bian, J M; Bianchi, F; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, H Y; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, X K; Cibinetto, G; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dbeyssi, A; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; De Mori, F; Ding, Y; Dong, C; Dong, J; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Duan, P F; Fan, J Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fang, X; Fang, Y; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Felici, G; Feng, C Q; Fioravanti, E; Fritsch, M; Fu, C D; Gao, Q; Gao, Y; Gao, Z; Garzia, I; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, Y; Guo, Y P; Haddadi, Z; Hafner, A; Han, S; Han, Y L; Hao, X Q; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Hu, Y; Huang, G M; Huang, G S; Huang, H P; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y; Hussain, T; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L L; Jiang, L W; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Johansson, T; Julin, A; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kang, X L; Kang, X S; Kavatsyuk, M; Ke, B C; Kliemt, R; Kloss, B; Kolcu, O B; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kuehn, W; Kupsc, A; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Leng, C; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, Jin; Li, K; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, P R; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X M; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Lin, D X; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J P; Liu, J Y; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, L D; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, X X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, R Q; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Lyu, X R; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X N; Ma, X Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Marcello, S; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Morales, C Morales; Moriya, K; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nerling, F; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, S L; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Pu, Y N; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, N; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ren, H L; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Santoro, V; Sarantsev, A; Savrié, M; Schoenning, K; Schumann, S; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, P X; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Sosio, S; Spataro, S; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Tiemens, M; Toth, D; Ullrich, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B L; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, W; Wang, X F; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Weber, T; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, Q N; Xu, X P; Xu, Z R; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yin, J H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, H W; Yu, J S; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Yuncu, A; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J L; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, K; Zhang, L; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y T; Zhang, Z H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, J Y; Zhao, J Z; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, W J; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zotti, L; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Blake Marshall, AMO's lead for Additive Manufacturing Technologies, will provide an overview of current R&D activities in additive manufacturing and its application to fuel cell prototyping and...

77

Additive manufacturing method of producing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Additive manufacturing method of producing silver or copper tracks on polyimide film Problem/stripping) using an additive process support by a novel bio- degradable photo-initiator package. technology. Building on previous work by Hoyd- Gigg Ng et al. [1,2], Heriot-Watt has developed an additive film

Painter, Kevin

78

Observing the Inflationary Reheating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reheating is the the epoch which connects inflation to the subsequent hot Big-Bang phase. Conceptually very important, this era is however observationally poorly known. We show that the current Planck satellite measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies constrain the kinematic properties of the reheating era for most of the inflationary models. This result is obtained by deriving the marginalized posterior distributions of the reheating parameter for about 200 models taken in Encyclopaedia Inflationaris. Weighted by the statistical evidence of each model to explain the data, we show that the Planck 2013 measurements induce an average reduction of the posterior-to-prior volume by 40%. Making some additional assumptions on reheating, such as specifying a mean equation of state parameter, or focusing the analysis on peculiar scenarios, can enhance or reduce this constraint. Our study also indicates that the Bayesian evidence of a model can substantially be affected by the reheating properties. The precision of the current CMB data is therefore such that estimating the observational performance of a model now requires to incorporate information about its reheating history.

Jerome Martin; Christophe Ringeval; Vincent Vennin

2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

79

Observation of the nuclear magnetic octupole moment of $^{173}$Yb from precise measurements of hyperfine structure in the ${^3P}_2$ state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We measure hyperfine structure in the metastable ${^3P}_2$ state of $^{173}$Yb and extract the nuclear magnetic octupole moment. We populate the state using dipole-allowed transitions through the ${^3P}_1$ and ${^3S}_1$ states. We measure frequencies of hyperfine transitions of the ${^3P}_2 \\rightarrow {^3S}_1$ line at 770 nm using a Rb-stabilized ring cavity resonator with a precision of 200 kHz. Second-order corrections due to perturbations from the nearby ${^3P}_1$ and ${^1P}_1$ states are below 30 kHz. We obtain the hyperfine coefficients as: $A=-742.11(2)$ MHz, $B=1339.2(2)$ MHz, which represent two orders-of-magnitude improvement in precision, and $C=0.54(2)$ MHz. From atomic structure calculations, we obtain the nuclear moments: quadrupole $Q=2.46(12)$ b and octupole $\\Omega=-34.4(21)$ b\\,$\\times \\mu_N$.

Singh, Alok K; Natarajan, Vasant

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Additive assembly of digital materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis develops the use of additive assembly of press-fit digital materials as a new rapid-prototyping process. Digital materials consist of a finite set of parts that have discrete connections and occupy discrete ...

Ward, Jonathan (Jonathan Daniel)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional observer states" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

2007 Penn State Geospatial Technology Summer Camp Additional Registration Forms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the space provided below. Respiratory problems--asthma, tuberculosis, persistent cough, etc. Heart problems

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

82

The Pennsylvania State University HUB Addition and Renovation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· MEP DemoliKon of Bookstore · Storage Trailers at Temporary Bookstore © GilbaneKnue MEP DemoliKon of Bookstore · Temporary Walls on B2 and Ground Floor Levels at Grange Building Ramp & Parking Area · ConKnue Storage Trailers at Temporary

83

Carbon Dioxide Addition to Microbial Fuel Cell Cathodes Maintains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service (ARS), National Center for Agricultural-cathode MFC, CO2 addition resulted in a stable catholyte film pH of 6.61 ( 0.12 and a 152% increase in steady

Angenent, Lars T.

84

Decontamination formulation with sorbent additive  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a bleaching activator, a sorbent additive, and water. The highly adsorbent, water-soluble sorbent additive (e.g., sorbitol or mannitol) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients, such as the liquid bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate) and convert the activator into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

Tucker; Mark D. (Albuquerque, NM), Comstock; Robert H. (Gardendale, AL)

2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

85

Hadroproduction of the Iota Meson observed in the K/sub s/K/sub s/. pi. /sup 0/ final state  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results from an experiment studying the C=+1K/sub s/K/sub s/..pi../sup O/ system produced ..pi../sup /minus plus//p interactions at 21.4 GeV/c are presented. It is shown that the structure present in the data between 1.4 and 1.5 GeV/c/sup 2/ has mass and width consistent with the (1460) observed in J//PSI/ radiative decay and most probably has J/sup PC/=O/sup /minus plus//. 19 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Cason, N.M.; Bensinger, J.R.; Bishop, J.M.; Biswas, N.N.; Busenitz, J.K.; Etkin, A.; Foley, K.J.; Fortner, M.R.; Fortney, L.R.; Goo, J.; Goshaw, A.T.; Kenney, V.P.; Kirsch, L.E.; Kramer, M.A.; Lindenbaum, S.J.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; McCrory, E.M.; Morris, T.W.; Piekarz, H.; Piekarz, J.; Platner, E.D.; Poster, R.A.; Rath, M.G.; Robertson, W.J.; Ruchti, R.C.; Saulys, A.C.; Shephard, W.D.; Zogrofou, P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Training program to prepare the U.S. DOE laboratories for the entry into force of the protocol additional to the agreement between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in the United  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2008, a joint team from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) consisting of specialists in training IAEA inspectors in the use of complementary access activities formulated a training program to prepare the U.S DOE laboratories for the entry into force of the U.S. Additional Protocol. Since the U.S. Additional Protocol would allow for IAEA access to the DOE laboratories under the aegis of complementary access activities, the DOE laboratories would need to prepare for such visits. The goal of the training was to ensure that the DOE laboratories would successfully host an IAEA complementary access. In doing so, the labs must be able to provide the IAEA with the information that the IAEA would need to resolve its questions about the U.S. Declaration and declared activities at the lab, and also protect certain equities, as provided under the U.S. Additional Protocol Article 1.b and c. which set forth a 'National Security Exclusion.' This 'NSE' states that the AP provisions apply within the United States 'excluding only instances where its application would result in access by the Agency to activities with direct national security significance to the United States or to location or information associated with such activities.' These activities are referred to collectively as DNSS-direct national security significance. Furthermore, the U.S. has a specific right to employ managed access, without prejudice to the right under Article 1.b, in connection with activities of DNSS. The provisions in Articles 1.b and 1.c are unique to the U.S. AP, and are additional to the more general right, under Article 7, to use managed access to protect from disclosure proprietary and/or proliferation-sensitive information, and to meet safety and security requirements, that is incorporated directly from the Model Additional Protocol. The BNL-LANL team performed training at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to cover the situations that these labs, which respectively represent nuclear weapons labs, nuclear energy labs, and science labs and environmental management sites, would encounter during a complementary access. Each of the three labs hosted a mock complementary access activity, which included mock inspectors from the BNL-LANL team. In addition to reviewing the draft declarations from each of the host labs, the BNL-LANL team conducted open source research in a manner similar to what IAEA inspectors would do to research the activities at a location and prepare questions for the location to answer and that would be the focus of a complementary access. The host labs and other labs attending the training found the training to be extremely useful and helpful in making sure that each lab's Additional Protocol team had made correct declarations of nuclear activities, had properly trained staff ready to host and answer IAEA inquiries, and would implement managed access during a complementary access that would provide access by the IAEA team to resolve questions or inconsistencies about a particular declaration and still protect the information addressed by Articles 1 and 7 of the U.S. AP.

Boyer, Brian David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stevens, Rebecca C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Uribe, Eva C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, M Analisa [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valente, John N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valente, John U [BNL; Jo, Jae H [BNL; Sellen, Joana [U.S. DOE/NNSA; Wonder, Edward [QINETIQ-NORTH AMERICA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

CREATION OF THE MODEL ADDITIONAL PROTOCOL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1991, the international nuclear nonproliferation community was dismayed to discover that the implementation of safeguards by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) under its NPT INFCIRC/153 safeguards agreement with Iraq had failed to detect Iraq's nuclear weapon program. It was now clear that ensuring that states were fulfilling their obligations under the NPT would require not just detecting diversion but also the ability to detect undeclared materials and activities. To achieve this, the IAEA initiated what would turn out to be a five-year effort to reappraise the NPT safeguards system. The effort engaged the IAEA and its Member States and led to agreement in 1997 on a new safeguards agreement, the Model Protocol Additional to the Agreement(s) between States and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards. The Model Protocol makes explicit that one IAEA goal is to provide assurance of the absence of undeclared nuclear material and activities. The Model Protocol requires an expanded declaration that identifies a State's nuclear potential, empowers the IAEA to raise questions about the correctness and completeness of the State's declaration, and, if needed, allows IAEA access to locations. The information required and the locations available for access are much broader than those provided for under INFCIRC/153. The negotiation was completed in quite a short time because it started with a relatively complete draft of an agreement prepared by the IAEA Secretariat. This paper describes how the Model Protocol was constructed and reviews key decisions that were made both during the five-year period and in the actual negotiation.

Houck, F.; Rosenthal, M.; Wulf, N.

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

88

Additional Resources | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartment of EnergyAbout Us » FAQsUCNIOFActiveAdditional Resources

89

Precision and Energy Usage for Additive Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainability of additive manufacturing: measuring theCommittee F42 on Additive Manufacturing Technologies," TheASTM Committee F42 on Additive Manufacturing Technologies. -

Clemon, Lee; Sudradjat, Anton; Jaquez, Maribel; Krishna, Aditya; Rammah, Marwan; Dornfeld, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

REVIEW OF THE NEGOTIATION OF THE MODEL PROTOCOL ADDITIONAL TO THE AGREEMENT(S) BETWEEN STATE(S) AND THE INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY FOR THE APPLICATION OF SAFEGUARDS,INFCIRC/540 (Corrected) VOLUME I/III SETTING THE STAGE: 1991-1996.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Events in Iraq at the beginning of the 1990s demonstrated that the safeguards system of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) needed to be improved. It had failed, after all, to detect Iraq's clandestine nuclear weapon program even though some of Iraq's's activities had been pursued at inspected facilities in buildings adjacent to ones being inspected by the IAEA. Although there were aspects of the implementation of safeguards where the IAEA needed to improve, the primary limitations were considered to be part of the safeguards system itself. That system was based on the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty of 1970, to which Iraq was a party, and implemented on the basis of a model NPT safeguards agreement, published by the IAEA 1972 as INFCIRC/153 (corrected). The agreement calls for states to accept and for the IAEA to apply safeguards to all nuclear material in the state. Iraq was a party to such an agreement, but it violated the agreement by concealing nuclear material and other nuclear activities from the IAEA. Although the IAEA was inspecting in Iraq, it was hindered by aspects of the agreement that essentially limited its access to points in declared facilities and provided the IAEA with little information about nuclear activities anywhere else in Iraq. As a result, a major review of the NPT safeguards system was initiated by its Director General and Member States with the objective of finding the best means to enable the IAEA to detect both diversions from declared stocks and any undeclared nuclear material or activities in the state. Significant improvements that could be made within existing legal authority were taken quickly, most importantly a change in 1992 in how and when and what design information would be reported to the IAEA. During 1991-1996, the IAEA pursued intensive study, legal and technical analysis, and field trials and held numerous consultations with Member States. The Board of Governors discussed the issue of strengthening safeguards at almost all of its meeting.

Rosenthal, M.D.; Saum-Manning, L.; Houck, F.; Anzelon, G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Occupational health experience with organic additives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For many decades, interest in occupational medicine has been focused on the wide variety of organic additives, which includes a large number of substances, for example, dyestuffs, pigments, and auxiliaries for the textile, leather, and paper industries. The reason is that, if the recommended precautions are not observed, there is a risk of exposure to most of these substances during both production and use. Moreover, over the years, some additives have caused concern and aroused suspicion regarding adverse effects on health. In order to deal with health problems in this field, it is important to be aware of how, what, and where occupational diseases or accidents arise. Much knowledge has been gained about these, and it would be an impossible task to give a systematic survey of the data that have accumulated, especially since it is necessary to take account of the problem of exposure to more than one substance. Thus an attempt is made to report on occupational health experience in general, and to demonstrate how an industrial hygienist may approach the many and various problems. Some epidemiological studies on organic additives (auramine, anthraquinone dyestuffs, organic dyes, etc.) are discussed.

Thiess, A.M.; Wellenreuther, G.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Accomplishments and future perspective of coastal ocean observing systems Coastal oceans are the most densely urbanized regions on the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as communities increasingly rely on the coastal ocean to provide additional sources of energy (wind, waves, oil Observing System (IOOS) in the United States [see Marine Technologies Society Journal volumes 44(No.6 08901, United States E-mail address: oscar@marine.rutgers.edu Yi Chao n Remote Sensing Solutions, Inc

93

REVIEW OF THE NEGOTIATION OF THE MODEL PROTOCOL ADDITIONAL TO THE AGREEMENT(S) BETWEEN STATE(S) AND THE INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY FOR THE APPLICATION OF SAFEGUARDS, INFCIRC/540 (Corrected) VOLUME III/III, IAEA COMMITTEE 24, DEVELOPMENT OF INFCIRC/540, ARTICLE-BY-ARTICLE REVIEW (1996-1997).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this section of the report, the development of INFCIRC/540 is traced by a compilation of citations from the IAEA documents presented to the Board of Governors and the records of discussions in the Board that took place prior to the establishment of Committee 24 as well as the documents and discussions of that committee. The evolution of the text is presented separately for each article or, for the more complex articles, for each paragraph or group of paragraphs of the article. This section covers all articles, including those involving no issues. Background, issues, interpretations and conclusions, which were addressed in Volumes I, II, and III are not repeated here. The comments by states that are included are generally limited to objections and suggested changes. Requests for clarification or elaboration have been omitted, although it is recognized that such comments were sometimes veiled objections.

Rosenthal, M.D.; Houck, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

The Additional Interpolators Method for Variational Analysis in Lattice QCD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, I describe the Additional Interpolators Method, a new technique for variational analysis in lattice QCD. It is shown to be an excellent method which uses additional interpolators to remove backward in time running states that would otherwise contaminate the signal. The proof of principle, which also makes use of the Time-Shift Trick (Generalized Pencil-of-Functions method), will be delivered at an example on a $64^4$ lattice close to the physical pion mass.

Rainer W. Schiel

2015-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

95

Optimization of the transmission of observable expectation values and observable statistics in Continuous Variable Teleportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the statistics of observables in continuous variable quantum teleportation in the formalism of the characteristic function. We derive expressions for average values of output state observables in particular cumulants which are additive in terms of the input state and the resource of teleportation. Working with Squeezed Bell-like states, which may be optimized in a free parameter for better teleportation performance we discuss the relation between resources optimal for fidelity and for different observable averages. We obtain the values of the free parameter which optimize the central momenta and cumulants up to fourth order. For the cumulants the distortion between in and out states due to teleportation depends only on the resource. We obtain optimal parameters for the second and fourth order cumulants which do not depend on the squeezing of the resource. The second order central momenta which is equal to the second order cumulants and the photon number average are optimized by the same resource. We show that the optimal fidelity resource, found in reference (Phys. Rev. A {\\bf 76}, 022301 (2007)) to depend also on the characteristics of input, tends for high squeezing to the resource which optimizes the second order momenta. A similar behavior is obtained for the resource which optimizes the photon statistics which is treated here using the sum of the squared differences in photon probabilities of input and output states as the distortion measure. This is interpreted to mean that the distortions associated to second order momenta dominates the behavior of the output state for large squeezing of the resource. Optimal fidelity and optimal photon statistics resources are compared and is shown that for mixtures of Fock states they are equivalent.

L. Albano Farias; J. Stephany

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

96

Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal & overcharge abuse Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal & overcharge abuse 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program...

97

Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

98

Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy SHARE Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy As the nation's premier research laboratory, ORNL is one of the world's most capable resources...

99

ICME & MGI Big Area Additive Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICME & MGI · Big Area Additive Manufacturing · Neutron Characterization for AM · Materials problems in additive manu- facturing (AM). Additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3-D) printing of the world's most advanced neu- tron facilities, the HFIR and SNS, to characterize additive manufactured

100

E-Print Network 3.0 - additives estabilizacao radiolitica Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of 10): Additional service ... Source: Chinnam, Ratna Babu - Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Wayne State University Collection: Engineering 13 Introduction...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional observer states" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

E-Print Network 3.0 - additives Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of 10): Additional service ... Source: Chinnam, Ratna Babu - Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Wayne State University Collection: Engineering 2 Introduction...

102

For additional information, contact: Department of Agricultural Economics & Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For additional information, contact: Department of Agricultural Economics & Economics Montana State.montana.edu/econ agecon@montana.edu 1 2 AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS & ECONOMICS KELLY GORHAM 1 Austin Owens traveled to Greece as mentors for students in Economics 101 4 Chris Stoddard was the recipient of a MSU Cox Family Faculty

Lawrence, Rick L.

103

www.biology.pdx.edu For additional information about  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOLOGY www.biology.pdx.edu For additional information about the Biology Department: Visit: Biology Department Portland State University P.O. Box 751 Portland, OR 97207-0751/ Undergraduate Degrees Offered: Bachelor of Arts in Biology Bachelor of Science in Biology Minor in Biology Our challenging

104

Origin State Destination State  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

7. Estimated truck transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Origin State Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Alabama Alabama W W W W W Alabama...

105

Additive Manufacturing: Implications on Research and Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Additive Manufacturing: Implications on Research and Manufacturing With recent developments, etc.), additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to become a transformative technology in innovation-based manufacturing. Agencies such as the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation

Crawford, T. Daniel

106

Webinar: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Video recording and text version of the webinar titled "Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells," originally presented on February 11, 2014.

107

Towards Mobile Microrobot Swarms for Additive Micromanufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of independently controlled microrobots in advanced, additive manufacturing applications. Keywords Mobile Microrobotics, Multi-robot Control, Additive Manufacturing 1. Introduction Flexible manufacturing capabilities, and additive manufacturing has proven to be a disruptive technology at the small- to medium-scale. Many

Zavlanos, Michael

108

EFFECTIVE STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING WITH ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will be presented for components that can be processed by additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing. The origin structures. KEYWORDS : structural health monitoring methodology, 3D printing, additive manufacturing, fatigue, intelligent structure INTRODUCTION Additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D Printing or Rapid

Boyer, Edmond

109

Generating Unit Additions in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID4,2,"Alabama","Alabama","Electric PowerStocksSep-14Initial Month of

110

Generating Unit Additions in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID4,2,"Alabama","Alabama","Electric PowerStocksSep-14Initial Month

111

The effect of chemical additives on the synthesis of ethanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to elucidate the role of various chemical additives on ethanol synthesis over Rh- and Ni-based catalysts. Chemical additives used will include S, P, Ag, Cu, Mn, and Na. The effect of additives on the surface state of the catalysts, heat of adsorption of reactant molecules, reaction intermediates, reaction pathways, reaction kinetics, and product distributions is/will be investigated by a series of studies including temperature programmed desorption, infrared study of NO adsorption, reactive probing, steady state rate measurement, and transient kinetic study. A better understanding of the role of additive may allow us to use chemical additives to manipulate the catalytic properties of Rh- and Ni-based catalysts for producing high yields of ethanol from syngas. CO insertion is known to be a key step to the formation of acetaldehyde and ethanol from CO hydrogenation over Rh catalysts. Ethylene hydroformylation has often served as a probe to determine CO insertion capabilities of Rh catalysts. The mechanism of CO insertion in ethylene hydroformylation over Rh/SiO{sub 2} was investigated.

Chuang, S.S.C.

1989-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

112

Health studies indicate MTBE is safe gasoline additive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Implementation of the oxygenated fuels program by EPA in 39 metropolitan areas, including Fairbanks and Anchorage, Alaska, in the winter of 1992, encountered some unexpected difficulties. Complaints of headaches, dizziness, nausea, and irritated eyes started in Fairbanks, jumped to Anchorage, and popped up in various locations in the lower 48 states. The suspected culprit behind these complaints was the main additive for oxygenation of gasoline is methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). A test program, hastily organized in response to these complaints, has indicated that MTBE is a safe gasoline additive. However, official certification of the safety of MTBE is still awaited.

Anderson, E.V.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

In situ combustion with metallic additives SUPRI TR 87  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-situ combustion is the most energy efficient of the thermal oil recovery methods. In this process, a portion of a reservoir`s oil is burned in-situ as fuel to drive the recovery process. In light oil reservoirs, too little fuel may be deposited, making sustained combustion difficult. In heavy oil reservoirs, too much fuel may be deposited leading to high air injection requirements and unfavorable economics. This study has been designed to attack these problems. Water soluble metallic additives are investigated as agents to modify fuel deposition and combustion performance. This report describes seven combustion tube runs using two cradle oils and two metallic additives. The oils are 12{degrees} and 34{degrees} API, both from Cymric (California). The metallic additives tested are ionic nitrate (Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}9H{sub 2}O) and zinc nitrate (Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}6H{sub 2}O). Iron and tin additives improved the combustion efficiency in all cases. Fluctuations in the produced gas compositions were observed in all control runs, but nearly disappeared with the iron and tin additives. The combustion front velocities were also increased by iron and tin. Changes were also observed in the apparent hydrogen to carbon (H/C) ratio of the fuel, heat of combustion, air requirements, and amount of fuel deposited. Iron and tin caused increases in fuel concentration while causing a decrease in air requirement. The increase in fuel concentration varied between the oils, however, tin and iron were consistently more effective than zinc. A particularly interesting result occurred with the Cymric light oil. In the control runs, a sustained combustion front was not achieved, while in the iron additive runs, stable, sustained combustion was achieved. Iron and tin salts are suitable additives to increase fuel deposition when that is needed. Additives suitable for use as a fuel reducing agent have not yet been found. 26 refs., 23 figs, 6 tabs.

Holt, R.J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

In situ combustion with metallic additives SUPRI TR 87  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-situ combustion is the most energy efficient of the thermal oil recovery methods. In this process, a portion of a reservoir's oil is burned in-situ as fuel to drive the recovery process. In light oil reservoirs, too little fuel may be deposited, making sustained combustion difficult. In heavy oil reservoirs, too much fuel may be deposited leading to high air injection requirements and unfavorable economics. This study has been designed to attack these problems. Water soluble metallic additives are investigated as agents to modify fuel deposition and combustion performance. This report describes seven combustion tube runs using two cradle oils and two metallic additives. The oils are 12{degrees} and 34{degrees} API, both from Cymric (California). The metallic additives tested are ionic nitrate (Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}9H{sub 2}O) and zinc nitrate (Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}6H{sub 2}O). Iron and tin additives improved the combustion efficiency in all cases. Fluctuations in the produced gas compositions were observed in all control runs, but nearly disappeared with the iron and tin additives. The combustion front velocities were also increased by iron and tin. Changes were also observed in the apparent hydrogen to carbon (H/C) ratio of the fuel, heat of combustion, air requirements, and amount of fuel deposited. Iron and tin caused increases in fuel concentration while causing a decrease in air requirement. The increase in fuel concentration varied between the oils, however, tin and iron were consistently more effective than zinc. A particularly interesting result occurred with the Cymric light oil. In the control runs, a sustained combustion front was not achieved, while in the iron additive runs, stable, sustained combustion was achieved. Iron and tin salts are suitable additives to increase fuel deposition when that is needed. Additives suitable for use as a fuel reducing agent have not yet been found. 26 refs., 23 figs, 6 tabs.

Holt, R.J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Additive Manufacturing Opportunities for Transportation | ornl...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Additive Manufacturing Opportunities for Transportation Mar 13 2015 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Lonnie Love, Manufacturing Systems Research Group Transportation Science Seminar Series...

116

DOE Announces Additional Energy Efficiency Enforcement Action...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Energy Efficiency Enforcement Action to Protect Consumers DOE Announces Additional Energy Efficiency Enforcement Action to Protect Consumers January 7, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis...

117

Additional Guidance Regarding Application of Current Procedures...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Additional Guidance Regarding Application of Current Procedures for Testing Energy Consumption of Clothes Washers with Warm Rinse Cycles, Issued: June 30, 2010. Draft of DOE...

118

A Management Strategy for Additive Manufacturing:.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The thesis is about a Management Strategy for Additive Manufacturing - how engineering change influences the NPD process through the adoption of new manufacturing technology.… (more)

Zahn, N.Z.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Characteristics and Effects of Lubricant Additive Chemistry...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Characteristics and Effects of Lubricant Additive Chemistry and Exhaust Conditions on Diesel Particulate Filter Service Life and Vehicle Fuel Economy A Consortium to Optimize...

120

Unimolecular photodissociation dynamics of ketene (CH{sub 2}CO): The singlet/triplet branching ratio and experimental observation of the vibrational level thresholds of the transition-state  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rotational distributions of CO products from the dissociation of ketene at photolysis energies 10 cm{sup {minus}1} below, 56, 110, 200, 325, 425, 1,107, 1,435, 1,720, and 2,500 cm{sup {minus}1} above the singlet threshold, are measured in a supersonic free jet of ketene. The CO(v{double_prime} = 0) rotational distributions at 56, 110, 200, 325, and 425 cm{sup {minus}1} are bimodal. The peaks at low J`s, which are due to CO from the singlet channel, show that the product rotational distribution of CO product from ketene dissociation on the singlet surface is well described by phase space theory (PST). For CO(v{double_prime} = 0) rotational distributions at higher excess energies, the singlet and triplet contributions are not clearly resolved, and the singlet/triplet branching ratios are estimated by assuming that PST accurately predicts the CO rotational distribution from the singlet channel and that the distribution from the triplet channel changes little from that at 10 cm{sup {minus}1} below the singlet threshold. At 2,500 cm{sup {minus}1} excess energy, the CO(v{double_prime} = 1) rotational distribution is obtained, and the ratio of CO(v{double_prime} = 1) to CO(v{double_prime} = 0) products for the singlet channel is close to the variational RRKM calculation, 0.038, and the separate statistical ensembles (SSE) prediction, 0.041, but much greater than the PST prediction, 0.016. Rate constants for the dissociation of ketene (CH{sub 2}CO) and deuterated ketene (CD{sub 2}CO) have been measured at the threshold for the production of the CH(D){sub 2} and CO. Sharp peaks observed in photofragment excitation (PHOFEX) spectra probing CO (v = 0, J = 2) product are identified with the C-C-O bending mode of the transition state. RRKM calculations are carried out for two limiting cases for the dynamics of K-mixing in highly vibrationally excited reactant states.

Kim, S.K.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional observer states" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Observations of the 6 Centimeter Lines of OH in Evolved (OH/IR) Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent observational and theoretical advances have called into question traditional OH maser pumping models in evolved (OH/IR) stars. The detection of excited-state OH lines would provide additional constraints to discriminate amongst these theoretical models. In this Letter, we report on VLA observations of the 4750 MHz and 4765 MHz lines of OH toward 45 sources, mostly evolved stars. We detect 4765 MHz emission in the star forming regions Mon R2 and LDN 1084, but we do not detect excited-state emission in any evolved stars. The flux density and velocity of the 4765 MHz detection in Mon R2 suggests that a new flaring event has begun.

Vincent L. Fish; Laura K. Zschaechner; Loránt O. Sjouwerman; Ylva M. Pihlström; Mark J. Claussen

2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

122

Additive manufacturing of metallic tracks on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Additive manufacturing of metallic tracks on green ceramic/dielectrics Problem this technology microelectronics such as manufacture of LTCC ceramic/ Dielectric antenna and rapid PCB prototyping or repair (note: may require additional tooling/ set up time) · Rapid Prototyping & small scale manufacture

Painter, Kevin

123

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES BUILDING ADDITION March 30, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES BUILDING ADDITION March 30, 2012 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: The current concept. The addition is proposed to be constructed on the east side of the existing building. The auditorium is based on building and finishing the auditorium and main level offices. The upper and basement levels

124

Reduction of CCD observations obtained with the Fabry-Perot scanning interferometer. II. Additional Procedures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe a software package used at the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences to reduce and analyze the data obtained with the Fabry-Perot scanning interferometer. We already described most of the algorithms employed in our earlier Paper I (Moiseev, 2002). In this paper we focus on extra procedures required in the case of the use of a high-resolution Fabry-Perot interferometer: removal of ghosts and measurement of the velocity dispersion of ionized gas in galactic and extragalactic objects.

A. V. Moiseev; O. V. Egorov

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Observation of breakup transfer process for the bound states of {sup 16}O populated from {sup 12}C({sup 6}Li,d) reaction at 20 MeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The deuteron angular distribution for the {sup 12}C({sup 6}Li,d){sup 16}O* has been measured at 20 MeV populating bound and unbound states of {sup 16}O. Analysis shows a dominance of breakup induced alpha transfer in comparison to a direct alpha transfer process for the bound states. The effect increases as the excitation energy of {sup 16}O decreases, maximizing at the ground state.

Adhikari, S.; Basu, C.; Thompson, I. J.; Sugathan, P.; Jhinghan, A.; Golda, K. S.; Babu, A.; Singh, D.; Ray, S.; Mitra, A. K. [Nuclear Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata-700064 (India); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, L-414, Livermore CA 94551 (United States); Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi 110067 (India); Physics Department, Ramkrishna Vivekananda University, Belur, Howrah (India); Nuclear Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata-700064 (India)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

126

Ab initio calculation of the Hoyle state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Hoyle state plays a crucial role in the hydrogen burning of stars heavier than our sun and in the production of carbon and other elements necessary for life. This excited state of the carbon-12 nucleus was postulated by Hoyle [1] as a necessary ingredient for the fusion of three alpha particles to produce carbon at stellar temperatures. Although the Hoyle state was seen experimentally more than a half century ago [2,3], nuclear theorists have not yet uncovered the nature of this state from first principles. In this letter we report the first ab initio calculation of the low-lying states of carbon-12 using supercomputer lattice simulations and a theoretical framework known as effective field theory. In addition to the ground state and excited spin-2 state, we find a resonance at -85(3) MeV with all of the properties of the Hoyle state and in agreement with the experimentally observed energy. These lattice simulations provide insight into the structure of this unique state and new clues as to the amount of fine-tuning needed in nature for the production of carbon in stars.

Evgeny Epelbaum; Hermann Krebs; Dean Lee; Ulf-G. Meißner

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

127

Faculty Position in Mechanical Engineering Additive Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using additive manufacturing in applications such as, but not limited to the net shape manufacture of) Promoting Well-Being, Finding Cures; (3) Building Communities, Expanding Opportunities; and (4) Harnessing

128

Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

testing Cathode: LiNi13Mn13Co13O2 Anode: MCMB Electrolyte: 1.2M LiPF6 ECEMC 37 with or without additive - Separator: Celgard 2325 Voltage for cycling:...

129

Chemical Additive Selection in Matrix Acidizing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work proposes to survey new chemical knowledge, developed since 1984, on fluid additives used in matrix stimulation treatments of carbonate and sandstone petroleum reservoirs and describes one method of organizing this new knowledge in a...

Weidner, Jason 1981-

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

130

Fuel and Additive Characterization for HCCI Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper shows a numerical evaluation of fuels and additives for HCCl combustion. First, a long list of candidate HCCl fuels is selected. For all the fuels in the list, operating conditions (compression ratio, equivalence ratio and intake temperature) are determined that result in optimum performance under typical operation for a heavy-duty engine. Fuels are also characterized by presenting Log(p)-Log(T) maps for multiple fuels under HCCl conditions. Log(p)-Log(T) maps illustrate important processes during HCCl engine operation, including compression, low temperature heat release and ignition. Log(p)-Log(T) diagrams can be used for visualizing these processes and can be used as a tool for detailed analysis of HCCl combustion. The paper also includes a ranking of many potential additives. Experiments and analyses have indicated that small amounts (a few parts per million) of secondary fuels (additives) may considerably affect HCCl combustion and may play a significant role in controlling HCCl combustion. Additives are ranked according to their capability to advance HCCl ignition. The best additives are listed and an explanation of their effect on HCCl combustion is included.

Aceves, S M; Flowers, D; Martinez-Frias, J; Espinosa-Loza, F; Pitz, W J; Dibble, R

2003-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

131

Stabilization of polyaniline solutions through additives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A stabilized non-conductive polyaniline solution comprising from about 1 to about 10 percent by weight polyaniline or a polyaniline derivative, from about 90 to about 99 percent by weight N-methylpyrrolidone, and from about 0.5 percent by weight to about 15 percent by weight of a solution stabilizing additive selected from the group consisting of hindered amine light stabilizers, polymeric amines, and dialkylamines, percent by weight of additive based on the total weight of polyaniline or polyaniline derivative is provided together with a method for stabilizing a polyaniline solution. 4 figs.

Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.

1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

132

Stabilization of polyaniline solutions through additives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A stabilized non-conductive polyaniline solution comprising from about 1 to bout 10 percent by weight polyaniline or a polyaniline derivative, from about 90 to about 99 percent by weight N-methylpyrrolidone, and from about 0.5 percent by weight to about 15 percent by weight of a solution stabilizing additive selected from the group consisting of hindered amine light stabilizers, polymeric amines, and dialkylamines, percent by weight of additive based on the total weight of polyaniline or polyaniline derivative is provided together with a method for stabilizing a polyaniline solution.

Wrobleski, Debra A. (Los Alamos, NM); Benicewicz, Brian C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

CONSTRUCTION ALERT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSTRUCTION ALERT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project TO: Deans, Directors, Chairpersons panels on the roof of PBRC. DURATION OF PROJECT: September 20, 2011 HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION: 7:30 a.m. to 4 of this construction project are advised to respect all construction barricades and all posted safety/detour signs

Dong, Yingfei

134

CONSTRUCTION ALERT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSTRUCTION ALERT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project TO: Deans, Directors, Chairpersons: November 28 to December 1, 2011 HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION: 6:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. ACCESSIBLE ROUTES: No accessible routes will be affected. ADVISORY: All persons in the vicinity of this construction project

135

Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Co 13 O 2 , LiNi 0.5 Mn 1.5 O 4 Anode: MCMB, LTO Electrolyte-1: 1.2M LiPF 6 ECEMC 37 with or without additive Electrolyte-2: fully or partially fluorinated...

136

Internship FBI Fingerprint Procedures and Additional Screenings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Internship FBI Fingerprint Procedures and Additional Screenings ALL INTERNS: Required by DESE/Full-Year Internship) or August 1st (Spring Internship) o Web application https to get your fingerprints taken for your internship: 4 digit Registration #2301 Cost - $44.80 Valid

Gering, Jon C.

137

Patent Issued Additional Office Actions Received  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Patent Issued Additional Office Actions Received 3-12 mo. Respond to Office Action Patent attorney The patent examiner provides notification of which claims in the application have been rejected or accepted determines there are multiple inventions in 1 application. Patent Application Published 6 mo. Non

Cui, Yan

138

Voluntary Offer Safeguards Agreement and Additional Protocol with the International Atomic Energy Agency  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order defines requirements for Department of Energy (DOE) compliance with the Agreement between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the United States, the Protocol to the Agreement, the Additional Protocol to the Agreement, and the Subsidiary Arrangements to the Agreement and Additional Protocol. Cancels DOE O 142.2. Admin Chg 1, 6-27-13.

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

Voluntary Offer Safeguards Agreement and Additional Protocol with the International Atomic Energy Agency  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order defines requirements for Department of Energy (DOE) compliance with the Agreement between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the United States, the Protocol to the Agreement, the Additional Protocol to the Agreement, and the Subsidiary Arrangements to the Agreement and Additional Protocol. Cancels DOE O 142.2. Admin Chg 1, dated 6-27-13, cancels DOE O 142.1A. Certified 12-3-14.

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

MTBE demand as a oxygenated fuel additive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MTBE markets are in the state of flux. In the U.S. the demand has reached a plateau while in other parts of the world, it is increasing. The various factors why MTBE is experiencing a global shift will be examined and future volumes projected.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional observer states" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Ocean Observing Ocean Observing Systems (OOS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, national, and global scales. · Ocean Observing Systems serve: Fishing industry National security Coastal properties, such as salinity, temperature, and waves Satellite maps of sea surface temperature NATIONAL Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) 11 REGIONAL Systems, including: MANY LOCAL Systems

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

142

Anomalous yield reduction in direct-drive DT implosions due to 3He addition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Glass capsules were imploded in direct drive on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et aI., Opt. Commun. 133, 495, 1997] to look for anomalous degradation in deuterium/tritium (DT) yield (i.e., beyond what is predicted) and changes in reaction history with {sup 3}He addition. Such anomalies have previously been reported for D/{sup 3}He plasmas, but had not yet been investigated for DT/{sup 3}He. Anomalies such as these provide fertile ground for furthering our physics understanding of ICF implosions and capsule performance. A relatively short laser pulse (600 ps) was used to provide some degree of temporal separation between shock and compression yield components for analysis. Anomalous degradation in the compression component of yield was observed, consistent with the 'factor of two' degradation previously reported by MIT at a 50% {sup 3}He atom fraction in D{sub 2} using plastic capsules [Rygg et aI., Phys. Plasmas 13, 052702 (2006)]. However, clean calculations (i.e., no fuel-shell mixing) predict the shock component of yield quite well, contrary to the result reported by MIT, but consistent with LANL results in D{sub 2}/{sup 3}He [Wilson, et aI., lml Phys: Conf Series 112, 022015 (2008)]. X-ray imaging suggests less-than-predicted compression ofcapsules containing {sup 3}He. Leading candidate explanations are poorly understood Equation-of-State (EOS) for gas mixtures, and unanticipated particle pressure variation with increasing {sup 3}He addition.

Herrmann, Hans W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Langenbrunner, James R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mack, Joseph M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cooley, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, Douglas C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Evans, Scott C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, Tom J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kyrala, George A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Caldwell, Stephen E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Young, Carlton A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nobile, Arthur [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wermer, Joseph R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Paglieri, Stephen N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcevoy, Aaron M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kim, Yong Ho [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batha, Steven H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Horsfield, Colin J [AWE, UK; Drew, Dave [AWE, UK; Garbett, Warren [AWE, UK; Rubery, Michael [AWE, UK; Glebov, Vladimir Yu [UNIV OF ROCHESTER; Roberts, Samuel [UNIV OF ROCHESTER; Frenje, Johan A [MIT

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Energetic additive manufacturing process with feed wire  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for additive manufacture by energetic wire deposition is described. A source wire is fed into a energy beam generated melt-pool on a growth surface as the melt-pool moves over the growth surface. This process enables the rapid prototyping and manufacture of fully dense, near-net shape components, as well as cladding and welding processes. Alloys, graded materials, and other inhomogeneous materials can be grown using this process.

Harwell, Lane D. (Albuquerque, NM); Griffith, Michelle L. (Albuquerque, NM); Greene, Donald L. (Corrales, NM); Pressly, Gary A. (Sandia Park, NM)

2000-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

144

CONSTRUCTION ALERT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSTRUCTION ALERT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project TO: Deans, Directors, Chairpersons to August 19, 2011 HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION: 4:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. on August 17 and 18 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p of this construction project are advised to respect all construction barricades and all posted safety/detour signs

Dong, Yingfei

145

Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAre the EffectsAcknowledgmentdynamics inforOfficeAdditive

146

he increasing frequency of detection of the widely used gasoline additive methyl tert-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

T he increasing frequency of detection of the widely used gasoline additive methyl tert- butyl, the September 15, 1999, Report of the Blue Ribbon Panel on Oxygenates in Gasoline (1) states that between 5 with large releases (e.g., LUFTs). Unprecedented growth in use Use of MTBE as a gasoline additive began

147

Additive Manufacturing in China: Aviation and Aerospace Applications (Part 2)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis May 2013 Additive Manufacturing in China: Aviationan overview of China’s additive manufacturing industry wasmilitary achievements in additive manufacturing. 2 Initial

ANDERSON, Eric

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. Results: In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. Conclusions: For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify arrangements equivalent to equiangular geometries but using fewer beams. Furthermore, SBA provides the value of the objective function as the number of beams is increased, allowing the planner to select the minimal beam number that achieves the clinical goals. The method is simple to implement and could readily be incorporated into an existing optimization system.

Popple, Richard A., E-mail: rpopple@uabmc.edu; Brezovich, Ivan A.; Fiveash, John B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama 35294 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama 35294 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Charm cross-section and charmonium(like) states in e+e- annihilation with Belle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report BELLE measurements of the exclusive cross sections for the processes e+e-->DD*, e+e-->DD, e+e-->DDpi, the first observation of psi(4415)-> DD*2(2460)bar decay and new state, Y(4660), using ISR. In addition, another cluster of events at around 4.05GeV/c2 is reported.

T. Uglov

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

150

Secondary Pollutants from Ozone Reaction with Ventilation Filters and Degradation of Filter Media Additives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior research suggests that chemical processes taking place on the surface of particle filters employed in buildings may lead to the formation of harmful secondary byproducts. We investigated ozone reactions with fiberglass, polyester, cotton/polyester and polyolefin filter media, as well as hydrolysis of filter media additives. Studies were carried out on unused media, and on filters that were installed for 3 months in buildings at two different locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. Specimens from each filter media were exposed to {approx}150 ppbv ozone in a flow tube under a constant flow of dry or humidified air (50percent RH). Ozone breakthrough was recorded for each sample over periods of {approx}1000 min; the ozone uptake rate was calculated for an initial transient period and for steady-state conditions. While ozone uptake was observed in all cases, we did not observe significant differences in the uptake rate and capacity for the various types of filter media tested. Most experiments were performed at an airflow rate of 1.3 L/min (face velocity = 0.013 m/s), and a few tests were also run at higher rates (8 to 10 L/min). Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, two oxidation byproducts, were quantified downstream of each sample. Those aldehydes (m/z 31 and 45) and other volatile byproducts (m/z 57, 59, 61 and 101) were also detected in real-time using Proton-Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). Low-ppbv byproduct emissions were consistently higher under humidified air than under dry conditions, and were higher when the filters were loaded with particles, as compared with unused filters. No significant differences were observed when ozone reacted over various types of filter media. Fiberglass filters heavily coated with impaction oil (tackifier) showed higher formaldehyde emissions than other samples. Those emissions were particularly high in the case of used filters, and were observed even in the absence of ozone, suggesting that hydrolysis of additives, rather than ozonolysis, is the main formaldehyde source in those filters. Emission rates of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were not found to be large enough to substantially increase indoor concentrations in typical building scenarios. Nevertheless, ozone reactions on HVAC filters cannot be ignored as a source of low levels of indoor irritants.

Destaillats, Hugo; Chen, Wenhao; Apte, Michael; Li, Nuan; Spears, Michael; Almosni, Jérémie; Brunner, Gregory; Zhang, Jianshun (Jensen); Fisk, William J.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Probing the ladder of dressed states and nonclassical light generation in quantum dot-cavity QED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the photon induced tunneling phenomena in a photonic crystal cavity containing a strongly coupled quantum dot and describe how this tunneling can be used to generate photon states consisting mainly of a particular Fock state. Additionally, we study experimentally the photon-induced tunneling as a function of excitation laser power and frequency and show the signature of second rung of the Jaynes-Cummings Hamiltonian in the observed photon-statistics.

Arka Majumdar; Michal Bajcsy; Jelena Vuckovic

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

152

Compatibility of quantum states  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We introduce a measure of compatibility between quantum states--the likelihood that two density matrices describe the same object. Our measure is motivated by two elementary requirements, which lead to a natural definition. We list some properties of this measure, and discuss its relation to the problem of combining two observers' states of knowledge.

Poulin, David; Blume-Kohout, Robin [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS-B210, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Rapid Variability of Blazar 3C 279 during Flaring States in 2013-2014 with Joint Fermi-LAT, NuSTAR, Swift, and Ground-Based Multi-wavelength Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the results of a multi-band observing campaign on the famous blazer 3C 279 conducted during a phase of increased activity from 2013 December to 2014 April, including first observations of it with NuSTAR. The $\\gamma$-ray emission of the source measured by Fermi-LAT showed multiple distinct flares reaching the highest flux level measured in this object since the beginning of the Fermi mission, with $F(E > 100\\,{\\rm MeV})$ of $10^{-5}$ photons cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$, and with a flux doubling time scale as short as 2 hours. The $\\gamma$-ray spectrum during one of the flares was very hard, with an index of $\\Gamma_\\gamma = 1.7 \\pm 0.1$, which is rarely seen in flat spectrum radio quasars. The lack of concurrent optical variability implies a very high Compton dominance parameter $L_\\gamma/L_{\\rm syn} > 300$. Two 1-day NuSTAR observations with accompanying Swift pointings were separated by 2 weeks, probing different levels of source activity. While the 0.5$-$70 keV X-ray spectrum obtained during the first poi...

Hayashida, M; Madejski, G M; Sikora, M; Itoh, R; Ajello, M; Blandford, R D; Buson, S; Chiang, J; Fukazawa, Y; Furniss, A K; Urry, C M; Hasan, I; Harrison, F A; Alexander, D M; Balokovi?, M; Barret, D; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Forster, K; Giommi, P; Grefenstette, B; Hailey, C; Hornstrup, A; Kitaguchi, T; Koglin, J E; Madsen, K K; Mao, P H; Miyasaka, H; Mori, K; Perri, M; Pivovaroff, M J; Puccetti, S; Rana, V; Stern, D; Tagliaferri, G; Westergaard, N J; Zhang, W W; Zoglauer, A; Gurwell, M A; Uemura, M; Akitaya, H; Kawabata, K S; Kawaguch, K; Kanda, Y; Moritani, Y; Takaki, K; Ui, T; Yoshida, M; Agarwal, A; Gupta, A C

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

NMR relaxometry study of plaster mortar with polymer additives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cement mixed with water forms a plastic paste or slurry which stiffness in time and finally hardens into a resistant stone. The addition of sand aggregates, polymers (Walocel) and/or calcium carbonate will modify dramatically the final mortar mechanic and thermal properties. The hydration processes can be observed using the 1D NMR measurements of transverse T{sub 2} relaxation times distributions analysed by a Laplace inversion algorithm. These distributions were obtained for mortar pasta measured at 2 hours after preparation then at 3, 7 and 28 days after preparation. Multiple components are identified in the T{sub 2} distributions. These can be associated with the proton bounded chemical or physical to the mortar minerals characterized by a short T{sub 2} relaxation time and to water protons in pores with three different pore sizes as observed from SEM images. The evaporation process is faster in the first hours after preparation, while the mortar hydration (bonding of water molecules to mortar minerals) can be still observed after days or months from preparation. Finally, the mechanic resistance was correlated with the transverse T{sub 2} relaxation rates corresponding to the bound water.

Jumate, E.; Manea, D. [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Faculty of Civil Engineering. 15 C Daicoviciu Str., 400020, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Faculty of Civil Engineering. 15 C Daicoviciu Str., 400020, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Moldovan, D.; Fechete, R. [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Department of Physics and Chemistry, 25 G. Baritiu Str., 400027, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Department of Physics and Chemistry, 25 G. Baritiu Str., 400027, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

155

Thermochemical Kinetics for Multireference Systems: Addition Reactions of Ozone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions of ozone to ethyne and ethene provide extreme examples of multireference singlet-state chemistry, and they are examined here to test the applicability of several approaches to thermochemical kinetics of systems with large static correlation. Four different multireference diagnostics are applied to measure the multireference characters of the reactants, products, and transition states; all diagnostics indicate significant multireference character in the reactant portion of the potential energy surfaces. We make a more complete estimation of the effect of quadruple excitations than was previously available, and we use this with CCSDT/CBS estimation of Wheeler et al. (Wheeler, S. E.; Ess, D. H.; Houk, K. N. J. Phys. Chem. A 2008, 112, 1798.) to make new best estimates of the van der Waals association energy, the barrier height, and the reaction energy to form the cycloadduct for both reactions. Comparing with these best estimates, we present comprehensive mean unsigned errors for a variety of coupled cluster, multilevel, and density functional methods. Several computational aspects of multireference reactions are considered: (i) the applicability of multilevel theory, (ii) the convergence of coupled cluster theory for reaction barrier heights, (iii) the applicability of completely renormalized coupled cluster methods to multireference systems, (iv) the treatment by density functional theory, (v) the multireference perturbation theory for multireference reactions, and (vi) the relative accuracy of scaling-type multilevel methods as compared with additive ones. It is found that scaling-type multilevel methods do not perform better than the additive-type multilevel methods. Among the 48 tested density functionals, only M05 reproduces the best estimates within their uncertainty. Multireference perturbation theory based on the complete-active-space reference wave functions constructed using a small number of reaction-specific active orbitals gives accurate forward barrier heights; however, it significantly underestimates reaction energies.

Zhao, Yan; Tishchenko, Oksana; Gour, Jeffrey R.; Li, Wei; Lutz, Jesse; Piecuch, Piotr; Truhlar, Donald G.

2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

156

HISTORY OF WEATHER OBSERVATIONS MOUNT AUBURN, OHIO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HISTORY OF WEATHER OBSERVATIONS MOUNT AUBURN, OHIO 1861 - 1881 October 2004 Prepared By Glen Conner Center under the auspices of the Climate Database Modernization Program, NOAA's National Climatic Data;1 HISTORY OF WEATHER OBSERVATIONS MOUNT AUBURN, OHIO 1861-1881 Glen Conner Kentucky State Climatologist

Maynard, J. Barry

157

MECH 502: Advanced/Additive Manufacturing Engineering COURSE DESCRIPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MECH 502: Advanced/Additive Manufacturing Engineering COURSE DESCRIPTION In this course you product development and innovation. You will develop a rich knowledge of additive manufacturing processes enabling advanced/additive manufacturing and personal fabrication. You will have the opportunity

Schumacher, Russ

158

Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats, Opportunities, and Developments (Part I)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

application of additive manufacturing in China’s aviationAnalysis May 2013 Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats,an overview of China’s additive manufacturing industry is

ANDERSON, Eric

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Observables of Macdonald processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a framework for computing averages of various observables of Macdonald processes. This leads to new contour--integral formulas for averages of a large class of multilevel observables, as well as Fredholm determinants for averages of two different single level observables.

Alexei Borodin; Ivan Corwin; Vadim Gorin; Shamil Shakirov

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

160

Methoden Wetenschappelijk and Observational  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methoden Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek Fact-free and Observational Science #12;Data · Part of modern science is based on observation ­How do we do this? ­And what are the pitfalls? · Knowing how to observe is an important step in experimental design #12;Three kinds of science · There are (in my view) three ways

Steels, Luc

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional observer states" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Energy Department Makes Additional $4 Billion in Loan Guarantees...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Makes Additional 4 Billion in Loan Guarantees Available for Innovative Renewable Energy and Efficient Energy Projects Energy Department Makes Additional 4 Billion in Loan...

162

The Role of Lubricant Additives in Fuel Efficiency and Emission...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Lubricant Additives in Fuel Efficiency and Emission Reductions: Viscosity Effects The Role of Lubricant Additives in Fuel Efficiency and Emission Reductions: Viscosity Effects...

163

Effects of Tungsten Oxide Addition on the Electrochemical Performance...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tungsten Oxide Addition on the Electrochemical Performance of Nanoscale Tantalum Oxide-Based Electrocatalysts for Effects of Tungsten Oxide Addition on the Electrochemical...

164

Surface and Structural Stabilities of Carbon Additives in High...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Structural Stabilities of Carbon Additives in High Voltage Lithium Ion Batteries. Surface and Structural Stabilities of Carbon Additives in High Voltage Lithium Ion Batteries....

165

Energy Department Seeks Additional Feedback on Draft Guidance...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Seeks Additional Feedback on Draft Guidance for the Hydroelectric Production Incentive Program Energy Department Seeks Additional Feedback on Draft Guidance for the Hydroelectric...

166

Ionic Liquids as Novel Engine Lubricants or Lubricant Additives...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Additives Ionic Liquids as Novel Engine Lubricants or Lubricant Additives Bench test results showed that compared with fully-formulated engine oils, selected low-viscosity...

167

Obama Administration Announces Additional $13,969,700 for Local...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Obama Administration Announces Additional 13,969,700 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Alaska Obama Administration Announces Additional 13,969,700 for Local Energy...

168

Obama Administration Announces Additional $37,157,700 for Local...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Obama Administration Announces Additional 37,157,700 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Wisconsin Obama Administration Announces Additional 37,157,700 for Local Energy...

169

Additives and Cathode Materials for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Additives and Cathode Materials for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur Batteries Additives and Cathode Materials for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur Batteries 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

170

Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export...

171

Develop and Evaluate Materials and Additives that Enhance Thermal...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse High Voltage Electrolyte for Lithium Batteries...

172

Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Lubricant and Additive...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Theoretical Investigation of Lubricant and Additive Effects on Engine Friction Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Lubricant and Additive Effects on Engine Friction...

173

Energy Department Provides Additional Emergency Fuel Loan to...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Additional Emergency Fuel Loan to Department of Defense as Part of Hurricane Sandy and Nor'easter Recovery Energy Department Provides Additional Emergency Fuel Loan to Department...

174

Upcoming Webinar February 11: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

February 11: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells Upcoming Webinar February 11: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells February 6, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis On Tuesday, February 11,...

175

Webinar: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells Webinar: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells February 11, 2014 5:00PM to 6:00PM EST Online...

176

Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency and Durability in Engines Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency and...

177

Fuel Additive Strategies for Enhancing the Performance of Engines...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Additive Strategies for Enhancing the Performance of Engines and Engine Oils Fuel Additive Strategies for Enhancing the Performance of Engines and Engine Oils 2003 DEER Conference...

178

Department of Energy Announces Two Additional Loans of Oil from...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Additional Loans of Oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Department of Energy Announces Two Additional Loans of Oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve September 2, 2005 -...

179

United States Department of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: For additional copies: U.S. FOREST SERVICE U.S. Forest Service 11 CAMPUS BLVD SUITE 200 Publications Distribution Forest, New Hampshire, began in 1932. One of the studies, still maintained today, consisted of severalUnited States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northern Research Station Research Paper NRS

180

United States Department of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Station at Durham, New Hampshire. The computer program described in this publication was created usingUnited States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northern Research Station General Technical://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/ Published by: For additional copies: U.S. FOREST SERVICE U.S. Forest Service 11 CAMPUS BLVD SUITE 200

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional observer states" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Observation of an Antimatter Hypernucleus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear collisions recreate conditions in the universe microseconds after the Big Bang. Only a very small fraction of the emitted fragments are light nuclei, but these states are of fundamental interest. We report the observation of antihypertritons - composed of an antiproton, antineutron, and antilambda hyperon - produced by colliding gold nuclei at high energy. Our analysis yields 70 {+-} 17 antihypertritons ({sub {bar {Lambda}}}{sup 3}{bar H}) and 157 {+-} 30 hypertritons ({sub {Lambda}}{sup 3}H). The measured yields of {sub {Lambda}}{sup 3}H ({sub {bar {Lambda}}}{sup 3}{bar H}) and {sup 3}He ({sup 3}{ovr He}) are similar, suggesting an equilibrium in coordinate and momentum space populations of up, down, and strange quarks and antiquarks, unlike the pattern observed at lower collision energies. The production and properties of antinuclei, and nuclei containing strange quarks, have implications spanning nuclear/particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology.

STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

182

Observations of the Icy Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Freeze-out of the gas phase elements onto cold grains in dense interstellar and circumstellar media builds up ice mantles consisting of molecules that are mostly formed in situ (H2O, NH3, CO2, CO, CH3OH, and more). This review summarizes the detected infrared spectroscopic ice features and compares the abundances across Galactic, extragalactic, and solar system environments. A tremendous amount of information is contained in the ice band profiles. Laboratory experiments play a critical role in the analysis of the observations. Strong evidence is found for distinct ice formation stages, separated by CO freeze out at high densities. The ice bands have proven to be excellent probes of the thermal history of their environment. The evidence for the long-held idea that processing of ices by energetic photons and cosmic rays produces complex molecules is weak. Recent state of the art observations show promise for much progress in this area with planned infrared facilities.

Boogert, Adwin; Whittet, Douglas

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

An observable for vacancy characterization and diffusion in crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To locate the position and characterize the dynamics of a vacancy in a crystal, we propose to represent it by the ground state density of a quantum probe quasi-particle for the Hamiltonian associated to the potential energy field generated by the atoms in the sample. In this description, the h^2/2mu coefficient of the kinetic energy term is a tunable parameter controlling the density localization in the regions of relevant minima of the potential energy field. Based on this description, we derive a set of collective variables that we use in rare event simulations to identify some of the vacancy diffusion paths in a 2D crystal. Our simulations reveal, in addition to the simple and expected nearest neighbor hopping path, a collective migration mechanism of the vacancy. This mechanism involves several lattice sites and produces a long range migration of the vacancy. Finally, we also observed a vacancy induced crystal reorientation process.

Pierre-Antoine Geslin; Giovanni Ciccotti; Eric Vanden-Eijnden; Simone Meloni

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

184

The PennsylvaniaState University HUB-RobesonAddition and Renovation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building Co., Inc. #12;Work In Progress · Pour Concrete Tie-in at Green Roof · Pour Electrical Room;© Gilbane Building Co., Inc. BookstoreGreenRoofSlabInfills #12;© Gilbane Building Co., Inc. ConcreteWorkatthe BookstoreGreenRoof #12;© Gilbane Building Co., Inc. RetainingWallinCourtyard #12;© Gilbane Building Co., Inc

185

The PennsylvaniaStateUniversity HUB-RobesonAddition and Renovation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Waterproof Green Roof · Sealing B4 Level Concrete © Gilbane Building Co., Inc. #12;© Gilbane Building Co. BookstoreGreenRoof Cleaning #12;© Gilbane Building Co., Inc. Level1ConcretePourPrep #12;© Gilbane Building Building Co., Inc. August8,2014 #12;Work In Progress · Painting in Food Service · Hanging Light Fixtures

186

The PennsylvaniaState University HUB-RobesonAddition and Renovation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rain Water Piping in the Meeting Rooms · Excavate Foundations at South Entrance Tunnel · Backfill South Foundations and Piers at South Entry Tunnel · Demo HUB Elevator Overbuild Roof · HUB Parking Deck Plaza

187

The PennsylvaniaStateUniversity HUB-RobesonAddition and Renovation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;© Gilbane Building Co., Inc. FoodServiceTerrazzoPreparation #12;© Gilbane Building Co., Inc. FoodService Building Co., Inc. July11,2014 #12;Work In Progress · Hang Drywall in Food Service · Paint Ceiling and Ductwork in Food Service · Pull Wire in Food Service · Prepare for Food Service Terrazzo · Insulate Duct

188

The PennsylvaniaState University HUB-RobesonAddition and Renovation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Storage Room B032 © Gilbane Building Co., Inc. #12;ProjectOverviewFromParking Garage © Gilbane Building Co., Inc. #12;SouthEntranceView © Gilbane Building Co., Inc. #12;LoadingDockView © Gilbane Building Co Slab in Food Storage Area · Install Heat Exchanger in Storage Room B032 © Gilbane Building Co., Inc

189

The PennsylvaniaState University HUB-RobesonAddition and Renovation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cooler Space Extension · Lay CMU Walls in Food Service Storage Space · Form and Reinforce Shear Wall Near Co., Inc. #12;ProjectOverviewFromParking Garage © Gilbane Building Co., Inc. #12;South., Inc. DemolitionofRobesonAtriumRoof #12;© Gilbane Building Co., Inc. LayCMUForFoodServiceCoolers #12

190

The PennsylvaniaState University HUB-RobesonAddition and Renovation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Service Storage Space · Form and Reinforce Foundations in Courtyard · Excavation in the Courtyard · Hang © Gilbane Building Co., Inc. #12;ProjectOverviewFromParking Garage © Gilbane Building Co., Inc. #12;South;© Gilbane Building Co., Inc. DemolitionofRobesonAtriumRoof #12;© Gilbane Building Co., Inc. PourSlabinFoodService

191

Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ALLETE Inc d b a Minnesota Power Smart Grid Project ALLETE Inc d b a Minnesota Power Smart Grid Project Duluth Minnesota American Transmission Company LLC II Smart Grid Project...

192

The PennsylvaniaStateUniversity HUB-RobesonAddition and Renovation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Install Bookstore Lights · Prime Paint in Bookstore · Bookstore Café Piping & Hot Water Heater · HangGLevel StairBuild-out forATMs #12;© Gilbane Building Co., Inc. BookstoreCaféPiping&DomesticWater Heater #12., Inc. EastExteriorConcreteStair #12;© Gilbane Building Co., Inc. HotWaterPipingUnderMonumental Stair

193

Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocusOskiPhilipspresents new ClimateProject Better PlaceMays

194

Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocusOskiPhilipspresents new ClimateProject Better

195

Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocusOskiPhilipspresents new ClimateProject BetterCorporation Inc

196

Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocusOskiPhilipspresents new ClimateProject BetterCorporation

197

Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocusOskiPhilipspresents new ClimateProject

198

Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocusOskiPhilipspresents new ClimateProjectBurbank California

199

Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocusOskiPhilipspresents new ClimateProjectBurbank

200

Technical Options for Processing Additional Light Tight Oil Volumes within the United States  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousand CubicinResidualU.S. RefinerEntity-Level

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional observer states" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine:Plug Power IncPowderClimateMeadows,Progressive LightingFrogCity

202

Project Project HQ City HQ State ARRA Funding Total Value Additional  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine:Plug Power IncPowderClimateMeadows,Progressive

203

The Effect of Zn Addition on the Oxidation State of Cobalt in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The effect of Zn promotion on the activity and selectivity of CoZrO2 catalysts for ethanol steam reforming was investigated. The catalysts were synthesized by incipient wetness...

204

Observational learning in horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING IN HORSES A Thesis by KATHERINE LOUISE BAER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1979 Major Subject: Animal... Science OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING IN HORSES A Thesis by KATHERINE LOUISE BAER Approved as to style and content by: L7 . 5+~ (Chairma of . C mmittee) ) c r (Mem ) YiNicc CJ ~- (Membeh) (Head of Department May 1979 ABSTRACT Observational...

Baer, Katherine Louise

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Obama Administration Announces Additional $31,577,900 for Local...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

climate goals." Funding for state, city, and county governments in the state includes: AL Alabama Total Sum City, County, and SEO Allocations All 31,577,900 AL Alabama State...

206

Hot Pot Field Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

Lane, Michael

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

207

Hot Pot Field Observations  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

Lane, Michael

208

Department of Energy Announces Plans for Additional Comment Period on National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department has decided that, prior to issuing a report that designates any national interest electric transmission corridor, the Department will first issue any designation that it is considering in draft form, so as to allow additional opportunities for review and comment by affected States, regional entities, and the general public.

209

Observation Critical Thinking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecologist Ecotoxicologist Environmental planner Natural resource manager Park Ranger Pollution control Construction Firm State & Federal Government Environmental Organization Academia Museum Law Firm Energy Operations Manager Computer Software Developer Industrial Hygienist Computer Technologist Geologist

Jiang, Huiqiang

210

Wright State University CORE Scholar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wright State University CORE Scholar Psychology Faculty Publications Psychology 10-1-2010 The Statistical Properties of the Survivor Interaction Contrast Joseph W. Houpt Wright State University - Main Campus, joseph.houpt@wright.edu James T. Townsend Follow this and additional works at: http://corescholar.libraries.wright

Townsend, James T.

211

Faraday Rotation Observations of Magnetic Fields in galaxy Clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The presence of magnetic fields in the intracluster medium in clusters of galaxies has been revealed through several different observational techniques. These fields may be dynamically important in clusters as they will provide additional pressure support to the intracluster medium as well as inhibit transport mechanisms such as thermal conduction. Here, we review the current observational state of Faraday rotation measure studies of the cluster fields. The fields are generally found to be a few to 10 microG in non-cooling core clusters and ordered on scales of 10-20 kpc. Studies of sources at large impact parameters show that the magnetic fields extend from cluster cores to radii of at least 500 kpc. In central regions of cooling core systems the field strengths are often somewhat higher (10-40 microG) and appear to be ordered on smaller scales of a few to 10 kpc. We also review some of the recent work on interpreting Faraday rotation measure observations through theory and numerical simulations. These techniques allow us to build up a much more detailed view of the strength and topology of the fields.

Tracy E. Clarke

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

212

Core Lithology From the State of Hawaii Scientific Observation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for SOH-1 test hole Authors Frank A. Trusdell, Elizabeth A. Novak, Rene' S. Evans and Kelly Okano Published U.S. Dept. of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey, The date "unknown"...

213

Stochastic Search with an Observable State Variable Lauren A. Hannah  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is an example: a wind farm manager must pledge how much energy she will provide to a utility company an hour, the difference is lost. The objective function depends on the future wind and market price, both unknown. The last 24 hours of wind and market prices, time of day and time of year all contain information about

Powell, Warren B.

214

OCEANOGRAPHIC OBSERVATIONS, 1957, EAST COAST OF THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ttie Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Supported by U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Contract no. 14

215

The Duality of State and Observation in Probabilistic Transition Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Canada 2 Google Inc., Mountain View, California, USA 3 McGill University, Montr´eal, Qu´ebec Abstract is expectation maximization (EM) [11], but for POMDPs this approach is plagued by local minima (more so than

Pineau, Joelle

216

The Duality of State and Observation in Probabilistic Transition Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

´eal, Qu´ebec 2 Google Inc., Mountain View, California, USA 3 Morgan Stanley, Montreal, Canada Abstract algorithmic solution is ex- pectation maximization (EM) [11], but for POMDPs this approach is plagued by local

Panangaden, Prakash

217

Core Lithology State of Hawaii Scientific Observation Hole 4 Kilauea  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova Electric Coop, IncKilauea Volcano, Hawaii |

218

Core Lithology State of Hawail Scientific Observation Hole 2 Kilauea  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova Electric Coop, IncKilauea Volcano, Hawaii

219

Mechanisms of transition-metal catalyzed additions to olefins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

....................................................................................................... 33 10 Reaction schematic for 13C KIE studies on free-radical polymerization and ATRP ........... 34 11 Transition structures for (a) the addition of methyl radical to ethylene and (b) the addition of formylmethyl radical to acrolein...

Nowlan, Daniel Thomas

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

220

Effects of additives on the stability of electrolytes for all...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effects of additives on the stability of electrolytes for all-vanadium redox flow batteries. Effects of additives on the stability of electrolytes for all-vanadium redox flow...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional observer states" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Multi component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency and Durability in Engines ITP Nanomanufacturing:...

222

MANUFACTURABILITY ANALYSIS TO COMBINE ADDITIVE AND SUBTRACTIVE PROCESSES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MANUFACTURABILITY ANALYSIS TO COMBINE ADDITIVE AND SUBTRACTIVE PROCESSES Authors: Olivier Kerbrat of the tool may advantageously be machined or manufactured by an additive process. Originality/value: Nowadays is proposed to combine additive and subtractive processes, for tooling design and manufacturing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

223

EBSD analysis of magnesium addition on inclusion formation in SS400 structural steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the effect of magnesium addition on the inclusion formation in SS400 steel was investigated. The experimental specimens with and without Mg addition treatment were compared. The microstructure was observed using optical microscopy after etching with 3% nital. The morphology and chemical composition of the inclusions were analyzed via scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry. The lattice structure and orientation of the inclusions were identified by electron backscattering diffraction. The average size of inclusions in SS400 was between 0.67 and 0.75 ?m, and between 0.65 and 0.68 ?m in SS400 + Mg. The 2 ppm Mg addition resulted in the oxide formation change from Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to MgO·Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and in the inclusion formation change from Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–MnS to MgO·Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–MnS. Moreover, a simple-phase MnS with an average grain size of 1 ?m to 2 ?m was observed in rod-like, globular, and polyhedron forms. - Highlights: • The effect of magnesium addition was investigated for SS400 steel. • 2 ppm Mg addition changes the inclusion formation from Al2O3-MnS to MgO·Al2O3-MnS. • MnS observed in inclusions exhibits rod-like, globular, and polyhedron forms.

Luo, Sin-Jie [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Su, Yen-Hao Frank; Lu, Muh-Jung [China Steel Corporation, Kaohsiung 81233, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Jui-Chao, E-mail: jckuo@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Remarks on additivity of the Holevo channel capacity and of the entanglement of formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of these notes is to discuss the relation between the additivity questions regarding the quantities (Holevo) capacity of a quantum channel T and entanglement of formation of a given bipartite state. In particular, using the Stinespring dilation theorem, we give a formula for the channel capacity involving entanglement of formation. This can be used to show that additivity of the latter for some states can be inferred from the additivity of capacity for certain channels. We demonstrate this connection for a family of group--covariant channels, allowing us to calculate the entanglement cost for many states, including some where a strictly smaller upper bound on the distillable entanglement is known. This is presented in a general framework, extending recent findings of Vidal, Dur and Cirac (e-print quant-ph/0112131). In an appendix we speculate on a general relation of superadditivity of the entanglement of formation, which would imply both the general additivity of this function under tensor produc...

Matsumoto, K; Winter, A; Matsumoto, Keiji; Shimono, Toshiyuki; Winter, Andreas

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

A Search for Additional Planets in Five of the Exoplanetary Systems Studied by the Nasa Epoxi Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present time series photometry and constraints on additional planets in five of the exoplanetary systems studied by the EPOCh (Extrasolar Planet Observation and Characterization) component of the NASA EPOXI mission: ...

Ballard, Sarah

226

Observing Massive Galaxy Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A major goal of contemporary astrophysics is understanding the origin of the most massive galaxies in the universe, particularly nearby ellipticals and spirals. Theoretical models of galaxy formation have existed for many decades, although low and high redshift observations are only beginning to put constraints on different ideas. We briefly describe these observations and how they are revealing the methods by which galaxies form by contrasting and comparing fiducial rapid collapse and hierarchical formation model predictions. The available data show that cluster ellipticals must have rapidly formed at z > 2, and that up to 50% of all massive galaxies at z ~ 2.5 are involved in major mergers. While the former is consistent with the monolithic collapse picture, we argue that hierarchal formation is the only model that can reproduce all the available observations.

Christopher J. Conselice

2002-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

227

Air Observe System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This manuscript contains a description and basic principles for observing inaccessible areas using low cost, easily deployed equipment. The basic premise is to suspend a tiny video camera at an altitude of 10 - 200 meters over the area to be surveyed. The TV camera supports at altitude by wind or balloon. The technical challenges regard the means by which the camera is suspended. Such a system may be used by military or police forces or by civil authorities for rescue missions or assessment of natural disasters. The method may be further developed for military applications by integrating the surveillance task with deployment of munitions. Key words: air observer, air suspended system, low altitude video observer.

Alexander Bolonkin

2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

228

Robustness of chimera states for coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo oscillators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chimera states are complex spatio-temporal patterns that consist of coexisting domains of spatially coherent and incoherent dynamics. This counterintuitive phenomenon was first observed in systems of identical oscillators with symmetric coupling topology. Can one overcome these limitations? To address this question, we discuss the robustness of chimera states in networks of FitzHugh-Nagumo oscillators. Considering networks of inhomogeneous elements with regular coupling topology, and networks of identical elements with irregular coupling topologies, we demonstrate that chimera states are robust with respect to these perturbations, and analyze their properties as the inhomogeneities increase. We find that modifications of coupling topologies cause qualitative changes of chimera states: additional random links induce a shift of the stability regions in the system parameter plane, gaps in the connectivity matrix result in a change of the multiplicity of incoherent regions of the chimera state, and hierarchical geometry in the connectivity matrix induces nested coherent and incoherent regions.

Iryna Omelchenko; Astero Provata; Johanne Hizanidis; Eckehard Schoell; Philipp Hoevel

2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

229

A Radically Configurable Six-State Compound  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experimentally accessible redox states (0, 2+, 4+, 6+, 7+, and 8+) from within the total of nine states evaluated by quantum mechanical methods. All six of the observable redox states have been identified by electrochemical cationic state is low and the lifetimes of these radical viologen derivatives is short as a result

Goddard III, William A.

230

CLIMATE MODELING BEST ESTIMATE DATASET (CMBE) -NEW ADDITIONS Renata McCoy, Shaocheng Xie, Stephen Klein, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLIMATE MODELING BEST ESTIMATE DATASET (CMBE) - NEW ADDITIONS Renata McCoy, Shaocheng Xie, Stephen ARM product, the Climate Modeling Best Estimate (CMBE) dataset, is being augmented with the additional observational and model data. The CMBE dataset was created to serve the needs of climate model developers

231

www.goviks.com For additional information about  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Idaho State, Montana, Sacramento State, Montana State and Northern Colorado. Viking Home Events take-725-8585 Cheerleading & Dance (M/W), Darlene Brady, 503-725-5604 Scholarships Scholarships are determined by each coach quarterly fee. Personal Fitness Students may use the Stott Center exercise facilities including a weight

232

Academic Writing Observation Papers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a particular action and did not notice something about the people involved. Note what you did not notice observations. People: If the setting is crowded, choose a particular group (or groups) or focus on random paper around a research question: For example, you may be interested in power relations, interactions

233

Academic Writing Observation Papers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a particular action and did not notice something about the people involved. Note what you did not notice observations. People: If the setting is crowded, choose a particular group (or groups) or focus on random in power relations, interactions between interpersonal communication processes and other media, or other

234

Global Warming Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Warming Observations: 1. Global temperature has been gradually rising in recent years #15 in range 8000 12000 nm { CFC's, methane and N 2 O important for global warming even though concentra- tions in concentration of \\greenhouse gases" like CO 2 What determines global temperature? Energy budget of earth: 1

Schofield, Jeremy

235

EBONEEUROPEAN BIODIVERSITY OBSERVATION NETWORK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EBONEEUROPEAN BIODIVERSITY OBSERVATION NETWORK Geert De Blust, Guy Laurijssens, Hans Van Calster of biodiversity monitoring through close collaboration of users and data providers #12;#12;Design of a monitoring-effectiveness Optimization of biodiversity monitoring through close collaboration of users and data providers Geert De Blust1

236

Single electron states in polyethylene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report computer simulations of an excess electron in various structural motifs of polyethylene at room temperature, including lamellar and interfacial regions between amorphous and lamellae, as well as nanometre-sized voids. Electronic properties such as density of states, mobility edges, and mobilities are computed on the different phases using a block Lanczos algorithm. Our results suggest that the electronic density of states for a heterogeneous material can be approximated by summing the single phase density of states weighted by their corresponding volume fractions. Additionally, a quantitative connection between the localized states of the excess electron and the local atomic structure is presented.

Wang, Y. [State Key Lab. of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, No. 28 Xianning West Road, Xi'an 710049, Shaanxi (China) [State Key Lab. of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, No. 28 Xianning West Road, Xi'an 710049, Shaanxi (China); School of Physics and Complex Adaptive Systems Laboratory, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); MacKernan, D. [School of Physics and Complex Adaptive Systems Laboratory, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)] [School of Physics and Complex Adaptive Systems Laboratory, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Cubero, D., E-mail: dcubero@us.es, E-mail: n.quirke@imperial.ac.uk [State Key Lab. of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, No. 28 Xianning West Road, Xi'an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Departmento de Física Aplicada I, Universidad de Sevilla, Calle Virgen de Africa 7, 41011 Seville (Spain); Coker, D. F. [School of Physics and Complex Adaptive Systems Laboratory, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland) [School of Physics and Complex Adaptive Systems Laboratory, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Department of Chemistry, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Quirke, N., E-mail: dcubero@us.es, E-mail: n.quirke@imperial.ac.uk [State Key Lab. of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, No. 28 Xianning West Road, Xi'an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Department of Chemistry, Imperial College, London SW7 2AY (United Kingdom)

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

237

AN ALTERNATIVE OBSERVER FOR ZERO DEFICIENCY CHEMICAL NETWORKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for detectability, and went on to explicitly construct a full-state observer that is guaranteed to converge 1 Email by a construction di#11;erent from the one employed in a previous paper. The new observer exhibits slower (Sontag, 2001) for background material on stability), which dealt with the construction of observers

Chaves, Madalena

238

additional experimental information: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Information Last Name First Name Middle Initial UT EID B. Childcare Expense Information Number 92 Method of Additional Structures on the Objects of a Monoidal Kleisli Category as...

239

Unlocking the Potential of Additive Manufacturing in the Fuel...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Manufacturing in the Fuel Cells Industry Download presentation slides from the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells" held on...

240

EIS-0250: Notice of Public Comment Period Extension and Additional...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Period Extension and Additional Public Meeting Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, NV...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional observer states" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

EIS-0369: Notice of Public Comment Period Extension and Additional...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Notice of Public Comment Period Extension and Additional Public Meeting Supplemental Yucca Mountain Rail Corridor and Rail Alignment The Department of Energy is now announcing...

242

Obama Administration Announces Additional $14,521,300 for Local...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

4,521,300 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Rhode Island Obama Administration Announces Additional 14,521,300 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Rhode Island...

243

Obama Administration Announces Additional $52,295,100 for Local...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

52,295,100 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Maryland Obama Administration Announces Additional 52,295,100 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Maryland March 26,...

244

Obama Administration Announces Additional $102,508,400 for Local...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

02,508,400 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Pennsylvania Obama Administration Announces Additional 102,508,400 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Pennsylvania...

245

Obama Administration Announces Additional $63,817,400 for Local...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

63,817,400 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Arizona Obama Administration Announces Additional 63,817,400 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Arizona March 26,...

246

Obama Administration Announces Additional $33,977,000 for Local...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

33,977,000 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Puerto Rico Obama Administration Announces Additional 33,977,000 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Puerto Rico...

247

Resource Consumption in Additive Manufacturing with a PSS Approach.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Since the 1980’s, additive manufacturing (AM) has gradually advanced from rapid prototyping applications towards fabricating end consumer products. Many small companies may prefer accessing AM… (more)

Nopparat, Nanond; Kianian, Babak; Thompson, Anthony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Development of a Process Planning Module for Metal Additive Manufacturing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Producing metallic parts using Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™) additive manufacturing allows for a wide range of flexibility and customization while reducing waste material compared… (more)

Chernow, Eric

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

,"New York Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","2272015"...

250

NMAC 17.5.440 Extensions, Improvements, Additions, and Cooperative...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

440 Extensions, Improvements, Additions, and Cooperative Agreements between or among Utilities Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

251

Characteristics and Effects of Lubricant Additive Chemistry and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Characteristics and Effects of Lubricant Additive Chemistry and Exhaust Conditions on Diesel Particulate Filter Service Life and Vehicle Fuel Economy Characteristics and Effects of...

252

additive main effect: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

be presented for components that can be processed by additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing. The origin structures. KEYWORDS : structural health monitoring methodology, 3D...

253

additional effective dose: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

be presented for components that can be processed by additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing. The origin structures. KEYWORDS : structural health monitoring methodology, 3D...

254

Effect of Nitrogen Additives on Flame Retardant Action of Tributyl...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of tributyl phosphate (TBP) has been investigated. From the LOI tests on treated cotton it is clear that the nitrogen additives have synergistic action. Estimation of...

255

Transformer Addition Project near Page, Coconino County, Arizona  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

r * I. Categorical Exclusion for Glen Canyon 230138-kV Transformer Addition Project near Page, Coconino County, Arizona RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION A. Proposed...

256

Develop and Evaluate Materials and Additives that Enhance Thermal...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal & overcharge abuse Cell Comp't Thermal Reactivity & Improvements Develop & Evaluate...

257

DOE Announces Additional Public Comment Meetings for Draft National...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

in which transmission congestion may addressed, including enhanced energy efficiency, demand response, more local generation, and additional transmission capacity. To submit...

258

Correlated observables in single-particle systems and field theoretic interpretations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bell-type experiments that test correlated observables typically involve measurements of spin or polarization on multi-particle systems in singlet states. These observables are all non-commuting and satisfy an uncertainty relation. Theoretically, the non-commuting nature should be independent of whether the singlet state consists of multiple particles or a single particle. Recent experiments in single neutron interferometry have in fact demonstrated this. In addition, if Bell-type inequalities can be found for experiments involving spin and polarization, the same should be true for experiments involving other non-commuting observables such as position and momentum as in the original EPR paper. As such, an experiment is proposed to measure (quantum mechanically) position and momentum for a single oscillator as a means for deriving a Bell-type inequality for these correlated observables. The experiment, if realizable, would shed light on the basic nature of matter, perhaps pointing to some form of self-entanglement, and would also help to further elucidate a possible mechanism behind the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. Violation of these inequalities would, in fact, offer yet another confirmation of the principle.

Ian T. Durham

2005-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

259

Addition of photosensitive dopants to the D0 liquid argon calorimeter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The addition of photosensitive dopants to liquid argon greatly enhances the signal from heavily ionizing particles. Since binding energy losses we correlated with the heavily ionizing component in hadronic showers, the addition of photosensitive dopants has been suggested as a mechanism to tune the e/[pi] ratio in liquid argon calorimeters. A measurement was performed at the FNAL test beam, adding 4 ppM tetramethylgermanium to the D[phi] uranium-liquid argon calorimeter. An increase in response for electromagnetic and hadronic showers was observed, with no net change in the e/[pi] ratio.

Amos, N.A.; Anderson, D.F.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Remark on the additivity conjecture for the quantum depolarizing channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider bistochastic quantum channels generated by unitary representations of the discret group. The proof of the additivity conjecture for the quantum depolarizing channel $\\Phi$ based on the decreasing property of the relative entropy is given. We show that the additivity conjecture is true for the channel $\\Xi =\\Psi \\circ \\Phi $, where $\\Psi $ is the phase damping.

G. G. Amosov

2005-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional observer states" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

South High Rise Renovation and Addition Project OSU-109000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

South High Rise Renovation and Addition Project OSU-109000 Program of Requirements February 16 Mission Project Objectives Project Budget #12;Program of Requirements South High Rises Renovation Rises Renovation & Addition Project OSU-109000 February 2010 Project Overview February 2010 Page 4

262

South High Rises Renovation and Addition Program of Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

South High Rises Renovation and Addition OSU-109000 Program of Requirements October 2009 234 N Project Objectives Project Budget #12;Program of Requirements South High Rises Renovation and Addition are considered to be part of the Program of Requirements. #12;Program of Requirements South High Rises Renovation

263

DECISION-THEORETIC ELICITATION OF GENERALIZED ADDITIVE UTILITIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DECISION-THEORETIC ELICITATION OF GENERALIZED ADDITIVE UTILITIES by Darius Brazi¯unas A thesis-theoretic elicitation of generalized additive utilities Darius Brazi¯unas Doctor of Philosophy Graduate Department outcomes that can be represented by a utility function. We assume that user preferences are generalized

Toronto, University of

264

Extraction of Additives from Polystyrene and Subsequent Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The extraction of fifteen (15) polymer additives with supercritical carbon dioxide which are used as antioxidants, uv stabilizers, process lubes, flame retardants and antistats from eight formulations of polystyrene is demonstrated and compared to traditional dissolution/precipitation extractions. The purpose of the study was twofold: 1) the development of a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method(s) for the additives and 2) the determination of the viability of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) for the additives from polystyrene. Separation of some of the additives was achieved using reversed phase liquid chromatography. Nine of the additives were assayed in this manner while, the remaining six additives could not be assayed using reversed phase liquid chromatography. In order to develop an extraction method for the additives, the effects of static extraction time, CO2 density, and temperature were first investigated. These preliminary extractions revealed that a static extraction period which afforded an opportunity for the polymer to swell combined with a high CO2 density and extraction temperature above the glass transition (Tg) yielded quantitative recoveries of the additives. Triplicate extractions of the

Susan H. Smith; Larry T. Taylor; Gary L. Long; James F. Wolfe; Susan H. Smith

265

Brnsted Acid Catalyzed Addition of Phenols, Carboxylic Acids, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and often toxic metal catalysts, including pal- ladium,2 rhodium,3 ruthenium,4 lanthanides,5 main group-scale applications of these reactions and often generates heavy metal impurities in the product. Direct use of simple addition methods and is an alternative to metal-catalyzed reactions. Nucleophilic addition of phenols

He, Chuan

266

additional energy savings: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

additional energy savings First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 ESTIMATES OF ADDITIONAL...

267

Obama Administration Announces Additional $21,062,200 for Local...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

spans more than one state, the number above reflects the allocation for the Tribal government as a whole.) More information on the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block...

268

Obama Administration Announces Additional $42,618,700 for Local...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

spans more than one state, the number above reflects the allocation for the Tribal government as a whole.) More information on the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block...

269

Obama Administration Announces Additional $13,167,500 for Local...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

spans more than one state, the number above reflects the allocation for the Tribal government as a whole.) More information on the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block...

270

Obama Administration Announces Additional $31,449,200 for Local...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

spans more than one state, the number above reflects the allocation for the Tribal government as a whole.) More information on the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block...

271

Obama Administration Announces Additional $42,380,100 for Local...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

spans more than one state, the number above reflects the allocation for the Tribal government as a whole.) More information on the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block...

272

Observations of Edge Turbulence  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeedingUnder Well-ControlledObservation ofofEdge Turbulence

273

Experimental Observation of Simultaneous Wave and Particle Behaviors in a Narrowband Single Photon's Wave Packe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Light's wave-particle duality is at the heart of quantum mechanics and can be well illustrated by Wheeler's delayed-choice experiment. The choice of inserting or removing the second classical (quantum) beam splitter in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer determines the classical (quantum) wave-particle behaviors of a photon. In this paper, we report our experiment using the classical beam splitter to observe the simultaneous wave-particle behaviors in the wave-packet of a narrowband single photon. This observation suggests that it is necessary to generalize the current quantum wave-particle duality theory. Our experiment demonstrates that the produced wave-particle state can be considered an additional degree of freedom and can be utilized in encoding quantum information.

H. Yan; K. Liao; Z. Deng; J. He; Z. Y. Xue; Z. M. Zhang; S. L. Zhu

2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

274

PONDER - A Real time software backend for pulsar and IPS observations at the Ooty Radio Telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes a new real-time versatile backend, the Pulsar Ooty Radio Telescope New Digital Efficient Receiver (PONDER), which has been designed to operate along with the legacy analog system of the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT). PONDER makes use of the current state of the art computing hardware, a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) and sufficiently large disk storage to support high time resolution real-time data of pulsar observations, obtained by coherent dedispersion over a bandpass of 16 MHz. Four different modes for pulsar observations are implemented in PONDER to provide standard reduced data products, such as time-stamped integrated profiles and dedispersed time series, allowing faster avenues to scientific results for a variety of pulsar studies. Additionally, PONDER also supports general modes of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements and very long baseline interferometry data recording. The IPS mode yields a single polarisation correlated time series of solar wind scintillation over a b...

Naidu, Arun; Manoharan, P K; Krishnakumar, M A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

INTEGRAL observations of HER X-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

First results of observations of the low mass X-ray binary Her X-1/HZ Her performed by the INTEGRAL satellite in July-August 2005 are presented. A significant part of one 35 day main-on state was covered. The cyclotron line in the X-ray spectrum is well observed and its position and shape, as well as its variability with time and phase of the 1.24 s pulsation are explored. X-ray pulse profiles for different energy bands are studied throughout the observation. The pulse period is found to vary on short time scales revealing a dynamical spin-up/spin-down behavior. Results of simultaneous optical observations of HZ Her are also discussed.

D. Klochkov; R. Staubert; S. Tsygankov; A. Lutovinov; K. P. Postnov; N. I. Shakura; S. A. Potanin; C. Ferrigno; I. Kreykenbohm; J. Wilms

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

276

Quantum discord between relatively accelerated observers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate the quantum discord between two free modes of a scalar field which start in a maximally entangled state and then undergo a relative, constant acceleration. In a regime where there is no distillable entanglement due to the Unruh effect, we show that there is a finite amount of quantum discord, which is a measure of purely quantum correlations in a state, over and above quantum entanglement. Even in the limit of infinite acceleration of the observer detecting one of the modes, we provide evidence for a non-zero amount of purely quantum correlations, which might be exploited to gain non-trivial quantum advantages.

Animesh Datta

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

277

Reconstructing equation of state of dark energy with principal component analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We represent a method to reconstruct the equation of state for dark energy directly from observational Hubble parameter data in a nonparametric way. We use principal component analysis (PCA) to extract the signal from data with noise. In addition, we modify Akaike information criteria (AIC) to guarantee the quality of reconstruction and avoid over-fitting simultaneously. The results show that our method is robust in reconstruction of dark energy equation of state. Although current observational Hubble parameter data alone can not give a strong constraint yet, future observations with more accurate data can help to improve the quality of reconstruction significantly, which is consistent with the results of H.-R. Yu et al.

Qin, Hao-Feng; Wan, Hao-Yi; Zhang, Tong-Jie

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Effect of argon addition on plasma parameters and dust charging in hydrogen plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental results on effect of adding argon gas to hydrogen plasma in a multi-cusp dusty plasma device are reported. Addition of argon modifies plasma density, electron temperature, degree of hydrogen dissociation, dust current as well as dust charge. From the dust charging profile, it is observed that the dust current and dust charge decrease significantly up to 40% addition of argon flow rate in hydrogen plasma. But beyond 40% of argon flow rate, the changes in dust current and dust charge are insignificant. Results show that the addition of argon to hydrogen plasma in a dusty plasma device can be used as a tool to control the dust charging in a low pressure dusty plasma.

Kakati, B., E-mail: bharatkakati15@gmail.com; Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K. [Centre of Plasma Physics-Institute for Plasma Research, Nazirakhat, Sonapur, Kamrup 782402, Assam (India); Bandyopadhyay, M.; Saxena, Y. C. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India)

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

279

additive antioxidant therapy: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 The Study of Variations in the Properties of Biodiesel on Addition of Antioxidants. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary:...

280

Obama Administration Announces Additional $27,777,600 for Local...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

27,777,600 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Utah Obama Administration Announces Additional 27,777,600 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Utah March 26, 2009 -...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional observer states" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Improvements in floating point addition/subtraction operations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus is described for decreasing the latency time associated with floating point addition and subtraction in a computer, using a novel bifurcated, pre-normalization/post-normalization approach that distinguishes between differences of floating point exponents.

Farmwald, P.M.

1984-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

282

Lossless fault-tolerant data structures with additive overhead  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop the first dynamic data structures that tolerate ? memory faults, lose no data, and incur only an O(? ) additive overhead in overall space and time per operation. We obtain such data structures for arrays, linked ...

Christiano, Paul F.

283

Novel electrolytes and electrolyte additives for PHEV applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

diagnostics. Some of these electrolytes contained the following: - Solvents: EC, PC, EMC, etc. - Salts: LiPF 6 , LiBF 4 , LiB(C 2 O 4 ) 2 , LiF 2 BC 2 O 4 , etc. - Additives:...

284

The Selection and Use of Fireside Additives on Industrial Boilers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As energy prices have escalated and fuel quality deteriorated, fuel chemicals have found increasing acceptance as tools for improving efficiency and reliability of combustion systems. Though application of fuel additives is not new, their use has...

Radway, J. E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Sulfurized olefin lubricant additives and compositions containing same  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lubricant additives having substantially improved extreme pressure characteristics are provided by modifying certain sulfurized olefins by reacting said olefins with a cyclic polydisulfide under controlled reaction conditions and at a temperature of at least about 130/sup 0/ C.

Braid, M.

1980-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

286

Non-Traditional Soil Additives: Can They Improve Crop Production?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-traditional soil additives include soil conditioners such as organic materials and minerals, soil activators that claim to stimulate soil microbes or inoculate soil with new beneficial organisms, and wetting agents that may be marketed...

McFarland, Mark L.; Stichler, Charles; Lemon, Robert G.

2002-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

287

Beyond 3D Printing: The New Dimensions of Additive Fabrication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Additive fabrication, often referred to as 3D printing, is the construction of objects by adding material. This stands in contrast to subtractive methods, which involve removing material by means of milling or cutting. ...

Keating, Steven John

288

Approaches to Maintaining Provenance throughout the Additive Manufacturing Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

prototyping and 3D printing by users both in engineering and the humanities. The proposed digital signing--Digital Signing; 3D printing; 3D objects; provenance. I.INTRODUCTION Additive manufacturing as a process has been

289

additive gene effects: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gustavo Glusman; Shizhen Qin; M. Raafat El-gewely; Andrew F. Siegel; Jared C. Roach; Leroy Hood; Arian F. A. Smit 19 EFFECTS OF ADDITIVE NOISE ON THE THROUGHPUT OF CDMA...

290

Additivity in the Analysis and Design of HIV Protease Inhibitors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore the applicability of an additive treatment of substituent effects to the analysis and design of HIV protease inhibitors. Affinity data for a set of inhibitors with a common chemical framework were analyzed to ...

Jorissen, Robert N.

291

Cyanoethylated compounds as additives in lithium/lithium batteries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The power loss of lithium/lithium ion battery cells is significantly reduced, especially at low temperatures, when about 1% by weight of an additive is incorporated in the electrolyte layer of the cells. The usable additives are organic solvent soluble cyanoethylated polysaccharides and poly(vinyl alcohol). The power loss decrease results primarily from the decrease in the charge transfer resistance at the interface between the electrolyte and the cathode.

Nagasubramanian, Ganesan (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricants and /or Lubricant Additives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This ORNL-GM CRADA developed ionic liquids (ILs) as novel lubricants or oil additives for engine lubrication. A new group of oil-miscible ILs have been designed and synthesized with high thermal stability, non-corrosiveness, excellent wettability, and most importantly effective anti-scuffing/anti-wear and friction reduction characteristics. Mechanistic analysis attributes the superior lubricating performance of IL additives to their physical and chemical interactions with metallic surfaces. Working with a leading lubricant formulation company, the team has successfully developed a prototype low-viscosity engine oil using a phosphonium-phosphate IL as an anti-wear additive. Tribological bench tests of the IL-additized formulated oil showed 20-33% lower friction in mixed and elastohydrodynamic lubrication and 38-92% lower wear in boundary lubrication when compared with commercial Mobil 1 and Mobil Clean 5W-30 engine oils. High-temperature, high load (HTHL) full-size engine tests confirmed the excellent anti-wear performance for the IL-additized engine oil. Sequence VID engine dynamometer tests demonstrated an improved fuel economy by >2% for this IL-additized engine oil benchmarked against the Mobil 1 5W-30 oil. In addition, accelerated catalyst aging tests suggest that the IL additive may potentially have less adverse impact on three-way catalysts compared to the conventional ZDDP. Follow-on research is needed for further development and optimization of IL chemistry and oil formulation to fully meet ILSAC GF-5 specifications and further enhance the automotive engine efficiency and durability.

Qu, J. [ORNL; Viola, M. B. [General Motors Company

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

293

Systems simulation of oil additives to grain at terminal elevators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SYSTEMS SIMULATION OF OIL ADDITIVES TO GRAIN AT TERMINAL ELEVATORS A Thesis by Kerry James Goforth Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1985 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering SYSTEMS SIMULATION OF OIL ADDITIVES TO GRAIN AT TERMINAL ELEVATORS A Thesis by KERRY J. GOFORTH Approved as to style and content by: Calvin B. Parne 1, Jr. (Chairman of Committee) tto R. Kunze...

Goforth, Kerry James

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Blast furnace coke quality in relation to petroleum coke addition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The incorporation of petroleum coke as an additive in industrial coking coal blends is a practice often used by steel companies. A suitable blast furnace coke produced by replacing part of the coking coal blend with a suitable petroleum coke (addition of 5 to 15%), was made by Great Lakes Carbon Corporation and successfully tested at several blast furnaces. This coke had lower reactivity, less ash and slightly higher sulfur content than coke made without the addition of petroleum coke. In contrast with these results, it has been reported in a BCRA study that additions of petroleum coke to a strong coking coal, above 5 wt%, increased coke reactivity. These differences may be explained on the basis of the coal or blend characteristics to which petroleum coke is added. Petroleum coke addition seems to give better results if the coal/blend has high fluidity. The present situation in Spain is favorable for the use of petroleum coke. So, a study of laboratory and semi-industrial scale was made to assess the possibility of using petroleum coke as an additive to the typical industrial coal blend coked by the Spanish Steel Company, ENSIDESA. The influence of the petroleum coke particle size was also studied to semi-industrial scale.

Alvarez, R.; Diez, M.A.; Menendez, J.A.; Barriocanal, C.; Pis, J.J. [CSIC, Oviedo (Spain). Inst. Nacional del Carbon; Sirgado, M. [ENSIDESA, Aviles (Spain)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Evaluation of anti-wear performance of PFPE-soluble additives under sliding contact in high vacuum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The anti-wear performances of perfluoropolyether (PEPE)-soluble additives were evaluated under vacuum using a vacuum four-ball tribometer with 440C stainless steel balls as test specimens. PEPE derivatives having the hydroxyl, carboxyl and phosphate groups at the end of the Type D-PEPE molecules were studied. The addition of either PEPE-soluble carboxylic acid or PEPE-soluble phosphates to the PEPE base oil remarkably reduced steady wear rates in a vacuum environment, whereas the addition of PEPE-soluble alcohol did not. Contrary to the performance in vacuum, an appreciable increase in wear rate was observed in the air atmosphere with all the types of additives used. The effect of moisture is studied in explaining the high wear rates obtained with the additives in the air environment. The mechanism of boundary lubrication with PEPE-soluble additives is discussed.

Masuko, M.; Takeshita, N.; Okabe, H. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

actinium additions: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

protactinium, and uranium isotopes CERN Preprints Summary: Currently, 31 actinium, 31 thorium, 28 protactinium, and 23 uranium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of...

297

BOWHUNTER OBSERVATIONS VERSUS SPOTLIGHTING AS AN INDEX TO DEER ABUNDANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arboretum (MFCA) in southeastern New York State since 1970 (Davis 1975, Winchcombe 1993). The objective and observations of deer by bowhunters) were used at the MFCA to assess effectiveness in reaching the objective

298

The Tensor Rank of the Tripartite State $\\ket{W}^{\\otimes n}$}  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tensor rank refers to the number of product states needed to express a given multipartite quantum state. Its non-additivity as an entanglement measure has recently been observed. In this note, we estimate the tensor rank of multiple copies of the tripartite state $\\ket{W}=\\tfrac{1}{\\sqrt{3}}(\\ket{100}+\\ket{010}+\\ket{001})$. Both an upper bound and a lower bound of this rank are derived. In particular, it is proven that the tensor rank of $\\ket{W}^{\\otimes 2}$ is seven, thus resolving a previously open problem. Some implications of this result are discussed in terms of transformation rates between $\\ket{W}^{\\otimes n}$ and multiple copies of the state $\\ket{GHZ}=\\tfrac{1}{\\sqrt{2}}(\\ket{000}+\\ket{111})$.

Nengkun Yu; Eric Chitambar; Cheng Guo; Runyao Duan

2009-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

299

When Nonlocal Coupling Between Oscillators Becomes Stronger: Patched Synchrony or Multi-Chimera States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Systems of nonlocally coupled oscillators can exhibit complex spatio-temporal patterns, called chimera states, which consist of coexisting domains of spatially coherent (synchronized) and incoherent dynamics. We report on a novel form of these states, found in a widely used model of a limit-cycle oscillator if one goes beyond the limit of weak coupling typical for phase oscillators. Then patches of synchronized dynamics appear within the incoherent domain giving rise to a multi-chimera state. We find that, depending on the coupling strength and range, different multi-chimeras arise in a transition from classical chimera states. The additional spatial modulation is due to strong coupling interaction and thus cannot be observed in simple phase-oscillator models.

Iryna Omelchenko; Oleh E. Omel'chenko; Philipp Hövel; Eckehard Schöll

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

300

Extremality of Gaussian quantum states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate Gaussian quantum states in view of their exceptional role within the space of all continuous variables states. A general method for deriving extremality results is provided and applied to entanglement measures, secret key distillation and the classical capacity of Bosonic quantum channels. We prove that for every given covariance matrix the distillable secret key rate and the entanglement, if measured appropriately, are minimized by Gaussian states. This result leads to a clearer picture of the validity of frequently made Gaussian approximations. Moreover, it implies that Gaussian encodings are optimal for the transmission of classical information through Bosonic channels, if the capacity is additive.

Michael M. Wolf; Geza Giedke; J. Ignacio Cirac

2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional observer states" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Observing alternatives to inflation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the possibility that the inflationary paradigm, undoubtfully today's best framework to understand all the present cosmological data, may still have some viable challengers. The underlying idea for such discussions is that although inflation already passed quite a large number of tests, indeed enough to make it part of the so-called ``standard model'' of cosmology, it has always been through indirect measurements: there is not a chance that we may ever directly check its validity, and therefore, in order to assert its factuality with increasing level of confidence, it is required that we compare its predictions not only to observations, but also to as many contenders as possible. Among other categories of possible models, we wish to put the emphasis in particular on bouncing cosmologies that, however not as complete as the inflation paradigm might be, could still represent a reasonnable way of explaining the current data. Hopefully, future data will be able to discriminate between these various sets of theories.

P. Peter

2009-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

302

Controlled Experiments on the Effects of Lubricant/Additive ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

P compounds Ca Ca 900 nm Ash Properties 5 m 5 m Current State of Research DPF Un-accelerated Ash Loading Studies (Fleet Testing) Cummins, BP, JM - 9 Trucks w 160k miles each...

303

Recycling of quantum information: Multiple observations of quantum systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Given a finite number of copies of an unknown qubit state that have already been measured optimally, can one still extract any information about the original unknown state? We give a positive answer to this question and quantify the information obtainable by a given observer as a function of the number of copies in the ensemble, and of the number of independent observers that, one after the other, have independently measured the same ensemble of qubits before him. The optimality of the protocol is proven and extensions to other states and encodings are also studied. According to the general lore, the state after a measurement has no information about the state before the measurement. Our results manifestly show that this statement has to be taken with a grain of salt, specially in situations where the quantum states encode confidential information.

Peter Rapcan; John Calsamiglia; Ramon Munoz-Tapia; Emilio Bagan; Vladimir Buzek

2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

304

Local cloning of Bell states and distillable entanglement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The necessary and sufficient amount of entanglement required for cloning of orthogonal Bell states by local operation and classical communication is derived, and using this result, we provide here some additional examples of reversible, as well as irreversible states.

Sibasish Ghosh; Guruprasad Kar; Anirban Roy

2004-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

305

Using the Galileoscope in astronomical observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This project aims to attract school students and teachers from the state education system from Ca\\c{c}apava do Sul - RS to Sciences and specially to Astronomy. We made astronomical observations using a Galileoscope choosing the Moon as a primary target. We also observed others objects that present high brightness in the night sky. The selection of targets, and their identification during the observations were carried out by a free software of planetary simulation, Stellarium. The results were in qualitative form and they show the great interest demonstrated by those participating in the project. Furthermore, this project helped to improve the understanding of the physical proprieties of the night sky objects (e.g. color). Finally, the project has showed that using a simple equipment and of relatively low cost it is possible to bring more people, specially the young students, to the Science World and to Astronomy.

Oliveira, V A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Catalyst Additives to Enhance Mercury Oxidation and Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Catalysis is the key fundamental ingredient to convert elemental mercury in coal-fired power stations into its oxidized forms that are more easily captured by sorbents, ESPs, baghouses, and wet scrubbers, whether the catalyst be unburned carbon (UBC) in the ash or vanadium pentoxide in SCR catalysts. This project has investigated several different types of catalysts that enhance mercury oxidation in several different ways. The stated objective of this project in the Statement of Objectives included testing duct-injection catalysts, catalyst-sorbent hybrids, and coated low-pressure-drop screens. Several different types of catalysts were considered for duct injection, including different forms of iron and carbon. Duct-injection catalysts would have to be inexpensive catalysts, as they would not be recycled. Iron and calcium had been shown to catalyze mercury oxidation in published bench-scale tests. However, as determined from results of an on-going EPRI/EPA project at Southern Research, while iron and calcium did catalyze mercury oxidation, the activity of these catalysts was orders of magnitude below that of carbon and had little impact in the short residence times available for duct-injected catalysts or catalyst-sorbent hybrids. In fact, the only catalyst found to be effective enough for duct injection was carbon, which is also used to capture mercury and remove it from the flue gas. It was discovered that carbon itself is an effective catalyst-sorbent hybrid. Bench-scale carbon-catalyst tests were conducted, to obtain kinetic rates of mercury adsorption (a key step in the catalytic oxidation of mercury by carbon) for different forms of carbon. All carbon types investigated behaved in a similar manner with respect to mercury sorption, including the effect of temperature and chlorine concentration. Activated carbon was more effective at adsorbing mercury than carbon black and unburned carbon (UBC), because their internal surface area of activated carbon was greater. Catalyst coating of low-pressure-drop screens was of particular interest as this project was being developed. However, it was discovered that URS was already heavily involved in the pursuit of this same technology, being funded by DOE, and reporting significant success. Hence, testing of SCR catalysts became a major focus of the project. Three different commercial SCR catalysts were examined for their ability to oxidize mercury in simulated flue-gas. Similar performance was observed from each of the three commercial catalysts, both in terms of mercury oxidation and SO{sub 3} generation. Ammonia injection hindered mercury oxidation at low HCl concentrations (i.e., {approx}2 ppmv), yet had little impact on mercury oxidation at higher HCl concentrations. On the other hand, SO{sub 2} oxidation was significantly reduced by the presence of ammonia at both low and high concentrations of HCl.

Thomas K. Gale

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

307

Undeformed (additive) energy conservation law in Doubly Special Relativity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

All the Doubly Special Relativity (DSR) models studied in literature so far involve a deformation of the energy conservation rule that forces us to release the hypothesis of the additivity of the energy for composite systems. In view of the importance of the issue for a consistent formulation of a DSR statistical mechanics and a DSR thermodynamics, we show that DSR models preserving the usual (i.e. additive) energy conservation rule can be found. These models allow the construction of a DSR-covariant extensive energy. The implications of the analysis for the dynamics of DSR-covariant multiparticle systems are also briefly discussed.

Gianluca Mandanici

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

308

Characteristics of yttrium oxide laser ceramics with additives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neodymium- or ytterbium-doped laser ceramics with a disordered crystal-field structure formed by introduction of iso- and heterovalent elements into yttrium oxide are studied. It is shown that these additives broaden the spectral band of laser transitions, which makes it possible to use ceramics as active laser media emitting ultrashort pulses. Lasing was obtained in several samples of this ceramics. At the same time, it is shown that addition of zirconium and hafnium stimulates the Foerster quenching of upper laser levels and pump levels. (extreme light fields and their applications)

Osipov, V V; Solomonov, V I; Orlov, A N; Shitov, V A; Maksimov, R N; Spirina, A V [Institute of Electrophysics, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

309

State coal profiles, January 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of State Coal Profiles is to provide basic information about the deposits, production, and use of coal in each of the 27 States with coal production in 1992. Although considerable information on coal has been published on a national level, there is a lack of a uniform overview for the individual States. This report is intended to help fill that gap and also to serve as a framework for more detailed studies. While focusing on coal output, State Coal Profiles shows that the coal-producing States are major users of coal, together accounting for about three-fourths of total US coal consumption in 1992. Each coal-producing State is profiled with a description of its coal deposits and a discussion of the development of its coal industry. Estimates of coal reserves in 1992 are categorized by mining method and sulfur content. Trends, patterns, and other information concerning production, number of mines, miners, productivity, mine price of coal, disposition, and consumption of coal are detailed in statistical tables for selected years from 1980 through 1992. In addition, coal`s contribution to the State`s estimated total energy consumption is given for 1991, the latest year for which data are available. A US summary of all data is provided for comparing individual States with the Nation as a whole. Sources of information are given at the end of the tables.

Not Available

1994-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

310

Manual for Implementation of the Voluntary Offer Safeguards Agreement and Additional Protocol with the International Atomic Energy Agency  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual provides detailed information for implementing the requirements of DOE O 142.2A, dated 12-15-06; the Agreement Between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for the Application of Safeguards in the United States; the Original Protocol to the Agreement; the Additional Protocol to the Agreement signed by the United States and the IAEA on June 12, 1998; and the Interagency Procedures for the Implementation of the U.S.-IAEA Safeguards Agreement. No cancellation. Admin Chg 1, dated 6-27-13, cancels DOE M 142.2-1. Certified 12-3-14.

1998-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

311

Manual for Implementation of the Voluntary Offer Safeguards Agreement and Additional Protocol with the International Atomic Energy Agency  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual provides detailed information for implementing the requirements of DOE O 142.2A, dated 12-15-06; the Agreement Between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for the Application of Safeguards in the United States; the Original Protocol to the Agreement; the Additional Protocol to the Agreement signed by the United States and the IAEA on June 12, 1998; and the Interagency Procedures for the Implementation of the U.S.-IAEA Safeguards Agreement. No cancellation. Admin Chg 1, 6-27-13

1998-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

312

Titanium addition practice, and maintenance for the hearths in AHMSA`s blast furnaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Altos Hornos de Mexico (AHMSA) is a steel company located in Northern Mexico, in the state of Coahuila. Currently there are three blast furnaces in operation and one more about to finish its general repair. This last one is to remain as a back-up unit. Because of blast furnace hearth wear outs AHMSA has developed some maintenance procedures. These procedures are based on titanium ore additions and hearth thermic control monitoring. There are also some other maintenance practices adopted to the working operations to assure that such operations detect and avoid in time hearth wear outs that place personnel and/or the unit in danger (due to hearth leaks). This paper describes titanium ore addition to No. 2 blast furnace during the final campaign and it also illustrates maintenance practices and continuous monitoring of temperature trends both of which were implemented at AHMSA`s No. 5 blast furnace.

Boone, A.G.; Jimenez, G.; Castillo, J. [Altos Hornos de Mexico, Monclova (Mexico)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

additional crop yield: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mills make as fine a flour as could be desired." Taylor (log), who went by horseback from San Antonio to El Paso and on to California in 1876, observed wheat..., he reports (1876)...

314

For additional information, contact: Department of History, Philosophy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For additional information, contact: Department of History, Philosophy & Religious Studies Montana "Philosophy of Science," "Nature and Religion" and "The Darwinian Revolution." The World The department offers courses ranging from "Latin American Perspectives" to "Religion of Ancient Egypt" to "Philosophies of Asia

315

Additives and method for controlling clathrate hydrates in fluid systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Discussed is a process for preventing clathrate hydrate masses from detrimentally impeding the possible flow of a fluid susceptible to clathrate hydrate formation. The process is particularly useful in the natural gas and petroleum production, transportation and processing industry where gas hydrate formation can cause serious problems. Additives preferably contain one or more five member, six member and/or seven member cyclic chemical groupings. Additives include polymers having lactam rings. Additives can also contain polyelectrolytes that are believed to improve conformance of polymer additives through steric hindrance and/or charge repulsion. Also, polymers having an amide on which a C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} group is attached to the nitrogen and/or the carbonyl carbon of the amide may be used alone, or in combination with ring-containing polymers for enhanced effectiveness. Polymers having at least some repeating units representative of polymerizing at least one of an oxazoline, an N-substituted acrylamide and an N-vinyl alkyl amide are preferred.

Sloan, E.D. Jr.; Christiansen, R.L.; Lederhos, J.P.; Long, J.P.; Panchalingam, V.; Du, Y.; Sum, A.K.W.

1997-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

316

Additives and method for controlling clathrate hydrates in fluid systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Discussed is a process for preventing clathrate hydrate masses from detrimentally impeding the possible flow of a fluid susceptible to clathrate hydrate formation. The process is particularly useful in the natural gas and petroleum production, transportation and processing industry where gas hydrate formation can cause serious problems. Additives preferably contain one or more five member, six member and/or seven member cyclic chemical groupings. Additives include polymers having lactam rings. Additives can also contain polyelectrolytes that are believed to improve conformance of polymer additives through steric hinderance and/or charge repulsion. Also, polymers having an amide on which a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 group is attached to the nitrogen and/or the carbonyl carbon of the amide may be used alone, or in combination with ring-containing polymers for enhanced effectiveness. Polymers having at least some repeating units representative of polymerizing at least one of an oxazoline, an N-substituted acrylamide and an N-vinyl alkyl amide are preferred.

Sloan, Jr., Earle Dendy (Golden, CO); Christiansen, Richard Lee (Littleton, CO); Lederhos, Joseph P. (Wheatridge, CO); Long, Jin Ping (Dallas, TX); Panchalingam, Vaithilingam (Lakewood, CO); Du, Yahe (Golden, CO); Sum, Amadeu Kun Wan (Golden, CO)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Original article Addition of urea to lucernes before industrial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Addition of urea to lucernes before industrial dehydration: Effect on nutritional and at the end of the third cycle: lucernes 1, 2 and 3. These three samples were submitted to an industrial) digestibility measured in sheep using the three dehydrated lucernes; and ii) on ruminal degradation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

318

Request for Addition or Change to SPP Submitted By  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Request for Addition or Change to SPP UM AEC Submitted By: Phone: E-mail: General Product Information Manufacturer/Product Name List of Installations within 50 Miles of Ann Arbor Years Product in Use Certification Certified wood Green Seal Standard GS-11 and Green Seal Plus (iaq) Greenguard Primarily indoor air

Kamat, Vineet R.

319

additive contents crada: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

additive contents crada First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 NIMH CRADAs Review and Approval...

320

http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robotica http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica: Email alerts: Click predictive controller for robots to follow a virtual leader Dongbing Gu and Huosheng Hu Robotica / Volume 27. Robotica, 27, pp 905-913 doi:10.1017/S0263574708005316 Request Permissions : Click here Downloaded from

Hu, Huosheng

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional observer states" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robotica http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica: Email alerts: Click and Vicente Matellán Robotica / Volume 26 / Issue 06 / November 2008, pp 817 - 830 DOI: 10.1017/S (2008). A hybrid approach to fast and accurate localization for legged robots. Robotica, 26, pp 817

Hu, Huosheng

322

http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robotica http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica: Email alerts: Click and Y. Ahmet ekerciolu Robotica / FirstView Article / October 2014, pp 1 - 13 DOI: 10.1017/S formation control of networked mobile robots in environments with obstacles. Robotica, Available on CJO 2014

Sekercioglu, Y. Ahmet

323

http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robotica http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica: Email alerts: Click. Goldberg Robotica / Volume 13 / Issue 06 / November 1995, pp 565 573 DOI: 10.1017/S0263574700018646 algorithms for automatic planning by robots in stochastic environments. Robotica,13, pp 565573 doi:10.1017/S

Goldberg, Ken

324

http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robotica http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica: Email alerts: Click Robotica / FirstView Article / September 2012, pp 1 8 DOI: 10.1017/S0263574711000774, Published online: 25 on taskoriented workspace. Robotica, Available on CJO 2011 doi:10.1017/S0263574711000774 Request Permissions

Kim, Jongwon

325

http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robotica http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica: Email alerts: Click Robotica / Volume 24 / Issue 04 / July 2006, pp 429 - 431 DOI: 10.1017/S0263574705002420, Published online positioning method for a humanoid robot. Robotica, 24, pp 429-431 doi:10.1017/S0263574705002420 Request

Hu, Huosheng

326

Service Contract Addition Please type or print information clearly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Service Contract Addition Please type or print information clearly Purchasing Department, Building for the service contract. If the item is part of an equipment system, all accessories must be listed. When adding 18. Serial Number 19. Location (Bldg./Rm.) 20. Requested Start Date 21. Service Contract Vendor 22

Wlodawer, Alexander

327

CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project TO: Deans, Directors 23, 2011 HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION: Monday to Friday 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ACCESSIBLE ROUTES: Accessible routes shall be maintained. ADVISORY: All persons in the vicinity of this construction project

Dong, Yingfei

328

CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project TO: Deans, Directors on the roof to June 30, 2011. DURATION OF PROJECT: May 21, 2011 to June 30, 2011 HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION: Monday persons in the vicinity of this construction project are advised to respect all construction barricades

329

CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project TO: Deans, Directors. DURATION OF PROJECT: May 31, 2011 to June 21, 2011 HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION: Monday to Friday 7:30 a.m. to 4. The loading area will be closed on May 31, 2011. ADVISORY: All persons in the vicinity of this construction

330

Additional reductions in the k-constrained modified KP hierarchy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Additional reductions in the modified k-constrained KP hierarchy are proposed. As a result we obtain generalizations of Kaup-Broer system, Korteweg-de Vries equation and a modification of Korteweg-de Vries equation that belongs to modified k-constrained KP hierarchy. We also propose solution generating technique based on binary Darboux transformations for the obtained equations.

Oleksandr Chvartatskyi; Yuriy Sydorenko

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

331

Mobile applications constantly demand additional memory, and traditional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This remote access could reduce local storage space, thereby reducing energy demands on the mobile plat- form60 Mobile applications constantly demand additional memory, and traditional designs increase- port connected ubiquitous environments. Engineers attempt to minimize network use because of its

Lee, Hsien-Hsin "Sean"

332

LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES WITH ADDITION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES WITH ADDITION OF ETHANOL P. Dirrenberger1 , P.A. Glaude*1 (2014) 162-169" DOI : 10.1016/j.fuel.2013.07.015 #12;2 LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES, Sweden Abstract The adiabatic laminar burning velocities of a commercial gasoline and of a model fuel (n

Boyer, Edmond

333

additional energy losses: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

additional energy losses First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Comparing energy loss...

334

Enclosure 1 Additional Information on Hanford Tank Wastes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enclosure 1 Additional Information on Hanford Tank Wastes Introduction The U. S. Nuclear Regulatory of Energy to the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency addressing the Hanford Tank and K Basin Wastes (CBFO stored in two tanks (designated as tanks 241-AW-103 and 241-AW-105) at the Hanford Site are not high

335

Observations of the Temperature Dependent Response of Ozone to NOx Reductions in an Urban Plume  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observations of NO{sub x} in the Sacramento, CA region show that mixing ratios decreased by 30% between 2001 and 2008. Here we use an observation-based method to quantify net ozone production rates in the outflow from the Sacramento metropolitan region and examine the O{sub 3} decrease resulting from reductions in NO{sub x} emissions. This observational method does not rely on assumptions about detailed chemistry of ozone production, rather it is an independent means to verify and test these assumptions. We use an instantaneous steady-state model as well as a detailed 1-D plume model to aid in interpretation of the ozone production inferred from observations. In agreement with the models, the observations show that early in the plume, the NO{sub x} dependence for O{sub x} (O{sub x} = O{sub 3}+NO{sub 2}) production is strongly coupled with temperature, suggesting that temperature dependent biogenic VOC emissions can drive O{sub x} production between NO{sub x}-limited and NO{sub x}-suppressed regimes. As a result, NO{sub x} reductions were found to be most effective at higher temperatures over the 7 year period. We show that violations of the California 1-hour O{sub 3} standard (90 ppb) in the region have been decreasing linearly with decreases in NO{sub x} (at a given temperature) and predict that reductions of NO{sub x} concentrations (and presumably emissions) by an additional 30% (relative to 2007 levels) will eliminate violations of the state 1 hour standard in the region. If current trends continue, a 30% decrease in NO{sub x} is expected by 2012, and an end to violations of the 1 hour standard in the Sacramento region appears to be imminent.

LaFranchi, B W; Goldstein, A H; Cohen, R C

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

336

New observations of the extended hydrogen exosphere of the extrasolar planet HD209458b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atomic hydrogen escaping from the planet HD209458b provides the largest observational signature ever detected for an extrasolar planet atmosphere. However, the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) used in previous observational studies is no longer available, whereas additional observations are still needed to better constrain the mechanisms subtending the evaporation process, and determine the evaporation state of other `hot Jupiters'. Here, we aim to detect the extended hydrogen exosphere of HD209458b with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and to find evidence for a hydrogen comet-like tail trailing the planet, which size would depend on the escape rate and the amount of ionizing radiation emitted by the star. These observations also provide a benchmark for other transiting planets, in the frame of a comparative study of the evaporation state of close-in giant planets. Eight HST orbits are used to observe two transits of HD209458b. Transit light curves are obtained by performing photometry of the unresolved stellar Lyman-alpha emission line during both transits. Absorption signatures of exospheric hydrogen during the transit are compared to light curve models predicting a hydrogen tail. Transit depths of (9.6 +/- 7.0)% and (5.3 +/- 10.0)% are measured on the whole Lyman-alpha line in visits 1 and 2, respectively. Averaging data from both visits, we find an absorption depth of (8.0 +/- 5.7)%, in good agreement with previous studies. The extended size of the exosphere confirms that the planet is likely loosing hydrogen to space. Yet, the photometric precision achieved does not allow us to better constrain the hydrogen mass loss rate.

David Ehrenreich; Alain Lecavelier des Etangs; Guillaume Hébrard; Jean-Michel Désert; Alfred Vidal-Madjar; John C. McConnell; Christopher D. Parkinson; Gilda E. Ballester

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

337

EFFECTS OF QUARTZ PARTICLE SIZE AND SUCROSE ADDITION ON MELTING BEHAVIOR OF A MELTER FEED FOR HIGH-LEVEL GLASS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behavior of melter feed (a mixture of nuclear waste and glass-forming additives) during waste-glass processing has a significant impact on the rate of the vitrification process. We studied the effects of silica particle size and sucrose addition on the volumetric expansion (foaming) of a high-alumina feed and the rate of dissolution of silica particles in feed samples heated at 5 C/min up to 1200 C. The initial size of quartz particles in feed ranged from 5 to 195 {micro}m. The fraction of the sucrose added ranged from 0 to 0.20 g per g glass. Extensive foaming occurred only in feeds with 5-{micro}m quartz particles; particles {ge}150 {micro}m formed clusters. Particles of 5 {micro}m completely dissolved by 900 C whereas particles {ge}150 {micro}m did not fully dissolve even when the temperature reached 1200 C. Sucrose addition had virtually zero impact on both foaming and the dissolution of silica particles. Over 100 sites in the United States are currently tasked with the storage of nuclear waste. The largest is the Hanford Site located in southeastern Washington State with 177 subterranean tanks containing over fifty-million gallons of nuclear waste from plutonium production from 1944 through 1987. This waste will be vitrified at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. In the vitrification process, feed is charged into a melter and converted into glass to be ultimately stored in a permanent repository. The duration of waste-site cleanups by the vitrification process depends on the rate of melting, i.e., on the rate of the feed-to-glass conversion. Foaming associated with the melting process and the rate of dissolution of quartz particles (silica being the major glass-forming additive) are assumed to be important factors that influence the rate of melting. Previous studies on foaming of high-alumina feed demonstrated that varying the makeup of a melter feed has a significant impact on foaming. The volume of feeds that contained 5-{micro}m quartz particles substantially increased because of foaming. The extent of foaming decreased as the particle size of quartz increased. Moreover, samples containing quartz particles 195 {micro}m formed agglomerates at temperatures above 900 C that only slowly dissolved in the melt. This study continues previous work on the feed-melting process, specifically on the effects of the size of silica particles on the formation of nuclear-waste glasses to determine a suitable range of silica particle sizes that causes neither excessive foaming nor undesirable agglomeration. Apart from varying the silica-particle size, carbon was added in the form of sucrose. Sucrose has been used to accelerate the rate of melting. In this study, we have observed its impact on feed foaming and quartz dissolution.

MARCIAL J; KRUGER AA; HRMA PR; SCHWEIGER MJ; SWEARINGEN KJ; TEGROTENHUIS WE; HENAGER SH

2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

338

Lossless anomalous dispersion and an inversionless gain doublet via dressed interacting ground states  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transparent media exhibiting anomalous dispersion have been of considerable interest since Wang, Kuzmich, and Dogariu [Nature 406, 277 (2000)] first observed light propagate with superluminal and negative group velocities without absorption. Here, we propose an atomic model exhibiting these properties, based on a generalization of amplification without inversion in a five-level dressed interacting ground-state system. The system consists of a {Lambda} atom prepared as in standard electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), with two additional metastable ground states coupled to the {Lambda} atom ground states by two rf-microwave fields. We consider two configurations by which population is incoherently pumped into the ground states of the atom. Under appropriate circumstances, we predict a pair of new gain lines with tunable width, separation, and height. Between these lines, absorption vanishes but dispersion is large and anomalous. The system described here is a significant improvement over other proposals in the anomalous dispersion literature in that it permits additional coherent control over the spectral properties of the anomalous region, including a possible 10{sup 4}-fold increase over the group delay observed by Wang, Kuzmich, and Dogariu.

Weatherall, James Owen [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Stevens Institute of Technology, Castle Point on Hudson, Hoboken, New Jersey 07030 (United States); Department of Mathematical Sciences, Stevens Institute of Technology, Castle Point on Hudson, Hoboken, New Jersey 07030 (United States); Department of Logic and Philosophy of Science, University of California Irvine, 3151 Social Science Plaza A, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Search, Christopher P. [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Stevens Institute of Technology, Castle Point on Hudson, Hoboken, New Jersey 07030 (United States)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

NOAA Fisheries Observers An Integral Part of Observing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

collection, tag recapture · Fisheries management, resource assessments, and bycatch reduction methodology, Papua New Guinea, Fed. States of Micronesia, Solomon Islands, Kiribati, and Vietnam) #12;11 Northeast

340

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofofOxford SiteToledoSampling at the GrandSr:s I ]Unied States- I

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional observer states" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

United States  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof2014National Nuclear23,Diversity part 2usingStates

342

States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCT 28SacandagaSite A/Plot3, zm State

343

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

Kathryn Baskin

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

Kathryn Baskin

2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

345

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts.

Kathryn Baskin

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Magnetic Edge States in Graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic confinement in graphene has been of recent and growing interest because its potential applications in nanotechnology. In particular, the observation of the so called magnetic edge states in graphene has opened the possibility to deepen into the generation of spin currents and its applications in spintronics. We study the magnetic edge states of quasi-particles arising in graphene monolayers due to an inhomogeneous magnetic field of a magnetic barrier in the formalism of the two-dimensional massless Dirac equation. We also show how the solutions of such states in each of both triangular sublattices of the graphene are related through a supersymmetric transformation in the quantum mechanical sense.

Gabriela Murguia

2010-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

347

A new DFM approach to combine machining and additive manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design For Manufacturing (DFM) approaches aim to integrate manufacturability aspects during the design stage. Most of DFM approaches usually consider only one manufacturing process, but products competitiveness may be improved by designing hybrid modular products, in which products are seen as 3-D puzzles with modules realized aside by the best manufacturing process and further gathered. A new DFM system is created in order to give quantitative information during the product design stage of which modules will benefit in being machined and which ones will advantageously be realized by an additive process (such as Selective Laser Sintering or laser deposition). A methodology for a manufacturability evaluation in case of a subtractive or an additive manufacturing process is developed and implemented in a CAD software. Tests are carried out on industrial products from automotive industry.

Kerbrat, Olivier; Hascoët, Jean-Yves; 10.1016/j.compind.2011.04.003

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Mass spectral characterization of petroleum dyes, tracers, and additives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Petroleum dyes, additives, and tracers are important for identifying gasolines in spill and contamination problems. High-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) was used for the characterization of 21 commercial petroleum dyes. Many contained common chromophores, typically azo or anthraquinone groups, and often differed only in their degree of alkyl substitution. Few dyes were pure and typically contained several chromogens with homologous series of substituents. A separation method was developed to concentrate the polar fractions containing the additives. Subsequent characterization of the polar fraction by GC/MS showed distinct differences between different gasolines. Various colorless tracers were evaluated in terms of detectability, soil adsorption, and cost. Many tracers exhibited soil adsorption and interferences which limited their detectability. Alcohols in the C8-C10 range were found to be the most suitable tracers with GC/MS detection limits of 1 ppm. 22 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

Youngless, T.L.; Swansiger, J.T.; Danner, D.A.; Greco, M.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Additive for iron disulfide cathodes used in thermal batteries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention comprises thermal batteries employing an FeS/sub 2/ depolarizer itself. A minor amount of CaSi/sub 2/ preferably 1-3% by weight is provided as an additive in the FeS/sub 2/ depolarizer to eliminate the voltage transient (spike) which normally occurs upon activation of batteries of this type. The amount of FeS/sub 2/ by weight generally comprises 64 to 90%.

Not Available

1982-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

350

Additive Manufacturing: Pursuing the Promise | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataCombinedDepartment2015 InformationAGuidefor the OfficeAdditional

351

Drag Reduction by Laser-Plasma Energy Addition in Hypersonic Flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to investigate the drag reduction by laser-plasma energy addition in a low density Mach 7 hypersonic flow. The experiments were conducted in a shock tunnel and the optical beam of a high power pulsed CO{sub 2} TEA laser operating with 7 J of energy and 30 MW peak power was focused to generate the plasma upstream of a hemispherical model installed in the tunnel test section. The non-intrusive schlieren optical technique was used to visualize the effects of the energy addition to hypersonic flow, from the plasma generation until the mitigation of the shock wave profile over the model surface. Aside the optical technique, a piezoelectric pressure transducer was used to measure the impact pressure at stagnation point of the hemispherical model and the pressure reduction could be observed.

Oliveira, A. C. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, 12630-000 Cachoeira Paulista (Brazil); Instituto de Estudos Avancados, 12228-001 Sao Jose dos Campos (Brazil); Minucci, M. A. S.; Toro, P. G. P.; Chanes, J. B. Jr [Instituto de Estudos Avancados, 12228-001 Sao Jose dos Campos (Brazil); Myrabo, L. N. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180-3590 (United States)

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

352

Field observations and lessons learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation outlines observations and lessons learned from the Megaports program. It provides: (1) details of field and technical observations collected during LANL field activities at ports around the world and details of observations collected during radiation detections system testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (2) provides suggestions for improvement and efficiency; and (3) discusses possible program execution changes for more effective operations.

Nielsen, Joh B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Electron Cloud observation in the LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Operation of LHC with bunch trains at different spacings has revealed the formation of an electron cloud inside the machine. The main observations of electron cloud build up are the pressure rise measured at the vacuum gauges in the warm regions, as well as the increase of the beam screen temperature in the cold regions due to an additional heat load. The effects of the electron cloud were also visible as instability and emittance growth affecting the last bunches of longer trains, which could be improved running with higher chromaticity or larger transverse emittances. A summary of the 2010 and 2011 observations and measurements and a comparison with models will be presented. The efficiency of scrubbing to improve the machine running performance will be briefly discussed.

Rumolo, G; Baglin, V; Bartosik, H; Biancacci, N; Baudrenghien, P; Bregliozzi, G; Chiggiato, P; Claudet, S; De Maria, R; Esteban-Muller, J; Favier, M; Hansen, C; Höfle, W; Jimenez, J M; Kain, V; Lanza, G; Li, K S B; Maury Cuna, G H I; Métral, E; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Roncarolo, F; Salvant, B; Shaposhnikova, E N; Steinhagen, R J; Tavian, L J; Valuch, D; Venturini Delsolaro, W; Zimmermann, F; Iriso, U; Dominguez, O; Koukovini-Platia, E; Mounet, N; Zannini, C; Bhat, C M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Impact of Acid Additives on Elastic Modulus of Viscoelastic Surfactants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In live acid solutions at concentrations of HCl namely 15-20 wt% HCl, elastic modulus remained quite low as compared to 10-12 wt% HCl concentrations. At 10 wt% HCl concentration, elastic modulus was 3.4 Pa observed whereas at 20 wt% HCl...

Khan, Waqar Ahmad

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

355

Arctic daily temperature and precipitation extremes: Observed and simulated physical behavior.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??ARCTIC DAILY TEMPERATURE AND PRECIPITATION EXTREMES: OBSERVED AND SIMULATED PHYSICAL BEHAVIOR Justin M. Glisan Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa… (more)

Glisan, Justin Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Solar-wind minor ions: recent observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the years following the Solar Wind Four Conference at Burghausen our knowledge of the solar wind ion composition and dynamics has grown. There have been some surprises, and our understanding of the evolution of the solar wind has been improved. Systematic studies have shown that the minor ions generally travel with a common bulk speed and have temperatures roughly proportional to their masses. It has been determined that the /sup 3/He/sup + +/ content varies greatly; /sup 3/He/sup + +///sup 4/He/sup + +/ ranges from as high as 10/sup 2/ values to below 2 x 10/sup -4/. In some solar wind flows which can be related to energetic coronal events, the minor ions are found in unusual ionization states containing Fe/sup 16 +/ as a prominent ion, showing that the states were formed at unusually high temperatures. Unexpectedly, in a few flows substantial quantities of /sup 4/He/sup +/ have been detected, sometimes with ions identifiable as O/sup 2 +/ and O/sup 3 +/. Surprisingly, in some of these examples the ionization state is mixed showing that part of the plasma escaped the corona without attaining the usual million-degree temperatures while other parts were heated more nearly in the normal manner. Additionally, detailed studies of the minor ions have increased our understanding of the coronal expansion. For example, such studies have contributed to identifying near equatorial coronal streamers as the source of solar wind flows between high speed streams.

Bame, S.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

First Ever STEREO Images of the Entire Sun These presentations give additional information on how STEREO's first ever  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STEREO 360 1 First Ever STEREO Images of the Entire Sun These presentations give additional information on how STEREO's first ever views of the entire sun will advance the study of solar and space years the STEREO spacecrafts and SDO will be able to observe the entire 360 degrees of the Sun. Credit

Christian, Eric

358

Observation  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

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359

Observation  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

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360

Observation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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361

Observation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeeding

362

A dynamical perspective on additional planets in 55 Cancri  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Five planets are known to orbit the star 55 Cancri. The recently-discovered planet f at 0.78 AU (Fischer et al. 2008) is located at the inner edge of a previously-identified stable zone that separates the three close-in planets from planet d at 5.9 AU. Here we map the stability of the orbital space between planets f and d using a suite of n-body integrations that include an additional, yet-to-be-discovered planet g with a radial velocity amplitude of 5 m/s (planet mass = 0.5-1.2 Saturn masses). We find a large stable zone extending from 0.9 to 3.8 AU at eccentricities below 0.4. For each system we quantify the probability of detecting planets b-f on their current orbits given perturbations from hypothetical planet g, in order to further constrain the mass and orbit of an additional planet. We find that large perturbations are associated with specific mean motion resonances (MMRs) with planets f and d. We show that two MMRs, 3f:1g (the 1:3 MMR between planets g and f) and 4g:1d cannot contain a planet g. The 2f:1g MMR is unlikely to contain a planet more massive than about 20 Earth masses. The 3g:1d and 5g:2d MMRs could contain a resonant planet but the resonant location is strongly confined. The 3f:2g, 2g:1d and 3g:2d MMRs exert a stabilizing influence and could contain a resonant planet. Furthermore, we show that the stable zone may in fact contain 2-3 additional planets, if they are ~50 Earth masses each. Finally, we show that any planets exterior to planet d must reside beyond 10 AU.

Sean N. Raymond; Rory Barnes; Noel Gorelick

2008-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

363

Immobilization of uranium in contaminated soil by natural apatite addition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Serbian natural mineral apatite as soil additive for reducing the migration of uranium from contaminated sediments. In laboratory study we investigated the sorption properties of domestic apatite upon different experimental conditions, such as pH, adsorbent mass, reaction period, concentration of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} in apatite, solid/liquid ratio. In second part of study, we did the quantification of uranium in soil samples, taken from uranium mine site 'Kalna', by sequential extraction method. The same procedure was, also, used for uranium determination in contaminated soil samples after apatite addition, in order to determine the changes in U distribution in soil fraction. The obtained results showed the significant level of immobilization (96.7%) upon certain conditions. Increase of %P{sub 2}O{sub 5} in apatite and process of mechano-chemical activation led to increase of immobilization capacity from 17.50% till 91.64%. The best results for uranium binding were obtained at pH 5.5 and reaction period 60 days (98.04%) The sequential extraction showed the presence of uranium (48.2%) in potentially available soil fractions, but with the apatite addition uranium content in these fractions decreased (30.64%), what is considering environmental aspect significant fact. In situ immobilization of radionuclide using inexpensive sequestering agents, such as apatite, is very adequate for big contaminated areas of soil with low level of contamination. This investigation study on natural apatite from deposit 'Lisina' Serbia was the first one of this type in our country. Key words: apatite, uranium, immobilization, soil, contamination. (authors)

Mrdakovic Popic, Jelena; Stojanovic, Mirjana; Milosevic, Sinisa; Iles, Deana; Zildzovic, Snezana [Institute for Technology of Nuclear and other Mineral Raw Materials, Franche d' Epere 86, Belgrade (Serbia)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Constraining the Braneworld with Gravitational Wave Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some braneworld models may have observable consequences that, if detected, would validate a requisite element of string theory. In the infinite Randall-Sundrum model (RS2), the AdS radius of curvature, l, of the extra dimension supports a single bound state of the massless graviton on the brane, thereby reproducing Newtonian gravity in the weak-field limit. However, using the AdS/CFT correspondence, it has been suggested that one possible consequence of RS2 is an enormous increase in Hawking radiation emitted by black holes. We utilize this possibility to derive two novel methods for constraining l via gravitational wave measurements. We show that the EMRI event rate detected by LISA can constrain l at the {approx}1 {mu}m level for optimal cases, while the observation of a single galactic black hole binary with LISA results in an optimal constraint of l{<=}5 {mu}m.

McWilliams, Sean T. [Gravitational Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt Maryland 20771 (United States)

2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

365

Direct observation of time reversal violation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A direct evidence for Time Reversal Violation (TRV) means an experiment that, considered by itself, clearly shows TRV independent of, and unconnected to, the results for CP Violation. No existing result before the recent BABAR experiment with entangled neutral B mesons had demonstrated TRV in this sense. There is a unique opportunity for a search of TRV with unstable particles thanks to the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) Entanglement between the two neutral mesons in B, and PHI, Factories. The two quantum effects of the first decay as a filtering measurement and the transfer of information to the still living partner allow performing a genuine TRV asymmetry with the exchange of 'in' and 'out' states. With four independent TRV asymmetries, BABAR observes a large deviation of T-invariance with a statistical significance of 14 standard deviations, far more than needed to declare the result as a discovery. This is the first direct observation of TRV in the time evolution of any system.

Bernabeu, J. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Valencia, and IFIC, Joint Centre Univ. Valencia-CSIC (Spain)

2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

366

Incompatibility between Self-Observing Consciousness and the Axioms of Quantum theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on the standard axioms of quantum theory, we provide a counter-example which invalidates the full compatibility between consciousness and quantum theory. In particular, we present an example of a natural phenomenon in which an observer's the mental state can be fully described in mathematical terms analogous to the state vector that is being observed. This mathematical description of the observer's mental state enables us to examine consciousness within the standard axioms of quantum theory. The separation between the observing party and the physical system being observed, imposed by the axiom of quantum theory, poses a problem when the observer is observing his own mental state, i.e., self-observing consciousness.

Song, Daegene

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Incompatibility between Self-Observing Consciousness and the Axioms of Quantum theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on the standard axioms of quantum theory, we provide a counter-example which invalidates the full compatibility between consciousness and quantum theory. In particular, we present an example of a natural phenomenon in which an observer's the mental state can be fully described in mathematical terms analogous to the state vector that is being observed. This mathematical description of the observer's mental state enables us to examine consciousness within the standard axioms of quantum theory. The separation between the observing party and the physical system being observed, imposed by the axiom of quantum theory, poses a problem when the observer is observing his own mental state, i.e., self-observing consciousness.

Daegene Song

2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

368

Portland State University Shattuck Hall  

High Performance Buildings Database

Portland, OR Portland State's Shattuck hall was originally constructed as an elementary school in 1915. In 2007 the university undertook extensive renovations of the building to bring it up to current seismic requirements. In addition to structural improvements, the design team was able to upgraded the building's aging mechanical and electrical systems, upgrade plumbing, and restore the large light wells that bring daylight into the U-shaped building. The resulting building houses Portland State's Architecture department, where students are able to learn from the exposed building systems.

369

EIS-0396: Notice of Additional Public Hearing | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program - LibbyofThis EIS evaluates The DepartmentNotice of additional public

370

Oregon Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4InputAdditions

371

Pennsylvania Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)Decade Year-0Sales (BillionDecade Year-0InputAdditions

372

South Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet) YearPriceThousandThousand479,741 476,85520 40Additions (Million

373

South Dakota Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet) YearPriceThousandThousand479,7416.18Decade Year-0 Year-1Additions

374

Tennessee Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic4,630.2 10,037.24. U.S.YearYear JanAdditions

375

Iowa Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0 0 0Year JanDecade Year-0Additions

376

Maryland Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Additions

377

SciTech Connect: Additive Manufacturing for Ceramics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systems controllerAdditive Manufacturing for Ceramics Citation Details

378

Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia" "EmissionDecade Year-0 Year-1Additions

379

Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623 4623 42 180NumberDecade Year-0Additions

380

Washington Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28Decreases349,980Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional observer states" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Microsoft Word - Directives Requiring Additional Documentation.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject8 - Outline andPROPOSAL68R18Requiring Additional

382

Effects of Additive Elements on the Phase Formation and Morphological Stability of Nickel Monosilicide Films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alloying elements can substantially affect the formation and morphological stability of nickel monosilicide. A comprehensive study of phase formation was performed on 24 Ni alloys with varying concentrations of alloying elements. Silicide films have been used for more than 15 years to contact the source, drain and gate of state-of-the-art complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices. In the past, the addition of alloying elements was shown to improve the transformation from the high resistivity C49 to the low resistivity C54-TiSi{sub 2} phase and to allow for the control of surface and interface roughness of CoSi{sub 2} films as well as produce significant improvements with respect to agglomeration of the films. Using simultaneous time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD), resistance and light scattering measurements, we follow the formation of the silicide phases in real time during rapid thermal annealing. Additions to the Ni-Si system lead to modifications in the phase formation sequence at low temperatures (metal-rich phases), to variations in the formation temperatures of NiSi and NiSi{sub 2}, and to changes in the agglomeration behavior of the films formed. Of the 24 elements studied, additions of Mo, Re, Ta and W are amongst the most efficient to retard agglomeration while elements such as Pd, Pt and Rh are most efficient to retard the formation of NiSi{sub 2}.

Lavoie,C.; Detavernier, C.; Cabral, Jr. , C.; d'Heurle, F.; Kellock, A.; Jordan-Sweet, J.; Harper, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Tensor network states and geometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tensor network states are used to approximate ground states of local Hamiltonians on a lattice in D spatial dimensions. Different types of tensor network states can be seen to generate different geometries. Matrix product states (MPS) in D=1 dimensions, as well as projected entangled pair states (PEPS) in D>1 dimensions, reproduce the D-dimensional physical geometry of the lattice model; in contrast, the multi-scale entanglement renormalization ansatz (MERA) generates a (D+1)-dimensional holographic geometry. Here we focus on homogeneous tensor networks, where all the tensors in the network are copies of the same tensor, and argue that certain structural properties of the resulting many-body states are preconditioned by the geometry of the tensor network and are therefore largely independent of the choice of variational parameters. Indeed, the asymptotic decay of correlations in homogeneous MPS and MERA for D=1 systems is seen to be determined by the structure of geodesics in the physical and holographic geometries, respectively; whereas the asymptotic scaling of entanglement entropy is seen to always obey a simple boundary law -- that is, again in the relevant geometry. This geometrical interpretation offers a simple and unifying framework to understand the structural properties of, and helps clarify the relation between, different tensor network states. In addition, it has recently motivated the branching MERA, a generalization of the MERA capable of reproducing violations of the entropic boundary law in D>1 dimensions.

G. Evenbly; G. Vidal

2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

384

INTEGRAL observations of Her X-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aims: We investigate the X-ray spectral and timing properties of the accreting X-ray pulsar Her X-1 observed with the INTEGRAL satellite in July-August 2005. Methods: The data analyzed in this work cover a substantial part of one main-on state of the source. The short-time scale pulse period development is measured. X-ray pulse profiles for different energy ranges and time intervals are constructed. Pulse-averaged and pulse-phase resolved broad band X-ray spectra are studied. Spectral changes during X-ray dips are explored. Results: The X-ray pulse profiles are found to change significantly during the period of observations. For the first time a strong spinup is measured within one 35 d cycle. Spectral characteristics observed during the X-ray dips are consistent with their interpretaion as due to partial covering as has been reported by several authors. The fundamental cyclotron absorption line is firmly observed in both pulse-averaged and pulse-phase resolved X-ray spectra. The energy, width, and the depth of the line are found to vary significantly with pulse phase.

D. Klochkov; R. Staubert; K. Postnov; N. Shakura; A. Santangelo; S. Tsygankov; A. Lutovinov; I. Kreykenbohm; J. Wilms

2008-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

385

International Workshops to Foster Implementation of the IAEA Additional Protocol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A country’s adherence to the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) Additional Protocol is an important statement to the world of that country’s commitment to nuclear nonproliferation. Without the Additional Protocol (AP) it is possible, as demonstrated in Iraq, for a country party to the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) to clandestinely work toward nuclear weapons and be undetected by the IAEA. This is because classical safeguards under the NPT are directed at diversion of nuclear material from declared activities. But a country may instead build undeclared activities to produce weapons-grade nuclear material. The AP is directed at detecting those undeclared activities. As of May 2003, 73 countries had signed the AP, but only 35 have entered into force. To further adherence to the AP, the IAEA has held regional, high-level seminars in Japan, South Africa, Kazakhstan, Peru, Romania, and Malaysia to explain AP provisions. To supplement these policy-level seminars, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has undertaken to develop a set of modules of technical competencies required to implement the AP. The intent is to work closely with the IAEA by providing these technical competencies to countries as well as to complement the IAEA’s regional seminars and other outreach efforts. This paper briefly describes the technical competency modules.

Killinger, Mark H.; Coates, Cameron W.; Bedke, Michael L.

2003-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

386

Microstructural characterization of superalloy 718 with boron and phosphorus additions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boron and phosphorus additions are known to improve the stress rupture properties of IN-718. One possible mechanism to explain this property improvement relies on the boron and phosphorus additions slowing down the growth of {gamma}{double_prime} and {gamma}{prime} precipitates during high temperature service or aging. However, atom probe analysis found no segregation of boron and phosphorus to {gamma}-{gamma}{double_prime} or to {gamma}-{gamma}{prime} interfaces in the alloys with the high boron and high phosphorus levels. No difference in growth rates were found by transmission electron microscopy in the sizes of the {gamma}{double_prime} or {gamma}{prime} in alloys with high phosphorus and high boron as compared to commercial alloys and to alloys with even lower levels of phosphorus and boron. Atom probe analysis further found that much of the phosphorus, boron, and carbon segregated to grain boundaries. Creep curves comparing the alloys with high levels of phosphorus and boron and alloys with low levels of phosphorus and boron show a large difference in strain rate in the first hours of the test. These results suggest that the boron and phosphorus may have a direct effect on dislocation mobility by some pinning mechanism.

Horton, J.A.; McKamey, C.G.; Miller, M.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Cao, W.D.; Kennedy, R.L. [Teledyne Allvac, Monroe, NC (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Naphthenic acids as antiwear additives for jet fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the ways in which the antiwear properties of jet fuels can be improved is the use of lubricity agents, otherwise known as antiwear additives. Among the various compounds that have antiwear properties in these fuels, naphthenic, acids merit special attention. These are alicyclic carboxylic acids, in most cases monobasic, with five- and six-membered carbon rings; they have the general formula R(CH{sub 2}){sub n}COOH, where R is a naphthene radical. Natural naphthenic acids consist mainly of acids of the cyclopentane series, beginning with the simplest, in particular cyclopentylacetic acid. The lower naphthenic acids are monocyclic; the higher acids, beginning with C{sub 13}, are bicyclic and polycyclic. Naphthenic acids of the cyclohexane series are encountered less frequently; they may be found, for example, in Baku, California, and Sakhalin crudes. The most widely used method for obtaining naphthenic acids is the treatment of light distillates, lube distillates, and diesel fuels. The standard GOST 13302-77 establishes several grades of naphthenic acids, depending on the raw material and the production technology. This work was aimed at the utilization of wastes containing naphthenic acids, with subsequent use as jet fuel additives.

Deineko, P.S.; Vasil`eva, E.N.; Popova, O.V.; Bashkatova, S.T.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

NS&T MANAGEMENT OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

Gianotto, David

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Comparing Environmental Impacts of Additive Manufacturing vs. Traditional Machining via Life-Cycle Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Social Impacts of Additive Manufacturing vs CNC MachiningImpacts of Additive Manufacturing vs. Traditional Machiningcutting! Impacts of Additive Manufacturing in Literature

Faludi, Jeremy; Bayley, Cindy; Bhogal, Suraj; Iribarne, Myles

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Gamma Ray Burst Afterglow Observations.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are among the most luminous explosions in the universe. We present an overview of the observational history of GRBs and the… (more)

Updike, Adria

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

The effect of chemical additives on the synthesis of ethanol. Technical progress report 5, September 16, 1988--December 15, 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to elucidate the role of various chemical additives on ethanol synthesis over Rh- and Ni-based catalysts. Chemical additives used will include S, P, Ag, Cu, Mn, and Na. The effect of additives on the surface state of the catalysts, heat of adsorption of reactant molecules, reaction intermediates, reaction pathways, reaction kinetics, and product distributions is/will be investigated by a series of studies including temperature programmed desorption, infrared study of NO adsorption, reactive probing, steady state rate measurement, and transient kinetic study. A better understanding of the role of additive may allow us to use chemical additives to manipulate the catalytic properties of Rh- and Ni-based catalysts for producing high yields of ethanol from syngas. CO insertion is known to be a key step to the formation of acetaldehyde and ethanol from CO hydrogenation over Rh catalysts. Ethylene hydroformylation has often served as a probe to determine CO insertion capabilities of Rh catalysts. The mechanism of CO insertion in ethylene hydroformylation over Rh/SiO{sub 2} was investigated.

Chuang, S.S.C.

1989-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

392

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

Kathryn Baskin

2004-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

393

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

Kathryn Baskin

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

394

DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

Kathryn Baskin

2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

Decontamination formulation with additive for enhanced mold remediation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Decontamination formulations with an additive for enhancing mold remediation. The formulations include a solubilizing agent (e.g., a cationic surfactant), a reactive compound (e.g., hydrogen peroxide), a carbonate or bicarbonate salt, a water-soluble bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate), a mold remediation enhancer containing Fe or Mn, and water. The concentration of Fe.sup.2+ or Mn.sup.2+ ions in the aqueous mixture is in the range of about 0.0001% to about 0.001%. The enhanced formulations can be delivered, for example, as a foam, spray, liquid, fog, mist, or aerosol for neutralization of chemical compounds, and for killing certain biological compounds or agents and mold spores, on contaminated surfaces and materials.

Tucker, Mark D. (Albuquerque, NM); Irvine, Kevin (Huntsville, AL); Berger, Paul (Rome, NY); Comstock, Robert (Bel Air, MD)

2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

396

8, 88178846, 2008 Observed boundary-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 8, 8817­8846, 2008 Observed boundary- layer/mesoscale impacts on Saharan dust J. H. Marsham et and Enviroment, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK 2 Institut f¨ur Meteorologie und Klimaforschung, Universit@env.leeds.ac.uk) 8817 #12;ACPD 8, 8817­8846, 2008 Observed boundary- layer/mesoscale impacts on Saharan dust J. H

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

397

Loop quantum gravity and observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum gravity has long been thought to be completely decoupled from experiments or observations. Although it is true that smoking guns are still missing, there are now serious hopes that quantum gravity phenomena might be tested. We review here some possible ways to observe loop quantum gravity effects either in the framework of cosmology or in astroparticle physics.

A. Barrau; J. Grain

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

398

State Transfer and Spin Measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a Hamiltonian that can be used for amplifying the signal from a quantum state, enabling the measurement of a macroscopic observable to determine the state of a single spin. We prove a general mapping between this Hamiltonian and an exchange Hamiltonian for arbitrary coupling strengths and local magnetic fields. This facilitates the use of existing schemes for perfect state transfer to give perfect amplification. We further prove a link between the evolution of this fixed Hamiltonian and classical Cellular Automata, thereby unifying previous approaches to this amplification task. Finally, we show how to use the new Hamiltonian for perfect state transfer in the, to date, unique scenario where total spin is not conserved during the evolution, and demonstrate that this yields a significantly different response in the presence of decoherence.

A. Kay

2006-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

399

Analysis of The Anomalous Orbital-Energy Changes Observed in Spacecraft Flybys of Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In March 2008 anomalous behavior in spacecraft flybys of Earth was reported in Physical Review Letters, Volume 100, Issue 9, March 7, 2008, in an article entitled "Anomalous Orbital-Energy Changes Observed during Spacecraft Flybys of Earth". The data indicate unaccounted for changes in spacecraft speed, both increases and decreases, for six different spacecraft involved in Earth flybys from December 8, 1990 to August 2, 2005. The article states that, "All ... potential sources of systematic error .... [have been] modeled. None can account for the observed anomalies.... Like the Pioneer anomaly ... the Earth flybys anomaly is a real effect .... Its source is unknown." In the present article it is shown that the Earth flybys anomaly would be caused by a very small acceleration [in addition to that of natural gravitation], centrally directed and independent of distance, the same effect as that which the Pioneer anomaly exhibits. How that effect operates to produce the observed results is analyzed. A cause of the centrally directed accelerations is presented.

Roger Ellman

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Spatial Corrections of ROSAT HRI Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray observations with the ROSAT High Resolution Imager (HRI) often have spatial smearing on the order of 10 arcsec (Morse 1994). This degradation of the intrinsic resolution of the instrument (5 arcsec) can be attributed to errors in the aspect solution associated with the wobble of the space craft or with the reacquisition of the guide stars. We have developed a set of IRAF/PROS and MIDAS/EXSAS routines to minimize these effects. Our procedure attempts to isolate aspect errors that are repeated through each cycle of the wobble. The method assigns a 'wobble phase' to each event based on the 402 second period of the ROSAT wobble. The observation is grouped into a number of phase bins and a centroid is calculated for each sub-image. The corrected HRI event list is reconstructed by adding the sub-images which have been shifted to a common source position. This method has shown approx. 30% reduction of the full width half maximum (FWHM) of an X-ray observation of the radio galaxy 3C 120. Additional examples are presented.

D. E. Harris; J. D. Silverman; G. Hasinger; I. Lehmann

1998-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional observer states" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Geometrical Rabi transitions between decoupled quantum states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A periodic perturbation such as a laser field cannot induce transitions between two decoupled states for which the transition matrix element vanishes. We show, however, that if in addition some system parameters are varied adiabatically, such transitions become possible via adiabatic-change-induced excitations to other states. We demonstrate that full amplitude transfer between the two decoupled states can be achieved, and more significantly, the evolution of the system only depends on its path in parameter space. Our technique then provides a valuable means of studying nontrivial geometrical dynamics via auxiliary states with large energy splittings.

Xingxiang Zhou; Ari Mizel

2008-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

402

Advanced Electrolyte Additives for PHEV/EV Lithium-ion Battery...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Advanced Electrolyte Additives for PHEVEV Lithium-ion Battery Development of Advanced Electrolytes and Electrolyte Additives...

403

Additional EIPC Study Analysis: Interim Report on High Priority Topics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Between 2010 and 2012 the Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) conducted a major long-term resource and transmission study of the Eastern Interconnection (EI). With guidance from a Stakeholder Steering Committee (SSC) that included representatives from the Eastern Interconnection States Planning Council (EISPC) among others, the project was conducted in two phases. Phase 1 involved a long-term capacity expansion analysis that involved creation of eight major futures plus 72 sensitivities. Three scenarios were selected for more extensive transmission- focused evaluation in Phase 2. Five power flow analyses, nine production cost model runs (including six sensitivities), and three capital cost estimations were developed during this second phase. The results from Phase 1 and 2 provided a wealth of data that could be examined further to address energy-related questions. A list of 13 topics was developed for further analysis; this paper discusses the first five.

Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

The Effect of Zn Addition on the Oxidation State of Cobalt in Co/ZrO2  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 and NbSe2Different Impacts of SO2Lamellar

405

Negative compressibility observed in graphene containing resonant impurities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We observed negative compressibility in monolayer graphene containing resonant impurities under different magnetic fields. Hydrogenous impurities were introduced into graphene by electron beam (e-beam) irradiation. Resonant states located in the energy region of {+-}0.04 eV around the charge neutrality point were probed in e-beam-irradiated graphene capacitors. Theoretical results based on tight-binding and Lifshitz models agreed well with experimental observations of graphene containing a low concentration of resonant impurities. The interaction between resonant states and Landau levels was detected by varying the applied magnetic field. The interaction mechanisms and enhancement of the negative compressibility in disordered graphene are discussed.

Chen, X. L.; Wang, L.; Li, W.; Wang, Y.; He, Y. H.; Wu, Z. F.; Han, Y.; Zhang, M. W.; Xiong, W.; Wang, N. [Department of Physics and The William Mong Institute of Nano Science and Technology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)] [Department of Physics and The William Mong Institute of Nano Science and Technology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

406

STATE ESTIMATION FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER 1 STATE ESTIMATION FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES O. Bernard1 , B. Chachuat2 , and J sensors (also called observers) for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). We give an overview model description (e.g., the 1 #12;2 STATE ESTIMATION FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES extended Kalman

Bernard, Olivier

407

State-Machine Replication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

State-Machine Replication #12;The Problem Clients Server #12;The Problem Clients Server #12;The (state machine) #12;The Solution 1. Make server deterministic (state machine) State machine #12;The Solution 1. Make server deterministic (state machine) 2. Replicate server State machines #12;The Solution 1

Venkataramani, Arun

408

Scattering states of a particle, with position-dependent mass, in a double heterojunction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we obtain the exact analytical scattering solutions of a particle (electron or hole) in a semiconductor double heterojunction - potential well / barrier - where the effective mass of the particle varies with position inside the heterojunctions. It is observed that the spatial dependence of mass within the well / barrier introduces a nonlinear component in the plane wave solutions of the continuum states. Additionally, the transmission coefficient is found to increase with increasing energy, finally approaching unity, whereas the reflection coefficient follows the reverse trend and goes to zero.

Anjana Sinha

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

409

Optimization of soil mixing technology through metallic iron addition.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Enhanced soil mixing is a process used to remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from soil. In this process, also known as soil mixing with thermally enhanced soil vapor extraction, or SM/TESVE, a soil mixing apparatus breaks up and mixes a column of soil up to 9 m (30 ft) deep; simultaneously, hot air is blown through the soil. The hot air carries the VOCs to the surface where they are collected and safely disposed of. This technology is cost effective at high VOC concentrations, but it becomes cost prohibitive at low concentrations. Argonne National Laboratory-East conducted a project to evaluate ways of improving the effectiveness of this system. The project investigated the feasibility of integrating the SM/TESVE process with three soil treatment processes--soil vapor extraction, augmented indigenous biodegradation, and zero-valent iron addition. Each of these technologies was considered a polishing treatment designed to remove the contaminants left behind by enhanced soil mixing. The experiment was designed to determine if the overall VOC removal effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the SM/TESVE process could be improved by integrating this approach with one of the polishing treatment systems.

Moos, L. P.

1999-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

ADAPTIVE PDE OBSERVER FOR BATTERY SOC/SOH ESTIMATION Scott J. Moura  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

durability, thereby unlock- ing the full potential of battery energy storage. SOC/SOH esti- mationADAPTIVE PDE OBSERVER FOR BATTERY SOC/SOH ESTIMATION Scott J. Moura Miroslav Krstic Cymer Center develops an adaptive PDE observer for battery state-of-charge (SOC) and state-of-health (SOH) estimation

Krstic, Miroslav

411

Modified Inverse First Order Reliability Method (I-FORM) for Predicting Extreme Sea States.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental contours describing extreme sea states are generated as the input for numerical or physical model simulation s as a part of the stand ard current practice for designing marine structure s to survive extreme sea states. Such environmental contours are characterized by combinations of significant wave height ( ) and energy period ( ) values calculated for a given recurrence interval using a set of data based on hindcast simulations or buoy observations over a sufficient period of record. The use of the inverse first - order reliability method (IFORM) i s standard design practice for generating environmental contours. In this paper, the traditional appli cation of the IFORM to generating environmental contours representing extreme sea states is described in detail and its merits and drawbacks are assessed. The application of additional methods for analyzing sea state data including the use of principal component analysis (PCA) to create an uncorrelated representation of the data under consideration is proposed. A reexamination of the components of the IFORM application to the problem at hand including the use of new distribution fitting techniques are shown to contribute to the development of more accurate a nd reasonable representations of extreme sea states for use in survivability analysis for marine struc tures. Keywords: In verse FORM, Principal Component Analysis , Environmental Contours, Extreme Sea State Characteri zation, Wave Energy Converters

Eckert-Gallup, Aubrey Celia; Sallaberry, Cedric Jean-Marie; Dallman, Ann Renee; Neary, Vincent Sinclair

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Hamilton relativity group for noninertial states in quantum mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physical states in quantum mechanics are rays in a Hilbert space. Projective representations of a relativity group transform between the quantum physical states that are in the admissible class. The physical observables of position, time, energy and momentum are the Hermitian representation of the Weyl-Heisenberg algebra. We show that there is a consistency condition that requires the relativity group to be a subgroup of the group of automorphisms of the Weyl-Heisenberg algebra. This, together with the requirement of the invariance of classical time, results in the inhomogeneous Hamilton group that is the relativity group for noninertial frames in classical Hamilton's mechanics. The projective representation of a group is equivalent to unitary representations of its central extension. The central extension of the inhomogeneous Hamilton group and its corresponding Casimir invariants are computed. One of the Casimir invariants is a generalized spin that is invariant for noninertial states. It is the familiar inertial Galilean spin with additional terms that may be compared to noninertial experimental results.

Stephen G. Low

2007-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

413

Additional resonant contribution to the potential model for the 12C(alpha,gamma)16O reaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The additional resonant contribution to the potential model is examined in $\\alpha$+$^{12}$C elastic scattering and the low-energy $^{12}$C($\\alpha$,$\\gamma$)$^{16}$O reaction. The excitation function of elastic scattering below $E_{c.m.}= 5$ MeV seems to be reproduced by the potential model satisfactorily, and it is not profoundly disturbed by the additional resonances. The weak coupling is good enough to describe the $^{16}$O structure in the vicinity of the $\\alpha$-particle threshold, especially below $E_{c.m.}= 8$ MeV, corresponding to the excitation energy $E_x \\approx 15$ MeV. The additional resonances give the complement of the astrophysical $S$-factors from the simple potential model. The $S$-factor of $^{12}$C($\\alpha$,$\\gamma$)$^{16}$O at $E_{c.m.}=300$ keV is dominated by the $E$2 transition, which is enhanced by the subthreshold 2$^+_1$ state at $E_x= 6.92$ MeV. The contribution from the subthreshold 1$^-_1$ state at $E_x= 7.12$ MeV is predicted to be small. The additional resonances do not give the large contribution to the thermonuclear reaction rates of $^{12}$C($\\alpha$,$\\gamma$)$^{16}$O at helium burning temperatures.

M. Katsuma

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Energy efficiency standards for residential and commercial equipment: Additional opportunities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy efficiency standards set minimum levels of energy efficiency that must be met by new products. Depending on the dynamics of the market and the level of the standard, the effect on the market for a given product may be small, moderate, or large. Energy efficiency standards address a number of market failures that exist in the buildings sector. Decisions about efficiency levels often are made by people who will not be responsible for the energy bill, such as landlords or developers of commercial buildings. Many buildings are occupied for their entire lives by very temporary owners or renters, each unwilling to make long-term investments that would mostly reward subsequent users. And sometimes what looks like apathy about efficiency merely reflects inadequate information or time invested to evaluate it. In addition to these sector-specific market failures, energy efficiency standards address the endemic failure of energy prices to incorporate externalities. In the U.S., energy efficiency standards for consumer products were first implemented in California in 1977. National standards became effective starting in 1988. By the end of 2001, national standards were in effect for over a dozen residential appliances, as well as for a number of commercial sector products. Updated standards will take effect in the next few years for several products. Outside the U.S., over 30 countries have adopted minimum energy performance standards. Technologies and markets are dynamic, and additional opportunities to improve energy efficiency exist. There are two main avenues for extending energy efficiency standards. One is upgrading standards that already exist for specific products. The other is adopting standards for products that are not covered by existing standards. In the absence of new and upgraded energy efficiency standards, it is likely that many new products will enter the stock with lower levels of energy efficiency than would otherwise be the case. Once in the stock, it is either impossible or more costly to improve the energy efficiency. Therefore, by not expanding or upgrading energy efficiency standards, opportunities for saving energy would be lost. In the past two decades, standards have significantly raised the level of energy efficiency for new products. How much more might be gained by making standards more stringent on products already subject to them, or by extending standards to products not yet covered? The main goal of this study is to estimate key national impacts of new and upgraded energy efficiency standards for residential and commercial equipment. These impacts approximate the opportunity for national benefits that may be lost if standards are not upgraded and expanded from current levels. This study also identifies the end uses where the largest opportunities exist. This analysis was prepared for the National Commission on Energy Policy (NCEP). It uses an analytical approach that is similar in concept to that used by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to set standard levels. It relies on much less data and uses more simplified assumptions than the detailed and complex formulations used in DOE's standard-setting process. The results of this analysis should thus be viewed as a first approximation of the impacts that would actually be achieved by new standards. All monetary values in this report are in 2002 dollars.

Rosenquist, Greg; McNeil, Michael; Iyer, Maithili; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, Jim

2004-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

415

WATEQ3 geochemical model: thermodynamic data for several additional solids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geochemical models such as WATEQ3 can be used to model the concentrations of water-soluble pollutants that may result from the disposal of nuclear waste and retorted oil shale. However, for a model to competently deal with these water-soluble pollutants, an adequate thermodynamic data base must be provided that includes elements identified as important in modeling these pollutants. To this end, several minerals and related solid phases were identified that were absent from the thermodynamic data base of WATEQ3. In this study, the thermodynamic data for the identified solids were compiled and selected from several published tabulations of thermodynamic data. For these solids, an accepted Gibbs free energy of formation, ..delta..G/sup 0//sub f,298/, was selected for each solid phase based on the recentness of the tabulated data and on considerations of internal consistency with respect to both the published tabulations and the existing data in WATEQ3. For those solids not included in these published tabulations, Gibbs free energies of formation were calculated from published solubility data (e.g., lepidocrocite), or were estimated (e.g., nontronite) using a free-energy summation method described by Mattigod and Sposito (1978). The accepted or estimated free energies were then combined with internally consistent, ancillary thermodynamic data to calculate equilibrium constants for the hydrolysis reactions of these minerals and related solid phases. Including these values in the WATEQ3 data base increased the competency of this geochemical model in applications associated with the disposal of nuclear waste and retorted oil shale. Additional minerals and related solid phases that need to be added to the solubility submodel will be identified as modeling applications continue in these two programs.

Krupka, K.M.; Jenne, E.A.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Discrete State Estimators for Systems on a Lattice D. Del Vecchio  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be final state determinable are given [4]. In Alessandri et al., Luenberger-like observers are proposed

Murray, Richard M.

417

Observational Tests of Modified Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modified gravity theories have richer observational consequences for large-scale structure than conventional dark energy models, in that different observables are not described by a single growth factor even in the linear regime. We examine the relationships between perturbations in the metric potentials, density and velocity fields, and discuss strategies for measuring them using gravitational lensing, galaxy cluster abundances, galaxy clustering/dynamics and the ISW effect. We show how a broad class of gravity theories can be tested by combining these probes. A robust way to interpret observations is by constraining two key functions: the ratio of the two metric potentials, and the ratio of the Gravitational ``constant'' in the Poisson equation to Newton's constant. We also discuss quasilinear effects that carry signatures of gravity, such as through induced three-point correlations. Clustering of dark energy can mimic features of modified gravity theories and thus confuse the search for distinct signatures of such theories. It can produce pressure perturbations and anisotropic stresses, which breaks the equality between the two metric potentials even in general relativity. With these two extra degrees of freedom, can a clustered dark energy model mimic modified gravity models in all observational tests? We show with specific examples that observational constraints on both the metric potentials and density perturbations can in principle distinguish modifications of gravity from dark energy models. We compare our result with other recent studies that have slightly different assumptions (and apparently contradictory conclusions).

Bhuvnesh Jain; Pengjie Zhang

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

418

Properties of Inconel 625 Mesh Structures Grown by Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Relationships between electron beam parameters (beam current, beam speed, and beam focus) and physical properties (mass, diameter, elastic modulus, and yield strength) have been investigated for Inconel 625 mesh cubes fabricated using an additive manufacturing technology based on electron beam melting. The elastic modulus and yield strength of the mesh cubes have been systematically varied by approximately a factor of ten by changing the electron beam parameters. Simple models have been used to understand better these relationships. Structural anisotropies of the mesh associated with the layered build architecture have been observed and may contribute, along with microstructural anisotropies, to the anisotropic mechanical properties of the mesh. Knowledge of this kind is likely applicable to other metal and alloy systems and is essential to rapidly realize the full potential of this burgeoning technology.

List III, Frederick Alyious [ORNL; Dehoff, Ryan R [ORNL; Lowe, Larry E [ORNL; Sames, William J [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Thermodynamic States in Explosion Fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Here we investigate the thermodynamic states occurring in explosion fields from the detonation of condensed explosives in air. In typical applications, the pressure of expanded detonation products gases is modeled by a Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) function: P{sub JWL} = f(v,s{sub CJ}); constants in that function are fit to cylinder test data. This function provides a specification of pressure as a function of specific volume, v, along the expansion isentrope (s = constant = s{sub CJ}) starting at the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) state. However, the JWL function is not a fundamental equation of thermodynamics, and therefore gives an incomplete specification of states. For example, explosions inherently involve shock reflections from surfaces; this changes the entropy of the products, and in such situations the JWL function provides no information on the products states. In addition, most explosives are not oxygen balanced, so if hot detonation products mix with air, they after-burn, releasing the heat of reaction via a turbulent combustion process. This raises the temperature of explosion products cloud to the adiabatic flame temperature ({approx}3,000K). Again, the JWL function provides no information on the combustion products states.

Kuhl, A L

2009-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

420

Statistics of reversible transitions in two-state trajectories in force-ramp spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A possible way to extract information about the reversible dissociation of a molecular adhesion bond from force fluctuations observed in force ramp experiments is discussed. For small loading rates the system undergoes a limited number of unbinding and rebinding transitions observable in the so-called force versus extension (FE) curves. The statistics of these transient fluctuations can be utilized to estimate the parameters for the rebinding rate. This is relevant in the experimentally important situation where the direct observation of the reversed FE-curves is hampered, e.g., due to the presence of soft linkers. I generalize the stochastic theory of the kinetics in two-state models to the case of time-dependent kinetic rates and compute the relevant distributions of characteristic forces. While for irreversible systems there is an intrinsic relation between the rupture force distribution and the population of the free-energy well of the bound state, the situation is slightly more complex if reversible systems are considered. For a two-state model, a “stationary” rupture force distribution that is proportional to the population can be defined and allows to consistently discuss quantities averaged over the transient fluctuations. While irreversible systems are best analyzed in the soft spring limit of small pulling device stiffness and large loading rates, here I argue to use the stiffness of the pulling device as a control parameter in addition to the loading rate.

Diezemann, Gregor [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Johannes Gutenberg Universität Mainz, Duesbergweg 10-14, 55128 Mainz (Germany)] [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Johannes Gutenberg Universität Mainz, Duesbergweg 10-14, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional observer states" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

State Appliance Standards (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

State appliance standards have existed for decades, starting with Californias enforcement of minimum efficiency requirements for refrigerators and several other products in 1979. In 1987, recognizing that different efficiency standards for the same products in different states could create problems for manufacturers, Congress enacted the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act (NAECA), which initially covered 12 products. The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT92), EPACT2005, and EISA2007 added additional residential and commercial products to the 12 products originally specified under NAECA.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Observation of B ->phi K and B ->phi K  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied two-body charmless hadronic decays of R mesons into the final states phiK and phiK(*). Using 9.7 million B (B) over bar pairs collected with the CLEO II detector, we observe the decays B- --> phiK(-) and ...

Ammar, Raymond G.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Sponsored by: Texas Soil Observation Network (TxSON)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sponsored by: Texas Soil Observation Network (TxSON) A Program for Monitoring SOIL MOISTURE Across the State of Texas Refined soil moisture satellite data products for operational use and improved to meet water, wind, and energy demands Real-time emergency response data for natural disasters

Yang, Zong-Liang

424

Dark energy and dark matter from cosmological observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present status of our knowledge about the dark matter and dark energy is reviewed. Bounds on the content of cold and hot dark matter from cosmological observations are discussed in some detail. I also review current bounds on the physical properties of dark energy, mainly its equation of state and effective speed of sound.

Steen Hannestad

2005-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

425

Global Volunteer Observing Ship (VOS) Program Data  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

CDIAC provides data management support for the Global Volunteer Observing Ship (VOS) Program. The VOS project is coordinated by the UNESCO International Ocean Carbon Coordination Project (IOCCP). The international groups from 14 countries have been outfitting research ships and commercial vessels with automated CO2 sampling equipment to analyze the carbon exchange between the ocean and atmosphere. [copied from http://cdiac.ornl.gov/oceans/genInfo.html] CDIAC provides a map interface with the shipping routes of the 14 countries involved marked in different colors. Clicking on the ship's name on that route brings up information about the vessel, the kinds of measurements collected and the timeframe, links to project pages, and, most important, the links to the data files themselves. The 14 countries are: United States, United Kingdom, Japan, France, Germany, Australia, Canada, Spain, Norway, New Zealand, China (including Taiwan), Iceland, and the Netherlands. Both archived and current, underway data can be accessed from the CDIAC VOS page.

426

Dark Energy: Observational Evidence and Theoretical Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The book elucidates the current state of the dark energy problem and presents the results of the authors, who work in this area. It describes the observational evidence for the existence of dark energy, the methods and results of constraining of its parameters, modeling of dark energy by scalar fields, the space-times with extra spatial dimensions, especially Kaluza---Klein models, the braneworld models with a single extra dimension as well as the problems of positive definition of gravitational energy in General Relativity, energy conditions and consequences of their violation in the presence of dark energy. This monograph is intended for science professionals, educators and graduate students, specializing in general relativity, cosmology, field theory and particle physics.

Novosyadlyj, B; Shtanov, Yu; Zhuk, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Laser frequency combs for astronomical observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A direct measurement of the universe's expansion history could be made by observing in real time the evolution of the cosmological redshift of distant objects. However, this would require measurements of Doppler velocity drifts of about 1 centimeter per second per year, and astronomical spectrographs have not yet been calibrated to this tolerance. We demonstrate the first use of a laser frequency comb for wavelength calibration of an astronomical telescope. Even with a simple analysis, absolute calibration is achieved with an equivalent Doppler precision of approximately 9 meters per second at about 1.5 micrometers - beyond state-of-the-art accuracy. We show that tracking complex, time-varying systematic effects in the spectrograph and detector system is a particular advantage of laser frequency comb calibration. This technique promises an effective means for modeling and removal of such systematic effects to the accuracy required by future experiments to see direct evidence of the universe's putative acceleration.

Tilo Steinmetz; Tobias Wilken; Constanza Araujo-Hauck; Ronald Holzwarth; Theodor W. Hänsch; Luca Pasquini; Antonio Manescau; Sandro D'Odorico; Michael T. Murphy; Thomas Kentischer; Wolfgang Schmidt; Thomas Udem

2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

428

State of the State's Rural Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of health status, health behavior, or health- care access and Oklahomans do not compare favorablyState of the State's Rural Health 2007 Edition Produced by OSU Center for Rural Health ASnapshotof-4391 January 1, 2007 Dear Reader: Welcome to the Oklahoma State University Center for Rural Health's inaugural

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

429

X-Ray Observations of Radio Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review some of the ways that X-ray observations provide unique information on radio galaxies. Thermal bremsstrahlung X-ray emission provides detailed data on ambient densities and temperatures. These parameters in turn can be used for pressure balance calculations and can demonstrate how the ambient gas affects radio source structure. Additionally, many signatures of the interaction of radio jets and lobes with the hot gas are found in high resolution X-ray maps. Non-thermal X-ray emission from knots and hotspots of radio jets can give us constraints on the relativistic electron population for energies greater that that normally sampled in the radio (in the case of synchrotron emission) or can give us an independent estimate of the average magnetic field strength (if inverse Compton emission is the origin of the X-rays). From recent ROSAT HRI observations of 3C 390.3 and 3C 120, we show evidence that X-ray emission from knots and hotspots appears to be associated with regions of large gradients in the radio surface brightness; i.e. at the location of powerful shocks.

D. E. Harris

1998-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

430

Protocol Additional to the Agreement between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the United States of America  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICE OF CIVIL RIGHTS/%2A

431

Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) additional geologic site characterization studies, Bryan Mound Salt Dome, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report revises the original report that was published in 1980. Some of the topics covered in the earlier report were provisional and it is now practicable to reexamine them using new or revised geotechnical data and that obtained from SPR cavern operations, which involves 16 new caverns. Revised structure maps and sections show interpretative differences as compared with the 1980 report and more definition in the dome shape and caprock structural contours, especially a major southeast-northwest trending anomalous zone. The original interpretation was of westward tilt of the dome, this revision shows a tilt to the southeast, consistent with other gravity and seismic data. This interpretation refines the evaluation of additional cavern space, by adding more salt buffer and allowing several more caverns. Additional storage space is constrained on this nearly full dome because of low-lying peripheral wetlands, but 60 MMBBL or more of additional volume could be gained in six or more new caverns. Subsidence values at Bryan Mound are among the lowest in the SPR system, averaging about 11 mm/yr (0.4 in/yr), but measurement and interpretation issues persist, as observed values are about the same as survey measurement accuracy. Periodic flooding is a continuing threat because of the coastal proximity and because peripheral portions of the site are at elevations less than 15 ft. This threat may increase slightly as future subsidence lowers the surface, but the amount is apt to be small. Caprock integrity may be affected by structural features, especially the faulting associated with anomalous zones. Injection wells have not been used extensively at Bryan Mound, but could be a practicable solution to future brine disposal needs. Environmental issues center on the areas of low elevation that are below 15 feet above mean sea level: the coastal proximity and lowland environment combined with the potential for flooding create conditions that require continuing surveillance.

Neal, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Magorian, T.R.; Ahmad, S. [Acres International Corp., Amherst, NY (United States)] [Acres International Corp., Amherst, NY (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Schlieren Visualization of the Energy Addition by Multi Laser Pulse in Hypersonic Flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The experimental results of the energy addition by multi laser pulse in Mach 7 hypersonic flow are presented. Two high power pulsed CO{sub 2} TEA lasers (TEA1 5.5 J, TEA2 3.9 J) were assembled sharing the same optical cavity to generate the plasma upstream of a hemispherical model installed in the tunnel test section. The lasers can be triggered with a selectable time delay and in the present report the results obtained with delay between 30 {mu}s and 80 {mu}s are shown. The schlieren technique associated with a high speed camera was used to accomplish the influence of the energy addition in the mitigation of the shock wave formed on the model surface by the hypersonic flow. A piezoelectric pressure transducer was used to obtain the time history of the impact pressure at stagnation point of the model and the pressure reduction could be measured. The total recovery of the shock wave between pulses as well as the prolonged effect of the mitigation without recovery was observed by changing the delay.

Oliveira, A. C. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, 12630-000 Cachoeira Paulista (Brazil); Instituto de Estudos Avancados, 12228-001 Sao Jose dos Campos (Brazil); Minucci, M. A. S.; Toro, P. G. P.; Chanes, J. B. Jr [Instituto de Estudos Avancados, 12228-001 Sao Jose dos Campos (Brazil); Myrabo, L. N. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180-3590 (United States)

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

433

Oil-Miscible and Non-Corrosive Phosphonium Ionic Liquids as Candidate Lubricant Additives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ionic liquids (ILs) have been receiving considerable attention from the lubricants industry as potential friction and wear-reducing additives, but their solubility in oils is an issue. Unlike most ionic liquids that are insoluble in non-polar hydrocarbon oils, this study reports phosphonium-based ILs (PP-ILs) that are fully miscible with both mineral oil-based and synthetic lubricants. Both the cation and anion in quaternary structures, long alkyl chains, and capability of pairing the cation and the anion via a H-O bond are hypothesized to improve the compatibility between ions and neutral oil molecules. The measured viscosities of the oil-IL blends agree well with the Refutas equation that is for solutions containing multiple components. High thermal stability and non-corrosiveness were observed for the PP-ILs. Effective friction reduction and anti-wear functionality have been demonstrated in tribological tests when adding 5 wt% of a PP-IL into a base oil, suggesting potential applications for using the oil-miscible PP-ILs as lubricant additives.

Yu, Bo [ORNL; Bansal, Dinesh G [ORNL; Qu, Jun [ORNL; Sun, Xiaoqi [ORNL; Luo, Huimin [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL; Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL; Mordukhovich, Gregory [GM R& D and Planning, Warren, Michigan; Smolenski, Donald [GM R& D and Planning, Warren, Michigan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Modeling of on-line catalyst addition effects in a short contact time reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently developed short-contact-time reactors (SCTR), consisting of porous alumina monoliths coated with platinum, have been shown to produce ethylene from rich ethane/oxygen(hydrogen) mixtures with yields and selectivities comparable to conventional steam cracking, using a reactor of much smaller size. Although the overall mechanism is clearly autothermal and catalytic, the details, in particular the relative contributions of heterogeneous and homogeneous chemistry, are a matter of considerable debate. Recent experiments show that reactor performance can be further enhanced by dripping a dilute platinum solution onto the SCTR front face during reaction, resulting in catalyst deposition within only a short (several millimeter) zone of the reactor. The authors have undertaken a computational study of this system, using two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations with full heat and mass transport and detailed heterogeneous and homogeneous kinetic mechanisms. The results indicate that front-face catalyst loading enhances reactor performance by limiting the opportunity for heterogeneous ethane reactions that produce methane. As a result, ethylene selectivity increases and CH{sub 4} selectivity decreases. The results strongly support a mechanism recently proposed by the authors, in which rapid, heterogeneous oxidation of adsorbed hydrogen consumes most of the oxygen. The resulting heat is then released to the gas phase, causing homogeneous pyrolysis of ethane to occur in an environment containing much less oxygen. This mechanism explains not only the effects of on-line catalyst addition, but also the increase in ethylene selectivity observed upon addition of hydrogen to the reactant mixture.

D. K. Zerkle; M. d. Allendorf; M. Wolf; O. Deutschmann

2000-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

435

Floating Cities, Islands and States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many small countries are in need of additional territory. They build landfills and expensive artificial islands. The ocean covers 71 per cent of the Earth surface. Those countries (or persons of wealth) starting the early colonization of the ocean may obtain advantages through additional territory or creating their own independent state. An old idea is building a big ship. The best solution to this problem, however, is the provision of floating cities, islands, and states. The author idea is to use for floating cities, islands, and states a cheap floating platform created from a natural ice field taken from the Arctic or Antarctic oceans. These cheap platforms protected by air-film (bottom and sides) and a conventional insulating cover (top) and having a cooling system can exist for an unlimited time. They can be increased in number or size at any time, float in warm oceans, travel to different continents and countries, serve as artificial airports, harbors and other marine improvements, as well as floating c...

Bolonkin, Alexander

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

State electricity profiles, March 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to the role electricity plays in the Nation`s economic and social well-being, interested parties have been following the electric power industry`s transition by keeping abreast of the restructuring and deregulation events that are taking place almost daily. Much of the attention centers around the States and how they are restructuring the business of electricity supply within their respective jurisdictions. This report is designed to profile each State and the District of Columbia regarding not only their current restructuring activities, but also their electricity generation and concomitant statistics from 1986 through 1996. Included are data on a number of subject areas including generating capability, generation, revenues, fuel use, capacity factor for nuclear plants, retail sales, and pollutant emissions. Although the Energy Information Administration (EIA) publishes this type of information, there is a lack of a uniform overview for each individual State. This report is intended to help fill that gap and also to serve as a framework for more detailed studies. In addition to basic statistics in tables and graphs, a textual section is provided for each State, discussing some of the points relative to electricity production that are noteworthy in, or unique to, that particular State. Also, each State is ranked according to the place it holds, as compared to the rest of the states, in various relevant areas, such as its average price of electricity per kilowatthour, its population, and its emissions of certain atmospheric pollutants. The final chapter covers the Nation as a whole. 451 figs., 520 tabs.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

A cooperative control algorithm for camera based observational systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last several years, there has been considerable growth in camera based observation systems for a variety of safety, scientific, and recreational applications. In order to improve the effectiveness of these systems, we frequently desire the ability to increase the number of observed objects, but solving this problem is not as simple as adding more cameras. Quite often, there are economic or physical restrictions that prevent us from adding additional cameras to the system. As a result, we require methods that coordinate the tracking of objects between multiple cameras in an optimal way. In order to accomplish this goal, we present a new cooperative control algorithm for a camera based observational system. Specifically, we present a receding horizon control where we model the underlying optimal control problem as a mixed integer linear program. The benefit of this design is that we can coordinate the actions between each camera while simultaneously respecting its kinematics. In addition, we further improve the quality of our solution by coupling our algorithm with a Kalman filter. Through this integration, we not only add a predictive component to our control, but we use the uncertainty estimates provided by the filter to encourage the system to periodically observe any outliers in the observed area. This combined approach allows us to intelligently observe the entire region of interest in an effective and thorough manner.

Young, Joseph G.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Fe-24 wt.%Cr-4.1 wt.%C hardfacing alloy: Microstructure and carbide refinement mechanisms with ceria additive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microstructure and carbide refinement mechanisms of Fe-24 wt.%Cr-4.1 wt.%C hardfacing alloys with 0 wt.%, 0.5 wt.%, 1.0 wt.%, 2 wt.%, and 4 wt.% ceria additives have been systematically investigated in this work. Optical microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectrometer, and X-ray diffraction were collectively used to study the microstructure, the phase components, and the chemical formation of inclusion formed in the welding process. Wear-resistance of the alloys was comparatively studied using an abrasive wear testing machine. The structure analysis results show that the Fe-Cr-C hardfacing alloy mainly consists of martensite, retained austenite, MC carbide and M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbide. With increasing ceria additive contents, the average size of the primary M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbide decreases and reaches a most refined state in the alloy with 2 wt.% ceria additives. Comparative wear tests data shows that the wear resistance of the hardfacing alloys with ceria additives is better than that without ceria additive. In a good agreement with the carbide refinement results, the wear resistance of the alloy reaches an optimum level in the sample with 2 wt.% ceria additive. The main RE inclusion type identified with in-situ XRD analysis is RE inclusion Ce{sub 2}O{sub 2}S. Thermodynamics calculation confirms that this type of RE inclusion could precipitate prior to M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides, and act as a heterogeneous nucleus for M{sub 7}C{sub 3} in the welding process, which effectively provides a mechanism for significant refinement of the M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbide and improves its wear resistance. - Graphical Abstract: Rare Earth inclusion (Ce{sub 2}O{sub 2}S) distributes in the primary M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbide. Moreover, Ce{sub 2}O{sub 2}S, which acts as heterogeneous nuclei of the primary M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbide, is medium effective. Therefore, the primary M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbide has been refined. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Micro-hardness of primary M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbide in Fe-Cr-C hardfacing alloy is 1594 HV. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RE inclusion Ce{sub 2}O{sub 2}S can be observed in the primary M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ce{sub 2}O{sub 2}S as heterogeneous nuclei of the Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3} is medium effective. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Primary carbide is most refined with 2 wt.% ceria additive.

Zhou, Y.F.; Yang, Y.L.; Jiang, Y.W.; Yang, J. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Ren, X.J. [School of Engineering, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 3AF (United Kingdom)] [School of Engineering, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 3AF (United Kingdom); Yang, Q.X., E-mail: qxyang@ysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

439

Observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms is reported in this dissertation. Experiment 862 at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory observed antihydrogen atoms produced by the interaction of a circulating beam of high momentum (3 < p < 9 GeV/c) antiprotons and a jet of molecular hydrogen gas. Since the neutral antihydrogen does not bend in the antiproton source magnets, the detectors could be located far from the interaction point on a beamline tangent to the storage ring. The detection of the antihydrogen is accomplished by ionizing the atoms far from the interaction point. The positron is deflected by a magnetic spectrometer and detected, as are the back to back photons resulting from its annihilation. The antiproton travels a distance long enough for its momentum and time of flight to be measured accurately. A statistically significant sample of 101 antihydrogen atoms has been observed. A measurement of the cross section for {bar H}{sup 0} production is outlined within. The cross section corresponds to the process where a high momentum antiproton causes e{sup +} e{sup -} pair creation near a nucleus with the e{sup +} being captured by the antiproton. Antihydrogen is the first atom made exclusively of antimatter to be detected. The observation experiment's results are the first step towards an antihydrogen spectroscopy experiment which would measure the n = 2 Lamb shift and fine structure.

Blanford, Glenn DelFosse

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

UFOs: Observations, Studies and Extrapolations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UFOs (“ Unidentified Falling Objects”) could be one of the major performance limitations for nominal LHC operation. Therefore, in 2011, the diagnostics for UFO events were significantly improved, dedicated experiments and measurements in the LHC and in the laboratory were made and complemented by FLUKA simulations and theoretical studies. The state of knowledge is summarized and extrapolations for LHC operation in 2012 and beyond are presented. Mitigation strategies are proposed and related tests and measures for 2012 are specified.

Baer, T; Barnes, M J; Bartmann, W; Bracco, C; Carlier, E; Cerutti, F; Dehning, B; Ducimetière, L; Ferrari, A; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Garrel, N; Gerardin, A; Goddard, B; Holzer, E B; Jackson, S; Jimenez, J M; Kain, V; Zimmermann, F; Lechner, A; Mertens, V; Misiowiec, M; Nebot Del Busto, E; Morón Ballester, R; Norderhaug Drosdal, L; Nordt, A; Papotti, G; Redaelli, S; Uythoven, J; Velghe, B; Vlachoudis, V; Wenninger, J; Zamantzas, C; Zerlauth, M; Fuster Martinez, N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional observer states" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Seminar Title: Additive Manufacturing Advanced Manufacturing of Polymer and Composite Components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seminar Title: Additive Manufacturing ­ Advanced Manufacturing of Polymer and Composite Components Functionally Integrated Composite Structures, Augsburg, Germany ME Faculty Candidate Abstract: Additive Manufacturing ­ Advanced Manufacturing of Polymer and Composite Components Additive manufacturing technologies

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

442

Printing 3D Electrical Traces in Additive Manufactured Parts via Low Melting Temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Printing 3D Electrical Traces in Additive Manufactured Parts via Low where commercial Additive Manufacturing (AM) techniques can be used to concurrently construct quality and robustness of systems produced using additive manufacturing (AM) techniques is beginning

Dollar, Aaron M.

443

Hard x-ray observations of Cygnus X-1 with the MISO telescope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of hard x-ray, soft gamma-ray observations of the galactic black hole candidate, Cyg X-1, taken with the MISO telescope in October 1979 and May 1980 are presented, confirming the superlow state measured during September-October 1979 by the HEAO 3 satellite. The 1980 observation coincides with a low- to high-state transition and is consistent with HEAO 3 observations taken at the same epoch. No gamma-ray counting-rate excess above 200 keV was recorded in either observation. Apart from these two measurements, the observation of the Crab Nebula as an a posteriori calibration source is also described. 15 references.

Perotti, F.; Della Ventura, A.; Villa, G.; Bassani, L.; Butler, R.C.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

A comparative analysis of total lightning observations and cloud-to-ground lightning observations in the Southeastern United States region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flashes of April 20, 1996, Orbit 13 After Performing Collocation Procedure. 19 21 5 OTD Versus NLDN Lightning Flashes. 24 6 OTD and NLDN Lightning Flashes of December 20, 1995, Orbit 2. 26 7 OTD and NLDN Lightning Flashes of July 23, 1996, Orbit 2... prototype for the Lightning Imaging Sensor launched aboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) [Goodman et aL, 1996], has enabled the detection of total lightning from space and allowed interesting comparisons of data coincident with ground...

Hugo, Keith Michael

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Observations of Rabi oscillations in a non-polar InGaN quantum dot  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental observation of Rabi rotations between an exciton excited state and the crystal ground state in a single non-polar InGaN quantum dot is presented. The exciton excited state energy is determined by photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy using two-photon excitation from a pulsed laser. The population of the exciton excited state is seen to undergo power dependent damped Rabi oscillations.

Reid, Benjamin P. L., E-mail: benjamin.reid@physics.ox.ac.uk; Chan, Christopher C. S.; Taylor, Robert A. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Kocher, Claudius [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Konstanz University, Konstanz (Germany); Zhu, Tongtong; Oehler, Fabrice; Emery, Robert; Oliver, Rachel A. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

446

Carbon/Sulfur Nanocomposites and Additives for High-Energy Lithium...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Documents & Publications CarbonSulfur Nanocomposites and Additives for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur Batteries Additives and Cathode Materials for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur...

447

Carbon/Sulfur Nanocomposites and Additives for High-Energy Lithium...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Additives and Cathode Materials for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur Batteries CarbonSulfur Nanocomposites and Additives for High-Energy Lithium...

448

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative binders additives Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Design and Development of a LayerDesign and Development of a Layer--Based Additive Manufacturing... Based Additive Manufacturing Process for the Realization of Metal Parts...

449

States & Emerging Energy Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

States & Emerging Energy Technologies August 15, 2013 DOE's State and Local Technical Assistance Program 2 DOE's Technical Assistance Program * Strategic Energy Planning * Program...

450

Generalized coherent states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the coherent state of the harmonic oscillator, the probability density is that of the ground state subjected to an oscillation along a classical trajectory. Senitzky and others pointed out that there are states of the harmonic oscillator corresponding to an identical oscillatory displacement of the probability density of any energy eigenstate. These generalizations of the coherent state are rarely discussed, yet they furnish an interesting set of quantum states of light that combine features of number states and coherent states. Here we give an elementary account of the quantum optics of generalized coherent states.

T. G. Philbin

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

451

Unusual Outbursting State of a Z Cam-Type Star HL CMa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HL CMa is a Z Cam-type dwarf nova which was discovered as an Einstein X-ray source. In addition to normal outbursts and standstills, we noticed the presence of "the third" outbursting state. During this period, the star showed weak outbursts with a long outburst cycle length. We propose that this phenomenon is caused by a heating on the accretion disk. The presence of strong P Cyg feature in the ultraviolet and the unusual presence of high-excitation optical lines could be interpreted as an emerging signature of strong irradiation field. Since the object is still in this unusual state in 2002 March, we encourage X-ray and spectroscopic observations to detect further signatures of high-energy photons and irradiation.

T. Kato

2002-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

452

Observational Consequences of a Landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we consider the implications of the "landscape" paradigm for the large scale properties of the universe. The most direct implication of a rich landscape is that our local universe was born in a tunnelling event from a neighboring vacuum. This would imply that we live in an open FRW universe with negative spatial curvature. We argue that the "overshoot" problem, which in other settings would make it difficult to achieve slow roll inflation, actually favors such a cosmology. We consider anthropic bounds on the value of the curvature and on the parameters of inflation. When supplemented by statistical arguments these bounds suggest that the number of inflationary efolds is not very much larger than the observed lower bound. Although not statistically favored, the likelihood that the number of efolds is close to the bound set by observations is not negligible. The possible signatures of such a low number of efolds are briefly described.

Ben Freivogel; Matthew Kleban; Maria Rodriguez Martinez; Leonard Susskind

2005-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

453

Name : Joe Doe California State University, Fullerton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information (Please enter CWID to retrieve employee information) SAM PLE #12;Name : Joe Doe California State addition to Online Search) Update Enrollment Limit Place Registration Permits Update Service Indicators Center Classes Commencement Degree Checkout Enrollment End of Term Financial Aid Security (select any

de Lijser, Peter

454

Montana State University 1 Environmental Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montana State University 1 Environmental Sciences Note: MSU's programs in the biological. For additional options see Biological Sciences at MSU. Department of Land Resources & Environmental Sciences http and relationships in land and natural resources systems, combined with applications of environmental science

Maxwell, Bruce D.

455

Building a State Industrial Energy Efficiency Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Industries of the Future brings the tools and resources of the Industrial Technology Program of the Department of Energy to the state level. In addition, with the guidance of an industry-led advisory board, the program has developed conferences and forums...

Ferland, K.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

United States Department of Agriculture Research Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: For additional copies: U.S. FOREST SERVICE U.S. Forest Service 11 CAMPUS BLVD SUITE 200 Publications Distribution footprint from eastern Vermont, across New Hampshire, and into western Maine. Large pole-sized trees (8United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Research Paper NRS-25 Northern Research

457

Carbon Nanotube (CNT) Enhancements for Aerosurface State Awareness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The goal of the present effort was to develop an integrated system capable of reliable ice-deterioration, de-icing and anti-icing in addition to structural diagnostics to enable aerosurface state awareness. The basis for ...

Kessler, Seth S.

458

Observation of the $\\Xi_b^0$ Baryon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first observation of the heavy baryonic state {Xi}{sub b}{sup 0} is reported by the CDF Collaboration. A new decay mode of the established state {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} is also observed. In both cases the decay into a {Xi}{sub c} plus a charged pion is seen, with an equivalent statistical significance of above 6.8{sigma}. The quark model of elementary particles is well established and has a impressive history of success in its account of hadronic states. Nevertheless, it is important to continue to test it by searching for hitherto unobserved particles that are predicted to exist, both to provide continued confirmation of the quark model, and to provide a background for the possible discovery of unusual types of particle. In this presentation we report the first observation, by the CDF Collaboration, of a new baryonic state, the {Xi}{sub b}{sup 0}. This consists of a bsu quark combination and fills an important gap in the set of baryons containing a b quark.

Bussey, Peter; /Glasgow U.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Supporting Solar Power in Renewables Portfolio Standards: Experience from the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modified its pre-existing Solar Loan Program through whichdate. PSE&G’s current Solar Loan II Program is approved forsolar set-aside by the state’s competitive electricity suppliers. In addition to these loan

Wiser, Ryan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Additive Manufacturing Symposium This event is supported by the Department of Energy's Science and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Additive Manufacturing Symposium This event is supported by the Department of Energy's Science of Additive Manufacturing (AM) to: n Engage policy and research leaders in a dialogue on what potential AM has an Additive Manufacturing Summit in 2013. 9:00 am Welcome and Opening Comments 9:35 Additive Manufacturing

Beex, A. A. "Louis"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional observer states" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Hard X-ray observations of Cygnus X-1 with the Miso telescope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The black hole candidate Cygnus X-1 was observed in the hard X-ray - soft gamma-ray energy range by the Miso telescope on two different occasions: in September 1979 and May 1980. Two hard X-ray states of the source have beem measured: in 1979 the observed spectrum confirms the superlow state measured in the same period by the HEAO-3 satellite, while in 1980 the Miso X-ray data are consistent with the so-called low state of Cygnus X-1. In both occasions, no gamma-ray excess has been observed above 200 keV. 9 references.

Perotti, F.; Della Ventura, A.; Villa, G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

EUV emission lines and diagnostics observed with Hinode/EIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quiet Sun and active region spectra from the Hinode/EIS instrument are presented, and the strongest lines from different temperature regions discussed. A list of emission lines recommended to be included in EIS observation studies is presented based on analysis of blending and diagnostic potential using the CHIANTI atomic database. In addition we identify the most useful density diagnostics from the ions covered by EIS.

P. R. Young; G. Del Zanna; H. E. Mason; K. P. Dere; E. Landi; M. Landini; G. A. Doschek; C. M. Brown; J. L. Culhane; L. K. Harra; T. Watanabe; H. Hara

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

463

STATE OF CALIFORNIA STATE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.5.4, 25402.8 and 25910. II. HISTORY OF THE PROCEEDING To develop the 2013 Standards, the Energy CommissionSTATE OF CALIFORNIA STATE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION ) 2013 Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency ) Docket No. 12-BSTD-1 Standards Rulemaking Proceeding ) California Code

464

STATE OF CALIFORNIA STATE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. HISTORY OF THE PROCEEDING To develop the 2013 Standards, the Energy Commission conducted an open, transpaSTATE OF CALIFORNIA STATE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION ) 2013 Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency) Docket No. 12-BSTD-1 Standards Rulemaking Proceeding ) Order No. 12

465

Colorado State University Colorado State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colorado State University _______________ 1.1 Page 1 Colorado State University In 1870, the Territorial Council and House of Representatives of the Territory of Colorado created the Colorado that same year as Colorado's land-grant college under the Morrill Act of 1862. The Morrill Act provided

Stephens, Graeme L.

466

Colorado State University Colorado State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colorado State University Colorado State University In 1870, the Territorial Council and House of Representatives of the Territory of Colorado created the Colorado Agricultural College. When the Territory became. The College admitted its first students in 1879 and received designation that same year as Colorado's land

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

467

HERSCHEL OBSERVATIONS OF CATACLYSMIC VARIABLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have used the PACS instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory to observe eight cataclysmic variables at 70 and 160 {mu}m. Of these eight objects, only AM Her was detected. We have combined the Herschel results with ground-based, Spitzer, and WISE observations to construct spectral energy distributions for all of the targets. For the two dwarf novae in the sample, SS Cyg and U Gem, we find that their infrared luminosities are completely dominated by their secondary stars. For the two highly magnetic 'polars' in our survey, AM Her and EF Eri, we find that their mid-infrared excesses, previously attributed to circumbinary dust emission, can be fully explained by cyclotron emission. The WISE light curves for both sources show large, orbitally modulated variations that are identically phased to their near-IR light curves. We propose that significant emission from the lowest cyclotron harmonics (n {<=} 3) is present in EF Eri and AM Her. Previously, such emission would have been presumed to be optically thick, and not provide significant orbitally modulated flux. This suggests that the accretion onto polars is more complicated than assumed in the simple models developed for these two sources. We develop a model for the near-/mid-IR light curves for WZ Sge with an L2 donor star that shows that the ellipsoidal variations from its secondary star are detected. We conclude that none of the targets surveyed have dusty circumbinary disks.

Harrison, Thomas E.; Hamilton, Ryan T. [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001, MSC 4500, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001 (United States); Tappert, Claus [Departamento de Fisica y Astronomia, Universidad de Valparaiso, Avda. Gran Bretana 1111, Valparaiso (Chile); Hoffman, Douglas I. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Campbell, Ryan K., E-mail: tharriso@nmsu.edu, E-mail: rthamilt@nmsu.edu, E-mail: claus.tappert@uv.cl, E-mail: dhoffman@ipac.caltech.edu, E-mail: Ryan.Campbell@humobldt.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Humboldt State University, 1 Harpst St., Arcata, CA 95521 (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Addition of NH{sub 3} to Al{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent computational studies on the addition of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) to the Al{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -} cluster anion [A. Guevara-Garcia, A. Martinez, and J. V. Ortiz, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 214309 (2005)] have motivated experimental and additional computational studies, reported here. Al{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -} is observed to react with a single NH{sub 3} molecule to form the Al{sub 3}O{sub 3}NH{sub 3}{sup -} ion in mass spectrometric studies. This is in contrast to similarly performed studies with water, in which the Al{sub 3}O{sub 5}H{sub 4}{sup -} product was highly favored. However, the anion PE spectrum of the ammoniated species is very similar to that of Al{sub 3}O{sub 4}H{sub 2}{sup -}. The adiabatic electron affinity of Al{sub 3}O{sub 3}NH{sub 3} is determined to be 2.35(5) eV. Based on comparison between the spectra and calculated electron affinities, it appears that NH{sub 3} adds dissociatively to Al{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -}, suggesting that the time for the Al{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -}{center_dot}NH{sub 3} complex to either overcome or tunnel through the barrier to proton transfer (which is higher for NH{sub 3} than for water) is short relative to the time for collisional cooling in the experiment.

Wyrwas, Richard B.; Jarrold, Caroline Chick; Das, Ujjal; Raghavachari, Krishnan [Indiana University, Department of Chemistry, Bloomington, Indiana 47405-7102 (United States)

2006-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

469

Analytically derived limits on short-range fifth forces from quantum states of neutrons in the Earth's gravitational field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently, quantum states of ultra-cold neutrons in the Earth's gravitational field have been observed for the first time. From the fact that they are consistent with Newtonian gravity on the 10 %-level, analytical limits on alpha and lambda of short-range Yukawa-like additional interactions are derived between lambda = 1 micrometer and 1 mm. We arrive for lambda > 10 micrometer at alpha < 2 \\cdot 10^11 at 90 % confidence level. This translates into a limit g_s g_p / (\\hbar c) < 2 \\cdot 10^{-15} on the pseudo-scalar coupling of axions in the previously experimentally unaccessible astrophysical axion window.

Alexander Westphal; Hartmut Abele; Stefan Baessler

2007-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

470

Use of pyrolyzed carbon black as an additive (part 3. Air-cooled furnace slag). Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scrap tires, generated at the rate of over 242 million each year in the United States, are recognized as one of the most significant environmental problems. Most of these scrap tires have been disposed of in landfills, stockpiles, and illegal dumps (EPA 1991). There is a need to find more useful, environmentally friendly applications for these tires. Extensive researches have been conducted in the past years on the utilization of the scrap tires. The use of scrap tires for asphalt pavement, which is complicated by the complex behavior of asphalt, has received major attention. This research aims to describe the performance of mixtures of asphalt using pyrolyzed carbon black as an additive.

Lee, K.H.; Lovell, C.W.; Salgado, R.

1996-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

471

Additional Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The following resources are focused on Federal new construction and major renovation projects, sustainable construction, and the role of renewable energy technologies in such facilities. These...

472

Using postmeasurement information in state discrimination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider a special form of state discrimination in which after the measurement we are given additional information that may help us identify the state. This task plays a central role in the analysis of quantum cryptographic protocols in the noisy-storage model, where the identity of the state corresponds to a certain bit string, and the additional information is typically a choice of encoding that is initially unknown to the cheating party. We first provide simple optimality conditions for measurements for any such problem and show upper and lower bounds on the success probability. For a certain class of problems, we furthermore provide tight bounds on how useful postmeasurement information can be. In particular, we show that for this class finding the optimal measurement for the task of state discrimination with postmeasurement information does in fact reduce to solving a different problem of state discrimination without such information. However, we show that for the corresponding classical state discrimination problems with postmeasurement information such a reduction is impossible, by relating the success probability to the violation of Bell inequalities. This suggests the usefulness of postmeasurement information as another feature that distinguishes the classical from a quantum world.

Gopal, Deepthi [Institute for Quantum Information, Caltech, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Wehner, Stephanie [Institute for Quantum Information, Caltech, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, Singapore 117543 (Singapore)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

473

Null geodesics and observational cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Universe is not isotropic or spatially homogeneous on local scales. The averaging of local inhomogeneities in general relativity can lead to significant dynamical effects on the evolution of the Universe, and even if the effects are at the 1% level they must be taken into account in a proper interpretation of cosmological observations. We discuss the effects that averaging (and inhomogeneities in general) can have on the dynamical evolution of the Universe and the interpretation of cosmological data. All deductions about cosmology are based on the paths of photons. We discuss some qualitative aspects of the motion of photons in an averaged geometry, particularly within the context of the luminosity distance-redshift relation in the simple case of spherical symmetry.

A. A. Coley

2008-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

474

STATE WATER PLANNING A Mixture of Science and Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Integrated and Collaborative ­ 18+ federal and state agencies in addition to the private sector and state dollars · An understanding of emerging issues regarding water management #12;ROBUST PUBLIC OF SUPPLY AVAILABILITY · Streamflows · Reservoir storage and yield · Hydrologic variability ­ Average, wet

Soerens, Thomas

475

STATE OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY, TRADE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an addition $5 billion per year on energy costs an increase of nearly one and onehalf percent in our state GDP devoted to energy. Although we have little or no control over our petroleum and natural gasSTATE OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY, TRADE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Energy Policy Division

476

On the Revision of Probabilistic Belief States Craig Boutilier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and the author's 5, 7] proposal for minimal conditional (MC) revision. Spohn's model imposes additional structureOn the Revision of Probabilistic Belief States Craig Boutilier Department of Computer Science two approaches to the revision of probability functions. We assume that a probabilistic state

Boutilier, Craig

477

Theoretical investigation of the effect of hydrogen addition on the formation and properties of soliton in direct current argon plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study the effect of hydrogen addition on the formation and properties of soliton in direct-current (DC) argon plasma is theoretically investigated. By coupling fluid equations with Poisons equation for such multi-component plasma, the Mach number and amplitude of the soliton are determined following pseudo potential method. Addition of hydrogen in argon discharge leads to the decrease of electron, Ar{sup +} ion density while a reverse trend was observed for ArH{sup +} and hydrogen like ions. It was found that presence of hydrogen like ions in argon plasma affects the formation of soliton with its amplitude significantly decreases as concentration of hydrogen increases. On the other hand, increase in ion to electron temperature ratios of the lighter ions in the discharge also has a significant influence on the amplitude and formation of soliton. The inverse relation between solitons width and amplitude is found to be consistent for the entire range of study.

Saikia, P., E-mail: partha.008@gmail.com; Goswami, K. S.; Saikia, B. K. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Nazirakhat, Sonapur, Kamrup, Assam-782 402 (India)] [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Nazirakhat, Sonapur, Kamrup, Assam-782 402 (India)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

478

Observation of nuclear fusion driven by a pyroelectric crystalQ1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a room temperature solid-state setting, including `cold' fusion5 and `bubble' fusion6 , have met.............................................................. Observation of nuclear fusion driven ............................................................................................................................................................................. While progress in fusion research continues with magnetic1 and inertial2 confinement, alternative

Gimzewski, James

479

Improved microstructure of cement-based composites through the addition of rock wool particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rock wool is an inorganic fibrous substance produced by steam blasting and cooling molten glass. As with other industrial by-products, rock wool particles can be used as cementitious materials or ultra fine fillers in cement-based composites. This study investigated the microstructure of mortar specimens produced with cement-based composites that include various forms of rock wool particles. It conducted compressive strength testing, rapid chloride penetration tests, X-ray diffraction analysis, thermo-gravimetric analysis, and scanning electronic microscopy to evaluate the macro- and micro-properties of the cement-based composites. Test results indicate that inclusion of rock wool particles in composites improved compressive strength and reduced chloride ion penetration at the age of 91 days due to the reduction of calcium hydroxide content. Microscopic analysis confirms that the use of rock wool particles contributed to the formation of a denser, more compact microstructure within the hardened paste. In addition, X-ray diffraction analysis shows few changes in formation of pozzolanic reaction products and no new hydrations are formed with incorporating rock wool particles. - Highlights: • We report the microstructural characterization of cement-based composites. • Different mixes produced with various rock wool particles have been tested. • The influence of different mixes on macro and micro properties has been discussed. • The macro properties are included compressive strength and permeability. • XRD and SEM observations confirm the pozzolanic reaction in the resulting pastes.

Lin, Wei-Ting [Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Ilan University, Ilan 26047, Taiwan (China); Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, Taoyuan 32546, Taiwan (China); Cheng, An, E-mail: ancheng@niu.edu.tw [Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Ilan University, Ilan 26047, Taiwan (China); Huang, Ran; Zou, Si-Yu [Dept. of Harbor and River Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung 20224, Taiwan (China)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

480

State Water Quality (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is the policy of the Commonwealth of Virginia to: (1) protect existing high quality state waters and restore the quality of all other state waters to permit all reasonable public uses and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional observer states" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Environmental State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biology Water Science Nursery Management Plant Breeding Biofuel Feedstocks OUR DEPARTMENT The PLANT specialties, including plant breeding, genetic engineering, sustainable agriculture, ornamental production State University is the only land-grant, Hispanic serving university in the contiguous United States

482

Observational Field Assessment of Invasiveness for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

synthesis............................................................... 8 Jatropha observations.................................................................. 9 Jatropha risk synthesis................................................................. 12 and invasiveness. Observations were made around field plantings of banagrass, Jatropha (Jatropha curcas

483

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print Wednesday, 30 June 2010 00:00 An international team of scientists performing...

484

State Report forState Report forState Report forState Report for From the Research Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

State Report forState Report forState Report forState Report for From the Research Project State Report forState Report forState Report forState Report for Washington University In cooperation with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife FINAL REPORT April 2011

485

Resources for universal quantum state manipulation and engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate which non-Gaussian resources are needed, in addition to Gaussian operations and measurements, for implementation of arbitrary quantum gates on multimode quantum states of light. We show that an arbitrary set of states with finite expansion in Fock basis is sufficient for this task. As an illustration we present an explicit scheme for probabilistic implementation of the nonlinear sign gate using resource non-Gaussian states and Gaussian operations.

Petr Marek; Jaromír Fiurášek

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

486

States & Emerging Energy Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP), provides information on States & Emerging Energy Technologies.

487

AASG STATE GDR  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

003198MLTPL00 AASG State Geothermal Data Repository for the National Geothermal Data System.  http://repository.stategeothermaldata.org/repository/ 

488

Autonomous observing strategies for the ocean carbon cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding the exchanges of carbon between the atmosphere and ocean and the fate of carbon delivered to the deep sea is fundamental to the evaluation of ocean carbon sequestration options. An additional key requirement is that sequestration must be verifiable and that environmental effects be monitored and minimized. These needs can be addressed by carbon system observations made from low-cost autonomous ocean-profiling floats and gliders. We have developed a prototype ocean carbon system profiler based on the Sounding Oceanographic Lagrangian Observer (SOLO; Davis et al., 1999). The SOLO/ carbon profiler will measure the two biomass components of the carbon system and their relationship to physical variables, such as upper ocean stratification and mixing. The autonomous observations within the upper 1500 m will be made on daily time scales for periods of months to seasons and will be carried out in biologically dynamic locations in the world's oceans that are difficult to access with ships (due to weather) or observe using remote sensing satellites (due to cloud cover). Such an observational capability not only will serve an important role in carbon sequestration research but will provide key observations of the global ocean's natural carbon cycle.

Bishop, James K.; Davis, Russ E.

2000-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

489

E-Print Network 3.0 - additional cases including Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: additional cases including Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 SWE 214 (062) Chapter 21: Refining the Use Cases Slide 1 Chapter 21 Summary: requirements. The additional use-case...

490

E-Print Network 3.0 - approved food additive Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

food additive Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: approved food additive Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Phone: 206.616.1623 Fax:...

491

Analizing Aqueous Imbibition into Shale and the Effects of Optimizing Critical Fracturing Fluid Additives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of pertinent chemical additives on fluid imbibition and intercalation into shale samples. We do this with the hope that we will eventually be able to determine how natural phenomena and additives affect long term resource production from unconventional oil...

Qureshi, Maha

2013-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

492

Analyzing Aqueous Solution Imbibition into Shale and the Effects of Optimizing Critical Fracturing Fluid Additives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of pertinent chemical additives on fluid imbibition and intercalation into shale samples. We do this with the hope that we will eventually be able to determine how natural phenomena and additives affect long term resource production from unconventional oil...

Plamin, Sammazo Jean-bertrand

2013-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

493

Analyzing Aqueous Solution Imbibition into Shale and the Effects of Optimizing Critical Chemical Additives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of pertinent chemical additives on fluid imbibition and intercalation into shale samples. We do this with the hope that we will eventually be able to determine how natural phenomena and additives affect long term resource production from unconventional oil...

Wiese, Matthew Michael

2013-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

494

State Contracting and Procurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

State Contracting and Procurement Registration System (SCPRS) Illustrated User Manual #12;2 State Contracting and Procurement Registration System (SCPRS) Rev. 4/23/09 Copyright © 2008 RFP Depot, LLC dba Bid@bidsync.com Website: http://www.bidsync.com #12;3 State Contracting and Procurement Registration System (SCPRS) Rev. 4

495

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY INTRODUCTIONi.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;2 MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY INTRODUCTIONi. Welcome to the Online Professional Master of Science), and the College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) at Michigan State University (MSU). This booklet contains important, Program Director Online Master of Science in Food Safety Michigan State University 1129 Farm Lane, Rm B 51

496

Ground State Quantum Computation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We formulate a novel ground state quantum computation approach that requires no unitary evolution of qubits in time: the qubits are fixed in stationary states of the Hamiltonian. This formulation supplies a completely time-independent approach to realizing quantum computers. We give a concrete suggestion for a ground state quantum computer involving linked quantum dots.

Ari Mizel; M. W. Mitchell; Marvin L. Cohen

1999-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

497

Sustainability Cal State Fullerton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainability at Cal State Fullerton A Report from the Sustainability Initiative Study Group October 28, 2008 #12;Sustainability at Cal State Fullerton A Report from the Sustainability Initiative Safety Sally Yassine Contracts & Procurement #12;Sustainability at Cal State Fullerton A Report from

de Lijser, Peter

498

Black brane steady states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We follow the evolution of an asymptotically AdS black brane with a fixed temperature gradient at spatial infinity until a steady state is formed. The resulting energy density and energy flux of the steady state in the boundary theory are compared to a conjecture on the behavior of steady states in conformal field theories. Very good agreement is found.

Amado, Irene

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Fuel additives: Excluding aviation fuels. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning compositions, applications and performance of additives in fuels. Evaluations and environmental testing of additives in automotive, diesel, and boiler fuels are discussed. Additive effects on air pollution control, combustion stability, fuel economy and fuel storage are presented. Aviation fuel additives are covered in a separate bibliography. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Fuel additives: Excluding aviation fuels. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning compositions, applications and performance of additives in fuels. Evaluations and environmental testing of additives in automotive, diesel, and boiler fuels are discussed. Additive effects on air pollution control, combustion stability, fuel economy and fuel storage are presented. Aviation fuel additives are covered in a separate bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 231 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z